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Sample records for 8-ft-diameter barrel test

  1. Design of 8-ft-Diameter Barrel Test Article Attachment Rings for Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    The Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor (SBKF) project includes the testing of sub-scale cylinders to validate new shell buckling knockdown factors for use in the design of the Ares-I and Ares-V launch vehicles. Test article cylinders represent various barrel segments of the Ares-I and Ares-V vehicles, and also include checkout test articles. Testing will be conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for test articles having an eight-foot diameter outer mold line (OML) and having lengths that range from three to ten feet long. Both ends of the test articles will be connected to the test apparatus using attachment rings. Three multiple-piece and one single-piece design for the attachment rings were developed and analyzed. The single-piece design was chosen and will be fabricated from either steel or aluminum (Al) depending on the required safety factors (SF) for test hardware. This report summarizes the design and analysis of these attachment ring concepts.

  2. Beam test of the SDC barrel EM calorimeter test module

    SciTech Connect

    Balka, L.; Guarino, V.; Hill, N.

    1994-05-01

    The SDC barrel electromagnetic calorimeter test module was exposed to beams of high energy pions and electrons in the MP9 test beam at Fermilab in the fall of 1991. Data were collected on resolution, light yield, signal timing and hermiticity. These data demonstrated that the design met the specifications for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter of the Solenoidal Detector collaboration (SDC).

  3. First testing of the CALIFA Barrel Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietras, B.; Winkel, M.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Bendel, M.; Casarejos, E.; Cederkäll, J.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golubev, P.; González, D.; Hartig, A.; Izquierdo, P.; Klenze, P.; Le Bleis, T.; Nácher, E.; Perea, A.; Remmels, P.; Ribeiro, G.; Teubig, P.; Vilan, J.; Yañez, P.

    2016-04-01

    Advancement of the CALIFA calorimeter project has reached a new milestone with the construction of the first modules of the CALIFA Demonstrator, ultimately to be integrated into the final calorimeter. Aspects and methods of detector optimisation will be discussed, along with characterisation using proton beams of 70 test of each component's performance. A study of caesium iodide quenching over the available proton energy range has been performed, to accompany a method for proton calibration scaled from the measured gamma-ray energies.

  4. Heat-Transfer Tests of a Steel Cylinder Barrel with Aluminum Fins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1939-08-01

    determine the heat-transfer coefficients of the cylinder md the excellence of the bond between the steel barrel and the aluminum fins. com- parison is =de of... EnSino Supercharger. MMA Biormann, Arnold E., and Pinkol, Benjamin: l’innodMetal Oylinders in an Air Stream. 1934. a Jacket. NACA Tests of a R~ots...cylinder barrel trl.th aluminum fins to determine the heat-transfer coefficients’ of the cylinder and the excellence of the bond between the steel barrel

  5. 49 CFR 178.607 - Cooperage test for bung-type wooden barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooperage test for bung-type wooden barrels. 178.607 Section 178.607 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Testing of Non-bulk...

  6. Construction and test of the final CMS Barrel Drift Tube Muon Chamber prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Benítez, M.; Alberdi, J.; Arneodo, M.; Banicz, K.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bethke, S.; Cerrada, M.; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Dallavalle, M.; Daniel, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Fanfani, A.; Fanin, C.; Fouz, M. C.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Gonella, F.; Grandi, C.; Guaita, P.; Guerzoni, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Lippi, I.; Marcellini, S.; Marín, J.; Martinelli, R.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.; Migliore, E.; Mocholí, J.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Odorici, F.; Oller, J. C.; Paoletti, S.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Salicio, J. M.; Staiano, A.; Steinbeck, T.; Torassa, E.; Travaglini, R.; Ventura, L.; Ventura, S.; Vitelli, A.; Voetee, F.; Wegner, M.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.

    2002-03-01

    A prototype of the CMS Barrel Muon Detector incorporating all the features of the final chambers was built using the mass production assembly procedures and tools. The performance of this prototype was studied in a muon test beam at CERN and the results obtained are presented in this paper.

  7. Fabrication and Tests of M240 Machine Gun Barrels Lined with Stellite 25

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    ARL-TR-7662 ● APR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Fabrication and Tests of M240 Machine Gun Barrels Lined with Stellite 25...report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7662 ● APR 2016 US Army Research Laboratory ...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Research Laboratory ATTN: RDRL-WMM-F Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005

  8. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the ATLAS Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Delruelle, N.; Haug, F.; Junker, S.; Passardi, G.; Pengo, R.; Pirotte, O.

    2004-06-23

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requirements of the magnets in the various operating scenarios.

  9. Preliminary results from the multishot opening switch and barrel testing at ARDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, R.; Breitenstein, A.; Carr, S.; Coffman, L.; Cook, H.

    1986-11-01

    Design features and test data are summarized for a multishot switch and barrel of an electromagnetic launch system which has undergone trials at the Armament R&D Center (ARDC). The system features a 12 MJ homopolar generator, a 4.5 micro-H storage inductor and two circularly mounted parallel copper conductors separated by 2.5 cm. Tests focused on the performance of the opening switch with currents up to 500 kA. THe effects of the tests on the condition of the brush and on the operation of the switch are delineated, noting the deformations induced on the brush fingers by magnetic pressure, reducing contact force when the brush was in the input region of the switch. Design changes being implemented to alleviate the problem are outlined.

  10. Barrels XXIX: Barrels go Hollywood.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mathew H; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2017-03-01

    Barrels XXIX brought together researchers focusing on the rodent barrel cortex and associated systems. The meeting revolved around three themes: thalamocortical interactions in motor control, touch in rodent, monkey, and humans, and the nature of the multisensory computations the brain makes. Over two days these topics were covered as well as many more presentations that focused on the physiology, behavior, and development of the rodent whisker-to-barrel cortex system.

  11. Cooling Tests of an Air-Cooled Engine Cylinder with Copper Fins on the Barrel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-07-01

    of the piston thermo- couples aro shown in figures 3 and 4. The locations of the cylinder-surface tiernocc-~ples are shown In figure 5. The crankshaft ...the =esult of improvsd fin design shows that the outside barrel temperature may be a poor crite- rion for barrel cooling. ~or example, at 0.7...dimensions in the L . aluminum-muff design Is reetrieted by limits imposed In maohiriing the fins. With aluminum fins, ae with copper fins, the fin

  12. Fire testing and infrared thermography of oak barrels filled with distilled spirits (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jaap

    2017-05-01

    Adequate fire protection of distilled spirits stored in oak barrels requires understanding the failure mode of these barrels, including quantifying the leak rate. In this study, the use of a custom-calibrated, long-wave microbolometer camera is demonstrated to seek new protection methods for rack-stored distilled spirits. Individual oak barrels ranging between 200 L and 500 L filled with 75%/25% ethanol/water were exposed to both propane gas fires and pure ethanol pool fires. The IR camera was used to see through the smoke and flames showing the location of the leaks. The increase in HRR due to the leaked content was measured using gas calorimetry of the combustion products. This study showed that barrels leaked at a rate of approximately 4-8 lpm, resulting in heat release rates ranging between 1.2 and 2.4 MW. These numbers are confirmed by the quantitative measurements of gaseous H2O and CO¬2 in the exhaust. Surface temperature of the exposed oak could reach temperatures up to 750ºC.

  13. The Fabrication and Testing of Glass Matrix Composite Cylinders for Gun Barrel Liner Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    completely seal the com- posite from the HIP gas environment. Metal HIP Containers - The use of a stainless steel metal envelope is another approach to...catastrophic failure was exhibited. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND Current state-of-the-art gun barrels are fabricated from stellite lined chrome...plated steel tubes. Due to their high percentage of the critical ele- ments cobalt and chromium, they are becoming increasingly expensive to manu

  14. Field Developmental Test of the Dual Barrel Automatic Injector, MARK II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    criteria OCCURRENCE - a detected event 2-PAM-CL BARREL - the larger black-tipped cylinder contained within the autoinjector housing SAFETY PIN - the...yellow plastic protrusion from the safety cap which prevents injector activation SAFETY SCREW - the metal screw which attaches the safety pin to the...2 0 0 (1.1) (1.0) loose safety pin 164 27 10 13 (11.0) (10.7) (18.8) (21.7) NO DEFECTS NOTED 1184 209 42 35 (76.5) (82.9) (70.0) (58.0) UNKNOWN

  15. OPTIMIZING CENTRIFUGAL BARREL POLISHING FOR MIRROR FINISH SRF CAVITY AND RF TESTS AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Hui Tian

    2012-07-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on a 1.3 GHz fine grain TESLA single cell cavity and 1.5 GHz fine grain CEBAF high gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) single cell cavity following a modified recipe originally developed at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL). We were able to obtain a mirror like surface similar to that obtained at FNAL, while reducing the number of CBP steps and total processing time. This paper will discuss the change in surface and subsequent cavity performance post CBP, after a 800 C bake (no pre-bake chemistry) and minimal controlled electro-polishing (10 micron). In addition to Q vs. E{sub ACC} thermometry mapping with preheating characteristics and optical inspection of the cavity after CBP will also be shown.

  16. National Dioxin Study Tier 4 - combustion sources: final test report - Site 11, drum and barrel reclamation furnace DBR-A

    SciTech Connect

    Knisley, D.R.; Kelly, W.E.; Keller, L.E.

    1987-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a dioxin/furan emissions test of a drum and barrel reconditioning furnace equipped with an afterburner for emissions control. Steel drums are reconditioned by combusting the drum contents (residual material) in a tunnel furnace. The test was the 11th in a series of emission tests conducted under Tier 4 of the National Dioxin Study. The primary objective of Tier 4 is to determine if various combustion devices are sources of dioxin and/or furan emissions. If any of the combustion sources are found to emit dioxin or furan, the secondary objective of Tier 4 is to quantify these emissions. Drum-reconditioning furnaces are one of 8 combustion-device categories that have been tested in the Tier 4 program. The tested furnace, DBR-A, was selected for the test after an initial information screening and a one-day pretest survey. The drums processed at the plant are received from a number of different sources, thus the combustible material burned in the furnace is heterogeneous. Furnace DBR-A is considered representative of other drum-reconditioning furnaces operating in the United States. Data presented in the report include dioxin (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDD) and furan (tetra through octa homologue +2378 TCDF) results for both stack samples and ash samples. In addition, process data collected during sampling are also presented.

  17. Development of an advanced electromagnetic gun barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, T. W.; D'Aoust, J.; Sevier, L.; Johnson, R.; Wesley, J.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced EM gun (AEMG) barrel was developed for the USAF Wright Laboratory to repetitively accelerate large-mass projectiles. The AEMG barrel employed 5-m rails, had a 50 mm square bore, and was designed to operate at a peak current of 1.5 MA (bore pressure 25 ksi). Key technical achievements included (1) an efficient barrel containment structure that weighs approximately 25 percent of a similarly rated clamped barrel, (2) an insulator material that retains surface resistivity after repeated firings, and (3) a high-velocity water cooling system designed to remove a peak heat flux of 5 MJ/sq m per shot. The AEMG barrel's thermal management system employed a 500 psi blowdown system that generated high velocity coolant flow rates in five axial coolant channels within each rail. Innovative fabrication processes were used to develop the barrel. A 2-m prototype of the AEMG barrel was tested in the General Atomics 4 MJ EM launcher test facility.

  18. Clean fog rapid procedure test of artificially and naturally polluted HVDC porcelain barrel insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Vlastos, A.E. )

    1992-07-01

    The first question asked in this paper refers to the variation of the peak leakage current prior to the flashover and the variation of the time prior to flashover in the test of artificially polluted insulators when using the up-and-down method. To answer this question sums up the test procedure used in the up-and-down method. For each trial represented the insulator was again polluted artificially and then dried following the procedure described in the paper. Then the insulator was transported into the fog chamber and the voltage and fog was switched on simultaneously. In these experiments a low fog injection rate was used.

  19. Radiation Hardness Tests of SiPMs for the JLab Hall D Barrel Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Qiang, Carl Zorn, Fernando Barbosa, Elton Smith

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the neutron radiation hardness of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation in Japan and SensL in Ireland. Samples from both companies were irradiated by neutrons created by a 1 GeV electron beam hitting a thin lead target at Jefferson Lab Hall A. More tests regarding the temperature dependence of the neutron radiation damage and self-annealing were performed on Hamamatsu SiPMs using a calibrated Am–Be neutron source from the Jefferson Lab Radiation Control group. As the result of irradiation both dark current and dark rate increase linearly as a function of the 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence and a temperature dependent self-annealing effect is observed

  20. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel: Comparison of In- and Out-of-Autoclave Facesheet Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan Jorge; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Kellas, Sotiris; Dixon, Genevieve D.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Gyekenyesi, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle, were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration and the NASA Constellation Ares V programs. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.0 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3 ft. by 5 ft. panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections and tested under compressive loading. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3 ft. by 5 ft. panel. To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yielded good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  1. Critical current measurement with spatial periodic bending imposed by electromagnetic force on a standard test barrel with slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijhuis, A.; Wessel, W. A. J.; Ilyin, Y.; den Ouden, A.; ten Kate, H. H. J.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed and validated a straightforward and fast method to investigate the response of technological superconducting strain sensitive wires (e.g., Nb3Sn) to a spatial periodic bending strain. In the present concept of cabled superconductors for application in nuclear fusion reactors the wires are twisted and cabled in several stages. When subjected to transverse electromagnetic forces after charging the magnet, the individual strands are subjected to spatial periodic bending with wavelengths in the order of 5-10mm. Several apparatuses are presently under development to study the effect of bending on the transport properties, i.e., the voltage-current transition in terms of critical current (Ic) and n value. We propose a supplementary simple method to investigate the influence of bending strain by using a spatial periodic wire support on a broadly used standard Ic measurement barrel in combination with a Lorentz force. The bending force (BI) is varied by changing the applied field B. The peak bending strain in the Nb3Sn filaments is determined by the amplitude of the bending deflection, which is deduced from the mechanical axial tensile stress-strain properties of the wire. Three different spatial periodic wavelengths are applied and the results are in good agreement with the predictions. In addition we found a good agreement with results obtained by a more advanced experiment, named TARSIS, which is described briefly. The "barrel-with-slots" method can be applied easily and straightforward with minor effort and cost in laboratories having a standard Ic measurement facility for superconducting wire.

  2. Critical current measurement with spatial periodic bending imposed by electromagnetic force on a standard test barrel with slots

    SciTech Connect

    Nijhuis, A.; Wessel, W.A.J.; Ilyin, Y.; Ouden, A. den; Kate, H.H.J. ten

    2006-05-15

    We have developed and validated a straightforward and fast method to investigate the response of technological superconducting strain sensitive wires (e.g., Nb{sub 3}Sn) to a spatial periodic bending strain. In the present concept of cabled superconductors for application in nuclear fusion reactors the wires are twisted and cabled in several stages. When subjected to transverse electromagnetic forces after charging the magnet, the individual strands are subjected to spatial periodic bending with wavelengths in the order of 5-10 mm. Several apparatuses are presently under development to study the effect of bending on the transport properties, i.e., the voltage-current transition in terms of critical current (I{sub c}) and n value. We propose a supplementary simple method to investigate the influence of bending strain by using a spatial periodic wire support on a broadly used standard I{sub c} measurement barrel in combination with a Lorentz force. The bending force (BI) is varied by changing the applied field B. The peak bending strain in the Nb{sub 3}Sn filaments is determined by the amplitude of the bending deflection, which is deduced from the mechanical axial tensile stress-strain properties of the wire. Three different spatial periodic wavelengths are applied and the results are in good agreement with the predictions. In addition we found a good agreement with results obtained by a more advanced experiment, named TARSIS, which is described briefly. The 'barrel-with-slots' method can be applied easily and straightforward with minor effort and cost in laboratories having a standard I{sub c} measurement facility for superconducting wire.

  3. Computer vision barrel inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, William J.; Gunderson, James; Walworth, Matthew E.

    1994-02-01

    One of the Department of Energy's (DOE) ongoing tasks is the storage and inspection of a large number of waste barrels containing a variety of hazardous substances. Martin Marietta is currently contracted to develop a robotic system -- the Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) -- for the automatic monitoring and inspection of these barrels. The IMSS is a mobile robot with multiple sensors: video cameras, illuminators, laser ranging and barcode reader. We assisted Martin Marietta in this task, specifically in the development of image processing algorithms that recognize and classify the barrel labels. Our subsystem uses video images to detect and locate the barcode, so that the barcode reader can be pointed at the barcode.

  4. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 3; 8-ply Out-of-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Myers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10 m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800B/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of the 3- by 5-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, T40-800B/5320-1 facesheets (referred to as Panel C). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear, two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D), models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength.

  5. The PANDA Barrel DIRC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, M.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt, will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Efficient Particle Identification for a wide momentum range and the full solid angle is required for reconstructing the various physics channels of the PANDA program. Hadronic Particle Identification in the barrel region of the detector will be provided by a DIRC counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with important improvements, such as focusing optics and fast photon timing. Several of these improvements, including different radiator geometries and optics, were tested in particle beams at GSI and at CERN. The evolution of the conceptual design of the PANDA Barrel DIRC and the performance of complex prototypes in test beam campaigns will be discussed.

  6. Barrel Stave Flextensional Projector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-23

    end stave flextensional transducer having piezoelectric elements cap, both end caps having a circular shape. A plurality of for producing an acoustic...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Barrel Stave Flextensional Projector 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...54] BARREL STAVE FLEXTENSIONAL Atomey, Agent, or Firm-Ron Billi PROJECTOR [57] ABSTRACT [75] Inventor: Robert A Dechico, Pennington, N.J. An

  7. The PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhygadlo, R.; Schwarz, C.; Belias, A.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PANDA detector at the international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) addresses fundamental questions of hadron physics. Experiments concerning charmonium spectroscopy, the search for hybrids and glueballs and the interaction of hidden and open charm particles with nucleons and nuclei will be performed with antiproton beams impinging on hydrogen or nuclear targets. Cooled beams allow the precision scan of resonances in formation experiments. The momentum range of the antiproton beam between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c tests predictions by perturbation theory and will reveal deviations originating from strong QCD . An excellent hadronic particle identification will be accomplished by DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counters. The design for the barrel region is based on the successful BaBar DIRC with several key improvements, such as fast photon timing and a compact imaging region. DIRC designs based on different radiator geometries with several focusing options were studied in simulation. The performance of each design was characterized in terms of photon yield and single photon Cherenkov angle resolution. Selected design options were implemented in prototypes and tested with hadronic particle beams at GSI and CERN.

  8. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel. Part 2; 6-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Meyers, David E.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Dixon, Genevieve D.

    2013-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panel types, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), were manufactured and tested under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Constellation Ares V program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: in-autoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3- by 5-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed to predict the compressive response of each 3- by 5-ft panel. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panels composed of 6-ply, IM7/977-3 facesheets (referred to as Panels B-1 and B-2). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was correctly predicted that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber angle misalignments, and three-dimensional (3-D) effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  9. Multi-rail barrel design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Brian L.; Bauer, David P.; Challita, Antonios

    1993-01-01

    Railgun barrels containing multiple isolated rail pairs can be used to control armature current distribution and/or to obtain independent circuits for use with specialized power supplies. Armature current control can be used to effectively distribute acceleration forces for improved projectile launch. Independent rail 'load' circuits are attractive for use with some power supplies such as a polyphase compulsator. We have built and tested a 30 mm barrel containing three distinct rail pairs. These three rail pairs were powered by separate power supplies. This paper describes issues associated with multi-rail barrel design and our band design and performance. Rail alignment, isolation, and construction are described. The effect of multiple rail pairs on the effective inductance gradient of the band is described and test results are provided.

  10. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, C.; Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  11. DIOXIN FORMATION: THE BURN BARREL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results from tests designed to examine some of the factors influencing the emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs) from burn barrels. Results from PCDDs/Fs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are reported, al...

  12. BARREL Team Launching 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A movie made by the NASA-Funded Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses, or BARREL, team on their work launching 20 balloons in Antarctica during the Dec. 2013/Jan. 2014 campa...

  13. Variant M4 Barrel Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    an Instron Wilson-Tukon micro hardness - tester using a Knoop indenter with a 200g load. Knoop hardness values where then converted to 3 Rockwell ...relatively thin and localized to wide cracks and surfaces where the chromium has been completely removed. All fired barrels show extensive copper ...barrels had large deposits of copper at the root of the lands; in addition to collecting copper and firing debris at surface cracks and disparities

  14. OSIRIS camera barrel optomechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Alejandro; Tejada, Carlos; Gonzalez, Jesus; Cobos, Francisco J.; Sanchez, Beatriz; Fuentes, Javier; Ruiz, Elfego

    2004-09-01

    A Camera Barrel, located in the OSIRIS imager/spectrograph for the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), is described in this article. The barrel design has been developed by the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Mexico (IA-UNAM), in collaboration with the Institute for Astrophysics of Canarias (IAC), Spain. The barrel is being manufactured by the Engineering Center for Industrial Development (CIDESI) at Queretaro, Mexico. The Camera Barrel includes a set of eight lenses (three doublets and two singlets), with their respective supports and cells, as well as two subsystems: the Focusing Unit, which is a mechanism that modifies the first doublet relative position; and the Passive Displacement Unit (PDU), which uses the third doublet as thermal compensator to maintain the camera focal length and image quality when the ambient temperature changes. This article includes a brief description of the scientific instrument; describes the design criteria related with performance justification; and summarizes the specifications related with misalignment errors and generated stresses. The Camera Barrel components are described and analytical calculations, FEA simulations and error budgets are also included.

  15. Pressurized core barrel for sampling gas-charged marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Denk, E.W.; Dunlap, W.A.; Bryant, W.R.; Milberger, L.J.; Whelan, T.J. III

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a recently developed pressurized core barrel which can sample gas-charged sediments and maintain them at the downhole pressure for subsequent testing. The pressurized samples are placed in a hyperbaric chamber manned by geotechnically trained ''divers''. Here, various tests are performed on the samples at the downhole pressure. These tests include undrained shear strength and gas content determinations. Additional tests, such as consolidation and triaxial compression, are performed by mounting samples in pressurized test devices which are then passed out of the hyperbaric chamber. The pressurized core barrel was designed to be operated in a standard geotechnical borehole. A discussion of the design features is presented.

  16. Erosion in Large Gun Barrels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    AD-A017-104 EROSION IN LARGE GUN BARRELS National Materials Advisory Board (NAS-NAE) Washington, D. C. 1975 i OD O i...KCEUMk MO Erosion in Large Quo Barrels « »CIIPOMMIHO 0»C MK»0"T NUMK* • COWtWACT OM GHAnT NUMIEIV.I •UTH. National Materials Advisory...Ad Hoc Committee on Gun Tube Erosion MDA903-74-C-0167 — • PCMFOMMIMG 0*)0AMIIAT|©M H «Ml AMD AOO«eSS National Materials Advisory Board

  17. Superior Barrel & Drum, Elk Township, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Superior Barrel and Drum Superfund site is a 5.5-acre property located in Elk Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Superior Barrel and Drum is listed as a drum reconditioning business. These facilities typically clean and recondition metal

  18. Use of Electroplated Chromium in Gun Barrels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Temperature; oF S t r e s s R e t a i n e d ; % 50% swage 75% swage Residual stress retained following 2 hr furnace heating of 120mm M256 gun barrels... Swage Autofrettage LARGE CALIBER GUN BARREL STRENGTH Coating Process Temperature Limitations Autofrettage allows gun barrels to be lighter and

  19. Treatment Method for Fermi Barrel Sodium Metal Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

    2005-06-01

    Fermi barrels are 55-gallon drums that once contained bulk sodium metal from the shutdown Fermi 1 breeder reactor facility, and now contain residual sodium metal and other sodium/air reaction products. This report provides a residual sodium treatment method and proposed quality assurance steps that will ensure that all residual sodium is deactivated and removed from the Fermi barrels before disposal. The treatment method is the application of humidified carbon dioxide to the residual sodium followed by a water wash. The experimental application of the treatment method to six Fermi barrels is discussed, and recommendations are provided for further testing and evaluation of the method. Though more testing would allow for a greater refinement of the treatment technique, enough data has been gathered from the tests already performed to prove that 100% compliance with stated waste criteria can be achieved.

  20. Direct 3D Analyses Reveal Barrel-Specific Vascular Distribution and Cross-Barrel Branching in the Mouse Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingpeng; Guo, Congdi; Chen, Shangbin; Jiang, Tao; He, Yong; Ding, Wenxiang; Yang, Zhongqin; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Whether vascular distribution is spatially specific among cortical columns is a fundamental yet controversial question. Here, we have obtained 1-μm resolution 3D datasets that cover the whole mouse barrel cortex by combining Nissl staining with micro-optical sectioning tomography to simultaneously visualize individual cells and blood vessels, including capillaries. Pinpointing layer IV of the posteromedial barrel subfield, direct 3D reconstruction and quantitative analysis showed that (1) penetrating vessels preferentially locate in the interbarrel septa/barrel wall (75.1%) rather than the barrel hollows, (2) the branches of 70% penetrating vessels only reach the neighboring but not always all the neighboring barrels and the other 30% extend beyond the neighboring barrels and may provide cross-barrel blood supply or drainage, (3) the branches of 59.6% penetrating vessels reach all the neighboring barrels, while the rest only reach part of them, and (4) the length density of microvessels in the interbarrel septa/barrel wall is lower than that in the barrel hollows with a ratio of 0.92. These results reveal that the penetrating vessels and microvessels exhibit a barrel-specific organization, whereas the branches of penetrating vessels do not, which suggests a much more complex vascular distribution pattern among cortical columns than previously thought. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Drag Measurements of a Protruding .50-caliber Machine Gun with Barrel Jacket Removed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luoma, Arvo A.

    1943-01-01

    Tests were made in 8-ft high-speed wind tunnel to determine the drag reduction possible by eliminating the barrel jacket of a protruding 50-caliber aircraft gun. It was found that the drag of a standard aircraft gun protruding into the air stream at right angles to the flow can be reduced by 23% by discarding the barrel jacket. At 300 mph and sea-level conditions, this amounts to a decrease in drag of from 83 to 64 pounds. A rough surface finish on the barrel was found to have no adverse effects on the drag of the barrel, the drag being actually less at high Mach Numbers.

  2. 15 CFR 241.2 - Legal standard barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., VEGETABLES AND OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.2 Legal standard barrels. (a) Any barrel..., other than cranberries, in section 1 of the standard-barrel law, or any barrel or a subdivision thereof... than cranberries, or a legal subdivision thereof. No other barrel or subdivision in barrel form is a...

  3. 15 CFR 241.2 - Legal standard barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., VEGETABLES AND OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.2 Legal standard barrels. (a) Any barrel..., other than cranberries, in section 1 of the standard-barrel law, or any barrel or a subdivision thereof... than cranberries, or a legal subdivision thereof. No other barrel or subdivision in barrel form is a...

  4. 15 CFR 241.2 - Legal standard barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., VEGETABLES AND OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.2 Legal standard barrels. (a) Any barrel..., other than cranberries, in section 1 of the standard-barrel law, or any barrel or a subdivision thereof... than cranberries, or a legal subdivision thereof. No other barrel or subdivision in barrel form is a...

  5. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Honeycomb Sandwich Panel Arc Segments of a Full-Scale Fairing Barrel Part 1: 8-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets. Part 1; 8-Ply In-Autoclave Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Pineda, Evan J.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2013-01-01

    Four honeycomb sandwich panels, representing 1/16th arc segments of a 10-m diameter barrel section of the heavy lift launch vehicle, were manufactured under the NASA Composites for Exploration program and the NASA Space Launch Systems program. Two configurations were chosen for the panels: 6-ply facesheets with 1.125 in. honeycomb core and 8-ply facesheets with 1.000 in. honeycomb core. Additionally, two separate carbon fiber/epoxy material systems were chosen for the facesheets: inautoclave IM7/977-3 and out-of-autoclave T40-800b/5320-1. Smaller 3.00- by 5.00-ft panels were cut from the 1/16th barrel sections. These panels were tested under compressive loading at the NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, linear eigenvalue and geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to predict the compressive response of the 3.00- by 5.00-ft panels. This manuscript summarizes the experimental and analytical modeling efforts pertaining to the panel composed of 8-ply, IM7/977-3 facesheets (referred to Panel A). To improve the robustness of the geometrically nonlinear finite element model, measured surface imperfections were included in the geometry of the model. Both the linear and nonlinear models yield good qualitative and quantitative predictions. Additionally, it was predicted correctly that the panel would fail in buckling prior to failing in strength. Furthermore, several imperfection studies were performed to investigate the influence of geometric imperfections, fiber misalignments, and three-dimensional (3 D) effects on the compressive response of the panel.

  6. Status of the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Schwiening, J.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Hohler, R.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh; Vodopianov, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Koch, P.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Ugur, C.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.; Widmann, E.; The PANDA Cherenkov Group

    2014-05-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt will study fundamental questions of hadron physics and QCD using high-intensity cooled antiproton beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/c. Hadronic PID in the barrel region of the PANDA detector will be provided by a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counter. The design is based on the successful BABAR DIRC with several key improvements, such as fast photon timing and a compact imaging region. Detailed Monte Carlo simulation studies were performed for DIRC designs based on narrow bars or wide plates with a variety of focusing solutions. The performance of each design was characterized in terms of photon yield and single photon Cherenkov angle resolution and a maximum likelihood approach was used to determine the π/K separation. Selected design options were implemented in prototypes and tested with hadronic particle beams at GSI and CERN. This article describes the status of the design and R&D for the PANDA Barrel DIRC detector, with a focus on the performance of different DIRC designs in simulation and particle beams.

  7. Calibration and operation of the PNL Barrel Assayer

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R J

    1991-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory operates a Barrel Assayer to measure the radionuclide content of 208-liter waste drums. This mobile apparatus is designed to provide quantitative information on each radioisotope in a drum and to recognize and locate hot spots within the drum. A lead-collimated intrinsic-germanium detector mounted on a moveable platform vertically scans a rotating drum for gamma-ray activity while 62 stationary {sup 10}BF{sub 3} tubes measure neutrons emitted by transuranic isotopes within the waste. Several approaches have been used to document the controls under which the Barrel Assayer has been operated from February 1989 through December 1990. Resin-filled 208-1 calibration barrels containing known quantities of {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 134}Cs were measured by the Barrel Assayer and found to be well within 25% of the known values. A thorium nitrate standard that served as the secondary, or field, standard verified that the detector has been within calibration during the period from February 1989 through December 1990. In previous testing, 23 waste drums were assayed at several commercial nuclear power plants. Subsequently, aliquots from the top, middle, and bottom of the barrels were analyzed. The ratio of grab-sample concentration to direct-assay concentration averaged {minus}1.6 for one plant and +1.3 for another. Results using the Barrel Assayer were also comparable to those obtained using Safeguards Security's Segmented Gamma-ray Scanner (SGS) system in a cross-calibration experiment performed by a third party on several drums containing TRU wastes. 6 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Postsynaptic Deregulation in GAP-43 Heterozygous Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Emily A.; Tremblay, Marie-Ève; McCasland, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Formation of whisker-related barrels in primary somatosensory cortex (S1) requires communication between presynaptic thalamocortical afferents (TCAs) and postsynaptic cortical neurons. GAP-43 is crucially involved in targeting TCAs to postsynaptic S1 neurons but its influence on the interactions between these 2 elements has not been explored. Here, we tested the hypothesis that reduced early expression of presynaptic GAP-43 (GAP-43 heterozygous [HZ] mice) alters postsynaptic differentiation of barrel cells. We found a transient increase in cytochrome oxidase staining between P6 and P14 in HZ animals, indicative of increased metabolic activity in barrel cortex during this time. Golgi impregnation and microtubule-associated protein 2 immunohistochemistry showed anomalous dendritic patterning in GAP-43 HZ cortex at P5, with altered dendritic length and branching and abnormal retention of dendrites that extend into developing septa. This deficiency was no longer apparent at P7, suggesting partial recovery of dendritic pruning processes. Finally, we showed early defects in synaptogenesis from P4 to P5 with increased colocalization of NR1 and GluR1 staining in HZ mice. By P7, this colocalization had normalized to wild type levels. Taken together, our findings suggest abnormal postsynaptic differentiation in GAP-43 HZ cortex during early barrel development, followed by adaptive compensation and partial phenotypic rescue. PMID:19915093

  9. Excitatory neuronal connectivity in the barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical areas are believed to be organized into vertical modules, the cortical columns, and the horizontal layers 1–6. In the somatosensory barrel cortex these columns are defined by the readily discernible barrel structure in layer 4. Information processing in the neocortex occurs along vertical and horizontal axes, thereby linking individual barrel-related columns via axons running through the different cortical layers of the barrel cortex. Long-range signaling occurs within the neocortical layers but also through axons projecting through the white matter to other neocortical areas and subcortical brain regions. Because of the ease of identification of barrel-related columns, the rodent barrel cortex has become a prototypical system to study the interactions between different neuronal connections within a sensory cortical area and between this area and other cortical as well subcortical regions. Such interactions will be discussed specifically for the feed-forward and feedback loops between the somatosensory and the somatomotor cortices as well as the different thalamic nuclei. In addition, recent advances concerning the morphological characteristics of excitatory neurons and their impact on the synaptic connectivity patterns and signaling properties of neuronal microcircuits in the whisker-related somatosensory cortex will be reviewed. In this context, their relationship between the structural properties of barrel-related columns and their function as a module in vertical synaptic signaling in the whisker-related cortical areas will be discussed. PMID:22798946

  10. CALIFA Barrel prototype detector characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietras, B.; Gascón, M.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Bendel, M.; Bloch, T.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Durán, I.; Fiori, E.; Gernhäuser, R.; González, D.; Kröll, T.; Le Bleis, T.; Montes, N.; Nácher, E.; Robles, M.; Perea, A.; Vilán, J. A.; Winkel, M.

    2013-11-01

    Well established in the field of scintillator detection, Caesium Iodide remains at the forefront of scintillators for use in modern calorimeters. Recent developments in photosensor technology have lead to the production of Large Area Avalanche Photo Diodes (LAAPDs), a huge advancement on traditional photosensors in terms of high internal gain, dynamic range, magnetic field insensitivity, high quantum efficiency and fast recovery time. The R3B physics programme has a number of requirements for its calorimeter, one of the most challenging being the dual functionality as both a calorimeter and a spectrometer. This involves the simultaneous detection of ∼300 MeV protons and gamma rays ranging from 0.1 to 20 MeV. This scintillator - photosensor coupling provides an excellent solution in this capacity, in part due to the near perfect match of the LAAPD quantum efficiency peak to the light output wavelength of CsI(Tl). Modern detector development is guided by use of Monte Carlo simulations to predict detector performance, nonetheless it is essential to benchmark these simulations against real data taken with prototype detector arrays. Here follows an account of the performance of two such prototypes representing different polar regions of the Barrel section of the forthcoming CALIFA calorimeter. Measurements were taken for gamma-ray energies up to 15.1 MeV (Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Garching, Germany) and for direct irradiation with a 180 MeV proton beam (The Svedberg Laboratoriet, Uppsala, Sweden). Results are discussed in light of complementary GEANT4 simulations.

  11. Mitochondria can recognize and assemble fragments of a β-barrel structure

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jonas E.N.; Papic, Drazen; Ulrich, Thomas; Grin, Iwan; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Tommassen, Jan; Linke, Dirk; Dimmer, Kai S.; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Rapaport, Doron

    2011-01-01

    β-barrel proteins are found in the outer membranes of eukaryotic organelles of endosymbiotic origin as well as in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Precursors of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins are synthesized in the cytosol and have to be targeted to the organelle. Currently, the signal that assures their specific targeting to mitochondria is poorly defined. To characterize the structural features needed for specific mitochondrial targeting and to test whether a full β-barrel structure is required, we expressed in yeast cells the β-barrel domain of the trimeric autotransporter Yersinia adhesin A (YadA). Trimeric autotransporters are found only in prokaryotes, where they are anchored to the outer membrane by a single 12-stranded β-barrel structure to which each monomer is contributing four β-strands. Importantly, we found that YadA is solely localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane, where it exists in a native trimeric conformation. These findings demonstrate that, rather than a linear sequence or a complete β-barrel structure, four β-strands are sufficient for the mitochondria to recognize and assemble a β-barrel protein. Remarkably, the evolutionary origin of mitochondria from bacteria enables them to import and assemble even proteins belonging to a class that is absent in eukaryotes. PMID:21460184

  12. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Barrel-Shaped Asymmetrical Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.; Carruth, M. R.; Edwards, D. L.; Finchum, A.; Maxwell, G.; Nabors, S.; Smalley, L.; Huston, D.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Barrel-Shaped Asymmetrical Capacitor (NACAP) has been extensively tested at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the National Space Science and Technology Center. Trichel pulse emission was first discovered here. The NACAP is a magnetohydrodynamic device for electric propulsion. In air it requires no onboard propellant nor any moving parts. No performance was observed in hard vacuum. The next step shall be optimizing the technology for future applications.

  13. 15 CFR 241.2 - Legal standard barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... having the dimensions specified for a standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities... form or dimensions, is a legal standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, or other dry commodities other... having the dimensions specified for a standard barrel for cranberries in section 1 of the standard-barrel...

  14. 15 CFR 241.2 - Legal standard barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... having the dimensions specified for a standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities... form or dimensions, is a legal standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, or other dry commodities other... having the dimensions specified for a standard barrel for cranberries in section 1 of the standard-barrel...

  15. Cold Rotary Forging of Small Caliber Gun Barrels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    COMPONENTS SUPPORTED. (1) 7.62mm M219 machine gun barrel (2) 7.62mm M134 mini gun ( Gau barrel) (3) .30 caliber machine gun barrel (4) 5.56=m MI6Al rifle ...barrel (5) 50 cal. M8C spotting rifle barrel (6) 7.62mm Ml4 National Match rifle bw’rel (7) other small arms weapon barrels K -. 1. FACILITIES SUPPORTED... rifle barrels was made in conjunction with the rotary forging process. From this, a purchase description was written and submitted for bid for a

  16. Lightweight optical barrel assembly structures for large deployable space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Peter A.; Silver, Mark J.; Dobson, Benjamin J.

    2009-08-01

    Future space based telescopes will need apertures and focal lengths that exceed the dimensions of the launch vehicle shroud. In addition to deploying the primary mirror and secondary mirror support structure, these large telescopes must also deploy the stray light and thermal barriers needed to ensure proper telescope performance. The authors present a deployable light and thermal optical barrel assembly approach for a very large telescope with a variable sun angle and fast slew rate. The Strain Energy Deployable Optical Barrel Assembly (SEDOBA) uses elastic composite hinges to power the deployment of a hierarchical truss structure that supports the thermal and stray light shroud material that form the overall system. The paper describes the overall design approach, the key component technologies, and the design and preliminary testing of a self deploying scale model prototype.

  17. Effect of Barrel Material on Critical Current Measurements of High-Jc RRP Nb3Sn Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.

    2011-08-03

    Nb{sub 3}Sn strands extracted from a 20-strand rectangular Rutherford cable were reacted on either stainless steel or Ti-alloy barrels and the critical current, I{sub c}, in the field range of 8-11.5 T was measured on ITER-type barrels made from Ti-6Al-4V alloy, 304 stainless steel and G-10. Measurements on the 'standard' Ti-alloy barrel using the test procedure employed at BNL are shown to reproduce I{sub c} for extracted strands to {+-}2%. The I{sub c} data for the sample mounted on the 'standard' Ti-alloy are fit to the deviatoric strain scaling model developed for Nb{sub 3}Sn by the University of Twente group using an arbitrary pre-strain. Using the parameters for this fit, the I{sub c} data for the other barrels are fitted by only adjusting the strain. Using this procedure, the strain difference due to the barrel material is determined. Assuming a thermal pre-strain of -0.2% for the sample measured on the Ti-alloy barrel, the use of stainless steel barrel increases the compressive strain by -0.07%, that of G-10 by -0.10%. With the wire soldered to the stainless steel barrel, the strain increases to -0.15%. Details of this study are presented.

  18. Rain Barrels: A Catalyst for Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakacs, Michele E.; Haberland, Mike; Mangiafico, Salvatore S.; Winquist, Aileen; Obropta, Christopher C.; Boyajian, Amy; Mellor, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 4 years, rain barrel programming for residents has been implemented in both Northern Virginia and New Jersey as a method for educating the public about stormwater management and water conservation. Program participants demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge of water resource issues. Follow-up surveys showed 58% of New…

  19. Rain Barrels: A Catalyst for Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakacs, Michele E.; Haberland, Mike; Mangiafico, Salvatore S.; Winquist, Aileen; Obropta, Christopher C.; Boyajian, Amy; Mellor, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 4 years, rain barrel programming for residents has been implemented in both Northern Virginia and New Jersey as a method for educating the public about stormwater management and water conservation. Program participants demonstrated a significant increase in knowledge of water resource issues. Follow-up surveys showed 58% of New…

  20. 49 CFR 178.510 - Standards for wooden barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PACKAGINGS Non-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.510 Standards for wooden barrels. (a) The... intended use of the barrel. (3) Staves and heads must be sawn or cleft with the grain so that no...

  1. Barrel lateral force modeling of a curved EM railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Szu H.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a mathematical model to assess the normal barrel-projectile interaction forces arising from the barrel curvature of an electromagnetic railgun. It shows the significant relationships among the main parameters, such as the Lorentz force, the projectile displacement, velocity and the barrel curvature. Equations are derived to make quick computations and parametric relations are expressed explicitly. In a sample computation, the results show a large normal force would be generated by a sufficiently curved barrel.

  2. Design and fabrication of an advanced, lightweight, high stiffness, railgun barrel concept

    SciTech Connect

    Vrable, D.L.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Korican, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    An advanced lightweight and high stiffness railgun barrel design and incorporates several new design features and advanced materials is being developed by SPARTA, Inc. The program is sponsored by the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center ARDEC and by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The railgun is 7 m long and has a 90 mm round bore. It is designed to accommodate both solid and plasma armatures. Muzzle energies are expected in the range of 9 to 15 MJ. Analysis and final design has been completed and the barrel and other railgun subassemblies are in the fabrication stage at SPARTA, Inc. in San Diego, California. Initial testing will be conducted at Maxwell Laboratories Green Farm facility in September 1990 and will subsequently be shipped to the ARDEC Railgun Laboratory in October 1990 for full power operation and testing. This paper discusses the design features and fabrication approaches for this high performance, lightweight railgun barrel system.

  3. Quench Induced Pressure Rise in the Cooling Pipes of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Model

    SciTech Connect

    Haug, F.; Bottura, L.; Junker, S.; Broggi, F.

    2004-06-23

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of a Barrel Toroid, two End-Cap Toroids and a Solenoid. Eight individual racetrack coils will be assembled to form the Barrel Toroid with overall dimensions of 26 m length and 20 m diameter. In order to verify the design concept a 9 m long short version of a single Barrel Toroid coil was built. A test program was conducted at the CERN cryogenic test facility which included the evaluation of the pressure rise in the helium cooling channels during quenches of the coil. A specific experimental set-up with cold pressure transducers and capillaries was installed for online measurement of the pressure signals. In addition a computer model was used to simulate these events. The data obtained are presented.

  4. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, V. E. Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2015-12-15

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ∼6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV.

  5. Barrel cortex and whisker-mediated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Neural networks of the rodent barrel cortex are particularly tractable for developing a quantitative understanding of response transformations in a cortical column. A column in barrel cortex consists of approximately 10 compartments. Two thalamic input pathways, a sensory lemniscal one and sensorimotor paralemniscal one, are transformed to approximately 7 population outputs, each with distinct spatiotemporal response characteristics. Granular and supragranular layers are sites of segregated processing in lemniscal and paralemniscal pathways, whereas infragranular layers are sites of intracolumnar, lemniscal/paralemniscal integration. Individual thalamocortical connections are relatively weak, and a considerable fraction of thalamocortical afferents contributes to each sensory response. Intracortically, relatively few but strong synaptic connections contribute to sensory responses, and responses are rapidly terminated by inhibition. Overall cortical population activity is very low. Whiskers mediate a wide range of behaviors and many natural tactile behaviors occur very rapidly. Vibrissal object recognition can be size invariant and motion invariant and is based on the tactile 'Gestaltwahrnehmung' of shape.

  6. Weight Reduction Study on the 20MM, M61A1, Vulcan Gun Barrel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    breech 20am , M&LAl barrel o o o • OO —o x • —to ^2 cr2- S Effective Bore Boundary Conditions CL h - 3210 BTU/HR - FT« - c 5* » 1350...Minute 18" from breech 20am , MßlAl barrel 3 a 00 —o y ’ o o IT . ’is |LJ§ o. BP z. c Effective Bore Boundary Condltiona h » 23*0...1 Director Joint Military Packaging Training Center ATTN: DRXPT- PT Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 1 Commander U.S. Army Tropic Test Center

  7. Studies of hadron-electron separators for the ZEUS barrel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ambats, I.; Bortz, D.; Connolly, A.

    1995-05-25

    Two possible upgrades, a shower maximum detector and a presampler, designed to improve the low energy electron/hadron separation capabilities of the ZEUS barrel calorimeter are described and test-beam results are reported. The presampler can also be used to correct for energy loss of particles traversing the dead material in front of the calorimeter.

  8. PARAMETERS INFLUENCING EMISSIONS OF PCDDS/FS FROM OPEN BURNING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE IN BARRELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results from tests that were designed to examine some of the factors influencing the emissions of polychlorinated-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs) from burn barrels. Based on the wide variability of emissions within duplicate-run sets, in ...

  9. Results from the SLD barrel CRID detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Antilogus, P. |; Aston, D.

    1993-11-01

    We report on operational experience with and experimental performance of the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector from the 1992 and 1993 physics runs. The liquid (C{sub 6}F{sub 14}) and gas (C{sub 5}F{sub 12}) radiator recirculation systems have performed well, and the drift gas supply system has operated successfully with TMAE for three years. Cherenkov rings have been observed from both the liquid and gas radiators. The number and angular resolution of Cherenkov photons have been measured, and found to be close to design specifications.

  10. Real-time monitoring of barrel thickness and barrel/screw separation using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Zun, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Makiko

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasonic sensors together with a fast data acquisition system have been used to monitor the barrel thickness and barrel/screw separation during low-density polyethylene as well as high-density polyethylene extrusion in 30 mm and 50 mm twin-screw extruders. The sensors include sol-gel sprayed high temperature (HT) piezoelectric thick ceramic film ultrasonic transducers (UTs), stand-alone HTUTs and air-cooled buffer rod type sensors consisting of a room temperature UT and a non-clad or clad buffer rod to which the room temperature UT is attached. The installation and use of these sensors are non-intrusive to the extruder and non-destructive to the polymers being processed. This study has demonstrated the capability of appropriately designed ultrasonic sensors in monitoring the barrel and screw integrity at the melting, mixing and pumping zones of the extruder via barrel or flange. The merits and limitations of these sensors are discussed. The measurement speed and analysis of the sensitivity for quantitative wear measurements are also presented.

  11. 1. EXTERIOR, SIDE OF PICKLE BARREL RESTAURANT AND ADJOINING STORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR, SIDE OF PICKLE BARREL RESTAURANT AND ADJOINING STORE - Silverton Historic District, East Thirteenth & Green Streets (Commercial Building), East Thirteenh & Green Streets, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  12. Parametric modeling of zoom lens barrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Charles W.

    2001-12-01

    Today's customer requires zoom lens designs that are compact, inexpensive, and at six-sigma quality levels. While incorporating these customer requirements, a design team must often work within compressed design cycles and minimal product development budgets. These customer and project constraints, coupled with the inherent complexity of a zoom lens module, force the design team to try new and innovative techniques to deliver their products. This paper presents the methods used to develop lens barrels for several zoom lens module projects at Eastman Kodak Company. The lens barrel, a critical interface between the mechanical and optical systems, presented a technical barrier from both an engineering analysis and manufacturing perspective. The method used to overcome these barriers consisted of identifying several key functional parameters, creating a parameter-driven 3-D solid model in a commercially available CAD system, and then using the model to make iterative, data-driven design decisions while leveraging the model to create engineering drawings and the necessary prototypes and production tooling. As a result, the designs were able to meet their size, cost, and design cycle time requirements while realizing a better than anticipated first pass yield and quality level.

  13. Observations of a solar storm from the stratosphere: The BARREL Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Alexa

    2016-07-01

    During the Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) second campaign, BARREL observed with a single primary instrument, a 3"x3" NaI spectrometer measuring 20 keV - 10 MeV X-rays [Woodger et al 2015 JGR], portions of an entire solar storm. This very small event, in terms of geomagnetic activity, or one of the largest of the current solar cycle, in terms of solar energetic particle events, has given us a very clear set of observations of the response of the day side magnetosphere to the arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection shock. The BARREL mission of opportunity working in tandem with the Van Allen Probes was designed to study the loss of radiation belt electrons to the ionosphere and upper atmosphere. However BARREL is able to see X-rays from a multitude of sources. During the second campaign, the Sun produced, and BARREL observed, an X-class flare [McGregor et al in prep.]. This was followed by BARREL observations of X-rays, gamma-rays, and directly injected protons from the solar energetic particle (SEP) event associated with the eruption from the Sun while simultaneously the Van Allen Probes observed the SEP protons in the inner magnetosphere [Halford et al 2016 submitted JGR]. Two days later the shock generated by the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME-shock) hit the Earth while BARREL was in conjunction with the Van Allen Probes and GOES [Halford et al 2015 JGR]. Although this was a Mars directed CME and the Earth only received a glancing blow [Möstl et al 2015 Nat. Commun., Mays et al 2015 ApJ], the modest compression led to the formation of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and very low frequency (VLF) whistler mode waves [Halford and Mann 2016 submitted to JGR]. The combination of these waves and the enhancement of the local particle population led to precipitation of electrons remotely observed by BARREL. This was not a Halloween, Bastille Day, or one of the now

  14. An outbreak of norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis associated with contaminated barrelled water in many schools in Zhejiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Minyang; Song, Jianqiang; He, Fan; Qiu, Yinwei; Wu, Haocheng; Lu, Qinbao; Feng, Yan; Lin, Junfen; Chen, Enfu; Chai, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives More than 900 students and teachers at many schools in Jiaxing city developed acute gastroenteritis in February 2014. An immediate epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the pathogen, infection sources and route of transmission. Methods The probable cases and confirmed cases were defined as students or teachers with diarrhoea or vomiting present since the term began in February 2014. An active search was conducted for undiagnosed cases among students and teachers. Details such as demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and drinking water preference and frequency were collected via a uniform epidemiological questionnaire. A case-control study was implemented, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Rectal swabs from several patients, food handlers and barrelled water factory workers, as well as water and food samples, were collected to test for potential bacteria and viruses. Results A total of 924 cases fit the definition of the probable case, including 8 cases of laboratory-confirmed norovirus infection at 13 schools in Jiaxing city between February 12 and February 21, 2014. The case-control study demonstrated that barrelled water was a risk factor (OR: 20.15, 95% CI: 2.59–156.76) and that bottled water and boiled barrelled water were protective factors (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13–0.70, and OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16–0.77). A total of 11 rectal samples and 8 barrelled water samples were detected as norovirus-positive, and the genotypes of viral strains were the same (GII). The norovirus that contaminated the barrelled water largely came from the asymptomatic workers. Conclusions This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was caused by barrelled water contaminated by norovirus. The outbreak was controlled after stopping the supply of barrelled water. The barrelled water supply in China represents a potential source of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks due to the lack of surveillance and supervision

  15. An outbreak of norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis associated with contaminated barrelled water in many schools in Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaopeng; Fu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Peng; Sheng, Minyang; Song, Jianqiang; He, Fan; Qiu, Yinwei; Wu, Haocheng; Lu, Qinbao; Feng, Yan; Lin, Junfen; Chen, Enfu; Chai, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    More than 900 students and teachers at many schools in Jiaxing city developed acute gastroenteritis in February 2014. An immediate epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the pathogen, infection sources and route of transmission. The probable cases and confirmed cases were defined as students or teachers with diarrhoea or vomiting present since the term began in February 2014. An active search was conducted for undiagnosed cases among students and teachers. Details such as demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and drinking water preference and frequency were collected via a uniform epidemiological questionnaire. A case-control study was implemented, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Rectal swabs from several patients, food handlers and barrelled water factory workers, as well as water and food samples, were collected to test for potential bacteria and viruses. A total of 924 cases fit the definition of the probable case, including 8 cases of laboratory-confirmed norovirus infection at 13 schools in Jiaxing city between February 12 and February 21, 2014. The case-control study demonstrated that barrelled water was a risk factor (OR: 20.15, 95% CI: 2.59-156.76) and that bottled water and boiled barrelled water were protective factors (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13-0.70, and OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16-0.77). A total of 11 rectal samples and 8 barrelled water samples were detected as norovirus-positive, and the genotypes of viral strains were the same (GII). The norovirus that contaminated the barrelled water largely came from the asymptomatic workers. This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was caused by barrelled water contaminated by norovirus. The outbreak was controlled after stopping the supply of barrelled water. The barrelled water supply in China represents a potential source of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks due to the lack of surveillance and supervision. Therefore, more attention should be paid to this

  16. OMPcontact: An Outer Membrane Protein Inter-Barrel Residue Contact Prediction Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Han; Yan, Lun; Su, Lingtao; Xu, Dong

    2017-03-01

    In the two transmembrane protein types, outer membrane proteins (OMPs) perform diverse important biochemical functions, including substrate transport and passive nutrient uptake and intake. Hence their 3D structures are expected to reveal these functions. Because experimental structures are scarce, predicted 3D structures are more adapted to OMP research instead, and the inter-barrel residue contact is becoming one of the most remarkable features, improving prediction accuracy by describing the structural information of OMPs. To predict OMP structures accurately, we explored an OMP inter-barrel residue contact prediction method: OMPcontact. Multiple OMP-specific features were integrated in the method, including residue evolutionary covariation, topology-based transmembrane segment relative residue position, OMP lipid layer accessibility, and residue evolution conservation. These features describe the properties of a residue pair in different respects: sequential, structural, evolutionary, and biochemical. Within a 3-residues slide window, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) could accurately determinate the inter-barrel contact residue pair using above features. A 5-fold cross-valuation process was applied in testing the OMPcontact performance against a non-redundant OMP set with 75 samples inside. The tests compared four evolutionary covariation methods and screen analyzed the adaptive ones for inter-barrel contact prediction. The results showed our method not only efficiently realized the prediction, but also scored the possibility for residue pairs reliably. This is expected to improve OMP tertiary structure prediction. Therefore, OMPcontact will be helpful in compiling a structural census of outer membrane protein.

  17. The CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Track Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ero, J.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Guiducci, L.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Sphicas, P.; Triossi, A.; Wulz, C.

    2016-03-01

    The design and performance of the upgraded CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) is presented. Monte Carlo simulation data as well as cosmic ray data from a CMS muon detector slice test have been used to study in detail the performance of the new track finder. The design architecture is based on twelve MP7 cards each of which uses a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA and can receive and transmit data at 10 Gbps from 72 input and 72 output fibers. According to the CMS Trigger Upgrade TDR the BMTF receives trigger primitive data which are computed using both RPC and DT data and transmits data from a number of muon candidates to the upgraded Global Muon Trigger. Results from detailed studies of comparisons between the BMTF algorithm results and the results of a C++ emulator are also presented. The new BMTF will be commissioned for data taking in 2016.

