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Sample records for 8-hour ozone standards

  1. EPA Approves Redesignation of Knoxville Area to Attainment for the 2008 8-Hour Ozone Standard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (07/13/15 - ATLANTA ) - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that it is taking final action to approve the state of Tennessee's request to redesignate the Knoxville area to attainment for the 2008 8-hour ozone standard. This actio

  2. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  3. 75 FR 51960 - Proposed Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AP30 Proposed Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New Source Review Anti-Backsliding Provisions for Former 1-Hour Ozone Standard AGENCY... designated nonattainment for the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS). The...

  4. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  5. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  6. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  7. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  8. 76 FR 33647 - Approval and Promulgation of Determination of Attainment for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... 51.918, a final determination that the area has met the 1997 8-hour ozone standard suspends the state... nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51... (MO-IL) metropolitan nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour National Ambient Air...

  9. 75 FR 57220 - Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New Source Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AP30 Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard: New Source Review Anti-Backsliding Provisions for Former 1-Hour Ozone Standard--Public Hearing... is announcing a public hearing to be held for the proposed ``Rule to Implement the 1997 8-Hour...

  10. 77 FR 35285 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Arizona; Attainment Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Ozone Standard AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is... demonstrate attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) in the Phoenix... the SIP elements required for ozone nonattainment areas under title I, part D, subpart 1 of the...

  11. 75 FR 68736 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for the Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... .067 42-045-0002 Delaware/Pennsylvania 2009 .065 42-091-0013 Montgomery/Pennsylvania......... 2009 .070... standard (NAAQS). This extension is based in part on air quality data recorded during the 2009 ozone season. Specifically, the Philadelphia Area's 4th highest daily 8-hour monitored ozone value during the 2009...

  12. 77 FR 21690 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plan for 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard; Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Ozone Nonattainment Area A. Background on the 1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS Ground-level ozone pollution is... by many types of pollution sources including on- and off-road motor vehicles and engines, power plants and industrial facilities, and smaller area sources such as lawn and garden equipment and...

  13. 75 FR 43069 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard in the Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    .... 40 CFR 51.907 sets forth how sections 172(a)(2)(C) and 181(a)(5) apply to an area subject to the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. Under 40 CFR 51.907, an area will meet the requirement of section 172(a)(2)(C... Baltimore Moderate Nonattainment Area AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct...

  14. 76 FR 13289 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard in the Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Appendix A can be found in the ``Quality Assurance Handbook for Air Pollution Measurement Systems,'' volume...).) List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 81 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, National parks... Baltimore nonattainment area, which is classified as moderate for the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient...

  15. 75 FR 68733 - Approval and Promulgation of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    .../Pennsylvania 2009 .065 42-091-0013 Montgomery/Pennsylvania......... 2009 .070 42-101-0004 Philadelphia..., quality-assured air quality data recorded during the 2009 ozone season. In accordance with requirements... the 2009 ozone season at each monitor in the area is less than 0.084 parts per million (ppm). If...

  16. 76 FR 54412 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Baltimore 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Ozone Nonattainment Area; MD AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to determine that the Baltimore moderate 8- hour ozone nonattainment area (the Baltimore Area) did not attain the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) by...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  2. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  3. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  4. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  5. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  6. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  7. 78 FR 32222 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour..., 2009, to address the reasonable further progress (RFP) plan requirements for the Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. The Atlanta,...

  8. 78 FR 44439 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour... Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. EPA... Planning Branch, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta,...

  9. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  10. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  11. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  12. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  13. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  14. 78 FR 32135 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...EPA is taking direct final action to approve a state implementation plan (SIP) revision, submitted by the State of Georgia, through the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (GA EPD), on October 21, 2009, to address the reasonable further progress (RFP) plan requirements for the Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) nonattainment area. The......

  15. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  16. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  17. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  18. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  19. 40 CFR 51.918 - Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? 51.918... 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.918 Can any SIP planning requirements be suspended in 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas that have air quality data that meets the NAAQS? Upon...

  20. 75 FR 80420 - Reasonable Further Progress Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). Specifically, EPA is proposing that... nitrogen oxides (NO X )] that contribute to ground-level ozone concentrations. B. What should I consider...

  1. 78 FR 34965 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan Revision; Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for the Ohio Portion of the Wheeling... Act, EPA is proposing to approve the request by Ohio to revise the 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance...

  2. 75 FR 9781 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Atlanta, Georgia, 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Ozone Nonattainment Area; Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule..., area from marginal to moderate for the 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area by operation of law. This....311. The reclassification of the Atlanta Area from marginal to moderate for the 1997 8-hour...

  3. 75 FR 79302 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Dallas/Fort Worth 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area; Texas AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... nonattainment area failed to attain the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS or... Federal Regulations (CFR) for moderate nonattainment areas. This final determination is based on...

  4. 75 FR 42672 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; 8-hour Ozone Control Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; 8- hour Ozone... Implementation Plan (SIP) for ozone involving the control of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The proposed SIP... ozone. DATES: Comments must be received on or before August 23, 2010. ADDRESSES: Submit your...

  5. 75 FR 80340 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; 8-Hour Ozone Control Measures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey; 8- Hour Ozone... Plan (SIP) for ozone involving the control of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The SIP revision... ozone. DATES: Effective Date: This rule is effective on January 21, 2011. ADDRESSES: EPA has...

  6. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  7. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  8. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  9. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  10. 40 CFR 51.908 - What modeling and attainment demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... demonstration requirements apply for purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.908 Section 51.908 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... purposes of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What is the attainment demonstration requirement for an...

  11. 76 FR 2859 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Adoption of 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ...EPA proposes to approve the State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the Commonwealth of Virginia for the purpose of adding the 2008 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 0.075 parts per million (ppm), related reference conditions, and updating the list of appendices under ``Documents Incorporated by Reference.'' In the Final Rules section of this Federal......

  12. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  13. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  14. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  15. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  16. 40 CFR 52.387 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.387 Section 52.387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 52.387 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On March 13, 2007, the State...)(D)(i) interstate transport requirements of the Clean Air Act for the 1997 8-hour ozone and...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1393 - Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1393 Section 52.1393 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1393 Interstate Transport Declaration for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. The... Section 110(a)(2)(D)(i) for the 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS promulgated in July 1997. The...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  2. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  3. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2499 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.2499 Section 52.2499 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...) Washington § 52.2499 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On January 17, 2007,...

  6. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  7. 40 CFR 52.97 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.97 Section 52.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION....97 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 NAAQS. On February 7, 2008, the...

  8. 75 FR 54778 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Baton Rouge 8-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Rouge 8-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area; Determination of Attainment of the 8-Hour Ozone Standard AGENCY... (BR) moderate 8- hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air... air monitoring data that show the area has monitored attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS for...

  9. 75 FR 55977 - Adequacy Status of the Knoxville, TN 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan Motor Vehicle Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Vehicle Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... the Knoxville, Tennessee 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan are adequate for transportation conformity... used for transportation conformity determinations until EPA has affirmatively found them adequate. As...

  10. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  11. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  12. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  13. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  14. 40 CFR 51.917 - What is the effective date of designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... designation for the Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area? 51.917 Section 51.917 Protection of..., AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient... ozone nonattainment area? The Las Vegas, NV, 8-hour ozone nonattainment area (designated on September...

  15. Trends analyses of 30 years of ambient 8 hour ozone and precursor monitoring data in the South Central U.S.: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sather, Mark E; Cavender, Kevin

    2016-07-13

    In the last 30 years ambient ozone concentrations have notably decreased in the South Central U.S. Yet, current ambient ozone concentrations measured over the past three years 2013-2015 in this area of the U.S. are not meeting the U.S. 2015 8 hour ozone standard of 70 parts per billion (ppb). This paper provides an update on long-term trends analyses of ambient 8 hour ozone and ozone precursor monitoring data collected over the past 30 years (1986-2015) in four South Central U.S. cities, following up on two previously published reviews of 20 and 25 year trends for these cities. All four cities have benefitted from national ozone precursor controls put in place during the 1990s and 2000s involving cleaner vehicles (vehicle fleet turnover/replacement over time), cleaner fuels, cleaner gasoline and diesel engines, and improved inspection/maintenance programs for existing vehicles. Additional ozone precursor emission controls specific to each city are detailed in this paper. The controls have resulted in impressive ambient ozone and ambient ozone precursor concentration reductions in the four South Central U.S. cities over the past 30 years, including 31-70% ambient nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentration declines from historical peaks to the present, 43-72% volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration declines from historical peaks to the present, a related 45-76% VOC reactivity decline for a subset of VOC species from historical peaks to the present, and an 18-38 ppb reduction in city 8 hour ozone design value concentrations. A new challenge for each of the four South Central U.S. cities will be meeting the U.S. 2015 8 hour ozone standard of 70 ppb.

  16. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. (a... 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. The SIP revision also meets the requirements of Clean...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. (a... 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. The SIP revision also meets the requirements of Clean...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. (a... 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. The SIP revision also meets the requirements of Clean...

  19. 75 FR 26225 - Adequacy Status of the Chicago, Illinois Area Submitted 8-Hour Ozone Redesignation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Plans for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... conformity determinations. Illinois submitted a redesignation request and maintenance plan for the Illinois... must use the MVEBs from the submitted ozone maintenance plan for future transportation...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1989 - Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS. 52.1989 Section 52.1989 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... (CONTINUED) Oregon § 52.1989 Interstate Transport for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS and 1997 PM2.5 NAAQS....

  1. 78 FR 65877 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Atlanta, Georgia 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Area. Signal preemption for MARTA Atlanta 6/17/96 4/26/99. routes 15 and 23. Improve and expand service... for Control Atlanta 1997 8- 10/21/2009........ 09/28/2013. of VOC Emissions from Reactor Hour Ozone Processes and Distillation Nonattainment Operations in Synthetic Organic Area. Chemical...

  2. 75 FR 17915 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... National Ambient Air Quality Standard, EPA ICR No. 2236.03, OMB Control No. 2060-0594 AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), this document announces that EPA is planning to submit a request to renew...

  3. 75 FR 8331 - Adequacy Status of the Cincinnati, Ohio/Indiana Submitted 8-Hour Ozone Redesignation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Maintenance Plans for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... ozone nonattainment area are adequate for use in transportation conformity determinations. Ohio... ozone maintenance plan for future transportation conformity determinations. DATES: This finding...

  4. 75 FR 9893 - Adequacy Determination for the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range 8-Hour Ozone Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Plan's Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes; State of Colorado AGENCY... Attainment Plan (hereafter ``Denver/NFR Ozone Attainment Plan'') are adequate for transportation conformity... budgets for future transportation conformity determinations once this finding becomes effective....

  5. 76 FR 2829 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Adoption of 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... NAAQS for ozone on March 27, 2008 (73 FR 16436). II. Summary of SIP Revision On September 27, 2010, the... Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an information...); Does not have Federalism implications as specified in Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August...

  6. Eastern Texas Air Quality Forecasting System to Support TexAQS-II and 8-hour Ozone Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, D. W.

    2005-12-01

    The main objective of the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) for 2005 and 2006 is to understand emissions and processes associated with the formation and transport of ozone and regional haze in Texas. The target research area is the more populated eastern half of the state, roughly from Interstate 35 eastward. Accurate meteorological and photochemical modeling efforts are essential to support this study and further enhance modeling efforts for establishing the State Implementation Plan (SIP) by Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). An air quality forecasting (AQF) system for Eastern Texas has been developed to provide these data and to further facilitate retrospective simulations to allow for model improvement and increased understanding of ozone episodes and emissions. We perform two-day air quality forecasting simulations with the 12-km Eastern Texas regional domain, and the 4-km Houston-Galveston area (HGA) domain utilizing a 48-CPU Beowulf Linux computer system. The dynamic boundary conditions are provided by the 36-km resolution conterminous US (CONUS) domain CMAQ simulations. Initial meteorological conditions are provided by the daily ETA forecast results. The results of individual runs are stored and made available to researchers and state and local officials via internet to study the patterns of air quality and its relationship to weather conditions and emissions. The data during the pre- and post-processing stages are in tens of gigabytes and must be managed efficiently during both the actual real-time and the subsequent computation periods. The nature of these forecasts and the time at which the initial data is available necessitates that models be executed within tight deadlines. A set of complex operational scripts is used to allow automatic operation of the data download, sequencing processors, performing graphical analysis, building database archives, and presenting on the web.

  7. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... designated nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS and for any area in a section 184 ozone transport...

  8. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... designated nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS and for any area in a section 184 ozone transport...

  9. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  10. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  11. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  12. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  13. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  14. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  15. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.915 What... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part...

  16. A Procedure for Inter-Comparing the Skill of Regional-Scale Air Quality Model Simulations of Daily Maximum 8-Hour Ozone Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    An operational model evaluation procedure is described to quantitatively assess the relative skill among several regionalscale air quality models simulating various percentiles of the cumulative frequency distribution of observed daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations. Bootstrap ...

  17. 40 CFR 51.913 - How do the section 182(f) NOX exemption provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions apply for the 8-hour NAAQS? 51.913 Section 51.913 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.913... petition the Administrator for an exemption from NOX obligations under section 182(f) for any...

  18. Guidance on Developing Fee Programs Required by Clean Air Act Section 185 for the 1997 1-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This January 2010 memorandum provides additional guidance on fee collection programs for the 1997 1-hour ozone NAAQS, which are required as anti-backsliding measures during transition to the 1997 8-hour ozone standard.

  19. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area...

  20. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area...

  1. 76 FR 3840 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard for the Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ..., consists of: Cecil County in Maryland; Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties in... Philadelphia-Wilmin- Atlantic Ci, PA-NJ-MD-DE (Cecil County) to read as follows: Sec. 81.321 Maryland... * * * * * * * Philadelphia-Wilmin-Atlantic Ci, PA-NJ-MD-DE: Cecil County Nonattainment..... Subpart 2/...

  2. 77 FR 28423 - Final Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... Areas b. Timing of SIP Submission Under Subpart 2 Classification c. Timing of Attainment Date d. Data.... Required Required No. 182(a)(3)(B)). Subpart 2 RACT for VOCs and NOX (Sec. Not Required Required No. 182(b... Review (Sec. Required Required No. 182(a)(2)(C), (a)(4), (b)(5)). Vehicle I/M (Sec. 182(a)(2)(B),...

  3. 77 FR 43521 - Final Rule To Implement the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Designation \\a\\ Category/classification Designated area Date \\1\\ Type Date \\1\\ Type Amador and Calaveras Cos., CA: (Central Mountain Cos.) Amador County Nonattainment 6/13/12 Subpart 2/Moderate. Calaveras County.... * * * * * * * Mariposa and Tuolumne Cos., CA: (Southern Mountain Counties) Mariposa County Nonattainment 6/13/12...

  4. 75 FR 43114 - Approval of One-Year Extension for Attaining the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard in the Baltimore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your... in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA... the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available...

  5. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  6. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality... subsequently redesignated to nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, any absolute, fixed date applicable...

  7. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National...) Submit an 8-hour ozone attainment demonstration no later than 1 year following designations...

  8. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National...) Submit an 8-hour ozone attainment demonstration no later than 1 year following designations...

  9. 40 CFR 51.907 - For an area that fails to attain the 8-hour NAAQS by its attainment date, how does EPA interpret...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.907 For an area that... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false For an area that fails to attain the 8... the CAA? 51.907 Section 51.907 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  10. 40 CFR 51.906 - Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS. 51.906 Section 51.906 Protection of Environment... Standard § 51.906 Redesignation to nonattainment following initial designations for the 8-hour NAAQS. For any area that is initially designated attainment or unclassifiable for the 8-hour NAAQS and that...

  11. 40 CFR 51.915 - What emissions inventory requirements apply under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nonattainment area subject only to title I, part D, subpart 1 of the Act in accordance with § 51.902(b), the... emissions inventories for these areas, the ozone-relevant data element requirements under 40 CFR part 51... apply under the 8-hour NAAQS? 51.915 Section 51.915 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  12. 78 FR 34177 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements AGENCY: Environmental... 2008 ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) (the ``2008 ozone NAAQS'') that...

  13. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  14. Setting and Reviewing Standards to Control Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ozone standards are part of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), which limit air pollution to protect health and the environment. Standards are periodically reviewed and updated, and air quality across the U.S. is measured against them.

  15. 78 FR 34964 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... proposed rule ``Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State... proposed rulemaking proposes to implement the 2008 ozone national ambient air quality standards...

  16. 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Infrastructure Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Read about the EPA's infrastructure actions for the 2008 Ozone NAAQS. These actions are regarding states' failure to submit SIPs addressing various parts of the standards. Here you can read the federal register notices, fact sheets, and the docket folder.

  17. Ground-level Ozone (Smog) Information | New England | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-02-16

    Ground-level ozone presents a serious air quality problem in New England. In 2008, EPA revised the ozone standard to a level of 0.075 parts per million, 8-hour average. Over the last 5 years (2006 through 2010), there have been an average of 31 days per summer when New England's air exceeded this standard.

  18. Ground-level Ozone (Smog) Information | New England | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    Ground-level ozone presents a serious air quality problem in New England. In 2008, EPA revised the ozone standard to a level of 0.075 parts per million, 8-hour average. Over the last 5 years (2006 through 2010), there have been an average of 31 days per summer when New England's air exceeded this standard.

  19. Air Emissions Inventory Guidance for Implementation of Ozone and Particulate Matter NAAQS and Regional Haze Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance document on how to develop emission inventories to meet State Implementation Plan requirements for complying with the 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS), the revised particulate matter (PM) NAAQS, and the regional haze reg

  20. 77 FR 8197 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... 1997 Ozone Standards for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... designations for the 2008 ozone NAAQS for transportation conformity purposes only. DATES: Comments must be... NAAQS D. Transportation Conformity and the 1997 Ozone NAAQS III. What are the proposed...

  1. 78 FR 9596 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey and New York Ozone Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey and New York Ozone... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is approving the ozone attainment demonstration portion of comprehensive... requirements for attaining the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard. EPA is approving...

  2. 77 FR 73570 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey and New York Ozone Attainment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...-0840, FRL-9761-7] Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Jersey and New York Ozone... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing action on the ozone attainment demonstration portion of... requirements for attaining the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard. EPA is proposing...

  3. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  4. 77 FR 30160 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... 1997 Ozone Standards for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... provides for the revocation of the 1997 ozone NAAQS for transportation conformity purposes to occur 1 year... Received C. Final Action VI. When is the EPA revoking the 1997 ozone NAAQS for transportation...

  5. 78 FR 44485 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements'' (June 6, 2013). The EPA is extending the...) and nitrogen oxides (NO X )) that contribute to ground-level ozone formation. B. What should...

  6. Development of KRISS standard reference photometer (SRP) for ambient ozone measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Lee, J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ozone has adverse impacts on human health and ecosystem. Accurate measurement of ambient ozone concentration is essential for developing effective mitigation strategies and understanding atmospheric chemistry. Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has developed new ozone standard reference photometers (SRPs) for the calibration of ambient ozone instruments. The basic principle of the KRISS ozone SRPs is to determine the absorption of ultraviolet radiation at a specific wavelength, 253.7 nm, by ozone in the atmosphere. Ozone concentration is calculated by converting UV transmittance through the Beer-Lambert Law. This study introduces the newly developed ozone SRPs and characterizes their performance through uncertainty analysis and comparison with BIPM (International Bureau of Weights and Measures) SRP.

  7. 78 FR 47572 - Disapproval of State Implementation Plan; Infrastructure Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, is not placed on the Internet...: Definitions For the purpose of this document, we are giving meaning to certain words or initials as...

  8. 78 FR 34903 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the SIP revision request to EPA on December 7... modeling and participated in the consultation process. The Federal Highway Administration and the...

  9. 78 FR 45188 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ..., mechanical or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., by... Protection Agency, T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; telephone number: (919)...

  10. 78 FR 32613 - Disapproval of State Implementation Plan; Infrastructure Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... agency certifies that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of... jurisdictions. For purposes of assessing the impacts of today's proposed rule on small entities, small entity is... its field. After considering the economic impacts of today's proposed rule on small entities,...

  11. 77 FR 30087 - Air Quality Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... 21, 2012 Part III Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 50, 51 and 81 Air Quality Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards; Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: Nonattainment Area Classifications Approach, Attainment Deadlines...

  12. Geostatistics as a validation tool for setting ozone standards for durum wheat.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Alessandra; Screpanti, Augusto; Paoletti, Elena

    2010-02-01

    Which is the best standard for protecting plants from ozone? To answer this question, we must validate the standards by testing biological responses vs. ambient data in the field. A validation is missing for European and USA standards, because the networks for ozone, meteorology and plant responses are spatially independent. We proposed geostatistics as validation tool, and used durum wheat in central Italy as a test. The standards summarized ozone impact on yield better than hourly averages. Although USA criteria explained ozone-induced yield losses better than European criteria, USA legal level (75 ppb) protected only 39% of sites. European exposure-based standards protected > or =90%. Reducing the USA level to the Canadian 65 ppb or using W126 protected 91% and 97%, respectively. For a no-threshold accumulated stomatal flux, 22 mmol m(-2) was suggested to protect 97% of sites. In a multiple regression, precipitation explained 22% and ozone explained <0.9% of yield variability.

  13. Regulatory Impact Analysis of the Final Revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ground-Level Ozone

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA performed an illustrative analysis of the potential costs, human health benefits, and welfare benefits of nationally attaining a revised primary ozone standard of 70 ppb and a primary alternative ozone standard level of 65 ppb.

  14. EPA Proposes to Move DFW Area into Severe Ozone Category

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Feb. 10, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed to reclassify the Dallas-Fort Worth area (DFW) as being in severe nonattainment of the original 8-hour ozone standard of 84 parts per billion. The proposal will be publ

  15. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  16. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  17. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  19. 75 FR 1566 - Public Hearings for Reconsideration of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... proposed rule, ``Reconsideration of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone,'' which was... the following Web site: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/ozone/s_o3_cr_fr.html for the...

  20. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  1. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  6. 2:30 PM EDT: EPA to Hold Media Call on Updated Ozone Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON- Today at 2:30 p.m. EDT, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy will hold a press call on the updated ozone standards. Exposure to ozone can harm the respiratory system (the upper airways and lungs), aggrav

  7. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  8. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  9. EPA Proposes to Redesignate Crittenden County, Ark., as Attaining the Ozone Standard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Jan. 28, 2016) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to approve the state of Arkansas' request to designate Crittenden County, Ark., as attaining the federal 2008 ozone standard. Crittenden County lies within the tri-

  10. PREDICTING THE IMPACT OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE ON ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES FOR SETTING NATIONAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act provides for establishing National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to protect public welfare (including crops, forests, ecosystems, and soils) from adverrse effects of air pollutants, including tropospheric ozone. The formulation of policies is science-bas...

  11. Ozone (O3) Standards - Policy Assessments from Current Review

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The policy assessment (PA) provides a transparent staff analysis of the scientific basis for alternative policy options for consideration by senior EPA management prior to rulemaking. These are the policy assessments used to develop the ozone NAAQS.

  12. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS....

  13. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS....

  14. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. (a) Determination of attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS....

  15. 40 CFR 52.1342 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1342...: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. EPA has determined, as of June 9, 2011, that the St. Louis (MO-IL) metropolitan 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This...

  16. 77 FR 65490 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Fredericksburg 8-Hour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia... Virginia's State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the Virginia Department of Environmental... model (MOVES2010a). The revised MVEBs continue to demonstrate maintenance of the 1997 8-hour...

  17. The path toward clean air: implementing new standards for ozone and fine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lydia Wegman; Erika Sasser

    2005-04-01

    Many areas in the United States have air pollution that exceeds the levels allowed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under its revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone and fine particles. This article provides an overview of the steps EPA and states are taking to implement the new standards. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Ozone emissions from a "personal air purifier".

    PubMed

    Phillips, T J; Bloudoff, D P; Jenkins, P L; Stroud, K R

    1999-01-01

    Ozone emissions were measured above a "personal air purifier" (PAP) designed to be worn on a lapel, shirt pocket, or neck strap. The device is being marketed as a negative ion generator that purifies the air. However, it also produces ozone within the person's immediate breathing zone. In order to assess worst-case potential human exposure to ozone at the mouth and nose, we measured ozone concentrations in separate tests at 1, 3, 5, and 6 in. above each of two PAPs in a closed office. One PAP was new, and one had been used slightly for 3 months. Temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, room ozone concentration, and outdoor ozone concentration also were measured concurrently during the tests. Average ozone levels measured directly above the individual PAPs ranged from 65-71 ppb at 6 in. above the device to 268-389 ppb at 1 in. above the device. Ozone emission rates from the PAPs were estimated to be 1.7-1.9 microg/minute. When house dust was sprinkled on the top grid of the PAPs, one showed an initial peak of 522 ppb ozone at 1 in., and then returned to the 200-400 ppb range. Room ozone levels increased by only 0-5 ppb during the tests. Even when two PAPs were left operating over a weekend, room ozone levels did not noticeably increase beyond background room ozone levels. These results indicate that this "PAP," even without significant background ozone, can potentially elevate the user's exposures to ozone levels greater than the health-based air quality standards for outdoor air in California (0.09 ppm, 1-hour average) and the United States (0.08 ppm, 8-hour average).

  19. 40 CFR 51.905 - How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NAAQS to the 1997 8-hour NAAQS and what are the anti-backsliding provisions? 51.905 Section 51.905... National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.905 How do areas transition from the 1-hour NAAQS to the 1997 8... implement the applicable requirements as defined in § 51.900(f), except as provided in paragraph...

  20. Standard Gibbs free energies of reactions of ozone with free radicals in aqueous solution: quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Sergej; von Sonntag, Clemens

    2011-11-01

    Free radicals are common intermediates in the chemistry of ozone in aqueous solution. Their reactions with ozone have been probed by calculating the standard Gibbs free energies of such reactions using density functional theory (Jaguar 7.6 program). O(2) reacts fast and irreversibly only with simple carbon-centered radicals. In contrast, ozone also reacts irreversibly with conjugated carbon-centered radicals such as bisallylic (hydroxycylohexadienyl) radicals, with conjugated carbon/oxygen-centered radicals such as phenoxyl radicals, and even with nitrogen- oxygen-, sulfur-, and halogen-centered radicals. In these reactions, further ozone-reactive radicals are generated. Chain reactions may destroy ozone without giving rise to products other than O(2). This may be of importance when ozonation is used in pollution control, and reactions of free radicals with ozone have to be taken into account in modeling such processes.

  1. 78 FR 52893 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 50, 51, 70 and 71 RIN 2060-AR34 Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements Correction In proposed rule...

  2. 78 FR 17197 - Adequacy Status of Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets in Submitted Ozone Maintenance Plan for San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... transportation activities will not produce new air quality violations, worsen existing violations, or delay... maintenance plan for the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard. As a result of our adequacy... conformity is required by Clean Air Act section 176(c). EPA's conformity rule requires that...

  3. Pulmonary Responses in Healthy Young Adults Exposed to Low Concentration of Ozone for 6.6 Hours with Mild Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rational: Recent studies have shown small but significant decreases in lung function following a prolonged exposure (6.6 hour) of healthy young adults to levels of ozone (0.08 ppm) near the current 8 hour standard. It is unclear, however, if such effects may be extended to concen...

  4. A survey of ozone concentrations in rural western Utah: unexpected results and spatial heterogeneity from 2010-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, S. J.; Harper, K.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone concentrations and meteorological variables were monitored at eleven sites in rural western Utah during late spring through summer of 2010-2013 to determine regional background concentrations of ozone and to determine attainment or nonattainment of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Ozone concentrations have been monitored along the Wasatch Front of Utah (Logan, Ogden, Salt Lake City and Provo) for 30 years by the Utah Division of Air Quality (DAQ), but no ozone data from outside the cities of Wasatch Front existed prior to 2010. All rural sites, except Badger Springs, west of St. George, UT, were in attainment of the ozone NAAQS, which is 75 ppb averaged over 8 hours. However, ozone concentrations were higher than expected at seven of the eleven sites. All eleven sites were located in either small rural towns or uninhabited areas of western Utah, which were distant from anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors. In 2010, ozone concentrations were relatively low along the Wasatch Front of Utah. Ozone concentrations exceeded 65 ppb for one day at three of four rural sites. Ozone concentrations at two of the four sites were generally in the range of expected rural ozone concentrations of 50-60 ppb. Ozone concentrations during 2011-2012 were higher throughout Utah compared to 2010. In 2011, 8-hour ozone concentrations exceeded 70 ppb for at least one day at four of five sites. The maximum 8-hour ozone concentration was 78 ppb, observed at Lytle Ranch, west of St. George, UT. Ozone concentrations at only one rural Utah site were in the expected range of 50-60 ppb. Ozone concentrations during 2012 were the highest observed during the four years of the study with 8-hour ozone concentrations exceeding 75 ppb at three of five rural sites and exceeding 70 ppb for at least four days at four of five sites. Although data collected was not considered regulatory by the EPA, the ozone NAAQS was exceeded at Badger Springs in southwestern Utah. Ozone

  5. An approach for evaluating the effectiveness of various ozone air quality standards for protecting trees.

    PubMed

    Hogsett, William E; Tingey, David T; Lee, E Henry; Beedlow, Peter A; Andersen, Christian P

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate an approach for evaluating the level of protection attained using a variety of forms and levels of past, current, and proposed Air Quality Standards (AQSs). The U.S. Clean Air Act requires the establishment of ambient air quality standards to protect health and public welfare. However, determination of attainment of these standards is based on ambient pollutant concentrations rather than prevention of adverse effects. To determine if a given AQS protected against adverse effects on vegetation, hourly ozone concentrations were adjusted to create exposure levels that "just attain" a given standard. These exposures were used in combination with a physiologically-based tree growth model to account for the interactions of climate and ozone. In the evaluation, we used ozone concentrations from two 6-year time periods from the San Bernardino Mountains in California. There were clear differences in the level of vegetation protection achieved with the various AQSs. Based on modeled plant growth, the most effective standards were the California 8-hr average maximum of 70 ppb and a seasonal, cumulative, concentration-weighted index (SUM06), which if attained, resulted in annual growth reductions of 1% or less. Least effective was the 1-hr maximum of 120 ppb which resulted in a 7% annual reduction. We conclude that combining climate, exposure scenarios, and a process-based plant growth simulator was a useful approach for evaluating effectiveness of current or proposed air quality standards, or evaluating the form and/or level of a standard based on preventing adverse growth effects.

  6. Potential Interference Bias in Ozone Standard Compliance Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leston, Alan R; Ollison, Will M; Spicer, Chester W; Satola, Jan

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a federal reference method (FRM) for ozone (O3) and allowed for designation of federal equivalent methods (FEMs). However, the ethylene-chemiluminescence FRM for O3 has been replaced by the UV photometric FEM by most state and local monitoring agencies because of its relative ease of operation. Accumulating evidence indicates that the FEM is prone to bias under the hot, humid, and stagnant conditions conducive to high O3 formation. This bias may lead to overreporting hourly O3 concentrations by as much as 20-40 ppb. Measurement bias is caused by contamination of the O3 scrubber, a problem that is not detected by dry air calibration. An adequate wet test has not been codified, although a procedure has been proposed for agency consideration. This paper includes documentation of laboratory tests quantifying specific interferant responses, collocated ambient FRM/FEM monitoring results, and smog chamber comparisons of the FRM and FEMs with alternative scrubber designs. As the numbers of reports on monitor interferences have grown, interested parties have called for agency recognition and correction of these biases.

  7. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  8. A direct sensitivity approach to predict hourly ozone resulting from compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standard.

    PubMed

    Simon, Heather; Baker, Kirk R; Akhtar, Farhan; Napelenok, Sergey L; Possiel, Norm; Wells, Benjamin; Timin, Brian

    2013-03-05

    In setting primary ambient air quality standards, the EPA's responsibility under the law is to establish standards that protect public health. As part of the current review of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), the US EPA evaluated the health exposure and risks associated with ambient ozone pollution using a statistical approach to adjust recent air quality to simulate just meeting the current standard level, without specifying emission control strategies. One drawback of this purely statistical concentration rollback approach is that it does not take into account spatial and temporal heterogeneity of ozone response to emissions changes. The application of the higher-order decoupled direct method (HDDM) in the community multiscale air quality (CMAQ) model is discussed here to provide an example of a methodology that could incorporate this variability into the risk assessment analyses. Because this approach includes a full representation of the chemical production and physical transport of ozone in the atmosphere, it does not require assumed background concentrations, which have been applied to constrain estimates from past statistical techniques. The CMAQ-HDDM adjustment approach is extended to measured ozone concentrations by determining typical sensitivities at each monitor location and hour of the day based on a linear relationship between first-order sensitivities and hourly ozone values. This approach is demonstrated by modeling ozone responses for monitor locations in Detroit and Charlotte to domain-wide reductions in anthropogenic NOx and VOCs emissions. As seen in previous studies, ozone response calculated using HDDM compared well to brute-force emissions changes up to approximately a 50% reduction in emissions. A new stepwise approach is developed here to apply this method to emissions reductions beyond 50% allowing for the simulation of more stringent reductions in ozone concentrations. Compared to previous rollback methods, this

  9. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General This appendix explains how to... associated examples are contained in the “Guideline for Interpretation of Ozone Air Quality Standards.”...

  14. 77 FR 64036 - Determination of Attainment of the 1-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS or standard), and to exclude certain 2008 data caused by wildfire exceptional events... occurred due to wildfire exceptional events in 2008.\\1\\ In making its proposed determination, EPA proposed... ozone exceptional events that are caused by wildfires. These air quality determinations were...

  15. 78 FR 34965 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8... Implementation Plan (SIP) to replace the previously approved motor vehicle emissions budgets with budgets developed using EPA's Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the...

  16. 75 FR 16456 - Adequacy Status of the Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX Maintenance Plan; 8-Hour Ozone Motor Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes. As a result of EPA's finding, the BPA area must use these budgets for future conformity determinations for...

  17. 78 FR 7429 - Adequacy Status of the Dallas-Fort Worth, TX Reasonable Further Progress 8-Hour Ozone Motor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Vehicle Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes. As a result of EPA's finding, the DFW area must use these budgets for future conformity determinations....

  18. 76 FR 28223 - Adequacy Status of the Baton Rouge, Louisiana Maintenance Plan 8-Hour Ozone Motor Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes. As a result of EPA's finding, the Baton Rouge area must use these budgets for future...

  19. 78 FR 34906 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Lima 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. Ohio submitted the SIP revision request to... consultation process. The Federal Highway Administration and the Ohio Department of Transportation have taken...

  20. 75 FR 47746 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Dallas/Fort Worth 1997 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... rulemaking for this reclassification, pursuant to section 182(b)(3)(A) of the Act. DATES: Comments must be...'' before submitting comments. E-mail: Mr. Guy Donaldson at donaldson.guy@epa.gov . Please also send a copy... nonattainment area. Section 181(b)(2)(A) of the Act requires that EPA determine, based on the area's...

  1. Ozone Basics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn the difference between good (stratospheric) and bad (tropospheric) ozone, how bad ozone affects our air quality, health, and environment, and what EPA is doing about it through regulations and standards.

  2. PREDICTING THE IMPACT OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE ON PLANTS AND ECOSYSTEMS AS A BASIS FOR SETTING NATIONAL AIR QUALITY STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act provides for establishing National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to protect public welfare (including crops, forests, ecosystems, and soils) from adverse effects of air pollutants, including tropospheric ozone. The formulation of policies is science-base...

  3. Correlations of beta-aminoisobutyric acid in 8 hour and 24 hour urinary samples determined by dual column gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sjölin, K E; Nyholm, K K

    1980-05-01

    The correlations of beta-aminoisobutyric acid values in 8 hour and 24 hour urinary samples from 23 healthy persons were determined. beta-AIB in the 8 hour urinary samples was measured by gas chromatography and the 24 hour excretion was calculated from the results of three 8 hour determinations. Simultaneous determinations of urinary creatinine were performed by Jaffe's reaction. Based on the 8 hour values of urinary beta-AIB the results demonstrated a constant excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid within the 24 hour periods in both low and high excretors. The precision in distinguishing low and high 24 hour excretors of beta-AIB by using 8 hour values was 91%. If 8 hour values of beta-AIB were related to creatinine the same precision for this calculated ratio was 96.5%. However, for high excretors of beta-AIB, failures were 24.5% by using the 8 hour excretion of beta-AIB as indicator, but only 6.5% by using the ratio.

  4. EPA Strengthens Ozone Standards to Protect Public Health/Science-based standards to reduce sick days, asthma attacks, emergency room visits, greatly outweigh costs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Based on extensive scientific evidence on effects that ground-level ozone pollution, or smog, has on public health and welfare, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has strengthened the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (

  5. Proposed standardized definitions for vertical resolution and uncertainty in the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature algorithms - Part 2: Ozone DIAL uncertainty budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; Sica, Robert J.; van Gijsel, Joanna A. E.; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Haefele, Alexander; Trickl, Thomas; Payen, Guillaume; Liberti, Gianluigi

    2016-08-01

    A standardized approach for the definition, propagation, and reporting of uncertainty in the ozone differential absorption lidar data products contributing to the Network for the Detection for Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) database is proposed. One essential aspect of the proposed approach is the propagation in parallel of all independent uncertainty components through the data processing chain before they are combined together to form the ozone combined standard uncertainty. The independent uncertainty components contributing to the overall budget include random noise associated with signal detection, uncertainty due to saturation correction, background noise extraction, the absorption cross sections of O3, NO2, SO2, and O2, the molecular extinction cross sections, and the number densities of the air, NO2, and SO2. The expression of the individual uncertainty components and their step-by-step propagation through the ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) processing chain are thoroughly estimated. All sources of uncertainty except detection noise imply correlated terms in the vertical dimension, which requires knowledge of the covariance matrix when the lidar signal is vertically filtered. In addition, the covariance terms must be taken into account if the same detection hardware is shared by the lidar receiver channels at the absorbed and non-absorbed wavelengths. The ozone uncertainty budget is presented as much as possible in a generic form (i.e., as a function of instrument performance and wavelength) so that all NDACC ozone DIAL investigators across the network can estimate, for their own instrument and in a straightforward manner, the expected impact of each reviewed uncertainty component. In addition, two actual examples of full uncertainty budget are provided, using nighttime measurements from the tropospheric ozone DIAL located at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Table Mountain Facility, California, and nighttime measurements from the JPL

  6. A Direct sensitivity approach to predict hourly ozone resulting from compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standard

    EPA Science Inventory

    In setting primary ambient air quality standards, the EPA’s responsibility under the law is to establish standards that protect public health. As part of the current review of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), the US EPA evaluated the health exposure and ...