  18. 27 CFR 25.141 - Barrels and kegs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Barrels and kegs. 25.141 Section 25.141 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Marks, Brands, and Labels § 25.141 Barrels and kegs. (a) General...

  19. 27 CFR 25.144 - Rebranding barrels and kegs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rebranding barrels and kegs. 25.144 Section 25.144 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Marks, Brands, and Labels § 25.144 Rebranding barrels and...

  20. The structure of the β-barrel assembly machinery complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bakelar, Jeremy; Buchanan, Susan K.; Noinaj, Nicholas

    2016-01-08

    β-Barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are found in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and are essential for nutrient import, signaling, and adhesion. A 200-kilodalton five-component complex called the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex has been implicated in the biogenesis of OMPs. In this paper, we report the structure of the BAM complex from Escherichia coli, revealing that binding of BamCDE modulates the conformation of BamA, the central component, which may serve to regulate the BAM complex. The periplasmic domain of BamA was in a closed state that prevents access to the barrel lumen, which indicates substrate OMPs may not be threaded through the barrel during biogenesis. Finally and further, conformational shifts in the barrel domain lead to opening of the exit pore and rearrangement at the lateral gate.

  1. The structure of the β-barrel assembly machinery complex

    DOE PAGES

    Bakelar, Jeremy; Buchanan, Susan K.; Noinaj, Nicholas

    2016-01-08

    β-Barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are found in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and are essential for nutrient import, signaling, and adhesion. A 200-kilodalton five-component complex called the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex has been implicated in the biogenesis of OMPs. In this paper, we report the structure of the BAM complex from Escherichia coli, revealing that binding of BamCDE modulates the conformation of BamA, the central component, which may serve to regulate the BAM complex. The periplasmic domain of BamA was in a closed state that prevents access to the barrel lumen, which indicates substrate OMPs may notmore » be threaded through the barrel during biogenesis. Finally and further, conformational shifts in the barrel domain lead to opening of the exit pore and rearrangement at the lateral gate.« less

  2. Recent results from the Crystal Barrel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-09

    The Crystal Barrel experiment has been constructed and installed at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. It has been fully operational since late 1989. In this talk, recent results of meson spectroscopy in p[bar p]-annihilations are presented. The main emphasis is on all-neutral annihilations, the study of the strange quark content of the proton, and the investigation of the decay mode of il particles. A 2[sup ++] resonance decaying into [pi][degrees][pi][degrees]at a mass of 1515 [plus minus] 10 MeV with a width of 120 [plus minus] 10 MeV has been seen in a 3[pi][degrees] final state.

  3. Recent results from the Crystal Barrel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    The Crystal Barrel Collaboration

    1991-10-09

    The Crystal Barrel experiment has been constructed and installed at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. It has been fully operational since late 1989. In this talk, recent results of meson spectroscopy in p{bar p}-annihilations are presented. The main emphasis is on all-neutral annihilations, the study of the strange quark content of the proton, and the investigation of the decay mode of il particles. A 2{sup ++} resonance decaying into {pi}{degrees}{pi}{degrees}at a mass of 1515 {plus_minus} 10 MeV with a width of 120 {plus_minus} 10 MeV has been seen in a 3{pi}{degrees} final state.

  4. Analysis of gun barrel rifling twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jia; Chen, Guangsong; Qian, Linfang; Liu, Taisu

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at the problem of gun barrel rifling twist, the constraint relation between rifling and projectile is investigated. The constraint model of rifling and projectile is established and the geometric relation between the twist and the motion of projectile is analyzed. Based on the constraint model, according to the rotating band that is fired, the stress and the motion law of the rotating band in bore are analyzed. The effects to rotating band (double rotating band or wide driving band) caused by different rifling (rib rifling, increasing rifling and combined rifling) are also investigated. The model is demonstrated by several examples. The results of numerical examples and the constraint mode show that the uncertainty factors will be brought in the increasing rifling and combined rifling during the projectile move in the bore. According to the amplitude and the strength of the twist acting on rotating band, the steady property of rotational motion of the projectile, the rib rifling is a better choose.

  5. Twenty years of barrel-stave flextensional transducer technology in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dennis F.

    2005-04-01

    The barrel-stave flextensional transducer, a compact underwater sound source, was conceived at DRDC Atlantic in 1986 [G. W. McMahon and D. F. Jones, U.S. Patent No. 4,922,470 (1 May 1990); Canadian Patent No. 1,285,646 (2 July 1991)]. Over the years, five barrel-stave designs belonging to three flextensional classes were built and tested at DRDC Atlantic. Three Class I transducers with operating frequencies ranging from 800 to 1600 Hz were integrated into submarine communications buoys, low frequency active horizontal projector arrays, and a broadband sonar towbody. A high-power Class II and broadband (1-7 kHz) Class III transducer were deployed under the ice in the Lincoln Sea for research related to rapidly deployable surveillance systems. These barrel-stave flextensional transducers have also supported a variety of marine mammal studies including vocal mimicry in long-finned pilot whales, coda dialects in sperm whales, and the R&D of acoustic detection and tracking systems for endangered northern right whales. In August 2004 a barrel-stave transducer was used to lure a trapped juvenile humpback whale to the sluice gates of a tidal generating station on the Annapolis River in Nova Scotia by transmitting humpback whale calls underwater. The acoustic performance parameters for all 5 transducers will be presented.

  6. Superior long-term stability of a glucose biosensor based on inserted barrel plating gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Teng; Hsiao, Hung-Chan; Fang, Mei-Yen; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-10-15

    Disposable one shot usage blood glucose strips are routinely used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus and their performance can vary greatly. In this paper we critically evaluated the long-term stability of glucose strips made of barrel plating gold electrodes. Compared to other glucose biosensing platforms of vapor deposited palladium and screen printed carbon electrodes, the proposed glucose biosensor was found to show the best stability among the three biosensing platforms in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C for 6 months with an average bias of 3.4% at glucose concentrations of 5-20 mM. The precision test of this barrel plating gold glucose biosensor also showed the best performance (coefficients of variation in the range of 1.4-2.4%) in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 70 degrees C for 27 days. Error grid analysis revealed that all measurements fell in zone A and zone B. Regression analysis showed no significant difference between the proposed biosensor and the reference method at 99% confidence level. The amperometric glucose biosensor fabricated by inserting two barrel plating gold electrodes onto an injection-molding plastic base followed by immobilizing with a bio-reagent layer and membrane was very impressive with a long-term stability up to 2.5 years at 25 degrees C. Overall, these results indicated that the glucose oxidase/barrel plating gold biosensing platform is ideal for long-term accurate glycemic control.

  7. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Neuronal Response Characteristics in Deep Layers of Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Narjes; Mohammadi, Elham; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a chemical often used as a solvent for water-insoluble drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DMSO on neural response characteristics (in 1200–1500 μm depth) of the rat barrel cortex. Methods: DMSO solution was prepared in 10% v/v concentration and injected into the lateral ventricle of rats. Neuronal spontaneous activity and neuronal responses to deflection of the principal whisker (PW) and adjacent whisker (AW) were recorded in barrel cortex. A condition test ratio (CTR) was used to measure inhibitory receptive fields in barrel cortex. Results: The results showed that both PW and AW evoked ON and OFF responses, neuronal spontaneous activity and inhibitory receptive fields did not change following ICV administration of DMSO. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that acute ICV administration of 10% DMSO did not modulate the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons in the l deep ayers of rat barrel cortex. PMID:27563414

  8. Globally intertwined evolutionary history of giant barrel sponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierts, Thomas; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; de Leeuw, Christiaan A.; Breeuwer, Johannes A. J.; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; de Voogd, Nicole J.

    2017-09-01

    Three species of giant barrel sponge are currently recognized in two distinct geographic regions, the tropical Atlantic and the Indo-Pacific. In this study, we used molecular techniques to study populations of giant barrel sponges across the globe and assessed whether the genetic structure of these populations agreed with current taxonomic consensus or, in contrast, whether there was evidence of cryptic species. Using molecular data, we assessed whether giant barrel sponges in each oceanic realm represented separate monophyletic lineages. Giant barrel sponges from 17 coral reef systems across the globe were sequenced for mitochondrial (partial CO1 and ATP6 genes) and nuclear (ATPsβ intron) DNA markers. In total, we obtained 395 combined sequences of the mitochondrial CO1 and ATP6 markers, which resulted in 17 different haplotypes. We compared a phylogenetic tree constructed from 285 alleles of the nuclear intron ATPsβ to the 17 mitochondrial haplotypes. Congruent patterns between mitochondrial and nuclear gene trees of giant barrel sponges provided evidence for the existence of multiple reproductively isolated species, particularly where they occurred in sympatry. The species complexes in the tropical Atlantic and the Indo-Pacific, however, do not form separate monophyletic lineages. This rules out the scenario that one species of giant barrel sponge developed into separate species complexes following geographic separation and instead suggests that multiple species of giant barrel sponges already existed prior to the physical separation of the Indo-Pacific and tropical Atlantic.

  9. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  10. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-04-28

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand-strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases.

  11. Software development for the P¯ANDA barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Dipanwita; P¯ANDA Cherenkov Group

    2011-05-01

    The charged particle identification in the barrel region of the P¯ANDA detector in the future FAIR facility at GSI is planned with a very thin Cherenkov detector using the DIRC principle. Due to a very compact design of the barrel DIRC with focusing optics, the reconstruction of the Cherenkov angle is quite challenging. In this contribution, the possible reconstruction algorithm of the barrel DIRC will be discussed, with emphasis on the possibility to include the DIRC in the trigger decision and the correction of the chromatic dispersion with fast timing information.

  12. Transmembrane beta-barrel protein structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Arlo; Baldi, Pierre

    Transmembrane β-barrel (TMB) proteins are embedded in the outer membranes of mitochondria, Gram-negative bacteria, and chloroplasts. These proteins perform critical functions, including active ion-transport and passive nutrient intake. Therefore, there is a need for accurate prediction of secondary and tertiary structures of TMB proteins. A variety of methods have been developed for predicting the secondary structure and these predictions are very useful for constructing a coarse topology of TMB structure; however, they do not provide enough information to construct a low-resolution tertiary structure for a TMB protein. In addition, while the overall structural architecture is well conserved among TMB proteins, the amino acid sequences are highly divergent. Thus, traditional homology modeling methods cannot be applied to many putative TMB proteins. Here, we describe the TMBpro: a pipeline of methods for predicting TMB secondary structure, β-residue contacts, and finally tertiary structure. The tertiary prediction method relies on the specific construction rules that TMB proteins adhere to and on the predicted β-residue contacts to dramatically reduce the search space for the model building procedure.

  13. 18. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING SURPLUS GUN BARRELS IN PLACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING SURPLUS GUN BARRELS IN PLACE TO BE USED AS PIPE TUNNELS. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-59-925. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. 16. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING SURPLUS GUN BARREL BEING LOWERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING SURPLUS GUN BARREL BEING LOWERED INTO PLACE FOR USE AS PIPE TUNNEL. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-59-709. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Finite element analysis of the SDC barrel and endcap calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Nasiakta, J.

    1992-03-11

    In designing the SCD barrel and endcap calorimeters, the inter-module connecting forces must be known in order to determine the required size and number of connecting links between modules, and in order to understand how individual modules will be affected by these forces when assembled to form a full barrel and endcap. The connecting forces were found by analyzing three-dimensional Finite Element Models of both the barrel and endcap. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part will describe in detail the results of the barrel analysis and the second part will describe the results obtained from the endcap analysis. A similar approach was used in constructing the models for both analysis.

  16. 49 CFR 178.510 - Standards for wooden barrels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Non... of the barrel. (3) Staves and heads must be sawn or cleft with the grain so that no annual...

  17. Finite element analysis of the SDC barrel and endcap calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Nasiakta, J.

    1992-03-11

    In designing the SCD barrel and endcap calorimeters, the inter-module connecting forces must be known in order to determine the required size and number of connecting links between modules, and in order to understand how individual modules will be affected by these forces when assembled to form a full barrel and endcap. The connecting forces were found by analyzing three-dimensional Finite Element Models of both the barrel and endcap. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part will describe in detail the results of the barrel analysis and the second part will describe the results obtained from the endcap analysis. A similar approach was used in constructing the models for both analysis.

  18. Interior view, barrel vaulted store room opening from the south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, barrel vaulted store room opening from the south side of the ground floors central east-west passage (PA-1622-A-51) looking northeast. - U. S. Naval Asylum, Biddle Hall, Gray's Ferry Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. 8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE STONE WORK, 1920 CONCRETE REPAIRS, AND STEEL BRACES ADDED BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CIRCA 1962. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  20. Barrel view from east end, looking toward swing span. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Barrel view from east end, looking toward swing span. - Pennsylvania & New Jersey Railroad, Delaware River Bridge, Spanning Delaware River, south of Betsy Ross Bridge (State Route 90), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Barrel view at east end of swing span. Pennsylvania ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Barrel view at east end of swing span. - Pennsylvania & New Jersey Railroad, Delaware River Bridge, Spanning Delaware River, south of Betsy Ross Bridge (State Route 90), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Barrel view at east end of verticallift span. Pennsylvania ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Barrel view at east end of vertical-lift span. - Pennsylvania & New Jersey Railroad, Delaware River Bridge, Spanning Delaware River, south of Betsy Ross Bridge (State Route 90), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Allen Auditorium attic looking from southeast corner. Wine barrels with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Allen Auditorium attic looking from southeast corner. Wine barrels with scrap used for counterweight material for lift up walls no longer in use - Sheldon Jackson College, Richard H. Allen Memorial Hall, Lincoln Street, Sitka, Sitka Borough, AK

  4. Staining in firearm barrels after experimental contact shots.

    PubMed

    Schyma, C; Bauer, K; Brünig, J; Courts, C; Madea, B

    2017-04-01

    After contact shots to the head biological traces inside firearm barrels can be found. This study was conducted to simulate and to evaluate such staining. Five current handguns of four inch barrel length in the calibre .22 long rifle, 7.65mm Browning, 9mm Luger and .38 special were used to perform 24 contact shots on silicone coated, gelatine filled box models using the triple contrast method. The staining was documented by endoscopy and swabs gathered from both ends of the barrel were analysed by quantitative PCR. With the exception of the .22 revolver, all firearms showed distinct staining which decreased from the muzzle to the rear end of the barrel. The pattern was varied, showing droplets, elongated forms or stripes. In 14 of 24 shots, staining reached the chamber. The staining results were comparable to real suicide cases.

  5. 1. Exterior, corner, wall, and barrel of cannon used to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Exterior, corner, wall, and barrel of cannon used to protect corner of building from cart wheels. 1960. - Jefferson Barracks, Brick & Stone Powder Magazine, Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis County, MO

  6. 3. BARREL VIEW, LOOKING DOWN LENGTH OF BRIDGE, SHOWING MAKER'S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BARREL VIEW, LOOKING DOWN LENGTH OF BRIDGE, SHOWING MAKER'S PLATE, DECORATIVE SCROLLWORK AND URN FINIALS ON NORTHEAST PORTAL - "Forder" Pratt Through Truss Bridge, Spanning Maumee River at County Route 73, Antwerp, Paulding County, OH

  7. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF BARREL ROOF STRUCTURE, FACING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF BARREL ROOF STRUCTURE, FACING NORTHEAST. - Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Building 13, Harris Avenue at its intersection of Black Avenue and Woodfin Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  8. Neonatal lead exposure impairs development of rodent barrel field cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.; Goldstein, Gary W.; Blue, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    Childhood exposure to low-level lead can permanently reduce intelligence, but the neurobiologic mechanism for this effect is unknown. We examined the impact of lead exposure on the development of cortical columns, using the rodent barrel field as a model. In all areas of mammalian neocortex, cortical columns constitute a fundamental structural unit subserving information processing. Barrel field cortex contains columnar processing units with distinct clusters of layer IV neurons that receive sensory input from individual whiskers. In this study, rat pups were exposed to 0, 0.2, 1, 1.5, or 2 g/liter lead acetate in their dam's drinking water from birth through postnatal day 10. This treatment, which coincides with the development of segregated columns in the barrel field, produced blood lead concentrations from 1 to 31 μg/dl. On postnatal day 10, the area of the barrel field and of individual barrels was measured. A dose-related reduction in barrel field area was observed (Pearson correlation = −0.740; P < 0.001); mean barrel field area in the highest exposure group was decreased 12% versus controls. Individual barrels in the physiologically more active caudoventral group were affected preferentially. Total cortical area measured in the same sections was not altered significantly by lead exposure. These data support the hypothesis that lead exposure may impair the development of columnar processing units in immature neocortex. We demonstrate that low levels of blood lead, in the range seen in many impoverished inner-city children, cause structural alterations in a neocortical somatosensory map. PMID:10805810

  9. Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill expedited response action proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill. The Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Site was used in 1945 for disposal of crushed barrels. The site location is the sole waste site within the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. The Waste Information Data System (WIDS 1992) assumes that the crushed barrels contained 1% residual sodium dichromate at burial time and that only buried crushed barrels are at the site. Burial depth is shallow since visual inspection finds numerous barrel debris on the surface. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the ERA will present a final remediation of the 100-IU-4 operable unit.

  10. Composting barrel for sustainable organic waste management in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, Md Azizul; Bushra, Quazi Sifat; Rahman, M H

    2011-12-01

    To ensure quick and uniform aerobic stabilization of biowaste through domestic composting and to prevent malodorous emissions, two modifications were made to a conventional steel barrel composter by: (1) providing 0.0125 m diameter openings throughout the sides and (2) placing a 0.0254 m diameter perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe in the middle portion of the barrel. The volume of composting waste before modification of the composting barrel was 40% of the original volume and it was 70%, 4 weeks following the modifications. In addition, the nutrients in the compost were found to be in a more suitable range after modification of the composting barrel. The carbon-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of the compost was in the ideal range of 11-15 in the modified composting reactor but it was quite high (24-25) in the conventional barrel. This modified barrel composting plant proved to be an efficient, eco-friendly, cost-effective solution for the management of organic solid waste materials in developing and technologically less sophisticated countries such as Bangladesh.

  11. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood.

  12. Performance of Prototypes for the Barrel Part of the ANDA Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Christoph; Diehl, S.; Dormenev, V.; Drexler, P.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuske, T.; Nazarenko, S.; Novotny, R.; Rosier, P.; Ryazantsev, A.; Wieczorek, P.; Wilms, A.; Zaunick, H.-G.; P¯ANDA Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    The performance of the most recent prototypes of the ANDA barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be compared. The first large scale prototype PROTO60 was designed to test the performance of the improved tapered lead tungstate crystals (PWO-II). The PROTO60 which consists of 6 × 10 crystals was tested at various accelerator facilities over the complete envisaged energy range fulfilling the requirements of the TDR of the ANDA EMC in terms of energy, position and time resolution. To realize the final barrel geometry and to test the final front end electronics, a second prototype PROTO120 has been constructed. It represents a larger section of a barrel slice, containing the most tapered crystals and the close to final components for the ANDA EMC. The performance of both prototypes will be compared with a focus on the analysis procedure including the signal extraction, noise rejection, calibration and the energy resolution. In addition, the influence of the non-uniformity of the crystal on the energy resolution will be discussed.

  13. Health assessment for Byron Barrel, Genesee County, Byron, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD980780670. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-30

    The Byron Barrel and Drum Site is listed on the National Priorities List. Byron Barrel and Drum site contains an abandoned gravel pit and was used as a salvage yard for heavy construction equipment such as graders, bulldozers, cement mixers, and cranes. In 1982 an unidentified individual reported that the site was also used for the disposal of approximately 400 (55-gallon) steel barrels filled with noxious-smelling chemicals. Prior to drum removal, several drums were sampled to characterize the chemical constituents of the wastes. The results of these tests demonstrated that the drums contained organic solvents and degreasing agents including toluene, benzene, xylenes, and methylene chloride. Contamination of on-site ground-water has been confirmed. The amount of soil contamination on site is unknown and should be fully characterized.

  14. Emissions of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from the open burning of household waste in barrels. Report for July--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, C.C.; Lemieux, P.M.; Abbott, J.A.; Aldous, K.M.

    1997-12-31

    The paper discusses emissions of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the open burning of household waste in barrels. Using a waste mixture designed to simulate waste generated by an avid cycler and a non-cycler, the emissions of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, metals, acid gases, and respirable particulates were measured from a 55-gal. (208-L) burn barrel at EPA`s open burning test facility. Total measured PAH emissions ranged from 24 (avid recycler) to 82 mg/kg (non-recycler) of a waste burned. This study provides important data on a potentially significant source of emissions of air toxics.

  15. Lens barrel design of the NIRST IR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Patrice; Leclerc, Mélanie; Châteauneuf, François; Marraco, Hugo

    2009-08-01

    The use of uncooled microbolometer detectors for space infrared (IR) imaging application requires high optical throughput, which leads to very fast optical design (~f/1). This directly translates into stringent requirements for components, assembly and alignment. The Institut National d'Optique (INO) in Quebec City, Canada, designed such a system for the NIRST IR Camera. The instrument is part of the Aquarius/SAC-D satellite, a cooperative mission conducted jointly by NASA and the Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE) of Argentina. Due to the tight volume and mass allocation, the NIRST camera module is an all refractive design. Since the Camera is made of two lens barrels co-registered to cover the same ground area at different wavelength bands, it also adds coregistration alignment constraints. This paper presents the optomechanical solutions and alignment scheme that enabled the successful design and flight qualification. Trade-off study between thermally induced stress and structural stiffness of the lens RTV bond is discussed. Special attention is given to lens subcell alignment integrity under random vibration encountered during launch. Detailed Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is used to check early design assumptions. Test results of the final vibration campaign are also presented.

  16. Compressibility and Heating Effects on Pressure Loss and Cooling of a Baffled Cylinder Barrel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W.; Ellerbrock, Herman H., Jr.

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that, because air is compressible, the pressure-drop requirements for cooling an air-cooled engine will be much greater at high altitudes and high speeds than at sea level and low speeds. Tests were conducted by the NACA to obtain some experimental confirmation of the effect of air compressibility on cooling and pressure loss of a baffled cylinder barrel and to evaluate various methods of analysis. The results reported in the present paper are regarded as preliminary to tests on single-cylinder and multi-cylinder engines. Tests were conducted over a wide range of air flows and density altitudes.

  17. Compressibility and Heating Effects on Pressure Loss and Cooling of a Baffled Cylinder Barrel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1944-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that, because air is compressible, the pressure-drop requirements for cooling an air-cooled engine will be much greater at high altitudes and high speeds than at sea level and low speeds. Tests were conducted by the NACA to obtain some experimental confirmation of the effect of air compressibility on cooling and pressure loss of a baffled cylinder barrel and to evaluate various methods of analysis. The results reported in the present paper are regarded as preliminary to tests on single-cylinder and multicylinder engines. Tests were conducted over a wide range of air flows and density altitudes.

  18. Aroma potential of oak battens prepared from decommissioned oak barrels.

    PubMed

    Li, Sijing; Crump, Anna M; Grbin, Paul R; Cozzolino, Daniel; Warren, Peter; Hayasaka, Yoji; Wilkinson, Kerry L

    2015-04-08

    During barrel maturation, volatile compounds are extracted from oak wood and impart aroma and flavor to wine, enhancing its character and complexity. However, barrels contain a finite pool of extractable material, which diminishes with time. As a consequence, most barrels are decommissioned after 5 or 6 years. This study investigated whether or not decommissioned barrels can be "reclaimed" and utilized as a previously untapped source of quality oak for wine maturation. Oak battens were prepared from staves of decommissioned French and American oak barrels, and their composition analyzed before and after toasting. The oak lactone glycoconjugate content of untoasted reclaimed oak was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, while the concentrations of cis- and trans-oak lactone, guaiacol, 4-methlyguaiacol, vanillin, eugenol, furfural, and 5-methylfurfural present in toasted reclaimed oak were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Aroma potential was then evaluated by comparing the composition of reclaimed oak with that of new oak. Comparable levels of oak lactone glycoconjugates and oak volatiles were observed, demonstrating the aroma potential of reclaimed oak and therefore its suitability as a raw material for alternative oak products, i.e., chips or battens, for the maturation of wine. The temperature profiles achieved during toasting were also measured to evaluate the viability of any yeast or bacteria present in reclaimed oak.

  19. β-Barrel membrane protein assembly by the Bam complex.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Christine L; Silhavy, Thomas J; Kahne, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    β-barrel membrane proteins perform important functions in the outer membranes (OMs) of Gram-negative bacteria and of the mitochondria and chloroplasts of eukaryotes. The protein complexes that assemble these proteins in their respective membranes have been identified and shown to contain a component that has been conserved from bacteria to humans. β-barrel proteins are handled differently from α-helical membrane proteins in the cell in order to efficiently transport them to their final locations in unfolded but folding-competent states. The mechanism by which the assembly complex then binds, folds, and inserts β-barrels into the membrane is not well understood, but recent structural, biochemical, and genetic studies have begun to elucidate elements of how the complex provides a facilitated pathway for β-barrel assembly. Ultimately, studies of the mechanism of β-barrel assembly and comparison to the better-understood process of α-helical membrane protein assembly will reveal whether there are general principles that guide the folding and insertion of all membrane proteins.

  20. Early bilateral sensory deprivation blocks the development of coincident discharge in rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Ayan; Pouget, Pierre; Popescu, Maria; Ebner, Ford

    2009-02-25

    Several theories have proposed a functional role for synchronous neuronal firing in generating the neural code of a sensory perception. Synchronous neural activity develops during a critical postnatal period of cortical maturation, and severely reducing neural activity in a sensory pathway during this period could interfere with the development of coincident discharge among cortical neurons. Loss of such synchrony could provide a fundamental mechanism for the degradation of acuity shown in behavioral studies. We tested the hypothesis that synchronous discharge of barrel cortex neurons would fail to develop after sensory deprivation produced by bilateral whisker trimming from birth to postnatal day 60. By studying the correlated discharge of cortical neuron pairs, we found evidence for strong correlated firing in control animals, and this synchrony was almost absent among pairs of cortical barrel neurons in deprived animals. The degree of synchrony impairment was different in subregions of rat barrel cortex. The model that best fits the data is that cortical neurons receiving direct inputs from the primary sensory (lemniscal) pathway show the greatest decrement in synchrony following sensory deprivation, while neurons with diverse inputs from other areas of thalamus and cortex are relatively less affected in this dimension of cortical function.

  1. Mapping plasticity in the forepaw digit barrel subfield of rat brains using functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jun-Cheng; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Goloshevsky, Artem; Dodd, Stephen J.; Sharer, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    The topographic organization of the forepaw barrel subfield in layer IV of rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is a good model for studying neural function and plasticity. The goal of this study was to test the feasibility of functional MRI (fMRI) to map the forepaw digit representations in the S1 of the rat and its plasticity after digit amputation. Three dimentional echo-planar imaging with 300 micron isotropic resolution at 11.7 T was used to achieve high signal-to-noise ratios and laminar layer resolution. By alternating electrical stimulation of the 2nd (D2) and 4th (D4) digits, functional activation in layer IV of the barrel subfields could be distinguished using a differential analysis. Furthermore, two and a half months after the amputation of the 3rd digit in baby rats, the overlapping area between D2 and D4 representations was increased. This indicates that the forepaw barrel subfield previously associated with the ablated digit is now associated with the representation of nearby digits, which is consistent with studies using electrophysiology and cytochrome oxidase staining. PMID:20804851

  2. Amyloid β-Protein C-Terminal Fragments: Formation of Cylindrins and β-Barrels.

    PubMed

    Do, Thanh D; LaPointe, Nichole E; Nelson, Rebecca; Krotee, Pascal; Hayden, Eric Y; Ulrich, Brittany; Quan, Sarah; Feinstein, Stuart C; Teplow, David B; Eisenberg, David; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2016-01-20

    In order to evaluate potential therapeutic targets for treatment of amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is essential to determine the structures of toxic amyloid oligomers. However, for the amyloid β-protein peptide (Aβ), thought to be the seminal neuropathogenetic agent in AD, its fast aggregation kinetics and the rapid equilibrium dynamics among oligomers of different size pose significant experimental challenges. Here we use ion-mobility mass spectrometry, in combination with electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and computational modeling, to test the hypothesis that Aβ peptides can form oligomeric structures resembling cylindrins and β-barrels. These structures are hypothesized to cause neuronal injury and death through perturbation of plasma membrane integrity. We show that hexamers of C-terminal Aβ fragments, including Aβ(24-34), Aβ(25-35) and Aβ(26-36), have collision cross sections similar to those of cylindrins. We also show that linking two identical fragments head-to-tail using diglycine increases the proportion of cylindrin-sized oligomers. In addition, we find that larger oligomers of these fragments may adopt β-barrel structures and that β-barrels can be formed by folding an out-of-register β-sheet, a common type of structure found in amyloid proteins.

  3. Amyloid β-Protein C-terminal Fragments: Formation of Cylindrins and β-barrels

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh D.; LaPointe, Nichole E.; Nelson, Rebecca; Krotee, Pascal; Hayden, Eric Y.; Ulrich, Brittany; Quan, Sarah; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Teplow, David B.; Eisenberg, David; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate potential therapeutic targets for treatment of amyloidoses such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is essential to determine the structures of toxic amyloid oligomers. However, for the amyloid β-protein peptide (Aβ), thought to be the seminal neuropathogenetic agent in AD, its fast aggregation kinetics and the rapid equilibrium dynamics among oligomers of different size pose significant experimental challenges. Here we use ion-mobility mass spectrometry, in combination with electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and computational modeling, to test the hypothesis that Aβ peptides can form oligomeric structures resembling cylindrins and β-barrels. These structures are hypothesized to cause neuronal injury and death through perturbation of plasma membrane integrity. We show that hexamers of C-terminal Aβ fragments, including Aβ(24-34), Aβ(25-35) and Aβ(26-36), have collision cross-sections similar to those of cylindrins. We also show that linking two identical fragments head-to-tail using di-glycine increases the proportion of cylindrin-sized oligomers. In addition, we find that larger oligomers of these fragments may adopt β-barrel structures and that β-barrels can be formed by folding an out-of-register β-sheet, a common type of structure found in amyloid proteins. PMID:26700445

  4. Small arms mini-fire control system: fiber-optic barrel deflection sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally the methods to increase firearms accuracy, particularly at distance, have concentrated on barrel isolation (free floating) and substantial barrel wall thickening to gain rigidity. This barrel stiffening technique did not completely eliminate barrel movement but the problem was significantly reduced to allow a noticeable accuracy enhancement. This process, although highly successful, came at a very high weight penalty. Obviously the goal would be to lighten the barrel (firearm), yet achieve even greater accuracy. Thus, if lightweight barrels could ultimately be compensated for both their static and dynamic mechanical perturbations, the result would be very accurate, yet significantly lighter weight, weapons. We discuss our development of a barrel reference sensor system that is designed to accomplish this ambitious goal. Our optical fiber-based sensor monitors the barrel muzzle position and autonomously compensates for any induced perturbations. The reticle is electronically adjusted in position to compensate for the induced barrel deviation in real time.

  5. Small arms mini-fire control system: fiber-optic barrel deflection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajic, S.; Datskos, P.; Lawrence, W.; Marlar, T.; Quinton, B.

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally the methods to increase firearms accuracy, particularly at distance, have concentrated on barrel isolation (free floating) and substantial barrel wall thickening to gain rigidity. This barrel stiffening technique did not completely eliminate barrel movement but the problem was significantly reduced to allow a noticeable accuracy enhancement. This process, although highly successful, came at a very high weight penalty. Obviously the goal would be to lighten the barrel (firearm), yet achieve even greater accuracy. Thus, if lightweight barrels could ultimately be compensated for both their static and dynamic mechanical perturbations, the result would be very accurate, yet significantly lighter weight, weapons. We discuss our development of a barrel reference sensor system that is designed to accomplish this ambitious goal. Our optical fiber-based sensor monitors the barrel muzzle position and autonomously compensates for any induced perturbations. The reticle is electronically adjusted in position to compensate for the induced barrel deviation in real time.

  6. [Barrel finishing of cobalt-chromium alloy cast plate--basic study on polishing materials and time].

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Tetsuo; Furusawa, Masanori; Shimazaki, Masato; Nakayama, Kimito; Waguri, Noriyuki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Seino, Kazuo

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to establish the optimum grinding condition of barrel finishing for cobalt-chromium alloy. Smoothing of the mucosal surface, reduction of labor, and improvement of the working environment were estimated by the application of barrel finishing to cobalt-chromium alloy. Tabular test pieces cast in cobalt-chromium alloy whose surface was standardized by waterproof abrasive papers were used in this study with a centrifugal flow barrel finishing machine. The abrasive that was most suitable for the primary polishing was selected, and proper polishing time was then decided by measuring the surface roughness of the test pieces. The abrasive and polishing time for the secondary polishing were decided in the same manner. Finally, the surface texture of the test pieces, which were finished in this condition by the manufacturer's instruction or by the electrolytic polishing method, were compared. Statistic analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance and the multiple comparison test. A triangular prism-shape abrasive made of Al(2)O(3) and SiO(2) whose one side or height was 6 mm was selected for the primary polishing, and the same kind of abrasive with one side or height of 4 mm was chosen for the secondary one. The optimum polishing time for the primary polishing and the secondary polishing were 60 minutes and 40 minutes, respectively. The surface roughness of the test pieces that were finished in this condition was significantly smaller than that finished following the manufacturer's indication or that finished by the electrolytic polishing method. The optimum polishing condition of barrel finishing for cobalt-chromium alloy was established in this study. For the polished surface of cast dentures, polishing by a rotary cutting instrument after barrel finishing in this condition would be needed, as no luster was observed on the finished surface.

  7. The impact of acceleration on barrel/launch package design

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A. ); Hauze, G. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of launch acceleration on the design of electromagnetic launcher barrels and on the design of associated launch packages. This is of particular interest because launch package size and mass directly affect the overall armament system size and mass. A common design approach is to use as the peak launch acceleration, the maximum acceleration which the projectile can be designed to withstand. While this approach will minimize barrel length, it may also yield an excessively large overall system size and mass, especially for the long, slender projectile configurations which are desired for high aero-thermal and terminal ballistics performance. An alternate design approach is described which balances the goals of reducing barrel length with reducing launch package mass. Results illustrate the benefits of this balanced design approach on overall armament system size and mass.

  8. A monodisperse transmembrane α-helical peptide barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Niitsu, Ai; Kong, Lingbing; Thomson, Andrew R.; Sessions, Richard B.; Woolfson, Derek N.; Bayley, Hagan

    2017-05-01

    The fabrication of monodisperse transmembrane barrels formed from short synthetic peptides has not been demonstrated previously. This is in part because of the complexity of the interactions between peptides and lipids within the hydrophobic environment of a membrane. Here we report the formation of a transmembrane pore through the self-assembly of 35 amino acid α-helical peptides. The design of the peptides is based on the C-terminal D4 domain of the Escherichia coli polysaccharide transporter Wza. By using single-channel current recording, we define discrete assembly intermediates and show that the pore is most probably a helix barrel that contains eight D4 peptides arranged in parallel. We also show that the peptide pore is functional and capable of conducting ions and binding blockers. Such α-helix barrels engineered from peptides could find applications in nanopore technologies such as single-molecule sensing and nucleic-acid sequencing.

  9. Simultaneous visualization of cortical barrels and horseradish peroxidase-injected layer 5b vibrissa neurones in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, M

    1992-01-01

    1. Using diaminobenzidine (DAB) as a chromagen, horseradish peroxidase-injected neurones and cytochrome oxidase-stained barrels were visualized simultaneously in the rat vibrissa cortex. Neurones were initially tested during extracellular recording for responses to whisker deflections. This was followed by intracellular injection of the soma with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and histological processing to visualize the HRP-stained neurone in an incubation solution which contained, in addition to DAB, cytochrome C for cytochrome oxidase (CO) reaction of the barrels. 2. Recording and intracellular staining were made in layer 5b under urethane anaesthesia. CO-stained barrels were observed in layer 4. Physiologically and morphologically characterized neurones were mostly large pyramidal neurones that responded to more than one whisker and displayed transient-type responses. 3. In tangential sections, the apical dendrite of the HRP-filled neurone was followed from the soma level upward as it ascended through the barrelfield in layer 4. The cross-section of the apical dendrite was found in the periphery of the CO-stained barrel. Using the apical dendrite as a guide, the basal dendritic field of the layer 5b pyramidal neurone was aligned on the pattern of layer 4 barrels. The soma was seen to project basal dendrites in all directions, involving one or two neighbouring barrels/columns. 4. In sixteen neurones examined in tangential sections, a complete spatial tuning map constructed by measuring sensitivity of the neurone to different whiskers could be compared to the basal dendritic field in relation to the pattern of overlying layer 4 barrels. The mean receptive field size in terms of the number of effective whiskers was 5.8 whereas the mean dendritic field size in terms of the number of barrels/columns involved was 2.2. In addition to the well-documented role of intracortical connectivity in elaboration of multi-whisker receptor fields in the cortical neurones, the role

  10. Railgun barrel and secondary armature characterization using voltage monitor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, Hugh A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    1992-01-01

    Although breech and muzzle voltage monitors are common on most railgun experiments, voltage monitors located at intermediate positions along the rails usually are not present. These monitors, combined with other common measurements such as armature position and velocity, can provide a wealth of valuable information for characterizing the railgun barrel and the armature. Expressions for calculating the barrel inductance gradient, and the resistance gradient, are developed. When the plasma armature develops a secondary arc, the voltage monitor array can provide information about the secondary arc voltage, current, and rate of change of current.

  11. Cross-Barrel Temperature Difference Due to Wall Thickness Variation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    atmosphere. F Is the radiation interchange factor between the barrel outer wall and the environment (in our case, we assume F = 0.95), and a is the Stefan ...barrel metal [kg/mrJ o Stefan -Boltzmann constant = 5.669 x 10-8 J/(m2 s K4) * azimuthal coordinate In transverse plane azimuthal coordinate in...Pomey SMCAR-CCB-DS, P. Votlis Fort Knox, KY 40121-5212 SMCAR-CCB-DS, C. Andrade SMCAR-LBD-D, J. Zweig 1 Paul Gough Associates, Inc. SMCAR-CCB, L

  12. Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from the open burning of household waste in barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, P.M.; Lutes, C.C.; Abbott, J.A.; Aldous, K.M.

    2000-02-01

    Backyard burning of household waste in barrels is a common waste disposal practice for which pollutant emissions have not been well characterized. This study measured the emissions of several pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), from burning mixtures designed to simulate waste generated by a recycling and a nonrecycling family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. This paper focuses on the PCDD/PCDF emissions and discusses the factors influencing PCDD/PCDF formation for different test burns. Four test burns were made in which the amount of waste placed in the barrel varied from 6.4 to 13.6 kg and the amount actually burned varied from 46.6% to 68.1%. Emissions of total PCDDs/PCDFs ranged between 0.0046 and 0.48 mg/kg of waste burned. Emissions are also presented in terms of 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents. Emissions of PCDDs/PCDFs appear to correlate with both copper and hydrochloric acid emissions. The results of this study indicate that backyard burning emits more PCDDs/PCDFs on a mass of refuse burned basis than various types of municipal waste combustors (MWCs). Comparison of burn barrel emissions to emissions from a hypothetical modern MWC equipped with high-efficiency flue gas cleaning technology indicates that about 2--40 households burning their trash daily in barrels can produce average PCDD/PCDF emissions comparable to a 182,000 kg/day (200 ton/day) MWC facility. This study provides important data on a potentially significant source of emissions of PCDDs/PCDFs.

  13. Centrifugal Barrel Finishing Of Turbine-Blade "Fir Trees"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Modified centrifugal barrel-finishing machine imparts desired residual compressive stresses to "fir trees" of turbine blades. Centrifugal forces generate compressive stresses, which are transmitted to turbine blades through abrasive slurries in which suspended. Eliminates need for shot peening, rounding of edges and burrs caused by shot peening and, consequently, need for mass finishing operations to remove burrs. Improves surface finish of "fir trees".

  14. Centrifugal Barrel Finishing Of Turbine-Blade "Fir Trees"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Modified centrifugal barrel-finishing machine imparts desired residual compressive stresses to "fir trees" of turbine blades. Centrifugal forces generate compressive stresses, which are transmitted to turbine blades through abrasive slurries in which suspended. Eliminates need for shot peening, rounding of edges and burrs caused by shot peening and, consequently, need for mass finishing operations to remove burrs. Improves surface finish of "fir trees".

  15. Modulation of artificial whisking related signals in barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bezdudnaya, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Rats use rhythmic whisker movements, called active whisking, to sense the environment, which include whisker protractions followed by retractions at various frequencies. Using a proxy of active whisking in anesthetized rats, called artificial whisking, which is induced by electrically stimulating the facial motor nerve, we characterized the neural responses evoked in the barrel cortex by whisking in air (without contact) and on a surface (with contact). Neural responses were compared between distinct network states consisting of cortical deactivation (synchronized slow oscillations) and activation (desynchronized state) produced by neuromodulation (cholinergic or noradrenergic stimulation in neocortex or thalamus). Here we show that population responses in the barrel cortex consist of a robust signal driven by the onset of the whisker protraction followed by a whisking retraction signal that emerges during low frequency whisking on a surface. The whisking movement onset signal is suppressed by increasing whisking frequency, is controlled by cortical synaptic inhibition, is suppressed during cortical activation states, is little affected by whisking on a surface, and is ubiquitous in ventroposterior medial (VPM) thalamus, barrel cortex, and superior colliculus. The whisking retraction signal codes the duration of the preceding whisker protraction, is present in thalamocortical networks but not in superior colliculus, and is robust during cortical activation; a state associated with natural exploratory whisking. The expression of different whisking signals in forebrain and midbrain may define the sensory processing abilities of those sensorimotor circuits. Whisking related signals in the barrel cortex are controlled by network states that are set by neuromodulators. PMID:25505118

  16. 27 CFR 25.144 - Rebranding barrels and kegs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Marks, Brands, and Labels § 25.144 Rebranding barrels and... permanently remove or durably cover the original marks and brands after notifying the appropriate TTB officer... the original marks and brands if the brewer: (1) Adopts a trade name substantially identical to the...

  17. New results in meson spectroscopy from the crystal barrel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, C.A.

    1994-04-01

    Recent observations by the Crystal Barrel experiment of two scalar resonances, f{sub o}(1365) and a{sub o}(1450) have allowed the authors to clarify the members of the scalar nonet. In addition, a third scalar, f{sub o}(1500), appears to be supernumerary, and is a candidate for the scalar glueball expected near 1500 MeV.

  18. 9. Generator Barrel and Rotor of Unit 1, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Generator Barrel and Rotor of Unit 1, view to the southeast, showing part of the rotor and generator coils along top of photograph and southeast entry stairwell and doors in lower center of photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  19. 14. Interior view, grain tanks (bins). Barrel view of tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view, grain tanks (bins). Barrel view of tunnel for load-out belt conveyor system located below tanks. Square, numbered spouts gravity-feed grain from overhead bins onto belt. - Saint Anthony Elevator No. 3, 620 Malcom Avenue, Southeast, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  20. 4. AERIAL 'BARREL' SHOT OF THE PATH TRANSIT SYSTEM BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL 'BARREL' SHOT OF THE PATH TRANSIT SYSTEM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARDS JERSEY CITY. TO THE RIGHT ARE THE NEWARK TURNPIKE AND THE CONRAIL BRIDGE (HAER No. NJ-43). THE PULASKI SKYWAY (HAER No. NJ-34) IS IN THE BACKGROUND TO THE RIGHT - Path Transit System Bridge, Spanning Hackensack River, Kearny, Hudson County, NJ

  1. 13. Interior view, grain tanks (bins). Barrel view of overhead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Interior view, grain tanks (bins). Barrel view of overhead (fill) conveyor gallery bridge extending through tops of tanks just below roofs. Grain tripper straddles belt conveyor at mid-view. - Saint Anthony Elevator No. 3, 620 Malcom Avenue, Southeast, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  2. 1. INTERIOR VIEW WITH NAVE, BARREL VAULTED SOLEA, ICONOSTAS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. INTERIOR VIEW WITH NAVE, BARREL VAULTED SOLEA, ICONOSTAS WITH ICON AND SANCTUARY. IN ARCH ABOVE THE SANCTUARY IS THE TABLE OF ABRAHAM. THE ICONOSTAS INCLUDES ICONS OF THE ARCHANGEL MICHAEL, THE HOLY TRINITY, MOTHER OF GOD HOLDING THE CHRIST CHILD, JESUS. - Holy Trinity-Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Church, 200 Nineteenth Street South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. 8. Generator Barrel and Shaft of Unit 1, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Generator Barrel and Shaft of Unit 1, view to the northwest, with turbine shaft and thrust bearing visible in upper center of photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  4. [Death after explosion of an "empty" acetone barrel].

    PubMed

    Preuss-Wössner, Johanna; Gerling, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate disposal of (hazardous) waste material led to an explosion of an acetone-air mixture in a metal barrel. The lid was blown off and caused blunt traumatization with fatal exsanguination. The case furnishes information relevant for the practical teaching of forensic knowledge and the indicated consultation of medico-legal experts already at scene.

  5. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL AT CENTER FOREGROUND, BULLION FURNACE IN LARGE HOOD BEHIND IT, AND GOLD RETORT IN BACKGROUND HOOD. NOTE OVERHEAD MONORAIL FOR MATERIALS HANDLING. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  6. Barrelettes without barrels in the American water shrew.

    PubMed

    Catania, Kenneth C; Catania, Elizabeth H; Sawyer, Eva K; Leitch, Duncan B

    2013-01-01

    Water shrews (Sorex palustris) depend heavily on their elaborate whiskers to navigate their environment and locate prey. They have small eyes and ears with correspondingly small optic and auditory nerves. Previous investigations have shown that water shrew neocortex is dominated by large representations of the whiskers in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 and S2). Flattened sections of juvenile cortex processed for cytochrome oxidase revealed clear borders of the whisker pad representation in S1, but no cortical barrels. We were therefore surprised to discover prominent barrelettes in brainstem of juvenile water shrews in the present investigation. These distinctive modules were found in the principal trigeminal nucleus (PrV), and in two of the three spinal trigeminal subnuclei (interpolaris--SpVi and caudalis--SpVc). Analysis of the shrew's whisker pad revealed the likely relationship between whiskers and barrelettes. Barrelettes persisted in adult water shrew PrV, but barrels were also absent from adult cortex. Thus in contrast to mice and rats, which have obvious barrels in primary somatosensory cortex and less clear barrelettes in the principal nucleus, water shrews have clear barrelettes in the brainstem and no barrels in the neocortex. These results highlight the diverse ways that similar mechanoreceptors can be represented in the central nervous systems of different species.

  7. A summary of the BARREL campaigns: Technique for studying electron precipitation.

    PubMed

    Woodger, L A; Halford, A J; Millan, R M; McCarthy, M P; Smith, D M; Bowers, G S; Sample, J G; Anderson, B R; Liang, X

    2015-06-01

    BARREL observed electron precipitation over wide range of energy and timescalesPrecipitating electron distribution is determined using spectroscopy for 19 January 2013 eventBARREL timing data has accuracy within sampling interval of 0.05 s.

  8. 15 CFR 241.6 - Classes of barrels for tolerance application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STANDARDS FOR BARRELS BARRELS FOR... other dry commodities other than cranberries, are hereby divided into two classes as follows: (a) Class... (b) Class 2 shall include all barrels at least one dimension of which is in error by more than the...

  9. Preliminary analysis of cross beam data from the Gun Barrel Hill site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.; Bice, A. R.; Cliff, W. C.; Hablutzel, B. C.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary evaluation of cross beam data taken at the Gun Barrell Hill test site of ESSA is presented. The evaluation is made using the analog Princeton Time Correlator. A study of the frequency band width limitations of the Princeton Time Correlator is made. Based on the band width limitations, it is possible to demonstrate that nearly identical correlation is obtained for frequencies from .01 to 3.9 hertz. Difficulty is encountered in that maximums in the correlation curves do not occur at zero time lag for zero beam separations.

  10. Resilience to Disturbance Despite Limited Dispersal and Self-Recruitment in Tropical Barrel Sponges: Implications for Conservation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bell, James J.; Smith, David; Hannan, Danielle; Haris, Abdul; Jompa, Jamaludin; Thomas, Luke

    2014-01-01

    While estimates of connectivity are important for effective management, few such estimates are available for reef invertebrates other than for corals. Barrel sponges are one of the largest and most conspicuous members of the coral reef fauna across the Indo-Pacific and given their large size, longevity and ability to process large volumes of water, they have a major role in reef functioning. Here we used a panel of microsatellite markers to characterise the genetic structure of two barrel sponge species, Xestospongia testudinaria and a currently undescribed Xestospongia species. We sampled across seven populations in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, SE Sulawesi (Indonesia) spanning a spatial scale of approximately 2 to 70 km, and present the first estimates of demographic connectivity for coral reef sponges. Genetic analyses showed high levels of genetic differentiation between all populations for both species, but contrasting patterns of genetic structuring for the two species. Autocorrelation analyses showed the likely dispersal distances of both species to be in the order of 60 and 140 m for Xestopongia sp. and Xestospongia testudinaria, respectively, which was supported by assignment tests that showed high levels of self-recruitment (>80%). We also found consistently high inbreeding coefficients across all populations for both species. Our study highlights the potential susceptibility of barrel sponges to environmental perturbations because they are generally long-lived, slow growing, have small population sizes and are likely to be reliant on self-recruitment. Surprisingly, despite these features we actually found the highest abundance of both barrel sponge species (although they were generally smaller) at a site that has been severely impacted by humans over the last fifty years. This suggests that barrel sponges exhibit environmental adaptation to declining environmental quality and has important implications for the management and conservation of these

  11. The design and performance of a twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John A.

    1994-05-01

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have lead to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in- situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extrusively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius.

  12. Subscale and Full-Scale Testing of Buckling-Critical Launch Vehicle Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Haynie, Waddy T.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Roberts, Michael G.; Norris, Jeffery P.; Waters, W. Allen; Herring, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    New analysis-based shell buckling design factors (aka knockdown factors), along with associated design and analysis technologies, are being developed by NASA for the design of launch vehicle structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s launch vehicle development and performance risks by reducing the reliance on testing, providing high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. However, in order to validate any new analysis-based design data or methods, a series of carefully designed and executed structural tests are required at both the subscale and full-scale level. This paper describes recent buckling test efforts at NASA on two different orthogrid-stiffened metallic cylindrical shell test articles. One of the test articles was an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened cylinder and was subjected to an axial compression load. The second test article was a 27.5-ft-diameter Space Shuttle External Tank-derived cylinder and was subjected to combined internal pressure and axial compression.

  13. Concepts for Fieldable Electromagnetic Gun Barrels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-26

    Range at the University of Texas at Austin," IEEE Transactions of Magnetics, Vol 25 , No. 1, 653-661, January 1989 7. M. Holland et al , "Advanced Railgun... Glidcop , an oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloy produced by powder metallurgy, with fine alumina particles in the copper matrix. The insulators...Technology Development," IEEE Transactions of Magnetics, Vol 35, No. 1, 473-478, January 1999 2. K. G. Cook et al , "Subscale Rotor Spin Testing for

  14. Membrane potential correlates of sensory perception in mouse barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Sreenivasan, Varun; Kyriakatos, Alexandros; Kremer, Yves; Petersen, Carl C H

    2013-11-01

    Neocortical activity can evoke sensory percepts, but the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We trained mice to detect single brief whisker stimuli and report perceived stimuli by licking to obtain a reward. Pharmacological inactivation and optogenetic stimulation demonstrated a causal role for the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Whole-cell recordings from barrel cortex neurons revealed membrane potential correlates of sensory perception. Sensory responses depended strongly on prestimulus cortical state, but both slow-wave and desynchronized cortical states were compatible with task performance. Whisker deflection evoked an early (<50 ms) reliable sensory response that was encoded through cell-specific reversal potentials. A secondary late (50-400 ms) depolarization was enhanced on hit trials compared to misses. Optogenetic inactivation revealed a causal role for late excitation. Our data reveal dynamic processing in the sensory cortex during task performance, with an early sensory response reliably encoding the stimulus and later secondary activity contributing to driving the subjective percept.

  15. Simulation and reconstruction of the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Go¨tzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Fo¨hl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kro¨ck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Hadronic particle identification (PID) in the barrel region of the PANDA experiment at the new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR) at GSI, Darmstadt will be provided by a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) counter. To optimize the performance and reduce the detector cost, detailed simulations of different design elements, such as the width of the radiators, the shape of the expansion volume, and the type of focusing system, were performed using Geant. Custom reconstruction algorithms were developed to match the detector geometry. We will discuss the single photon resolution and photon yield as well as the PID performance for the Barrel DIRC baseline design and several detector design options.

  16. Barrel cortex membrane potential dynamics in social touch.

    PubMed

    Lenschow, Constanze; Brecht, Michael

    2015-02-18

    The impact of social stimuli on the membrane potential dynamics of barrel cortex neurons is unknown. We obtained in vivo whole-cell recordings in the barrel cortex of head-restrained rats while they interacted with conspecifics. Social touch was associated with a depolarization and large membrane potential fluctuations locked to the rat's whisking. Both depolarization and membrane potential fluctuations were already observed prior to contact and did not occur during free whisking. This anticipatory pre-contact depolarization was not seen in passive social touch in anesthetized animals. The membrane potential fluctuations locked to the rat's whisking observed in interactions with awake conspecifics were larger than those seen for whisking onto nonconspecific stimuli (stuffed rats, objects, and the experimenter's hand). Responses did not correlate with whisker movement parameters. We conclude that responses to social touch differ from conventional tactile responses in (1) amplitude, (2) locking to whisking, and (3) pre-contact membrane potential changes.

  17. The bar PANDA Barrel-TOF Detector at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, S.; Suzuki, K.; Steinschaden, D.; Chirita, M.; Ahmed, G.; Dutta, K.; Kalita, K.; Lehmann, A.; Böhm, M.; Schwarz, K.; Orth, H.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.

    2017-08-01

    The barrel-Time-of-Flight subdetector is one of the outer layers of the multi-layer design of the \\panda target spectrometer. It is designed with a minimal material budget in mind mainly consisting of 90×30×5 mm3 thin plastic scintillator tiles read out on each end by a serial connection of 4 SiPMs. 120 such tiles are placed on 16 2460 × 180 mm2 PCB boards forming a barrel covering an azimuthal angle from 22.5o to 150o. The detector is designed to achieve a time resolution below σ< 100 ps which allows to distinguish events in the constant stream of hits, as well as particle identification below the Cherenkov threshold via the time-of-flight; simultaneously providing the interaction times of events. The current prototype achieved a time resolution of ~54 ps, well below the design goal.

  18. Triple-barrel aorta: dissection of a healed aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lie, J T

    1982-08-01

    An unusual case of a triple-barrel aorta in a 51-year-old woman is described. The patient first had a spontaneous type I dissection of the aorta and acute aortic insufficiency, for which she underwent aortic valve replacement and Dacron graft replacement of the ascending aorta. She remained asymptomatic for five years with a healed aortic dissection (double-barrel aorta) distal to the graft. She then underwent a second operation for repair and poppet replacement of the malfunctioned prosthesis. Postoperative cardiac failure necessitated the use of a counterpulsation intra-aortic balloon catheter, which entered and dissected the wall of the false lumen, thus creating a triple-lumen aorta.

  19. Upgrade of the CMS muon trigger system in the barrel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabady, Dinyar; Ero, Janos; Flouris, Giannis; Fulcher, Jonathan; Loukas, Nikitas; Paradas, Evangelos; Reis, Thomas; Sakulin, Hannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    To maintain the excellent performance shown during the LHC's Run-1 the Level-1 Trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment underwent a significant upgrade. One part of this upgrade is the re-organization of the muon trigger path from a subsystem-centric view in which hits in the drift tubes (DT), the cathode strip chambers (CSC), and the resistive plate chambers (RPC) were treated separately in dedicated track-finding systems to one in which complementary detector systems for a given region (barrel, overlap, and endcap) are merged at the track-finding level. This fundamental restructuring of the muon trigger system required the development of a system to receive track candidates from the track-finding layer, remove potential duplicate tracks, and forward the best candidates to the global decision layer. An overview will be given of the new track-finder system for the barrel region, the Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF), as well as the cancel-out and sorting layer: the upgraded Global Muon Trigger (μGMT). Both the BMTF and μGMT have been implemented in a Xilinx Virtex-7 card utilizing the microTCA architecture. While the BMTF improves on the proven and well-tested algorithms used in the Drift Tube Track Finder during Run-1, the μGMT is an almost complete re-development due to the re-organization of the underlying systems from track-finders for a specific detector to regional track finders covering a given area of the whole detector. Additionally the μGMT calculates a muon's isolation using energy information received from the calorimeter trigger. This information is added to the muon objects forwarded to the global decision layer, the so-called Global Trigger.

  20. [Easily closed gun-barrel enterostomy. A new technique].

    PubMed

    Belliard, R; Saric, J; Dost, C; Vergne, P; Perissat, J

    1982-05-15

    The availability of continuous low rate enteral and parenteral feeding has enlarged the indications of enterostomy, notably in patients with multiple operations. However, closing an enterostomy, which may be high up in the small bowel, rises technical problems and is not always without risk. In this study a new technique of gun-barrel enterostomy easily closed with automatic sutures and without reopening of the abdominal wall is presented.

  1. Rotary combustor barrel with water-cooled baffles

    SciTech Connect

    Jurusz, M.T.

    1988-04-05

    A combustion barrel in a rotary combustor used for burning solid material is described. The rotary combustor is connected to heat exchanging equipment. The combustion barrel comprises: a generally cylindrical side wall rotatable about a central axis of rotation and having an input end and an exit end, baffle pipes, attached to the interior of the generally cylindrical side wall, extending longitudinally with adjacent baffle pipes separated by a second spacing distance more than twice as large as the first spacing distance, and having first and second pipe ends at the exit and input ends, respectively of the side wall, for agitating the solid material as the combustion barrel is rotated; a ring header, having a generally annular shape, coupled to the heat exchanging equipment, for supplying coolant to, and discharging coolant from, the cooling pipes and the baffle pipes; coupling means for coupling and sealing the first pipe ends of the cooling and baffle pipes to the ring header, supplying coolant to a first set of pipes selected from among the cooling pipes and the baffle pipes and discharging coolant from a second set of pipes corresponding to the remaining ones of the the cooling pipes and the baffle pipes; and return means for returning the coolant from the second ends of the cooling and baffle pipes in the first set of pipes to the ring header via the second set of pipes.

  2. Intrinsic mechanisms for adaptive gain rescaling in barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Quesada, Marta; Maravall, Miguel

    2008-01-16

    Barrel cortex neuronal responses adapt to changes in the statistics of complex whisker stimuli. This form of adaptation involves an adjustment in the input-output tuning functions of the neurons, such that their gain rescales depending on the range of the current stimulus distribution. Similar phenomena have been observed in other sensory systems, suggesting that adaptive adjustment of responses to ongoing stimulus statistics is an important principle of sensory function. In other systems, adaptation and gain rescaling can depend on intrinsic properties; however, in barrel cortex, whether intrinsic mechanisms can contribute to adaptation to stimulus statistics is unknown. To examine this, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal cells in acute slices while injecting stochastic current stimuli. We induced changes in statistical context by switching across stimulus distributions. The firing rates of neurons adapted in response to changes in stimulus statistics. Adaptation depended on the form of the changes in stimulus distribution: in vivo-like adaptation occurred only for rectified stimuli that maintained neurons in a persistent state of net depolarization. Under these conditions, neurons rescaled the gain of their input-output functions according to the scale of the stimulus distribution, as observed in vivo. This stimulus-specific adaptation was caused by intrinsic properties and correlated strongly with the amplitude of calcium-dependent slow afterhyperpolarizations. Our results suggest that widely expressed intrinsic mechanisms participate in barrel cortex adaptation but that their recruitment is highly stimulus specific.

  3. Development and Critical Period Plasticity of the Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumlu, Reha S.; Gaspar, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    In primary sensory neocortical areas of the mammals, the distribution of sensory receptors is mapped with topographic precision and amplification in proportion to the peripheral receptor density. The visual, somatosensory and auditory cortical maps are established during a critical period in development. Throughout this window in time, the developing cortical maps are vulnerable to deleterious effects of sense organ damage or sensory deprivation. The rodent barrel cortex offers an invaluable model system to investigate mechanisms underlying the formation of topographic maps and their plasticity during development. Five rows of mystacial vibrissa (whisker) follicles on the snout and an array of sinus hairs are represented by layer IV neural modules (“barrels”) and thalamocortical axon terminals in the primary somatosensory cortex. Perinatal damage to the whiskers or the sensory nerve innervating them irreversibly alters the structural organization of the barrels. Earlier studies emphasized the role of sensory periphery in dictating whisker-specific brain maps and patterns. Recent advances in molecular genetics and analyses of genetically altered mice allow new insights into neural pattern formation in the neocortex and the mechanisms underlying critical period plasticity. Here we review the development and patterning of the barrel cortex and the critical period plasticity. PMID:22607000

  4. The representation of social facial touch in rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, Evgeny; Wolfe, Jason; Rao, Rajnish P; Brecht, Michael

    2014-01-06

    Controlled presentation of stimuli to anesthetized [1] or awake [2] animals suggested that neurons in sensory cortices respond to elementary features [3, 4], but we know little about neuronal responses evoked by social interactions. Here we investigate processing in the barrel cortex of rats engaging in social facial touch [5, 6]. Sensory stimulation by conspecifics differs from classic whisker stimuli such as deflections, contact poles [7, 8], or textures [9, 10]. A large fraction of barrel cortex neurons responded to facial touch. Social touch responses peaked when animals aligned their faces and contacted each other by multiple whiskers with small, irregular whisker movements. Object touch was associated with larger, more regular whisker movements, and object responses were weaker than social responses. Whisker trimming abolished responses. During social touch, neurons in males increased their firing on average by 44%, while neurons in females increased their firing by only 19%. In females, socially evoked and ongoing firing rates were more than 1.5-fold higher in nonestrus than in estrus. Barrel cortex represented socially different contacts by distinct firing rates, and the variation of activity with sex and sexual status could contribute to the generation of gender-specific neural constructs of conspecifics.

  5. Rapid, learning-induced inhibitory synaptogenesis in murine barrel field

    PubMed Central

    Jasinska, M.; Siucinska, E.; Cybulska-Klosowicz, A.; Pyza, E.; Furness, D.N.; Kossut, M.; Glazewski, S.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of neurones changes during development and in response to injury or alteration in sensory experience. Changes occur in the number, shape and dimensions of dendritic spines together with their synapses. However, precise data on these changes in response to learning are sparse. Here, we show using quantitative transmission electron microscopy that a simple form of learning involving mystacial vibrissae results in about 70% increase in the density of inhibitory synapses on spines of neurones located in layer IV barrels that represent the stimulated vibrissae. The spines contain one asymmetrical (excitatory) and one symmetrical (inhibitory) synapse (double-synapse spines) and their density increases 3-fold due to learning with no apparent change in the density of asymmetrical synapses. This effect seems to be specific for learning as pseudoconditioning (where the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are delivered at random) does not lead to the enhancement of symmetrical synapses, but instead results in an up-regulation of asymmetrical synapses on spines. Symmetrical synapses of cells located in barrels receiving the conditioned stimulus show also a greater concentration of γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) in their presynaptic terminals. These results indicate that the immediate effect of classical conditioning in the ‘conditioned’ barrels is rapid, pronounced and inhibitory. PMID:20089926

  6. Neural coding in barrel cortex during whisker-guided locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Sofroniew, Nicholas James; Vlasov, Yurii A; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Freeman, Jeremy; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Animals seek out relevant information by moving through a dynamic world, but sensory systems are usually studied under highly constrained and passive conditions that may not probe important dimensions of the neural code. Here, we explored neural coding in the barrel cortex of head-fixed mice that tracked walls with their whiskers in tactile virtual reality. Optogenetic manipulations revealed that barrel cortex plays a role in wall-tracking. Closed-loop optogenetic control of layer 4 neurons can substitute for whisker-object contact to guide behavior resembling wall tracking. We measured neural activity using two-photon calcium imaging and extracellular recordings. Neurons were tuned to the distance between the animal snout and the contralateral wall, with monotonic, unimodal, and multimodal tuning curves. This rich representation of object location in the barrel cortex could not be predicted based on simple stimulus-response relationships involving individual whiskers and likely emerges within cortical circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12559.001 PMID:26701910

  7. Cellular organization of cortical barrel columns is whisker-specific.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Hanno S; Egger, Robert; Guest, Jason M; Foerster, Rita; Reissl, Stefan; Oberlaender, Marcel

    2013-11-19

    The cellular organization of the cortex is of fundamental importance for elucidating the structural principles that underlie its functions. It has been suggested that reconstructing the structure and synaptic wiring of the elementary functional building block of mammalian cortices, the cortical column, might suffice to reverse engineer and simulate the functions of entire cortices. In the vibrissal area of rodent somatosensory cortex, whisker-related "barrel" columns have been referred to as potential cytoarchitectonic equivalents of functional cortical columns. Here, we investigated the structural stereotypy of cortical barrel columns by measuring the 3D neuronal composition of the entire vibrissal area in rat somatosensory cortex and thalamus. We found that the number of neurons per cortical barrel column and thalamic "barreloid" varied substantially within individual animals, increasing by ∼2.5-fold from dorsal to ventral whiskers. As a result, the ratio between whisker-specific thalamic and cortical neurons was remarkably constant. Thus, we hypothesize that the cellular architecture of sensory cortices reflects the degree of similarity in sensory input and not columnar and/or cortical uniformity principles.

  8. Wine consumption habits and consumer preferences between wines aged in barrels or with chips.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Ortega-Heras, Miriam; González-Sanjosé, María Luisa

    2011-03-30

    The use of oak wood pieces in winemaking is increasing, but the acceptance of this technique by consumers is unknown. For that reason, the main aim of this study was to measure consumers' opinion of red wines made with this new technique, their acceptance of them and their intention to purchase these wines. A preference ranking test was also carried out. A specific questionnaire was drawn up for this study and 65 frequent red wine consumers tasted four wines, two aged traditionally in barrels and two macerated with chips, and a forced choice preference test was carried out. Fifty-five per cent of respondents said that they would not buy wines made using oak chips, although most respondents would buy these wines if, after tasting them, they were as pleasant and had the same quality as the wines aged traditionally in barrels. Wines obtained with oak wood fragments were not significantly rejected either by consumers who answered the questionnaire or by consumer tasters, which could be due to the large disparity of preferences found among tasters. The results clearly indicate that producers should develop each wine taking into account the specific preferences of each consumer group. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Effect of pulsed electric field processing of red grapes on wine chromatic and phenolic characteristics during aging in oak barrels.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, E; Saldaña, G; Alvarez, I; Raso, J

    2010-02-24

    The influence of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment of grape berries at pilot-plant scale on the evolution of the chromatic and phenolic characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon red wines during aging in American oak barrels and subsequent storage in bottle has been studied. Results obtained in this investigation confirm that the better chromatic characteristics and higher phenolic content obtained due to the PEF treatment after the fermentation process remain or even increase during aging in oxidative conditions in American oak barrels and their subsequent storage in bottle. No sensory differences in color and bouquet were detected after 8 months of aging in bottle by triangle tests. According to the results, PEF is a promising enological technology to obtain wines with the high phenolic content necessary for the production of high quality oak aged red wines.

  10. High voltage performance of a dc photoemission electron gun with centrifugal barrel-polished electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Bullard, D.; Hannon, F.; Wang, Y.; Poelker, M.

    2017-09-01

    The design and fabrication of electrodes for direct current (dc) high voltage photoemission electron guns can significantly influence their performance, most notably in terms of maximum achievable bias voltage. Proper electrostatic design of the triple-point junction shield electrode minimizes the risk of electrical breakdown (arcing) along the insulator-cable plug interface, while the electrode shape is designed to maintain <10 MV/m at the desired operating voltage aiming at little or no field emission once conditioned. Typical electrode surface preparation involves diamond-paste polishing by skilled personnel, requiring several weeks of effort per electrode. In this work, we describe a centrifugal barrel-polishing technique commonly used for polishing the interior surface of superconducting radio frequency cavities but implemented here for the first time to polish electrodes for dc high voltage photoguns. The technique reduced polishing time from weeks to hours while providing surface roughness comparable to that obtained with diamond-paste polishing and with unprecedented consistency between different electrode samples. We present electrode design considerations and high voltage conditioning results to 360 kV (˜11 MV/m), comparing barrel-polished electrode performance to that of diamond-paste polished electrodes. Tests were performed using a dc high voltage photogun with an inverted-geometry ceramic insulator design.

  11. Gamma ray scanner systems for nondestructive assay of heterogeneous waste barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.E.; Decman, B.J.; Roberson, G.P.; Levai, F.

    1997-03-25

    Traditional gamma safeguards measurements have usually been performed using a segmented gamma scanning (SGS) system. The accuracy of this technique relies on the assumption that the sample matrix and the activity are both uniform for a segment. Waste barrels are often highly heterogeneous, span a wide range of composition and matrix type. The primary sources of error are all directly or indirectly related to a non-uniform measurement response associated with unknown radioactive source spatial distribution and heterogeneity of the matrix. These errors can be significantly reduced by some imaging techniques that measure exact spatial locations of sources and attenuation maps. In this paper we describe a joint R&D effort between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Institute of Nuclear Techniques (INT) of the Technical University, Budapest, to compare results obtained by two different gamma-ray nondestructive assay (NDA) systems used for imaging waste barrels. The basic principles are the same, but the approaches are different. Key factors to judge the adequacy of a method are the detection limit and the accuracy. Test drums representing waste to be measured are used to determine basic parameters of these techniques.

  12. The reference cube: A new ballistic model to generate staining in firearm barrels.

    PubMed

    Schyma, Christian; Bauer, Kristina; Brünig, Julia

    2017-06-01

    After contact shots to the head biological traces can be found inside firearm barrels. So far silicone coated, gelatin filled box models were used to generate such staining according to the triple contrast method (mixture of acrylic paint, barium sulfate and blood sealed in a thin foil bag). This study was conducted to develop a transparent ballistic model allowing contact shots. Gelatin filled polyethylene bottles with and without a silicone coat were tested in comparison to non-covered gelatin blocks. Finally, thin foil bags of 5 cm × 5 cm dimension were glued on a synthetic absorbent kitchen wipe on top of which 1 L 10% gelatin solution was molded to create blocks of 8.5 cm length. A kitchen wipe with a paint pad on its inside formed the front of the cube. Three contact shots each with a 9 mm Luger pistol and a .38 special revolver were performed on all model variations. The staining was documented by endoscopy and swabs gathered from both ends of the barrel were analyzed by quantitative PCR. Reliable staining was achieved using the front covered gelatin block with comparable results to the silicone coated box model used before. For further research using ballistic models to simulate a human head a symmetric form of the gelatin block such as a cube is recommended.

  13. Modeling Beta-Traces for Beta-Barrels from Cryo-EM Density Maps

    PubMed Central

    Si, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has produced density maps of various resolutions. Although α-helices can be detected from density maps at 5–8 Å resolutions, β-strands are challenging to detect at such density maps due to close-spacing of β-strands. The variety of shapes of β-sheets adds the complexity of β-strands detection from density maps. We propose a new approach to model traces of β-strands for β-barrel density regions that are extracted from cryo-EM density maps. In the test containing eight β-barrels extracted from experimental cryo-EM density maps at 5.5 Å–8.25 Å resolution, StrandRoller detected about 74.26% of the amino acids in the β-strands with an overall 2.05 Å 2-way distance between the detected β-traces and the observed ones, if the best of the fifteen detection cases is considered. PMID:28164115

  14. The barrel DIRC detector for the P¯ ANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiening, J.; P¯ Group; ANDA Cherenkov Group

    2011-05-01

    The P¯ANDA experiment at FAIR will perform high precision experiments in the charmed quark sector using cooled antiproton beams of unprecedented intensities of L=2×10 32 cm -2 s -1 in the momentum range of 1-15 GeV/ c. The charged particle identification in the barrel region needs a thin detector operating in a strong magnetic field. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector using the DIRC principle is an excellent match to those requirements. This article describes aspects of the design and R&D for the P¯ANDA barrel DIRC detector. The availability of highly pixelated fast photon detectors allows several key improvements compared to the successful BaBar-DIRC detector, some of which were tested in a proton beam at GSI. The optical properties of the radiator bars, made from synthetic fused silica, are critical to the success of the DIRC. Measurements of the attenuation length and reflection coefficient allow the determination of the surface roughness of prototype radiator bars.

  15. Modeling Beta-Traces for Beta-Barrels from Cryo-EM Density Maps.

    PubMed

    Si, Dong; He, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has produced density maps of various resolutions. Although α-helices can be detected from density maps at 5-8 Å resolutions, β-strands are challenging to detect at such density maps due to close-spacing of β-strands. The variety of shapes of β-sheets adds the complexity of β-strands detection from density maps. We propose a new approach to model traces of β-strands for β-barrel density regions that are extracted from cryo-EM density maps. In the test containing eight β-barrels extracted from experimental cryo-EM density maps at 5.5 Å-8.25 Å resolution, StrandRoller detected about 74.26% of the amino acids in the β-strands with an overall 2.05 Å 2-way distance between the detected β-traces and the observed ones, if the best of the fifteen detection cases is considered.

  16. Barrel maturation, oak alternatives and micro-oxygenation: influence on red wine aging and quality.

    PubMed

    Oberholster, A; Elmendorf, B L; Lerno, L A; King, E S; Heymann, H; Brenneman, C E; Boulton, R B

    2015-04-15

    The impact of micro-oxygenation (MOX) in conjunction with a variety of oak alternatives on phenolic composition and red wine aging was investigated and compared with traditional barrel aging. Although several studies concluded that MOX give similar results to barrel aging, few have compared them directly and none directly compared MOX with and without wood alternatives and barrel aging. Results confirmed that MOX had a positive effect on colour density, even after 5 months of bottle aging. This is supported by an increase in polymeric phenol and pigment content not only with aging but in the MOX compared to barrel matured wine treatments. Descriptive analysis showed that MOX in combination with wood alternatives such as oak chips and staves could mimic short term (six months) barrel aging in new American and French oak barrels in regards to sensory characteristics.

  17. Recent advances in the evaluation of the oxygen transfer rate in oak barrels.

    PubMed

    del Alamo-Sanza, María; Nevares, Ignacio

    2014-09-03

    The entry of atmospheric oxygen into wine barrels is a desirable characteristic of the wine aging process. The oxygen transfer rate regulates changes in wine affecting aging rates because some barrels may undergo a greater wine oxygenation. This study measured the transfer rate and oxygen distribution within a barrel. The analysis confirmed the presence of a dissolved oxygen concentration gradient in the liquid, with greater concentrations near the bung. The study of the transfer rate of oxygen over time, in 12 barrels of different types, showed that wetting wood reduces oxygen diffusion and the oxygen transfer rate (OTR). These results are the first to determine the kinetics of oxygen entry into wine barrels and can be used to quantify the annual rate of oxygen entry into wine barrels.

  18. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-26

    Arrival of the RRS Ernest Shackleton near Halley Research Station in Antarctica. The Shackleton is the regular resupply ship for the station and it also brought in some of the BARREL team scientists. The long tether is for the ship’s mooring. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch

  19. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-25

    An emperor penguin waddles away on Christmas morning in Antarctica. On Christmas day, the BARREL team visited a penguin colony. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through

  20. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-30

    Watching a BARREL balloon – and the instruments dangling below – float up over the SANAE IV research base in Antarctica. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four

  1. Processing of Niobium-Lined M240 Machine Gun Barrels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    produce at least a 0.001 inch (0.025 mm) expansion of the steel cylinder to allow the mandrel to fit inside the liner . The other dimensions were...barrel blank and niobium liner is shown in Fig. 2. 4 Fig. 2 Gun tube and niobium- liner hardware 3. Experimental Approach 3.1 Load Cylinder ...The load cylinder outer diameter was taken to be 0.308 inch (7.82 mm), giving enough clearance between it and the niobium liner to ensure easy

  2. Optical System of the STAR Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachov, O. A.

    2000-04-01

    The STAR Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter(BEMC) is a sampling calorimeter and the core of structure consist of a lead-scintillator plate stack. The plastic scintillator in the form of Mega-tile with 40 optically isolated tiles in each layer. The tile/fiber system uses a wavelength shifting fiber to read out the signal of a tile and a optical clear fiber carry the light through the magnet structure to the electronic-PMT box. A discription of the Optical system of BEMC is presented along with a current status of the quality control program of the calorimeter production.

  3. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The BARREL team at the SANAE IV research station celebrates their final launch in the Antarctica sun. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors

  4. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    BARREL team members run under the payload as the balloon first takes flight at the SANAE IV research station in Antarctica. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four

  5. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A BARREL balloon floats into the sky as it is partially filled. When fully inflated, each balloon is 90 feet in diameter and carries an instrument suite that weighs 50 pounds. This is small for an Antarctica balloon launch, which can have balloons Typical balloons l the size of a football field with payloads of some 3,000 pounds. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in

  6. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    An iceberg as viewed from the bow of the RRS Ernest Shackleton a few days before the BARREL team reached Halley Research Station in Antarctica. This research vessel regularly carries scientists and supplies to Halley. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014

  7. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Some of the BARREL balloon launches took place at the South African National Antarctic Expedition Research base, called SANAE IV, the others at Halley Research Station. This balloon is taking flight at SANAE IV. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA

  8. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Pumping helium into the first BARREL balloon to launch from Halley Research Satation. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science

  9. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A crane lowers two BARREL balloon payloads onto the platform at Halley Research Station in Antarctica. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors

  10. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The BARREL cargo on its four-hour journey from the supply ship to the research station. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science

  11. Innovative active control of gun barrels using smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattice, Michael S.; LaVigna, Chris

    1997-06-01

    The accuracy of stabilized, turreted gun systems like the 120mm gun on the M1A2 Abrams tank and the 30mm gun on the Apache helicopter are limited by, among other things, structural flexure of the gun barrel and support structure. An advanced actuation system based on piezoelectric translators and an optical fiber strain sensing system are described in conjunction with a rapid prototyping workstation for the design of distributed parameter control systems to actively minimize the effects of vibrations caused by traversing rough terrain or weapon firing.

  12. Theoretical Exploration of Barrel-Shaped Drops on Cactus Spines.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng

    2015-11-03

    To survive an arid environment, desert cacti are capable of harvesting water from fog by transporting condensed water drops using their spines. Cactus spines have a conical shape. In this work, on the basis of the difference of liquid pressure, a new theoretical model has been developed for a barrel-shaped liquid drop on a conical wire. This model is further simplified to interpret the effects of contact angles, conical angle, surface microgrooves, and gravity on the drop movement along a cactus spine.

  13. Design and performance of the silicon sensors for the CMS barrel pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Bortoletto, D.; Chiochia, V.; Cremaldi, L.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Hörmann, C.; Horisberger, R.; Kim, D.; Konecki, M.; Kotlinski, D.; Prokofiev, K.; Regenfus, C.; Rohe, T.; Sanders, D. A.; Son, S.; Swartz, M.; Speer, T.

    2008-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the (LHC) includes a hybrid silicon pixel detector for the reconstruction of charged tracks and of the interaction vertices. The barrel region consists of n-in-n sensors with 100×150 μm2 cell size processed on diffusion oxygenated float zone silicon. A biasing grid is implemented and pixel isolation is achieved with the moderated p-spray technique. An extensive test program was carried out on the H 2 beam line of the CERN-SPS. In this paper we describe the sensor layout, the beam test setup and the results obtained with both irradiated and non-irradiated prototype devices. Measurements of charge collection, hit detection efficiency, Lorentz angle and spatial resolution are presented.

  14. Repair of Erosion Defects in Gun Barrels by Direct Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, Steffen; Spatzier, Joerg; Kubisch, Frank; Scharek, Siegfried; Ortner, Jens; Beyer, Eckhard

    2012-12-01

    In recent years the development of functional carbide coatings follows the trend to use composite powders with fine grained hard particles. In addition to thermal spraying, laser cladding is a suitable surface technology in particular for dynamically loaded components, and it is widely used for the manufacturing of coatings as well as complex 3D structures. The paper presents an application addressing the repair of erosion defects in large gun barrels using a novel internal diameter laser cladding head. The most promising material systems are TiC- and VC-based metal-matrix composites. Samples were evaluated in a special erosion test that emulates realistic load conditions. In this test, the materials are exposed to extreme stresses by temperature and pressure shocks, a very reactive atmosphere and erosive particles. As result, TiC-based coatings showed the best performance, and they are applicable for both repair and surface protection of inner surfaces of components and tools.

  15. Experience-dependent regulation of NG2 progenitors in the developing barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, Jean-Marie; Li, Peijun; Scafidi, Joseph; Gallo, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    We show that during formation of the mouse barrel cortex, NG2 cells receive glutamatergic synapses from thalamocortical fibers and preferentially accumulate along septa separating the barrels. Sensory deprivation reduces thalamocortical inputs on NG2 cells and increases their proliferation, leading to a more uniform distribution within the deprived barrels. Therefore, early sensory experience regulates thalamocortical innervation on NG2 cells, as well as their proliferation and distribution during development. PMID:22885848

  16. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Advanced Ceramics for Gun Barrel Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Advanced Ceramics for Gun Barrel Applications by Jeffrey J. Swab, Andrew A. Wereszczak, Jason Tice, Russ... Barrel Applications Jeffrey J. Swab, Andrew A. Wereszczak, Jason Tice, Russ Caspe, Reuben H. Kraft, and Jane W. Adams Weapons and Materials Research...Ceramics for Gun Barrel Applications 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 622618.H80 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jeffrey J. Swab

  17. Friction Stir Welding of the Space Shuttle External Tank Longitudinal Barrel Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Glynn; Pareti, Paul; Thompson, Jack; Lawless, Kirby; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Through the implementation of friction stir welding, the safety, reliability, and producibility of the external tank is enhanced. Such fusion procedures are accomplished with the use of a short barrel weld tool or a long barrel weld tool. Forecasted developments in the fusion tooling field include the advent of a universal tool which is capable to fusing all barrel configurations. A wide array of mechanical and electrical controls are described for such a device.

  18. Oak wine barrel as an active vessel: A critical review of past and current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Del Alamo-Sanza, Maria; Nevares, Ignacio

    2017-05-30

    We review the role of the oak barrel as an active vessel for wine maturation. We present a historical background to highlight that previously established aspects of processes occurring with wine inside the oak barrel are still without confirmation. We argue that recently published new findings on the topic are determining factors in defining the manner in which the oak barrel works with wine. Several studies have been published reviewing how the wine barrel functions as an active vessel that releases chemical compounds into the wine, improving its physical, chemical, and sensory properties. Nevertheless, there are hardly any studies that describe how a wine barrel functions as an active vessel. The present review details the main factors affecting the gas exchange capacity of the barrel, such as the pressure drop generated within the barrel, the formation of a headspace, the effect of wood anatomy, the different oxygen entry routes, the role of wood moisture content and soluble ellagitannins, and the effect of barrel toasting on cooperage. Finally, a hypothesis is proposed regarding the function of the barrel as an active vessel, which determines the manner in which it interacts with the wine that it contains during aging.

  19. Dynamic response of a lightweight gun barrel during a firing-pressure transient

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, S.V.; Phillips, L.P. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    This report presents the results of a nonlinear, dynamic structural analysis of a gun barrel design during a firing-pressure transient. The final design was defined by an iterative design/analysis process in which the effects of design modifications were compared with established design criteria. The ADINA finite element code was used to analyze the titanium/carbon composite gun barrel assembly for a maximum transient pressure of 29,000 psi. The gun barrel weighs 42 lb; however, a significant potential exists for weight savings in future gun barrel designs. 2 refs., 41 figs.

  20. Parallel access alignment network with barrel switch implementation for d-ordered vector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An alignment network between N parallel data input ports and N parallel data outputs includes a first and a second barrel switch. The first barrel switch fed by the N parallel input ports shifts the N outputs thereof and in turn feeds the N-1 input data paths of the second barrel switch according to the relationship X=k.sup.y modulo N wherein x represents the output data path ordering of the first barrel switch, y represents the input data path ordering of the second barrel switch, and k equals a primitive root of the number N. The zero (0) ordered output data path of the first barrel switch is fed directly to the zero ordered output port. The N-1 output data paths of the second barrel switch are connected to the N output ports in the reverse ordering of the connections between the output data paths of the first barrel switch and the input data paths of the second barrel switch. The second switch is controlled by a value m, which in the preferred embodiment is produced at the output of a ROM addressed by the value d wherein d represents the incremental spacing or distance between data elements to be accessed from the N input ports, and m is generated therefrom according to the relationship d=k.sup.m modulo N.

  1. Oak Stave Oxygen Permeation: A New Tool To Make Barrels with Different Wine Oxygenation Potentials.

    PubMed

    Nevares, Ignacio; Del Alamo-Sanza, María

    2015-01-22

    The aim of this study was to classify rough staves according to their permeability to oxygen by measuring their transmission rate to assess the capacity to build barrels with high and low oxygen transmission rates (OTRs). The ability to assess the OTR would be important for better understanding and controlling the aging process of wine in barrels. To accomplish this, we built a device that measures the OTR of rough staves under the same conditions as those in a full barrel, in which the stave is in contact with a liquid solution on one face and with a diffusing gas on the opposite face. A total of 69 rough staves were classified to yield a high-OTR group, with a mean 2.6 times higher than the mean of the low-OTR group. A high-OTR barrel and a low-OTR barrel were constructed, and we confirmed that the stave OTR decreased between 3- and 4.5-fold in the barrels and that the high-OTR barrel allowed the entry of twice the concentration of oxygen compared to the low-OTR barrel. These results confirmed the capacity to classify rough staves and build barrels with different OTRs.

  2. Fabrication of a metal-cored multi-barrelled microiontophoresis assembly.

    PubMed

    Hellier, M; Boers, P; Lambert, G A

    1990-04-01

    A method is described for fabrication of 7-barrelled microiontophoresis electrodes with a center barrel of platinum-coated tungsten. The electrodes require a minimum of expensive apparatus and can be fabricated in an hour or two. The electrodes have low recording impedance (typically 100 k omega and low resistance iontophoresis barrels (typically 20-50 M omega). Compared to electrodes with a micropipette recording barrel, these electrodes are practically noise-free and can pass ionotophoretic currents of up to 200 nA without an appreciable increase in recording noise.

  3. Creation of active TIM barrel enzymes through genetic fusion of half-barrel domain constructs derived from two distantly related glycosyl hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prerna; Kaila, Pallavi; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-12-01

    Diverse unrelated enzymes that adopt the beta/alpha (or TIM) barrel topology display similar arrangements of beta/alpha units placed in a radial eight-fold symmetry around the barrel's axis. The TIM barrel was originally thought to be a single structural domain; however, it is now thought that TIM barrels arose from duplication and fusion of smaller half-barrels consisting of four beta/alpha units. We describe here the design, expression and purification, as well as characterization of folding, activity and stability, of chimeras of two TIM barrel glycosyl hydrolases, made by fusing different half-barrel domains derived from an endoglucanase from Clostridium cellulolyticum, CelCCA and a beta-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus, CelB. We show that after refolding following purification from inclusion bodies, the two half-barrel fusion chimeras (CelCCACelB and CelBCelCCA) display catalytic activity although they assemble into large soluble oligomeric aggregated species containing chains of mixed beta and alpha structure. CelBCelCCA displays hyperthermophile-like structural stability as well as significant stability to chemical denaturation (Cm of 2.6 m guanidinium hydrochloride), whereas CelCCACelB displays mesophile-like stability (Tm of ~ 71 °C). The endoglucanase activities of both chimeras are an order of magnitude lower than those of CelB or CelCCA, whereas the beta-glucosidase activity of CelBCelCCA is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of CelB. The chimera CelCCACelB shows no beta-glucosidase activity. Our results demonstrate that half-barrel domains from unrelated sources can fold, assemble and function, with scope for improvement.

  4. Evaluation of methods for predicting the topology of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins and a consensus prediction method.

    PubMed

    Bagos, Pantelis G; Liakopoulos, Theodore D; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2005-01-12

    Prediction of the transmembrane strands and topology of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins is of interest in current bioinformatics research. Several methods have been applied so far for this task, utilizing different algorithmic techniques and a number of freely available predictors exist. The methods can be grossly divided to those based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), on Neural Networks (NNs) and on Support Vector Machines (SVMs). In this work, we compare the different available methods for topology prediction of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins. We evaluate their performance on a non-redundant dataset of 20 beta-barrel outer membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria, with structures known at atomic resolution. Also, we describe, for the first time, an effective way to combine the individual predictors, at will, to a single consensus prediction method. We assess the statistical significance of the performance of each prediction scheme and conclude that Hidden Markov Model based methods, HMM-B2TMR, ProfTMB and PRED-TMBB, are currently the best predictors, according to either the per-residue accuracy, the segments overlap measure (SOV) or the total number of proteins with correctly predicted topologies in the test set. Furthermore, we show that the available predictors perform better when only transmembrane beta-barrel domains are used for prediction, rather than the precursor full-length sequences, even though the HMM-based predictors are not influenced significantly. The consensus prediction method performs significantly better than each individual available predictor, since it increases the accuracy up to 4% regarding SOV and up to 15% in correctly predicted topologies. The consensus prediction method described in this work, optimizes the predicted topology with a dynamic programming algorithm and is implemented in a web-based application freely available to non-commercial users at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/ConBBPRED.

  5. EMIC Waves Observed in Conjunction with BARREL Electron Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C.; Engebretson, M. J.; Lessard, M.; Halford, A. J.; Millan, R. M.; Horne, R. B.; Singer, H. J.

    2013-05-01

    Electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been detected at Halley, Antarctica coinciding with observations of electron precipitation on high altitude balloons from the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign launched in early 2013 from SANAE IV and Halley Station. The balloons were launched such that both spatial and temporal properties of electron precipitation might be examined. With a magnetic foot point mapped to the radiation belts, Halley is an ideal location to capture ground based signatures that coincide with electron precipitation. EMIC waves have been shown, both theoretically and through statistical surveys, to pitch angle scatter energetic protons and relativistic electrons via cyclotron resonance and contribute to radiation belt dynamics. EMIC waves were detected at Halley Station 23 times from 12 Jan - 4 Feb with 17 of those waves occurring during times when at least one BARREL balloon observed precipitation in one or more energy channels. High resolution magnetometer data from GOES 13 (which has a magnetic foot point near WAIS Divide, Antarctica-located about 2.5 hours, in MLT, west of Halley) show similar EMIC wave structure and frequency to 9 waves observed at Halley, suggesting the source region extended to at least the longitude and L value of GOES 13 during some events. The ground observed waves appeared in all local times and during both quiet and disturbed intervals.

  6. Double Barrel In Situ Recanalization of Thrombosed Nonretrievable IVC filter.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shubhabrata; Patel, Hiten M; Sheorain, Virender K; Grover, Tarun; Parakh, Rajiv

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of endovascular recanalization of complete thrombotic occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and bilateral iliac veins using the architectural knowledge of the in situ permanent IVC filter in a 23-year-old male. The infrarenal permanent IVC filter was TRAPEASE permanent vena cava filter (Cordis) placed at an outstation hospital for pulmonary embolism. Being permanent variant of filter, percutaneous removal was not possible. The patient had severe venous claudication and an attempt to recanalize the blocked filter was considered, in view of the age no justifiable indication for a long-term filter. After pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis, there was residual focal flow-limiting thrombus within the filter. The design of the Trapease Cordis filter was instrumental in our decision to attempt to recanalize the filter in situ using 2 parallel stents with the filter struts as anchoring pillars in a double-barrel alignment. In similar cases of persistent Trapease filter-related thrombotic occlusion of the IVC, this double barrel in situ recanalization shall be a viable alternative to the well-described technique of crushing the filter and recanalizing it with a single stent.

  7. Performance of the prototype module of the GlueX electromagnetic barrel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Leverington, Blake; Lolos, George; Papandreou, Zisis; Hakobyan, Rafael; Huber, Garth; Janzen, Kathryn; Semenov, Andrei; Scott, Eric; Shepherd, Matthew; Carman, Daniel; Lawrence, David; Smith, Elton; Taylor, Simon; Wolin, Elliott; Klein, Franz; Santoro, Joseph; Sober, Daniel; Kourkoumeli, Christina

    2008-11-01

    A photon beam test of the 4 m long prototype lead/scintillating-fibre module for the GlueX electromagnetic barrel calorimeter was carried out in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the objective of measuring the energy and timing resolutions of the module as well as the number of photoelectrons generated. Data were collected over an energy range of 150 - â 650 MeV at multiple positions and angles along the module. Details of the analysis at the centre of and perpendicular to the module are shown herein; the results are View the MathML source, View the MathML source ps, and 660 photoelectrons for 1 GeV at each end of the module.

  8. Dosimetry assessments for the reactor pressure vessel and core barrel in UK PWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, D.A.; Allen, D.A.; Huggon, A.P.; Picton, D.J.; Robinson, A.T.; Steadman, R.J.; Seren, T.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.

    2011-07-01

    Specimens for the Sizewell B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) inservice steels surveillance program are irradiated inside eight capsules located within the reactor pressure vessel and loaded prior to commissioning. The periodic removal of these capsules and testing of their contents provides material properties data at intervals during the lifetime of the plant. Neutron activation measurements and radiation transport calculations play an essential role in assessing the neutron exposure of the specimens and RPV. Following the most recent withdrawal, seven capsules have now been removed covering nine cycles of reactor operation. This paper summarizes the dosimetry results of the Sizewell B surveillance program obtained to date. In addition to an overview of the calculational methodology it includes a review of the measurements. Finally, it describes an extension of the methodology to provide dosimetry recommendations for the core barrel and briefly discusses the results that were obtained. (authors)

  9. NASA’s BARREL Mission Launches 20 Balloons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-04

    Liftoff! A balloon begins to rise over the brand new Halley VI Research Station, which had its grand opening in February 2013. Credit: NASA --- In Antarctica in January, 2013 – the summer at the South Pole – scientists launched 20 balloons up into the air to study an enduring mystery of space weather: when the giant radiation belts surrounding Earth lose material, where do the extra particles actually go? The mission is called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) and it is led by physicist Robyn Millan of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Millan provided photographs from the team’s time in Antarctica. The team launched a balloon every day or two into the circumpolar winds that circulate around the pole. Each balloon floated for anywhere from 3 to 40 days, measuring X-rays produced by fast-moving electrons high up in the atmosphere. BARREL works hand in hand with another NASA mission called the Van Allen Probes, which travels through the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The belts wax and wane over time in response to incoming energy and material from the sun, sometimes intensifying the radiation through which satellites must travel. Scientists wish to understand this process better, and even provide forecasts of this space weather, in order to protect our spacecraft. As the Van Allen Probes were observing what was happening in the belts, BARREL tracked electrons that precipitated out of the belts and hurtled down Earth’s magnetic field lines toward the poles. By comparing data, scientists will be able to track how what’s happening in the belts correlates to the loss of particles – information that can help us understand this mysterious, dynamic region that can impact spacecraft. Having launched balloons in early 2013, the team is back at home building the next set of payloads. They will launch 20 more balloons in 2014. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through

  10. 15 CFR 241.6 - Classes of barrels for tolerance application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 shall include (1) all barrels no dimension of which is in error by more than the following amounts, and (2) all barrels one or more of the dimensions of which are in error by more than the following amounts, and which in addition have no dimension in error in the opposite direction: Error, inches...

  11. 15 CFR 241.6 - Classes of barrels for tolerance application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 shall include (1) all barrels no dimension of which is in error by more than the following amounts, and (2) all barrels one or more of the dimensions of which are in error by more than the following amounts, and which in addition have no dimension in error in the opposite direction: Error, inches...

  12. 15 CFR 241.6 - Classes of barrels for tolerance application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 shall include (1) all barrels no dimension of which is in error by more than the following amounts, and (2) all barrels one or more of the dimensions of which are in error by more than the following amounts, and which in addition have no dimension in error in the opposite direction: Error, inches...

  13. 15 CFR 241.6 - Classes of barrels for tolerance application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 shall include (1) all barrels no dimension of which is in error by more than the following amounts, and (2) all barrels one or more of the dimensions of which are in error by more than the following amounts, and which in addition have no dimension in error in the opposite direction: Error, inches...

  14. Tapered laser rods as a means of minimizing the path length of trapped barrel mode rays

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Payne, Stephen A.; Mercer, Ian; Perry, Michael D.

    2005-08-30

    By tapering the diameter of a flanged barrel laser rod over its length, the maximum trapped path length of a barrel mode can be dramatically reduced, thereby reducing the ability of the trapped spontaneous emission to negatively impact laser performance through amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Laser rods with polished barrels and flanged end caps have found increasing application in diode array end-pumped laser systems. The polished barrel of the rod serves to confine diode array pump light within the rod. In systems utilizing an end-pumping geometry and such polished barrel laser rods, the pump light that is introduced into one or both ends of the laser rod, is ducted down the length of the rod via the total internal reflections (TIRs) that occur when the light strikes the rod's barrel. A disadvantage of using polished barrel laser rods is that such rods are very susceptible to barrel mode paths that can trap spontaneous emission over long path lengths. This trapped spontaneous emission can then be amplified through stimulated emission resulting in a situation where the stored energy available to the desired lasing mode is effectively depleted, which then negatively impacts the laser's performance, a result that is effectively reduced by introducing a taper onto the laser rod.

  15. Structural comparisons of TIM barrel proteins suggest functional and evolutionary relationships between beta-galactosidase and other glycohydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Juers, D. H.; Huber, R. E.; Matthews, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    Beta-galactosidase (lacZ) from Escherichia coli is a 464 kDa homotetramer. Each subunit consists of five domains, the third being an alpha/beta barrel that contains most of the active site residues. A comparison is made between each of the domains and a large set of proteins representative of all structures from the protein data bank. Many structures include an alpha/beta barrel. Those that are most similar to the alpha/beta barrel of E. coli beta-galactosidase have similar catalytic residues and belong to the so-called "4/7 superfamily" of glycosyl hydrolases. The structure comparison suggests that beta-amylase should also be included in this family. Of three structure comparison methods tested, the "ProSup" procedure of Zu-Kang and Sippl and the "Superimpose" procedure of Diederichs were slightly superior in discriminating the members of this superfamily, although all procedures were very powerful in identifying related protein structures. Domains 1, 2, and 4 of E. coli beta-galactosidase have topologies related to "jelly-roll barrels" and "immunoglobulin constant" domains. This fold also occurs in the cellulose binding domains (CBDs) of a number of glycosyl hydrolases. The fold of domain 1 of E. coli beta-galactosidase is closely related to some CBDs, and the domain contributes to substrate binding, but in a manner unrelated to cellulose binding by the CBDs. This is typical of domains 1, 2, 4, and 5, which appear to have been recruited to play roles in beta-galactosidase that are unrelated to the functions that such domains provide in other contexts. It is proposed that beta-galactosidase arose from a prototypical single domain alpha/beta barrel with an extended active site cleft. The subsequent incorporation of elements from other domains could then have reduced the size of the active site from a cleft to a pocket to better hydrolyze the disaccharide lactose and, at the same time, to facilitate the production of inducer, allolactose. PMID:10210191

  16. A radial map of multi-whisker correlation selectivity in the rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Estebanez, Luc; Bertherat, Julien; Shulz, Daniel E; Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François

    2016-11-21

    In the barrel cortex, several features of single-whisker stimuli are organized in functional maps. The barrel cortex also encodes spatio-temporal correlation patterns of multi-whisker inputs, but so far the cortical mapping of neurons tuned to such input statistics is unknown. Here we report that layer 2/3 of the rat barrel cortex contains an additional functional map based on neuronal tuning to correlated versus uncorrelated multi-whisker stimuli: neuron responses to uncorrelated multi-whisker stimulation are strongest above barrel centres, whereas neuron responses to correlated and anti-correlated multi-whisker stimulation peak above the barrel-septal borders, forming rings of multi-whisker synchrony-preferring cells.

  17. Alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism in barrel cactus populations of Drosophila mojavensis.

    PubMed

    Cleland, S; Hocutt, G D; Breitmeyer, C M; Markow, T A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-07-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis revealed that the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-2) locus was polymorphic in two populations (from Agua Caliente, California and the Grand Canyon, Arizona) of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that utilize barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes) as a host plant. Electromorphs representing products of a slow (S) and a fast (F) allele were found in adult flies. The frequency of the slow allele was 0.448 in flies from Agua Caliente and 0.659 in flies from the Grand Canyon. These frequencies were intermediate to those of the low (Baja California peninsula, Mexico) and high (Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona) frequency Adh-2S populations of D. mojavensis that utilize different species of host cacti.

  18. Performance of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel module 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Ballansat, J.; Bazan, A.; Beaugiraud, B.; Boniface, J.; Chollet, F.; Colas, J.; Delebecque, P.; di Ciaccio, L.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; El Kacimi, M.; Gaumer, O.; Ghez, P.; Girard, C.; Gouanère, M.; Kambara, H.; Jérémie, A.; Jézéquel, S.; Lafaye, R.; Leflour, T.; Le Maner, C.; Lesueur, J.; Massol, N.; Moynot, M.; Neukermans, L.; Perrodo, P.; Perrot, G.; Poggioli, L.; Prast, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Riccadona, X.; Sauvage, G.; Thion, J.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Zitoun, R.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Chen, H.; Citterio, M.; Farrell, J.; Gordon, H.; Hackenburg, B.; Hoffman, A.; Kierstead, J.; Lanni, F.; Leite, M.; Lissauer, D.; Ma, H.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rescia, S.; Stumer, I.; Takai, H.; Yip, K.; Benchekroun, D.; Driouichi, C.; Hoummada, A.; Hakimi, M.; Stroynowski, R.; Ye, J.; Beck Hansen, J.; Belymam, A.; Bremer, J.; Chevalley, J. L.; Fassnacht, P.; Gianotti, F.; Hervas, L.; Marin, C. P.; Pailler, P.; Schilly, P.; Seidl, W.; Vossebeld, J.; Vuillemin, V.; Clark, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Moneta, L.; Belhorma, B.; Collot, J.; de Saintignon, P.; Dzahini, D.; Ferrari, A.; Gallin-Martel, M. L.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Martin, P.; Muraz, J. F.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Saboumazrag, S.; Ban, J.; Cartiglia, N.; Cunitz, H.; Dodd, J.; Gara, A.; Leltchouk, M.; Negroni, S.; Parsons, J. A.; Seman, M.; Simion, S.; Sippach, W.; Willis, W.; Barreiro, F.; Garcia, G.; Labarga, L.; Rodier, S.; Del Peso, J.; Alexa, C.; Barrillon, P.; Benchouk, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Dinkespiler, B.; Djama, F.; Duval, P. Y.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hinz, L.; Jevaud, M.; Karst, P.; Le van Suu, A.; Martin, L.; Martin, O.; Mirea, A.; Monnier, E.; Nagy, E.; Nicod, D.; Olivier, C.; Pralavorio, P.; Repetti, B.; Raymond, M.; Sauvage, D.; Tisserant, S.; Toth, J.; Wielers, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bonivento, W.; Carminati, L.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Delmastro, M.; Fanti, M.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Perini, L.; Resconi, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Aulchenko, V.; Kazanin, V.; Kolachev, G.; Malyshev, V.; Maslennikov, A.; Pospelov, G.; Snopkov, R.; Shousharo, A.; Talyshev, A.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Augé, E.; Bourdarios, C.; Breton, D.; Cros, P.; de La Taille, C.; Falleau, I.; Fournier, D.; Guilhem, G.; Hassani, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Kordas, K.; Macé, G.; Merkel, B.; Noppe, J. M.; Parrour, G.; Pétroff, P.; Puzo, P.; Richer, J. P.; Rousseau, D.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Serin, L.; Tocut, V.; Veillet, J. J.; Zerwas, D.; Astesan, F.; Bertoli, W.; Camard, A.; Canton, B.; Fichet, S.; Hubaut, F.; Imbault, D.; Lacour, D.; Laforge, B.; Le Dortz, O.; Martin, D.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Orsini, F.; Rossel, F.; Schwemling, P.; Cleland, W.; McDonald, J.; Abouelouafa, E. M.; Ben Mansour, A.; Cherkaoui, R.; El Mouahhidi, Y.; Ghazlane, H.; Idrissi, A.; Belorgey, J.; Bernard, R.; Chalifour, M.; Le Coroller, A.; Ernwein, J.; Mansoulié, B.; Renardy, J. F.; Schwindling, J.; Taguet, J.-P.; Teiger, J.; Clément, C.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundqvist, J.; Megner, L.; Pearce, M.; Rydstrom, S.; Egdemir, J.; Engelmann, R.; Hoffman, J.; McCarthy, R.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Steffens, J.; Atlas Electromagnetic Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2003-03-01

    The construction and performance of the barrel pre-series module 0 of the future ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC is described. The signal reconstruction and performance of ATLAS-like electronics has been studied. The signal to noise ratio for muons has been found to be 7.11±0.07. An energy resolution of better than 9.5% GeV1/2/ E (sampling term) has been obtained with electron beams of up to 245 GeV. The uniformity of the response to electrons in an area of Δ η×Δ φ=1.2×0.075 has been measured to be better than 0.8%.

  19. Modeling of gun barrel surface erosion: Historic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1996-08-01

    Results and interpretations of numerical simulations of some dominant processes influencing gun barrel propellant combustion and flow-induced erosion are presented. Results include modeled influences of erosion reduction techniques such as solid additives, vapor phase chemical modifications, and alteration of surface solid composition through use of thin coatings. Precedents and historical perspective are provided with predictions from traditional interior ballistics compared to computer simulations. Accelerating reactive combustion flow, multiphase and multicomponent transport, flow-to-surface thermal/momentum/phase change/gas-surface chemical exchanges, surface and micro-depth subsurface heating/stress/composition evolution and their roles in inducing surface cracking, spall, ablation, melting, and vaporization are considered. Recognition is given to cyclic effects of previous firing history on material preconditioning. Current perspective and outlook for future are based on results of a US Army-LLNL erosion research program covering 7 y in late 1970s. This is supplemented by more recent research on hypervelocity electromagnetic projectile launchers.

  20. Surround suppression and sparse coding in visual and barrel cortices

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Krause, Matthew R.; Mazer, James A.

    2012-01-01

    During natural vision the entire retina is stimulated. Likewise, during natural tactile behaviors, spatially extensive regions of the somatosensory surface are co-activated. The large spatial extent of naturalistic stimulation means that surround suppression, a phenomenon whose neural mechanisms remain a matter of debate, must arise during natural behavior. To identify common neural motifs that might instantiate surround suppression across modalities, we review models of surround suppression and compare the evidence supporting the competing ideas that surround suppression has either cortical or sub-cortical origins in visual and barrel cortex. In the visual system there is general agreement lateral inhibitory mechanisms contribute to surround suppression, but little direct experimental evidence that intracortical inhibition plays a major role. Two intracellular recording studies of V1, one using naturalistic stimuli (Haider et al., 2010), the other sinusoidal gratings (Ozeki et al., 2009), sought to identify the causes of reduced activity in V1 with increasing stimulus size, a hallmark of surround suppression. The former attributed this effect to increased inhibition, the latter to largely balanced withdrawal of excitation and inhibition. In rodent primary somatosensory barrel cortex, multi-whisker responses are generally weaker than single whisker responses, suggesting multi-whisker stimulation engages similar surround suppressive mechanisms. The origins of suppression in S1 remain elusive: studies have implicated brainstem lateral/internuclear interactions and both thalamic and cortical inhibition. Although the anatomical organization and instantiation of surround suppression in the visual and somatosensory systems differ, we consider the idea that one common function of surround suppression, in both modalities, is to remove the statistical redundancies associated with natural stimuli by increasing the sparseness or selectivity of sensory responses. PMID:22783169

  1. Neuronal activity in rat barrel cortex underlying texture discrimination.

    PubMed

    von Heimendahl, Moritz; Itskov, Pavel M; Arabzadeh, Ehsan; Diamond, Mathew E

    2007-11-01

    Rats and mice palpate objects with their whiskers to generate tactile sensations. This form of active sensing endows the animals with the capacity for fast and accurate texture discrimination. The present work is aimed at understanding the nature of the underlying cortical signals. We recorded neuronal activity from barrel cortex while rats used their whiskers to discriminate between rough and smooth textures. On whisker contact with either texture, firing rate increased by a factor of two to ten. Average firing rate was significantly higher for rough than for smooth textures, and we therefore propose firing rate as the fundamental coding mechanism. The rat, however, cannot take an average across trials, but must make an immediate decision using the signals generated on each trial. To estimate single-trial signals, we calculated the mutual information between stimulus and firing rate in the time window leading to the rat's observed choice. Activity during the last 75 ms before choice transmitted the most informative signal; in this window, neuronal clusters carried, on average, 0.03 bits of information about the stimulus on trials in which the rat's behavioral response was correct. To understand how cortical activity guides behavior, we examined responses in incorrect trials and found that, in contrast to correct trials, neuronal firing rate was higher for smooth than for rough textures. Analysis of high-speed films suggested that the inappropriate signal on incorrect trials was due, at least in part, to nonoptimal whisker contact. In conclusion, these data suggest that barrel cortex firing rate on each trial leads directly to the animal's judgment of texture.