  7. Does one size fit all? The suitability of standard ozone exposure metric conversion ratios and implications for epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G Brooke; Bell, Michelle L

    2010-01-01

    Several exposure metrics have been applied in health research and policy settings to represent ozone exposure, such as the 24 h average and daily 8 h maximum. Frequently, results calculated using one exposure metric are converted using a simple ratio to compare or combine findings with results using a different metric. This conversion, however, assumes that such a ratio is constant across locations and time periods. We investigated the appropriateness of this conversion method by examining the relationships among various forms of ozone concentrations (24 h average, daily 1 h maximum, and daily 8 h maximum) within and between communities for 78 US communities from 2000 to 2004 and compared results to commonly used conversion ratios. We explored whether the relationships between ozone exposure metrics differ by region, weather, season, and city-specific characteristics. Analysis revealed variation in the relationship among ozone metrics, both across communities and across time within individual communities, indicating that conversion of ozone exposure metrics with a standard ratio introduces uncertainty. For example, the average ratio of the daily 8 h maximum to the daily concentration ranged from 1.23 to 1.83. Within a community, days with higher ozone levels had lower ratios. Relationships among metrics within a community were associated with daily temperature. The community-average exposure metric ratios were lower for communities with higher long-term ozone levels. Ozone metric ratios differed by season because of the different rate of change of ozone metrics throughout the year. We recommend that health effects studies present results from multiple ozone exposure metrics, if possible. When conversions are necessary, more accurate estimates can be obtained using summaries of data for a given location and time period if available, or by basing conversion ratios on data from a similar city and season, such as the results provided in this study.

  8. Long-term changes in the total ozone mapping spectrometer relative to world primary standard Dobson spectrometer 83

    SciTech Connect

    McPeters, R.D. ); Komhyr, W.D. )

    1991-02-20

    The authors have examined the stability of the calibration of the Nimbus 7 solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) and total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instruments by comparing their ozone measurements with those made by a single, very stable Dobson instrument: the world primary standard Dobson spectrometer number 83. Measurements of ozone made with instrument 83 at Mauna Loa observatory in eight summers between 1979 and 1989 were compared with coincident TOMS ozone measurements. The comparison shows that relative to instrument 83, ozone measured by TOMS (and SBUV) was stable between 1979 and approximately 1983, had decreased by 3% by 1986, and had decreased by almost 7% by 1989. A similar time dependence is seen when data from an ensemble of 39 Dobson stations throughout the world is compared with TOMS over the period 1979-1987. The most likely reason for the relative drift is that the diffuser plate used by both SBUV and TOMS to measure solar flux has suffered an uncorrected wavelength dependent degradation, with most of the degradation occurring after 1983. The recently released version 6 TOMS data, corrected using the internal pair justification technique, show almost no drift relative to Dobson instrument 83. The authors conclude from these comparisons that accurate measurements of long-term global ozone change will require a coherent system incorporating both ground based and satellite based ozone measurements.

  9. Important considerations for establishing a secondary ozone standard to protect vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Lefohn, A.S. ); Runeckles, V.C. ); Krupa, S.V. ); Shadwick, D.S. )

    1989-08-01

    Based on recent evidence published in the literature, as well as retrospective studies using data from the National Crop Loss Assessment Network (NCLAN), cumulative indices can be used to describe exposures of ozone for predicting agricultural crop effects. However, the mathematical form of the standard that may be proposed to protect crops does not necessarily have to be of the same form as that used in the statistical or process oriented mathematical models that relate ambient ozone exposures with vegetation effects. This paper discusses the limitations associated with applying a simple statistic that may take the place of a more biologically meaningful exposure parameter. While the NCLAN data have been helpful in identifying identifying indices that may be appropriate for establishing exposure-response relationships, the limitations associated with the NCLAN protocol need to be considered when attempting to apply these relationships in the establishment of a secondary national ambient air quality standard. The Weibull model derived from NCLAN experiments must demonstrate its generality and universal applicability. Furthermore, its predictive power must be tested using independent sets of field data.

  10. Are the elements of the proposed ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards informed by the best available science?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Sax, Sonja N; Lange, Sabine; Rhomberg, Lorenz R

    2015-06-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) issues National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six criteria pollutants, including ozone. Each standard has four elements: an indicator, level, averaging time, and form. Ozone levels (i.e., air concentrations) alone in scientific studies are not directly comparable to the "level" element of the NAAQS because the standard considers the level in the context of its relation to the remaining elements. Failure to appreciate this has led to misunderstandings regarding NAAQS that would be health-protective. This can be seen with controlled human ozone exposure studies, which often involved small numbers of people exercising quasi-continuously for a long duration at an intensity not common in the general population (and unlikely achievable by most sensitive individuals), under worst-case exposure profiles. In addition, epidemiology studies have used different averaging times and have had methodological limitations that may have biased results. Such considerations can make it difficult to compare ozone levels and results across studies and to appropriately apply them in a NAAQS evaluation. Relating patterns and circumstances of exposure, and exposure measurements, to all elements of the NAAQS can be challenging, but if US EPA fully undertook this, it would be evident that available evidence does not indicate that proposed lower ozone standards would be more health protective than the current one.

  11. Development of a sensitive passive sampler using indigotrisulfonate for the determination of tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew George; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves

    2010-06-01

    A new sampling and analytical design for measurement of ambient ozone is presented. The procedure is based on ozone absorption and decoloration (at 600 nm) of indigotrisulfonate dye, where ozone adds itself across the carbon-carbon double bond of the indigo. A mean relative standard deviation of 8.6% was obtained using samplers exposed in triplicate, and a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.957 was achieved in parallel measurements using the samplers and a commercial UV ozone instrument. The devices were evaluated in a measurement campaign, mapping spatial and temporal trends of ozone concentrations in a region of southeast Brazil strongly influenced by seasonal agricultural biomass burning, with associated emissions of ozone precursors. Ozone concentrations were highest in rural areas and lowest at an urban site, due to formation during downwind transport and short-term depletion due to titration with nitric oxide. Ozone concentrations showed strong seasonal trends, due to the influences of precursor emissions, relative humidity and solar radiation intensity. Advantages of the technique include ease and speed of use, the ready availability of components, and excellent sensitivity. Achievable temporal resolution of ozone concentrations is 8 hours at an ambient ozone concentration of 3.8 ppb, or 2 hours at a concentration of 15.2 ppb.

  12. 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Findings of Failure to Submit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This final action finds that 15 states and the District of Columbia have failed to submit specific state implementation plan (SIP) elements to satisfy certain nonattainment area, and/or Ozone Transport Region (OTR), planning requirements for the 2008 ozone

  13. 2015 Revision to 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Supporting Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find tools for background ozone, maps of nonattainment areas, an overview of the proposal, and information on designations, monitoring and permitting requirements and a presentation on the 2015 ozone NAAQS revision.

  14. 2014 Proposed Revision to 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Supporting Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find information on the 2014 proposed ozone NAAQS revision, and find tools for background ozone, maps of nonattainment areas, an overview of the proposal, and information on designations, monitoring and permitting requirements

  15. Estimating potential productivity cobenefits for crops and trees from reduced ozone with U.S. coal power plant carbon standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, Shannon L.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Fakhraei, Habibollah; Templer, Pamela H.; Craig, Kenneth J.; Milford, Jana B.; Lambert, Kathleen F.

    2016-12-01

    A standard for carbon dioxide emissions from power plants in the United States, known as the Clean Power Plan, has been finalized by the Environmental Protection Agency. Decreases in carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion have the potential cobenefit of reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen, which contribute to the formation of ground-level ozone. Emissions of ozone precursors may result in elevated ozone concentrations nearby or downwind. Chronic exposure of sensitive vegetation to tropospheric ozone reduces its potential productivity. To evaluate the cobenefits of the Clean Power Plan to sensitive vegetation, we estimate ozone concentrations in the continental U.S. in 2020 with a chemical transport model in accordance with reference and alternative Clean Power Plan policy scenarios, which represent a range of possible approaches to reducing carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. The reductions in biomass, or the potential productivity losses, due to the exposure of 4 crops and 11 tree species to ozone are as large as 1.9% and 32%, respectively, in the reference scenario. The least stringent policy scenario reduces these losses by less than 3% for any given species; however, the scenarios consistent with policies resulting in more rigorous nitrogen oxide reductions produce potential productivity losses lower than the reference scenario by as much as 16% and 13% for individual crops or tree species, respectively. This analysis affords the opportunity to consider public welfare cobenefits of a regulation that is designed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.

  16. OZONE TOXICOLOGY: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES OF HTE SCIENCE THAT SHAPED THE REGULATORY STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone can be found in essentially all locations in the troposphere. Too much exposure of vegetation and humans to this potent oxidizing gas can prove toxic. Reports of human toxicity to ozone first appeared in the 1800's from accidental occupational exposures when ozone was fir...

  17. Using the World Primary Standard Dobson Spectrometer to Monitor the Stability of a Multi-Instrument Satellite Ozone Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, R.D.; Oltmans, Samuel J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is creating a long term satellite ozone time series by combining data from multiple instruments: Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) (1978 - 1993), Meteor 3 TOMS (1991 - 1994), Earth Probe TOMS (1996 - present), Nimbus 7 SB-JV (1978 - 1990), NOAA-9 Solar Backscatter UV Spectrometer (SBUV/2) (1984 - 1997), NOAA-11 SBUV/2 (1989 - 1994), and NOAA-14 SBUV/2 (1995 - present). The stability of individual data sets and possible instrument-to-instrument differences are best checked by comparison with ground-based measurements. We have examined the time dependence of the calibrations of these instruments by comparing satellite derived ozone with that measured by the world primary standard Dobson spectrometer No. 83. This instrument has been maintained since 1962 as a standard for total ozone to an uncertainty of plus or minus 0.5%. Measurements of AD pair ozone made with instrument No. 83 at Mauna Loa observatory most summers since 1979 were compared with coincident TOMS and SBUV(/2) ozone measurements. The comparison shows that the various instruments were stable relative to instrument No. 83 to within about plus or minus 1%, but that there are instrument-to-instrument biases of as much as 3%. Earth Probe TOMS, for example, is 1% to 2% high relative to Nimbus 7 TOMS when the world standard instrument is used as a transfer standard. Similar results are seen when comparisons are made with an ensemble of 41 Dobson stations throughout the world, demonstrating that the ensemble as a whole is stable despite the fact that many instruments within the ensemble have clear calibration changes.

  18. Comparison of UV/ozone cleaning of platinum/iridium kilogram mass standards with nettoyage-lavage cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, James; Davidson, Stuart; Barat, Pauline; Davis, Richard

    2011-06-01

    A cleaning method using ultraviolet activated ozone has been developed at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). A comparison to test the effectiveness of this cleaning method with nettoyage-lavage cleaning on platinum-iridium artefacts and kilogram mass standards was undertaken at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Three cleaning trials were performed to compare the effectiveness of the two methods at removing natural, medium and heavy levels of surface contamination. Both the ultraviolet light/ozone method and the nettoyage-lavage method successfully removed both natural levels and medium levels of surface contamination. However, in the medium contamination trial nettoyage-lavage cleaning removed additional mass from the Pt/Ir mass standard under test that could not be accounted for in terms of surface contamination. In the heavy contamination trial nettoyage-lavage cleaning successfully removed most of the contamination from the surface of the contaminated Pt/Ir mass standard. The ultraviolet light/ozone method removed about two thirds of the surface contamination and therefore for heavily contaminated mass standards it is advisable to pre-clean them with a solvent before ultraviolet/ozone cleaning.

  19. Effects of light duty gasoline vehicle emission standards in the United States on ozone and particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Lindhjem, Chris; DenBleyker, Allison; Nopmongcol, Uarporn; Grant, John; Tai, Edward; Yarwood, Greg

    2012-12-01

    More stringent motor vehicle emission standards are being considered in the United States to attain national air quality standards for ozone and PM2.5. We modeled past, present and potential future US emission standards for on-road gasoline-fueled light duty vehicles (including both cars and light trucks) (LDVs) to assess incremental air quality benefits in the eastern US in 2022. The modeling results show that large benefits in ozone and PM2.5 (up to 16 ppb (14%) reductions in daily maximum 8-h ozone, up to 10 ppb (11%) reductions in the monthly mean of daily maximum 8-h ozone, up to 4.5 μg m-3 (9%) reductions in maximum 24-h PM2.5 and up to 2.1 μg m-3 (10%) reductions in the monthly mean PM2.5) accrued from the transition from Tier 1 to Tier 2 standards. However, the implementation of additional nationwide LDV controls similar to draft proposed California LEV III regulations would result in very small additional improvements in air quality by 2022 (up to 0.3 ppb (0.3%) reductions in daily maximum 8-h ozone, up to 0.2 ppb (0.2%) reductions in the monthly mean of daily maximum 8-h ozone, up to 0.1 μg m-3 (0.5%) reductions in maximum 24-h PM2.5 and up to 0.1 μg m-3 (0.5%) reductions in the monthly mean PM2.5). The complete elimination of gasoline-fueled LDV emissions in 2022 is predicted to result in improvements in air quality (up to 7 ppb (8%) reductions in daily maximum 8-h ozone, up to 4 ppb (6%) reductions in the monthly mean of daily maximum 8-h ozone, up to 2.8 μg m-3 (7%) reductions in maximum 24-h PM2.5 and up to 1.8 μg m-3 (8%) reductions in the monthly mean PM2.5) from Tier 2 levels, that are generally smaller than the improvements obtained in switching from Tier 1 to Tier 2.

  20. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Georgia § 52.582 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Approval... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  2. 40 CFR 52.523 - Control strategy: Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone 52.523 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Florida § 52.523 Control strategy: Ozone (a) Disapproval. EPA is disapproving portions of Florida's infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  4. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1779 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1779... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  7. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Georgia § 52.582 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Approval... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40...

  8. 40 CFR 52.582 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.582 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Georgia § 52.582 Control strategy: Ozone. (a) Approval... area has attaining data for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40...

  9. 40 CFR 52.523 - Control strategy: Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone 52.523 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Florida § 52.523 Control strategy: Ozone (a) Disapproval. EPA is disapproving portions of Florida's infrastructure SIP for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS...

  10. 40 CFR 52.2125 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2125... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination of attaining data. EPA has determined, as of November 15, 2011, the bi... for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. This determination, in accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, suspends...

  11. Ozone (O3) Standards - Other Technical Documents from the Current Review

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These memoranda were each sent in to the Ozone NAAQS Review Docket, EPA-HQ-OAR-2008-0699, after the proposed rule was published. They present technical data on the methods, monitoring stations, and metrics used to estimate ozone concentrations.

  12. Fact Sheets on Review of National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone Staff Papers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The second draft Staff Paper points to an expanded body of health effects evidence suggesting a wide range of adverse health effects associated with exposure to ambient ozone. This is part of the process for review of the NAAQS for ground-level ozone.

  13. 77 FR 26441 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Charlotte; Ozone 2002 Base...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Charlotte; Ozone... rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve the ozone 2002 base year emissions... ozone attainment demonstration that was submitted for the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air...

  14. Cerebral blood flow determination within the first 8 hours of cerebral infarction using stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.L.; Yonas, H.; Gur, D.; Latchaw, R.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow mapping with stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe/CT) was performed in conjunction with conventional computed tomography (CT) within the first 8 hours after the onset of symptoms in seven patients with cerebral infarction. Six patients had hemispheric infarctions, and one had a progressive brainstem infarction. Three patients with very low (less than 10 ml/100 g/min) blood flow in an anatomic area appropriate for the neurologic deficit had no clinical improvement by the time of discharge from the hospital; follow-up CT scans of these three patients confirmed infarction in the area of very low blood flow. Three patients with moderate blood flow reductions (15-45 ml/100 g/min) in the appropriate anatomic area had significant clinical improvement from their initial deficits and had normal follow-up CT scans. One patient studied 8 hours after stroke had increased blood flow (hyperemia) in the appropriate anatomic area and made no clinical recovery.

  15. Emission reductions and urban ozone responses under more stringent US standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Nicole; Emery, Chris; Jung, Jaegun; Sakulyanontvittaya, Tanarit; Hebert, Laura; Blewitt, Doug; Yarwood, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We use a photochemical grid model instrumented with the high-order Decoupled Direct Method (HDDM) to evaluate the response of ozone (O3) to reductions in US-wide anthropogenic emissions, and to estimate emission reductions necessary to meet more stringent National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for O3. We simulate hourly O3 response to nationwide reductions in nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions throughout 2006 and compare O3 responses in 4 US cities: Los Angeles, Sacramento, St. Louis, and Philadelphia. We compare O3 responses between NOx-rich, O3-inhibited urban core sites and NOx-sensitive, higher O3 suburban sites and analyze projected O3 frequency distributions, which can be used to drive health effect models. We find that 2006 anthropogenic NOx and VOC emissions must be reduced by 60-70% to reach annual 4th highest (H4) maximum daily 8-h (MDA8) O3 of 75 ppb (the current US standard) in Sacramento, St. Louis, and Philadelphia, and by 80-85% to reach an H4 MDA8 of 60 ppb. Los Angeles requires larger emissions reductions and achieves an H4 MDA8 of 75 ppb with 92% reductions and 60 ppb with 97% reductions. As emissions are reduced, hourly and MDA8 frequency distributions tend toward mid-level background distributions. Mid-level O3 exposure is an important driver of O3 health impacts calculated by epidemiological models. A significant fraction (at least 48%) of summertime integrated MDA8 O3 at all sites remains after complete elimination of US anthropogenic NOx and VOC emissions, implying that mid-level O3 exposure due to background will become more important as domestic precursor emissions are controlled.

  16. Role of Concentration and Time of Day in Developing Ozone Exposure Indices for a Secondary Standard.

    PubMed

    Lee, E H; Hogsett, W E

    1999-06-01

    Evidence from exposure-response studies and a turbulent transfer model demonstrate that plant response is differential to concentration, duration, temporal pattern, and time of day of exposure. Reductions in productivity of crops and trees as seedlings are greater when plants are exposed to higher daytime ozone (O3) concentrations (0800-2000 hr standard time) or for longer durations. Primary evidence on the greater role of concentration comes from exposure-response experiments where plants are exposed to a series of pollutant concentrations in open-top chambers under field conditions. These studies demonstrate that the integrated exposure indices that give preferential weight to higher concentrations are better predictors of response than mean or peak indices. Evidence suggesting that mid-range O3 concentrations (0.05-0.09 parts per million, ppm) play a greater role than higher concentrations (>0.09 ppm) in biological response could not be justified. The time of day when O3 concentrations and atmospheric and stomatal conductances of gas exchange are optimal is a key to understanding plant response because plants respond only to O3 entering the leaf via stomata. A turbulent transfer model that describes the resistance of pollutant gas exchange from the atmosphere to the boundary layer of a forest canopy, as a function of micrometeorological variables, is developed to determine when flux of O3 is optimal. Based on meteorological and ambient air quality monitoring data at remote forest sites in the United States, it appears that O3 flux densities to the forest boundary layer are optimal during the 0800-2000 hr window. It is concluded that descriptors of ambient air quality for use in setting a federal standard should (1) cumulate hourly O3 concentrations, (2) give preferential weight to daytime concentrations between 0800 and 2000 hr, and (3) give preferential weight to higher O3 concentrations.

  17. Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Known as tropospheric or ground-level ozone, this gas is harmful to human heath and the environment. Since it forms from emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), these pollutants are regulated under air quality standards.

  18. Ozone and plants: need for a biologically based air quality standard.

    PubMed

    Manning, William J

    2002-02-01

    For the past 10 years, I have spent parts of late July and early August in central Europe, assessing ozone injury symptom expression on native plants in upland meadows and along forest edges. Much of this work has been done with local colleagues in and near the Tatra Mountains in southern Poland and eastern Slovakia and in the Carpathian Mountains in western Ukraine. Active and passive ozone air monitors and samplers were also used at most of the study sites.