  2. Neuronal Activity in Rat Barrel Cortex Underlying Texture Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    von Heimendahl, Moritz; Itskov, Pavel M; Arabzadeh, Ehsan; Diamond, Mathew E

    2007-01-01

    Rats and mice palpate objects with their whiskers to generate tactile sensations. This form of active sensing endows the animals with the capacity for fast and accurate texture discrimination. The present work is aimed at understanding the nature of the underlying cortical signals. We recorded neuronal activity from barrel cortex while rats used their whiskers to discriminate between rough and smooth textures. On whisker contact with either texture, firing rate increased by a factor of two to ten. Average firing rate was significantly higher for rough than for smooth textures, and we therefore propose firing rate as the fundamental coding mechanism. The rat, however, cannot take an average across trials, but must make an immediate decision using the signals generated on each trial. To estimate single-trial signals, we calculated the mutual information between stimulus and firing rate in the time window leading to the rat's observed choice. Activity during the last 75 ms before choice transmitted the most informative signal; in this window, neuronal clusters carried, on average, 0.03 bits of information about the stimulus on trials in which the rat's behavioral response was correct. To understand how cortical activity guides behavior, we examined responses in incorrect trials and found that, in contrast to correct trials, neuronal firing rate was higher for smooth than for rough textures. Analysis of high-speed films suggested that the inappropriate signal on incorrect trials was due, at least in part, to nonoptimal whisker contact. In conclusion, these data suggest that barrel cortex firing rate on each trial leads directly to the animal's judgment of texture. PMID:18001152

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane β-Barrel Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Jąkalski, Marcin; Pieńkowska, Joanna R.; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Weiner, January; Kmita, Hanna; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Transport of molecules across mitochondrial outer membrane is pivotal for a proper function of mitochondria. The transport pathways across the membrane are formed by ion channels that participate in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytoplasm (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel, VDAC) as well as in import of proteins encoded by nuclear genes (Tom40 and Sam50/Tob55). VDAC, Tom40, and Sam50/Tob55 are present in all eukaryotic organisms, encoded in the nuclear genome, and have β-barrel topology. We have compiled data sets of these protein sequences and studied their phylogenetic relationships with a special focus on the position of Amoebozoa. Additionally, we identified these protein-coding genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii and Dictyostelium discoideum to complement our data set and verify the phylogenetic position of these model organisms. Our analysis show that mitochondrial β-barrel channels from Archaeplastida (plants) and Opisthokonta (animals and fungi) experienced many duplication events that resulted in multiple paralogous isoforms and form well-defined monophyletic clades that match the current model of eukaryotic evolution. However, in representatives of Amoebozoa, Chromalveolata, and Excavata (former Protista), they do not form clearly distinguishable clades, although they locate basally to the plant and algae branches. In most cases, they do not posses paralogs and their sequences appear to have evolved quickly or degenerated. Consequently, the obtained phylogenies of mitochondrial outer membrane β-channels do not entirely reflect the recent eukaryotic classification system involving the six supergroups: Chromalveolata, Excavata, Archaeplastida, Rhizaria, Amoebozoa, and Opisthokonta. PMID:22155732

  4. Assembly of 5.5-Meter Diameter Developmental Barrel Segments for the Ares I Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Full scale assembly welding of Ares I Upper Stage 5.5-Meter diameter cryogenic tank barrel segments has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One full-scale developmental article produced under the Ares 1 Upper Stage project is the Manufacturing Demonstration Article (MDA) Barrel. This presentation will focus on the welded assembly of this barrel section, and associated lessons learned. Among the MDA articles planned on the Ares 1 Program, the Barrel was the first to be completed, primarily because the process of manufacture from piece parts (barrel panels) utilized the most mature friction stir process planned for use on the Ares US program: Conventional fixed pin Friction Stir Welding (FSW). This process is in use on other space launch systems, including the Shuttle s External Tank, the Delta IV common booster core, the Delta II, and the Atlas V rockets. The goals for the MDA Barrel development were several fold: 1) to prove out Marshall Space Flight Center s new Vertical Weld Tool for use in manufacture of cylindrical barrel sections, 2) to serve as a first run for weld qualification to a new weld specification, and 3) to provide a full size cylindrical section for downstream use in precision cleaning and Spray-on Foam Insulation development. The progression leading into the welding of the full size barrel included sub scale panel welding, subscale cylinder welding, a full length confidence weld, and finally, the 3 seamed MDA barrel processing. Lessons learned on this MDA program have been carried forward into the production tooling for the Ares 1 US Program, and in the use of the MSFC VWT in processing other large scale hardware, including two 8.4 meter diameter Shuttle External Tank barrel sections that are currently being used in structural analysis to validate shell buckling models.

  5. Organization of myelin in the mouse somatosensory barrel cortex and the effects of sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Kyrstle; Chu, Philip; Abramowitz, Jason; Steger, Robert; Ramos, Raddy L; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2013-04-01

    In rodents, the barrel cortex is a specialized area within the somatosensory cortex that processes signals from the mystacial whiskers. We investigated the normal development of myelination in the barrel cortex of mice, as well as the effects of sensory deprivation on this pattern. Deprivation was achieved by trimming the whiskers on one side of the face every other day from birth. In control mice, myelin was not present until postnatal day 14 and did not show prominence until postnatal day 30; adult levels of myelination were reached by the end of the second postnatal month. Unbiased stereology was used to estimate axon density in the interbarrel septal region and barrel walls as well as the barrel centers. Myelin was significantly more concentrated in the interbarrel septa/barrel walls than in the barrel centers in both control and sensory-deprived conditions. Sensory deprivation did not impact the onset of myelination but resulted in a significant decrease in myelinated axons in the barrel region and decreased the amount of myelin ensheathing each axon. Visualization of the oligodendrocyte nuclear marker Olig2 revealed a similar pattern of myelin as seen using histochemistry, but with no significant changes in Olig2+ nuclei following sensory deprivation. Consistent with the anatomical results showing less myelination, local field potentials revealed slower rise times following trimming. Our results suggest that myelination develops relatively late and can be influenced by sensory experience.

  6. Weaker feedforward inhibition accounts for less pronounced thalamocortical response transformation in mouse vs. rat barrels

    PubMed Central

    Kwegyir-Afful, E. E.; Kyriazi, H. T.

    2013-01-01

    Feedforward inhibition is a common motif of thalamocortical circuits. Strong engagement of inhibitory neurons by thalamic inputs enhances response differentials between preferred and nonpreferred stimuli. In rat whisker-barrel cortex, robustly driven inhibitory barrel neurons establish a brief epoch during which synchronous or near-synchronous thalamic firing produces larger responses to preferred stimuli, such as high-velocity deflections of the principal whisker in a preferred direction. Present experiments in mice show that barrel neuron responses to preferred vs. nonpreferred stimuli differ less than in rats. In addition, fast-spike units, thought to be inhibitory barrel neurons, fire less robustly to whisker stimuli in mice than in rats. Analyses of real and simulated data indicate that mouse barrel circuitry integrates thalamic inputs over a broad temporal window, and that, as a consequence, responses of barrel neurons are largely similar to those of thalamic neurons. Results are consistent with weaker feedforward inhibition in mouse barrels. Differences in thalamocortical circuitry between mice and rats may reflect mechanical properties of the whiskers themselves. PMID:23966677

  7. The TIM Barrel Architecture Facilitated the Early Evolution of Protein-Mediated Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron David; Beatty, Joshua T; Landweber, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    The triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel protein fold is a structurally repetitive architecture that is present in approximately 10% of all enzymes. It is generally assumed that this ubiquity in modern proteomes reflects an essential historical role in early protein-mediated metabolism. Here, we provide quantitative and comparative analyses to support several hypotheses about the early importance of the TIM barrel architecture. An information theoretical analysis of protein structures supports the hypothesis that the TIM barrel architecture could arise more easily by duplication and recombination compared to other mixed α/β structures. We show that TIM barrel enzymes corresponding to the most taxonomically broad superfamilies also have the broadest range of functions, often aided by metal and nucleotide-derived cofactors that are thought to reflect an earlier stage of metabolic evolution. By comparison to other putatively ancient protein architectures, we find that the functional diversity of TIM barrel proteins cannot be explained simply by their antiquity. Instead, the breadth of TIM barrel functions can be explained, in part, by the incorporation of a broad range of cofactors, a trend that does not appear to be shared by proteins in general. These results support the hypothesis that the simple and functionally general TIM barrel architecture may have arisen early in the evolution of protein biosynthesis and provided an ideal scaffold to facilitate the metabolic transition from ribozymes, peptides, and geochemical catalysts to modern protein enzymes.

  8. Structural insight into the biogenesis of β-barrel membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Kuszak, Adam J; Gumbart, James C; Lukacik, Petra; Chang, Hoshing; Easley, Nicole C; Lithgow, Trevor; Buchanan, Susan K

    2013-09-19

    β-barrel membrane proteins are essential for nutrient import, signalling, motility and survival. In Gram-negative bacteria, the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) complex is responsible for the biogenesis of β-barrel membrane proteins, with homologous complexes found in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we describe the structure of BamA, the central and essential component of the BAM complex, from two species of bacteria: Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus ducreyi. BamA consists of a large periplasmic domain attached to a 16-strand transmembrane β-barrel domain. Three structural features shed light on the mechanism by which BamA catalyses β-barrel assembly. First, the interior cavity is accessible in one BamA structure and conformationally closed in the other. Second, an exterior rim of the β-barrel has a distinctly narrowed hydrophobic surface, locally destabilizing the outer membrane. And third, the β-barrel can undergo lateral opening, suggesting a route from the interior cavity in BamA into the outer membrane.

  9. Prenatal alcohol exposure delays the development of the cortical barrel field in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Margret, Cecilia P; Li, Cheng X; Chappell, Tyson D; Elberger, Andrea J; Matta, Shannon G; Waters, Robert S

    2006-06-01

    In-utero alcohol exposure produces sensorimotor developmental abnormalities that often persist into adulthood. The rodent cortical barrel field associated with the representation of the body surface was used as our model system to examine the effect of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on early somatosensory cortical development. In this study, pregnant female rats were intragastrically gavaged daily with high doses of alcohol (6 gm/kg body weight) throughout the first 20 days of pregnancy. Blood alcohol levels were measured in the pregnant dams on gestational days 13 (G13) and G20. The ethanol treated group (EtOH) was compared to the normal control chowfed (CF) group, nutritionally matched pairfed (PF) group, and cross-foster (XF) group. Cortical barrel development was examined in pups across all treatment groups from G25, corresponding to postnatal day 2 (P2), to G32 corresponding to P9. The EtOH and control group pups were weighed, anesthetized, and perfused. Brains were removed and weighed with, and without cerebellum and olfactory bulbs, and neocortex was removed and weighed. Cortices were then flattened, sectioned tangentially, and stained with a metabolic marker, cytochrome oxidase (CO) to reveal the barrel field. Progression of barrel development was distinguished into three categories: (a) absent, (b) cloudy barrel-like pattern, and (c) well-formed barrels with intervening septae. The major findings are: (1) PAE delayed barrel field development by one or more days, (2) the barrel field first appeared as a cloudy pattern that gave way on subsequent days to an adult-like pattern with clearly demarcated intervening septal regions, (3) the barrel field developed differentially in a lateral-to-medial gradient in both alcohol and control groups, (4) PAE delayed birth by one or more days in 53% of the pups, (5) regardless of whether pups were born on G23 (normal expected birth date for non-alcohol controls) or as in the case for the alcohol-delayed pups born as

  10. [The composition and characteristics of the spread of the shot products from a gas-barrel weapon].

    PubMed

    Isakov, V D; Babakhanian, R V; Kuznetsov, Iu D; Sigalov, F A

    1998-01-01

    Chemical composition and diffusion of additional factors of a shot from barrel gun supplied with a standard chemical cartridge are studied. Experimental shots from gas pistols of three designs were made. During shots from gas barrel guns the victim is exposed to additional factors characteristic of both fire arms and gas barrel guns, namely, fragments of plastic cartridge container and pads, magnesium particles, and lacquer powder. The characteristics of the short range zone for gas barrel guns correspond to those of short barrel fire arms.

  11. Geometry optimization of a barrel silicon pixelated tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing-Yuan; Wang, Meng; Winter, Marc

    2017-08-01

    We have studied optimization of the design of a barrel-shaped pixelated tracker for given spatial boundaries. The optimization includes choice of number of layers and layer spacing. Focusing on tracking performance only, momentum resolution is chosen as the figure of merit. The layer spacing is studied based on Gluckstern’s method and a numerical geometry scan of all possible tracker layouts. A formula to give the optimal geometry for curvature measurement is derived in the case of negligible multiple scattering to deal with trajectories of very high momentum particles. The result is validated by a numerical scan method, which could also be implemented with any track fitting algorithm involving material effects, to search for the optimal layer spacing and to determine the total number of layers for the momentum range of interest under the same magnetic field. The geometry optimization of an inner silicon pixel tracker proposed for BESIII is also studied by using a numerical scan and these results are compared with Geant4-based simulations. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232202)

  12. Barrel calorimeters and computer solve boiler circulation problem

    SciTech Connect

    Godbey, J.W.; Ruggles, W.L.

    1997-12-01

    The specific design of water-tube fired boilers and waste-heat steam generators can sometimes actually impede circulation of the steam/water mix essential for proper tube cooling and overall operation. However, proving that and developing corrective measurements can be difficult. This situation can be dealt with using a combination of an antiquated but simple technology--barrel calorimeters--and a computer. The technique shows the effects of boiler load, steam drum water level and modifications to the steam drum primary baffle on tube top-dryness and, indirectly, circulation. The method was applied to up to 20 tubes simultaneously in a chemical plant boiler. The boiler involved was a 300 thousand pound per hour (Mlb/hr) gas-fired unit designed to operate at 335 psig and 600 F. During the first few months of operation, it experienced several incidents of sagging, ductile-swelling and thin-lipped ruptures in the front wall and roof tubes immediately above its burners. These phenomena were also accompanied by scale-related heat blistering of the furnace wall and screen tubes. Were two separate problems being experienced or were these different symptoms of a single problem?

  13. Performance of prototypes for the PANDA barrel EMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, D. A.; Eissner, T.; Drexler, P.; Moritz, M.; Novotny, R. W.; PANDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment will be part of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) and aims for the study of strong interaction within the charm sector via antiproton proton collisions up to antiproton momenta of 15 GeV/c. Reflecting the variety of the physics program the PANDA detector is designed as a multi-purpose detector able to perform tracking, calorimetry and particle identification with nearly complete coverage of the solid angle. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) contained inside its Target Spectrometer is based on cooled PbWO4 scintillator crystals. In order to ensure an excellent performance throughout the large dynamic range of photon/electron energies ranging from a few MeV up to 15 GeV an extensive prototyping phase is mandatory. This contribution describes the measured response of the EMC barrel part prototype PROTO60 at the largest design energy to secondary beams provided by the SPS at CERN. In addition to PROTO60 a tracking station was deployed, providing precise position information of the 15 GeV/c positrons. For calibration purposes a 150 GeV/c muon beam and cosmic radiation, in combination with estimations from GEANT4 simulations were used. The obtained performance concerning energy, position and time information is presented.

  14. Performance of the GlueX Barrel Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elton; Dalton, Mark; McGinley, William; Papandreou, Zisis; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab will search for exotic hybrid mesons, a new form of hadronic matter that exhibits gluonic degrees of freedom. We have taken data to commission the experiment and report here on the construction and performance of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter (BCAL). The BCAL is a ``spaghetti calorimeter,'' consisting of layers of corrugated lead sheets, interleaved with planes of 1-mm-diameter, double-clad, scintillating fibers, bonded in the lead grooves using optical epoxy. This detector consists of 48 modules that are readout using 3,840 large-area Multi-Photon Pixel counter (MPPC) arrays. The measured width of the π0 mass peak is approximately 10 MeV, only slightly higher than projections based on prototypes. Systematic studies are underway to understand the contributions to the resolution and improve its performance. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  15. External barrel temperature of a small bore olympic rifle and shooting precision.

    PubMed

    Gladyszewska, B; Baranowski, P; Mazurek, W; Wozniak, J; Gladyszewski, G

    2013-03-01

    Investigations on changes in a rifle's barrel temperature during shooting in a rhythm typical for practitioners of Olympic shooting sports are presented. Walther KK300 (cal. 5.6 mm), a typical rifle often used in Olympic competitions, R50 RWS ammunition and a high speed thermographic camera were used in the study. Altair version 5 software was used to process thermal images and a stationary wavelet transform was applied to denoise signals for all the studied points. It was found that the temperature of the rifle barrel does not exceed 0.3°C after one shot whereas the total temperature increase does not exceed 5°C after taking 40 shots and does not affect the position of the hitting point on a target. In fact, contrary to popular belief, the so-called "warming shots" are not done for barrel heating but for cleaning of remnants in the barrel.

  16. A radial map of multi-whisker correlation selectivity in the rat barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Estebanez, Luc; Bertherat, Julien; Shulz, Daniel E.; Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean- François

    2016-01-01

    In the barrel cortex, several features of single-whisker stimuli are organized in functional maps. The barrel cortex also encodes spatio-temporal correlation patterns of multi-whisker inputs, but so far the cortical mapping of neurons tuned to such input statistics is unknown. Here we report that layer 2/3 of the rat barrel cortex contains an additional functional map based on neuronal tuning to correlated versus uncorrelated multi-whisker stimuli: neuron responses to uncorrelated multi-whisker stimulation are strongest above barrel centres, whereas neuron responses to correlated and anti-correlated multi-whisker stimulation peak above the barrel–septal borders, forming rings of multi-whisker synchrony-preferring cells. PMID:27869114

  17. Carbon fiber plates production for the CMS tracker outer barrel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

    2001-03-01

    The production methods together with the achieved flatness and thickness of the composite support structures of the CMS tracker outer barrel (TOB) detector are presented. Possible areas of improvement in the process and in the materials used are also suggested.

  18. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors are colocalized and coregulated with whisker barrels in rat somatosensory cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, P.; Kaufmann, D.; Hand, P.J.; Wolfe, B.B. )

    1990-07-01

    Autoradiography has been used to visualize independently the subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat somatosensory cortex. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors, but not beta 1-adrenergic receptors colocalize with whisker barrels in this tissue. Thus, each whisker sends a specific multisynaptic pathway to the somatosensory cortex that can be histochemically visualized and only one subtype of beta-adrenergic receptor is specifically associated with this cortical representation. Additionally, neonatal lesion of any or all of the whisker follicles results in loss of the corresponding barrel(s) as shown by histochemical markers. This loss is paralleled by a similar loss in the organization of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the somatosensory cortex. Other results indicate that these beta 2-adrenergic receptors are not involved in moment-to-moment signal transmission in this pathway and, additionally, are not involved in a gross way in the development of whisker-barrel array.

  19. Long-term Operational Experience with the Barrel CRID at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, Jaroslav

    1999-05-20

    The Barrel CRID detector has been operating successfully at SLD for the past seven years. It is an important tool for SLD physics analyses. The long-term operational experience with this device is described.

  20. EXTERNAL BARREL TEMPERATURE OF A SMALL BORE OLYMPIC RIFLE AND SHOOTING PRECISION

    PubMed Central

    Gladyszewska, B.; Baranowski, P.; Mazurek, W.; Wozniak, J.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations on changes in a rifle's barrel temperature during shooting in a rhythm typical for practitioners of Olympic shooting sports are presented. Walther KK300 (cal. 5.6 mm), a typical rifle often used in Olympic competitions, R50 RWS ammunition and a high speed thermographic camera were used in the study. Altair version 5 software was used to process thermal images and a stationary wavelet transform was applied to denoise signals for all the studied points. It was found that the temperature of the rifle barrel does not exceed 0.3°C after one shot whereas the total temperature increase does not exceed 5°C after taking 40 shots and does not affect the position of the hitting point on a target. In fact, contrary to popular belief, the so-called “warming shots” are not done for barrel heating but for cleaning of remnants in the barrel. PMID:24744465

  1. Functionally independent columns of rat somatosensory barrel cortex revealed with voltage-sensitive dye imaging.

    PubMed

    Petersen, C C; Sakmann, B

    2001-11-01

    Whisker movement is somatotopically represented in rodent neocortex by electrical activity in clearly defined barrels, which can be visualized in living brain slices. The functional architecture of this part of the cortex can thus be mapped in vitro with respect to its physiological input and compared with its anatomical architecture. The spatial extent of excitation was measured at high temporal resolution by imaging optical signals from voltage-sensitive dye evoked by stimulation of individual barrels in layer 4. The optical signals correlated closely with subthreshold EPSPs recorded simultaneously from excitatory neurons in layer 4 and layer 2/3, respectively. Excitation was initially (<2 msec) limited to the stimulated barrel and subsequently (>3 msec) spread in a columnar manner into layer 2/3 and then subsided in both layers after approximately 50 msec. The lateral extent of the response was limited to the cortical column defined structurally by the barrel in layer 4. Two experimental interventions increased the spread of excitation. First, blocking GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition caused excitation to spread laterally throughout wide regions of layer 2/3 and layer 5 but not into neighboring barrels, suggesting that the local excitatory connections within layer 4 are restricted to single barrels and that inhibitory neurons control spread in supragranular and infragranular layers. Second, NMDA receptor-dependent increase of the spread of excitation was induced by pairing repetitive stimulation of a barrel column with coincident stimulation of layer 2/3 in a neighboring column. Such plasticity in the spatial extent of excitation in a barrel column could underlie changes in cortical map structure induced by alterations of sensory experience.

  2. Yeast Mitochondria as a Model System to Study the Biogenesis of Bacterial β-Barrel Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Thomas; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Rapaport, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The evolutionary conservation in the biogenesis of these proteins allows mitochondria to assemble bacterial β-barrel proteins in their functional form. In this chapter, we describe exemplarily how the capacity of yeast mitochondria to process the trimeric autotransporter YadA can be used to study the role of bacterial periplasmic chaperones in this process.

  3. Evolutions of volatile sulfur compounds of Cabernet Sauvignon wines during aging in different oak barrels.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dong-Qing; Zheng, Xiao-Tian; Xu, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Yun-He; Duan, Chang-Qing; Liu, Yan-Lin

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in Cabernet Sauvignon wines from seven regions of China during maturation in oak barrels was investigated. The barrels were made of different wood grains (fine and medium) and toasting levels (light and medium). Twelve VSCs were quantified by GC/FPD, with dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and methionol exceeding their sensory thresholds. Most VSCs tended to decline during the aging, while DMS was found to increase. After one year aging, the levels of DMS, 2-methyltetrahy-drothiophen-3-one and sulfur-containing esters were lower in the wines aged in oak barrels than in stainless steel tanks. The wood grain and toasting level of oak barrels significantly influenced the concentration of S-methyl thioacetate and 2-methyltetrahy-drothiophen-3-one. This study reported the evolution of VSCs in wines during oak barrel aging for the first time and evaluated the influence of barrel types, which would provide wine-makers with references in making proposals about wine aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Research on vibration characteristics of gun barrel based on contact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhou, Qizheng; Yue, Pengfei

    2017-04-01

    In order to study vibration characteristics of the gun barrel under the action of moving projectile, the gun barrel is simplified to cross sectional cantilever beam such as Euler. Considering contact conditions of inertia effect and projectile with the gun barrel, the equation of lateral vibration of the gun barrel is established under the projectile-gun coupling effect; the modal analysis method is used to give the analytic solutions of equation series. The effect of the motion parameters the projectile on the vibration of gun barrel is discussed, and characteristics of vibration of gun barrel are further studied under two conditions of repeating and projectile with mass eccentricity. The research results show that reasonable control of the acceleration of the projectile in the gun bore, and reduction of projectile mass eccentricity can help reduce the muzzle vibration at the gun firing. The research results can provide reference for overall design of the gun, and the modeling and analysis method used in the paper can be promoted for the solution of vibration of other related projects under the moving excitation.

  5. Subbarrel Patterns in Somatosensory Cortical Barrels Can Emerge from Local Dynamic Instabilities

    PubMed Central

    Ermentrout, Bard; Simons, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Complex spatial patterning, common in the brain as well as in other biological systems, can emerge as a result of dynamic interactions that occur locally within developing structures. In the rodent somatosensory cortex, groups of neurons called “barrels” correspond to individual whiskers on the contralateral face. Barrels themselves often contain subbarrels organized into one of a few characteristic patterns. Here we demonstrate that similar patterns can be simulated by means of local growth-promoting and growth-retarding interactions within the circular domains of single barrels. The model correctly predicts that larger barrels contain more spatially complex subbarrel patterns, suggesting that the development of barrels and of the patterns within them may be understood in terms of some relatively simple dynamic processes. We also simulate the full nonlinear equations to demonstrate the predictive value of our linear analysis. Finally, we show that the pattern formation is robust with respect to the geometry of the barrel by simulating patterns on a realistically shaped barrel domain. This work shows how simple pattern forming mechanisms can explain neural wiring both qualitatively and quantitatively even in complex and irregular domains. PMID:19834600

  6. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels.

  7. Cortical damping: analysis of thalamocortical response transformations in rodent barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Pinto, David J; Hartings, Jed A; Brumberg, Joshua C; Simons, Daniel J

    2003-01-01

    In the whisker-barrel system, layer IV excitatory neurons respond preferentially to high-velocity deflections of their principal whisker, and these responses are inhibited by deflections of adjacent whiskers. Thalamic input neurons are amplitude and velocity sensitive and have larger excitatory and weaker inhibitory receptive fields than cortical neurons. Computational models based on known features of barrel circuitry capture these and other differences between thalamic and cortical neuron response properties. The models' responses are highly sensitive to thalamic firing synchrony, a finding subsequently confirmed in real barrels by in vivo experiments. Here, we use dynamic systems analysis to examine how barrel circuitry attains its sensitivity to input timing, and how this sensitivity explains the transformation of receptive fields between thalamus and cortex. We find that strong inhibition renders the net effect of intracortical connections suppressive or damping, distinguishing it from previous amplifying models of cortical microcircuits. In damping circuits, recurrent excitation enhances response tuning not by amplifying responses to preferred inputs, but by enabling them to better withstand strong inhibitory influences. Dense interconnections among barrel neurons result in considerable response homogeneity. Neurons outside the barrel layer respond more heterogeneously, possibly reflecting diverse networks and multiple transformations within the cortical output layers.

  8. Functional diversity of supragranular GABAergic neurons in the barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gentet, Luc J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the neocortex forms a distributed system comprised of several functional areas, its vertical columnar organization is largely conserved across areas and species, suggesting the existence of a canonical neocortical microcircuit. In order to elucidate the principles governing the organization of such a cortical diagram, a detailed understanding of the dynamics binding different types of cortical neurons into a coherent algorithm is essential. Within this complex circuitry, GABAergic interneurons, while forming approximately only 15–20% of all cortical neurons, appear critical in maintaining a dynamic balance between excitation and inhibition. Despite their importance, cortical GABAergic neurons have not been extensively studied in vivo and their precise role in shaping the local microcircuit sensory response still remains to be determined. Their paucity, combined with their molecular, anatomical, and physiological diversity, has made it difficult to even establish a consensual nomenclature. However, recent technological advances in microscopy and mouse genetics have fostered a renewed interest in neocortical interneurons by putting them within “visible” reach of experimenters. The anatomically well-defined whisker-to-barrel pathway of the rodent is particularly amenable to studies attempting to link cortical circuit dynamics to behavior. To each whisker corresponds a discrete cortical unit equivalent to a single column, specialized in the encoding and processing of the sensory information it receives. In this review, we will focus on the functional role that each subtype of supragranular GABAergic neuron embedded within such a single neocortical unit may play in shaping the dynamics of the local circuit during somatosensory integration. PMID:22912602

  9. Flavonoids from barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Iwona; Stochmal, Anna; Kapusta, Ireneusz; Janda, Bogdan; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2007-04-04

    Twenty-three flavonoids have been identified in the aerial parts of barrel medic, and their structures were established by spectrometric and spectroscopic (ESI-MS/MS and NMR) techniques. Eight of the identified compounds, including apigenin 7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->3)-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside, apigenin 7-O-[2'-O-sinapoyl-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside], apigenin 7-O-{2-O-feruloyl-[beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside}, chrysoeriol 7-O-[beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside, chrysoeriol 7-O-{2'-O-p-coumaroyl-[beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside}, tricin 7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-4'-O-glucopyranoside, tricin 7-O-[2'-O-feruloyl-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside], and tricin 7-O-{2'-O-p-coumaroyl-[beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranosyl(1-->2)-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside}, have not been reported before in the plant kingdom. Additionally, the presence of two luteolin, three apigenin, one chrysoeriol, and six tricin glycosides, previously identified in alfalfa (Medicago sativa), was confirmed in M. truncatula. Moreover, besides the above flavones, the aerial parts of this species contained three flavonols including rutin, laricitrin 3,7,5'-triglucoside, and laricitrin 3,5'-diglucoside.

  10. Comparison Between Malolactic Fermentation Container and Barrel Toasting Effects on Phenolic, Volatile and Sensory Profile of Red Wines.

    PubMed

    González-Centeno, María Reyes; Chira, Kleopatra; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2017-04-01

    Ellagitannin and anthocyanin profiles, woody volatile composition and sensory properties of wines in which malolactic fermentation (MLF) took place in barrels or stainless steel tanks, have been compared after 12 months of barrel ageing. Three different barrel toastings were evaluated. Barrel-fermented wines generally presented 1.2-fold higher total phenolics, whereas tank-fermented wines exhibited 1.1 and 1.2-fold greater total proanthocyanidin and anthocyanin contents, respectively. Concerning ellagitannin composition, barrel toasting effect seemed to be more important than differences due to MLF-container. Certain woody and fruity volatiles varied significantly (p < 0.05) depending on whether MLF occurred in barrels or tanks. Barrel-fermented wines were preferred in mouth, while olfactory preference depended on barrel toasting. This is the first study that evaluates the impact of oak wood during MLF on ellagitannin composition of wine, as well as the barrel toasting effect on wine attributes during ageing when MLF occurred whether in barrels or tanks.

  11. Performance prospects for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel avalanche photodiodes for LHC phase I and phase II: Radiation hardness and longevity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addesa, F.; Cavallari, F.

    2015-07-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC is a hermetic, fine-grained, homogeneous calorimeter, comprising 75,848 lead tungstate scintillating crystals. Avalanche photodiodes produced by Hamamatsu are used as sensors for the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter. These devices were tested for radiation hardness assuming an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1, which corresponds to a neutron fluence of 2- 4 ×1013 n /cm2, depending on the detector location. Beginning in 2022, a new phase of the LHC is foreseen to exploit the full potential of the accelerator, which will deliver 3000 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Irradiation studies up to a fluence of 1.5 ×1014 n /cm2 have been performed to qualify the avalanche photodiodes for radiation hardness. We present measurements of gain, quantum efficiency and noise, and discuss the implications for the CMS electromagnetic barrel calorimeter performance.

  12. Time-course and mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity in layers 2/3 and 5 of the barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that ocular dominance plasticity in layer 2/3 of the visual cortex exhibits a form of homeostatic plasticity that is related to synaptic scaling and depends on TNFα. In this study, we tested whether a similar form of plasticity was present in layer 2/3 of the barrel cortex and, therefore, whether the mechanism was likely to be a general property of cortical neurons. We found that whisker deprivation could induce homeostatic plasticity in layer 2/3 of barrel cortex, but not in a mouse strain lacking synaptic scaling. The time-course of homeostatic plasticity in layer 2/3 was similar to that of L5 regular spiking (RS) neurons (L5RS), but slower than that of L5 intrinsic bursting (IB) neurons (L5IB). In layer 5, the strength of evoked whisker responses and ex vivo miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) amplitudes showed an identical time-course for homeostatic plasticity, implying that plasticity at excitatory synapses contacting layer 5 neurons is sufficient to explain the changes in evoked responses. Spontaneous firing rate also showed homeostatic behaviour for L5IB cells, but was absent for L5RS cells over the time-course studied. Spontaneous firing rate homeostasis was found to be independent of evoked response homeostasis suggesting that the two depend on different mechanisms. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity’. PMID:28093546

  13. Calibration of the ATLAS Hadronic Barrel Calorimeter TileCal using 2008, 2009 and 2010 Cosmic-ray Muon Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zhili; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Group

    The ATLAS iron-scintillator hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides precision measurements of jets and missing transverse energy produced in the LHC proton-proton collisions. Results assessing the calorimeter calibration obtained using cosmic ray muons collected in 2008, 2009 and 2010 are presented. The analysis was based on the comparison between experimental and simulated data, and addresses three issues. First the average non-uniformity of the response of the cells within a layer was estimated to be about ±2%. Second, the average response of different layers was found to be not inter-calibrated, considering the sources of error. The largest difference between the responses of two layers was 4%. Finally, the differences between the energy scales of each layer obtained in this analysis and the value set at test beams using electrons was found to range between -3% and +1%. The sources of uncertainties in the response measurements were strongly correlated, including the uncertainty in the simulation. The total error of each layer determinations was 2%. Stable response values were obtained for the three data-taking periods. The uncertainties on the comparisons were less than ±1% for the Long Barrel layers and less than ±3% for the Extended Barrel ones.

  14. Time-course and mechanisms of homeostatic plasticity in layers 2/3 and 5 of the barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Glazewski, Stanislaw; Greenhill, Stuart; Fox, Kevin

    2017-03-05

    Recent studies have shown that ocular dominance plasticity in layer 2/3 of the visual cortex exhibits a form of homeostatic plasticity that is related to synaptic scaling and depends on TNFα. In this study, we tested whether a similar form of plasticity was present in layer 2/3 of the barrel cortex and, therefore, whether the mechanism was likely to be a general property of cortical neurons. We found that whisker deprivation could induce homeostatic plasticity in layer 2/3 of barrel cortex, but not in a mouse strain lacking synaptic scaling. The time-course of homeostatic plasticity in layer 2/3 was similar to that of L5 regular spiking (RS) neurons (L5RS), but slower than that of L5 intrinsic bursting (IB) neurons (L5IB). In layer 5, the strength of evoked whisker responses and ex vivo miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) amplitudes showed an identical time-course for homeostatic plasticity, implying that plasticity at excitatory synapses contacting layer 5 neurons is sufficient to explain the changes in evoked responses. Spontaneous firing rate also showed homeostatic behaviour for L5IB cells, but was absent for L5RS cells over the time-course studied. Spontaneous firing rate homeostasis was found to be independent of evoked response homeostasis suggesting that the two depend on different mechanisms.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity'.

  15. Aβ42 assembles into specific β-barrel pore-forming oligomers in membrane-mimicking environments

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Batiste, Montserrat; Ninot-Pedrosa, Martí; Bayoumi, Mariam; Gairí, Margarida; Maglia, Giovanni; Carulla, Natàlia

    2016-01-01

    The formation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) oligomers at the cellular membrane is considered to be a crucial process underlying neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, it is critical to characterize the oligomers that form within a membrane environment. To contribute to this characterization, we have applied strategies widely used to examine the structure of membrane proteins to study the two major Aβ variants, Aβ40 and Aβ42. Accordingly, various types of detergent micelles were extensively screened to identify one that preserved the properties of Aβ in lipid environments—namely the formation of oligomers that function as pores. Remarkably, under the optimized detergent micelle conditions, Aβ40 and Aβ42 showed different behavior. Aβ40 aggregated into amyloid fibrils, whereas Aβ42 assembled into oligomers that inserted into lipid bilayers as well-defined pores and adopted a specific structure with characteristics of a β-barrel arrangement that we named β-barrel pore-forming Aβ42 oligomers (βPFOsAβ42). Because Aβ42, relative to Aβ40, has a more prominent role in AD, the higher propensity of Aβ42 to form βPFOs constitutes an indication of their relevance in AD. Moreover, because βPFOsAβ42 adopt a specific structure, this property offers an unprecedented opportunity for testing a hypothesis regarding the involvement of βPFOs and, more generally, membrane-associated Aβ oligomers in AD. PMID:27621459

  16. The CMS barrel calorimeter response to particle beams from 2-GeV/c to 350-GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Adzic, P.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, N.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Virginia U. /Iowa State U.

    2009-01-01

    The response of the CMS barrel calorimeter (electromagnetic plus hadronic) to hadrons, electrons and muons over a wide momentum range from 2 to 350 GeV/c has been measured. To our knowledge, this is the widest range of momenta in which any calorimeter system has been studied. These tests, carried out at the H2 beam-line at CERN, provide a wealth of information, especially at low energies. The analysis of the differences in calorimeter response to charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons and a detailed discussion of the underlying phenomena are presented. We also show techniques that apply corrections to the signals from the considerably different electromagnetic (EB) and hadronic (HB) barrel calorimeters in reconstructing the energies of hadrons. Above 5 GeV/c, these corrections improve the energy resolution of the combined system where the stochastic term equals 84.7 {+-} 1.6% and the constant term is 7.4 {+-} 0.8%. The corrected mean response remains constant within 1.3% rms.

  17. Long-term sensory deprivation selectively rearranges functional inhibitory circuits in mouse barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Peijun; Rudolph, Uwe; Huntsman, Molly M

    2009-07-21

    Long-term whisker removal alters the balance of excitation and inhibition in rodent barrel cortex, yet little is known about the contributions of individual cells and synapses in this process. We studied synaptic inhibition in four major types of neurons in live tangential slices that isolate layer 4 in the posteromedial barrel subfield. Voltage-clamp recordings of layer 4 neurons reveal that fast decay of synaptic inhibition requires alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptors. After 7 weeks of deprivation, we found that GABA(A)-receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in the inhibitory low-threshold-spiking (LTS) cell recorded in deprived barrels exhibited faster decay kinetics and larger amplitudes in whisker-deprived barrels than those in nondeprived barrels in age-matched controls. This was not observed in other cell types. Additionally, IPSCs recorded in LTS cells from deprived barrels show a marked increase in zolpidem sensitivity. To determine if the faster IPSC decay in LTS cells from deprived barrels indicates an increase in alpha1 subunit functionality, we deprived alpha1(H101R) mutant mice with zolpidem-insensitive alpha1-containing GABA(A) receptors. In these mice and matched wild-type controls, IPSC decay kinetics in LTS cells were faster after whisker removal; however, the deprivation-induced sensitivity to zolpidem was reduced in alpha1(H101R) mice. These data illustrate a change of synaptic inhibition in LTS cells via an increase in alpha1-subunit-mediated function. Because alpha1 subunits are commonly associated with circuit-specific plasticity in sensory cortex, this switch in LTS cell synaptic inhibition may signal necessary circuit changes required for plastic adjustments in sensory-deprived cortex.

  18. Double-barrel vascularised fibula graft in mandibular reconstruction: a 10-year experience with an algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Guo, Xue-hua; Sun, Jian; Li, Jun; Shi, Jun; Huang, Wei; Ow, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This retrospective study aims to report an algorithm to assist surgeons in selecting different modes of the double-barrel vascularised fibula graft for mandibular reconstruction. A total of 45 patients who underwent reconstruction of mandibular defects with different modes of the double-barrel vascularised fibula graft were reviewed. Our algorithm for deciding on any one of the different modes for different mandibular defects is influenced by factors including history of radiotherapy, the length of mandibular body defect and the need to preserve the inferior mandibular border. Post-operative functional outcomes included diet type and speech, and aesthetic results gained at post-operative 2 years. Patients with implant-borne prosthetic teeth underwent assessment of their masticatory function. There were four modes of mandibular reconstruction according to our algorithm, which included double-barrel vascularised fibula graft (n=21), partial double-barrel fibula graft (n=11), condylar prosthesis in combination with partial/double-barrel fibula graft (n=11), and double-barrel fibula onlay graft (n=2). Flap survival in all patients was 97.78%. Good occlusion, bony unions and wound closures were observed in 44 patients. Eleven patients received dental implantation in the transplanted fibula at post-operative 9-18th months. One patient wore removal partial dentures. For 11 patients with implant-borne prosthetic teeth, the average post-operative ipsilateral occlusal force was 41.5±17.7% of the contralateral force. Good functional and aesthetic results were achieved in 38 patients with more than 2 years of follow-up, including regular diet, normal speech and excellent or good appearance, especially for patients with dental rehabilitation. Good aesthetic and functional results can be achieved after dental rehabilitation by following our algorithm when choosing the different modes of double-barrel vascularised fibula graft for mandibular reconstruction. Copyright © 2012

  19. Thalamic adenylyl cyclase 1 is required for barrel formation in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Lee, L-J; Hayashi, Y; Muglia, L; Itohara, S; Erzurumlu, R S; Iwasato, T

    2015-04-02

    Cyclic AMP signaling is critical for activity-dependent refinement of neuronal circuits. Global disruption of adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1), the major calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase in the brain, impairs formation of whisker-related discrete neural modules (the barrels) in cortical layer 4 in mice. Since AC1 is expressed both in the thalamus and the neocortex, the question of whether pre- or postsynaptic (or both) AC1 plays a role in barrel formation has emerged. Previously, we generated cortex-specific AC1 knockout (Cx-AC1KO) mice and found that these animals develop histologically normal barrels, suggesting a potentially more prominent role for thalamic AC1 in barrel formation. To determine this, we generated three new lines of mice: one in which AC1 is disrupted in nearly half of the thalamic ventrobasal nucleus cells in addition to the cortical excitatory neurons (Cx/pTh-AC1KO mouse), and another in which AC1 is disrupted in the thalamus but not in the cortex or brainstem nuclei of the somatosensory system (Th-AC1KO mouse). Cx/pTh-AC1KO mice show severe deficits in barrel formation. Th-AC1KO mice show even more severe disruption in barrel patterning. In these two lines, single thalamocortical (TC) axon labeling revealed a larger lateral extent of TC axons in layer 4 compared to controls. In the third line, all calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (both AC1 and AC8) are deleted in cortical excitatory neurons. These mice have normal barrels. Taken together, these results indicate that thalamic AC1 plays a major role in patterning and refinement of the mouse TC circuitry.

  20. Barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, L.; Brunner, S. E.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2016-07-01

    The barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR is foreseen as a Scintillator Tile (SciTil) Hodoscope based on several thousand small plastic scintillator tiles read-out with directly attached Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The main tasks of the system are an accurate determination of the time origin of particle tracks to avoid event mixing at high collision rates, relative time-of-flight measurements as well as particle identification in the low momentum regime. The main requirements are the use of a minimum material amount and a time resolution of σ < 100 ps. We have performed extensive optimization studies and prototype tests to prove the feasibility of the SciTil design and finalize the R&D phase. In a 2.7 GeV/c proton beam at Forschungszentrum Jülich a time resolution of about 80 ps has been achieved using SiPMs from KETEK and Hamamatsu with an active area of 3 × 3mm2. Employing the Digital Photon Counter from Philips a time resolution of about 30 ps has been reached.

  1. Emergence of spatiotemporal invariance in large neuronal ensembles in rat barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Nathan S.; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2015-01-01

    Invariant sensory coding is the robust coding of some sensory information (e.g., stimulus type) despite major changes in other sensory parameters (e.g., stimulus strength). The contribution of large populations of neurons (ensembles) to invariant sensory coding is not well understood, but could offer distinct advantages over invariance in single cell receptive fields. To test invariant sensory coding in neuronal ensembles evoked by single whisker stimulation as early as primary sensory cortex, we recorded detailed spatiotemporal movies of evoked ensemble activity through the depth of rat barrel cortex using microelectrode arrays. We found that an emergent property of whisker evoked ensemble activity, its spatiotemporal profile, was notably invariant across major changes in stimulus amplitude (up to >200-fold). Such ensemble-based invariance was found for single whisker stimulation as well as for the integrated profile of activity evoked by the more naturalistic stimulation of the entire whisker array. Further, the integrated profile of whisker array evoked ensemble activity and its invariance to stimulus amplitude shares striking similarities to “funneled” tactile perception in humans. We therefore suggest that ensemble-based invariance could provide a robust neurobiological substrate for invariant sensory coding and integration at an early stage of cortical sensory processing already in primary sensory cortex. PMID:26217194

  2. Assembly of a Full-Scale External Tank Barrel Section Using Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Chip; Adams, Glynn

    1999-01-01

    A full-scale pathfinder barrel section of the External Tank for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Transport System (Space Shuttle) has been assembled at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) via a collaborative effort between NASA/MSFC and Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems. The barrel section is 27.5 feet in diameter and 15 feet in height. The barrel was assembled using Super-Light-Weight (SLWT), orthogrid, Al-Li 2195 panel sections and a single longeron panel. A vertical weld tool at MSFC was modified to accommodate FSW and used to assemble the barrel. These modifications included the addition of a FSW weld head and new controller hardware and software, the addition of a backing anvil and the replacement of the clamping system with individually actuated clamps. Weld process 4evelopment was initially conducted to optimize the process for the welds required for completing the assembly. The variable thickness welds in the longeron section were conducted via both two-sided welds and with the use of a retractable pin tool. The barrel assembly was completed in October 1998. Details of the vertical weld tool modifications and the assembly process are presented.

  3. Unusual mode of firearm injury from the recoiled rear end of a gun barrel.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A; Malla, G; Joshi, S; Kumar, A; Koirala, S

    2008-09-01

    Atypical gunshot wounds are caused by a diverse set of parameters relating to weapons and ammunition. We report a previously-unreported and atypical mode of gunshot wound produced by a detached rear end of the barrel of a gun following accidental gun fire, and discuss the difficulties in the management. A 36-year-old man presented to the emergency department with an alleged history of injury on the forehead with the rear end of a gun barrel following accidental gunfire while cleaning the nozzle. Since the time of injury, the patient was in an altered sensorium and had weakness on the right side of the body. There was minimal but continuous bleeding from the wound, with extrusion of brain matter. Skull radiograph showed that the rear end of the barrel had entered the left frontal bone, with associated depressed fracture of the frontal bone. The patient underwent a bicoronal, bifrontal craniotomy with a T-shaped extension towards the barrel to facilitate the reflection of the scalp flap and to avoid any movement of the barrel as it might further injure the brain. Necrotic brain, dura and bone pieces were removed. The patient was doing well at follow-up except for mild residual motor deficits. This case illustrates that while working with limited facilities, particularly in underdeveloped countries, a careful clinical assessment, interpretation of available images and a judicious operative approach can help to save the patient.

  4. Angular tuning and velocity sensitivity in different neuron classes within layer 4 of rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Hyun; Simons, Daniel J

    2004-01-01

    Local circuitry within layer IV whisker-related barrels is preferentially sensitive to thalamic population firing synchrony, and neurons respond most vigorously to stimuli, such as high-velocity whisker deflections, that evoke it. Field potential recordings suggest that thalamic barreloid neurons having similar angular preferences fire synchronously. To examine whether angular tuning of cortical neurons might also be affected by thalamic firing synchrony, we characterized responses of layer IV units to whisker deflections that varied in angular direction and velocity. Barrel regular-spike units (RSUs) became more tuned for deflection angle with slower whisker movements. Deflection amplitude had no affect. Barrel fast-spike units (FSUs) were poorly tuned for deflection angle, and their responses remained constant with different deflection velocity. The dependence of angular tuning on deflection velocity among barrel RSUs appears to reflect the same underlying response dynamics that determine their velocity sensitivity and receptive field focus. Unexpectedly, septal RSUs and FSUs are largely similar to their barrel counterparts despite available evidence suggesting that they receive different afferent inputs and are embedded within different local circuits.

  5. RORβ Induces Barrel-like Neuronal Clusters in the Developing Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Jabaudon, Denis; J. Shnider, Sara; J. Tischfield, David; J. Galazo, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Neurons in layer IV of the rodent whisker somatosensory cortex are tangentially organized in periodic clusters called barrels, each of which is innervated by thalamocortical axons transmitting sensory information from a single principal whisker, together forming a somatotopic map of the whisker pad. Proper thalamocortical innervation is critical for barrel formation during development, but the molecular mechanisms controlling layer IV neuron clustering are unknown. Here, we investigate the role in this mapping of the nuclear orphan receptor RORβ, which is expressed in neurons in layer IV during corticogenesis. We find that RORβ protein expression specifically increases in the whisker barrel cortex during barrel formation and that in vivo overexpression of RORβ is sufficient to induce periodic barrel-like clustering of cortical neurons. Remarkably, this clustering can be induced as early as E18, prior to innervation by thalamocortical afferents and whisker derived-input. At later developmental stages, these ectopic neuronal clusters are specifically innervated by thalamocortical axons, demonstrated by anterograde labeling from the thalamus and by expression of thalamocortical-specific synaptic markers. Together, these data indicate that RORβ expression levels control cytoarchitectural patterning of neocortical neurons during development, a critical process for the topographical mapping of whisker input onto the cortical surface. PMID:21799210

  6. Adaptation to sensory stimulation in the Rat Barrel Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Jaime

    Sustained stimulation of sensory organs results in adaptation of the neuronal response along the sensory pathway. Whether or not cortical adaptation affects equally excitatory and inhibitory inputs is poorly understood. This question was examined using patch recordings of neurons in the barrel cortex of anesthetized rats while repetitively stimulating the principal whisker. After characterizing the excitation and inhibition evoked either by single or double whisker deflection or by different stimulation strengths, it was found that inhibition, unlike excitation, sums linearly and adapts more, causing the balance between these inputs to shift towards excitation. A comparison of the latency of thalamic firing and evoked synaptic inputs in the cortex strongly suggests that adaptation of inhibition results mostly from depression of inhibitory synapses rather than reduction in the firing of inhibitory cells. A similar change in the balance was reproduced by a simple feedforward model. The differential adaptation of the synaptic inputs that shifts the balance toward excitation may act as a gain mechanism which enhances the subthreshold response during sustained stimulation, despite a reduction in excitation. Natural sensory stimulation rarely arrives in an isolated manner, but in a context of several stimulations, like when a rat sweeps its whisker along a surface with a given texture. It was shown that individual single cells sporadically fail to respond, in a very variable fashion from trial to trial. Whether or not adaptation is correlated among neighboring neurons or is it a private, independent phenomenon was investigated by performing simultaneous recordings. Neighboring neurons presented a highly correlated responsiveness to repetitive stimulation, which strongly varied from trial to trial in a synchronized way. Population averages of a single trial obtained by LFP recordings and VSD imaging differed considerably from the time average but was highly correlated to

  7. HHrep: de novo protein repeat detection and the origin of TIM barrels

    PubMed Central

    Söding, Johannes; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    HHrep is a web server for the de novo identification of repeats in protein sequences, which is based on the pairwise comparison of profile hidden Markov models (HMMs). Its main strength is its sensitivity, allowing it to detect highly divergent repeat units in protein sequences whose repeats could as yet only be detected from their structures. Examples include sequences with β-propellor fold, ferredoxin-like fold, double psi barrels or (βα)8 (TIM) barrels. We illustrate this with proteins from four superfamilies of TIM barrels by revealing a clear 4- and 8-fold symmetry, which we detect solely from their sequences. This symmetry might be the trace of an ancient origin through duplication of a βαβα or βα unit. HHrep can be accessed at . PMID:16844977

  8. HHrep: de novo protein repeat detection and the origin of TIM barrels.

    PubMed

    Söding, Johannes; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas

    2006-07-01

    HHrep is a web server for the de novo identification of repeats in protein sequences, which is based on the pairwise comparison of profile hidden Markov models (HMMs). Its main strength is its sensitivity, allowing it to detect highly divergent repeat units in protein sequences whose repeats could as yet only be detected from their structures. Examples include sequences with beta-propellor fold, ferredoxin-like fold, double psi barrels or (betaalpha)8 (TIM) barrels. We illustrate this with proteins from four superfamilies of TIM barrels by revealing a clear 4- and 8-fold symmetry, which we detect solely from their sequences. This symmetry might be the trace of an ancient origin through duplication of a betaalphabetaalpha or betaalpha unit. HHrep can be accessed at http://hhrep.tuebingen.mpg.de.

  9. [Automatic polishing of dental prostheses. 1. Development of a centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus].

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Y; Miyazaki, T; Aoyama, N; Suzuki, E; Miyaji, T

    1990-09-01

    A centrifugal barrel finishing apparatus with a variable turn table rotational speed (250-1,000 rpm) was newly developed and barrel finishing of Ni-Cr casting plates (10 x 10 x 2 mm) was performed using alumina base chips. When using the sample with a mirror face the amount of polishing and the surface roughness increased and the surface gloss decreased with the increase in rotation speed. A high rotational speed was useful for coarse polishing and low rotational speed was useful for fine polishing. The continuous barrel polishing was trially performed using the sample prepared by the carborundum wheel under variable rotational speed. Automatic polishing to fine polishing could be done using this apparatus.

  10. Beta-Barrel Scaffold of Fluorescent Proteins: Folding, Stability and Role in Chromophore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the current view of the interaction between the β-barrel scaffold of fluorescent proteins and their unique chromophore located in the internal helix. The chromophore originates from the polypeptide chain and its properties are influenced by the surrounding protein matrix of the β-barrel. On the other hand, it appears that a chromophore tightens the β-barrel scaffold and plays a crucial role in its stability. Furthermore, the presence of a mature chromophore causes hysteresis of protein unfolding and refolding. We survey studies measuring protein unfolding and refolding using traditional methods as well as new approaches, such as mechanical unfolding and reassembly of truncated fluorescent proteins. We also analyze models of fluorescent protein unfolding and refolding obtained through different approaches, and compare the results of protein folding in vitro to co-translational folding of a newly synthesized polypeptide chain. PMID:23351712

  11. Lewin estimates 2 billion barrels of US tar sand recoverable at mid $20/bbl

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    In 1983, Lewin and Associates prepared a report which established that the US tar sands resource amounts to over 60 billion barrels of bitumen in-place. However, no estimate was made of the technically or economically recoverable portion of this resource. More recent work carried out by Lewin for the US Department of Energy presents an appraisal of technically and economically recoverable tar sands. The paper describes the tar sand resource in-place, tar sand recovery models used in the study, engineering cost models, the economics of the steam soak prospect, and the economics of a surface mining prospect. The results of the Lewin study show that 5.7 billion barrels of domestic tar sand are technically recoverable, using cyclic steam injection and surface extractive mining. Of this, 4.9 billion barrels are technically recoverable from surface mining methods, with 0.8 billion recoverable from steam soak applications. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  12. Network mechanisms of spindle-burst oscillations in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Minlebaev, Marat; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-01-01

    Early in development, cortical networks generate particular patterns of activity that participate in cortical development. The dominant pattern of electrical activity in the neonatal rat neocortex in vivo is a spatially confined spindle-burst. Here, we studied network mechanisms of generation of spindle-bursts in the barrel cortex of neonatal rats using a superfused cortex preparation in vivo. Both spontaneous and sensory-evoked spindle-bursts were present in the superfused barrel cortex. Pharmacological analysis revealed that spindle-bursts are driven by glutamatergic synapses with a major contribution of AMPA/kainate receptors, but slight participation of NMDA receptors and gap junctions. Although GABAergic synapses contributed minimally to the pacing the rhythm of spindle-burst oscillations, surround GABAergic inhibition appeared to be crucial for their compartmentalization. We propose that local spindle-burst oscillations, driven by glutamatergic synapses and spatially confined by GABAergic synapses, contribute to the development of barrel cortex during the critical period of developmental plasticity.

  13. A novel open-barrel structure of octameric translin reveals a potential RNA entryway.

    PubMed

    Eliahoo, Elad; Marx, Ailie; Manor, Haim; Alian, Akram

    2015-02-27

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/RNA binding protein translin was suggested to be involved in chromosomal translocations, telomere metabolism, and mRNA transport and translation. Oligonucleotide binding surfaces map within a closed cavity of translin octameric barrels, raising the question as to how DNA/RNA gain access to this inner cavity, particularly given that, to date, none of the barrel structures reported hint to an entryway. Here, we argue against a mechanism by which translin octamers may "dissociate and reassemble" upon RNA binding and report a novel "open"-barrel structure of human translin revealing a feasible DNA/RNA entryway into the cavity. Additionally, we report that translin not only is confined to binding of ssDNA oligonucleotides, or single-stranded extensions of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), but also can bind single-stranded sequences internally embedded in dsDNA molecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distributed Wireless Monitoring System for Ullage and Temperature in Wine Barrels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenqi; Skouroumounis, George K.; Monro, Tanya M.; Taylor, Dennis K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multipurpose and low cost sensor for the simultaneous monitoring of temperature and ullage of wine in barrels in two of the most important stages of winemaking, that being fermentation and maturation. The distributed sensor subsystem is imbedded within the bung of the barrel and runs on battery for a period of at least 12 months and costs around $27 AUD for all parts. In addition, software was designed which allows for the remote transmission and easy visual interpretation of the data for the winemaker. Early warning signals can be sent when the temperature or ullage deviates from a winemakers expectations so remedial action can be taken, such as when topping is required or the movement of the barrels to a cooler cellar location. Such knowledge of a wine’s properties or storage conditions allows for a more precise control of the final wine quality. PMID:26266410

  15. Changes in amine concentrations during aging of red wine in oak barrels.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Moreno, Nerea; Torrea Goñi, Diego; Ancín Azpilicueta, Carmen

    2003-09-10

    This investigation studied the evolution of amines in red wines made with Merlot variety, during aging in American oak barrels (Quercus alba) and in French oak barrels (Quercus sessilis) from the Allier and Nevers regions. From the results obtained it was observed that the evolutions of the amines were similar in all three types of oak woods. Histamine and tyramine were produced at the beginning of the aging process, although they were not accumulated in the wines, probably due to their degradation. Putrescine was the most abundant amine in the wines; its concentration increased to an important extent during aging as it did not undergo degradation. The concentration of cadaverine increased slightly at the first stage of aging and, like putrescine, did not degrade at all. The volatile amines showed slight variations during aging, although in no cases were high accumulations observed in the wines. Dimethylamine and isobutylamine were degraded during storage in the barrels.

  16. Early stages in the biogenesis of eukaryotic β-barrel proteins.

    PubMed

    Jores, Tobias; Rapaport, Doron

    2017-09-01

    The endosymbiotic organelles mitochondria and chloroplasts harbour, similarly to their prokaryotic progenitors, β-barrel proteins in their outer membrane. These proteins are encoded on nuclear DNA, translated on cytosolic ribosomes and imported into their target organelles by a dedicated machinery. Recent studies have provided insights into the import into the organelles and the membrane insertion of these proteins. Although the cytosolic stages of their biogenesis are less well defined, it is speculated that upon their synthesis, chaperones prevent β-barrel proteins from aggregation and keep them in an import-competent conformation. In this Review, we summarize the current knowledge about the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins, focusing on the early stages from the translation on cytosolic ribosomes to the recognition on the surface of the organelle. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Quantitative/Statistical Approach to Bullet-to-Firearm Identification with Consecutively Manufactured Barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Striupaitis; R.E. Gaensslen

    2005-01-30

    Efforts to use objective image comparison and bullet scanning technologies to distinguish bullets from consecutively manufactured handgun barrels from two manufacturers gave mixed results. The ability of a technology to reliably distinguish between matching and non-matching bullets, where the non-matching bullets were as close in pattern to the matching ones as is probably possible, would provide evidence that the distinctions could be made ''objectively'', and independently of human eyes. That evidence is identical or very close to what seems to be needed to satisfy Daubert standards. It is fair to say that the FTI IBIS image comparison technology correctly distinguished between all the Springfield barrel bullets, and between most but not all of the HiPoint barrel bullets. In the HiPoint cases that were not distinguished 100% of the time, they would he distinguished correctly at least 83% of the time. These results, although obviously limited to the materials used in the comparisons, provide strong evidence that barrel-to-bullet matching is objectively reliable. The results with SciClops were less compelling. The results do not mean that bullet-to-barrel matching is not objectively reliable--rather, they mean that this version of the particular technology could not quite distinguish between these extremely similar yet different bullets as well as the image comparison technology did. In a number of cases, the numerical results made the correct distinctions, although they were close to one another. It is hard to say from this data that this technology differs in its ability to make distinctions between the manufacturers, because the results are very similar with both. The human examiner results were as expected. We did not expect any misidentifications, and there were not any. It would have been preferable to have a higher return rate, and thus more comparisons in the overall sample. As noted, the ''consecutively manufactured barrel exercise'' has been done before

  18. Persistence of biological traces in gun barrels--an approach to an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Courts, Cornelius; Madea, Burkhard; Schyma, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Traces of backspatter in gun barrels after homicidal or suicidal contact shots may be a valuable source of forensic evidence. Yet, a systematic investigation of the persistence and durability of DNA from biological traces in gun barrels is lacking. Our aim was to generate a realistic model to emulate blood and tissue spatters in gun barrels generated by contact gunshots at biological targets and to analyse the persistence and typability of DNA recovered from such stains. Herein, we devise and evaluate three different models for the emulation of backspatter from contact shots: a gelatine-based model with embedded blood bags, a model based on a spongious matrix soaked with blood and covered with a thin plastic membrane and a head model consisting of an acrylic half sphere filled with ballistic gelatine and with blood bags attached to the sphere under a 3-mm silicone layer. The sampling procedure for all three models: a first shot was fired with several types of guns at each model construction and subsequently a second shot was fired at a backstop. Blood samples were collected after each shot by probing the inner surface of the front and rear end of the respective gun barrel with a sterile swab. DNA was then extracted and quantified and up to 20 different short tandem repeat (STR) systems were amplified to generate DNA profiles. Although DNA quantity and STR typing results were heterogenous between the models, all models succeeded in delivering full STR profiles even after more than one shot. We conclude that biological traces in gun barrels are robust and accessible to forensic analysis and that systematic examination of the inside of gun barrels may be advisable for forensic casework.

  19. Double-Barrel Remplissage: An Arthroscopic All-Intra-articular Technique Using the Double-Barrel Knot for Anterior Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2015-02-01

    The arthroscopic remplissage procedure is an effective addition to a standard anterior repair in traumatic anterior shoulder instability associated with large humeral defects. The double-barrel remplissage is an all-intra-articular technique that uses a double-pulley, sliding, and self-retaining knot mechanism called the double-barrel knot. A 70° arthroscope (posterior portal) is necessary for adequate visualization of the humeral defect and the rotator cuff. Trans-tendon anchors (single or double loaded) are inserted into the superior and inferior aspects of the humeral defect through a cannula that is placed posterior to the infraspinatus. Placement of anchors is facilitated by insertion of a guidewire, as well as an anchor sleeve that is threaded over it. The double-barrel knot is formed using the anchors as a double-pulley system, and the knot is tensioned after the anterior repair is complete. Intra-articular visualization confirms adequate approximation and compression of the infraspinatus tendon and capsule into the defect. Advantages include an increased surface area (footprint) for healing and ease of knotting without the necessity for additional subacromial dissection.

  20. Involvement and necessity of the Cpx regulon in the event of aberrant β-barrel outer membrane protein assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gerken, Henri; Leiser, Owen P.; Bennion, Drew; Misra, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Cpx and σE regulons help maintain outer membrane integrity; the Cpx pathway monitors the biogenesis of cell surface structures, such as pili, while the σE pathway monitors the biogenesis of β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs). In this study we revealed the importance of the Cpx regulon in the event of β-barrel OMP mis-assembly, by utilizing mutants expressing either a defective β-barrel OMP assembly machinery (Bam) or assembly defective β-barrel OMPs. Analysis of specific mRNAs showed that ΔcpxR bam double mutants failed to induce degP expression beyond the wild type level, despite activation of the σE pathway. The synthetic conditional lethal phenotype of ΔcpxR in mutant Bam or β-barrel OMP backgrounds was reversed by wild type DegP expressed from a heterologous plasmid promoter. Consistent with the involvement of the Cpx regulon in the event of aberrant β-barrel OMP assembly, the expression of cpxP, the archetypal member of the cpx regulon, was upregulated in defective Bam backgrounds or in cells expressing a single assembly-defective β-barrel OMP species. Together, these results showed that both the Cpx and σE regulons are required to reduce envelope stress caused by aberrant β-barrel OMP assembly, with the Cpx regulon principally contributing by controlling degP expression. PMID:20487295

  1. 27 CFR 25.160 - Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. 25.160 Section 25.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.160 Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer....

  2. An improved method for constructing and selectively silanizing double-barreled, neutral liquid-carrier, ion-selective microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Deveau, Jason S.T.; Grodzinski, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    We describe an improved, efficient and reliable method for the vapour-phase silanization of multi-barreled, ion-selective microelectrodes of which the silanized barrel(s) are to be filled with neutral liquid ion-exchanger (LIX). The technique employs a metal manifold to exclusively and simultaneously deliver dimethyldichlorosilane to only the ion-selective barrels of several multi-barreled microelectrodes. Compared to previously published methods the technique requires fewer procedural steps, less handling of individual microelectrodes, improved reproducibility of silanization of the selected microelectrode barrels and employs standard borosilicate tubing rather than the less-conventional theta-type glass. The electrodes remain stable for up to 3 weeks after the silanization procedure. The efficacy of a double-barreled electrode containing a proton ionophore in the ion-selective barrel is demonstrated in situ in the leaf apoplasm of pea (Pisum) and sunflower (Helianthus). Individual leaves were penetrated to depth of ~150 μm through the abaxial surface. Microelectrode readings remained stable after multiple impalements without the need for a stabilizing PVC matrix. PMID:16136222

  3. 27 CFR 25.160 - Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. 25.160 Section 25.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.160 Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer....

  4. 27 CFR 25.160 - Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. 25.160 Section 25.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.160 Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer....

  5. 27 CFR 25.160 - Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. 25.160 Section 25.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.160 Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer....

  6. 27 CFR 25.160 - Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer. 25.160 Section 25.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Determination of Tax § 25.160 Tax adjustment for brewers who produce more than 2,000,000 barrels of beer....

  7. Volatile compounds and sensorial characterisation of red wine aged in cherry, chestnut, false acacia, ash and oak wood barrels.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Simón, B; Martínez, J; Sanz, M; Cadahía, E; Esteruelas, E; Muñoz, A M

    2014-03-15

    The wood-related volatile profile of wines aged in cherry, acacia, ash, chestnut and oak wood barrels was studied by GC-MS, and could be a useful tool to identify the wood specie used. Thus, 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde in wines aged in acacia barrels, and ethyl-2-benzoate in cherry barrels could be used as chemical markers of these wood species, for authenticity purposes. Also, the quantitative differences obtained in the volatile profiles allow a good classification of all wines regarding wood species of barrels, during all aging time, and they contributed with different intensities to aromatic and gustative characteristics of aged wines. Wines aged in oak were the best valuated during all aging time, but the differences were not always significant. The lowest scores were assigned to wines aged in cherry barrels from 6 months of aging, so this wood could be more suitable in short aging times.

  8. Antifungal properties of Japanese cedar essential oil from waste wood chips made from used sake barrels.

    PubMed

    Takao, Yoshifumi; Kuriyama, Isoko; Yamada, Tasuku; Mizoguchi, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we prepared essential oil (EO) from waste wood chips made from used sake barrels (USBs) of Japanese cedar (i.e., EO-USB) by steam distillation. We found that EO-USB and three commercially purchased EOs derived from xylem tissue of Japanese woods, such as Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and false arborvitae (Thujopsis dolabrata), suppressed fungal growth activity against Trichophyton rubrum, which is the cause of tinea disease. The magnitude of the suppressive effects of the EOs ranked as follows: T. dolabrata > USB = C. japonica > C. obtusa. These EOs also inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase in an extract from T. rubrum mycelia with the following ranking: T. dolabrata > USB = C. japonica > C. obtusa. In addition, 50 µg/ml of EO-USB showed antifungal properties, killing T. rubrum mycelia at 27-42˚C in 20 min. By gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis, the main sesquiterpenes in EO-USB were δ-cadinene (25.94%) and epi-cubenol (11.55%), and the composition of EO-USB was approximately the same as that of EO-C. japonica. Three prepared sesquiterpenes, δ-cadinene, epi-cubenol and β-eudesmol, inhibited the fungal growth and DNA polymerase activities of T. rubrum, and epi-cubenol showed the strongest inhibition among the compounds tested. These sesquiterpenes had no inhibitory effects on the activities of other DNA metabolic enzymes, such as DNA topoisomerase II, IMP dehydrogenase, polynucleotide kinase and deoxyribonuclease from T. rubrum. Taken together, these results suggest that EO-USB containing epi-cubenol may be useful for its anti-tinea disease properties, which are based on DNA polymerase inhibition.

  9. Determination of Heat Transfer Coefficient in a Gun Barrel from Experimental Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Barrels, BRL-R- 1740, September 1974. AD #BOOO71L. Mark W. Zemansky , Heat and Thermodynamics, McGraw-Hill Book Company Inc., New York, 1957. 3 Max Jacob...September 1974. AD #BOO17lL. 2. Mark W. Zemansky , Heat and Thermodynamics, McGraw-Hill Book Company Inc., New York, 1957. 3. Max Jacob, Heat Transfer, Vol. 1

  10. 33 CFR 135.103 - Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil. 135.103 Section 135.103 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION...

  11. 33 CFR 135.103 - Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil. 135.103 Section 135.103 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION...

  12. 33 CFR 135.103 - Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil. 135.103 Section 135.103 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION...

  13. 33 CFR 135.103 - Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil. 135.103 Section 135.103 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION...

  14. 77 FR 37321 - Safety Zone, Barrel Recovery, Lake Superior; Duluth, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Barrel Recovery, Lake Superior; Duluth, MN..., Duluth, MN. This safety zone is precautionary to protect recreational vessels and marine traffic from any... Brighton Beach, up to approximately 4 miles offshore on Lake Superior, Duluth, MN. This safety zone will be...

  15. Late emergence of the vibrissa direction selectivity map in the rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Yves; Léger, Jean-François; Goodman, Dan; Brette, Romain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-07-20

    In the neocortex, neuronal selectivities for multiple sensorimotor modalities are often distributed in topographical maps thought to emerge during a restricted period in early postnatal development. Rodent barrel cortex contains a somatotopic map for vibrissa identity, but the existence of maps representing other tactile features has not been clearly demonstrated. We addressed the issue of the existence in the rat cortex of an intrabarrel map for vibrissa movement direction using in vivo two-photon imaging. We discovered that the emergence of a direction map in rat barrel cortex occurs long after all known critical periods in the somatosensory system. This map is remarkably specific, taking a pinwheel-like form centered near the barrel center and aligned to the barrel cortex somatotopy. We suggest that this map may arise from intracortical mechanisms and demonstrate by simulation that the combination of spike-timing-dependent plasticity at synapses between layer 4 and layer 2/3 and realistic pad stimulation is sufficient to produce such a map. Its late emergence long after other classical maps suggests that experience-dependent map formation and refinement continue throughout adult life.

  16. LINC Modeling of August 19, 2004 Queen City Barrel Company Fire In Cincinnati, OH

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M B; Nasstrom, J S; Baskett, R L; Pobanz, B M

    2004-09-14

    This report details the information received, assumptions made, actions taken, and products delivered by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during the August 19, 2004 fire at the Queen City Barrel Company (QCB) in Cincinnati, OH. During the course of the event, LLNL provided four sets of plume model products to various Cincinnati emergency response organizations.

  17. Inverse determination of heat flux into a gun barrel using temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Jonathan A.; Jablonski, Melissa N.

    2017-05-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the thermal response of a temperature sensor located within a gun barrel, which accounts for the time-constant of the sensor and a measurement bias. The model is inversely solved to estimate the total heat flux applied to the bore surface as well as the transient history of the applied heat flux for a given thermal response of a temperature sensor. A parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of sensor time-constant, sensor location within the gun barrel, and measurement bias on the accuracy of the estimated heat flux as applied to a 155mm gun barrel. It is found that the accuracy of the estimated heat flux improves as the time-constant of the sensor decreases, the sensor is located closer to the bore surface, and the measurement bias decreases. A regression model is provided to estimate that accuracy and it is shown how a typical thermocouple would perform at various locations through the thickness of the gun barrel.

  18. Evaluation of mRNA Localization Using Double Barrel Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nashimoto, Yuji; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Zhou, Yuanshu; Ito, Hidenori; Ida, Hiroki; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Shiku, Hitoshi

    2016-07-26

    Information regarding spatial mRNA localization in single cells is necessary for a better understanding of cellular functions in tissues. Here, we report a method for evaluating localization of mRNA in single cells using double-barrel scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM). Two barrels in a nanopipette were filled with aqueous and organic electrolyte solutions and used for SICM and as an electrochemical syringe, respectively. We confirmed that the organic phase barrel could be used to collect cytosol from living cells, which is a minute but sufficient amount to assess cellular status using qPCR analysis. The water phase barrel could be used for SICM to image topography with subcellular resolution, which could be used to determine positions for analyzing mRNA expression. This system was able to evaluate mRNA localization in single cells. After puncturing the cellular membrane in a minimally invasive manner, using SICM imaging as a guide, we collected a small amount cytosol from different positions within a single cell and showed that mRNA expression depends on cellular position. In this study, we show that SICM imaging can be utilized for the analysis of mRNA localization in single cells. In addition, we fully automated the pipet movement in the XYZ-directions during the puncturing processes, making it applicable as a high-throughput system for collecting cytosol and analyzing mRNA localization.

  19. EVALUATION OF EMISSIONS FROM THE OPEN BURNING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTES IN BARRELS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a detailed emissions characterization study undertaken to examine, characterize, and quantify emissions from the simulated burning of household waste in barrels. The study evaluated two waste streams: that of an avid recycler, who removed most of the r...

  20. EVALUATION OF EMISSIONS FROM THE OPEN BURNING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE IN BARRELS - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a detailed emissions characterization study undertaken to examine, characterize, and quantify emissions from the simulated burning of household waste in barrels. The study evaluated two waste streams: that of an avid recycler, who removed most of the r...

  1. 27 CFR 478.113a - Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees. 478.113a Section 478.113a Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN...

  2. 27 CFR 478.113a - Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees. 478.113a Section 478.113a Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN...

  3. 27 CFR 478.113a - Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees. 478.113a Section 478.113a Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN...

  4. 27 CFR 478.113a - Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees. 478.113a Section 478.113a Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN...

  5. 27 CFR 478.113a - Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Importation of firearm barrels by nonlicensees. 478.113a Section 478.113a Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN...

  6. VARIABLES AFFECTING EMISSIONS OF PCDDS/FS FROM UNCONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE IN BARRELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The uncontrolled burning of household waste in barrels has recently been implicated as a major source of airborne emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs). Based on the need to generate a more accurate emission factor for burn ba...

  7. Analysis of Fibular Single Graft and Fibular Double-barrel Graft for Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Ihara, Jyun; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-quality mandibular reconstruction using vascularized free fibular graft is necessary to provide an osseointegrated dental implant and fixed denture. An appropriate crown–implant ratio is needed, and a good match between bones is extremely important. There are no articles describing the analysis and evaluation of both the fibula and mandible in the same patients. Methods: Computed tomography images of both mandible and fibula of 80 patients were selected in a random manner. We measured bone height of the fibula and mandible at specified points and evaluated the difference of bone height between the fibula and mandible using fibular single or double-barrel grafts. Results: The percentage of patients who had a “good” result for a fibular single graft was only 13.8%. There was no significant difference in bone heights when analyzed by gender. Whether patients were dentulous or not had a large influence on the difference between fibular and mandibular bone heights. Most young patients, but only half of older patients, needed fibular double-barrel grafts. Overweight patients with a high body mass index more often needed fibular double-barrel grafts. Conclusions: For mandibular reconstruction using a fibular graft, preoperative analysis of the patient’s profile and proper use of a fibular single or double-barrel graft contribute to minimizing the difference between the height of the grafted fibula and native mandible and are keys to an ideal reconstruction with good cosmetics and function. PMID:27622091

  8. 33 CFR 135.103 - Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OCS oil. 135.103 Section 135.103 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION COMPENSATION FUND Levy of Fees § 135.103 Levy and payment of barrel fee on OCS oil. (a) A fee of $.03...

  9. Assessment of Residential Rain Barrel Water Quality and Use in Cincinnati, Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    The collection, storage, and reuse of rainwater collected in rain barrels from urban rooftop areas assists municipalities in achieving stormwater management objectives and in some areas also serves as an adjunct resource for domestic water supplies. In this study, rainwater reuse...

  10. Assessment of Residential Rain Barrel Water Quality and Use in Cincinnati, Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    The collection, storage, and reuse of rainwater collected in rain barrels from urban rooftop areas assists municipalities in achieving stormwater management objectives and in some areas also serves as an adjunct resource for domestic water supplies. In this study, rainwater reuse...

  11. Metal dust deposition in a shotgun wound associated with barrel modification.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew S; Bowes, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Contact-range gunshot wounds commonly demonstrate deposition of black soot in and around the wound. Deposition of other visible pigments originating from the firearm has not been specifically described. In the current case, an adult male was found dead adjacent to a shotgun fixed in a vice grip with a modified, shortened barrel. A handheld, powered, metal grinding wheel was nearby. Autopsy revealed an intraoral gunshot wound, including soot deposition in and around the mouth and within the wound track. In addition, there was a peculiar, gray, lustrous film on the lips, gingiva, and anterior teeth. The material was concentrated around the most severe areas of injury in the anterior mouth and easily rubbed off with a cotton swab. It was not visualized in the rest of the mouth and not present in the larynx, or the esophagus. Overall, our opinion is that this unique, gray, lustrous film represents deposition of fine metallic dust that accumulated in the barrel of the shotgun during its modification with the grinding wheel. This type of unique pigment deposition should be recognized by forensic pathologists as possibly being related to the discharge of a firearm with a recently modified barrel or other cause for fine metallic dust accumulation within the barrel. Depending on the circumstances of the case, collection of samples of such metal dust deposits could be indicated for subsequent analysis.

  12. Npas4 Expression in Two Experimental Models of the Barrel Cortex Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kaliszewska, Aleksandra; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Npas4 has recently been identified as an important factor in brain plasticity, particularly in mechanisms of inhibitory control. Little is known about Npas4 expression in terms of cortical plasticity. In the present study expressions of Npas4 and the archetypal immediate early gene (IEG) c-Fos were investigated in the barrel cortex of mice after sensory deprivation (sparing one row of whiskers for 7 days) or sensory conditioning (pairing stimulation of one row of whiskers with aversive stimulus). Laser microdissection of individual barrel rows allowed for analysis of IEGs expression precisely in deprived and nondeprived barrels (in deprivation study) or stimulated and nonstimulated barrels (in conditioning study). Cortex activation by sensory conditioning was found to upregulate the expression of both Npas4 and c-Fos. Reorganization of cortical circuits triggered by removal of selected rows of whiskers strongly affected c-Fos but not Npas4 expression. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory synaptogenesis observed previously after conditioning may be mediated by Npas4 expression. PMID:25785202

  13. Analysis of Fibular Single Graft and Fibular Double-barrel Graft for Mandibular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Naohiro; Shimizu, Yusuke; Ihara, Jyun; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    High-quality mandibular reconstruction using vascularized free fibular graft is necessary to provide an osseointegrated dental implant and fixed denture. An appropriate crown-implant ratio is needed, and a good match between bones is extremely important. There are no articles describing the analysis and evaluation of both the fibula and mandible in the same patients. Computed tomography images of both mandible and fibula of 80 patients were selected in a random manner. We measured bone height of the fibula and mandible at specified points and evaluated the difference of bone height between the fibula and mandible using fibular single or double-barrel grafts. The percentage of patients who had a "good" result for a fibular single graft was only 13.8%. There was no significant difference in bone heights when analyzed by gender. Whether patients were dentulous or not had a large influence on the difference between fibular and mandibular bone heights. Most young patients, but only half of older patients, needed fibular double-barrel grafts. Overweight patients with a high body mass index more often needed fibular double-barrel grafts. For mandibular reconstruction using a fibular graft, preoperative analysis of the patient's profile and proper use of a fibular single or double-barrel graft contribute to minimizing the difference between the height of the grafted fibula and native mandible and are keys to an ideal reconstruction with good cosmetics and function.

  14. EVALUATION OF EMISSIONS FROM THE OPEN BURNING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTES IN BARRELS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a detailed emissions characterization study undertaken to examine, characterize, and quantify emissions from the simulated burning of household waste in barrels. The study evaluated two waste streams: that of an avid recycler, who removed most of the r...

  15. EVALUATION OF EMISSIONS FROM THE OPEN BURNING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE IN BARRELS - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a detailed emissions characterization study undertaken to examine, characterize, and quantify emissions from the simulated burning of household waste in barrels. The study evaluated two waste streams: that of an avid recycler, who removed most of the r...

  16. 7 CFR 58.425 - Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese. 58.425 Section 58.425 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.425 Conveyor for moving and draining block or...

  17. 7 CFR 58.425 - Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese. 58.425 Section 58.425 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.425 Conveyor for moving and draining block or...

  18. 7 CFR 58.425 - Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese. 58.425 Section 58.425 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.425 Conveyor for moving and draining block or...

  19. 7 CFR 58.425 - Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese. 58.425 Section 58.425 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... cheese. The conveyor shall be constructed so that it will not contaminate the cheese and be easily...

  20. 7 CFR 58.425 - Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conveyor for moving and draining block or barrel cheese. 58.425 Section 58.425 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... cheese. The conveyor shall be constructed so that it will not contaminate the cheese and be easily...

  1. 3. PHOTOCOPY OF 1/2 OF CA. 1880 STREOCARD SHOWING 'BARREL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PHOTOCOPY OF 1/2 OF CA. 1880 STREOCARD SHOWING 'BARREL SHOT' VIEW LOOKING DOWN THE LENGTH OF LOWER DECK. JAMES CREMER, PHOTOGRAPHER AND PUBLISHER, 18 SOUTH EIGHTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA. - Callowhill Street Bridge, Schuylkill River at Spring Garden & Callowhill Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Fabrication of a glucose biosensor based on inserted barrel plating gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Teng; Chung, Hsieh-Hsun; Tsai, Dong-Mung; Fang, Mei-Yen; Hsiao, Hung-Chan; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate here the application of barrel plating gold electrodes for fabricating a new type of disposable amperometric glucose biosensor. It is prepared by inserting two barrel plating gold electrodes onto an injection molding plastic base followed by immobilizing with a bioreagent layer and membrane on the electrode surface. The primary function of barrel plating is to provide an economical way to electroplate manufactured parts. The manufacture procedure is simple and can increase the fabrication precision for automation in mass production. At the two-electrode system, the detection of glucose is linear up to 800 mg/dL (i.e., 44.5 mM, r(2) > 0.99) in pH 7.4 PBS with a sensitivity of 0.71 microA/mM. Excellent sensor-to-sensor reproducibility shows coefficients of variation of only 0.8-1.4% for the detection of 56.5-561.0 mg/dL glucose. In laboratory trials 176 capillary blood samples with a range of 30-572 mg/dL glucose are used to evaluate the clinical application of the biosensor. A good linear correlation is observed between the measured values of the proposed biosensor and laboratory reference. Error grid analysis verifies that the proposed technique is promising in fabricating biosensor strips on a mass scale. As successfully demonstrated by using whole blood glucose as a model analyte, the fabrication technique can extend into other barrel plating noble metal electrodes for various applications.

  3. High speed machining of space shuttle external tank liquid hydrogen barrel panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Actual and projected optimum High Speed Machining data for producing shuttle external tank liquid hydrogen barrel panels of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are reported. The data included various machining parameters; e.g., spindle speeds, cutting speed, table feed, chip load, metal removal rate, horsepower, cutting efficiency, cutter wear (lack of) and chip removal methods.

  4. Polyphenols in red wine aged in acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) and oak (Quercus petraea) wood barrels.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miriam; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Esteruelas, Enrique; Muñoz, Angel Ma; Cadahía, Estrella; Hernández, Ma Teresa; Estrella, Isabel; Martinez, Juana

    2012-06-30

    Polyphenolic composition of two Syrah wines aged during 6 or 12 months in medium toasting acacia and oak 225L barrels was studied by LC-DAD-ESI/MS. A total of 43 nonanthocyanic phenolic compounds were found in all wines, and other 15 compounds only in the wines from acacia barrels. Thus, the nonanthocyanic phenolic profile could be a useful tool to identify the wines aged in acacia barrels. Among all of them the dihydrorobinetin highlights because of its high levels, but also robinetin, 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, a tetrahydroxydihydroflavonol, fustin, butin, a trihydroxymethoxydihydroflavonol and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid were detected at appreciable levels in wines during aging in acacia barrels, and could be used as phenolic markers for authenticity purposes. Although longer contact time with acacia wood mean higher concentrations of phenolic markers found in wines, the identification of these wines will also be easy after short aging times due the high levels reached by these compounds, even after only 2 months of aging.

  5. Simulations and Experiments of Hot Forging Design and Evaluation of the Aircraft Landing Gear Barrel Al Alloy Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Prabhu, T.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the hot forging design of a typical landing gear barrel was evolved using finite element simulations and validated with experiments. A DEFORM3D software was used to evolve the forging steps to obtain the sound quality part free of defects with minimum press force requirements. The hot forging trial of a barrel structure was carried out in a 30 MN hydraulic press based on the simulation outputs. The tensile properties of the part were evaluated by taking samples from all three orientations (longitudinal, long transverse, short transverse). The hardness and microstructure of the part were also investigated. To study the soundness of the product, fluorescent penetrant inspection and ultrasonic testing were performed in order to identify any potential surface or internal defects in the part. From experiments, it was found that the part was formed successfully without any forging defects such as under filling, laps, or folds that validated the effectiveness of the process simulation. The tensile properties of the part were well above the specification limit (>10%) and the properties variation with respect to the orientation was less than 2.5%. The part has qualified the surface defects level of Mil Std 1907 Grade C and the internal defects level of AMS 2630 Class A (2 mm FBh). The microstructure shows mean grain length and width of 167 and 66 µm in the longitudinal direction. However, microstructure results revealed that the coarse grain structure was observed on the flat surface near the lug region due to the dead zone formation. An innovative and simple method of milling the surface layer after each pressing operation was applied to solve the problem of the surface coarse grain structure.

  6. A wireline piston core barrel for sampling cohesionless sand and gravel below the water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zapico, Michael M.; Vales, Samuel; Cherry, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A coring device has been developed to obtain long and minimally disturbed samples of saturated cohesionless sand and gravel. The coring device, which includes a wireline and piston, was developed specifically for use during hollow-stem auger drilling but it also offers possibilities for cable tool and rotary drilling. The core barrel consists of an inner liner made of inexpensive aluminum or plastic tubing, a piston for core recovery, and an exterior steel housing that protects the liner when the core barrel is driven into the aquifer. The core barrel, which is approximately 1.6m (5.6 feet) long, is advanced ahead of the lead auger by hammering at the surface on drill rods that are attached to the core barrel. After the sampler has been driven 1.5m (5 feet), the drill rods are detached and a wireline is used to hoist the core barrel, with the sample contained in the aluminum or plastic liner, to the surface. A vacuum developed by the piston during the coring operation provides good recovery of both the sediment and aquifer fluids contained in the sediment. In the field the sample tubes can be easily split along their length for on-site inspection or they can be capped with the pore water fluids inside and transported to the laboratory. The cores are 5cm (2 inches) in diameter by 1.5m (5 feet) long. Core acquisition to depths of 35m (115 feet), with a recovery greater than 90 percent, has become routine in University of Waterloo aquifer studies. A large diameter (12.7cm [5 inch]) version has also been used successfully. Nearly continuous sample sequences from sand and gravel aquifers have been obtained for studies of sedimentology, hydraulic conductivity, hydrogeochemistry and microbiology.

  7. Effect of oak wood barrel capacity and utilization time on phenolic and sensorial profile evolution of an Encruzado white wine.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paulo; Muxagata, Sara; Correia, Ana C; Nunes, Fernando M; Cosme, Fernanda; Jordão, António M

    2017-04-06

    Several studies have reported the influence of diverse winemaking technologies in white wine characteristics. However, the impact of the use of different oak wood barrel capacities and utilization time on the evolution of white wine phenolic content and sensorial characteristics are not usually considered. Thus the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of oak wood barrel capacity and utilization time on the evolution of phenolic compounds, browning potential index and sensorial profile of an Encruzado white wine. For the 180 aging days considered, the use of new oak wood barrels induced a greater increase in global phenolic composition, including several individual compounds, such as gallic and ellagic acid, independently of the barrel capacity. Tendency for a lesser increase of the browning potential index values was detected for white wines aged in new oak wood barrels. The sensorial profile evolution, showed significant differences only for the aroma descriptors, namely for 'wood aroma' and 'aroma intensity', white wine aged in 225 L new oak wood barrels being the highest scored. The results show that, in general, the use of different capacities and utilization time of oak wood barrels used for white wine aging could play an important role in white wine quality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Consumer demand for green stormwater management technology in an urban setting: The case of Chicago rain barrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Amy W.; Freitas, Luiz P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrological disruption and water pollution from urbanization can be reduced if households in urban areas adopt decentralized storm water controls. We study a citywide municipal subsidized rain-barrel program in the third biggest city in the United States, Chicago, to explore what factors influence whether households purchase this sort of green storm water management technology in an urban setting. Specifically, we regress census-tract level data on the number of rain barrels adopted in different parts of the city on socioeconomic variables, data on local flood frequency, and features of the housing stock. We find that rain-barrel purchases are not correlated with local levels of flooding, even though city residents were told by program managers that rain barrels could alleviate local flooding. Instead, rain barrels are heavily concentrated in places with high-income attitudinally green populations. We do find more rain barrels were adopted in places close to rain-barrel distribution points and near sites of hydrological information campaigns; thus, policy makers might increase green-technology adoption in areas where they can do the most good by reducing transaction costs and providing education programs to those areas. Finally, our results indicate that owner occupancy is positively correlated with green-technology adoption. Low-rise rental housing may have inefficiently low levels of adoption, such that city managers might want to develop programs to encourage storm water management investments by landlords who do not live in their own properties.

  9. A Supercomplex Spanning the Inner and Outer Membranes Mediates the Biogenesis of β-Barrel Outer Membrane Proteins in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Rui; Jin, Feng; Liu, Yang; Yu, Jiayu; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2016-08-05

    β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are ubiquitously present in Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts, and function in a variety of biological processes. The mechanism by which the hydrophobic nascent β-barrel OMPs are transported through the hydrophilic periplasmic space in bacterial cells remains elusive. Here, mainly via unnatural amino acid-mediated in vivo photo-crosslinking studies, we revealed that the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA interacts with nascent β-barrel OMPs largely via its N-domain but with β-barrel assembly machine protein BamA mainly via its satellite P2 domain, and that the nascent β-barrel OMPs interact with SurA via their N- and C-terminal regions. Additionally, via dual in vivo photo-crosslinking, we demonstrated the formation of a ternary complex involving β-barrel OMP, SurA, and BamA in cells. More importantly, we found that a supercomplex spanning the inner and outer membranes and involving the BamA, BamB, SurA, PpiD, SecY, SecE, and SecA proteins appears to exist in living cells, as revealed by a combined analyses of sucrose-gradient ultra-centrifugation, Blue native PAGE and mass spectrometry. We propose that this supercomplex integrates the translocation, transportation, and membrane insertion events for β-barrel OMP biogenesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Cobalamin-Independent Methionine Synthase (MetE): A Face-to-Face Double Barrel that Evolved by Gene Duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Robert; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2010-03-08

    Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to L-homocysteine (Hcy) without using an intermediate methyl carrier. Although MetE displays no detectable sequence homology with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH), both enzymes require zinc for activation and binding of Hcy. Crystallographic analyses of MetE from T. maritima reveal an unusual dual-barrel structure in which the active site lies between the tops of the two ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrels. The fold of the N-terminal barrel confirms that it has evolved from the C-terminal polypeptide by gene duplication; comparisons of the barrels provide an intriguing example of homologous domain evolution in which binding sites are obliterated. The C-terminal barrel incorporates the zinc ion that binds and activates Hcy. The zinc-binding site in MetE is distinguished from the (Cys){sub 3}Zn site in the related enzymes, MetH and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, by its position in the barrel and by the metal ligands, which are histidine, cysteine, glutamate, and cysteine in the resting form of MetE. Hcy associates at the face of the metal opposite glutamate, which moves away from the zinc in the binary E {center_dot} Hcy complex. The folate substrate is not intimately associated with the N-terminal barrel; instead, elements from both barrels contribute binding determinants in a binary complex in which the folate substrate is incorrectly oriented for methyl transfer. Atypical locations of the Hcy and folate sites in the C-terminal barrel presumably permit direct interaction of the substrates in a ternary complex. Structures of the binary substrate complexes imply that rearrangement of folate, perhaps accompanied by domain rearrangement, must occur before formation of a ternary complex that is competent for methyl transfer.

  11. Whisker barrel cortex delta oscillations and gamma power in the awake mouse are linked to respiration

    PubMed Central

    Ito, J.; Roy, S.; Liu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Fletcher, M.; Lu, L.; Boughter, J.D.; Grün, S.; Heck, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that delta oscillations (0.5–4 Hz) in the brain are generated by intrinsic network mechanisms involving cortical and thalamic circuits. Here we report that delta band oscillation in spike and local field potential (LFP) activity in the whisker barrel cortex of awake mice is phase locked to respiration. Furthermore, LFP oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30–80 Hz) are amplitude modulated in phase with the respiratory rhythm. Removal of the olfactory bulb eliminates respiration-locked delta oscillations and delta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling. Our findings thus suggest respiration-locked olfactory bulb activity as a main driving force behind delta oscillations and gamma power modulation in the whisker barrel cortex in the awake state. PMID:24686563

  12. Gamma ray scanner systems for nondestructive assay of heterogeneous waste barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.E.; Roberson, G.P.; Decman, D.J.; Camp, D.C.; Levai, F.

    1997-08-01

    Traditional gamma measurement errors are related to non-uniform measurement responses associated with unknown radioactive source and matrix material distributions. These errors can be reduced by application of tomographic techniques that measure these distributions. LLNL has developed two tomographic-based waste assay systems. They use external radioactive sources and tomography-protocol to map the attenuation within a waste barrel as a function of mono-energetic gamma-ray energy in waste containers. Passive tomography is used to localize and identify specific radioactive waste contents within the same waste containers. Reconstruction of the passive data via the active images allows internal waste radioactivities in a barrel to be corrected for any overlying heterogeneous materials, thus yielding an absolute assay of the waste radioactivities. Calibration of both systems requires only point source measurements and are independent of matrix materials.

  13. Correlation of fitness landscapes from three orthologous TIM barrels originates from sequence and structure constraints

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne H.; Venev, Sergey V.; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Matthews, C. Robert

    2017-01-01

    Sequence divergence of orthologous proteins enables adaptation to environmental stresses and promotes evolution of novel functions. Limits on evolution imposed by constraints on sequence and structure were explored using a model TIM barrel protein, indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS). Fitness effects of point mutations in three phylogenetically divergent IGPS proteins during adaptation to temperature stress were probed by auxotrophic complementation of yeast with prokaryotic, thermophilic IGPS. Analysis of beneficial mutations pointed to an unexpected, long-range allosteric pathway towards the active site of the protein. Significant correlations between the fitness landscapes of distant orthologues implicate both sequence and structure as primary forces in defining the TIM barrel fitness landscape and suggest that fitness landscapes can be translocated in sequence space. Exploration of fitness landscapes in the context of a protein fold provides a strategy for elucidating the sequence-structure-fitness relationships in other common motifs. PMID:28262665

  14. Site geotechnical considerations for expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T. ); Whittington, D.W. ); Magorian, T.R. , Amherst, NY )

    1991-01-01

    Eight Gulf Coast salt domes have emerged as candidate sites for possible expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels. Two existing SPR sites, Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA, are among the eight that are being considered. To achieve the billion barrel capacity, some 25 new leached caverns would be constructed, and would probably be established in two separate sites in Louisiana and Texas because of distribution requirements. Geotechnical factors involved in siting studies have centered first and foremost on cavern integrity and environmental acceptability, once logistical suitability is realized. Other factors have involved subsidence and flooding potential, loss of coastal marshlands, seismicity, brine injection well utility, and co-use by multiple operators. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Results from the USIP_UH contribution to the BARREL-4 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrend, C. C.; Bering, E. A., III; Ehteshami, A.; Fenton, A.; Gamblin, R.; Greer, M.; Mathur, S.; Glennie, C. L.; Velasquez, B.; Marpaung, J.; Lalata, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Undergraduate Student Instrumentation Project (USIP) at the University of Houston sent a team to Kiruna, Sweden to participate with NASA/Dartmouth's BARREL-4 campaign in August 2016. BARREL-4's primary instrument is an MeV x-ray scintillation counter. The team has provided two different experiments to be flown, a dual frequency GPS receiver to calculate total electron content and a Very Low Frequency (VLF) receiver to measure the VLF emissions associated with electron precipitation. TEC is calculated via finding pseudo-ranges comparing the sent and received signals from passing satellites. The VLF receiver has an air-core magnetic loop antenna that utilizes a transformer coupled with an integrating pre-amp which is then recorded to a standard music recorder. The presentation will include a summary of observations.

  16. a Barrel Ifr Instrumented with Limited Streamer Tubes for Babar Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibinetto, Gianluigi

    The new barrel Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) of BABAR detector will be reported here. Limited Stramer Tubes (LSTs) have been chosen to replace the existing RPCs as active elements of the barrel IFR. The layout of the new detector will be discussed: in particular, a cell bigger than the standard one has been used to improve efficiency and reliability. The extruded profile is coated with a resistive layer of graphite having a typical surface resistivity between 0.2 and 0.4 MOhm/square. The tubes are assembled in modules and installed in 12 active layers of each sextant of the IFR detector. R&D studies which have been done to choose the final design will be discussed, as well as the Quality Control procedure adopted during the tube production to assure high performances of the detector.

  17. A Barrel IFR Instrumented With Limited Streamer Tubes for BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Andreotti, M.; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

    2006-11-15

    The new barrel Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) of BABAR detector will be reported here. Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs) have been chosen to replace the existing RPCs as active elements of the barrel IFR. The layout of the new detector will be discussed: in particular, a cell bigger than the standard one has been used to improve efficiency and reliability. The extruded profile is coated with a resistive layer of graphite having a typical surface resistivity between 0.2 and 0.4 MOhm/square. The tubes are assembled in modules and installed in 12 active layers of each sextant of the IFR detector. R&D studies to choose the final design and Quality Control procedure adopted during the tube production will be briefly discussed. Finally the performances of installed LSTs into 2/3 of IFR after 8 months of operations will be reported.

  18. a Barrel Ifr Instrumented with Limited Streamer Tubes for Babar Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, Mirco

    2006-04-01

    The new barrel Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) of BABAR detector will be reported here. Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs) have been chosen to replace the existing RPCs as active elements of the barrel IFR. The layout of the new detector will be discussed: in particular, a cell bigger than the standard one has been used to improve efficiency and reliability. The extruded profile is coated with a resistive layer of graphite having a typical surface resistivity between 0.2 and 0.4 MOhm/square. The tubes are assembled in modules and installed in 12 active layers of each sextant of the IFR detector. R&D studies to choose the final design and Quality Control procedure adopted during the tube production will be briefly discussed. Finally the performances of installed LSTs into 2/3 of IFR after 8 months of operations will be reported.

  19. Synaptic molecular imaging in spared and deprived columns of mouse barrel cortex with array tomography

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Nicholas C; Collman, Forrest; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal; Smith, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    A major question in neuroscience is how diverse subsets of synaptic connections in neural circuits are affected by experience dependent plasticity to form the basis for behavioral learning and memory. Differences in protein expression patterns at individual synapses could constitute a key to understanding both synaptic diversity and the effects of plasticity at different synapse populations. Our approach to this question leverages the immunohistochemical multiplexing capability of array tomography (ATomo) and the columnar organization of mouse barrel cortex to create a dataset comprising high resolution volumetric images of spared and deprived cortical whisker barrels stained for over a dozen synaptic molecules each. These dataset has been made available through the Open Connectome Project for interactive online viewing, and may also be downloaded for offline analysis using web, Matlab, and other interfaces. PMID:25977797

  20. Synaptic molecular imaging in spared and deprived columns of mouse barrel cortex with array tomography.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Nicholas C; Collman, Forrest; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal; Smith, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    A major question in neuroscience is how diverse subsets of synaptic connections in neural circuits are affected by experience dependent plasticity to form the basis for behavioral learning and memory. Differences in protein expression patterns at individual synapses could constitute a key to understanding both synaptic diversity and the effects of plasticity at different synapse populations. Our approach to this question leverages the immunohistochemical multiplexing capability of array tomography (ATomo) and the columnar organization of mouse barrel cortex to create a dataset comprising high resolution volumetric images of spared and deprived cortical whisker barrels stained for over a dozen synaptic molecules each. These dataset has been made available through the Open Connectome Project for interactive online viewing, and may also be downloaded for offline analysis using web, Matlab, and other interfaces.

  1. The New APD Based Readout for the Crystal Barrel Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, M.; Honisch, Ch; Steinacher, M.; CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The CBELSA/TAPS experiment at ELSA measures double polarization observables in meson photoproduction off protons and neutrons. To be able to measure purely neutral reactions off polarized neutrons with high efficiency, the main calorimeter has to be integrated into the first level trigger. This requires to exchange the existing PIN photo diode by a new avalanche photo diode (APD) readout. The newly developed readout electronics will provide an energy resolution compatible to the previous set-up and a fast trigger signal down to 10 MeV energy deposit per crystal. After the successful final tests with a 3x3 CsI crystal matrix in Bonn at ELSA and in Mainz at MAMI all front-end electronics were produced in fall 2013. Automated test routines for the front-end electronics were developed and the characterization measurements of all APDs were successfully accomplished in Bonn. The project is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB/TR16) and Schweizerischer Nationalfonds.

  2. Parallel beta/alpha-barrels of alpha-amylase, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase and oligo-1,6-glucosidase versus the barrel of beta-amylase: evolutionary distance is a reflection of unrelated sequences.

    PubMed

    Janecek, S

    1994-10-17

    The structures of functionally related beta/alpha-barrel starch hydrolases, alpha-amylase, beta-amylase, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase and oligo-1,6-glucosidase, are discussed, their mutual sequence similarities being emphasized. Since these enzymes (except for beta-amylase) along with the predicted set of more than ten beta/alpha-barrels from the alpha-amylase enzyme superfamily fulfil the criteria characteristic of the products of divergent evolution, their unrooted distance tree is presented.

  3. Cofilin1 Controls Transcolumnar Plasticity in Dendritic Spines in Adult Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tsubota, Tadashi; Okubo-Suzuki, Reiko; Ohashi, Yohei; Tamura, Keita; Ogata, Koshin; Yaguchi, Masae; Matsuyama, Makoto; Inokuchi, Kaoru; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    During sensory deprivation, the barrel cortex undergoes expansion of a functional column representing spared inputs (spared column), into the neighboring deprived columns (representing deprived inputs) which are in turn shrunk. As a result, the neurons in a deprived column simultaneously increase and decrease their responses to spared and deprived inputs, respectively. Previous studies revealed that dendritic spines are remodeled during this barrel map plasticity. Because cofilin1, a predominant regulator of actin filament turnover, governs both the expansion and shrinkage of the dendritic spine structure in vitro, it hypothetically regulates both responses in barrel map plasticity. However, this hypothesis remains untested. Using lentiviral vectors, we knocked down cofilin1 locally within layer 2/3 neurons in a deprived column. Cofilin1-knocked-down neurons were optogenetically labeled using channelrhodopsin-2, and electrophysiological recordings were targeted to these knocked-down neurons. We showed that cofilin1 knockdown impaired response increases to spared inputs but preserved response decreases to deprived inputs, indicating that cofilin1 dependency is dissociated in these two types of barrel map plasticity. To explore the structural basis of this dissociation, we then analyzed spine densities on deprived column dendritic branches, which were supposed to receive dense horizontal transcolumnar projections from the spared column. We found that spine number increased in a cofilin1-dependent manner selectively in the distal part of the supragranular layer, where most of the transcolumnar projections existed. Our findings suggest that cofilin1-mediated actin dynamics regulate functional map plasticity in an input-specific manner through the dendritic spine remodeling that occurs in the horizontal transcolumnar circuits. These new mechanistic insights into transcolumnar plasticity in adult rats may have a general significance for understanding reorganization of

  4. Nitrobindin: An Ubiquitous Family of All β-Barrel Heme-proteins.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Giovanna; Ascenzi, Paolo; Polticelli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Rhodnius prolixus nitrophorins (Rp-NPs), Arabidopsis thaliana nitrobindin (At-Nb), and Homo sapiens THAP4 (Hs-THAP4) are the unique known proteins that use a β-barrel fold to bind ferric heme, which is devoted to NO transport and/or catalysis. The eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Rp-NPs, which represent the only heme-binding lipocalins, are devoted to deliver NO into the blood vessel of the host and to scavenge histamine during blood sucking. Regarding Nbs, crystallographic data suggest the ability of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 to bind ferric heme; however, no data are available with respect to these functions in the natural host. Here, a bioinformatics investigation based on the amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures of At-Nb and Hs-THAP4 suggests a conservation of the 10-stranded antiparallel β-barrel Nb structural module in all life kingdoms of the evolutionary ladder. In particular, amino acid residues involved in the heme recognition and in the structure stabilization of the Nb structural module are highly conserved (identity > 29%; homology > 83%). Moreover, molecular models of putative Nbs from different organisms match very well with each other and known three-dimensional structures of Nbs. Furthermore, phylogenetic tree reconstruction indicates that NPs and Nbs group in distinct clades. These data indicate that 10-stranded β-barrel Nbs constitute a new ubiquitous heme protein family spanning from bacteria to Homo sapiens. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):423-428, 2016.

  5. Particle contamination from Martin Optical Black. [in design of barrel baffle of Infrared Astronomical Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. J.; Noll, R.; Andreozzi, L.; Hope, J.

    1981-01-01

    The design of the barrel baffle of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Optical Subsystem to minimize production of particulate contamination is described. The configuration of the 50-inch long, 28.5-inch diameter baffle required pop-rivet assembly after coating with Martin Optical Black for stray light suppression. An experiment to determine the contamination produced at assembly led to the modification of the baffle construction to preclude such damage to the coated surfaces.

  6. A 30degree 'barrel shot' taken at track level showing operator's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A 30-degree 'barrel shot' taken at track level showing operator's house in center of swing span and the track with timber ties. The ties are transverse (90-degree) to the track with each end resting on the bottom chord of the steel swing span truss, thus providing their support with live loads being transferred to the swing span truss bridge. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  7. Double-barreled and Concentric Microelectrodes for Measurement of Extracellular Ion Signals in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Nicole; Durry, Simone; Kafitz, Karl W.; Chesler, Mitchell; Rose, Christine R.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical activity in the brain is accompanied by significant ion fluxes across membranes, resulting in complex changes in the extracellular concentration of all major ions. As these ion shifts bear significant functional consequences, their quantitative determination is often required to understand the function and dysfunction of neural networks under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, we demonstrate the fabrication and calibration of double-barreled ion-selective microelectrodes, which have proven to be excellent tools for such measurements in brain tissue. Moreover, so-called “concentric” ion-selective microelectrodes are also described, which, based on their different design, offer a far better temporal resolution of fast ion changes. We then show how these electrodes can be employed in acute brain slice preparations of the mouse hippocampus. Using double-barreled, potassium-selective microelectrodes, changes in the extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) in response to exogenous application of glutamate receptor agonists or during epileptiform activity are demonstrated. Furthermore, we illustrate the response characteristics of sodium-sensitive, double-barreled and concentric electrodes and compare their detection of changes in the extracellular sodium concentration ([Na+]o) evoked by bath or pressure application of drugs. These measurements show that while response amplitudes are similar, the concentric sodium microelectrodes display a superior signal-to-noise ratio and response time as compared to the double-barreled design. Generally, the demonstrated procedures will be easily transferable to measurement of other ions species, including pH or calcium, and will also be applicable to other preparations. PMID:26381747

  8. Particle contamination from Martin Optical Black. [in design of barrel baffle of Infrared Astronomical Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. J.; Noll, R.; Andreozzi, L.; Hope, J.

    1981-01-01

    The design of the barrel baffle of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Optical Subsystem to minimize production of particulate contamination is described. The configuration of the 50-inch long, 28.5-inch diameter baffle required pop-rivet assembly after coating with Martin Optical Black for stray light suppression. An experiment to determine the contamination produced at assembly led to the modification of the baffle construction to preclude such damage to the coated surfaces.

  9. Altered somatosensory barrel cortex refinement in the developing brain of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Moroto, M; Nishimura, A; Morimoto, M; Isoda, K; Morita, T; Yoshida, M; Morioka, S; Tozawa, T; Hasegawa, T; Chiyonobu, T; Yoshimoto, K; Hosoi, H

    2013-11-06

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. In previous studies, monoaminergic dysfunctions have been detected in patients with RTT and in a murine model of RTT, the Mecp2-null mouse. Therefore, the pathogenesis of RTT is thought to involve impairments in the monoaminergic systems. However, there have been limited data showing that the impairment of monoamines leads to early symptoms during development. We used histochemistry to study the somatosensory barrel cortex in the B6.129P2(C)-Mecp2(tm1.1Bird) mouse model of RTT. The barrel cortex is widely used to investigate neuronal development and its regulation by various neurotransmitters including 5-HT. 5-HT levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC/EC), and serotonin transporter (SERT) and 5-HT1B receptor mRNAs were measured in the somatosensory cortex, thalamus and striatum on postnatal days (P) 10, P20 and P40. Mecp2-null mice (Mecp2-/y) had significantly smaller barrel fields than age-matched wild-type controls (Mecp2+/y) on P10 and P40, but the topographic map was accurately formed. Levels of 5-HT, and SERT and 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression in the somatosensory cortex did not differ significantly between the Mecp2-null and wild-type mice on P10. However, thalamic 5-HT was reduced in Mecp2-null mice. Our data indicate that a lack of MeCP2 may disturb the refinement of the barrel cortex in the early postnatal period. Our findings suggest that a decrease in thalamic 5-HT might be involved in this phenomenon.

  10. BARREL observations of a solar energetic electron and solar energetic proton event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, A. J.; McGregor, S. L.; Hudson, M. K.; Millan, R. M.; Kress, B. T.

    2016-05-01

    During the second Balloon Array for Radiation Belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign two solar energetic proton (SEP) events were observed. Although BARREL was designed to observe X-rays created during electron precipitation events, it is sensitive to X-rays from other sources. The gamma lines produced when energetic protons hit the upper atmosphere are used in this paper to study SEP events. During the second SEP event starting on 7 January 2014 and lasting ˜3 days, which also had a solar energetic electron (SEE) event occurring simultaneously, BARREL had six payloads afloat spanning all magnetic local time (MLT) sectors and L values. Three payloads were in a tight array (˜2 h in MLT and ˜2 ΔL) inside the inner magnetosphere and at times conjugate in both L and MLT with the Van Allen Probes (approximately once per day). The other three payloads mapped to higher L values with one payload on open field lines for the entire event, while the other two appear to be crossing from open to closed field lines. Using the observations of the SEE and SEP events, we are able to map the open-closed boundary. Halford et al. (2015) demonstrated how BARREL can monitor electron precipitation following an interplanetary shock created by a coronal mass ejection (ICME-shock) arrival at Earth, while in this study we look at the SEP event precursor to the arrival of the ICME-Shock in our cradle-to-grave view: from flare, to SEE and SEP events, to radiation belt electron precipitation.