  19. Control strategy optimization for attainment and exposure mitigation: case study for ozone in Macon, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Daniel S; Tian, Di; Hu, Yongtao; Russell, Armistead G

    2006-09-01

    Implementation of more stringent 8-hour ozone standards has led the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to designate nonattainment status to 474 counties nationwide, many of which had never previously violated air quality standards. As states select emission control measures to achieve attainment in these regions, their choices pose significant implications to local economies and the health of their citizens. Considering a case study of one such nonattainment region, Macon, Georgia, we develop a menu of potential controls that could be implemented locally or in neighboring parts of the state. The control menu offers the potential to control about 20-35% of ozone precursor emissions in most Georgia regions, but marginal costs increase rapidly beyond 15-20%. We link high-order ozone sensitivities with the control menu to identify cost-optimized strategies for achieving attainment and for alternative goals such as reducing spatially averaged or population-weighted ozone concentrations. Strategies targeted toward attainment of Macon ozone would prioritize local reductions of nitrogen oxides, whereas controls in the more densely populated Atlanta region are shown to be more effective for reducing statewide potential population exposure to ozone. A U.S. EPA-sanctioned approach for demonstrating ozone attainment with photochemical models is shown to be highly dependent on the choice of a baseline period and may not foster optimal strategies for assuring attainment and protecting human health.

  20. Standardizing Interfaces for External Access to Data and Processing for the NASA Ozone Product Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt A.; Fleig, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's traditional science data processing systems have focused on specific missions, and providing data access, processing and services to the funded science teams of those specific missions. Recently NASA has been modifying this stance, changing the focus from Missions to Measurements. Where a specific Mission has a discrete beginning and end, the Measurement considers long term data continuity across multiple missions. Total Column Ozone, a critical measurement of atmospheric composition, has been monitored for'decades on a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments. Some important European missions also monitor ozone, including the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and SCIAMACHY. With the U.S.IEuropean cooperative launch of the Dutch Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA Aura satellite, and the GOME-2 instrumental on MetOp, the ozone monitoring record has been further extended. In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NASA is now preparing to evaluate data and algorithms for the next generation Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) which will launch on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) in 2010. NASA is constructing the Science Data Segment (SDS) which is comprised of several elements to evaluate the various NPP data products and algorithms. The NPP SDS Ozone Product Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE) will build on the heritage of the TOMS and OM1 mission based processing systems. The overall measurement based system that will encompass these efforts is the Atmospheric Composition Processing System (ACPS). We have extended the system to include access to publically available data sets from other instruments where feasible, including non-NASA missions as appropriate. The heritage system was largely monolithic providing a very controlled processing flow from data.ingest of

  1. Unraveling the sources of ground level ozone in the Intermountain Western United States using Pb isotopes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, John N; Weiss-Penzias, Peter; Fine, Rebekka; McDade, Charles E; Trzepla, Krystyna; Brown, Shaun T; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-10-15

    Ozone as an atmospheric pollutant is largely produced by anthropogenic precursors and can significantly impact human and ecosystem health, and climate. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently proposed lowering the ozone standard from 75 ppbv (MDA8 = Maximum Daily 8-Hour Average) to between 65 and 70 ppbv. This will result in remote areas of the Intermountain West that includes many U.S. National Parks being out of compliance, despite a lack of significant local sources. We used Pb isotope fingerprinting and back-trajectory analysis to distinguish sources of imported ozone to Great Basin National Park in eastern Nevada. During discrete Chinese Pb events (> 1.1 ng/m(3) & > 80% Asian Pb) trans-Pacific transported ozone was 5 ± 5.5 ppbv above 19 year averages for those dates. In contrast, concentrations during regional transport from the Los Angeles and Las Vegas areas were 15 ± 2 ppbv above the long-term averages, and those characterized by high-altitude transport 3 days prior to sampling were 19 ± 4ppbv above. However, over the study period the contribution of trans-Pacific transported ozone increased at a rate of 0.8 ± 0.3 ppbv/year, suggesting that Asian inputs will exceed regional and high altitude sources by 2015-2020. All of these sources will impact regulatory compliance with a new ozone standard, given increasing global background.

  2. Spatial and temporal patterns of ozone in the high elevation ecosystems of the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptzin, D.; Helmig, D.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is regulated by the US EPA to protect human health and welfare. Because the precursors to ozone formation largely come from transportation and industrial activity, ozone has typically been thought of as an urban pollution problem. However, there is growing concern about increased ozone concentrations in rural areas. Surprisingly high ozone concentrations have been measured in the high elevation Rocky Mountain ecosystems in the Front Range of Colorado. The annual median ozone mixing ratios over the past decade at three high elevation monitoring stations ranged from 47 to 53 ppbv. The hourly ozone mixing ratio typically exceeds 100 ppbv at some point every year at these sites. The number of days where the ozone mixing ratio exceeded the current 8 hour US EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppb has ranged from 0 to 25 since 1987 at the monitoring site in Rocky Mountain National Park. A comparison with lower elevation sites suggests that ozone mixing ratios generally increase with elevation. In addition, the diurnal and seasonal variability of ozone decreases with elevation. Along an elevational gradient from the plains to the tundra, the tundra site had the highest median values and the least variability of any site. The seasonal pattern at these high elevation sites is also distinct as the maximum mixing ratios occur in the spring in contrast to the summer maximum typically observed in urban areas. While there have been relatively small changes in concentration in the measured data record going back a few decades, modeling suggests that ozone mixing ratios have almost doubled over the last one hundred years in Colorado. A plethora of studies has shown that elevated ozone damages foliage, with sensitive species showing effect at levels exceeding 35-40 ppbv. Since ozone levels in these high elevation ecosystems are clearly above that, we believe that they have been and will continue to be severely affected by elevated ozone. It is not

  3. Transatlantic transport of pollution and its effects on surface ozone in Europe and North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinbin; Jacob, Daniel J.; Bey, Isabelle; Palmer, Paul I.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Field, Brendan D.; Martin, Randall V.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Yantosca, Robert M.; Parrish, David D.; Simmonds, Peter G.; Oltmans, Samuel J.

    2002-07-01

    We examine the transatlantic transport of anthropogenic ozone and its impact on surface ozone in Europe and North America by using a 5-year (1993-1997) simulation with the GEOS-CHEM global three-dimensional model of tropospheric chemistry. Long-term time series of ozone and CO at Mace Head (Ireland) and Sable Island (Canada) are used to evaluate transatlantic transport in the model. North American anthropogenic emissions contribute on average 5 ppbv to surface ozone at Mace Head, and up to 10-20 ppbv during transatlantic transport events, which are forerunners of broader events in Europe. These events are associated with low-level westerly flow driven by an intense Icelandic low between Iceland and the British Isles. North American influence on ozone at Mace Head is strongly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), implying that the NAO index can be used to forecast transatlantic transport of North American pollution to Europe. European anthropogenic emissions contribute on average less than 2 ppbv to surface ozone at Sable Island but up to 5-10 ppbv during transatlantic transport events. These events are associated with low-level easterly flow established by anomalous low pressure at 45°N over the North Atlantic. North American anthropogenic emissions enhance surface ozone in continental Europe by 2-4 ppbv on average in summer and by 5-10 ppbv during transatlantic transport events; transport in the boundary layer and subsidence from the free troposphere are both important mechanisms. We find in the model that 20% of the violations of the European Council ozone standard (55 ppbv, 8-hour average) in the summer of 1997 over Europe would not have occurred in the absence of anthropogenic emissions from North America. North American influence on surface ozone in Europe is particularly strong at the thresholds used for the European standards (55-65 ppbv).

  4. 40 CFR 52.2043 - Control strategy for maintenance plans: ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: ozone. 52.2043 Section 52.2043 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Control strategy for maintenance plans: ozone. (a) As of December 26, 2013, EPA approves the following... (VOCs) for the Lancaster 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Area submitted by the Secretary of...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2052 - Motor vehicle emissions budgets for Pennsylvania ozone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pennsylvania ozone areas. 52.2052 Section 52.2052 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...) Pennsylvania § 52.2052 Motor vehicle emissions budgets for Pennsylvania ozone areas. (a) As of December 26... nitrogen oxides (NOX) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for the Lancaster 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

  6. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components. These results demonstrate that exposure to low ambient concentrations of ozone, near the current. National Ambient Air Quality Standard, induces pulmonary lesions

  7. Intercomparison of ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration techniques for ozone reference standards at ambient levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Mukai, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Shigeru; Norris, James E.

    2006-08-01

    Intercomparison experiments were made between two independent techniques for ozone (O3) reference standards often used as the primary standards in air quality monitoring networks. These techniques include ultraviolet absorption photometry of O3 at the 253.7-nm Hg line and gas-phase titration of O3 with excess NO. For ultraviolet photometry, a well-designed and maintained standard reference photometer (SRP) built by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) was employed. For gas-phase titration (GPT), an existing system was significantly modified by the National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan) by using gravimetric NO/N2 standard gases, accurate flow measurement systems based on laminar flow elements, and two chemiluminescence NO detectors to minimize uncertainty in the measurements, which had previously been a major shortcoming of this method. Uncertainty in the improved GPT system was reduced to less than 0.4% above 100 nmol mol-1 O3 mole fraction. A series of comparison runs between the two methods over the course of 13 months from August 2004 to August 2005 showed a significant discrepancy, which cannot be explained by the measurement uncertainties attributed to either SRP or GPT in the range of 80-800 nmol mol-1 O3, where GPT was about 2% higher than SRP. This result indicates possible biases in the currently existing O3 reference standards and warrants further studies to identify and characterize possible sources of the systematic discrepancy.

  8. 77 FR 51798 - First Draft Documents Related to the Review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Ozone AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of extension of comment period... documents titled, Health Risk and Exposure Assessment for Ozone, First External Review Draft; Welfare Risk and Exposure Assessment for Ozone, First External Review Draft; and Policy Assessment for the...

  9. Impacts of extra-regional pollutants on summertime California ozone levels and the implications on the secondary ozone standard design values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Kulkarni, S.; Spak, S.; Chai, T.; Pierce, R.

    2011-12-01

    Transported ozone (O3) from outside of the North America (NA) as well as the lower stratospheric O3 (referred to as extra-regional O3 in this paper), together with the locally-formed O3 from anthropogenic and natural emissions, affect the O3 variability over California. Quantification of the contributions from these sources is important as it helps define national emission reductions strategies. The impact of extra-regional anthropogenic and fire sources on California surface air quality during summer 2008 is evaluated using a multi-scale STEM modeling system. Several forward sensitivity simulations are conducted to estimate the contributions of extra-regional O3 and precursors on California O3 levels, indicating the direct transport of O3 through the model boundaries is the largest single extra-regional contributor, and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) plays an important role among several precursors. Weak impacts from stratospheric O3 are shown during this period. The impacts of extra-regional pollution from each of these contributing factors present regional differences over California and other western US states. The O3 sensitivity to extra-regional pollution is also compared with a sensitivity simulation with local emissions perturbed. The secondary O3 standard design value is the 3-year average of the annual maximum consecutive 3-month sum of adjusted monthly W126 index values, and is recommended to be set at a level in the range of 7 to 21 ppm-hours. Many of the areas violate the proposed secondary O3 standard without violating the primary O3 standard are located in rural areas due to long-range transport of O3 and its precursors. Here we calculate the sensitivity of monthly-based W126 index to extra-regional pollution based on the model forward sensitivity simulations. The surface O3 sensitivity to trans-boundary pollution over California is further interpreted by trajectories and adjoint sensitivity analysis. Probability of airmasses originating from northern

  10. AN APPROACH FOR EVALUATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VARIOUS OZONE AIR QUALITY STANDARDS FOR PROTECTING TREES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate an approach for evaluating the level of protection attained using a variety of forms and levels of past, current, and proposed Air Quality Standards (AQSs). The U.S. Clean Air Act requires the establishment of ambient air quality standards to protect health and pub...

  11. OZONE AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARD HAS BENEFICIAL EFFECT ON PONDEROSA PINE IN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air quality standards and control strategies are implemented to protect humans and vegetation from adverse effects. However, to date there has not been a simple and objective method to determine if the standards and resultant control strategies have reduced O3 impacts on ...

  12. Direct assessment of international consistency of standards for ground-level ozone: strategy and implementation toward metrological traceability network in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, H; Mukai, H; Sawa, Y; Matsueda, H; Yonemura, S; Wang, T; Poon, S; Wong, A; Lee, G; Jung, J Y; Kim, K R; Lee, M H; Lin, N H; Wang, J L; Ou-Yang, C F; Wu, C F; Akimoto, H; Pochanart, P; Tsuboi, K; Doi, H; Zellweger, C; Klausen, J

    2007-11-01

    An international exercise to directly assess consistency of standards for ground-level ozone in East Asia was conducted as part of the East Asian Regional Experiment 2005 (EAREX 2005) in the framework of the Atmospheric Brown Clouds (ABC) project. Ten organizations collaboratively participated in the intercomparison. Four groups representing Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, and Taiwan made comparisons at the Gosan super observatory, Jeju Island, Korea, in March 2005, with ozone instruments calibrated to their national standards, and four Japanese groups made off-site comparisons with laboratory-level standards. All comparisons generally indicated good agreement with the standard reference photometer (SRP) 35, built by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA) and maintained by the National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan). The assessment was expanded to measurement networks contributing to the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmospheric Watch (WMO/GAW) program as part of off-site comparisons, and excellent agreement was achieved. These efforts contribute to propagating traceability of the national metrology standards among the atmospheric science community, to ensuring comparability of the existing ozone measurements, and to establishing an integrated network of air quality monitoring in Asia.

  13. Surface ozone background in the United States: Canadian and Mexican pollution influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqun; Jacob, Daniel J.; Le Sager, Philippe; Streets, David G.; Park, Rokjin J.; Gilliland, Alice B.; van Donkelaar, A.

    We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) with 1° × 1° horizontal resolution to quantify the effects of anthropogenic emissions from Canada, Mexico, and outside North America on daily maximum 8-hour average ozone concentrations in US surface air. Simulations for summer 2001 indicate mean North American and US background concentrations of 26 ± 8 ppb and 30 ± 8 ppb, as obtained by eliminating anthropogenic emissions in North America vs. in the US only. The US background never exceeds 60 ppb in the model. The Canadian and Mexican pollution enhancement averages 3 ± 4 ppb in the US in summer but can be occasionally much higher in downwind regions of the northeast and southwest, peaking at 33 ppb in upstate New York (on a day with 75 ppb total ozone) and 18 ppb in southern California (on a day with 68 ppb total ozone). The model is successful in reproducing the observed variability of ozone in these regions, including the occurrence and magnitude of high-ozone episodes influenced by transboundary pollution. We find that exceedances of the 75 ppb US air quality standard in eastern Michigan, western New York, New Jersey, and southern California are often associated with Canadian and Mexican pollution enhancements in excess of 10 ppb. Sensitivity simulations with 2020 emission projections suggest that Canadian pollution influence in the Northeast US will become comparable in magnitude to that from domestic power plants.

  14. An Inter-Regional Comparison of Ozone Sensitivity to Reductions in Emissions in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, S.; Tanrikulu, S.; Tran, C.; Jia, Y.; Beaver, S.; Matsuoka, J.; Cordova, J.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of ozone precursors NOx and VOC have declined significantly in central California over the past 60 years due to rigorous emission control programs, with 40 to 50 percent reductions achieved from 1990 to 2010 alone. Three major air basins, however, are still designated as nonattainment areas for the federal 8-hour ozone standard: the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA), Sacramento area and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Historically, ozone response to reductions in emissions varied from region to region. While the maximum hourly ozone concentrations have declined significantly in all three air basins, the locations of maximum ozone shifted. Some exceedance areas came into compliance with the standard while new areas started exceeding the standard. Some areas did not significantly respond to reductions in emissions. To meet the current ozone standard, additional emission reductions are needed. Further emission reductions above and beyond the goal of meeting the current standard will be needed if the EPA lowers the current standard. In an effort to help planners and decision makers, we have been conducting a modeling study to better understand how ozone may respond to future emission reductions in the region. In this initial phase of the study, we used the WRF-CMAQ modeling system to simulate ozone for July 12-28, 2006, a representative high ozone period for all three air basins. With the selected high grid resolution and optimum model setup, the model performance for the base case simulation was exceptionally good. Statistical agreement with observations was better than most previously applied models in the region. We performed a number of sensitivity simulations by reducing anthropogenic VOC or NOx emissions separately or together 10-60 percent at 10 percent intervals uniformly across the board and prepared EKMA diagrams at observation stations. We found that a 60 percent reduction in VOC and NOx emissions reduced the maximum ozone by 20-30 percent in the

  15. Identifying ozone production from oil and gas versus urban emissions sources in the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Zaragoza, J.; Abeleira, A.; Flocke, F. M.; Farmer, D.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    During summertime, ozone concentrations in the Denver Metro Area and North Front Range of Colorado often exceed the 8-hour average EPA National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 75 ppbv. Ambient measurements of ozone, ozone precursors - volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) - and other secondary pollutants such as peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) were collected during spring (15 Mar-18 May) and summer (6 Jul-9 Sept) 2015 at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Erie, Colorado. These measurements were made in conjunction with airborne measurements from the Shale Oil and Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in spring 2015, which focused on studying the air quality impacts of emissions from oil and gas production in the western U.S. Using the in-situ ground-based measurements collected at the BAO field site, we attempt to identify and compare regional ozone production originating from oil and gas emissions (e.g., the Denver-Julesburg oil basin northeast of BAO) with that from urban and mobile sources (e.g., the Denver/Boulder metropolitan area south and west of BAO). We use ozone production efficiency (i.e., the number of molecules of ozone produced per molecule of NOx oxidized) and emissions ratios of selected VOCs as a metric for comparing ozone production associated with these different sources of emissions as well as seasonal differences between observations collected in spring versus summer.

  16. Standardization of the Definitions of Vertical Resolution and Uncertainty in the NDACC-archived Ozone and Temperature Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Payen, Godin-Beekmann; Gabarrot, Franck; vanGijsel, Anne; Bandoro, J.; Sica, R.; Trickl, T.

    2012-01-01

    The international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) is a global network of high-quality, remote-sensing research stations for observing and understanding the physical and chemical state of the Earth atmosphere. As part of NDACC, over 20 ground-based lidar instruments are dedicated to the long-term monitoring of atmospheric composition and to the validation of space-borne measurements of the atmosphere from environmental satellites such as Aura and ENVISAT. One caveat of large networks such as NDACC is the difficulty to archive measurement and analysis information consistently from one research group (or instrument) to another [1][2][3]. Yet the need for consistent definitions has strengthened as datasets of various origin (e.g., satellite and ground-based) are increasingly used for intercomparisons, validation, and ingested together in global assimilation systems.In the framework of the 2010 Call for Proposals by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) located in Bern, Switzerland, a Team of lidar experts was created to address existing issues in three critical aspects of the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature data retrievals: signal filtering and the vertical filtering of the retrieved profiles, the quantification and propagation of the uncertainties, and the consistent definition and reporting of filtering and uncertainties in the NDACC- archived products. Additional experts from the satellite and global data standards communities complement the team to help address issues specific to the latter aspect.

  17. Concentration measurements of ozone in the 1200-300ppbv range: an intercomparison between the BNM ultraviolet standard and infrared methods.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Gaëlle; Valentin, Alain; Henry, Annie; Hurtmans, Daniel; Camy-Peyret, Claude

    2004-12-01

    Simultaneous ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) measurements of ozone concentration in air in the 1200-300 ppbv range have been performed using the ultraviolet absorption in the Hartley band at 0.2537 microm and the infrared absorption of a doublet at 9.507 microm in the nu(3) vibration-rotation band. Infrared concentration measurements were achieved using the tunable diode laser spectrometer of LPMA in Paris with interferometric control of the emitted wavelength while the UV concentration measurements were performed with the 49PS Megatec ozone generator of the Bureau National de Metrologie (BNM). The simultaneous recording of spectra of a reference cell filled with pure distilled ozone and of a low concentration mixture inside a long absorbing path Herriott cell allows to carry out infrared concentration measurements with an accuracy of the same order as the ultraviolet ones and provides the instrumental parameters of the spectrometer corresponding to each concentration measurement, which reduces systematic errors. Within the respective absolute uncertainties proper to the two techniques, no systematic discrepancy was evidenced between the IR and the UV measurements. The ozone ultraviolet absorption coefficient value determined by Hearn (308.3 +/- 4 cm(-1)atm(-1)) and used by the BNM and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is confirmed by the present work.