  11. Double-barreled wet colostomy: a safe and simple method after pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Osorio Gullón, A; de Oca, J; Lopéz Costea, M A; Virgili, J; Ramos, E; del Rio, C; Martí Ragué, J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical and functional outcome of ureteric division to the distal segment of a loop colostomy: the double-barrelled wet colostomy have been analysed. 13 patients (8 female and 5 male, age 37 to 72 years) underwent pelvic exenteration with double-barrelled wet colostomy. The primary tumour included endometrial (n = 6), rectal (n = 1), anal (n = 1), cervical (n = 2), prostatic (n = 1) and bladder (n = 2). Indications for pelvic exenteration were locally advanced disease, recurrence and severe radiation or surgical damage. Six patients had pre-existing colostomy, and three had a Bricker ureteroileal diversion. The double-barrelled-wet colostomy technique consisted in anastomosing both ureters to a colon segment 25 cm distal to the loop colostomy. There was no operative mortality. Complications included one urinary leak which closed with conservative management and one case of recurrent episodes of pyelonephritis which finally required nephrectomy. Intravenous urography in the remaining patients showed good flow through the ureters to the conduit with no reflux. Postoperative plasma electrolytes, urea and creatinine were normal from day seven onwards. Urodynamic studies in four patients showed efficient contraction of the colon conduit with pressure levels similar to those in the colon proximal to the colostomy. In five cases biopsies of the conduit were taken at 3 and 16 months; no dysplasias were found. Four patients died due to disease progression. The overall mean survival was 41.2 months. The remainder are currently disease-free, maximum followup period being 19 months. Double-barrelled wet colostomy is a safe and simple technique with low morbidity. The patient needs to carry only one stoma and functional results are good.

  12. Spatiotemporal evolution of excitation and inhibition in the rat barrel cortex investigated with multielectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Corina; Lüscher, Hans-R

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the spatiotemporal evolution of activity in the rat barrel cortex using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). In acute brain slices, field potentials were recorded simultaneously from 60 electrodes with high spatial and temporal resolution. This new technique allowed us to map functionally discrete barrels and to observe the interplay between the excitatory and inhibitory network. The local field potentials (LFPs) were elicited by focal electrical stimulation in layer 4 (L4). Excitation recorded in a single barrel was first confined to the stimulated barrel and subsequently spread in a columnar manner to layer 2/3 (L2/3). This excitation in L4 and lower L2/3 was followed by inhibition curtailing excitation to a short period lasting only approximately 2 ms. In the uppermost layer, a long-lasting (approximately 10 ms), laterally spreading band of excitation remained active. Blockade of GABAA-receptors resulted in a long-lasting and diffuse activation of L4 and lower L2/3 and abolition of activation of the upper L2/3. Thus inhibition not only shaped the spatial-temporal map of excitation in L4 and lower L2/3 but also resulted indirectly in an excitatory action in the superficial layers. Stimulation in L6 revealed a feedforward inhibition to L4 and subsequently an excitatory L6-L4-L6 loop. The complex interplay between excitation and inhibition opens two spatial windows of excitation in the infra- and supragranular layers. They may prepare the L5 pyramidal neuron for associating top-down input from other cortical regions with bottom-up input from the whisker pad to generate behaviorally relevant output.

  13. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    PubMed

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernández-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (β/α)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery.

  14. Effects of sensory deprivation on columnar organization of neuronal circuits in the rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Schierloh, Anja; Eder, Matthias; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    We examined whether sensory deprivation during formation of the cortical circuitry influences the pattern of intracortical single-cell connections in rat barrel cortex. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons were recorded in vitro using patch-clamp techniques. In order to evoke EPSPs, presynaptic neurons were stimulated by photolytically applied glutamate, thus generating action potentials. Synaptic connections between the stimulated and the recorded neuron were identified by the occurrence of PSPs following photostimulation. Sensory deprivation changed the pattern of projections from L4 and L2/3 neurons to L2/3 pyramidal cells. In slices of non-deprived rats 86% of the total presynaptic neurons were located in the first and only 10% in the second barrel column. Deprivation changed these values to 67% and 26%, respectively. Therefore, the probability of presynaptic cells projecting to L2/3 neurons was shifted from adjacent to more remote barrel columns. These results indicate that deprivation of sensory input influences the pattern of intracortical connections.

  15. Destiny of a drop on a fiber: from barrel to clamshell and back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eral, Burak; de Ruiter, J.; de Ruiter, R.; Oh, J. M.; Semprebon, C.; Brinkman, M.; Mugele, F.

    2011-11-01

    Drops on cylindrical fibers are a familiar sight, for instance in the form of dew drops on spider webs. They can exist in two competing morphologies, a cylindrically symmetric barrel state completely engulfing the fiber and an asymmetric clamshell state, in which the drop sits on the side of the fiber. Despite their omnipresence and their practical relevance the physical mechanisms governing the stability of the two morphologies remained elusive. Using electrowetting-functionalized fibers we determined of the stability limits of both morphologies as a function of the two relevant control parameters, the contact angle and the liquid volume. While clamshells are found to prevail for large contact angles and small volumes, and barrels prevail for small angles and large volumes, there is also a wide range of intermediate parameter values, for which both morphologies are mechanically stable. Mapping out the energy landscape of the system by numerical minimization of the free energy we find that the barrel state is easily deformed by non-axisymmetric perturbations. From a general perspective, the demonstration of electrowetting-based reversible switching of liquid morphologies on fibers opens up opportunities for designing functional textiles and porous materials. We thank the Chemical Sciences division of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO-CW) for financial support.

  16. CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, Annabella; Borreca, Antonella; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Middei, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Experience modifies synaptic connectivity through processes that involve dendritic spine rearrangements in neuronal circuits. Although cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) has a key function in spines changes, its role in activity-dependent rearrangements in brain regions of rodents interacting with the surrounding environment has received little attention so far. Here we studied the effects of vibrissae trimming, a widely used model of sensory deprivation-induced cortical plasticity, on processes associated with dendritic spine rearrangements in the barrel cortex of a transgenic mouse model of CREB downregulation (mCREB mice). We found that sensory deprivation through prolonged whisker trimming leads to an increased number of thin spines in the layer V of related barrel cortex (Contra) in wild type but not mCREB mice. In the barrel field controlling spared whiskers (Ipsi), the same trimming protocol results in a CREB-dependent enlargement of dendritic spines. Last, we demonstrated that CREB regulates structural rearrangements of synapses that associate with dynamic changes of dendritic spines. Our findings suggest that CREB plays a key role in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic circuits rearrangements that account for new brain connectivity in response to changes in the environment. PMID:26075101

  17. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level. PMID:27548330

  18. A Novel Mitosomal β-Barrel Outer Membrane Protein in Entamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Herbert J.; Imai, Kenichiro; Makiuchi, Takashi; Tomii, Kentaro; Horton, Paul; Nozawa, Akira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba possesses a highly divergent mitochondrion-related organelle known as the mitosome. Here, we report the discovery of a novel protein in Entamoeba, which we name Mitosomal β-barrel Outer Membrane Protein of 30 kDa (MBOMP30). Initially identified through in silico analysis, we experimentally confirmed that MBOMP30 is indeed a β-barrel protein. Circular dichroism analysis showed MBOMP30 has a predominant β-sheet structure. Localization to Entamoeba histolytica mitosomes was observed through Percoll-gradient fractionation and immunofluorescence assay. Mitosomal membrane integration was demonstrated by carbonate fractionation, proteinase K digestion, and immunoelectron microscopy. Interestingly, the deletion of the putative β-signal, a sequence believed to guide β-barrel outer membrane protein (BOMP) assembly, did not affect membrane integration, but abolished the formation of a ~240 kDa complex. MBOMP30 represents only the seventh subclass of eukaryotic BOMPs discovered to date and lacks detectable homologs outside Entamoeba, suggesting that it may be unique to Entamoeba mitosomes. PMID:25711150

  19. Lateral opening in the intact β-barrel assembly machinery captured by cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Iadanza, Matthew G.; Higgins, Anna J.; Schiffrin, Bob; Calabrese, Antonio N.; Brockwell, David J.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Radford, Sheena E.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is a ∼203 kDa complex of five proteins (BamA–E), which is essential for viability in E. coli. BAM promotes the folding and insertion of β-barrel proteins into the outer membrane via a poorly understood mechanism. Several current models suggest that BAM functions through a ‘lateral gating' motion of the β-barrel of BamA. Here we present a cryo-EM structure of the BamABCDE complex, at 4.9 Å resolution. The structure is in a laterally open conformation showing that gating is independent of BamB binding. We describe conformational changes throughout the complex and interactions between BamA, B, D and E, and the detergent micelle that suggest communication between BAM and the lipid bilayer. Finally, using an enhanced reconstitution protocol and functional assays, we show that for the outer membrane protein OmpT, efficient folding in vitro requires lateral gating in BAM. PMID:27686148

  20. Improving the resistance of a eukaryotic β-barrel protein to thermal and chemical perturbations.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Dennis; Mager, Frauke; Naveed, Hammad; Arnold, Thomas; Weirich, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Liang, Jie; Nussberger, Stephan

    2011-10-14

    β-Barrel membrane proteins have regular structures with extensive hydrogen-bond networks between their transmembrane (TM) β-strands, which stabilize their protein fold. Nevertheless, weakly stable TM regions, which are important for the protein function and interaction with other proteins, exist. Here, we report on the apparent stability of human Tom40A, a member of the "mitochondrial porin family" and main constituent of the mitochondrial protein-conducting channel TOM (translocase of the outer membrane). Using a physical interaction model, TmSIP, for β-barrel membrane proteins, we have identified three unfavorable β-strands in the TM domain of the protein. Substitution of key residues inside these strands with hydrophobic amino acids results in a decreased sensitivity of the protein to chemical and/or thermal denaturation. The apparent melting temperature observed when denatured at a rate of 1 °C per minute is shifted from 73 to 84 °C. Moreover, the sensitivity of the protein to denaturant agents is significantly lowered. Further, we find a reduced tendency for the mutated protein to form dimers. We propose that the identified weakly stable β-strands 1, 2 and 9 of human Tom40A play an important role in quaternary protein-protein interactions within the mammalian TOM machinery. Our results show that the use of empirical energy functions to model the apparent stability of β-barrel membrane proteins may be a useful tool in the field of nanopore bioengineering.

  1. Improving the Resistance of a Eukaryotic β-Barrel Protein to Thermal and Chemical Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Dennis; Mager, Frauke; Naveed, Hammad; Arnold, Thomas; Weirich, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Liang, Jie; Nussberger, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Beta-barrel membrane proteins have regular structures with extensive hydrogen bonding networks between their transmembrane (TM) β-strands, which stabilize their protein fold. Nevertheless, weakly stable TM regions exist, which are important for the protein function and interaction with other proteins. Here, we report on the apparent stability of human Tom40A, a member of the ‘mitochondrial porin family’ and main constituent of the mitochondrial protein-conducting channel TOM. Using a physical interaction model TmSIP for β-barrel membrane proteins, we have identified three β-strands unfavorable in the TM domain of the protein. Substitution of key residues inside these strands with hydrophobic amino acids results in a decreased sensitivity of the protein to chemical and/or thermal denaturation. The apparent melting temperature observed when denatured at a rate of one degree per minute, is shifted from 73 to 84 °C. Moreover, the sensitivity of the protein to denaturant agents is significantly lowered. Further, we find a reduced tendency for the mutated protein to form dimers. We propose that the identified weakly stable β-strands 1, 2 and 9 of human Tom40A play an important role in quaternary protein-protein interactions within the mammalian TOM machinery. Our results show that the use of empirical energy functions to model the apparent stability of β-barrel membrane proteins may be a useful tool in the field of nanopore bioengineering. PMID:21835183

  2. Shifts in Developmental Timing, and Not Increased Levels of Experience-Dependent Neuronal Activity, Promote Barrel Expansion in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of Rats Enucleated at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Fetter-Pruneda, Ingrid; Ibarrarán-Viniegra, Ana Sofía; Martínez-Martínez, Eduardo; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Padilla-Cortés, Patricia; Mercado-Célis, Gabriela; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Birth-enucleated rodents display enlarged representations of whiskers (i.e., barrels of the posteromedial subfield) in the primary somatosensory cortex. Although the historical view maintains that barrel expansion is due to incremental increases in neuronal activity along the trigeminal pathway during postnatal development, recent evidence obtained in experimental models of intramodal plasticity challenges this view. Here, we re-evaluate the role of experience-dependent neuronal activity on barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats by combining various anatomical methods and sensory deprivation paradigms. We show that barrels in birth-enucleated rats were already enlarged by the end of the first week of life and had levels of metabolic activity comparable to those in control rats at different ages. Dewhiskering after the postnatal period of barrel formation did not prevent barrel expansion in adult, birth-enucleated rats. Further, dark rearing and enucleation after barrel formation did not lead to expanded barrels in adult brains. Because incremental increases of somatosensory experience did not promote barrel expansion in birth-enucleated rats, we explored whether shifts of the developmental timing could better explain barrel expansion during the first week of life. Accordingly, birth-enucleated rats show earlier formation of barrels, accelerated growth of somatosensory thalamocortical afferents, and an earlier H4 deacetylation. Interestingly, when H4 deacetylation was prevented with a histone deacetylases inhibitor (valproic acid), barrel specification timing returned to normal and barrel expansion did not occur. Thus, we provide evidence supporting that shifts in developmental timing modulated through epigenetic mechanisms, and not increased levels of experience dependent neuronal activity, promote barrel expansion in the primary somatosensory cortex of rats enucleated at birth. PMID:23372796

  3. EMISSIONS OF POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZOFURANS FROM THE OPEN BURNING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE IN BARRELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Backyard burning of household waste in barrels is a common waste disposal practice for which pollutant emissions have not been well characterized. This study measured the emissions of several pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofura...

  4. EMISSIONS OF POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS AND POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZOFURANS FROM THE OPEN BURNING OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE IN BARRELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Backyard burning of household waste in barrels is a common waste disposal practice for which pollutant emissions have not been well characterized. This study measured the emissions of several pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofura...

  5. TonB-dependent transporter FhuA in planar lipid bilayers: partial exit of its plug from the barrel.

    PubMed

    Udho, Eshwar; Jakes, Karen S; Finkelstein, Alan

    2012-08-28

    TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs), which transport iron-chelating siderophores and vitamin B(12) across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, share a conserved architecture of a 22-stranded β-barrel with an amino-terminal plug domain occluding the barrel. We previously reported that we could induce TBDTs to reversibly open in planar lipid bilayers via the use of urea and that these channels were responsive to physiological concentrations of ligands. Here we report that in the presence of urea, trypsin can cleave the amino-terminal 67 residues of the plug of the TonB-dependent transporter FhuA, as assessed by gel shift and mass spectrometry assays. On the bilayer, trypsin treatment in the presence of urea resulted in the induced conductance no longer being reversed upon removal of urea, suggesting that urea opens intact FhuA channels by pulling the plug at least partly out of the barrel and that removal of the urea then allows reinsertion of the plug into the barrel. When expressed separately, the FhuA plug domain was found to be a mostly unfolded structure that was able to occlude isolated FhuA β-barrels inserted into the membrane. Thus, although folded in the barrel, the plug need not be folded upon exiting the barrel. The rate of insertion of the β-barrels into the membrane was tremendously increased in the presence of an osmotic gradient provided by either urea or glycerol. Negative staining electron microscopy showed that FhuA in a detergent solution formed vesicles, thus explaining why an osmotic gradient promoted the insertion of FhuA into membranes.

  6. Water-Soluble Pd8L4 Self-assembled Molecular Barrel as an Aqueous Carrier for Hydrophobic Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Jain, Ruchi; Siddiqui, Mujahuddin M; Saini, Deepak K; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2017-05-01

    A tetrafacial water-soluble molecular barrel (1) was synthesized by coordination driven self-assembly of a symmetrical tetrapyridyl donor (L) with a cis-blocked 90° acceptor [cis-(en)Pd(NO3)2] (en = ethane-1,2-diamine). The open barrel structure of (1) was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The presence of a hydrophobic cavity with large windows makes it an ideal candidate for encapsulation and carrying hydrophobic drug like curcumin in an aqueous medium. The barrel (1) encapsulates curcumin inside its molecular cavity and protects highly photosensitive curcumin from photodegradation. The photostability of encapsulated curcumin is due to the absorption of a high proportion of the incident photons by the aromatic walls of 1 with a high absorption cross-sectional area, which helps the walls to shield the guest even against sunlight/UV radiations. As compared to free curcumin in water, we noticed a significant increase in solubility as well as cellular uptake of curcumin upon encapsulation inside the water-soluble molecular barrel (1) in aqueous medium. Fluorescence imaging confirmed that curcumin was delivered into HeLa cancer cells by the aqueous barrel (1) with the retention of its potential anticancer activity. While free curcumin is inactive toward cancer cells in aqueous medium at room temperature due to negligible solubility, the determined IC50 value of ∼14 μM for curcumin in aqueous medium in the presence of the barrel (1) reflects the efficiency of the barrel as a potential curcumin carrier in aqueous medium without any other additives. Thus, two major challenges of increasing the bioavailability and stability of curcumin in aqueous medium even in the presence of UV light have been addressed by using a new supramolecular water-soluble barrel (1) as a drug carrier.

  7. Boron Nanotubes/Nanofibers in Propellant Material Formulations: Testing and Characterization for Gun Barrel Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-13

    synthesis of boron nanostructures comprising of a mixture of boron nanotubes ( BNTs ) and nanofibers (BNFs) was developed under this contract. A method of...nitrogen doping the BNTs and BNFs was also demonstrated. A key feature of this work is the use of a solid instead of a gaseous boron precursor for the...synthesis of boron nanotubes and boron nanofibers. A solid boron precursor was chosen for BNT /BNF synthesis because typical gaseous boron precursors

  8. A barrel-related interneuron in layer 4 of rat somatosensory cortex with a high intrabarrel connectivity.

    PubMed

    Koelbl, Christian; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Lübke, Joachim; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-03-01

    Synaptic connections between identified fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, and excitatory spiny neurons in layer 4 (L4) of the barrel cortex were investigated using patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous biocytin fillings. Three distinct clusters of FS L4 interneurons were identified based on their axonal morphology relative to the barrel column suggesting that these neurons do not constitute a homogeneous interneuron population. One L4 FS interneuron type had an axonal domain strictly confined to a L4 barrel and was therefore named "barrel-confined inhibitory interneuron" (BIn). BIns established reliable inhibitory synaptic connections with L4 spiny neurons at a high connectivity rate of 67%, of which 69% were reciprocal. Unitary IPSPs at these connections had a mean amplitude of 0.9 ± 0.8 mV with little amplitude variation and weak short-term synaptic depression. We found on average 3.7 ± 1.3 putative inhibitory synaptic contacts that were not restricted to perisomatic areas. In conclusion, we characterized a novel type of barrel cortex interneuron in the major thalamo-recipient layer 4 forming dense synaptic networks with L4 spiny neurons. These networks constitute an efficient and powerful inhibitory feedback system, which may serve to rapidly reset the barrel microcircuitry following sensory activation.

  9. Volatile compounds in a spanish red wine aged in barrels made of Spanish, French, and American oak wood.

    PubMed

    De Simón, Brígida Fernández; Cadahía, Estrella; Jalocha, Jerzy

    2003-12-17

    A red Rioja wine was aged in barrels made of Spanish oak wood (Quercus robur, Quercus petraea,Quercus pyrenaica, and Quercus faginea) during 21 months. The concentrations of some volatile compounds [syringaldehyde, vanillin, eugenol, maltol, guaiacol, 4-ethylphenol, cis and trans isomers of beta-methyl-gamma-octalactone, 2-furfuraldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furfuraldehyde, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfuraldehyde, and furfuryl alcohol] were studied in these wines and compared with those of the same wine aged in barrels made from French oak of Q. robur (Limousin, France) and Q. petraea (Allier, France) and American oak of Quercus alba (Missouri). Similar concentrations of these compounds were found in wines aged in Spanish and French oak wood barrels, and significantly different concentrations were found with respect to wines aged in barrels made of American oak wood, indicating a different behavior. Thus, wines with different characteristics were obtained, depending on the kind of wood. Also, the kind of wood had an important influence on sensory characteristics of wine during the aging process. Spanish oak wood from Q. robur, Q. petraea, and Q. pyrenaica can be considered to be suitable for barrel production for quality wines, because a wine aged in barrels made of these Spanish oak woods showed similar and intermediate characteristics to those of the same wine aged in French and American oak woods usually used in cooperage.

  10. A Barrel-Related Interneuron in Layer 4 of Rat Somatosensory Cortex with a High Intrabarrel Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Koelbl, Christian; Helmstaedter, Moritz; Lübke, Joachim; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic connections between identified fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, and excitatory spiny neurons in layer 4 (L4) of the barrel cortex were investigated using patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous biocytin fillings. Three distinct clusters of FS L4 interneurons were identified based on their axonal morphology relative to the barrel column suggesting that these neurons do not constitute a homogeneous interneuron population. One L4 FS interneuron type had an axonal domain strictly confined to a L4 barrel and was therefore named “barrel-confined inhibitory interneuron” (BIn). BIns established reliable inhibitory synaptic connections with L4 spiny neurons at a high connectivity rate of 67%, of which 69% were reciprocal. Unitary IPSPs at these connections had a mean amplitude of 0.9 ± 0.8 mV with little amplitude variation and weak short-term synaptic depression. We found on average 3.7 ± 1.3 putative inhibitory synaptic contacts that were not restricted to perisomatic areas. In conclusion, we characterized a novel type of barrel cortex interneuron in the major thalamo-recipient layer 4 forming dense synaptic networks with L4 spiny neurons. These networks constitute an efficient and powerful inhibitory feedback system, which may serve to rapidly reset the barrel microcircuitry following sensory activation. PMID:24076498

  11. Final Report of the Rifling Profile Push Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    resistance pressure of the M855 projectile in an M16A2 barrel section. The M855 test projectiles were tested in a 2 × 2 matrix, two different M16A2 barrel...18 Distribution List 19 iii List of Figures Figure 1. Cross section of 5.56-mm M855 projectile ...for M855 projectiles . ................................11 Figure 16. Predicted pressure vs. time for M855 bullets with varying resistance pressures

  12. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 04-4-004A Natural Cold Weather Environment Test of Ammunition, Small Arms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-30

    smoke, muzzle flash, ice fog, and sound of the test ammunition when fired under natural cold environmental conditions. d. Manpack Mobility. The...barrels Barrels chambered for the specific test ammunition and ported for electronic or crusher type pressure gauges. b. Table 2 presents...a. When firing in temperatures below 29 ºC (-20 ºF), tracer observation may be obscured by the occurrence of ice fog from the muzzle blast. Ice fog

  13. Comparing the performance of IBIS and BulletTRAX-3D technology using bullets fired through 10 consecutively rifled barrels.

    PubMed

    Brinck, Toni B

    2008-05-01

    This study evaluates the abilities of the Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS) and BulletTRAX-3D electronic imaging systems to identify bullets fired by the same weapon in a large database of images. Ten consecutively rifled handgun barrels were test fired to obtain reference sample and known match sample pairs for upload onto both bullet acquisition systems. Both copper-jacketed and lead bullets were uploaded, to account for variations in the manner in which markings are reproduced on the different metal compositions. Ranked correlation lists were examined and evaluated. For copper-jacketed bullet correlations, both IBIS and BulletTRAX-3D identified all reference samples to their known matches within the top 10 positions. For lead bullets, BulletTRAX-3D identified all reference samples to their known match in the top 10 positions while IBIS identified only 30%. For inter composition comparisons, BulletTRAX-3D was more successful than IBIS, identifying 100% of reference samples to their known match in the top 20 for copper-jacketed to lead comparisons and 90% for lead to copper-jacketed comparisons. These results suggest that BulletTRAX-3D is more effective than IBIS in the analysis of a wider range of bullet types and it was also found to produce images of superior quality.

  14. Effect of limited proteolysis in the 8th loop of the barrel and of antibodies on porcine pancreas amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Desseaux, V; Payan, F; Ajandouz, E H; Svensson, B; Haser, R; Marchis-Mouren, G

    1991-11-15

    The porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase is a (beta/alpha)8-barrel protein, containing domains A and B (peptide sequence 1-403) and a distinct C-domain (peptide sequence 404-496). Separation of the terminal C-domain from the A and B domains has been attempted by limited proteolysis in the hinge region. Subtilisin was found to hydrolyse amylase between residues 369 and 370 situated in the loop between the eighth beta-strand and alpha-helix. The cleaved amylase was isolated by chromatofocusing and found to retain about 60% of the activity of the native enzyme, while the isolated fragments were inactive. Antigen binding fragments prepared from polyclonal antibodies to native amylase and the CNBr-fragment P1 (peptide sequence 395-496) respectively, were tested for influence on the enzyme activity. Antibodies directed against P1 had no effect whereas antibodies against the peptide sequence 1-394 and amylase respectively inhibited hydrolysis of substrates having four or more glucose residues but not of shorter oligomaltosides. Crystallographic analysis revealed that changes in the region of residue 369 might affect the conformation of the active site as well as of a second binding site. This site, located on the enzyme surface, is proposed to be required for the hydrolysis of larger substrates.

  15. R&D progress in SRF surface preparation with centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp) for both Nb and Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari

    2013-09-01

    Centrifugal Barrel polishing (CBP) is becoming a common R&D tool for SRF cavity preparation around the world. During the CBP process a cylindrically symmetric SRF cavity is filled with relatively cheap and environmentally friendly abrasive and sealed. The cavity is then spun around a cylindrically symmetric axis at high speeds uniformly conditioning the inner surface. This uniformity is especially relevant for SRF application because many times a single manufacturing defects limits cavity?s performance well below it?s theoretical limit. In addition CBP has created surfaces with roughness?s on the order of 10?s of nm which create a unique surface for wet chemistry or thin film deposition. CBP is now being utilized at Jefferson Laboratory, Fermi Laboratory and Cornell University in the US, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Germany, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro in Italy, and Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology in India. In this talk we will present current CBP research from each lab including equipment, baseline recipes, cavity removal rates and subsequent cryogenic cavity tests on niobium as well as copper cavities where available.

  16. Quad-barrel multifunctional electrochemical and ion conductance probe for voltammetric analysis and imaging.

    PubMed

    Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; McKelvey, Kim; Byers, Joshua C; Güell, Aleix G; Colburn, Alex W; Lazenby, Robert A; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-04-07

    The fabrication and use of a multifunctional electrochemical probe incorporating two independent carbon working electrodes and two electrolyte-filled barrels, equipped with quasi-reference counter electrodes (QRCEs), in the end of a tapered micrometer-scale pipet is described. This "quad-probe" (4-channel probe) was fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barrelled pipet. After filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, a meniscus forms at the end of the probe and covers the two working electrodes. The two carbon electrodes can be used to drive local electrochemical reactions within the meniscus while a bias between the QRCEs in the electrolyte channels provides an ion conductance signal that is used to control and position the meniscus on a surface of interest. When brought into contact with a surface, localized high resolution amperometric imaging can be achieved with the two carbon working electrodes with a spatial resolution defined by the meniscus contact area. The substrate can be an insulating material or (semi)conductor, but herein, we focus mainly on conducting substrates that can be connected as a third working electrode. Studies using both aqueous and ionic liquid electrolytes in the probe, together with gold and individual single walled carbon nanotube samples, demonstrate the utility of the technique. Substrate generation-dual tip collection measurements are shown to be characterized by high collection efficiencies (approaching 100%). This hybrid configuration of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) should be powerful for future applications in electrode mapping, as well as in studies of insulating materials as demonstrated by transient spot redox-titration measurements at an electrostatically charged Teflon surface and at a pristine calcite surface, where a functionalized probe is used to follow the

  17. Membrane-spanning α-helical barrels as tractable protein-design targets.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Ai; Heal, Jack W; Fauland, Kerstin; Thomson, Andrew R; Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-08-05

    The rational (de novo) design of membrane-spanning proteins lags behind that for water-soluble globular proteins. This is due to gaps in our knowledge of membrane-protein structure, and experimental difficulties in studying such proteins compared to water-soluble counterparts. One limiting factor is the small number of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures for transmembrane proteins. By contrast, many tens of thousands of globular protein structures provide a rich source of 'scaffolds' for protein design, and the means to garner sequence-to-structure relationships to guide the design process. The α-helical coiled coil is a protein-structure element found in both globular and membrane proteins, where it cements a variety of helix-helix interactions and helical bundles. Our deep understanding of coiled coils has enabled a large number of successful de novo designs. For one class, the α-helical barrels-that is, symmetric bundles of five or more helices with central accessible channels-there are both water-soluble and membrane-spanning examples. Recent computational designs of water-soluble α-helical barrels with five to seven helices have advanced the design field considerably. Here we identify and classify analogous and more complicated membrane-spanning α-helical barrels from the Protein Data Bank. These provide tantalizing but tractable targets for protein engineering and de novo protein design.This article is part of the themed issue 'Membrane pores: from structure and assembly, to medicine and technology'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. The barrel-stave model as applied to alamethicin and its analogs reevaluated.

    PubMed

    Laver, D R

    1994-02-01

    Alamethicin and its analogs from cation selective, multi-conductance channels in lipid bilayers. The conductance levels have been thought to be due to a barrel-stave structure where conducting pores (barrels) are formed by the self-assembly of a variable number of alpha-helical rods (staves). The conductance transitions were then interpreted as the addition or deletion of peptide monomers from the pore-forming complex (Sansom, M.S. 1991. Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 55:139-235). Initially, pore conductances were calculated from that expected of right circular cylinders of "bulk" electrolyte. More recent theories also included the access resistance of the electrolyte outside the pore. However, they all consistently overestimated the observed conductances. The reason for the discrepancy is presented here. Previous theories ignored the effects of ion concentration gradients near the pore. Hence, they only held in the limit of small bilayer potentials (< 25 mV) and so would overestimate measurements that typically used much larger potentials (> 100 mV). This theoretical flaw is corrected by using Läuger's theory of diffusion-limited ion flow (Läuger, P. 1976. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 455:493-509). Thus, including the effects of ion concentration gradients results in a considerable improvement in predicting pore conductances. It is found that: 1) the effects of ion concentration gradients must be included in the barrel-stave model for it to apply to the available data; 2) previously published explanations for the discrepancy between the model and the data, namely the "distorted bundle" and the "head-to-tail aggregate" hypotheses are not necessary (reviewed by Sansom, 1991).

  19. Rapid plasticity follows whisker pairing in barrel cortex of the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Sellien, Heike; Ebner, Ford F

    2007-02-01

    Synaptic plasticity can be induced easily throughout life in the rodent somatic sensory cortex. Trimming all but two whiskers on one side of an adult rat's face, called 'whisker pairing', causes the active (intact) whiskers to develop a stronger drive on cortical cells in their respective barrel columns, while inactive (trimmed) whisker efficacy is down-regulated. To date, this type of activity-dependent plasticity has been induced by trimming all but two whiskers, letting the rats explore their environment from 1 day to 1 month, after which cortical responses were analyzed physiologically under anesthesia. Such studies have enhanced our understanding of cortical plasticity, but the anesthesia complicates the examination of changes that occur in the first few hours after whisker trimming. Here we assayed the short-term changes that occur in alert, active animals over a period of hours after whisker trimming. The magnitude of barrel cortex evoked responses was measured in response to stimulation of the cut and paired whiskers of rats under several conditions: (a) whisking in air (control), (b) active whisking of an object by the rat, and (c) epochs of passive whisker stimulation to identify the onset of whisker pairing plasticity changes in cortex. The main difference between whisking in air without contact and passive whisker stimulation is that the former condition induces an increased response to stimulation of inactive cut whiskers, while the latter condition increases the responses to the stimulated whiskers. The results support the conclusion that whisker pairing plasticity in barrel cortex occurs within 4 h after whisker trimming in an awake, alert animal.

  20. High precision, low disturbance calibration system for the CMS Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter High Voltage apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, G.

    2017-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter utilizes scintillation lead tungstate crystals, with avalanche photodiodes (APD) as photo-detectors in the barrel part. 1224 HV channels bias groups of 50 APD pairs, each at a voltage of about 380 V. The APD gain dependence on the voltage is 3%/V. A stability of better than 60 mV is needed to have negligible impact on the calorimeter energy resolution. Until 2015 manual calibrations were performed yearly. A new calibration system was deployed recently, which satisfies the requirement of low disturbance and high precision. The system is discussed in detail and first operational experience is presented.

  1. Map transfer from the thalamus to the neocortex: inputs from the barrel field.

    PubMed

    Lokmane, Ludmilla; Garel, Sonia

    2014-11-01

    Sensory perception relies on the formation of stereotyped maps inside the brain. This feature is particularly well illustrated in the mammalian neocortex, which is subdivided into distinct cortical sensory areas that comprise topological maps, such as the somatosensory homunculus in humans or the barrel field of the large whiskers in rodents. How somatosensory maps are formed and relayed into the neocortex remain essential questions in developmental neuroscience. Here, we will present our current knowledge on whisker map transfer in the mouse model, with the goal of linking embryonic and postnatal studies into a comprehensive framework.

  2. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Duterloo, Dirk Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-06-15

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successful angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent.

  3. Analysis of biopharmaceutical market-appropriate plastic syringe barrel for extractables.

    PubMed

    DeGrazio, Frances; Runkle, Joseph; Smythe, Jeff; Miller, Amy

    2009-01-01

    A study was designed to evaluate a new syringe system developed specifically for sensitive pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical drug products. An in-depth review of the extractables portion of this program is presented and includes data generated by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy, ion chromatography, and inductively coupled plasma of the Crystal Zenith barrel before and after sterilization. One leachable was identified after e-beam irradiation processing. This leachable, identified as an organic acid species, was then evaluated from a safety assessment viewpoint. The details of this program and associated results are explained in this report.

  4. Virus evolution: how far does the double beta-barrel viral lineage extend?

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Bamford, Dennis H

    2008-12-01

    During the past few years one of the most astonishing findings in the field of virology has been the realization that viruses that infect hosts from all three domains of life are often structurally similar. The recent burst of structural information points to a need to create a new way to organize the virosphere that, in addition to the current classification, would reflect relationships between virus families. Using the vertical beta-barrel major capsid proteins and ATPases related to known viral genome-packaging ATPases as examples, we can now re-evaluate the classification of viruses and virus-like genetic elements from a structural standpoint.

  5. Correlations Decrease with Propagation of Spiking Activity in the Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Gayathri Nattar; Koester, Helmut Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity through neuronal populations is important for the function of the central nervous system. Neural correlations have an impact on cortical function particularly on the signaling of information and propagation of spiking activity. Therefore we measured the change in correlations as suprathreshold spiking activity propagated between recurrent neuronal networks of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Using optical methods we recorded spiking activity from large samples of neurons from two neural populations simultaneously. The results indicate that correlations decreased as spiking activity propagated from layer 4 to layer 2/3 in the rodent barrel cortex. PMID:21629764

  6. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  7. The performance of the Barrel CRID at the SLD: Long-term operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Ashford, V.; Aston, D.

    1997-11-01

    The Barrel CRID detector has been operating successfully at SLD for the past 7 years. It is an important tool for SLD physics analyses. The authors report results based on long term operational experience of a number of important quantities such as the Cherenkov quality factor, N{sub o}, of the device, fluid transparency, electron lifetime, single electron detection efficiency, anode wire aging, TMAE purity, long term stability of the gas refraction index, liquid radiator transparency, Cherenkov angle resolution and the number of photoelectrons observed per ring.

  8. Barrel-Clamshell analog in the capillary bridges between two solid spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, James; Farmer, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    Sessile drops on a wire are known to adopt one of two topological configurations, referred to as a barrel or a clamshell, depending on the volume and contact angle. Here we report on an analogous topological transition for the capillary bridge between two contacting solid spheres. We characterize the transition by numerically computing the bridge shapes that minimize surface energy for a variety of contact angles and volumes. Finally, we are able to develop an exact solution to the non-axisymmetric bridge shapes by relying on symmetries of the geometry.

  9. Thinking outside the barrel: what really matters in modern photographic lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Ken

    2009-08-01

    Because optical performance has increased so far with modern design software and aspherical manufacturing processes, optical performance is now the least important factor in modern photographic lens design. Far more important are ergonomic (usability) and systems-integration factors which determine a lens' acceptance by photographers, and ultimately, its commercial success. Common SLR cameras tend to have the most advanced systems and features, so they tend to be the focus of this paper simply because they offer the most to discuss. Inside-the-barrel optics and other design considerations have been covered in SPIE paper 7428-3.

  10. Design studies for the Phase II upgrade of the CMS Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornheim, A.

    2017-03-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) aims to reach the unprecedented integrated luminosity of 3 ab‑1 with an instantaneous luminosity up to 5 × 1034 cm‑2 s‑1. This poses stringent requirements on the radiation resistance of detector components and on the latency of the trigger system. The barrel region of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter will be able to retain the current lead tungstate crystals and avalanche photo diode detectors which will meet the performance requirements throughout the operational lifetime of the HL-LHC. The new front-end electronics and very front-end system required at high luminosities will be described.

  11. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-01-01

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successfull angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent. PMID:17410397

  12. Changes in the sotolon content of dry white wines during barrel and bottle aging.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Valérie; Pons, Alexandre; Darriet, Philippe; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2008-04-23

    GC-MS in electron ionization mode (EI) was used as a simple, sensitive method for assaying sotolon [4,5-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5) H-furanone] in various dry white wines. The impact of barrel-aging conditions, that is, whether yeast lees were present or not, on the formation of sotolon in dry white wines was then studied. The sotolon content was highest in dry white wines aged in new barrels without lees, often exceeding the perception threshold (8 microg/L). These results demonstrated that yeast lees were capable of minimizing the formation of sotolon in dry white wines during aging. The sotolon and oxygen contents of several bottle of the same white wine were also compared 7 years after bottling. At the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations generally measured, between 5 and 100 microg/L, the sotolon content remained below its perception threshold in wine. The perception threshold was exceeded only in wines with oxygen concentrations above 500 microg/L. The presence of dissolved oxygen in the wine samples analyzed also resulted in a decrease in their free sulfur dioxide content.

  13. Evolution of outer membrane beta-barrels from an ancestral beta beta hairpin.

    PubMed

    Remmert, M; Biegert, A; Linke, D; Lupas, A N; Söding, J

    2010-06-01

    Outer membrane beta-barrels (OMBBs) are the major class of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and plastids. Their transmembrane domains consist of 8-24 beta-strands forming a closed, barrel-shaped beta-sheet around a central pore. Despite their obvious structural regularity, evidence for an origin by duplication or for a common ancestry has not been found. We use three complementary approaches to show that all OMBBs from Gram-negative bacteria evolved from a single, ancestral beta beta hairpin. First, we link almost all families of known single-chain bacterial OMBBs with each other through transitive profile searches. Second, we identify a clear repeat signature in the sequences of many OMBBs in which the repeating sequence unit coincides with the structural beta beta hairpin repeat. Third, we show that the observed sequence similarity between OMBB hairpins cannot be explained by structural or membrane constraints on their sequences. The third approach addresses a longstanding problem in protein evolution: how to distinguish between a very remotely homologous relationship and the opposing scenario of "sequence convergence." The origin of a diverse group of proteins from a single hairpin module supports the hypothesis that, around the time of transition from the RNA to the protein world, proteins arose by amplification and recombination of short peptide modules that had previously evolved as cofactors of RNAs.

  14. Morphology and physiology of excitatory neurons in layer 6b of the somatosensory rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Marx, Manuel; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Neocortical lamina 6B (L6B) is a largely unexplored layer with a very heterogeneous cellular composition. To date, only little is known about L6B neurons on a systematic and quantitative basis. We investigated the morphological and electrophysiological properties of excitatory L6B neurons in the rat somatosensory barrel cortex using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and simultaneous biocytin fillings. Subsequent histological processing and computer-assisted 3D reconstructions provided the basis for a classification of excitatory L6B neurons according to their structural and functional characteristics. Three distinct clusters of excitatory L6B neurons were identified: (C1) pyramidal neurons with an apical dendrite pointing towards the pial surface, (C2) neurons with a prominent, "apical"-like dendrite not oriented towards the pia, and (C3) multipolar spiny neurons without any preferential dendritic orientation. The second group could be further subdivided into three categories termed inverted, "tangentially" oriented and "horizontally" oriented neurons. Furthermore, based on the axonal domain two subcategories of L6B pyramidal cells were identified that had either a more barrel-column confined or an extended axonal field. The classification of excitatory L6B neurons provided here may serve as a basis for future studies on the structure, function, and synaptic connectivity of L6B neurons.

  15. Mechanistic link between β barrel assembly and the initiation of autotransporter secretion

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Olga; Peterson, Janine H.; Ieva, Raffaele; Bernstein, Harris D.

    2013-01-01

    Autotransporters are bacterial virulence factors that contain an N-terminal extracellular (“passenger”) domain and a C-terminal β barrel (“β”) domain that anchors the protein to the outer membrane. The β domain is required for passenger domain secretion, but its exact role in autotransporter biogenesis is unclear. Here we describe insights into the function of the β domain that emerged from an analysis of mutations in the Escherichia coli O157:H7 autotransporter EspP. We found that the G1066A and G1081D mutations slightly distort the structure of the β domain and delay the initiation of passenger domain translocation. Site-specific photocrosslinking experiments revealed that the mutations slow the insertion of the β domain into the outer membrane, but do not delay the binding of the β domain to the factor that mediates the insertion reaction (the Bam complex). Our results demonstrate that the β domain does not simply target the passenger domain to the outer membrane, but promotes translocation when it reaches a specific stage of assembly. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that the Bam complex catalyzes the membrane integration of β barrel proteins in a multistep process that can be perturbed by minor structural defects in client proteins. PMID:23431155

  16. Structural (betaalpha)8 TIM barrel model of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase.

    PubMed

    Casals, Núria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Pié, Juan; Mir, Cecilia; Roca, Ramón; Puisac, Beatriz; Aledo, Rosa; Clotet, Josep; Menao, Sebastián; Serra, Dolors; Asins, Guillermina; Till, Jacqueline; Elias-Jones, Alun C; Cresto, Juan C; Chamoles, Nestor A; Abdenur, Jose E; Mayatepek, Ertan; Besley, Guy; Valencia, Alfonso; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2003-08-01

    This study describes three novel homozygous missense mutations (S75R, S201Y, and D204N) in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) lyase gene, which caused 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria in patients from Germany, England, and Argentina. Expression studies in Escherichia coli show that S75R and S201Y substitutions completely abolished the HMG-CoA lyase activity, whereas D204N reduced catalytic efficiency to 6.6% of the wild type. We also propose a three-dimensional model for human HMG-CoA lyase containing a (betaalpha)8 (TIM) barrel structure. The model is supported by the similarity with analogous TIM barrel structures of functionally related proteins, by the localization of catalytic amino acids at the active site, and by the coincidence between the shape of the substrate (HMG-CoA) and the predicted inner cavity. The three novel mutations explain the lack of HMG-CoA lyase activity on the basis of the proposed structure: in S75R and S201Y because the new amino acid residues occlude the substrate cavity, and in D204N because the mutation alters the electrochemical environment of the active site. We also report the localization of all missense mutations reported to date and show that these mutations are located in the beta-sheets around the substrate cavity.

  17. Calibration of the Shower Maximum Detector in the Barrel EMC at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, Kara; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Codrington, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Because of a photon's lack of interaction with the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), the γ-jet process (in which a direct photon is produced back to back with a jet) is a good probe of the medium. However, background photons, like those from π^0 decay must be factored in to the analysis. To distinguish between these direct and decay photons, a well calibrated detector is needed. The Barrel Shower Maximum Detector (BSMD) in the Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter (BEMC) at STAR has high resolution, but has not been calibrated well enough to discriminate between these two events. A pedestal subtraction was performed on the raw ADC vs. strip ID data from a Au+Au 200 GeV run. Each strip in both (pseudorapidity) and η (azimuth) was then assigned a status identification number, each corresponding to a hot, cold, dead, or good channel, for quality assurance. By finding the gains for each strip and normalizing them, calibration constants were obtained which can be applied to future runs. This accomplished a relative calibration of the BSMD.

  18. A New Four-Barrel Pellet Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; McGill, James M; Baylor, Larry R; Caughman, John B; Fehling, Dan T; Harris, Jeffrey H; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A; McCarthy, K. J.; Chamorro, M.; Garcia, R.; Hildago, C.; Medrano, M.; Unamuno, R.

    2011-01-01

    A new pellet injection system for the TJ-II stellarator has been developed/constructed as part of a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Centro de Investigaciones Energ ticas, Medioambientales y Tecnol gicas (CIEMAT). ORNL is providing most of the injector hardware and instrumentation, the pellet diagnostics, and the pellet transport tubes; CIEMAT is responsible for the injector stand/interface to the stellarator, cryogenic refrigerator, vacuum pumps/ballast volumes, gas manifolds, remote operations, plasma diagnostics, and data acquisition. The pellet injector design is an upgraded version of that used for the ORNL injector installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). It is a four-barrel system equipped with a cryogenic refrigerator for in situ hydrogen pellet formation and a combined mechanical punch/propellant valve system for pellet acceleration (speeds ~100 to 1000 m/s). On TJ-II, it will be used as an active diagnostic and for fueling. To accommodate the plasma experiments planned for TJ-II, pellet sizes significantly smaller than those typically used for the MST application are required. The system will initially be equipped with four different pellet sizes, with the gun barrel bores ranging between ~0.5 to 1.0 mm. The new system is almost complete and is described briefly here, highlighting the new features added since the original MST injector was constructed. Also, the future installation on TJ-II is reviewed.

  19. Ground and satellite EMIC wave observations in conjunction with BARREL electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C.; Lessard, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Millan, R. M.; Halford, A.; Horne, R. B.; Singer, H. J.; Green, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ground-based and satellite observations of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves are presented in conjunction with electron precipitation detected by high altitude balloons from the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign. On 17 Jan 2013, a high density solar wind compressed the magnetosphere and four satellites (GOES 13 & 15, Van Allen Probes A & B) as well as several ground stations (Dawson City, Canada and Halley, Antarctica) detected simultaneous EMIC waves across the night sector for about 2.5 hours during the compression (0130 - 0400 UT). The satellites and ground stations cover approximately 10 hours of magnetic local time and four L-shells, suggesting the generation region(s) covers the same extended area. At the strongest point of the compression (around 0300 UT with proton density 50 n/cc, flow pressure 20 nPa, SYM/H 50 nT) BARREL balloon 1G, which magnetically mapped close to GOES 13, detected relativistic electron precipitation concurrently with enhanced EMIC wave activity on GOES 13, which may show a direct observation of EMIC waves scattering relativistic electrons.

  20. Confinement of a β-barrel protein in nanoperforated free-standing nanomembranes for ion transport.

    PubMed

    Puiggalí-Jou, Anna; Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; Del Valle, Luis J; Armelin, Elaine; Casas, María T; Michaux, Catherine; Perpète, Eric A; Estrany, Francesc; Alemán, Carlos

    2016-09-29

    Bioinspired free-standing nanomembranes (FSNMs) for selective ion transport have been tailored by immobilizing the Omp2a β-barrel membrane protein inside nanoperforations created in flexible poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanomembranes. Perforated PLA FSNMs have been prepared by spin-coating a 99 : 1 PLA : poly(vinyl alcohol) mixture, and through a phase segregation process nanofeatures with dimensions similar to the entire nanomembrane thickness (∼110 nm) were induced. These nanofeatures have subsequently been transformed into nanoperforations (diameter: ∼51 nm) by selective solvent etching. The protein confined inside the nanopores of PLA FSNMs preserves the β-barrel structure and organizes in ovoid aggregates. The transport properties of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) across non-perforated PLA, nanoperforated PLA, and Omp2a-filled nanoperforated PLA have been monitored by measuring the nanomembrane resistance with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The incorporation of nanoperforations enhances the transport of ions across PLA nanomembranes, whereas the functionality of immobilized Omp2a is essential to exhibit effects similar to those observed in biological nanomembranes. Indeed, Omp2a-filled nanoperforated PLA nanomembranes exhibit stronger affinity towards Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions than towards K(+). In summary, this work provides a novel bioinspired strategy to develop mechanically stable and flexible FSNMs with channels for ion transport, which are precisely located inside artificial nanoperforations, thus holding great potential for applications in biofiltration and biosensing.

  1. A circularly permuted alpha-amylase-type alpha/beta-barrel structure in glucan-synthesizing glucosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E A; Jespersen, H M; Svensson, B

    1996-01-15

    A motif of amino acid residues, located at the active site and specific beta-strands in alpha-amylases, is recognized in alpha-1,3- and alpha-1,6-glucan-synthesizing glucosyltransferases, leading to the conclusion that these enzymes contain an alpha/beta-barrel closely related to the (beta/alpha)8-fold of the alpha-amylase superfamily. The secondary structure elements of the transferase barrel, however, are circularly permuted to start with an alpha-helix equivalent to helix 3 in the alpha-amylases. Thus, the transferase counterpart of the long third beta-->alpha connection--constituting a domain in the alpha-amylases--is divided to precede and succeed the barrel. This architectural arrangement may be coupled to sucrose scission and glucosyl transfer. The involvement in the mechanism in glucosyltransferases of active site residues recurring in amylolytic enzymes is discussed.

  2. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM-SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas

    2015-09-28

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM-SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. © 2015 Wenz et al.

  3. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM–SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM–SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:26416958

  4. Effectiveness of low impact development practices in two urbanized watersheds: retrofitting with rain barrel/cistern and porous pavement.

    PubMed

    Ahiablame, Laurent M; Engel, Bernard A; Chaubey, Indrajeet

    2013-04-15

    The impacts of urbanization on hydrology and water quality can be minimized with the use of low impact development (LID) practices in urban areas. This study assessed the performance of rain barrel/cistern and porous pavement as retrofitting technologies in two urbanized watersheds of 70 and 40 km(2) near Indianapolis, Indiana. Six scenarios consisting of the watershed existing condition, 25% and 50% implementation of rain barrel/cistern and porous pavement, and 25% rain barrel/cistern combined with 25% porous pavement were evaluated using a proposed LID modeling framework and the Long-Term Hydrologic Impact Assessment (L-THIA)-LID model. The model was calibrated for annual runoff from 1991 to 2000, and validated from 2001 to 2010 for the two watersheds. For the calibration period, R(2) and NSE values were greater than 0.60 and 0.50 for annual runoff and streamflow. Baseflow was not calibrated in this study. During the validation period, R(2) and NSE values were greater than 0.50 for runoff and streamflow, and 0.30 for baseflow in the two watersheds. The various application levels of barrel/cistern and porous pavement resulted in 2-12% reduction in runoff and pollutant loads for the two watersheds. Baseflow loads slightly increased with increase in baseflow by more than 1%. However, reduction in runoff led to reduction in total streamflow and associated pollutant loads by 1-9% in the watersheds. The results also indicate that the application of 50% rain barrel/cistern, 50% porous pavement and 25% rain barrel/cistern combined with 25% porous pavement are good retrofitting options in these watersheds. The L-THIA-LID model can be used to inform management and decision-making for implementation of LID practices at the watershed scale.

  5. The Effects of CO2 Injection and Barrel Temperatures on the Physiochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Extruded Cereals

    PubMed Central

    Thin, Thazin; Myat, Lin; Ryu, Gi-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The effects of CO2 injection and barrel temperatures on the physiochemical and antioxidant properties of extruded cereals (sorghum, barley, oats, and millet) were studied. Extrusion was carried out using a twin-screw extruder at different barrel temperatures (80, 110, and 140°C), CO2 injection (0 and 500 mL/min), screw speed of 200 rpm, and moisture content of 25%. Extrusion significantly increased the total flavonoid content (TFC) of extruded oats, and β-glucan and protein digestibility (PD) of extruded barley and oats. In contrast, there were significant reductions in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, PD of extruded sorghum and millet, as well as resistant starch (RS) of extruded sorghum and barley, and total phenolic content (TPC) of all extrudates, except extruded millet. At a barrel temperature of 140°C, TPC in extruded barley was significantly increased, and there was also an increase in DPPH and PD in extruded millet with or without CO2 injection. In contrast, at a barrel temperature of 140°C, the TPC of extruded sorghum decreased, TFC of extruded oats decreased, and at a barrel temperature of 110°C, PD of extruded sorghum without CO2 decreased. Some physical properties [expansion ratio (ER), specific length, piece density, color, and water absorption index] of the extrudates were significantly affected by the increase in barrel temperature. The CO2 injection significantly affected some physical properties (ER, specific length, piece density, water solubility index, and water absorption index), TPC, DPPH, β-glucan, and PD. In conclusion, extruded barley and millet had higher potential for making value added cereal-based foods than the other cereals. PMID:27752504

  6. BARREL observations of an ICME-shock impact with the magnetosphere and the resultant radiation belt electron loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, A. J.; McGregor, S. L.; Murphy, K. R.; Millan, R. M.; Hudson, M. K.; Woodger, L. A.; Cattel, C. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Mann, I. R.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gkioulidou, M.; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    The Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) mission of opportunity working in tandem with the Van Allen Probes was designed to study the loss of radiation belt electrons to the ionosphere and upper atmosphere. BARREL is also sensitive to X-rays from other sources. During the second BARREL campaign, the Sun produced an X-class flare followed by a solar energetic particle event (SEP) associated with the same active region. Two days later on 9 January 2014, the shock generated by the coronal mass ejection (CME) originating from the active region hits the Earth while BARREL was in a close conjunction with the Van Allen Probes. Time History Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite observed the impact of the interplanetary CME (ICME) shock near the magnetopause, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) were on either side of the BARREL/Van Allen Probe array. The solar interplanetary magnetic field was not ideally oriented to cause a significant geomagnetic storm, but compression from the shock impact led to the loss of radiation belt electrons. We propose that an azimuthal electric field impulse generated by magnetopause compression caused inward electron transport and minimal loss. This process also drove chorus waves, which were responsible for most of the precipitation observed outside the plasmapause. Observations of hiss inside the plasmapause explain the absence of loss at this location. ULF waves were found to be correlated with the structure of the precipitation. We demonstrate how BARREL can monitor precipitation following an ICME-shock impact at Earth in a cradle-to-grave view; from flare, to SEP, to electron precipitation.

  7. The Effects of CO2 Injection and Barrel Temperatures on the Physiochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Extruded Cereals.

    PubMed

    Thin, Thazin; Myat, Lin; Ryu, Gi-Hyung

    2016-09-01

    The effects of CO2 injection and barrel temperatures on the physiochemical and antioxidant properties of extruded cereals (sorghum, barley, oats, and millet) were studied. Extrusion was carried out using a twin-screw extruder at different barrel temperatures (80, 110, and 140°C), CO2 injection (0 and 500 mL/min), screw speed of 200 rpm, and moisture content of 25%. Extrusion significantly increased the total flavonoid content (TFC) of extruded oats, and β-glucan and protein digestibility (PD) of extruded barley and oats. In contrast, there were significant reductions in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, PD of extruded sorghum and millet, as well as resistant starch (RS) of extruded sorghum and barley, and total phenolic content (TPC) of all extrudates, except extruded millet. At a barrel temperature of 140°C, TPC in extruded barley was significantly increased, and there was also an increase in DPPH and PD in extruded millet with or without CO2 injection. In contrast, at a barrel temperature of 140°C, the TPC of extruded sorghum decreased, TFC of extruded oats decreased, and at a barrel temperature of 110°C, PD of extruded sorghum without CO2 decreased. Some physical properties [expansion ratio (ER), specific length, piece density, color, and water absorption index] of the extrudates were significantly affected by the increase in barrel temperature. The CO2 injection significantly affected some physical properties (ER, specific length, piece density, water solubility index, and water absorption index), TPC, DPPH, β-glucan, and PD. In conclusion, extruded barley and millet had higher potential for making value added cereal-based foods than the other cereals.

  8. Double anterograde tracing of outputs from adjacent "barrel columns" of rat somatosensory cortex. Neostriatal projection patterns and terminal ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Wright, A K; Norrie, L; Ingham, C A; Hutton, E A; Arbuthnott, G W

    1999-01-01

    The sensory input to the neostriatum from groups of cortical cells related to individual facial vibrissae has been investigated at both light- and electron-microscopic resolution. The purpose of the study was to establish the extent to which corticostriatal input maintains the anatomical coding of spatial information that is present in cortex. A double anterograde tracing method was used to identify the output projections from groups of adjacent neurons in different barrel columns, so that the anatomical relationships between two groups could be studied throughout their length. Adjacent whiskers are represented in adjoining cortical barrels and an examination of corticostriatal projections from these reveals two patterns of projection. In one, the anatomical topography is partially preserved; the barrels are represented in adjoining, discrete, areas of the somatosensory neostriatum. In the second projection pattern, the neostriatal innervation is diffuse and adjacent barrels are represented in overlapping regions of the neostriatum. Moreover, the fibres are thinner, have smaller boutons, and are present in both the ipsilateral and contralateral neostriatum. The two systems also enter the neostriatal neuropile separately. The discrete topographic system enters the adjacent neostriatum as collaterals which leave the descending corticofugal fibres at right angles, while the diffuse system enters directly from the corpus callosum at an acute angle. Examination of the neostriatal terminal fields by correlated light and electron microscopy, shows that characteristic axospinous terminals on spiny neurons are made by both groups of cortical fibres, although they differ in their size and morphology. It is concluded that at least two corticostriatal pathways arise from the barrel cortex. One connection maintains some of the anatomical code implicit in the barrel pattern of primary somatosensory cortex, but another, more diffuse, system is overlaid upon it which may carry

  9. Developmental decline in modulation of glutamatergic synapses in layer IV of the barrel cortex by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Z; Porter, J T

    2015-04-02

    Previously, we demonstrated that group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) reduce glutamate release from thalamocortical synapses during early postnatal development (P7-11). To further examine the role of group II mGluRs in the modulation of somatosensory circuitry, we determined whether group II mGluRs continue to modulate thalamocortical synapses until adulthood and whether these receptors also modulate intra-cortical synapses in the barrel cortex. To address these issues, we examined the effect of the group II mGluR agonists on thalamocortical excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and intra-barrel EPSCs in slices from animals of different ages (P7-53). We found that the depression of thalamocortical EPSCs by group II mGluRs rapidly declined after the second postnatal week. In contrast, adenosine continued to depress thalamocortical EPSCs via a presynaptic mechanism in young adult mice (P30-50). Activation of group II mGluRs also reduced intra-barrel EPSCs through a postsynaptic mechanism in young mice (P7-11). Similar to the thalamocortical synapses, the group II mGluR modulation of intra-barrel excitatory synapses declined with development. In young adult animals (P30-50), group II mGluR stimulation had little effect on intra-barrel EPSCs but did hyperpolarize the neurons. Together our results demonstrate that group II mGluRs modulate barrel cortex circuitry by presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms depending on the source of the synapse and that this modulation declines with development.

  10. Molecular correlates of cortical network modulation by long-term sensory experience in the adult rat barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vallès, Astrid; Granic, Ivica; De Weerd, Peter; Martens, Gerard J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cortical network connectivity is crucial for an adaptive response to experience. In the rat barrel cortex, long-term sensory stimulation induces cortical network modifications and neuronal response changes of which the molecular basis is unknown. Here, we show that long-term somatosensory stimulation by enriched environment up-regulates cortical expression of neuropeptide mRNAs and down-regulates immediate-early gene (IEG) mRNAs specifically in the barrel cortex, and not in other brain regions. The present data suggest a central role of neuropeptides in the fine-tuning of sensory cortical circuits by long-term experience. PMID:25171421

  11. Removal of GABAergic inhibition alters subthreshold input in neurons in forepaw barrel subfield (FBS) in rat first somatosensory cortex (SI) after digit stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng X; Callaway, Joseph C; Waters, Robert S

    2002-08-01

    Our objective was to test the hypothesis that suppression of GABAergic inhibition results in an enhancement of responses to stimulation of the surround receptive field. Neurons in the forepaw barrel subfield (FBS) in rat first somatosensory cortex (SI) receive short latency suprathreshold input from a principal location on the forepaw and longer latency subthreshold input from surrounding forepaw skin regions. Input from principal and surround receptive field sites was examined before, during, and after administration of the GABA(A) receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide (BMI) (in 165 mM NaCl at pH 3.3-3.5). In vivo extracellular recording was used to first identify the location of the glabrous forepaw digit representation within the FBS. In vivo intracellular recording and labeling techniques were then used to impale single FBS neurons in layer IV as well as neurons in layers III and V, determine the receptive field of the cell, and fill the cell with biocytin for subsequent morphological identification. The intracellular recording electrode was fastened with dental wax to a double-barrel pipette for BMI iontophoresis and current balance. A stimulating probe, placed on the glabrous forepaw skin surface, was used to identify principal and surround components of the receptive field. Once a cell was impaled and a stable recording was obtained, a stimulating probe was placed at a selected site within the surround receptive field. Single-pulse stimulation (1 Hz) was then delivered through the skin probe and the percentage of spikes occurring in 1-min intervals before BMI onset was used as a baseline measure. BMI was then iontophoresed while the periphery was simultaneously stimulated, and spike percentage measured during and after BMI ejection was compared with the pre-BMI baseline. The major findings are: (1) suppression of GABAergic inhibition enhanced evoked responses to firing level from sites in surround receptive fields in 65% of the cells ( n=17); (2) evoked

  12. Light yield of Kuraray SCSF-78MJ scintillating fibers for the Gluex barrel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, T D; Fischer, A P; Krueger, S T; Lolos, G J; Papandreou, Z; Plummer, E L; Semenov, A Yu; Semenova, I A; Sichello, L M; Teigro, L A; Smith, E S

    2014-09-01

    Over three quarters of a million 1-mm-diameter 4-m-long Kuraray double-clad SCSF-78MJ (blue-green) scintillating fibers have been used in the construction of the GlueX electromagnetic barrel calorimeter for the Hall D experimental program at Jefferson Lab. The quality of a random sample of 4,750 of these fibers was evaluated by exciting the fibers at their mid point using a 90Sr source in order to determine the light yield using a calibrated vacuum photomultiplier as the photosensor. A novel methodology was developed to extract the number of photoelectrons detected for measurements where individual photoelectron peaks are not discernible. The average number of photoelectrons from this sample of fibers was 9.17±0.6 at a source distance of 200 cm from the PMT.

  13. Phenolic and Aroma Composition of White Wines Produced by Prolonged Maceration and Maturation in Wooden Barrels

    PubMed Central

    Jedrejčić, Nikolina; Ganić, Karin Kovačević; Staver, Mario; Peršurić, Đordano

    2015-01-01

    Summary To investigate the phenolic and aroma composition of Malvazija istarska (Vitis vinifera L.) white wines produced by an unconventional technology comprising prolonged maceration followed by maturation in wooden barrels, representative samples were subjected to analysis by UV/Vis spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. When compared to standard wines, the investigated samples contained higher levels of dry extract, volatile acidity, lactic acid, phenols, colour intensity, antioxidant activity, majority of monoterpenes, C13-norisoprenoids, methanol, higher alcohols, ethyl acetate, branched-chain esters and esters of hydroxy and dicarboxylic acids, ethylphenols, furans, and acetals, as well as lower levels of malic acid, β-damascenone, straight-chain fatty acids, ethyl and acetate esters. It was estimated that maceration had a stronger influence on phenols, and maturation on volatile aromas. Despite different vintages and technological details, the investigated wines showed a relative homogeneity in the composition, representing a clear and distinctive type. PMID:27904375

  14. Twenty barrel in situ pipe gun type solid hydrogen pellet injector for the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Motojima, Gen; Hayashi, Hiromi; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Ogawa, Hideki; Takami, Shigeyuki; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    A 20 barrel solid hydrogen pellet injector, which is able to inject 20 cylindrical pellets with a diameter and length of between 3.0 and 3.8 mm at the velocity of 1200 m/s, has been developed for the purpose of direct core fueling in LHD (Large Helical Device). The in situ pipe gun concept with the use of compact cryo-coolers enables stable operation as a fundamental facility in plasma experiments. The combination of the two types of pellet injection timing control modes, i.e., pre-programing mode and real-time control mode, allows the build-up and sustainment of high density plasma around the density limit. The pellet injector has demonstrated stable operation characteristics during the past three years of LHD experiments.

  15. Coordinated developmental recruitment of latent fast spiking interneurons in layer IV barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Daw, Michael I; Ashby, Michael C; Isaac, John T R

    2007-04-01

    Feedforward inhibitory GABAergic transmission is critical for mature cortical circuit function; in the neonate, however, GABA is depolarizing and believed to have a different role. Here we show that the GABAA receptor-mediated conductance is depolarizing in excitatory (stellate) cells in neonatal (postnatal day [P]3-5) layer IV barrel cortex, but GABAergic transmission at this age is not engaged by thalamocortical input in the feedforward circuit and has no detectable circuit function. However, recruitment occurs at P6-7 as a result of coordinated increases in thalamic drive to fast-spiking interneurons, fast-spiking interneuron-stellate cell connectivity and hyperpolarization of the GABAA receptor-mediated response. Thus, GABAergic circuits are not engaged by thalamocortical input in the neonate, but are poised for a remarkably coordinated development of feedforward inhibition at the end of the first postnatal week, which has profound effects on circuit function at this critical time in development.

  16. A mutant with bilateral whisker to barrel inputs unveils somatosensory mapping rules in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Renier, Nicolas; Dominici, Chloe; Erzurumlu, Reha S; Kratochwil, Claudius F; Rijli, Filippo M; Gaspar, Patricia; Chédotal, Alain

    2017-03-28

    In mammals, tactile information is mapped topographically onto the contralateral side of the brain in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Here we describe that in Robo3 mouse mutants a sizeable fraction of the trigemino-thalamic inputs project ipsilaterally rather than contralaterally. The resulting mixture of crossed and uncrossed sensory inputs creates bilateral whisker maps in the thalamus and cortex. Surprisingly, these maps are segregated resulting in a duplication of whisker representations and a doubling of the number of barrels without changes of the S1 size. Sensory deprivation shows competitive interactions between the ipsi/contralateral whisker maps. This study reveals that the somatosensory system can form a somatotopic map to integrate bilateral sensory inputs but organizes the maps in a different way than in the visual, or auditory systems. Therefore, while the molecular pre-patterning constrains their orientation and position, the preservation of the continuity of inputs defines the layout of the somatosensory maps.

  17. Evolutionary Origins of Two-Barrel RNA Polymerases and Site-Specific Transcription Initiation.

    PubMed

    Fouqueau, Thomas; Blombach, Fabian; Werner, Finn

    2017-09-08

    Evolution-related multisubunit RNA polymerases (RNAPs) carry out RNA synthesis in all domains life. Although their catalytic cores and fundamental mechanisms of transcription elongation are conserved, the initiation stage of the transcription cycle differs substantially in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes in terms of the requirements for accessory factors and details of the molecular mechanisms. This review focuses on recent insights into the evolution of the transcription apparatus with regard to (a) the surprisingly pervasive double-Ψ β-barrel active-site configuration among different nucleic acid polymerase families, (b) the origin and phylogenetic distribution of TBP, TFB, and TFE transcription factors, and (c) the functional relationship between transcription and translation initiation mechanisms in terms of transcription start site selection and RNA structure.

  18. A growing toolbox of techniques for studying β-barrel outer membrane protein folding and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horne, Jim E; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-06-15

    Great strides into understanding protein folding have been made since the seminal work of Anfinsen over 40 years ago, but progress in the study of membrane protein folding has lagged behind that of their water soluble counterparts. Researchers in these fields continue to turn to more advanced techniques such as NMR, mass spectrometry, molecular dynamics (MD) and single molecule methods to interrogate how proteins fold. Our understanding of β-barrel outer membrane protein (OMP) folding has benefited from these advances in the last decade. This class of proteins must traverse the periplasm and then insert into an asymmetric lipid membrane in the absence of a chemical energy source. In this review we discuss old, new and emerging techniques used to examine the process of OMP folding and biogenesis in vitro and describe some of the insights and new questions these techniques have revealed. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Fixing mechanism for a wireline core barrel of core drilling equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Nenkov, N.D.; Petrov, I.B.; Peev, S.P.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes a wireline mechanism for removing a core barrel containing a core from within a hollow drill string carrying a hollow drill crown cutter on its lower end while the drill string is in position in the earth. The mechanism comprises a cylindrical fixer adapted to be mounted within the drill string coaxially thereof. A cap for attachment to a flexible elongated core-removing member is secured to the upper end of the fixer, a cylindrical hollow body is adapted to be mounted within the drill string coaxially thereof and generally below the fixer. A lower portion of the fixer is adapted to be telescoped within the upper portion of the cylindrical hollow body, a longitudinally extending stopper bar is connected to the upper part of the cylindrical hollow body, a locking bar and a nut connect the fixer to the lower part of the cylindrical hollow body.

  20. Detailed Surface Analysis Of Incremental Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) Of Single-Crystal Niobium Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari D.; Tian, Hui; Trofimova, Olga; Reece, Charles E.

    2011-07-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on single crystal niobium samples/coupons housed in a stainless steel sample holder following the polishing recipe developed at Fermi Lab (FNAL) in 2011 \\cite{C. A. Cooper 2011}. Post CBP, the sample coupons were analyzed for surface roughness, crystal composition and structure, and particle contamination. Following the initial analysis each coupon was high pressure rinsed (HRP) and analyzed for the effectiveness of contamination removal. We were able to obtain the mirror like surface finish after the final stage of tumbling, although some defects and embedded particles remained. In addition, standard HPR appears to have little effect on removing embedded particles which remain after each tumbling step, although final polishing media removal was partially affected by standard/extended HPR.

  1. Characterizing radiation belt electron precipitation losses using BARREL (Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses) data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, G. S.; Smith, D. M.; Millan, R. M.; Sample, J. G.; McCarthy, M.; Woodger, L. A.; Halford, A. J.; Liang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation loss is a process whereby charged particles trapped in the radiation belts scatter into the Earth's atmosphere and are removed from the belt population. Balloon-borne x-ray detectors and satellites like SAMPEX have generally observed precipitation losses of three types, here characterized by their MLT distribution and related e-folding energy of the inferred precipitating electron energy spectrum, the third characterized by its burstiness and brief duration: soft (isotropic in MLT with e-folding for balloons between 50-100 keV, for SAMPEX between 100-300 keV), hard (concentrated in the dusk-to-midnight sector with e-folding for balloons > 200 keV, for SAMPEX > 400 keV), and microbursts (concentrated in the dawn-to-noon sector, bursty and very short temporal structure < 1s). Soft precipitation occurs much more often than the others, but has received less attention in the literature even though recent analysis of observed SAMPEX losses has shown that soft precipitation may account for the greatest electron loss from the quiet time radiation belts. The goal of this project is to compare/reconcile the different spectral characterizations of soft precipitation observed by BARREL and SAMPEX, and seek to understand the wave scattering mechanisms responsible for these losses.For this work we will present the 2013/2014 observed BARREL precipitation events cataloged according to type, (soft, hard, microburst), MLT and L distribution, and geomagnetic/space weather conditions. In particular, we will use Van Allen Probe data to define the state of the belts and the position of the balloon relative to the plasmapause and trapping boundary before and after precipitation events.

  2. Material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastio, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly seventy-five years ago, the single screw extruder was introduced as a means to produce metal products. Shortly after that, the extruder found its way into the plastics industry. Today much of the world's polymer industry utilizes extruders to produce items such as soda bottles, PVC piping, and toy figurines. Given the significant economical advantages of extruders over conventional batch flow systems, extruders have also migrated into the food industry. Food applications include the meat, pet food, and cereal industries to name just a few. Cereal manufacturers utilize extruders to produce various forms of Ready-to-Eat (RTE) cereals. These cereals are made from grains such as rice, oats, wheat, and corn. The food industry has been incorrectly viewed as an extruder application requiring only minimal energy control and performance capability. This misconception has resulted in very little research in the area of material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruders. Breakfast cereal extruder barrels and individual screw elements are subjected to the extreme pressures and temperatures required to shear and cook the cereal ingredients, resulting in excessive material wear and catastrophic failure of these components. Therefore, this project focuses on the material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements, modeled as a Discrete Time Markov Chain (DTMC) process in which historical data is used to predict future failures. Such predictive analysis will yield cost savings opportunities by providing insight into extruder maintenance scheduling and interchangeability of screw elements. In this DTMC wear analysis, four states of wear are defined and a probability transition matrix is determined based upon 24,041 hours of operational data. This probability transition matrix is used to predict when an extruder component will move to the next state of wear and/or failure. This information can be used to determine

  3. Insights into the Fold Organization of TIM Barrel from Interaction Energy Based Structure Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vijayabaskar, M. S.; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    There are many well-known examples of proteins with low sequence similarity, adopting the same structural fold. This aspect of sequence-structure relationship has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically, however with limited success. Most of the studies consider remote homology or “sequence conservation” as the basis for their understanding. Recently “interaction energy” based network formalism (Protein Energy Networks (PENs)) was developed to understand the determinants of protein structures. In this paper we have used these PENs to investigate the common non-covalent interactions and their collective features which stabilize the TIM barrel fold. We have also developed a method of aligning PENs in order to understand the spatial conservation of interactions in the fold. We have identified key common interactions responsible for the conservation of the TIM fold, despite high sequence dissimilarity. For instance, the central beta barrel of the TIM fold is stabilized by long-range high energy electrostatic interactions and low-energy contiguous vdW interactions in certain families. The other interfaces like the helix-sheet or the helix-helix seem to be devoid of any high energy conserved interactions. Conserved interactions in the loop regions around the catalytic site of the TIM fold have also been identified, pointing out their significance in both structural and functional evolution. Based on these investigations, we have developed a novel network based phylogenetic analysis for remote homologues, which can perform better than sequence based phylogeny. Such an analysis is more meaningful from both structural and functional evolutionary perspective. We believe that the information obtained through the “interaction conservation” viewpoint and the subsequently developed method of structure network alignment, can shed new light in the fields of fold organization and de novo computational protein design. PMID:22615547

  4. Interplay between Drying and Stability of a TIM Barrel Protein: A Combined Simulation-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Payel; Kapoor, Divya; Halloran, Kevin T.; Zhou, Ruhong; Matthews, C. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent molecular dynamics simulations have suggested important roles for nanoscale dewetting on the stability, function, and folding dynamics of proteins. Using a synergistic simulation-experimental approach on the αTS TIM barrel protein, we validate this hypothesis by revealing the occurrence of drying inside hydrophobic amino acid clusters and its manifestation on experimental measures of protein stability and structure. Cavities created within three clusters of branched aliphatic amino acids, isoleucines, leucines and valines (ILV), were found to experience strong water density fluctuations or intermittent dewetting transitions in simulations. Individually substituting 10 residues in the large ILV cluster at the N-terminus with the less hydrophobic alanine showed a weakening or diminishing effect on dewetting that depended on the site of the mutation. Our simulations also demonstrated that replacement of buried leucines with the isosteric and polar asparagine enhanced the wetting of the N- and C-terminal clusters. Experimental results on the stability, secondary structure and compactness of the native and intermediate states for the asparagine variants are consistent with the preferential drying of the large N-terminal cluster in the intermediate. By contrast, the region encompassing the small C-terminal cluster only experiences partial drying in the intermediate and its structure and stability are unaffected by the asparagine substitution. Surprisingly, the structural distortions required to accommodate the replacement of leucine by asparagine in the N-terminal cluster revealed the existence of alternative stable folds in the native basin. This combined simulation-experimental study demonstrates the critical role of drying in hydrophobic ILV clusters to the folding and stability of the αTS TIM barrel. PMID:23293932

  5. Endocannabinoid-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation of Synaptic Transmission at Rat Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Maglio, Laura Eva; Noriega-Prieto, José Antonio; Maraver, Maria Jesús; Fernández de Sevilla, David

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in modulating plasticity in sensory cortices. Indeed, a BDNF-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) at distal basal excitatory synapses of Layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs) has been demonstrated in disinhibited rat barrel cortex slices. Although it is well established that this LTP requires the pairing of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) with Ca2+ spikes, its induction when synaptic inhibition is working remains unexplored. Here we show that low-frequency stimulation at basal dendrites of L5PNs is able to trigger a PSP followed by an action potential (AP) and a slow depolarization (termed PSP-Ca2+ response) in thalamocortical slices without blocking synaptic inhibition. We demonstrate that AP barrage-mediated release of endocannabinoids (eCBs) from the recorded L5PNs induces PSP-Ca2+ response facilitation and BDNF-dependent LTP. Indeed, this LTP requires the type 1 cannabinoid receptors activation, is prevented by postsynaptic intracellular 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N,N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) or the anandamide membrane transporter inhibitor AM404, and only occurs in L5PNs neurons showing depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition. Additionally, electrical stimulation at the posteromedial thalamic nucleus induced similar response and LTP. These results reveal a novel form of eCB-dependent LTP at L5PNs that could be relevant in the processing of sensory information in the barrel cortex. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Lhx2 regulates a cortex-specific mechanism for barrel formation

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashwin S.; Godbole, Geeta; Maheshwari, Upasana; Padmanabhan, Hari; Chaudhary, Rahul; Muralidharan, Bhavana; Hou, Pei-Shan; Monuki, Edwin S.; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Rema, V.; Tole, Shubha

    2013-01-01

    LIM homeodomain transcription factors are critical regulators of early development in multiple systems but have yet to be examined for a role in circuit formation. The LIM homeobox gene Lhx2 is expressed in cortical progenitors during development and also in the superficial layers of the neocortex in maturity. However, analysis of Lhx2 function at later stages of cortical development has been hampered by severe phenotypes associated with early loss of function. We identified a particular Cre-recombinase line that acts in the cortical primordium after its specification is complete, permitting an analysis of Lhx2 function in neocortical lamination, regionalization, and circuit formation by selective elimination of Lhx2 in the dorsal telencephalon. We report a profound disruption of cortical neuroanatomical and molecular features upon loss of Lhx2 in the cortex from embryonic day 11.5. A unique feature of cortical circuitry, the somatosensory barrels, is undetectable, and molecular patterning of cortical regions appears disrupted. Surprisingly, thalamocortical afferents innervate the mutant cortex with apparently normal regional specificity. Electrophysiological recordings reveal a loss of responses evoked by stimulation of individual whiskers, but responses to simultaneous stimulation of multiple whiskers were present, suggesting that thalamic afferents are unable to organize the neurocircuitry for barrel formation because of a cortex-specific requirement of Lhx2. We report that Lhx2 is required for the expression of transcription factor paired box gene 6, axon guidance molecule Ephrin A5, and the receptor NMDA receptor 1. These genes may mediate Lhx2 function in the formation of specialized neurocircuitry necessary for neocortical function. PMID:24262147

  7. Microcircuits of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in layer 2/3 of mouse barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Avermann, Michael; Tomm, Christian; Mateo, Celine; Gerstner, Wulfram; Petersen, Carl C H

    2012-06-01

    Synaptic interactions between nearby excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the neocortex are thought to play fundamental roles in sensory processing. Here, we have combined optogenetic stimulation, whole cell recordings, and computational modeling to define key functional microcircuits within layer 2/3 of mouse primary somatosensory barrel cortex. In vitro optogenetic stimulation of excitatory layer 2/3 neurons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 evoked a rapid sequence of excitation followed by inhibition. Fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic neurons received large-amplitude, fast-rising depolarizing postsynaptic potentials, often driving action potentials. In contrast, the same optogenetic stimulus evoked small-amplitude, subthreshold postsynaptic potentials in excitatory and non-fast-spiking (NFS) GABAergic neurons. To understand the synaptic mechanisms underlying this network activity, we investigated unitary synaptic connectivity through multiple simultaneous whole cell recordings. FS GABAergic neurons received unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials with higher probability, larger amplitudes, and faster kinetics compared with NFS GABAergic neurons and other excitatory neurons. Both FS and NFS GABAergic neurons evoked robust inhibition on postsynaptic layer 2/3 neurons. A simple computational model based on the experimentally determined electrophysiological properties of the different classes of layer 2/3 neurons and their unitary synaptic connectivity accounted for key aspects of the network activity evoked by optogenetic stimulation, including the strong recruitment of FS GABAergic neurons acting to suppress firing of excitatory neurons. We conclude that FS GABAergic neurons play an important role in neocortical microcircuit function through their strong local synaptic connectivity, which might contribute to driving sparse coding in excitatory layer 2/3 neurons of mouse barrel cortex in vivo.

  8. Water relations and photosynthesis of a barrel cactus, Ferocactus acanthodes, in the Colorado desert.

    PubMed

    Nobel, Park S

    1977-06-01

    The structural characteristics, water relations, and photosynthesis of Ferocactus acanthodes (Lemaire) Britton and Rose, a barrel cactus exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), were examined in its native habitat in the western Colorado desert. Water storage in its succulent stem permitted nighttime stomatal opening ot continue for about 40 days after the soil water potential became less than that of the stem, a period whe the plant would be unable to extract water from the soil. After 7 months of drought and consequent unreplenished water loss from a plant, diurnal stomatal activity was not observed and the stem osmotic pressure was 6.4 bars, more than double the value measured during wet periods with nighttime stomatal opening. F. acanthodes had a shallow root system (mean depth of 8 cm) which responded within 24 h to rainfall.When the nocturnal stem surface temperature was raised from 8.0° C to 35.0° C, the stomatal resistance increased 4-fold, indicating that cool nighttime temperatures are advantageous for gas exchange by F. acanthodes. Moreover, the optimal temperature for CO2 uptake in the dark was only 12.6° C. CO2 uptake at night became maximal for 3.0 mEinsteins cm(-2) of photosynthetically active radiation incident during the preceding day, and the minimum number of incident quanta absorbed per CO2 fixed was 68. The transpiration ratio (mass of water transpired/mass of CO2 fixed) had the relatively low value of 70 for an entire year, consistent with values obtained for other CAM plants. The total amount of water annually diverted to the floral structures was about 6% of the stem wet weight. The annual growth increment estimated from the net CO2 assimilation corresponded to about 10% of the stem mass for barrel cacti 34 cm tall, in agreement with measured dimension changes, and indicated that such plants were about 26 years old.

  9. Construction of Ag/AgCl Reference Electrode from Used Felt-Tipped Pen Barrel for Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inamdar, Shaukatali N.; Bhat, Mohsin A.; Haram, Santosh K.

    2009-01-01

    A reference electrode is one of the prerequisites of electrochemical investigations. Many electrodes are commercially available but are expensive and prone to accidental breakage by students. Here we report a simple, easy-to-fabricate, inexpensive, reliable, unbreakable, and reproducible Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The empty barrel of a…

  10. TP0326, a Treponema pallidum β-Barrel Assembly Machinery A (BamA) Ortholog and Rare Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star M; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cummings, Michael A. D.; Eshghi, Azad; Cameron, Caroline E.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Definitive identification of Treponema pallidum (Tp) rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has long eluded researchers. TP0326, the sole protein in Tp with sequence homology to a Gram-negative OMP, belongs to the BamA family of proteins essential for OM biogenesis. Structural modeling predicted that five polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains comprise the N-terminus of TP0326, while the C-terminus forms an 18-stranded amphipathic β-barrel. Circular dichroism, heat-modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning and liposome incorporation supported these topological predictions and confirmed that the β-barrel is responsible for the native protein's amphiphilicity. Expression analyses revealed that native TP0326 is expressed at low abundance, while a protease-surface accessibility assay confirmed surface exposure. Size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a modular Bam complex in Tp considerably larger than that of E. coli. Non-orthologous ancillary factors and self-association of TP0326 via its β-barrel may both contribute to the Bam complex. Tp-infected rabbits mount a vigorous antibody response to both POTRA and β-barrel portions of TP0326, whereas humans with secondary syphilis respond predominantly to POTRA. The syphilis spirochete appears to have devised a stratagem for harnessing the Bam pathway while satisfying its need to limit surface antigenicity. PMID:21488980

  11. Molecular Correlates of Cortical Network Modulation by Long-Term Sensory Experience in the Adult Rat Barrel Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallès, Astrid; Granic, Ivica; De Weerd, Peter; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cortical network connectivity is crucial for an adaptive response to experience. In the rat barrel cortex, long-term sensory stimulation induces cortical network modifications and neuronal response changes of which the molecular basis is unknown. Here, we show that long-term somatosensory stimulation by enriched environment…

  12. Construction of Ag/AgCl Reference Electrode from Used Felt-Tipped Pen Barrel for Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inamdar, Shaukatali N.; Bhat, Mohsin A.; Haram, Santosh K.

    2009-01-01

    A reference electrode is one of the prerequisites of electrochemical investigations. Many electrodes are commercially available but are expensive and prone to accidental breakage by students. Here we report a simple, easy-to-fabricate, inexpensive, reliable, unbreakable, and reproducible Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The empty barrel of a…

  13. Determination of local optical properties of the rat barrel cortex during neural activation: Monte-Carlo approach to light propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migacheva, E. V.; Chamot, S. R.; Seydoux, O.; Weber, B.; Depeursinge, C.; Marquet, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2010-04-01

    Spatially-spectrally-resolved reflectance measurements allow in vivo measuring the optical coefficients of absorption and scattering within the cortical tissue. This method, if applied to neural tissue during enhanced activity, could allow a straightforward monitoring of the blood oxygen saturation changes occurring in the brain cortex during hemodynamic responses. Furthermore, it may provide valuable information on possible absorption and scattering changes occurring during stimulation. The feasibility of such measurements was investigated by carrying a preliminary numerical study using a Monte-Carlo light propagation routine. Experimental parameters such as the geometry of the optical probe, baseline cortex optical coefficients retrieved from the literature and anatomical characteristics of the rat barrel cortex were used as an input for the simulations. The sensitivity of the probe to the local variations of optical coefficients was investigated with this numerical approach. Additionally, the influence of the barrel cortex dimensions and the probe positioning relatively to the activated region were studied for instrumental optimization purpose. It was found that typical variations of optical coefficients can be detected if the activated region of barrel cortex has a volume of typically 1 mm3 or larger. The decay of the probe sensitivity to changes was studied as a function of the depth of the activated region. The results showed that the best sensitivity is achieved by placing the light injection fiber of the optical probe aligned onto the center of the cylindrical barrel.

  14. Molecular Correlates of Cortical Network Modulation by Long-Term Sensory Experience in the Adult Rat Barrel Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallès, Astrid; Granic, Ivica; De Weerd, Peter; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cortical network connectivity is crucial for an adaptive response to experience. In the rat barrel cortex, long-term sensory stimulation induces cortical network modifications and neuronal response changes of which the molecular basis is unknown. Here, we show that long-term somatosensory stimulation by enriched environment…

  15. Texture coarseness responsive neurons and their mapping in layer 2–3 of the rat barrel cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Garion, Liora; Dubin, Uri; Rubin, Yoav; Khateb, Mohamed; Schiller, Yitzhak; Azouz, Rony; Schiller, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Texture discrimination is a fundamental function of somatosensory systems, yet the manner by which texture is coded and spatially represented in the barrel cortex are largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in the rat barrel cortex during artificial whisking against different surface coarseness or controlled passive whisker vibrations simulating different coarseness, we show that layer 2–3 neurons within barrel boundaries differentially respond to specific texture coarsenesses, while only a minority of neurons responded monotonically with increased or decreased surface coarseness. Neurons with similar preferred texture coarseness were spatially clustered. Multi-contact single unit recordings showed a vertical columnar organization of texture coarseness preference in layer 2–3. These findings indicate that layer 2–3 neurons perform high hierarchical processing of tactile information, with surface coarseness embodied by distinct neuronal subpopulations that are spatially mapped onto the barrel cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03405.001 PMID:25233151

  16. Production of transgenic barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaernt.) using the ipt-type MAT vector system and impairment of Recombinase-mediated excision events.

    PubMed

    Scaramelli, L; Balestrazzi, A; Bonadei, M; Piano, E; Carbonera, D; Confalonieri, M

    2009-02-01

    Expression of the uidA reporter gene was tested in transformation experiments of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula Gaertn.) with the ipt-type control vectors pIPT5, pIPT10 and pIPT20 and distinct in vitro culture conditions. The highest GUS expression levels were obtained with the pIPT10 construct carrying the ipt gene under the control of the native ipt promoter and using kanamycin as selective agent. The ipt-shooty transformants, characterized by the absence of both rooting ability and apical dominance associated with vitrification, were easily identified by visual selection. Using only the ipt gene as selectable marker, we obtained a stable transformation frequency of 9.8% with pIPT10 construct. The ipt-type MAT vector pEXM2 was then used to monitor the excision events mediated by the yeast Recombinase and the consequent production of ipt marker-free transgenic plants. Transgenic ipt-shooty lines were recovered at a frequency of 7.9% in the absence of kanamycin-based selection. The ipt-shooty phenotype was maintained in all the transgenic lines and no reversion to the normal phenotype occurred. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the 'hit and run' cassette in the genome of all the regenerated ipt-shooty lines while RT-PCR experiments confirmed the expression of the R gene, encoding the yeast Recombinase. A detailed molecular investigation, carried out to verify the integrity of the RS sites, revealed that these regions were intact in most cases. Our results with barrel medic suggest that the MAT system must be carefully evaluated and discussed on a case by case basis.

  17. Visualization of the powder pocket and its influence on staining in firearm barrels in experimental contact shots.

    PubMed

    Schyma, C; Bauer, K; Brünig, J; Schwendener, N; Müller, R

    2017-01-01

    The powder pocket or soot cavity is a morphologic characteristic of a close contact shot. In a research project concerning staining inside the barrel, the influence of the powder pocket on these traces was investigated.According to the 'triple contrast method', thin pads containing a mixture of acrylic paint, radiocontrast agent and blood were glued on plastic boxes which were coated with a 3-4-mm-thick silicone layer. The containers filled with 10 % ballistic gelatine, were stored for at least 60 h at 4 °C. Thirty-three contact shots were realized using different pistols and 22 lr, .32 auto, .38 special and 9-mm Luger with different barrel length using subsonic, non-deforming ammunition.The documentation comprised endoscopy, high speed video and computer tomography (CT) of the target models. Using image analysis, the ballooning of the silicone coat was studied (lateral view projection).High-speed video confirmed the actual comprehension of the behaviour of muzzle gases in contact shots. The powder cavity rises in about 1.5 to 2 ms, preceding the maximum of the temporary cavity, and the powder pocket's collapse takes 2.5 to 3 ms.The size of the silicone dome increased with decreasing barrel length. Comparing semi-automatic pistols of 4 in. barrel length in the calibres, .32 auto and 9-mm Luger, there were no significant differences of the powder pocket size. Material transport was observed, against and perpendicularly to the shooting direction. CT showed undermining and gas inclusions inside the powder pocket. A correlation between amount and pattern of the staining inside the barrel and the volume of the powder pocket was not observed.

  18. Chloroplast β-Barrel Proteins Are Assembled into the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane in a Process That Depends on the TOM and TOB Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Thomas; Gross, Lucia E.; Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico; Rapaport, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Membrane-embedded β-barrel proteins are found in the outer membranes (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. In eukaryotic cells, precursors of these proteins are synthesized in the cytosol and have to be sorted to their corresponding organelle. Currently, the signal that ensures their specific targeting to either mitochondria or chloroplasts is ill-defined. To address this issue, we studied targeting of the chloroplast β-barrel proteins Oep37 and Oep24. We found that both proteins can be integrated in vitro into isolated plant mitochondria. Furthermore, upon their expression in yeast cells Oep37 and Oep24 were exclusively located in the mitochondrial OM. Oep37 partially complemented the growth phenotype of yeast cells lacking Porin, the general metabolite transporter of this membrane. Similarly to mitochondrial β-barrel proteins, Oep37 and Oep24 expressed in yeast cells were assembled into the mitochondrial OM in a pathway dependent on the TOM and TOB complexes. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the central mitochondrial components that mediate the import of yeast β-barrel proteins can deal with precursors of chloroplast β-barrel proteins. This implies that the mitochondrial import machinery does not recognize signals that are unique to mitochondrial β-barrel proteins. Our results further suggest that dedicated targeting factors had to evolve in plant cells to prevent mis-sorting of chloroplast β-barrel proteins to mitochondria. PMID:22745120

  19. Summary of types of radiation belt electron precipitation observed by BARREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Alexa

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation belt Electron Loss (BARREL) was able to infer precipitation of radiation belt electrons on multiple time scales and due to multiple loss mechanisms. One storm will be specifically highlighted which occurred on 26 January 2013 when a solar wind shock hit the Earth. Although MeV electrons were observed to be lost due to an EMIC wave event [Zhang et al in prep], and multiple periods of electron loss during substorms were observed [Rae et al submitted JGR, Mann et al in prep], we will consider an event period where loss associated with multiple time scales, and thus possibly different loss mechanisms was observed from 1000 - 1200 UT on 26 January 2013. At about 1005 UT on 26 January 2013 an injection of radiation belt electrons followed by drift echoes for energies of ˜80 - 400 keV. BARREL observed X-rays with energies less than 180 keV associated with multiple temporal structures during the drift echo event period. The Van Allen Probes were at similar L-values but upwards of 2 hours away in MLT. Upper band chorus and ULF waves were observed during the event period. Throughout the beginning of the event period, microbursts were clearly observed. During this time lower band chorus waves as well as time domain structures were observed at Van Allen Probe A located upwards of 2 hours away in MLT. This large difference in MLT meant that neither potential loss mechanism was able to be clearly associated with the microbursts. As the lower band chorus and time domain structures were observed to recede, the microbursts were also observed to subside. ULF time scale modulation of the X-rays was also observed throughout most of the event period. We will examine if the ULF waves are the cause of the precipitation themselves, or are modulating the loss of particles from a secondary loss mechanism [Brito et al 2015 JGR, Rae et al Submitted JGR]. Although the 100s ms and ULF time scales are clearly observed, there is an ˜20 minute

  20. Lipid Bilayer-Bound Conformation of an Integral Membrane Beta Barrel Protein by Multidimensional MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Matthew T.; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms 2-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13C line width and less than 0.5 ppm 15N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  1. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Matthew T; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-04-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5-0.3 ppm for (13)C line widths and <0.5 ppm (15)N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  2. Patterns of population structure and dispersal in the long-lived "redwood" of the coral reef, the giant barrel sponge ( Xestospongia muta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Vincent P.; Bernard, Andrea M.; Feldheim, Kevin A.; Shivji, Mahmood S.

    2016-09-01

    Sponges are one of the dominant fauna on Florida and Caribbean coral reefs, with species diversity often exceeding that of scleractinian corals. Despite the key role of sponges as structural components, habitat providers, and nutrient recyclers in reef ecosystems, their dispersal dynamics are little understood. We used ten microsatellite markers to study the population structure and dispersal patterns of a prominent reef species, the giant barrel sponge ( Xestospongia muta), the long-lived "redwood" of the reef, throughout Florida and the Caribbean. F-statistics, exact tests of population differentiation, and Bayesian multi-locus genotype analyses revealed high levels of overall genetic partitioning ( F ST = 0.12, P = 0.001) and grouped 363 individuals collected from the Bahamas, Honduras, US Virgin Islands, Key Largo (Florida), and the remainder of the Florida reef tract into at minimum five genetic clusters ( K = 5). Exact tests, however, revealed further differentiation, grouping sponges sampled from five locations across the Florida reef tract (~250 km) into three populations, suggesting a total of six genetic populations across the eight locations sampled. Assignment tests showed dispersal over ecological timescales to be limited to relatively short distances, as the only migration detected among populations was within the Florida reef tract. Consequently, populations of this major coral reef benthic constituent appear largely self-recruiting. A combination of levels of genetic differentiation, genetic distance, and assignment tests support the important role of the Caribbean and Florida currents in shaping patterns of contemporary and historical gene flow in this widespread coral reef species.

  3. Health physics activities in support of the thermal shield removal/disposal and core support barrel repair at the St. Lucie Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Maisler, J J; Buchanan, H F

    1988-02-01

    The health physics activities related to the removal and disposal of a thermal shield at a nuclear power plant and subsequent repairs to the core support barrel required increased planning relative to a normal refueling/maintenance outage. The repair of the core support barrel was a "first" in the nuclear power industry. Pre-job planning was of great concern because of extremely high radiation levels associated with the irradiated stainless steel thermal shield and core support barrel. ALARA techniques used in the preparation of the thermal shield for removal and shipment to the disposal site are discussed.

  4. Whisker row deprivation affects the flow of sensory information through rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Vincent; Mitani, Akinori; Toyoizumi, Taro; Fox, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Whisker trimming causes substantial reorganization of neuronal response properties in barrel cortex. However, little is known about experience-dependent rerouting of sensory processing following sensory deprivation. To address this, we performed in vivo intracellular recordings from layers 2/3 (L2/3), layer 4 (L4), layer 5 regular-spiking (L5RS), and L5 intrinsically bursting (L5IB) neurons and measured their multiwhisker receptive field at the level of spiking activity, membrane potential, and synaptic conductance before and after sensory deprivation. We used Chernoff information to quantify the "sensory information" contained in the firing patterns of cells in response to spared and deprived whisker stimulation. In the control condition, information for flanking-row and same-row whiskers decreased in the order L4, L2/3, L5IB, L5RS. However, after whisker-row deprivation, spared flanking-row whisker information was reordered to L4, L5RS, L5IB, L2/3. Sensory information from the trimmed whiskers was reduced and delayed in L2/3 and L5IB neurons, whereas sensory information from spared whiskers was increased and advanced in L4 and L5RS neurons. Sensory information from spared whiskers was increased in L5IB neurons without a latency change. L5RS cells exhibited the largest changes in sensory information content through an atypical plasticity combining a significant decrease in spontaneous activity and an increase in a short-latency excitatory conductance.

  5. The evolutionary origins and catalytic importance of conserved electrostatic networks within TIM-barrel proteins.

    PubMed

    Livesay, Dennis R; La, David

    2005-05-01

    Conservation of function is the basic tenet of protein evolution. Conservation of key electrostatic properties is a frequently employed mechanism that leads to conserved function. In a previous report, we identified several conserved electrostatic properties in four protein families and one functionally diverse enzyme superfamily. In this report, we demonstrate the evolutionary and catalytic importance of electrostatic networks in three ubiquitous metabolic enzymes: triosephosphate isomerase, enolase, and transaldolase. Evolutionary importance is demonstrated using phylogenetic motifs (sequence fragments that parallel the overall familial phylogeny). Phylogenetic motifs frequently correspond to both catalytic residues and conserved interactions that fine-tune catalytic residue pKa values. Further, in the case of triosephosphate isomerase, quantitative differences in the catalytic Glu169 pKa values parallel subfamily differentiation. Finally, phylogenetic motifs are shown to structurally cluster around the active sites of eight different TIM-barrel families. Depending upon the mechanistic requisites of each reaction catalyzed, interruptions to the canonical fold may or may not be identified as phylogenetic motifs.

  6. A dynamic model for generating actuator specifications for small arms barrel active stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Anupam; Brei, Diann; Luntz, Jonathan; Lavigna, Chris

    2006-03-01

    Due to stresses encountered in combat, it is known that soldier marksmanship noticeably decreases regardless of prior training. Active stabilization systems in small arms have potential to address this problem to increase soldier survivability and mission effectiveness. The key to success is proper actuator design, but this is highly dependent on proper specification which is challenging due to the human/weapon interaction. This paper presents a generic analytical dynamic model which is capable of defining the necessary actuation specifications for a wide range of small arms platforms. The model is unique because it captures the human interface--shoulder and arm--that introduces the jitter disturbance in addition to the geometry, inertial properties and active stabilization stiffness of the small arms platform. Because no data to date is available for actual shooter-induced disturbance in field conditions, a method is given using the model to back-solve from measured shooting range variability data the disturbance amplitude information relative to the input source (arm or shoulder). As examples of the applicability of the model to various small arms systems, two different weapon systems were investigated: the M24 sniper weapon and the M16 assault rifle. In both cases, model based simulations provided valuable insight into impact on the actuation specifications (force, displacement, phase, frequency) due to the interplay of the human-weapon-active stabilization interface including the effect of shooter-disturbance frequency, disturbance location (shoulder vs. arm), and system parameters (stiffness, barrel rotation).

  7. Real-time million-synapse simulation of rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Thomas; Petersen, Rasmus; Furber, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of neural circuits are bounded in scale and speed by available computing resources, and particularly by the differences in parallelism and communication patterns between the brain and high-performance computers. SpiNNaker is a computer architecture designed to address this problem by emulating the structure and function of neural tissue, using very many low-power processors and an interprocessor communication mechanism inspired by axonal arbors. Here we demonstrate that thousand-processor SpiNNaker prototypes can simulate models of the rodent barrel system comprising 50,000 neurons and 50 million synapses. We use the PyNN library to specify models, and the intrinsic features of Python to control experimental procedures and analysis. The models reproduce known thalamocortical response transformations, exhibit known, balanced dynamics of excitation and inhibition, and show a spatiotemporal spread of activity though the superficial cortical layers. These demonstrations are a significant step toward tractable simulations of entire cortical areas on the million-processor SpiNNaker machines in development.

  8. Baryon spectroscopy: Recent results from the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at ELSA

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, U.

    2010-08-05

    To understand the spectrum and the properties of baryon resonances, the CBELSA/TAPS experiment at ELSA investigates the photoproduction of single- and multi-meson final states off the nucleon. In the latter final states baryon cascades via Dp and Dh and also via higher mass baryon resonances are clearly observed. A partial wave analysis based on single and double meson photoproduction data as well as data from other reactions allows a first determination of resonance properties including partial decay widths of various N* and {Delta}* states. Those include also the decays into the different p{pi}{sup 0{pi}0} and p{pi}{sup 0{eta}} decay channels resulting partly in unexpected results. Recently not only single but also double polarisation experiments have been performed, which are absolutelly necessary to resolve ambiguities in the partial wave analyses (PWA) used to extract the resonances from the data; without the measurement of polarisation observables a model-independent PWA will not be possible. Polarisation observables have been investigated using linearly, circularly polarized or unpolarized photons impinging on an longitudinally polarized or unpolarized target. Given the angular coverage of the Crystal-Barrel/TAPS experiment this data cover almost the full angular range and phase space. This data will provide key information for the partial wave analyses and brings us one step closer towards the needed complete experiment.

  9. Informational basis of sensory adaptation: entropy and single-spike efficiency in rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Mehdi; Clifford, Colin W G; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2013-09-11

    We showed recently that exposure to whisker vibrations enhances coding efficiency in rat barrel cortex despite increasing correlations in variability (Adibi et al., 2013). Here, to understand how adaptation achieves this improvement in sensory representation, we decomposed the stimulus information carried in neuronal population activity into its fundamental components in the framework of information theory. In the context of sensory coding, these components are the entropy of the responses across the entire stimulus set (response entropy) and the entropy of the responses conditional on the stimulus (conditional response entropy). We found that adaptation decreased response entropy and conditional response entropy at both the level of single neurons and the pooled activity of neuronal populations. However, the net effect of adaptation was to increase the mutual information because the drop in the conditional entropy outweighed the drop in the response entropy. The information transmitted by a single spike also increased under adaptation. As population size increased, the information content of individual spikes declined but the relative improvement attributable to adaptation was maintained.

  10. A beta-barrel outer membrane protein facilitates cellular uptake of polychlorophenols in Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Schaeffer, Scott M; Hasenoehrl, Shelley; Xun, Luying

    2010-06-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP). All of the gene products except TcpY have assigned functions in TCP metabolism. Sequence comparison identified TcpY as a member of COG4313, a group of hypothetical proteins. TcpY has a signal peptide, indicating it is a membrane or secreted protein. Secondary structure and topology analysis indicated TcpY as a beta-barrel outer membrane protein, similar to the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein FadL that transports hydrophobic long-chain fatty acids. Constitutive expression of tcpY in two C. necator strains rendered the cells more sensitive to TCP and other polychlorophenols. Further, C. necator JMP134 expressing cloned tcpY transported more TCP into the cell than a control with the cloning vector. Thus, TcpY is an outer membrane protein that facilitates the passing of polychlorophenols across the outer membrane of C. necator. Similarly, other COG4313 proteins are possibly outer membrane transporters of hydrophobic aromatic compounds.

  11. A β-barrel outer membrane protein facilitates cellular uptake of polychlorophenols in Cupriavidus necator

    PubMed Central

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Schaeffer, Scott M.; Hasenoehrl, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP). All of the gene products except TcpY have assigned functions in TCP metabolism. Sequence comparison identified TcpY as a member of COG4313, a group of hypothetical proteins. TcpY has a signal peptide, indicating it is a membrane or secreted protein. Secondary structure and topology analysis indicated TcpY as a β-barrel outer membrane protein, similar to the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein FadL that transports hydrophobic long-chain fatty acids. Constitutive expression of tcpY in two C. necator strains rendered the cells more sensitive to TCP and other polychlorophenols. Further, C. necator JMP134 expressing cloned tcpY transported more TCP into the cell than a control with the cloning vector. Thus, TcpY is an outer membrane protein that facilitates the passing of polychlorophenols across the outer membrane of C. necator. Similarly, other COG4313 proteins are possibly outer membrane transporters of hydrophobic aromatic compounds. PMID:19937267

  12. Variable Temporal Integration of Stimulus Patterns in the Mouse Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Pitas, Anna; Albarracín, Ana Lía; Molano-Mazón, Manuel; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Making sense of the world requires distinguishing temporal patterns and sequences lasting hundreds of milliseconds or more. How cortical circuits integrate over time to represent specific sensory sequences remains elusive. Here we assessed whether neurons in the barrel cortex (BC) integrate information about temporal patterns of whisker movements. We performed cell-attached recordings in anesthetized mice while delivering whisker deflections at variable intervals and compared the information carried by neurons about the latest interstimulus interval (reflecting sensitivity to instantaneous frequency) and earlier intervals (reflecting integration over timescales up to several hundred milliseconds). Neurons carried more information about the latest interval than earlier ones. The amount of temporal integration varied with neuronal responsiveness and with the cortical depth of the recording site, that is, with laminar location. A subset of neurons in the upper layers displayed the strongest integration. Highly responsive neurons in the deeper layers encoded the latest interval but integrated particularly weakly. Under these conditions, BC neurons act primarily as encoders of current stimulation parameters; however, our results suggest that temporal integration over hundreds of milliseconds can emerge in some neurons within BC.

  13. Detergent-associated Solution Conformations of Helical and Beta-barrel Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yiming; Lee, Byung-Kwon; Ankner, John Francis; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin; Heller, William T

    2008-01-01

    Membrane proteins present major challenges for structural biology. In particular, the production of suitable crystals for high-resolution structural determination continues to be a significant roadblock for developing an atomic-level understanding of these vital cellular systems. The use of detergents for extracting membrane proteins from the native membrane for either crystallization or reconstitution into model lipid membranes for further study is assumed to leave the protein with the proper fold with a belt of detergent encompassing the membrane-spanning segments of the structure. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to probe the detergent-associated solution conformations of three membrane proteins, namely bacteriorhodopsin (BR), the Ste2p G-protein coupled receptor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the Escherichia coli porin OmpF. The results demonstrate that, contrary to the traditional model of a detergent-associated membrane protein, the helical proteins BR and Ste2p are not in the expected, compact conformation and associated with detergent micelles, while the ?-barrel OmpF is indeed embedded in a disk-like micelle in a properly folded state. The comparison provided by the BR and Ste2p, both members of the 7TM family of helical membrane proteins, further suggests that the interhelical interactions between the transmembrane helices of the two proteins differ, such that BR, like other rhodopsins, can properly refold to crystallize, while Ste2p continues to prove resistant to crystallization from an initially detergent-associated state.

  14. Tactile Experience Induces c-fos Expression in Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Filipkowski, Robert K.; Rydz, Marek; Berdel, Bozena; Morys, Janusz; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2000-01-01

    Understanding gene expression that is responsive to sensory stimulation is central to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity. In this study we demonstrate two new methods of stimulating whiskers that provide major sensory input to rat neocortex. In the first paradigm, animals were placed on the top of a cylinder and their vibrissae were brushed by hand. In the second paradigm, animals were placed for a brief period of time into a new, wired cage resulting in vibrissae stimulation when they explored the new environment. Both approaches induced c-Fos expression in barrel cortex corresponding to the stimulated vibrissae, especially in layer IV. Layers II/III and V/VI also showed c-Fos induction, but there were no detectable changes in layer VIb. The majority of c-Fos-expressing cells are probably not inhibitory neurons, because they do not show parvalbumin staining. Both paradigms, in contrast to the previous methods, are simple to use and do not require anesthesia, restraint of animals, or elaborate experimental setups. PMID:10753978

  15. A lipoprotein/β-barrel complex monitors lipopolysaccharide integrity transducing information across the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Konovalova, Anna; Mitchell, Angela M; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein RcsF is the OM component of the Rcs envelope stress response. RcsF exists in complexes with β-barrel proteins (OMPs) allowing it to adopt a transmembrane orientation with a lipidated N-terminal domain on the cell surface and a periplasmic C-terminal domain. Here we report that mutations that remove BamE or alter a residue in the RcsF trans-lumen domain specifically prevent assembly of the interlocked complexes without inactivating either RcsF or the OMP. Using these mutations we demonstrate that these RcsF/OMP complexes are required for sensing OM outer leaflet stress. Using mutations that alter the positively charged surface-exposed domain, we show that RcsF monitors lateral interactions between lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. When these interactions are disrupted by cationic antimicrobial peptides, or by the loss of negatively charged phosphate groups on the LPS molecule, this information is transduced to the RcsF C-terminal signaling domain located in the periplasm to activate the stress response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15276.001 PMID:27282389

  16. Partial purification and identification of a metalloproteinase with anticoagulant activity from Rhizostoma pulmo (Barrel Jellyfish).