  18. Concentration measurements of ozone in the 1200-300 ppbv range: an intercomparison between the BNM ultraviolet standard and infrared methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Gaëlle; Valentin, Alain; Henry, Annie; Hurtmans, Daniel; Camy-Peyret, Claude

    2004-12-01

    Simultaneous ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) measurements of ozone concentration in air in the 1200-300 ppbv range have been performed using the ultraviolet absorption in the Hartley band at 0.2537 μm and the infrared absorption of a doublet at 9.507 μm in the ν3 vibration-rotation band. Infrared concentration measurements were achieved using the tunable diode laser spectrometer of LPMA in Paris with interferometric control of the emitted wavelength while the UV concentration measurements were performed with the 49PS Megatec ozone generator of the Bureau National de Métrologie (BNM). The simultaneous recording of spectra of a reference cell filled with pure distilled ozone and of a low concentration mixture inside a long absorbing path Herriott cell allows to carry out infrared concentration measurements with an accuracy of the same order as the ultraviolet ones and provides the instrumental parameters of the spectrometer corresponding to each concentration measurement, which reduces systematic errors. Within the respective absolute uncertainties proper to the two techniques, no systematic discrepancy was evidenced between the IR and the UV measurements. The ozone ultraviolet absorption coefficient value determined by Hearn (308.3±4 cm -1 atm -1) and used by the BNM and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is confirmed by the present work.

  19. The Impact of Meteorology on Ozone Levels in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiss, Sandra

    The Lake Tahoe Basin is located on the California-Nevada border and occasionally experiences elevated levels of ozone exceeding the 70 ppb California Air Resources Board (CARB) ambient air quality standard (8-hour average). Previous studies indicate that both the local generation of ozone in the Basin and long-range transport from out-of-Basin sources are important in contributing to ozone exceedances, but little is known about the impact of meteorology on the distribution of ozone source regions. In order to develop a better understanding of the factors affecting ozone levels and sources in the Lake Tahoe Basin, this study combines observational data from a 2010 and 2012 summer field campaigns, HYSPLIT back trajectories, and WRF model output to examine the meteorological influences of ozone transport in the topographically complex Lake Tahoe Basin. Findings from the field work portions of this study include enhanced background ozone levels at higher elevations, the local circulation pattern of lake breezes occurring at Lake level sites, and an indication that ozone precursors are coming off the Lake. Our analysis also showed that if transport of ozone does occur, it is more likely to come from the San Joaquin Valley to the south rather than originate in the large cities to the west, such as Sacramento and San Francisco. Analysis of modeled PBL schemes as compared with observational data showed that the ACM2 PBL scheme best represented the geographical domain. The ACM2 PBL scheme was then used to show wind circulation patterns in the Lake Tahoe Basin and concluded that there is decent vertical mixing over the Basin and no indication of ozone transport from the west however some indication of transport from the east. Overall this study concludes that transport from the west is less significant than transport from the south and east, and that transport only influences ozone values at higher elevations. Within the Basin itself (at lower elevations), local factors

  20. Proposed standardized definitions for vertical resolution and uncertainty in the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature algorithms - Part 1: Vertical resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; Sica, Robert J.; van Gijsel, Joanna A. E.; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Haefele, Alexander; Trickl, Thomas; Payen, Guillaume; Gabarrot, Frank

    2016-08-01

    A standardized approach for the definition and reporting of vertical resolution of the ozone and temperature lidar profiles contributing to the Network for the Detection for Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) database is proposed. Two standardized definitions homogeneously and unequivocally describing the impact of vertical filtering are recommended. The first proposed definition is based on the width of the response to a finite-impulse-type perturbation. The response is computed by convolving the filter coefficients with an impulse function, namely, a Kronecker delta function for smoothing filters, and a Heaviside step function for derivative filters. Once the response has been computed, the proposed standardized definition of vertical resolution is given by Δz = δz × HFWHM, where δz is the lidar's sampling resolution and HFWHM is the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the response, measured in sampling intervals. The second proposed definition relates to digital filtering theory. After applying a Laplace transform to a set of filter coefficients, the filter's gain characterizing the effect of the filter on the signal in the frequency domain is computed, from which the cut-off frequency fC, defined as the frequency at which the gain equals 0.5, is computed. Vertical resolution is then defined by Δz = δz/(2fC). Unlike common practice in the field of spectral analysis, a factor 2fC instead of fC is used here to yield vertical resolution values nearly equal to the values obtained with the impulse response definition using the same filter coefficients. When using either of the proposed definitions, unsmoothed signals yield the best possible vertical resolution Δz = δz (one sampling bin). Numerical tools were developed to support the implementation of these definitions across all NDACC lidar groups. The tools consist of ready-to-use "plug-in" routines written in several programming languages that can be inserted into any lidar data processing software and

  1. A Holistic Evaluation of the Houston, Texas Ozone Attainment Episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biton, L.; Vizuete, W.; Kim, B.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2006-12-01

    In early 2006, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) released a simulation episode to form the basis for its 8-Hour Ozone State Implementation Plan (SIP). The SIP details steps to be taken to bring the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria region into attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone (O3). The modeling episode will have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making, thus affecting the regional economy and human health. At present model performance evaluations (MPEs) are based on guidelines set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that rely heavily on statistical measures. While the episode falls within the recommended range for these EPA statistical metrics, examining the level of agreement between model predictions and observations for O3 is not a sufficient method to assess model accuracy. We have discovered severe inaccuracies in the 8-Hour modeling episode with an evaluation methodology that recognizes that (1) the formation of tropospheric O3 system is non-linear with respect to its precursors and (2) is the result of a multitude of chemical, emission, and meteorological processes. This paper presents the results of this improved evaluation method using new tools and software developed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. These tools were designed specifically to compensate for inadequacies in the existing statistical methods currently used for MPE. These tools enable investigators to review O3 production and concentrations in the context of meteorological and chemical conditions, allowing more holistic analytical techniques, not captured by traditional statistical metrics. In our analysis all modeling results are compared with high-resolution data from multiple sources, including an extensive ground-monitoring network, automatic gas-chromatographs (auto-GCs), and aircraft. First in our investigation, as a measure of progress, the latest 8-Hour episode is compared to TCEQ"s previous 1-Hour O3 SIP

  2. 75 FR 69036 - Notice of Data Availability Regarding Potential Changes to Required Ozone Monitoring Seasons for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Monitoring Seasons for Colorado, Kansas, and Utah AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... monitoring seasons. The data for these states consist of daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations. These... could impact changes to the current and proposed required ozone monitoring seasons for Colorado,...

  3. The role of refinery flaring events and bay breezes on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Fried, A.; Pickering, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area with maximum 8-hour average ozone peaking along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv. The NASA P-3B aircraft observed plumes from refinery flares west and northwest of Galveston Bay that were transported over the water. Continental air pollution from the north was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and a CMAQ model simulation with integrated source apportionment, which tracks the contribution of emissions source groups and regions on ozone concentrations.

  4. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Axonal Transport 1 and 2 Weeks After 8 Hours of Acute Intraocular Pressure Elevation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Carla J.; Choe, Tiffany E.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Wang, Lin; Fortune, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare in vivo retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and axonal transport at 1 and 2 weeks after an 8-hour acute IOP elevation in rats. Methods. Forty-seven adult male Brown Norway rats were used. Procedures were performed under anesthesia. The IOP was manometrically elevated to 50 mm Hg or held at 15 mm Hg (sham) for 8 hours unilaterally. The RNFLT was measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Anterograde and retrograde axonal transport was assessed from confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging 24 hours after bilateral injections of 2 μL 1% cholera toxin B-subunit conjugated to AlexaFluor 488 into the vitreous or superior colliculi, respectively. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and microglial densities were determined using antibodies against Brn3a and Iba-1. Results. The RNFLT in experimental eyes increased from baseline by 11% at 1 day (P < 0.001), peaked at 19% at 1 week (P < 0.0001), remained 11% thicker at 2 weeks (P < 0.001), recovered at 3 weeks (P > 0.05), and showed no sign of thinning at 6 weeks (P > 0.05). There was no disruption of anterograde transport at 1 week (superior colliculi fluorescence intensity, 75.3 ± 7.9 arbitrary units [AU] for the experimental eyes and 77.1 ± 6.7 AU for the control eyes) (P = 0.438) or 2 weeks (P = 0.188). There was no obstruction of retrograde transport at 1 week (RCG density, 1651 ± 153 per mm2 for the experimental eyes and 1615 ± 135 per mm2 for the control eyes) (P = 0.63) or 2 weeks (P = 0.25). There was no loss of Brn3a-positive RGC density at 6 weeks (P = 0.74) and no increase in microglial density (P = 0.92). Conclusions. Acute IOP elevation to 50 mm Hg for 8 hours does not cause a persisting axonal transport deficit at 1 or 2 weeks or a detectable RNFLT or RGC loss by 6 weeks but does lead to transient RNFL thickening that resolves by 3 weeks. PMID:24398096

  5. Ozone in the Atmosphere: II. The Lower Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Paul; Pickering, Pam

    1991-01-01

    Described are the problems caused by the increased concentration of ozone in the lower atmosphere. Photochemical pollution, mechanisms of ozone production, ozone levels in the troposphere, effects of ozone on human health and vegetation, ozone standards, and control measures are discussed. (KR)

  6. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  7. NODA for EPA's Updated Ozone Transport Modeling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find EPA's NODA for the Updated Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) along with the ExitExtension of Public Comment Period on CSAPR for the 2008 NAAQS.

  8. Spatio-temporal modeling for real-time ozone forecasting.

    PubMed

    Paci, Lucia; Gelfand, Alan E; Holland, David M

    2013-05-01

    The accurate assessment of exposure to ambient ozone concentrations is important for informing the public and pollution monitoring agencies about ozone levels that may lead to adverse health effects. High-resolution air quality information can offer significant health benefits by leading to improved environmental decisions. A practical challenge facing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is to provide real-time forecasting of current 8-hour average ozone exposure over the entire conterminous United States. Such real-time forecasting is now provided as spatial forecast maps of current 8-hour average ozone defined as the average of the previous four hours, current hour, and predictions for the next three hours. Current 8-hour average patterns are updated hourly throughout the day on the EPA-AIRNow web site. The contribution here is to show how we can substantially improve upon current real-time forecasting systems. To enable such forecasting, we introduce a downscaler fusion model based on first differences of real-time monitoring data and numerical model output. The model has a flexible coefficient structure and uses an efficient computational strategy to fit model parameters. Our hybrid computational strategy blends continuous background updated model fitting with real-time predictions. Model validation analyses show that we are achieving very accurate and precise ozone forecasts.

  9. The role of bay breezes and regional transport on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Estes, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area. Maximum 8-hour average ozone peaked along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv, at La Porte Sylvan Beach. Continental air pollution from the north and northeast was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front at La Porte Sylvan Beach. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and WRF and CMAQ model simulations.

  10. Alteration in carboxyhemoglobin concentrations during exposure to 9 ppm carbon monoxide for 8 hours at sea level and 2134 m altitude in a hypobaric chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1989-10-01

    Seventeen non-smoking young men served as subjects to determine the alteration in carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentrations during exposure to 0 or 9 ppm carbon monoxide for 8 hours (CO) at sea level or an altitude of 2134 meters (7000 feet) in a hypobaric chamber. Nine subjects rested during the exposure and 8 exercised for 10 minutes of each exposure hour at a mean ventilation of 25 L (BTPS). All subjects performed a maximal aerobic capacity test at the completion of their respective exposures. Carboxyhemoglobin concentrations fell in all subjects during their exposures to 0 ppm CO at sea level or 2134 m. During the 8-h exposures to 9 ppm CO, COHb rose linearly from approximately 0.2 percent to 0.7 percent. No significant differences in uptake were found whether the subjects were resting or intermittently exercising during their 8-h exposures. COHb levels attained were similar at both sea level and 2134 m. Maximal aerobic capacity was reduced approximately 7-10 percent consequent to altitude exposure during 0 ppm CO exposures. These values were not altered following exposure for 8 h to 9 ppm CO in either the resting or exercising subjects.

  11. Evaluating 2012 Ozone Impacts of Natural Gas Development in the Haynesville Shale with an Updated Emission Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemball-Cook, S. R.; Bar-Ilan, A.; Yarwood, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Haynesville Shale, located approximately 10,000-13,000 feet beneath Northeast Texas and Northwest Louisiana contains very large recoverable reserves of natural gas. Development of the Haynesville began in 2008, and since then, more than 3,000 wells have been drilled. The development of natural gas resources in the Haynesville is economically important, but also generates emissions of ozone precursors in a region with several ozone monitors that are close to or exceeding the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standard. During 2009, we developed an emission inventory of ozone precursors for projected future Haynesville Shale development from 2009 through 2020. Photochemical modeling with the 2012 emission inventory showed significant ozone impacts within Northeast Texas and Northwest Louisiana as a result of Haynesville emissions, with projected 8-hour ozone design value increases up to 5 ppb at area monitors. The original emission inventory was assembled during spring 2009, early in the development of the Haynesville when available data were limited. Since then, development in the Haynesville has continued, and additional data are now available and were used to refine the development projections and emission inventory through the year 2020. The updated 2012 emission inventory is now based on actual data rather than projections made in 2009. The number of drilling rigs operating in 2012 was lower than projected, but the well count was higher due intensive drilling activity in 2010-2011 that exceeded projections. The updated emission inventory draws on more Haynesville-specific data than the previous inventory. Energy producers currently active in the Haynesville were surveyed and provided information that included well drilling times, equipment used for well construction, production equipment present at typical Haynesville wells, and produced gas composition analyses. Producers provided information on the amount of truck traffic associated with transport of

  12. Stratospheric ozone is decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-03-01

    The recent discovery that chlorofluorocarbons create the Antarctic ozone hole every October through reactions mediated by ice particles formed at the lowest temperatures of the stratosphere is discussed. A large-scale reanalysis of measurements reveals that protective stratospheric ozone has decreased during the past 17 yrs with some decreases greatly exceeding predictions. It is noted that standard models did not, and still do not, include the ice in their reaction schemes. A tendency toward larger losses at higher colder latitudes is seen.

  13. UV/ozone cleaning of mass standards: results on the correlation between mass and surface chemical state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, P.; Marti, K.; Grgić, G.; Russi, S.

    2014-10-01

    UV/ozone cleaning of 1 kg Au and steel mass artefacts was studied by direct mass comparison and surface chemical analysis by XPS. Both materials are oxidized with an increasing oxide layer thickness upon prolonged exposure time. The gain in mass is significant. The gold oxides are not stable and decompose with time in part at ambient. As shown for artefacts of stacked discs, cavities and interspaces were also cleaned, but with a much longer cleaning time. Stacked discs, having a completely different cleaning time, are questionable for the determination of sorption phenomena.

  14. Investigating ozone in rural Nevada, USA: Results from the first year of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, M. S.; Fine, R.; Miller, M. B.; Peterson, C.; Burley, J. D.; Jaffe, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone has been measured at Great Basin National Park, located in a rural area of eastern Nevada, USA, since 1993. Observations at the Park indicate that the area likely will not be able to meet a revised U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of ≤ 70 ppbv. Routine ozone monitoring outside of the Park in Nevada has been limited to the two major metropolitan areas in the state, Reno and Las Vegas, and surrounding communities. To address this limitation, a research project, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI), was put into place. The NVROI goals are to characterize ozone concentrations, and to determine the sources contributing to observed concentrations in Nevada, and regions of the western United States. The first year of the project focused on establishing a network of ozone monitoring sites. Based on the measurements from 5 sites across the state where data were collected from July 2011 to June 2012, seasonal mean (× s) concentrations ranged from 39×15 to 54×9 ppbv (spring); 36×14 to 54×8 ppbv (summer); 27×13 to 44×6 ppbv (fall); and 23×11 to 41×5 ppbv (winter) across the state, with higher mean concentrations observed at the high elevation sites. The average daily maximum 1-hour concentrations of ozone (× s) were similar across these sites ranging from 58×6 to 69×7 ppbv (spring); 53×6 to 62×9 ppbv (summer); 44×7 to 49×6 ppbv (fall); and 37×5 to 45×4 ppbv (winter). Periods of elevated ozone were observed at these 5 NVROI network sites (1513 to 2082 m above sea level (asl)). There were 15, 28, and 81 days with at least one NVROI site experiencing a Maximum Daily 8-hour Average (MDA8) greater than 70, 65, and 60 ppbv, respectively. Events (MDA8 > 60 ppbv) were coincident with (1) passage of frontal systems (spring and early summer events), or (2) the presence of smoke generated by regional wildfires and an area of low pressure over Nevada (summer events). Atmospheric turbulence and vertical lifting is associated with frontal

  15. Expected ozone benefits of reducing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired electricity generating units in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Timothy; Bull, Emily; Canty, Timothy; He, Hao; Zalewsky, Eric; Woodman, Michael; Aburn, George; Ehrman, Sheryl; Dickerson, Russell R

    2017-03-01

    On hot summer days in the eastern United States, electricity demand rises, mainly because of increased use of air conditioning. Power plants must provide this additional energy, emitting additional pollutants when meteorological conditions are primed for poor air quality. To evaluate the impact of summertime NOx emissions from coal-fired electricity generating units (EGUs) on surface ozone formation, we performed a series of sensitivity modeling forecast scenarios utilizing EPA 2018 version 6.0 emissions (2011 base year) and CMAQ v5.0.2. Coal-fired EGU NOx emissions were adjusted to match the lowest NOx rates observed during the ozone seasons (April 1-October 31) of 2005-2012 (Scenario A), where ozone decreased by 3-4 ppb in affected areas. When compared to the highest emissions rates during the same time period (Scenario B), ozone increased ∼4-7 ppb. NOx emission rates adjusted to match the observed rates from 2011 (Scenario C) increased ozone by ∼4-5 ppb. Finally in Scenario D, the impact of additional NOx reductions was determined by assuming installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) controls on all units lacking postcombustion controls; this decreased ozone by an additional 2-4 ppb relative to Scenario A. Following the announcement of a stricter 8-hour ozone standard, this analysis outlines a strategy that would help bring coastal areas in the mid-Atlantic region closer to attainment, and would also provide profound benefits for upwind states where most of the regional EGU NOx originates, even if additional capital investments are not made (Scenario A).