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Akriti; Sarkar, Angshuman; Chakrabarty, Dibakar

    2017-06-15

    Rhizostoma pulmo (Barrel Jellyfish) is one of the commonly found jellyfishes on the South-Goan coast of India. Here we present characterization of R. pulmo tentacle extract. The tentacle extracts were found to be capable of affecting the hemostatic system at three different levels, as it exhibited fibrinogenolysis, fibrinolysis and inhibition of ADP induced platelet aggregation. It preferentially cleaved the Aα chain of fibrinogen, followed by the Bβ chain and the γ chain. The tentacle extract also showed significant hemolytic activity against human RBCs and strong proteolytic activity for substrates like (azo) casein and gelatin. However, this proteolytic activity was completely inhibited by EDTA (metalloproteinase inhibitor) but not by PMSF (serine proteinase inhibitor). The extract was devoid of phospholipase activity. A semi-purified protein possessing fibrinogenolytic activity was obtained by a combination of ammonium sulphate precipitation and size exclusion HPLC. Atomic absorption analysis of this protein indicated presence of Zn(2+) and treatment with metalloproteinase inhibitor caused complete loss of activity. A 95 kDa metalloproteinase was identified in this fraction and was named Rhizoprotease. Protein Mass Fingerprinting of Rhizoprotease indicates it to be a novel protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coordinated Plasticity between Barrel Cortical Glutamatergic and GABAergic Neurons during Associative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fenxia; Gao, Zilong; Chen, Pin; Huang, Li; Wang, Dangui; Chen, Na; Wu, Ruixiang; Feng, Jing; Cui, Shan; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Neural plasticity is associated with memory formation. The coordinated refinement and interaction between cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons remain elusive in associative memory, which we examine in a mouse model of associative learning. In the mice that show odorant-induced whisker motion after pairing whisker and odor stimulations, the barrel cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons are recruited to encode the newly learnt odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. These glutamatergic neurons are functionally upregulated, and GABAergic neurons are refined in a homeostatic manner. The mutual innervations between these glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons are upregulated. The analyses by high throughput sequencing show that certain microRNAs related to regulating synapses and neurons are involved in this cross-modal reflex. Thus, the coactivation of the sensory cortices through epigenetic processes recruits their glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons to be the associative memory cells as well as drive their coordinated refinements toward the optimal state for the storage of the associated signals. PMID:28070425

  18. The impact of development and sensory deprivation on dendritic protrusions in the mouse barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Bajnath, Adesh; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2015-06-01

    Dendritic protrusions (spines and filopodia) are structural indicators of synapses that have been linked to neuronal learning and memory through their morphological alterations induced by development and experienced-dependent activities. Although previous studies have demonstrated that depriving sensory experience leads to structural changes in neocortical organization, the more subtle effects on dendritic protrusions remain unclear, mostly due to focus on only one specific cell type and/or age of manipulation. Here, we show that sensory deprivation induced by whisker trimming influences the dendritic protrusions of basilar dendrites located in thalamocortical recipient lamina (IV and VI) of the mouse barrel cortex in a layer-specific manner. Following 1 month of whisker trimming after birth, the density of dendritic protrusions increased in layer IV, but decreased in layer VI. Whisker regrowth for 1 month returned protrusion densities to comparable level of age-matched controls in layer VI, but not in layer IV. In adults, chronic sensory deprivation led to an increase in protrusion densities in layer IV, but not in layer VI. In addition, chronic pharmacological blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) increased protrusion density in both layers IV and VI, which returned to the control level after 1 month of drug withdrawal. Our data reveal that different cortical layers respond to chronic sensory deprivation in different ways, with more pronounced effects during developmental critical periods than adulthood. We also show that chronically blocking NMDARs activity during developmental critical period also influences the protrusion density and morphology in the cerebral cortex.

  19. Spatiotemporal receptive fields of barrel cortex revealed by reverse correlation of synaptic input.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Alejandro; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A; Merel, Josh; Paninski, Liam; Miller, Kenneth D; Bruno, Randy M

    2014-06-01

    Of all of the sensory areas, barrel cortex is among the best understood in terms of circuitry, yet least understood in terms of sensory function. We combined intracellular recording in rats with a multi-directional, multi-whisker stimulator system to estimate receptive fields by reverse correlation of stimuli to synaptic inputs. Spatiotemporal receptive fields were identified orders of magnitude faster than by conventional spike-based approaches, even for neurons with little spiking activity. Given a suitable stimulus representation, a linear model captured the stimulus-response relationship for all neurons with high accuracy. In contrast with conventional single-whisker stimuli, complex stimuli revealed markedly sharpened receptive fields, largely as a result of adaptation. This phenomenon allowed the surround to facilitate rather than to suppress responses to the principal whisker. Optimized stimuli enhanced firing in layers 4-6, but not in layers 2/3, which remained sparsely active. Surround facilitation through adaptation may be required for discriminating complex shapes and textures during natural sensing.

  20. Oral creatine supplementation on performance of Quarter Horses used in barrel racing.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, F A; Araújo, A L; Ramalho, L O; Adamkosky, M S; Lacerda, T F; Coelho, C S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of oral creatine supplementation on the athletic performance of equines used for barrel racing. Ten healthy Quarter Horses, or Quarter Horse crossbred, weighing 429.7 ± 25.3 kg and with mean age of 3.8 ± 1.2 years, were used. Animals were evaluated in four different moments (M1, M2, M3, M4), and between M3 and M4, they were supplemented with 28 g of creatine/100 kg of body weight, orally, for 45 days. Although significant alterations for LDH activity, plasma glucose and packed cell volume were observed, it was possible to conclude that there was no improvement in the athletic performance for the animals used on the experiment, as there were no changes in time scores, heart rate and plasma lactate, variables considered as performance indicators, before and after supplementation. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Methods for Studying Interactions of Detergents and Lipids withα-Helical and β-Barrel Integral Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, S. Saif; Baniulis, Danas; Yamashita, Eiki; Zhalnina, Mariya V.; Zakharov, Stanislav D.; Stofleth, Jason T.; Cramer, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Methods for studying interactions of protein with lipids and detergents are described for representatives of two major classes of membrane proteins: (1) the α-helical heterooligomeric integral cytochrome b6f complex of oxygenic photosynthesis from cyanobacteria, and (2) the outer membrane β-barrel proteins BtuB and OmpF from Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria. Details are presented on the use of detergents for purification and crystallization of the b6f complex as well as a method for lipid exchange. The positions of detergent and lipid molecules, which define eight potential lipid-binding sites in the b6f complex, are described. Differences in detergent strategies for isolation and crystallization of β-barrel proteins relative to those for oligomeric helical membrane proteins are discussed, and purification and assessment of protein quality by circular dichroism (CD) is presented. PMID:24510648

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Lorentz Barrel and Drum Site, operable unit 1, San Jose, CA, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the selected remedial actions for Operable Unit One (OU-1) at the Lorentz Barrel Drum (LB D) Superfund site in San Jose, California. This operable unit (OU-1) addresses all remaining sources of contamination not already addressed by the removal of barrels, drums, and soils completed in 1988; the removal of structures, sumps, drums, and debris scheduled for 1993 and 1994; and the Operble Unit 2 (OU-2) shallow groundwater extraction and treatment system. Therefore, the OU-1 remedy selected in this ROD is considered and referred to as the 'final remedy' for the LB D site. While this remedy addresses contaminated soil, one of the principal threats at the LB D site, OU-2 will continue to address the principal threat posed by contaminated shallow groundwater.

  3. Methods for studying interactions of detergents and lipids with α-helical and β-barrel integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S Saif; Baniulis, Danas; Yamashita, Eiki; Zhalnina, Mariya V; Zakharov, Stanislav D; Stofleth, Jason T; Cramer, William A

    2013-11-05

    Methods for studying interactions of protein with lipids and detergents are described for representatives of two major classes of membrane proteins: (1) the α-helical hetero-oligomeric integral cytochrome b6 f complex of oxygenic photosynthesis from cyanobacteria, and (2) the outer membrane β-barrel proteins BtuB and OmpF from Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria. Details are presented on the use of detergents for purification and crystallization of the b6 f complex as well as a method for lipid exchange. The positions of detergent and lipid molecules, which define eight potential lipid-binding sites in the b6 f complex, are described. Differences in detergent strategies for isolation and crystallization of β-barrel proteins relative to those for oligomeric helical membrane proteins are discussed, and purification and assessment of protein quality by circular dichroism (CD) is presented. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Man-In-The-Barrel. A Case of Cervical Spinal Cord Infarction and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Antelo, María José García; Facal, Teresa Lema; Sánchez, Tamara Pablos; Facal, María Soledad López; Nazabal, Eduardo Rubio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Man-in-the-barrel syndrome was initially observed in patients with signs of serious cerebral hypoperfusion, in the border zone of the anterior and medial cerebral artery, but other causes were communicated later. Methods: a healthy 43-year-old woman who showed intense cervical pain, irradiating over both shoulders and arms. Physical examination on admission highlighted notable brachial diparesis, tacto-algesic hypoesthesia of both arms and sensory level C4-D9. Results: cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) on admission revealed a hyperintense intramedullar lesion at C3-C7 level, due to a cervical cord infarction. Conclusions: our case reveals that conventional neurological consideration about the specific anatomical location of man-in-the-barrel syndrome in the brain should be extended to other locations such as the cervical column and not only the brain area. PMID:23407685

  5. Man-in-the-barrel. A case of cervical spinal cord infarction and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Antelo, María José García; Facal, Teresa Lema; Sánchez, Tamara Pablos; Facal, María Soledad López; Nazabal, Eduardo Rubio

    2013-01-01

    Man-in-the-barrel syndrome was initially observed in patients with signs of serious cerebral hypoperfusion, in the border zone of the anterior and medial cerebral artery, but other causes were communicated later. a healthy 43-year-old woman who showed intense cervical pain, irradiating over both shoulders and arms. Physical examination on admission highlighted notable brachial diparesis, tacto-algesic hypoesthesia of both arms and sensory level C4-D9. cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) on admission revealed a hyperintense intramedullar lesion at C3-C7 level, due to a cervical cord infarction. our case reveals that conventional neurological consideration about the specific anatomical location of man-in-the-barrel syndrome in the brain should be extended to other locations such as the cervical column and not only the brain area.

  6. Total maxillary reconstruction using a double-barreled and double skin paddle fibular flap after total maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    de la Parra, Miguel; Sanchez, Gerardo; Lopez, Jaime; Perez, Adrian; Naal, Norberto

    2013-11-01

    Chondroblastomas are rare entities accounting for approximately 1% of all primary bone tumors. We describe a case of a 7-year-old girl with a giant chondroblastoma of the maxilla, treated with bilateral class III maxillectomy and reconstruction with a double-barreled and double skin paddle fibular free flap. We show evidence of an excellent aesthetic outcome at 6 months' follow up with no evidence of tumor recurrence.

  7. Total Maxillary Reconstruction Using a Double-Barreled and Double Skin Paddle Fibular Flap after Total Maxillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Gerardo; Lopez, Jaime; Perez, Adrian; Naal, Norberto

    2013-01-01

    Chondroblastomas are rare entities accounting for approximately 1% of all primary bone tumors. We describe a case of a 7-year-old girl with a giant chondroblastoma of the maxilla, treated with bilateral class III maxillectomy and reconstruction with a double-barreled and double skin paddle fibular free flap. We show evidence of an excellent aesthetic outcome at 6 months' follow up with no evidence of tumor recurrence. PMID:24286054

  8. Effects of long-term sensory deprivation on asymmetric synapses in the whisker barrel field of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Machín, Raquel; Pérez-Cejuela, César G; Bjugn, Roger; Avendaño, Carlos

    2006-08-30

    Whisker trimming deprives the cortical barrel field from the patterned sensory input that derives from active touch but leaves passive tactile signals unaltered. We have studied in the rat barrel field, by stereological procedures, the effects of a sustained period of unilateral deprivation by whisker clipping during adolescence and early adulthood on (1) the surface density (SV) of asymmetric synapses, as determined from measuring the presynaptic membrane specializations, and (2) the numerical density of asymmetric synaptic profiles (NA), classified according to their postsynaptic target and their apparent curvature. Compared to control rats, the procedure did not change the overall volume of the region, the volume fraction occupied by each cortical layer, or the volume fraction occupied by unmyelinated axons and boutons. However, the deprived barrel cortex displayed an increase in SV in layers I and II, and an increase in NA in layer I and in the cortex as a whole, mainly due to an increase in profiles with a convex shape. Layer IV was the least affected by the deprivation. These results point to a net increase, rather than a decrease, of excitatory synapses in the deprived cortex, which could result from a deprivation-induced decrease in the rate of normal synapse loss. This effect occurs specifically in superficial layers, more involved in intracortical and cortico-cortical, rather than thalamo-cortical, processing.

  9. transFold: a web server for predicting the structure and residue contacts of transmembrane beta-barrels.

    PubMed

    Waldispühl, J; Berger, Bonnie; Clote, Peter; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2006-07-01

    Transmembrane beta-barrel (TMB) proteins are embedded in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. The cellular location and functional diversity of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins makes them an important protein class. At the present time, very few non-homologous TMB structures have been determined by X-ray diffraction because of the experimental difficulty encountered in crystallizing transmembrane (TM) proteins. The transFold web server uses pairwise inter-strand residue statistical potentials derived from globular (non-outer-membrane) proteins to predict the supersecondary structure of TMB. Unlike all previous approaches, transFold does not use machine learning methods such as hidden Markov models or neural networks; instead, transFold employs multi-tape S-attribute grammars to describe all potential conformations, and then applies dynamic programming to determine the global minimum energy supersecondary structure. The transFold web server not only predicts secondary structure and TMB topology, but is the only method which additionally predicts the side-chain orientation of transmembrane beta-strand residues, inter-strand residue contacts and TM beta-strand inclination with respect to the membrane. The program transFold currently outperforms all other methods for accuracy of beta-barrel structure prediction. Available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/transFold.

  10. Job contenders: roles of the β-barrel assembly machinery and the translocation and assembly module in autotransporter secretion.

    PubMed

    Albenne, Cécile; Ieva, Raffaele

    2017-09-08

    In Gram-negative bacteria, autotransporters secrete effector protein domains that are linked to virulence. Although they were once thought to be simple and autonomous secretion machines, mounting evidence reveals that multiple factors of the bacterial envelope are necessary for autotransporter assembly. Secretion across the outer membrane of their soluble effector "passenger domain" is promoted by the assembly of an outer membrane-spanning "β-barrel domain". Both reactions require BamA, an essential component of the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM complex) that catalyzes the final reaction step by which outer membrane proteins are integrated into the lipid bilayer. A large amount of data generated in the last decade has shed key insights onto the mechanistic coordination of autotransporter β-barrel domain assembly and passenger domain secretion. These results, together with the recently solved structures of the BAM complex, offer an unprecedented opportunity to discuss a detailed model of autotransporter assembly. Importantly, some autotransporters benefit from the presence of an additional machinery, the translocation and assembly module (TAM), a two-membrane spanning complex, which contains a BamA-homologous subunit. Although it remains unclear how the BAM complex and the TAM cooperate, it is evident that multiple preparatory steps are necessary for efficient autotransporter biogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Fear learning increases the number of polyribosomes associated with excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Jasinska, Malgorzata; Siucinska, Ewa; Jasek, Ewa; Litwin, Jan A; Pyza, Elzbieta; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Associative fear learning, resulting from whisker stimulation paired with application of a mild electric shock to the tail in a classical conditioning paradigm, changes the motor behavior of mice and modifies the cortical functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning. It also induces the formation of new inhibitory synapses on double-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows. We studied density and distribution of polyribosomes, the putative structural markers of enhanced synaptic activation, following conditioning. By analyzing serial sections of the barrel cortex by electron microscopy and stereology, we found that the density of polyribosomes was significantly increased in dendrites of the barrel activated during conditioning. The results revealed fear learning-induced increase in the density of polyribosomes associated with both excitatory and inhibitory synapses located on dendritic spines (in both single- and double-synapse spines) and only with the inhibitory synapses located on dendritic shafts. This effect was accompanied by a significant increase in the postsynaptic density area of the excitatory synapses on single-synapse spines and of the inhibitory synapses on double-synapse spines containing polyribosomes. The present results show that associative fear learning not only induces inhibitory synaptogenesis, as demonstrated in the previous studies, but also stimulates local protein synthesis and produces modifications of the synapses that indicate their potentiation.

  12. Ellagitannin content, volatile composition and sensory profile of wines from different countries matured in oak barrels subjected to different toasting methods.

    PubMed

    González-Centeno, M R; Chira, K; Teissedre, P-L

    2016-11-01

    Ellagitannins and aromatic compounds evolution in Cabernet Sauvignon wines macerated in oak barrels for a year was studied. Identical barrels with different toastings (medium toasting, medium toasting with watering, Noisette) were used in French, Italian and USA cellars. Ellagitannins increased by 84-96% with aging time, as did woody volatiles, by 86-91% in French wines and 23-35% in Italian wines, while fruity aroma compounds declined by 50-57% in the French and Italian wines over a 12-months period. Nevertheless, other behaviors and different kinetics rates for these compounds were observed depending on barrel toasting, wine matrix and their interactions. Perceived overall woody intensity was closely related to trans-whiskey lactone, guaiacol and vanillin, whereas astringency and bitterness were significantly linked to ellagitannins (p<0.05). This is the first study that evaluates the toasting effect on wines from different countries matured in the same oak barrels.

  13. Variations in oxygen and ellagitannins, and organoleptic properties of red wine aged in French oak barrels classified by a near infrared system.

    PubMed

    Michel, Julien; Albertin, Warren; Jourdes, Michael; Le Floch, Alexandra; Giordanengo, Thomas; Mourey, Nicolas; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2016-08-01

    During wine aging in barrels, antioxidant molecules from wood, such as ellagitannins, are solubilized and react with wine molecules and oxygen. However, their concentrations are highly variable. Oxygen is an important factor, as it plays a role in wine parameters and organoleptic perceptions. Five barrel modalities were used; three polyphenol indices (IP), classified using the NIRS procedure, and three grain qualities. Barrels were equipped with windows to measure the oxygen using luminescence technology. The ellagitannin concentrations in the wine and its organoleptic properties were monitored. Oxygen concentrations decreased quickly during the first 8days of aging and this phenomenon was significantly more marked in barrels with a higher IP and medium grain. The ellagitannin concentrations were believed to be correlated with wood classification and oxygen consumption. Furthermore, the organoleptic properties were significantly impacted, as the wine with the lowest ellagitannin level was described as less astringent, bitter, woody, and smoky/toasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A 3-dimensional trimeric β-barrel model for Chlamydia MOMP contains conserved and novel elements of Gram-negative bacterial porins.

    PubMed

    Feher, Victoria A; Randall, Arlo; Baldi, Pierre; Bush, Robin M; de la Maza, Luis M; Amaro, Rommie E

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases and the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Global control of Chlamydia will best be achieved with a vaccine, a primary target for which is the major outer membrane protein, MOMP, which comprises ~60% of the outer membrane protein mass of this bacterium. In the absence of experimental structural information on MOMP, three previously published topology models presumed a16-stranded barrel architecture. Here, we use the latest β-barrel prediction algorithms, previous 2D topology modeling results, and comparative modeling methodology to build a 3D model based on the 16-stranded, trimeric assumption. We find that while a 3D MOMP model captures many structural hallmarks of a trimeric 16-stranded β-barrel porin, and is consistent with most of the experimental evidence for MOMP, MOMP residues 320-334 cannot be modeled as β-strands that span the entire membrane, as is consistently observed in published 16-stranded β-barrel crystal structures. Given the ambiguous results for β-strand delineation found in this study, recent publications of membrane β-barrel structures breaking with the canonical rule for an even number of β-strands, findings of β-barrels with strand-exchanged oligomeric conformations, and alternate folds dependent upon the lifecycle of the bacterium, we suggest that although the MOMP porin structure incorporates canonical 16-stranded conformations, it may have novel oligomeric or dynamic structural changes accounting for the discrepancies observed.

  15. Production summary for extended barrel module fabrication at Argonne for the ATLAS tile calorimeter.

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Petereit, E.; Skrzecz, F.; Wood, K.; Proudfoot, J.; Anderson, S.; Caird, A.; Keyser, C.; Kocenko, L.; Matijas, Z.; Nephew, T.; Stanek, R.; Franchini, F.; High Energy Physics

    2007-11-14

    The Tile Calorimeter is one of the main hadronic calorimeters to be used in the ATLAS experiment at CERN [1,2]. It is a steel/scintillator sampling calorimeter which is built by stacking 64 segments in azimuth and 3 separate cylinders to provide a total structure whose length is approximately 12m and whose diameter is a little over 8.4m. It has a total weight of about 2630 metric tons. Important features of this calorimeter are: A minimum gap (1.5mm) between modules in azimuth; Pockets in the structure to hold the scintillator tiles; Recessed channels at the edges of the module into which the readout fibers will sit; and Holes in the structure through which a radioactive source will pass. The mechanical structure for one of the 3 calorimeter sections, the Extended Barrel (EBA) was constructed at Argonne. A schematic of the calorimeter sampling structure and the layout of one of the 64 segments, termed a module, are shown in figure 1. Each module comprises mechanically of a precision machined, structural girder to which 10 submodules are bolted. One of these submodules, the ITC, has a customized shape to accommodate services for other detector elements. Each submodule weighs 850Kg and the assembled mechanical structure of the module weighs approximately 9000Kg (a fully instrumented Extended Barrel modules weighs {approx}9600Kg). A crucial issue for the tile calorimeter assembly is the minimization of the un-instrumented gap between modules when they are stacked on top of each other during final assembly. The design goal was originally 1mm gap which was eventually relaxed to 1.5mm following a careful evaluation of all tolerances in the construction and assembly process as shown in figure 2 [3]. Submodules for this assembly were produced at 4 locations [4] using tooling and procedures which were largely identical [5]. An important issue was the height of each submodule on the stacking fixture on which they were fabricated as this defines the length along the girder

  16. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  17. Structural coalescence underlies the aggregation propensity of a β-barrel protein motif.

    PubMed

    Angelani, Carla R; Caramelo, Julio J; Curto, Lucrecia M; Delfino, José M

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding of the structural foundations underlying protein aggregation is an elusive goal of central biomedical importance. A step toward this aim is exemplified by the β-barrel motif represented by the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and two abridged all-β sheet forms (Δ98Δ and Δ78Δ). At odds with the established notion that a perturbation of the native fold should necessarily favor a buildup of intermediate forms with an enhanced tendency to aggregate, the intrinsic stability (ΔG°H2O) of these proteins does not bear a straightforward correlation with their trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced aggregation propensity. In view of this fact, we found it more insightful to delve into the connection between structure and stability under sub-aggregating conditions (10% TFE). In the absence of the co-solvent, the abridged variants display a common native-like region decorated with a disordered C-terminal stretch. Upon TFE addition, an increase in secondary structure content is observed, assimilating them to the parent protein. In this sense, TFE perturbs a common native like region while exerting a global compaction effect. Importantly, in all cases, fatty acid binding function is preserved. Interestingly, energetic as well as structural diversity in aqueous solution evolves into a common conformational ensemble more akin in stability. These facts reconcile apparent paradoxical findings related to stability and rates of aggregation. This scenario likely mimics the accrual of aggregation-prone species in the population, an early critical event for the development of fibrillation.

  18. Thermal Energy Exchange Model and Water Loss of a Barrel Cactus, Ferocactus acanthodes1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Donald A.; Nobel, Park S.

    1977-01-01

    The influences of various diurnal stomatal opening patterns, spines, and ribs on the stem surface temperature and water economy of a CAM succulent, the barrel cactus Ferocactus acanthodes, were examined using an energy budget model. To incorporate energy exchanges by shortwave and longwave irradiation, latent heat, conduction, and convection as well as the heat storage in the massive stem, the plant was subdivided into over 100 internal and external regions in the model. This enabled the average surface temperature to be predicted within 1 C of the measured temperature for both winter and summer days. Reducing the stem water vapor conductance from the values observed in the field to zero caused the average daily stem surface temperature to increase only 0.7 C for a winter day and 0.3 C for a summer day. Thus, latent heat loss does not substantially reduce stem temperature. Although the surface temperatures averaged 18 C warmer for the summer day than for the winter day for a plant 41 cm tall, the temperature dependence of stomatal opening caused the simulated nighttime water loss rates to be about the same for the 2 days. Spines moderated the amplitude of the diurnal temperature changes of the stem surface, since the daily variation was 17 C for the winter day and 25 C for the summer day with spines compared with 23 C and 41 C, respectively, in their simulated absence. Ribs reduced the daytime temperature rise by providing 54% more area for convective heat loss than for a smooth circumscribing surface. In a simulation where both spines and ribs were eliminated, the daytime average surface temperature rose by 5 C. PMID:16660148

  19. Eukaryote-wide sequence analysis of mitochondrial β-barrel outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The outer membranes of mitochondria are thought to be homologous to the outer membranes of Gram negative bacteria, which contain 100's of distinct families of β-barrel membrane proteins (BOMPs) often forming channels for transport of nutrients or drugs. However, only four families of mitochondrial BOMPs (MBOMPs) have been confirmed to date. Although estimates as high as 100 have been made in the past, the number of yet undiscovered MBOMPs is an open question. Fortunately, the recent discovery of a membrane integration signal (the β-signal) for MBOMPs gave us an opportunity to look for undiscovered MBOMPs. Results We present the results of a comprehensive survey of eukaryotic protein sequences intended to identify new MBOMPs. Our search employs recent results on β-signals as well as structural information and a novel BOMP predictor trained on both bacterial and mitochondrial BOMPs. Our principal finding is circumstantial evidence suggesting that few MBOMPs remain to be discovered, if one assumes that, like known MBOMPs, novel MBOMPs will be monomeric and β-signal dependent. In addition to this, our analysis of MBOMP homologs reveals some exceptions to the current model of the β-signal, but confirms its consistent presence in the C-terminal region of MBOMP proteins. We also report a β-signal independent search for MBOMPs against the yeast and Arabidopsis proteomes. We find no good candidates MBOMPs in yeast but the Arabidopsis results are less conclusive. Conclusions Our results suggest there are no remaining MBOMPs left to discover in yeast; and if one assumes all MBOMPs are β-signal dependent, few MBOMP families remain undiscovered in any sequenced organism. PMID:21272379

  20. Volcanic stratigraphy of the Barrel Springs--Wild Cherry Formations, Davis Mountains, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.F. . Dept. Geology); Henry, C.D. . Bureau of Economic Geology); Kunk, M.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Detailed mapping, stratigraphy, [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages, and geochemistry allow, for the first time, a coherent volcanic history of the Barrel Springs--Wild Cherry (BS-WC) units, the most widespread of the Davis Mountains volcanic field (DMVF). These units erupted dominantly from the [approximately] 20 km-diameter Paradise Mountain caldera (PMC), in the west-central DMVF, where thick, locally silicified and kaolinized intracaldera tuffs and interbedded lavas were resurgently domed by an 8 x 5-km-diameter syenitic intrusion. BS-WC units, all rhyolites, consist dominantly of a lower, moderately porphyritic ash-flow tuff; a petrographically similar, middle ash-flow tuff; and an upper group of voluminous, abundantly porphyritic lavas. The lower ash-flow tuff is strongly rheomorphic throughout its occurrence. The middle ash-flow is also rheomorphic in thick outcrops near the PMC but not in thin ([<=]10m), distal outcrops. These three units are interbedded with lavas lithologically similar to the tuffs near the PMC and with volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks in more distal area. The two ash-flow tuffs are separated by strongly porphyritic trachyte lavas of the Mount Locke Formation in the vicinity of the PMC. Sources and extents of individual flows of the upper lavas have not been positively identified. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of alkali feldspar phenocrysts from thirteen samples constrain most BS-WC to a 300 ka span. The lower tuff erupted about 35.6 Ma. The middle tuff and part of the voluminous lava package erupted at 35.3 Ma. Ages of two lavas are 35.1 Ma, which suggests prolonged eruption. Correlations based on lithology and age relations are supplemented by trace element and mineral studies that confirm close geochemical affinities.

  1. Transcriptional activity of the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta Holobiont: molecular evidence for metabolic interchange

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Cara L.; Labrie, Micheline; Jarett, Jessica K.; Lesser, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to our understanding of the taxonomic composition of the symbiotic microbes in marine sponges, the functional diversity of these symbionts is largely unknown. Furthermore, the application of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic techniques to functional questions on sponge host-symbiont interactions is in its infancy. In this study, we generated a transcriptome for the host and a metatranscriptome of its microbial symbionts for the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, from the Caribbean. In combination with a gene-specific approach, our goals were to (1) characterize genetic evidence for nitrogen cycling in X. muta, an important limiting nutrient on coral reefs (2) identify which prokaryotic symbiont lineages are metabolically active and, (3) characterize the metabolic potential of the prokaryotic community. Xestospongia muta expresses genes from multiple nitrogen transformation pathways that when combined with the abundance of this sponge, and previous data on dissolved inorganic nitrogen fluxes, shows that this sponge is an important contributor to nitrogen cycling biogeochemistry on coral reefs. Additionally, we observed significant differences in gene expression of the archaeal amoA gene, which is involved in ammonia oxidation, between coral reef locations consistent with differences in the fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen previously reported. In regards to symbiont metabolic potential, the genes in the biosynthetic pathways of several amino acids were present in the prokaryotic metatranscriptome dataset but in the host-derived transcripts only the catabolic reactions for these amino acids were present. A similar pattern was observed for the B vitamins (riboflavin, biotin, thiamin, cobalamin). These results expand our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in sponges, and the metabolic interchange highlighted here advances the field of symbiont physiology by elucidating specific metabolic pathways where there is high potential for host

  2. Changes in blood flow, oxygenation, and volume following extended stimulation of rodent barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Myles; Berwick, Jason; Mayhew, John

    2002-03-01

    Simultaneous optical imaging spectroscopy and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used in rodent barrel cortex to examine the hemodynamic response to extended electrical stimulation (20 s, 5 Hz) of the whisker pad. Stimulation results in a fast early increase in deoxyhemoglobin concentration (Hbr) followed by a later decrease to a "plateau" phase approximately 4 s after stimulation onset. There was no corresponding decrease in oxyhemoglobin (HbO(2)), which simply increased after stimulation, reaching a plateau at approximately 5 s. The time series of flow and volume had similar onset times and did not differ significantly throughout the presentation of the stimuli. Following stimulation cessation all aspects of the hemodynamic response returned to baseline with a long decay constant (>20 s), CBV doing so at a slower rate than CBF. The time courses of CBF, CBV, Hbr, and HbO(2) were very similar to that produced by a brief stimulus up to peak. The relationship between the flow and the volume changes is well approximated by the expression CBV = CBF(phi). We find phi to be slightly lower under stimulation (0.26 +/- 0.0152) than during hypercapnia (0.32 +/- 0.0172). Saturation and flow data were used to estimate changes in CMRO(2) for a range of baseline oxygen extraction fractions (OEF). In the case of hypercapnia CMRO(2) was biphasic, increasing after onset and sharply decreasing below baseline following cessation. If it is assumed that there is no "net" increase in CMRO(2) (i.e., SigmaDeltaCMRO(2) = 0) following the onset and offset of hypercapnia, then the corresponding estimate of baseline OEF is 0.45. Evidence for increased oxygen consumption was obtained for all stimulation intensities assuming a baseline OEF of 0.45. ©2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  3. The β-Barrel Outer Membrane Protein Assembly Complex of Neisseria meningitidis▿

    PubMed Central

    Volokhina, Elena B.; Beckers, Frank; Tommassen, Jan; Bos, Martine P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein Omp85 is required for outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly in gram-negative bacteria and in mitochondria. Its Escherichia coli homolog, designated BamA, functions with four accessory lipoproteins, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE, together forming the β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam). Here, we addressed the composition of this machinery and the function of its components in Neisseria meningitidis, a model organism for outer membrane biogenesis studies. Analysis of genome sequences revealed homologs of BamC, BamD (previously described as ComL), and BamE and a second BamE homolog, Mlp. No homolog of BamB was found. As in E. coli, ComL/BamD appeared essential for viability and for OMP assembly, and it could not be replaced by its E. coli homolog. BamE was not essential but was found to contribute to the efficiency of OMP assembly and to the maintenance of OM integrity. A bamC mutant showed only marginal OMP assembly defects, but the impossibility of creating a bamC bamE double mutant further indicated the function of BamC in OMP assembly. An mlp mutant was unaffected in OMP assembly. The results of copurification assays demonstrated the association of BamC, ComL, and BamE with Omp85. Semi-native gel electrophoresis identified the RmpM protein as an additional component of the Omp85 complex, which was confirmed in copurification assays. RmpM was not required for OMP folding but stabilized OMP complexes. Thus, the Bam complex in N. meningitidis consists of Omp85/BamA plus RmpM, BamC, ComL/BamD, and BamE, of which ComL/BamD and BamE appear to be the most important accessory components for OMP assembly. PMID:19767435

  4. Neurovascular coupling investigated with two-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy in rat whisker barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Berwick, J; Johnston, D; Jones, M; Martindale, J; Redgrave, P; McLoughlin, N; Schiessl, I; Mayhew, J E W

    2005-10-01

    Optical imaging slit spectroscopy is a powerful method for estimating quantitative changes in cerebral haemodynamics, such as deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and blood volume (Hbr, HbO2 and Hbt, respectively). Its disadvantage is that there is a large loss of spatial data as one image dimension is used to encode spectral wavelength information. Single wavelength optical imaging, on the other hand, produces high-resolution spatiotemporal maps of brain activity, but yields only indirect measures of Hbr, HbO2 and Hbt. In this study we perform two-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy (2D-OIS) in rat barrel cortex during contralateral whisker stimulation to obtain two-dimensional maps over time of Hbr, HbO2 and Hbt. The 2D-OIS was performed by illuminating the cortex with four wavelengths of light (575, 559, 495 and 587 nm), which were presented sequentially at a high frame rate (32 Hz). The contralateral whisker pad was stimulated using two different durations: 1 and 16 s (5 Hz, 1.2 mA). Control experiments used a hypercapnic (5% CO2) challenge to manipulate baseline blood flow and volume in the absence of corresponding neural activation. The 2D-OIS method allowed separation of artery, vein and parenchyma regions. The magnitude of the haemodynamic response elicited varied considerably between different vascular compartments; the largest responses in Hbt were in the arteries and the smallest in the veins. Phase lags in the HbO2 response between arteries and veins suggest that a process of upstream signalling maybe responsible for dilating the arteries. There was also a consistent increase in Hbr from arterial regions after whisker stimulation.

  5. Thermal Energy Exchange Model and Water Loss of a Barrel Cactus, Ferocactus acanthodes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D A; Nobel, P S

    1977-10-01

    The influences of various diurnal stomatal opening patterns, spines, and ribs on the stem surface temperature and water economy of a CAM succulent, the barrel cactus Ferocactus acanthodes, were examined using an energy budget model. To incorporate energy exchanges by shortwave and longwave irradiation, latent heat, conduction, and convection as well as the heat storage in the massive stem, the plant was subdivided into over 100 internal and external regions in the model. This enabled the average surface temperature to be predicted within 1 C of the measured temperature for both winter and summer days.Reducing the stem water vapor conductance from the values observed in the field to zero caused the average daily stem surface temperature to increase only 0.7 C for a winter day and 0.3 C for a summer day. Thus, latent heat loss does not substantially reduce stem temperature. Although the surface temperatures averaged 18 C warmer for the summer day than for the winter day for a plant 41 cm tall, the temperature dependence of stomatal opening caused the simulated nighttime water loss rates to be about the same for the 2 days.Spines moderated the amplitude of the diurnal temperature changes of the stem surface, since the daily variation was 17 C for the winter day and 25 C for the summer day with spines compared with 23 C and 41 C, respectively, in their simulated absence. Ribs reduced the daytime temperature rise by providing 54% more area for convective heat loss than for a smooth circumscribing surface. In a simulation where both spines and ribs were eliminated, the daytime average surface temperature rose by 5 C.

  6. Morphological Characteristics of Electrophysiologically Characterized Layer Vb Pyramidal Cells in Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Loucif, Alexandre J. C.; Schubert, Dirk; Möck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Layer Vb pyramidal cells are the major output neurons of the neocortex and transmit the outcome of cortical columnar signal processing to distant target areas. At the same time they contribute to local tactile information processing by emitting recurrent axonal collaterals into the columnar microcircuitry. It is, however, not known how exactly the two types of pyramidal cells, called slender-tufted and thick-tufted, contribute to the local circuitry. Here, we investigated in the rat barrel cortex the detailed quantitative morphology of biocytin-filled layer Vb pyramidal cells in vitro, which were characterized for their intrinsic electrophysiology with special emphasis on their action potential firing pattern. Since we stained the same slices for cytochrome oxidase, we could also perform layer- and column-related analyses. Our results suggest that in layer Vb the unambiguous action potential firing patterns "regular spiking (RS)" and "repetitive burst spiking (RB)" (previously called intrinsically burst spiking) correlate well with a distinct morphology. RS pyramidal cells are somatodendritically of the slender-tufted type and possess numerous local intralaminar and intracolumnar axonal collaterals, mostly reaching layer I. By contrast, their transcolumnar projections are less well developed. The RB pyramidal cells are somatodendritically of the thick-tufted type and show only relatively sparse local axonal collaterals, which are preferentially emitted as long horizontal or oblique infragranular collaterals. However, contrary to many previous slice studies, a substantial number of these neurons also showed axonal collaterals reaching layer I. Thus, electrophysiologically defined pyramidal cells of layer Vb show an input and output pattern which suggests RS cells to be more "locally segregating" signal processors whereas RB cells seem to act more on a "global integrative" scale. PMID:27706253

  7. Structural coalescence underlies the aggregation propensity of a β-barrel protein motif

    PubMed Central

    Angelani, Carla R.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Curto, Lucrecia M.; Delfino, José M.

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding of the structural foundations underlying protein aggregation is an elusive goal of central biomedical importance. A step toward this aim is exemplified by the β-barrel motif represented by the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and two abridged all-β sheet forms (Δ98Δ and Δ78Δ). At odds with the established notion that a perturbation of the native fold should necessarily favor a buildup of intermediate forms with an enhanced tendency to aggregate, the intrinsic stability (ΔG°H2O) of these proteins does not bear a straightforward correlation with their trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced aggregation propensity. In view of this fact, we found it more insightful to delve into the connection between structure and stability under sub-aggregating conditions (10% TFE). In the absence of the co-solvent, the abridged variants display a common native-like region decorated with a disordered C-terminal stretch. Upon TFE addition, an increase in secondary structure content is observed, assimilating them to the parent protein. In this sense, TFE perturbs a common native like region while exerting a global compaction effect. Importantly, in all cases, fatty acid binding function is preserved. Interestingly, energetic as well as structural diversity in aqueous solution evolves into a common conformational ensemble more akin in stability. These facts reconcile apparent paradoxical findings related to stability and rates of aggregation. This scenario likely mimics the accrual of aggregation-prone species in the population, an early critical event for the development of fibrillation. PMID:28187186

  8. Energetics of side-chain partitioning of β-signal residues in unassisted folding of a transmembrane β-barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Zadafiya, Punit; Vetal, Pallavi Vijay; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2017-07-21

    The free energy of water-to-interface amino acid partitioning is a major contributing factor in membrane protein folding and stability. The interface residues at the C terminus of transmembrane β-barrels form the β-signal motif required for assisted β-barrel assembly in vivo but are believed to be less important for β-barrel assembly in vitro Here, we experimentally measured the thermodynamic contribution of all 20 amino acids at the β-signal motif to the unassisted folding of the model β-barrel protein PagP. We obtained the partitioning free energy for all 20 amino acids at the lipid-facing interface (ΔΔG(0)w,i(φ)) and the protein-facing interface (ΔΔG(0)w,i(π)) residues and found that hydrophobic amino acids are most favorably transferred to the lipid-facing interface, whereas charged and polar groups display the highest partitioning energy. Furthermore, the change in non-polar surface area correlated directly with the partitioning free energy for the lipid-facing residue and inversely with the protein-facing residue. We also demonstrate that the interface residues of the β-signal motif are vital for in vitro barrel assembly, because they exhibit a side chain-specific energetic contribution determined by the change in nonpolar accessible surface. We further establish that folding cooperativity and hydrophobic collapse are balanced at the membrane interface for optimal stability of the PagP β-barrel scaffold. We conclude that the PagP C-terminal β-signal motif influences the folding cooperativity and stability of the folded β-barrel and that the thermodynamic contributions of the lipid- and protein-facing residues in the transmembrane protein β-signal motif depend on the nature of the amino acid side chain. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Energetics of side-chain partitioning of β-signal residues in unassisted folding of a transmembrane β-barrel protein

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Zadafiya, Punit; Vetal, Pallavi Vijay

    2017-01-01

    The free energy of water-to-interface amino acid partitioning is a major contributing factor in membrane protein folding and stability. The interface residues at the C terminus of transmembrane β-barrels form the β-signal motif required for assisted β-barrel assembly in vivo but are believed to be less important for β-barrel assembly in vitro. Here, we experimentally measured the thermodynamic contribution of all 20 amino acids at the β-signal motif to the unassisted folding of the model β-barrel protein PagP. We obtained the partitioning free energy for all 20 amino acids at the lipid-facing interface (ΔΔG0w,i(φ)) and the protein-facing interface (ΔΔG0w,i(π)) residues and found that hydrophobic amino acids are most favorably transferred to the lipid-facing interface, whereas charged and polar groups display the highest partitioning energy. Furthermore, the change in non-polar surface area correlated directly with the partitioning free energy for the lipid-facing residue and inversely with the protein-facing residue. We also demonstrate that the interface residues of the β-signal motif are vital for in vitro barrel assembly, because they exhibit a side chain–specific energetic contribution determined by the change in nonpolar accessible surface. We further establish that folding cooperativity and hydrophobic collapse are balanced at the membrane interface for optimal stability of the PagP β-barrel scaffold. We conclude that the PagP C-terminal β-signal motif influences the folding cooperativity and stability of the folded β-barrel and that the thermodynamic contributions of the lipid- and protein-facing residues in the transmembrane protein β-signal motif depend on the nature of the amino acid side chain. PMID:28592485

  10. Identifying the structural boundaries of independent folding domains in the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase, a beta/alpha barrel protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zitzewitz, J. A.; Gualfetti, P. J.; Perkons, I. A.; Wasta, S. A.; Matthews, C. R.

    1999-01-01

    Two equilibrium intermediates have previously been observed in the urea denaturation of the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase (alphaTS) from Escherichia coli, an eight-stranded beta/alpha barrel protein. In the current study, a series of amino-terminal fragments were characterized to probe the elementary folding units that may be in part responsible for this complex behavior. Stop-codon mutagenesis was used to produce eight fragments ranging in size from 105-214 residues and containing incremental elements of secondary structure. Equilibrium studies by circular dichroism indicate that all of these fragments are capable of adopting secondary structure. All except for the shortest fragment fold cooperatively. The addition of the fourth, sixth, and eighth beta-strands leads to distinct increases in structure, cooperativity, and/or stability, suggesting that folding involves the modular assembly of betaalphabeta supersecondary structural elements. One-dimensional NMR titrations at high concentrations of urea, probing the environment around His92, were also performed to test for the presence of residual structure in the fragments. All fragments that contained the first four betaalpha units of structure exhibited a cooperative unfolding transition at high concentrations of urea with significant but reduced stability relative to the full-length protein. These results suggest that the residual structure in alphaTS requires the participation of hydrophobic residues in multiple beta-strands that span the entire sequence. PMID:10386870

  11. Whisker row deprivation affects the flow of sensory information through rat barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Vincent; Mitani, Akinori; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Whisker trimming causes substantial reorganization of neuronal response properties in barrel cortex. However, little is known about experience-dependent rerouting of sensory processing following sensory deprivation. To address this, we performed in vivo intracellular recordings from layers 2/3 (L2/3), layer 4 (L4), layer 5 regular-spiking (L5RS), and L5 intrinsically bursting (L5IB) neurons and measured their multiwhisker receptive field at the level of spiking activity, membrane potential, and synaptic conductance before and after sensory deprivation. We used Chernoff information to quantify the “sensory information” contained in the firing patterns of cells in response to spared and deprived whisker stimulation. In the control condition, information for flanking-row and same-row whiskers decreased in the order L4, L2/3, L5IB, L5RS. However, after whisker-row deprivation, spared flanking-row whisker information was reordered to L4, L5RS, L5IB, L2/3. Sensory information from the trimmed whiskers was reduced and delayed in L2/3 and L5IB neurons, whereas sensory information from spared whiskers was increased and advanced in L4 and L5RS neurons. Sensory information from spared whiskers was increased in L5IB neurons without a latency change. L5RS cells exhibited the largest changes in sensory information content through an atypical plasticity combining a significant decrease in spontaneous activity and an increase in a short-latency excitatory conductance. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Sensory cortical plasticity is usually quantified by changes in evoked firing rate. In this study we quantified plasticity by changes in sensory detection performance using Chernoff information and receiver operating characteristic analysis. We found that whisker deprivation causes a change in information flow within the cortical layers and that layer 5 regular-spiking cells, despite showing only a small potentiation of short-latency input, show the greatest increase in information content for

  12. Characterization of the β-barrel assembly machine accessory lipoproteins from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Joshua P; Kenedy, Melisha R; Iqbal, Henna; Akins, Darrin R

    2015-03-24

    Like all diderm bacteria studied to date, Borrelia burgdorferi possesses a β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex. The bacterial BAM complexes characterized thus far consist of an essential integral outer membrane protein designated BamA and one or more accessory proteins. The accessory proteins are typically lipid-modified proteins anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane through their lipid moieties. We previously identified and characterized the B. burgdorferi BamA protein in detail and more recently identified two lipoproteins encoded by open reading frames bb0324 and bb0028 that associate with the borrelial BamA protein. The role(s) of the BAM accessory lipoproteins in B. burgdorferi is currently unknown. Structural modeling of B. burgdorferi BB0028 revealed a distinct β-propeller fold similar to the known structure for the E. coli BAM accessory lipoprotein BamB. Additionally, the structural model for BB0324 was highly similar to the known structure of BamD, which is consistent with the prior finding that BB0324 contains tetratricopeptide repeat regions similar to other BamD orthologs. Consistent with BB0028 and BB0324 being BAM accessory lipoproteins, mutants lacking expression of each protein were found to exhibit altered membrane permeability and enhanced sensitivity to various antimicrobials. Additionally, BB0028 mutants also exhibited significantly impaired in vitro growth. Finally, immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that BB0028 and BB0324 each interact specifically and independently with BamA to form the BAM complex in B. burgdorferi. Combined structural studies, functional assays, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that BB0028 and BB0324 are the respective BamB and BamD orthologs in B. burgdorferi, and are important in membrane integrity and/or outer membrane protein localization. The borrelial BamB and BamD proteins both interact specifically and independently with BamA to form a tripartite BAM complex in B

  13. Barrel organ of plate tectonics - a new tool for outreach and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Petr; Machek, Matěj; Šorm, Zdar

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonics is the major geological concept to explain dynamics and structure of Earth's outer shell, the lithosphere. In the plate tectonic theory processes in the Earth lithosphere and its dynamics is driven by the relative motion and interaction of lithospheric plates. Geologically most active regions on Earth often correlate with the lithospheric plate boundaries. Thus for explaining the earth surface evolution, mountain building, volcanism and earthquake origin it is important to understand processes at the plate boundaries. However these processes associated with plate tectonics usually require significant period of time to take effects, therefore, their entire cycles cannot be directly observed in the nature by humans. This makes a challenge for scientists studying these processes, but also for teachers and popularizers trying to explain them to students and to the general public. Therefore, to overcome this problem, we developed a mechanical model of plate tectonics enabling demonstration of most important processes associated with plate tectonics in real time. The mechanical model is a wooden box, more specifically a special type of barrel organ, with hand painted backdrops in the front side. These backdrops are divided into several components representing geodynamic processes associated with plate tectonics, specifically convective currents occurring in the mantle, sea-floor spreading, a subduction of the oceanic crust under the continental crust, partial melting and volcanism associated with subduction, a formation of magmatic stripes, an ascent of mantle plume throughout the mantle, a volcanic activity associated with hot spots, and a formation and degradation of volcanic islands on moving lithospheric plate. All components are set in motion by a handle controlled by a human operator, and the scene is illuminated with colored lights controlled automatically by an electric device embedded in the box. Operation of the model may be seen on www

  14. Characterization of a novel β-barrel protein (AtOM47) from the mitochondrial outer membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Radomiljac, Jordan; Wang, Yan; Law, Simon R.; Keech, Olivier; Narsai, Reena; Berkowitz, Oliver; Duncan, Owen; Murcha, Monika W.; Whelan, James

    2016-01-01

    In plant cells, mitochondria are major providers of energy and building blocks for growth and development as well as abiotic and biotic stress responses. They are encircled by two lipid membranes containing proteins that control mitochondrial function through the import of macromolecules and metabolites. Characterization of a novel β-barrel protein, OUTER MEMBRANE PROTEIN 47 (OM47), unique to the green lineage and related to the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) protein family, showed that OM47 can complement a VDAC mutant in yeast. Mutation of OM47 in Arabidopsis thaliana by T-DNA insertion had no effect on the import of proteins, such as the β-barrel proteins translocase of the outer membrane 40 (TOM40) or sorting and assembly machinery 50 (SAM50), into mitochondria. Molecular and physiological analyses revealed a delay in chlorophyll breakdown, higher levels of starch, and a delay in the induction of senescence marker genes in the mutant lines. While there was a reduction of >90% in OM47 protein in mitochondria isolated from 3-week-old om47 mutants, in mitochondria isolated from 8-week-old plants OM47 levels were similar to that of the wild type. This recovery was achieved by an up-regulation of OM47 transcript abundance in the mutants. Combined, these results highlight a role in leaf senescence for this plant-specific β-barrel protein, probably mediating the recovery and recycling of chloroplast breakdown products by transporting metabolic intermediates into and out of mitochondria. PMID:27811077

  15. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of samples of transuranic waste contained in barrels in the presence of matrix material

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.T.; Herrera, G.C.; Hastings, R.D.; Shunk, E.R.; Kunz, W.E.

    1987-08-28

    Apparatus and method for performing corrections for matrix material effects on the neutron measurements generated from analysis of transuranic waste drums using the differential-dieaway technique. By measuring the absorption index and the moderator index for a particular drum, correction factors can be determined for the effects of matrix materials on the ''observed'' quantity of fissile and fertile material present therein in order to determine the actual assays thereof. A barrel flux monitor is introduced into the measurement chamber to accomplish these measurements as a new contribution to the differential-dieaway technology. 9 figs.

  16. Our Treatment Approaches in Severe Maxillofacial Injuries Occurring After Failed Suicide Attempts Using Long-Barreled Guns.

    PubMed

    Kucuker, Ismail; Şimşek, Tekin; Keles, Musa Kemal; Yosma, Engin; Aksakal, Ibrahim Alper; Demir, Ahmet

    2016-03-01

    Maxillofacial traumas with long-barreled guns may sometimes cause catastrophic results by means of smashing in facial structures. In these patients, reconstruction strategies of both fragmented/lost soft and hard tissues still remain controversial. In their clinic, the authors treated 5 patients with severely injured face after failed suicide attempt between 2008 and 2013. In this study, the authors aimed to present their clinical experiences on these severely injured maxillofacial gunshot traumas and offer a treatment algorithm to gain a result as possible as satisfactory in terms of functionality and appearance.

  17. Apparatus and method for quantitative assay of samples of transuranic waste contained in barrels in the presence of matrix material

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Herrera, G.C.; Hastings, R.D.; Shunk, E.R.; Kunz, W.E.

    1987-08-28

    Apparatus and method for performing corrections for matrix material effects on the neutron measurements generated from analysis of transuranic waste drums using the differential-dieaway technique. By measuring the absorption index and the moderator index for a particular drum, correction factors can be determined for the effects of matrix materials on the ''observed'' quantity of fissile and fertile material present therein in order to determine the actual assays thereof. A barrel flux monitor is introduced into the measurement chamber to accomplish these measurements as a new contribution to the differential-dieaway technology. 9 figs.

  18. Genetic analysis of posterior medial barrel subfield (PMBSF) size in somatosensory cortex (SI) in recombinant inbred strains of mice

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Taha A; Lu, Lu; Li, Cheng-Xiang; Williams, Robert W; Waters, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Background Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping is an important tool for identifying potential candidate genes linked to complex traits. QTL mapping has been used to identify genes associated with cytoarchitecture, cell number, brain size, and brain volume. Previously, QTL mapping was utilized to examine variation of barrel field size in the somatosensory cortex in a limited number of recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice. In order to further elucidate the underlying natural variation in mouse primary somatosensory cortex, we measured the size of the posterior medial barrel subfield (PMBSF), associated with the representation of the large mystacial vibrissae, in an expanded sample set that included 42 BXD RI strains, two parental strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), and one F1 strain (B6D2F1). Cytochrome oxidase labeling was used to visualize barrels within the PMBSF. Results We observed a 33% difference between the largest and smallest BXD RI strains with continuous variation in-between. Using QTL linkage analysis from WebQTL, we generated linkage maps of raw total PMBSF and brain weight adjusted total PMBSF areas. After removing the effects of brain weight, we detected a suggestive QTL (likelihood ratio statistic [LRS]: 14.20) on the proximal arm of chromosome 4. Candidate genes under the suggestive QTL peak for PMBSF area were selected based on the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present and the biological relevance of each gene. Among the candidate genes are Car8 and Rab2. More importantly, mRNA expression profiles obtained using GeneNetwork indicated a strong correlation between total PMBSF area and two genes (Adcy1 and Gap43) known to be important in mouse cortex development. GAP43 has been shown to be critical during neurodevelopment of the somatosensory cortex, while knockout Adcy1 mice have disrupted barrel field patterns. Conclusion We detected a novel suggestive QTL on chromosome 4 that is linked to PMBSF size. The present study is an

  19. Mitochondrial-bacterial hybrids of BamA/Tob55 suggest variable requirements for the membrane integration of β-barrel proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pfitzner, Anna-Katharina; Steblau, Nadja; Ulrich, Thomas; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Schütz, Monika; Rapaport, Doron

    2016-01-01

    β-Barrel proteins are found in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria. The assembly of these proteins into the corresponding OM is facilitated by a dedicated protein complex that contains a central conserved β-barrel protein termed BamA in bacteria and Tob55/Sam50 in mitochondria. BamA and Tob55 consist of a membrane-integral C-terminal domain that forms a β-barrel pore and a soluble N-terminal portion comprised of one (in Tob55) or five (in BamA) polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains. Currently the functional significance of this difference and whether the homology between BamA and Tob55 can allow them to replace each other are unclear. To address these issues we constructed hybrid Tob55/BamA proteins with differently configured N-terminal POTRA domains. We observed that constructs harboring a heterologous C-terminal domain could not functionally replace the bacterial BamA or the mitochondrial Tob55 demonstrating species-specific requirements. Interestingly, the various hybrid proteins in combination with the bacterial chaperones Skp or SurA supported to a variable extent the assembly of bacterial β-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial OM. Collectively, our findings suggest that the membrane assembly of various β-barrel proteins depends to a different extent on POTRA domains and periplasmic chaperones. PMID:27982054

  20. Associations of Unilateral Whisker and Olfactory Signals Induce Synapse Formation and Memory Cell Recruitment in Bilateral Barrel Cortices: Cellular Mechanism for Unilateral Training Toward Bilateral Memory

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zilong; Chen, Lei; Fan, Ruicheng; Lu, Wei; Wang, Dangui; Cui, Shan; Huang, Li; Zhao, Shidi; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex (CBC) were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveal the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory. PMID:28018178