  16. Dose-response study of healthy, heavily exercising men exposed to ozone at concentrations near the ambient air quality standard

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, W.S.; Avol, E.L.; Shamoo, D.A.; Spier, C.E.; Valencia, L.M.; Venet, T.G.; Fischer, D.A.; Hackney, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Twenty-four healthy, well-conditioned young adult male volunteers, free of asthma or clinical respiratory allergies, were exposed to purified air containing ozone (O3) at 0.16, 0.14, 0.12, 0.10, 0.08, and 0.00 part per million (ppm). Exposures were separated by 2-week intervals, occurred in random order, and lasted 2 hours each. Temperature was 32 +/- 1/sup 0/C and relative humidity was 38 +/- 3%, simulating Los Angeles area smog conditions. Subjects exercised 15 minutes of each half hour, attaining ventilation rates averaging 68 L/min (approximately 35 L/min per m2 body surface area). Lung function was measured pre-exposure and after 1 hr and 2 hr of exposure. Airway responsiveness to a cold-air challenge was measured immediately following the 2-hr exposure. Symptoms were recorded before, during, and for one-week periods following exposures. For the group as a whole, no meaningful untoward effects were found except for a mild typical respiratory irritant response after 2 hr exposure to 0.16 ppm O3. Two individual subjects showed possible responses at 0.14 ppm, and one of them also at 0.12 ppm. In comparison to some previous investigations, this study showed generally less response to O3. The comparative lack of response may relate to the favorable clinical status of the subjects, the pattern of exercise during exposure, or some other factor not yet identified.

  17. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  19. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  2. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  7. 40 CFR 52.2332 - Control Strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control Strategy: Ozone. 52.2332...: Ozone. Determinations—EPA is determining that, as of July 18, 1995, the Salt Lake and Davis Counties ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard based on air quality monitoring data from...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1023 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.1023...: Ozone. (a) Determination. EPA is determining that, as of July 21, 1995, the Lewiston-Auburn ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and...

  12. The effect of the Standard Nomenclature for Air Pollution (SNAP) categories on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagaris, Efthimios; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P.; Gounaris, Nikos; Andronopoulos, Spyros; Vlachogiannis, Diamando

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the contribution of different anthropogenic emission sources on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations over Europe since anthropogenic activities (and the related emissions) are the reason of air quality degradation. Gridded yearly averaged anthropogenic emissions for the year 2006 over Europe are provided by TNO at a 0.1×0.1 degree resolution. Emission sources have been classified into different activities according to the Standard Nomenclature for Air Pollution (SNAP). The available data include annual total emissions of CH4, CO, NH3, NMVOC, NOx, PM10, PM2.5, and SO2 for both area and point sources in ten (10) SNAP categories: power generation, residential-commercial and other combustion, industrial combustion, industrial processes, extraction distribution of fossil fuels, solvent use, road transport, other mobile sources, waste treatment and disposal, agriculture. Mobile sources and road transport are the major sources of NOx emissions followed by power generation units. Power generation is also the major source for SO2 emissions followed by mobile sources. Agricultural activities dominate NH3 emissions while combustion sources followed by mobile sources and road transport are the main sources for primary PM2.5. Emissions are processed by the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) v2.6 modeling system to convert their resolution to the resolution needed by the air quality model The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) v4.7 Modeling System with the Carbon Bond mechanism (CB05) is used for the regional air quality modeling over Europe at 35km grid spacing. Results quantify the contribution of each SNAP category on ozone and PM2.5 concentrations, locally, across Europe.

  13. Microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Adams, R.; Shen, C.; Quintana, C.; Showalter, S.

    1995-02-01

    Ozone, an allotrope of oxygen, present in the upper atmosphere (ozonosphere) plays a critical role in radiative balance. However, ozone is a toxic gas with a pungent odor when present in the troposphere and is considered a health hazard. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established a maximum permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.1 ppM in an 8 hour period. There are many sources of exposure to ozone in the workplace. Ozone is generated by high voltage discharge wires found in laser printers and photocopiers. Other common uses for ozone include waste water treatment, medical and dental instrument sterilization, drinking water purification, industrial oxidation processes, bleaching, and as a bactericide in swimming pools. Carbon filters are often used to minimize worker exposure to ozone. When designing a filter to decompose unwanted ozone, there are three requirements for most commercial applications. The first requirement is that production costs of the filter be minimal. Many applications require large quantities of filters and may have to be changed out often. The relatively low PEL also requires the filters to have a very high ozone decomposition efficiency. Finally, current applications tend to use small, low power fans to move air through the filters. Low back pressure is required to prevent over heating and prevent buildup of the toxic and potentially explosive ozone. In this paper, we will discuss two porous carbon filters that satisfy all of these requirements.

  14. Improved Space-Time Forecasting of next Day Ozone Concentrations in the Eastern U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an urgent need to provide accurate air quality information and forecasts to the general public and environmental health decision-makers. This paper develops a hierarchical space-time model for daily 8-hour maximum ozone concentration (O3) data covering much of the easter...

  15. 76 FR 72919 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY..., ``Second External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants... review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. DATES: The public comment...

  16. 76 FR 17121 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY..., ``First External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants... review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. DATES: The public comment...

  17. Ozone Layer Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Ozone Layer Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Ozone Layer Protection Welcome to EPA's ozone layer protection web ...

  18. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  19. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  20. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  1. Local fluctuations of ozone from 16 km to 45 km deduced from in situ vertical ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, G.; Robert, C.

    1994-01-01

    A vertical ozone profile obtained by an in situ ozone sonde from 16 km to 45 km, has allowed to observe local ozone concentration variations. These variations can be observed, thanks to a fast measurement system based on a UV absorption KrF excimer laser beam in a multipass cell. Ozone standard deviation versus altitude calculated from the mean is derived. Ozone variations or fluctuations are correlated with the different dynamic zones of the stratosphere.

  2. Identifying and forecasting deep stratospheric ozone intrusions over the western United States from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cooper, O. R.; Langford, A. O.; Pan, L.; Liu, X.; Reddy, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that deep stratospheric ozone intrusions can episodically enhance ground-level ozone above the health-based standard over the western U.S. in spring. Advanced warning of incoming intrusions could be used by state agencies to inform the public about poor air quality days. Here we explore the potential for using total ozone retrievals (version 5.2, level 3) at twice daily near global coverage from the AIRS instrument aboard the NASA Aqua satellite to identify stratospheric intrusions and forecast the eventual surface destination of transported stratospheric ozone. The method involves the correlation of AIRS daily total ozone columns at each 1ox1o grid box ~1-3 days prior to stratospheric enhancements to daily maximum 8-hour average ozone at a selected surface site using datasets from April to June in 2003-2011. The surface stratospheric enhancements are estimated by the GFDL AM3 chemistry-climate model which includes full stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and is nudged to reanalysis winds. Our earlier work shows that the model presents deep stratospheric intrusions over the Western U.S. consistently with observations from AIRS, surface networks, daily ozone sondes, and aircraft lidar available in spring of 2010 during the NOAA CalNex field campaign. For the 15 surface sites in the U.S. Mountain West considered, a correlation coefficient of 0.4-0.7 emerges with AIRS ozone columns over 30o-50oN latitudes and 125o-105oW longitudes - variability in the AIRS column within this spatial domain indicates incoming intrusions. For each "surface receptor site", the spatial domain can narrow to an area ~5ox5o northwest of the individual site, with the strong correlation (0.5-0.7) occurring when the AIRS data is lagged by 1 day from the AM3 stratospheric enhancements in surface air. The spatial pattern of correlations is consistent with our process-oriented understanding developed from case studies of extreme intrusions. Surface observations

  3. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  4. Ozone absorption coefficients' role in Dobson instrument ozone measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basher, R. E.

    1982-11-01

    The differences of 10% or more between the laboratory measurements of UV absorption coefficients by different investigators indicate accuracies that are quite inadequate for current needs in the measurement of atmospheric ozone. The standard band-integrated set of coefficients now used with the Dobson instrument are mutually consistent to about 2%, but their absolute accuracy is still in question. The accurate calculation of band-integrated coefficients must take account of their dependence on source spectral irradiance, atmospheric spectral transmittance, mean ozone temperature, and instrument spectral transmittance. A careful examination shows that Komhyr's (1980) case for an error of about +5% in the standard Dobson AD ozone estimation is subject to large uncertainties and certain lacks of independence. The obvious solution to this accuracy problem lies in better laboratory measurements of ozone absorption.

  5. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  6. Extended workdays: Effects of 8-hour and 12-hour rotating shift schedules on test performance, subjective alertness, sleep patterns, and psychological variables

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.R.; Colligan, M.J.; Lewis, P.

    1986-06-01

    A newly instituted 3 to 4 day/12-hr rotating shift schedule was compared to the previous 5 to 7 day/8-hr schedule using standard laboratory-type measures of performance and alertness, and a questionnaire on sleep patterns and other personal habits. After seven months adaptation to the new schedule, a preliminary analysis indicates that there were some decrements in alertness, reductions in sleep, and disruptions of other personal activities during 12-hr workdays. Gastro-intestinal state improved during night shift, however, and increases in self-reported stress were reduced by the shortened workweek. These results are discussed in terms of trade-offs between longer workdays and shorter workweeks. It is emphasized that at this time no determination can be made of the extent of risk associated with these changes in alertness.

  7. 78 FR 46947 - Adequacy Status of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, Texas Reasonable Further Progress and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Attainment Demonstration Implementation Plan for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard; Motor Vehicle Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... emissions budgets (MVEBs) in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, Texas (HGB) 1997 8-hour ozone...

  8. 40 CFR 51.900 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone...-hour NAAQS means the 1-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.9. (b) 8-hour NAAQS means the 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.10....

  9. 40 CFR 51.900 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone...-hour NAAQS means the 1-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.9. (b) 8-hour NAAQS means the 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards codified at 40 CFR 50.10....

  10. Evaluation of emission control strategies to reduce ozone pollution in the Paso del Norte region using a photochemical air quality modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Victor Hugo

    Air pollution emissions control strategies to reduce ozone precursor pollutants are analyzed by applying a photochemical modeling system. Simulations of air quality conditions during an ozone episode which occurred in June, 2006 are undertaken by increasing or reducing area source emissions in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Two air pollutants are primary drivers in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) undergo multiple chemical reactions under favorable meteorological conditions to form ozone, which is a secondary pollutant that irritates respiratory systems in sensitive individuals especially the elderly and young children. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) to limit ambient air pollutants such as ozone by establishing an 8-hour average concentration of 0.075 ppm as the threshold at which a violation of the standard occurs. Ozone forms primarily due reactions in the troposphere of NOx and VOC emissions generated primarily by anthropogenic sources in urban regions. Data from emissions inventories indicate area sources account for ˜15 of NOx and ˜45% of regional VOC emissions. Area sources include gasoline stations, automotive paint bodyshops and nonroad mobile sources. Multiplicity of air pollution emissions sources provides an opportunity to investigate and potentially implement air quality improvement strategies to reduce emissions which contribute to elevated ozone concentrations. A baseline modeling scenario was established using the CAMx photochemical air quality model from which a series of sensitivity analyses for evaluating air quality control strategies were conducted. Modifications to area source emissions were made by varying NOx and / or VOC emissions in the areas of particular interest. Model performance was assessed for each sensitivity analysis. Normalized bias (NB) and normalized error (NE) were used to identify

  11. A Reduced Form Model for Ozone Based on Two Decades of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A Reduced Form Model (RFM) is a mathematical relationship between the inputs and outputs of an air quality model, permitting estimation of additional modeling without costly new regional-scale simulations. A 21-year Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation for the continental United States provided the basis for the RFM developed in this study. Predictors included the principal component scores (PCS) of emissions and meteorological variables, while the predictand was the monthly mean of daily maximum 8-hour CMAQ ozone for the ozone season at each model grid. The PCS form an orthogonal basis for RFM inputs. A few PCS incorporate most of the variability of emissions and meteorology, thereby reducing the dimensionality of the source-receptor problem. Stochastic kriging was used to estimate the model. The RFM was used to separate the effects of emissions and meteorology on ozone concentrations. by running the RFM with emissions constant (ozone dependent on meteorology), or constant meteorology (ozone dependent on emissions). Years with ozone-conducive meteorology were identified, and meteorological variables best explaining meteorology-dependent ozone were identified. Meteorology accounted for 19% to 55% of ozone variability in the eastern US, and 39% to 92% in the western US. Temporal trends estimated for original CMAQ ozone data and emission-dependent ozone were mostly negative, but the confidence intervals for emission-dependent ozone are much

  12. Evaluation of Global Model Simulation of Tropospheric Ozone from ECHAM6-HAMMOZ1 with Surface Measurements over the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaffashzadeh, Najmeh; Schultz, Martin G.; Lyapina, Olga; Schröder, Sabine; Stadtler, Scarlet

    2016-04-01

    Current chemistry transport models are generally successful in describing the principle features of the present-day global tropospheric ozone (O3) distribution, but they exhibit large differences of ozone concentrations over the Mediterranean region. The Mediterranean region can be perturbed by long-range pollution import from Northern Europe, North Africa and Asia, in addition to local emissions, which may all contribute to ozone concentrations in this area. Identifying the main drivers for Mediterranean ozone concentrations and understanding the reasons for the inter-model differences remain scientific challenges. To investigate the geographical distribution of tropospheric ozone over the Mediterranean, we analyze hourly surface ozone measurements from more than 1000 stations in the Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR) database and compare these to hourly model outputs from the global chemistry climate model ECHAM6-HAMMOZ1 for the year 2012. The daily maximum 8-hour running mean value of ozone mixing ratios is calculated for both model and observation and compared. The preliminary results show that the model captures many features of the ozone and its precursor concentrations in many regions of Europe throughout the year. However, it substantially underestimates ozone in the Po Valley region in summer and overestimates ozone over much of the Mediterranean region during spring. The reasons for this behavior will be investigated through detailed sensitivity studies with respect to VOC emissions, anthropogenic emissions, ozone deposition, specific chemical reactions, and long range-import of ozone and precursors.

  13. Synoptic and meteorological drivers of extreme ozone concentrations over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Noelia Felipe; Sillmann, Jana; Schnell, Jordan L.; Rust, Henning W.; Butler, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The present work assesses the relationship between local and synoptic meteorological conditions and surface ozone concentration over Europe in spring and summer months, during the period 1998-2012 using a new interpolated data set of observed surface ozone concentrations over the European domain. Along with local meteorological conditions, the influence of large-scale atmospheric circulation on surface ozone is addressed through a set of airflow indices computed with a novel implementation of a grid-by-grid weather type classification across Europe. Drivers of surface ozone over the full distribution of maximum daily 8-hour average values are investigated, along with drivers of the extreme high percentiles and exceedances or air quality guideline thresholds. Three different regression techniques are applied: multiple linear regression to assess the drivers of maximum daily ozone, logistic regression to assess the probability of threshold exceedances and quantile regression to estimate the meteorological influence on extreme values, as represented by the 95th percentile. The relative importance of the input parameters (predictors) is assessed by a backward stepwise regression procedure that allows the identification of the most important predictors in each model. Spatial patterns of model performance exhibit distinct variations between regions. The inclusion of the ozone persistence is particularly relevant over Southern Europe. In general, the best model performance is found over Central Europe, where the maximum temperature plays an important role as a driver of maximum daily ozone as well as its extreme values, especially during warmer months.

  14. Evaluation of microporous carbon filters as catalysts for ozone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Coutts, D.; Shen, C.; Adams, R.; Quintana, C.; Showalter, S.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone is produced in small quantities in photocopiers and laser printers in the workplace and large quantities in industrial waste water treatment facilities. Carbon filters are commonly used to decompose this unwanted ozone. The three most important factors in producing a filter for this purpose are flow properties, efficiency, and cost. Most ozone decomposition applications require very low back-pressure at modest flow rates. The tradeoff between the number of pores and the size of the pores will be discussed. Typical unfiltered emissions in the workplace are approximately 1 ppm. The maximum permissible exposure limit, PEL, for worker exposure to ozone is 0.1 ppm over 8 hours. Several methods have been examined to increase the efficiency of ozone decomposition. Carbon surfaces were modified with catalysts, the surface activated, and the surface area was increased, in attempts to decompose ozone more effectively. Methods to reduce both the processing and raw material costs were investigated. Several sources of microporous carbon were investigated as ozone decomposition catalysts. Cheaper processing routes including macropore templating, faster drying and extracting methods were also studied.

  15. Stricter clean air standards

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.

    1997-07-01

    New standards for ozone and particulate matter stir a debate between the EPA and industrial groups. The article discusses both the history of the ozone and particulates standards, the goal of the EPA to protect health and evaluation of what the standards mean to health, and the industrial response.

  16. Tropopause Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, M.; Zhu, X.; Hsu, J.; Neu, J.; Tang, Q.

    2009-04-01

    The tropopause, however defined, is meant to describe the boundary between the well mixed troposphere and the stably stratified stratosphere. Ozone abundances in the vicinity of the tropopause exhibit large variations with latitude and season, being controlled by a combination of large-scale transport like the Brewer-Dobson circulation, small-scale turbulent mixing unresolved by global models, and photochemistry. A clear, instantaneous, 3-D definition of the tropopause is needed for diagnostics that separate stratosphere from troposphere, e.g., strat-trop exchange fluxes. In the UCI CTM, we define the stratosphere-troposphere boundary with what is effectively an age-of-air tracer: a tracer emitted uniformly from the surface with a uniform e-fold of 90 days (designated e90). Where the abundance of e90 falls below about 70% of the mass-median value (i.e., 33 days-old), we define as the stratosphere. With this diagnostic of the mixing barrier between stratosphere and troposphere the CTM with EC IFS forecast meteorology is able to match much of the observed seasonal cycle of the tropopause pressure and ozone abundance. With the CTM we examine the importance of chemistry vs. transport in controlling tropopause ozone. For example, we note that photolysis of molecular oxygen in the upper troposphere contributes significantly to tropopause ozone in the tropics and sub-tropics.

  17. 40 CFR 52.1486 - Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ozone. 52.1486 Section 52.1486 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since the plan does not provide for the attainment and maintenance of the national standard for ozone in the...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1486 - Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ozone. 52.1486 Section 52.1486 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since the plan does not provide for the attainment and maintenance of the national standard for ozone in the...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1486 - Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ozone. 52.1486 Section 52.1486 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since the plan does not provide for the attainment and maintenance of the national standard for ozone in the...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1486 - Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ozone. 52.1486 Section 52.1486 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since the plan does not provide for the attainment and maintenance of the national standard for ozone in the...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1486 - Control strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ozone. 52.1486 Section 52.1486 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... strategy: Hydrocarbons and ozone. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since the plan does not provide for the attainment and maintenance of the national standard for ozone in the...

  2. Nonattainment and Ozone Transport Region (OTR) SIP Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires a group of northeast states, which make up the Ozone Transport Region (OTR), to submit a SIP and install a certain level of controls for the pollutants that form ozone, even if they meet ozone standards.

  3. Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant staff is required by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems) standard ESS-EP-129 to develop and implement a Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program which will minimize emissions of ozone-depleting substances to the environment and maximize the use of ozone-safe alternatives in order to comply with Title VI of the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments and the implementing regulations promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This plan describes the requirements, initiatives, and accomplishments of the Y-12 Plant Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program.

  4. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  5. Proposed standardized definitions for vertical resolution and uncertainty in the NDACC lidar ozone and temperature algorithms - Part 3: Temperature uncertainty budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; Sica, Robert J.; van Gijsel, Joanna A. E.; Haefele, Alexander; Payen, Guillaume; Liberti, Gianluigi

    2016-08-01

    A standardized approach for the definition, propagation, and reporting of uncertainty in the temperature lidar data products contributing to the Network for the Detection for Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) database is proposed. One important aspect of the proposed approach is the ability to propagate all independent uncertainty components in parallel through the data processing chain. The individual uncertainty components are then combined together at the very last stage of processing to form the temperature combined standard uncertainty. The identified uncertainty sources comprise major components such as signal detection, saturation correction, background noise extraction, temperature tie-on at the top of the profile, and absorption by ozone if working in the visible spectrum, as well as other components such as molecular extinction, the acceleration of gravity, and the molecular mass of air, whose magnitudes depend on the instrument, data processing algorithm, and altitude range of interest. The expression of the individual uncertainty components and their step-by-step propagation through the temperature data processing chain are thoroughly estimated, taking into account the effect of vertical filtering and the merging of multiple channels. All sources of uncertainty except detection noise imply correlated terms in the vertical dimension, which means that covariance terms must be taken into account when vertical filtering is applied and when temperature is integrated from the top of the profile. Quantitatively, the uncertainty budget is presented in a generic form (i.e., as a function of instrument performance and wavelength), so that any NDACC temperature lidar investigator can easily estimate the expected impact of individual uncertainty components in the case of their own instrument. Using this standardized approach, an example of uncertainty budget is provided for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) lidar at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawai'i, which is

  6. 77 FR 63234 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina 110(a)(1) and (2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... ``Guidance on SIP Elements Required Under Section 110(a)(1) and (2) for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone and PM 2.5...) for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone and PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards,'' but as mentioned above... 2008 8-hour Ozone infrastructure SIP submission, committed the State to addressing CAA section...

  7. Evidence for vertical ozone redistribution since 1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, R.; Döhler, W.; Kirsch, H.-J.; Plessing, P.; Görsdorf, U.

    1993-03-01

    Long-term measurements of the ozone concentration in the vicinity of the city of Berlin have been performed with ground based Dobson spectrophotometers and balloon borne systems. The respective experiments cover the past 24 years. All data have been reevaluated and corrected towards uniform calibration standards, leading to the longest European data set of total column density, altitude-dependent ozone partial pressures and the corresponding temperatures. Smoothing algorithms unravel significant long-term trends. The analysis shows an increase of ozone concentration within the middle stratosphere (below 31 km height) as well as in the troposphere over the past 24 years. On the contrary, ongoing ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere has been found. The large scale vertical redistribution of atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere seems to be in agreement with model calculations and trend predictions that have their roots in changes of the chemical composition and the ozone photochemistry due to anthropogenically induced trace gas concentrations.

  8. Evidence for vertical ozone redistribution since 1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, R.; Döhler, W.; Kirsch, H.-J.; Plessing, P.; Görsdorf, U.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term measurements of ozone concentration in the vicinity of the city of Berlin have been performed with ground-based Dobson spectrophotometers and balloon borne systems. The respective experiments cover the past 24 yr. All data have been re-evaluated and corrected towards uniform calibration standards, leading to the longest lasting European data set of total column density, altitude-dependent ozone partial pressures and the corresponding temperatures. Smoothing algorithms reveal significant longterm trends. The analysis shows an increase of ozone concentration within the middle stratosphere (below 31 km height) as well as in the troposphere over the past 24 yr. On the contrary, ongoing ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere became evident. The large scale vertical redistribution of atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere seems to be in agreement with model calculations and trend predictions that have their roots in changes of the chemical composition and the ozone photochemistry due to anthropogenically induced tracer gas concentrations.

  9. Ozone Risk Assessment Utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.; Jusko, M. J.; Clemmons, M. A.

    1999-08-10

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates are based on the EPA''s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.

  10. In vitro testing of a denture cleaning method using ozone.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, M; Suzuki, T; Uchida, M; Furuya, J; Okamoto, Y

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microbicidal effect of gaseous ozone with that of ozonated water in order to determine its usefulness as a method for disinfecting dentures. Although a large number of research studies have been done on the bactericidal effect of ozone, little is known about its microbicidal effects on oral microorganisms. Therefore, we tested the effect of ozone on three standard strains of oral microorganisms: Streptococcus mutans (strain IID 973), Staphylococcus aureus (strain 209-P), and Candida albicans (strain LAM 14322). When the gaseous ozone injection method was used, the numbers of cells of all three strains decreased to 1/10(5) at 1 min, and by 3 min they were below the detection limit. Thus, the microbicidal effect of gaseous ozone was ascertained in a short time. In contrast, when ozonated water at 1 ppm and 3 ppm was used, C. albicans decreased to 1/10. A 700 mg/h ozone production level was needed to prepare 1 ppm ozonated water, whereas 20 mg/h of ozone was required by the gaseous ozone generator. These findings indicate that direct exposure to gaseous ozone seems to be a more effective microbicide compared with ozonated water, and that gaseous ozone can be clinically useful for disinfection of dentures.

  11. Sensitivity modeling study for an ozone occurrence during the 1996 Paso Del Norte Ozone Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lu, Duanjun; Reddy, Remata S; Fitzgerald, Rosa; Stockwell, William R; Williams, Quinton L; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2008-12-01

    Surface ozone pollution has been a persistent environmental problem in the US and Europe as well as the developing countries. A key prerequisite to find effective alternatives to meeting an ozone air quality standard is to understand the importance of local anthropogenic emissions, the significance of biogenic emissions, and the contribution of long-range transport. In this study, an air quality modeling system that includes chemistry and transport, CMAQ, an emission processing model, SMOKE, and a mesoscale numerical meteorological model, WRF, has been applied to investigate an ozone event occurring during the period of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Campaign. The results show that the modeling system exhibits the capability to simulate this high ozone occurrence by providing a comparable temporal variation of surface ozone concentration at one station and to capture the spatial evolution of the event. Several sensitivity tests were also conducted to identify the contributions to high surface ozone concentration from eight VOC subspecies, biogenic VOCs, anthropogenic VOCs and long-range transportation of ozone and its precursors. It is found that the reductions of ETH, ISOP, PAR, OLE and FORM help to mitigate the surface ozone concentration, and like anthropogenic VOCs, biogenic VOC plays a nonnegligible role in ozone formation. But for this case, long-range transport of ozone and its precursors appears to produce an insignificant contribution.

  12. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  13. 75 FR 2935 - Extension of Deadline for Promulgating Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 50, 58 and 81 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards; Final Rule and... Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... promulgating initial area designations for the ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) that...

  14. Effect of photoperiodic pretreatments on symptom development in plants exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Godish, T.

    1980-01-01

    Results presented in this report on the effects of photoperiodic pretreatment on ozone sensitivity of plants are significantly different from the lone previous report on this subject. Juhren et al (5) studied the effects of photoperiodic pretreatments on sensitivity of pinto beans exposed to oxidants (presumably ozone). They reported that pinto bean plants were most sensitive to oxidants under short photoperiods (8 hours) and least sensitive to long photoperiods (16 hours). In studies of tomato and peas presented in this report, minimum sensitivity for tomato was observed under the 8 hour pretreatment; for peas minimum sensitivity was observed for the 8 and 10 hour pretreatments. Maximum sensitivity for tomato was observed for the 12-hour photoperiodic pretreatment; peas showed maximum sensitivity under the 14-hour photoperiod. 7 references, 1 table.

  15. Effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate on polar lipids and fatty acids in leaves of morning glory and kidney bean. [Pharbitis nil; Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Nouchi, Isamu; Toyama, Susumu Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo )

    1988-07-01

    To compare the effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on leaf lipids, fatty acids and malondialdehyde (MDA), morning glory (Pharbitis nil Choisy cv Scarlet O'Hara) and kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Gintebo) plants were exposed to either ozone (0.15 microliter per liter for 8 hours) or PAN (0.10 microliter per liter for up to 8 hours). Ozone increased phospholipids in morning glory and decreased in kidney bean at the initial stage (2-4 hours) of exposure, while it scarcely changed glycolipids, the unsaturated fatty acids, and MDA in both plants. A large reduction of glycolipids occurred 1 day after ozone exposure in both plants. PAN caused marked drops in phospholipids and glycolipids in kidney bean at relatively late stage (6-8 hours) of exposure, while it increased phosphatidic acid and decreased the unsaturated fatty acids, an increase which was accompanied by a large increase in MDA. These results suggest that ozone may not directly oxidize unsaturated fatty acids at the initial stage of exposure, but may alter polar lipid metabolism, particularly phospholipids. On the other hand, PAN may abruptly and considerably degrade phospholipids and glycolipids by peroxidation or hydrolysis at the late stage of exposure. The present study shows that ozone and PAN affect polar lipids in different manners.

  16. Ozone NAAQS Review: Policy Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is one of the six major air pollutants for which EPA has issued air quality criteria and established national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) based on those criteria. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, existing air...

  17. Impact of enhanced ozone deposition and halogen chemistry on tropospheric ozone over the Northern Hemisphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fate of ozone in marine environments has been receiving increased attention due to the tightening of ambient air quality standards. The role of deposition and halogen chemistry is examined through incorporation of an enhanced ozone deposition algorithm and inclusion of halogen ch...

  18. Comparative Effects of Gamma Irradiation and Ozone Treatment on Hygienic Quality of Korean Red Ginseng Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Kang, Il-Jun; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Choi, Kang-Ju

    1998-06-01

    For the purpose of improving hygienic quality of Korean red ginseng powder, the comparative effects of gamma irradiation and ozone treatment on the microbial and physicochemical properties were investigated. Gamma irradiation at 7.5 kGy resulted in sterilization of total aerobic bacteria, molds and coliforms below detective levels, while ozone treatment for 8 hours up to 18 ppm did not sufficiently eliminate the microorganisms of the red ginseng powder. Physicochemical properties including compositions of the red ginseng saponin (ginsenosides) and fatty acids, pH and hydrogen doanting activity were not significantly changed by gamma irradiation, whereas, ozone treatment caused significant changes in fatty acid compositions, TBA value, pH, acidity and hydrogen donating activity. The results from this study led us to conclude that gamma irradiation was more effective than ozone treatment both for the improvement of hygienic quality and for the maintenance of physicochemical quality of red ginseng powder.

  19. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  20. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    Observations of Antarctic ozone levels and the discovery of a hole in the Antarctic region are examined. The effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on the level of stratospheric ozone are analyzed. Three cycles explaining the cause of ozone depletion in the poles are proposed. A comparison of field data and proposed depletion cycles reveals that the chemical origin of the ozone hole is due to CFCs. The potential global effects of the Antarctic ozone hole are discussed.

  1. Ozone production during an urban air stagnation episode over Nashville, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, R. J.; Imhoff, R. E.; Tanner, R. L.; Meagher, J. F.; Daum, P. H.; Hardesty, R. M.; Banta, R. M.; Alvarez, R. J.; McNider, R. T.; Gillani, N. V.

    1998-09-01

    The highest O3 levels observed during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study in middle Tennessee occurred during a period of air stagnation from July 11 through July 15. Extensive airborne (two fixed wing and one helicopter) and ground-based measurements of the chemistry and meteorology of this episode near Nashville, Tennessee, are presented. In situ airborne measurements include O3, NOy, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, nitrate, hydrocarbons, and aldehydes. Airborne LIDAR O3 measurements are also utilized to map the vertical and horizontal extent of the urban plume. The use of multiple instrumented research aircraft permitted highly detailed mapping of the plume chemistry in the vertical and horizontal dimensions. Interactions between the urban Nashville plume (primarily a NOx and hydrocarbon source) and the Gallatin coal-fired power plant plume (primarily a NOx and SO2 source) are also documented, and comparisons of ozone formation in the isolated and mixed urban and power plant plume are presented. The data suggest that during this episode the background air and the edges of the urban plume are NOx sensitive and the core of the urban plume is hydrocarbon sensitive. Under these worst case meteorological conditions, ambient O3 levels well over the level of the new National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (80 ppb) were observed over and just downwind of Nashville. For example, on July 12, the boundary layer air upwind of Nashville showed 60 to 70 ppb O3, while just downwind of the city the urban plume maximum was over 140 ppb O3. With a revised ozone standard set at 80 ppb (8 hour average) and upwind levels already within 10 or 20 ppb of the standard, only a slight increase in ozone from the urban area will cause difficulty in attaining the standard at monitors near the core of the urban plume during this type of episode. The helicopter mapping and LIDAR aircraft data clearly illustrate that high O3 levels can occur during stagnation episodes within a few kilometers of

  2. Long-Term Exposure to Ozone and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2002 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoyang; Balluz, Lina S; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Wen, Xiao-Jun; Hao, Yongping; Qualters, Judith R

    2016-02-01

    Long-term exposure to ground-level ozone is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The association remains uncertain between long-term exposure to ozone and life expectancy. We assessed the associations between seasonal mean daily 8-hour maximum (8-hr max) ozone concentrations measured during the ozone monitoring seasons and life expectancy at birth in 3109 counties of the conterminous U.S. during 2002 to 2008. We used latent class growth analysis to identify latent classes of counties that had distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations over the 7-year period and used linear regression analysis to determine differences in life expectancy by ozone levels. We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct seasonal mean daily 8-hr max ozone concentrations and rates of change. When compared with the counties with the lowest ozone concentrations, the counties with the highest ozone concentrations had 1.7- and 1.4-year lower mean life expectancy in males and females (both P < 0.0001), respectively. The associations remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding effects of seasonal mean PM2.5 concentrations and other selected environmental, demographic, socio-economic, and health-related factors (both P < 0.0001). A 5 ppb higher ozone concentration was associated with 0.25 year lower life expectancy in males (95% CI: -0.30 to -0.19) and 0.21 year in females (95% CI: -0.25 to -0.17). We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations. Our findings suggest that long-term exposure to a higher ozone concentration may be associated with a lower life expectancy.

  3. Long-Term Exposure to Ozone and Life Expectancy in the United States, 2002 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaoyang; Balluz, Lina S.; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Wen, Xiao-Jun; Hao, Yongping; Qualters, Judith R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Long-term exposure to ground-level ozone is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The association remains uncertain between long-term exposure to ozone and life expectancy. We assessed the associations between seasonal mean daily 8-hour maximum (8-hr max) ozone concentrations measured during the ozone monitoring seasons and life expectancy at birth in 3109 counties of the conterminous U.S. during 2002 to 2008. We used latent class growth analysis to identify latent classes of counties that had distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations over the 7-year period and used linear regression analysis to determine differences in life expectancy by ozone levels. We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct seasonal mean daily 8-hr max ozone concentrations and rates of change. When compared with the counties with the lowest ozone concentrations, the counties with the highest ozone concentrations had 1.7- and 1.4-year lower mean life expectancy in males and females (both P < 0.0001), respectively. The associations remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding effects of seasonal mean PM2.5 concentrations and other selected environmental, demographic, socio-economic, and health-related factors (both P < 0.0001). A 5 ppb higher ozone concentration was associated with 0.25 year lower life expectancy in males (95% CI: −0.30 to −0.19) and 0.21 year in females (95% CI: −0.25 to −0.17). We identified 3 classes of counties with distinct mean levels and rates of change in ozone concentrations. Our findings suggest that long-term exposure to a higher ozone concentration may be associated with a lower life expectancy. PMID:26886595

  4. Assessing Ozone Forecast Uncertainty with a Data Assimilation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coy, L.; Allen, D.; Eckermann, S. D.; McCormack, J.; Stajner, I.; Hogan, T.

    2006-12-01

    The increments or observation minus forecast (O-F) statistics produced by a data assimilation system provides a ready-made method of evaluating forecast skill. In this study, O-F statistics from the Global Ozone Assimilation Testing System (GOATS) are used to examine how ozone assimilation products and their associated O-F statistics depend on input data biases, ozone chemistry parameterizations, and forecast model variances. All the GOATS results shown are based on a 6-hour forecast and analysis cycle using observations from SBUV/2 (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer-2) during September--October~2002. Results show that using an ozone chemistry parameterization can provide a built-in standard for assessing observational bias that is lacking in a passive ozone advection model. This is because a passive tracer advection model is usually limited in how strongly it can change mean values, leaving global mean ozone to be data driven. These results answer the problem of why ozone assimilation with parameterized chemistry often have larger mean 0-Fs than passive ozone assimilation: the larger mean O-Fs with a chemistry parameterization reflects the ozone model's active contribution to the ozone assimilation. Results also show that including an ozone chemistry parameterization can lead to a significant reduction of the RMS O-Fs by both reducing the ozone forecast model variance as well as improving the covariance between the ozone forecast and observations. Understanding the O-F statistics from an ozone data assimilation system can lead to improved use of O-F statistics in diagnosing ozone and other tracer forecast skill and in monitoring operational ozone assimilation systems.

  5. The 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study: analysis of meteorological and air quality data that influence local ozone concentrations.

    PubMed

    MacDonal, C P; Roberts, P T; Main, H H; Dye, T S; Coe, D L; Yarbrough, J

    2001-08-10

    The 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study and subsequent data analyses were implemented to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical processes which lead to high concentrations of ozone in the Paso del Norte study area which includes El Paso County, Texas, Sunland Park, New Mexico, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Both the data and data analysis results are being used to support photochemical grid modeling. El Paso County and Sunland Park fail to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone, and neighboring Ciudad Juárez fails to meet the Mexican ambient standard for ozone. This paper summarizes the measurement campaigns of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study and the findings and conclusions that arose from subsequent data analyses. Data analyses showed that high ozone concentrations resulted from a combination of conditions, including high surface temperatures, strong sunlight with few clouds, light surface winds and high concentrations of ozone precursors at ground level in the morning, and slow convective boundary layer (CBL) growth. Synoptic-scale meteorological conditions observed during high ozone episodes included an aloft high-pressure system and aloft warming. Aloft carryover of ozone and ozone precursors did not significantly contribute to high concentrations of ozone at the surface.

  6. How does climate change contribute to surface ozone change over the United States?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murazaki, K.; Hess, P.

    2006-03-01

    The impact of climate change on U.S. surface ozone levels is investigated. We simulated two 10 year periods using the global chemical transport model MOZART-2 (Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers version 2): 1990-2000 and 2090-2100. In each case, MOZART-2 is driven by meteorology from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) coupled Climate Systems Model (CSM) 1.0 forced with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A1 scenario. During both periods the chemical emissions are fixed at 1990s levels, so that only changes in climate are allowed to impact ozone. The simulated surface ozone concentration during the 1990s is compared with observations from the Environmental Protection Agency's Aerometric Information Retrieval System (EPA AIRS) monitoring sites. Model-measurement correlations are high, but MOZART-2 overpredicts ozone especially over the eastern United States. The impact of climate change is calculated separately for background ozone and for the ozone generated through U.S. NOx emissions. Our results show that the response of ozone to climate change in polluted regions is not the same as in remote regions. MOZART-2 predicts a 0-2 ppbv decrease in background ozone in the future simulation over the United States but an increase in ozone produced internally within the United States of up to 6 ppbv. The decrease in background ozone is attributed to a future decrease in the lifetime of ozone in regions of low NOx. Over the western United States the decrease in background ozone approximately cancels the increase in locally produced ozone. As a result, the main impact of future climate change on ozone is centered over the eastern United States, where future ozone increases up to 5 ppbv. We predict that in the future over the northeast United States, up to 12 additional days each year will exceed the maximum daily 8-hour averaged ozone limit of 80 ppbv. Various climatic factors are

  7. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  8. Children's and adults' knowledge and models of reasoning about the ozone layer and its depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Bisanz, Gay L.

    2003-01-01

    As environmental concepts, the ozone layer and ozone hole are important to understand because they can profoundly influence our health. In this paper, we examined: (a) children's and adults' knowledge of the ozone layer and its depletion, and whether this knowledge increases with age' and (b) how the 'ozone layer' and 'ozone hole' might be structured as scientific concepts. We generated a standardized set of questions and used it to interview 24 kindergarten students, 48 Grade 3 students, 24 Grade 5 students, and 24 adults in university, in Canada. An analysis of participants' responses revealed that adults have more knowledge than children about the ozone layer and ozone hole, but both adults and children exhibit little knowledge about protecting themselves from the ozone hole. Moreover, only some participants exhibited 'mental models' in their conceptual understanding of the ozone layer and ozone hole. The implications of these results for health professionals, educators, and scientists are discussed.

  9. Plasmadynamic ozone generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, Yu. N.; Ogurechnikov, V. A.; Chizhov, Yu. L.

    2009-10-01

    The formation of ozone in a low-temperature supersonic flow of a mixture of air and partly dissociated oxygen supplied from a discharge plasmatron has been experimentally studied. For an oxygen mass fraction of 1.1% in the total gas flow supplied to this ozone generator, an ozone-air mixture containing 4.88 × 10-3 kg/m3 ozone is obtained at a specific energy consumption of 25.8 MJ/(kg ozone). In this regime, the ozone generator could operate for several dozen minutes.

  10. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For the historical perspective, the events leading up to the discovery of the 'hole' are presented, as well as the response from the international community and the measures taken to protect the ozone layer now and into the future.

  11. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  12. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    emitted species, in a process that is driven by sunlight and is accelerated by warm temperatures. This smog is largely the product of gasoline-powered engines (especially automobiles), although coal-fired industry can also generate photochemical smog. The process of photochemical smog formation was first identified by Haagen-Smit and Fox (1954) in association with Los Angeles, a city whose geography makes it particularly susceptible to this type of smog formation. Sulfate aerosols and organic particulates are often produced concurrently with ozone, giving rise to a characteristic milky-white haze associated with this type of air pollution.Today ozone and particulates are recognized as the air pollutants that are most likely to affect human health adversely. In the United States, most major metropolitan areas have periodic air pollution events with ozone in excess of government health standards. Violations of local health standards also occur in major cities in Canada and in much of Europe. Other cities around the world (especially Mexico City) also experience very high ozone levels. In addition to urban-scale events, elevated ozone occurs in region-wide events in the eastern USA and in Western Europe, with excess ozone extending over areas of 1,000 km2 or more. Ozone plumes of similar extent are found in the tropics (especially in Central Africa) at times of high biomass burning (e.g., Jenkins et al., 1997; Chatfield et al., 1998). In some cases ozone associated with biomass burning has been identified at distances up to 104 km from its sources (Schultz et al., 1999).Ozone also has a significant impact on the global troposphere, and ozone chemistry is a major component of global tropospheric chemistry. Global background ozone concentrations are much lower than urban or regional concentrations during pollution events, but there is evidence that the global background has increased as a result of human activities (e.g., Wang and Jacob, 1998; Volz and Kley, 1988). A rise in

  13. Ozone-induced changes in the expression of the genes encoding regulatory enzymes for polyamine, ethylene and phenylpropanoid metabolisms in ozone tolerant and sensitive birch (Betula pendula Roth) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Talvinen, J.; Pellinen, R.; Eloranta, T.; Kangasjaervi, J. ); Julkunen-Tiitto, R. ); Karjalainen, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Increase in the atmospheric ozone concentration has been shown to affect plant growth in several ways; from decreased photosynthetic activity to visible dames and in some extreme situations even to tissue death. Plants protect themselves from the damaging effect of ozone by inducing several physiological reactions. For example, increases in ethylene production, polyamine and phenylpropanoid synthesis have been observed in stress reaction induced by increased atmospheric ozone. similar changes, which are often called general stress reactions, are induced by several other biotic and which are often called general stress reactions, are induced by several other biontic and abiotic factors, e.g., plant pathogens. It has been shown previously that the production of stress ethylene can partly be responsible for the ozone damage formation in plants. Induction of stress-polyamine synthesis can prevent ethylene formation and is higher in some ozone-tolerant plants. We have exposed ozone sensitive and resistant birch clones to ozone (150 ppb. 8 hours) to analyze ozone-induced changes in the phenylpropanoid and polyamine metabolisms and gene expression. The polyamine and phenylpropanoid contents of the experimental material are currently being analyzed and the results will be presented. We have also cloned by PCR gene probes for birch ACC-synthase, arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and phenylalanine ammoniumlyase (PAL) genes. Results will be presented where the probes have been used to analyze ozone-induced expression of the genes in the birch clones.

  14. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  15. Impacts of Asian emissions on ozone air quality over western U.S. in spring and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.; Fiore, A. M.; Cooper, O. R.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.; Wyman, B.; Alvarez, R. J., II; Banta, R. M.; Bahreini, R.; Holloway, J. S.; Hardesty, R.; Johnson, B. J.; Langford, A. O.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Oltmans, S. J.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Senff, C. J.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    conduct AM3 model simulations at multiple horizontal resolutions (currently ~2 degrees with a target resolution of 0.25 degrees) to gauge the relative importance of synoptic (e.g. large-scale subsidence over the western U.S. following warm conveyor belt transport in spring) vs. meso-scale (e.g. surface-heating driven mountain-valley flow and land-sea breezes in summer) processes in controlling daily to seasonal variability of Asian pollution in the free troposphere and subsequent mixing into the western U.S. boundary layer. We will further explore the role of Asian emissions in exceedances of the 8-hour 70 ppbv ozone standard in the state of California.

  16. Surface Ozone evolution in Coastal Continental Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Comas, M.; Yela, M.; Gil, M.; Parrondo, M. C.; Ochoa, H.

    2009-04-01

    Surface ozone measurements from two complete years (February 2007 to February 2009) at Belgrano station (Antarctica, 78°S, 35°W) are presented. Belgrano is a coastal station lying approximately 20 km from the Weddell Sea coast and located 256 m above sea level. A UV photometric ozone analyzer, model TEI 49C, was deployed with the double purpose of, in the first place, perform the quality control of ozonesounding before launching and, on second place, background ozone monitoring in a long term basis. The two years data analysis shows an annual ozone cycle with one month lag on surface ozone data and the solstices. The ozone maximum is reached in mid-winter (in July), while the minimum is attained in summer (in January) in opposition of typical mid-latitude continental observatories, but in agreement with other coastal observatories in Antarctica. The daily mean maximum observed during the whole period peaks at 36.5 ppbv in July and the minimum value observed was found to be 6.9 ppbv, in December. The mean surface ozone concentration value calculated during the observational period was 24.3 ppbv with a standard deviation of 7.7 ppbv. The fast transition night to day that takes place in Belgrano does not correlate with the seasonal ozone distribution suggesting that distribution may be controlled by transport mechanisms with a minor contribution of the photochemistry. It is also observed a higher day to day variation after the polar night, during the Antarctic spring and summer. Several depleted ozone events have been found along the observational period during the Austral spring (October-December) season, attributable to photochemical catalyzed ozone depletion from halogen chemistry. During those days, the ozone mixing ration drops until only a few ppbv in a short period of time (within a few hours). BrO observation from the satellite instrument SCIAMACHY shows large patterns of enhancements of BrO in the Weddell Sea during those days and calculated HYSPLIT

  17. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2012-08-01

    Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone-associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor-generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air-­exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

  18. Airliner cabin ozone: An updated review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, C.E.

    1989-12-01

    The recent literature pertaining to ozone contamination of airliner cabins is reviewed. Measurements in airliner cabins without filters showed that ozone levels were about 50 percent of atmospheric ozone. Filters were about 90 percent effective in destroying ozone. Ozone (0.12 to 0.14 ppmv) caused mild subjective respiratory irritation in exercising men, but 0.20 to 0.30 ppmv did not have adverse effects on patients with chronic heart or lung disease. Ozone (1.0 to 2.0 ppmv) decreased survival time of influenza-infected rats and mice and suppressed the capacity of lung macrophages to destroy Listeria. Airway responses to ozone are divided into an early parasympathetically mediated bronchoconstrictive phase and a later histamine-mediated congestive phase. Evidence indicates that intracellular free radicals are responsible for ozone damage and that the damage may be spread to other cells by toxic intermediate products: Antioxidants provide some protection to cells in vitro from ozone but dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins by humans has only a weak effect, if any. This review indicates that earlier findings regarding ozone toxicity do not need to be corrected. Compliance with existing FAA ozone standards appears to provide adequate protection to aircrews and passengers.

  19. Ozone Trend Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The detection of anthropogenic disturbances in the Earth's ozone layer was studied. Two topics were addressed: (1) the level at which a trend in total ozoning is detected by existing data sources; and (2) empirical evidence in the prediction of the depletion in total ozone. Error sources are identified. The predictability of climatological series, whether empirical models can be trusted, and how errors in the Dobson total ozone data impact trend detectability, are discussed.

  20. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  1. Ozone columns obtained by ground-based remote sensing in Kiev for Aura Ozone Measuring Instrument validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavrina, A. V.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Veles, A.; Syniavskyi, I.; Kroon, M.

    2007-12-01

    Ground-based observations with a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared region (FTIR) were performed in Kiev (Ukraine) during the time frames August-October 2005 and June-October 2006 within the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) validation project 2907 entitled "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and profiles" in the frame of the international European Space Agency/Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programmes/Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute OMI Announcement of Opportunity effort. Ozone column data for 2005 were obtained by modeling the ozone spectral band at 9.6 μm with the radiative transfer code MODTRAN3.5. Our total ozone column values were found to be lower than OMI Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) total ozone column data by 8-10 Dobson units (DU, 1 DU = 0.001 atm cm) on average, while our observations have a relatively small standard error of about 2 DU. Improved modeling of the ozone spectral band, now based on HITRAN-2004 spectral data as calculated by us, moves our results toward better agreement with the OMI DOAS total ozone column data. The observations made during 2006 with a modernized FTIR spectrometer and higher signal-to-noise ratio were simulated by the MODTRAN4 model computations. For ozone column estimates the Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder satellite water vapor and temperature profiles were combined with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric ozone profiles and Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service-Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Instituut climatological profiles to create a priori input files for spectral modeling. The MODTRAN4 estimates of ozone columns from the 2006 observations compare rather well with the OMI total ozone column data: standard errors are of 1.11 DU and 0.68 DU, standard deviation are of 8.77 DU and 5.37 DU for OMI DOAS and OMI Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, respectively.

  2. Ozone drinking water treatment handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This book explains how ozone can be used to provide primary disinfection, while minimizing halogenated by-products. This is of use to those who design pilot plant studies in full scale ozone plants-and those who employ ozone and regulatory personnel. Detailed section on components of an ozonization system outlines feed gas preparation (air and oxygen), ozone generation, ozone contacting, ozone off gas destruction, monitoring and control of ozonation systems, engineering aspects of ozone, cost factors in ozone technology, case histories (European and U.S.).

  3. Ozone Antimicrobial Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is a potent germicide that has been used extensively for water purification. In Europe, 90 percent of the municipal water systems are treated with ozone, and in France, ozone has been used to treat drinking water since 1903. However, there is limited information on the bioc...

  4. Using Ozone Lidar to Investigate Sources of High Ozone Concentrations in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brewer, Wm. A.; Banta, R. M.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Sandberg, S. P.; Weickmann, A. M.; Holloway, J. S.; Williams, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    We have used NOAA's Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and oZone (TOPAZ) ozone lidar to investigate the sources of high surface ozone concentrations in two different regions of the western United States (US): the Uintah Basin in northeast Utah and Clark County in southern Nevada, which includes the city of Las Vegas. The Uintah Basin is a booming oil and gas producing region that often suffers from very high wintertime ozone concentrations. Clark County experiences violations of the US ozone standard primarily in spring and early summer despite a lack of any major local pollution sources. TOPAZ lidar observations, in conjunction with surface in situ measurements and model results, provided strong evidence that the high wintertime ozone concentrations in the Uintah Basin are primarily driven by local emissions associated with oil and gas exploration, whereas the Clark County ozone exceedances are often caused by ozone-rich air that is transported from the lower stratosphere all the way down to the earth's surface.

  5. Projections of Future Summertime Ozone over the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, G. G.; Walters, Stacy; Lamarque, J. F.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barth, Mary; Wong, John; Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy

    2014-05-05

    This study uses a regional fully coupled chemistry-transport model to assess changes in surface ozone over the summertime U.S. between present and a 2050 future time period at high spatial resolution (12 km grid spacing) under the SRES A2 climate and RCP8.5 anthropogenic pre-cursor emission scenario. The impact of predicted changes in climate and global background ozone is estimated to increase surface ozone over most of the U.S; the 5th - 95th percentile range for daily 8-hour maximum surface ozone increases from 31-79 ppbV to 30-87 ppbV between the present and future time periods. The analysis of a set of meteorological drivers suggests that these mostly will add to increasing ozone, but the set of simulations conducted does not allow to separate this effect from that through enhanced global background ozone. Statistically the most robust positive feedbacks are through increased temperature, biogenic emissions and solar radiation. Stringent emission controls can counteract these feedbacks and if considered, we estimate large reductions in surface ozone with the 5th-95th percentile reduced to 27-55 ppbV. A comparison of the high-resolution projections to global model projections shows that even though the global model is biased high in surface ozone compared to the regional model and compared to observations, both the global and the regional model predict similar changes in ozone between the present and future time periods. However, on smaller spatial scales, the regional predictions show more pronounced changes between urban and rural regimes that cannot be resolved at the coarse resolution of global model. In addition, the sign of the changes in overall ozone mixing ratios can be different between the global and the regional predictions in certain regions, such as the Western U.S. This study confirms the key role of emission control strategies in future air quality predictions and demonstrates the need for considering degradation of air quality with future

  6. Tropospheric Ozone Pollution from Space: New Views from the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Hudson, Robert D.; Frolov, Alexander D.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Kucsera, Tom L.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    New products from the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) >satellite instrument can resolve pollution events in tropical and mid-latitudes, Over the past several years, we have developed tropospheric ozone data sets by two methods. The modified-residual technique [Hudson and Thompson, 1998; Thompson and Hudson, 1999] uses v. 7 TOMS total ozone and is applicable to tropical regimes in which the wave-one pattern in total ozone is observed. The TOMSdirect method [Hudson et at., 2000] represents a new algorithm that uses TOMS radiances to extract tropospheric ozone in regions of constant stratospheric ozone and tropospheric ozone displaying high mixing ratios and variability characteristic of pollution, Absorbing aerosols (dust and smoke; Herman et at., 1997 Hsu et al., 1999), a standard TOMS product, provide transport and/or source marker information to interpret tropospheric ozone. For the Nimbus 7/TOMS observing period (1979-1992), modified-residual TTO (tropical tropospheric ozone) appears as two maps/month at I-degree latitude 2-degree longitude resolution at a homepage and digital data are available (20S to 20N) by ftp at http://metosrv2. umd.edu/tropo/ 14y_data.d. Preliminary modified-residual TTO data from the operational Earth-Probe/TOMS (1996- present) are posted in near-real-time at the same website. Analyses with the new tropospheric ozone and aerosol data are illustrated by the following (I)Signals in tropical tropospheric ozone column and smoke amount during ENSO (El Nino-Southern Oscillation) events, e.g. 1982-1983 and the intense ENSO induced biomass fires of 1997-1998 over the Indonesian region [Thompson et a[, 2000a, Thompson and Hudson, 1999]. (2) Trends in tropospheric ozone and smoke aerosols in various tropical regions (Atlantic, Pacific, Africa, Brazil). No significant trends were found for ozone from1980-1990 [Thompson and Hudson, 19991 although smoke aerosols increased during the period [Hsu et al.,1999]. (3) Temporal and spatial offsets

  7. Historical Exceedance Days in New England | Ground-level ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    A chart showing the number of days air quality monitors in each New England state recorded ozone concentrations exceeding the 1997 8-hour ozone standard (that is, days greater than 0.084 parts per million (ppm)), as well as the number of days exceeding the 2008 8-hour ozone standard (that is, days greater than 0.075 ppm).

  8. 77 FR 67600 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designation of Areas for Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule... plan for maintaining the 1997 8-hour ozone standard in Clark County for ten years beyond redesignation... Environmental Protection to redesignate the Clark County ozone nonattainment area to attainment of the 1997...

  9. Rocket Ozone Data Recovery for Digital Archival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S. H.; Krueger, A. J.; Hilsenrath, E.; Haffner, D. P.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ozone distributions in the photochemically-controlled upper stratosphere and mesosphere were first measured using spectrometers on V-2 rockets after WWII. The IGY(1957-1958) spurred development of new optical and chemical instruments for flight on meteorological and sounding rockets. In the early 1960's, the US Navy developed an Arcas rocket-borne optical ozonesonde and NASA GSFC developed chemiluminescent ozonesonde onboard Nike_Cajun and Arcas rocket. The Navy optical ozone program was moved in 1969 to GSFC where rocket ozone research was expanded and continued until 1994 using Super Loki-Dart rocket at 11 sites in the range of 0-65N and 35W-160W. Over 300 optical ozone soundings and 40 chemiluminescent soundings were made. The data have been used to produce the US Standard Ozone Atmosphere, determine seasonal and diurnal variations, and validate early photochemical models. The current effort includes soundings conducted by Australia, Japan, and Korea using optical techniques. New satellite ozone sounding techniques were initially calibrated and later validated using the rocket ozone data. As satellite techniques superseded the rocket methods, the sponsoring agencies lost interest in the data and many of those records have been discarded. The current task intends to recover as much of the data as possible from the private records of the experimenters and their publications, and to archive those records in the WOUDC (World Ozone and Ultraviolet Data Centre). The original data records are handwritten tabulations, computer printouts that are scanned with OCR techniques, and plots digitized from publications. This newly recovered digital rocket ozone profile data from 1965 to 2002 could make significant contributions to the Earth science community in atmospheric research including long-term trend analysis.

  10. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  11. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  12. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  13. On the "ozone deficit problem": what are Ox and HOx catalytic cycles for ozone depletion hiding?

    PubMed

    Varandas, António J C

    2002-05-17

    Studies on the role of vibrational excitation in the reactants for the O2 + O2, OH + O2, and HO2 + O2 reactions show that they can be important sources of ozone in the stratosphere, particularly at conditions of local thermodynamic disequilibrium. The results suggest that the Ox and HOx cycles commonly viewed as catalytic sinks of ozone may actually lead to its production, and hence help to clarify the "ozone deficit problem". This paper also presents an explanation for the general overestimation of the OH abundance in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere through standard HOx chemistry.

  14. Multi-Model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Surface Ozone Over the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  15. Multi-model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Ozone Concentrations over the United States (CM

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  16. 76 FR 28661 - Interim Final Determination To Defer Sanctions, Sacramento Metro 1-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Interim Final Determination To Defer Sanctions, Sacramento Metro 1-Hour Ozone... the Sacramento Metro 1- hour Ozone nonattainment area (Sacramento Metro Area) to satisfy anti- backsliding requirements for the 1-hour Ozone standard. DATES: This interim final determination is...

  17. Multi-model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Ozone Concentrations over the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  18. 77 FR 13974 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York State Ozone Implementation Plan Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York State Ozone... (SIP) for ozone concerning the control of volatile organic compounds. The proposed SIP revision... will help attain and maintain the national ambient air quality standards for ozone. DATES:...

  19. 76 FR 60820 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY... titled, ``Second External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical... ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. EPA is releasing this draft document to seek review...

  20. 77 FR 36534 - Third External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... AGENCY Third External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical... External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants'' (EPA/600... Standards (NAAQS) for ozone. EPA is releasing this draft document to seek review by the Clean Air...

  1. 76 FR 77178 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York State Ozone Implementation Plan Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New York State Ozone... Implementation Plan (SIP) for ozone concerning the control of volatile organic compounds. The proposed SIP... reductions that will help attain and maintain the national ambient air quality standards for ozone....

  2. 76 FR 10893 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants AGENCY... review draft of a document titled, ``First External Review Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone... review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. EPA is releasing this...

  3. Children's and Adults' Knowledge and Models of Reasoning about the Ozone Layer and Its Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Bisanz, Gay L.

    2003-01-01

    Examines children's and adults' knowledge of the ozone layer and its depletion, whether this knowledge increases with age, and how the ozone layer and ozone hole might be structured as scientific concepts. Uses a standardized set of questions to interview children and adults in Canada. Discusses implications of the results for health…

  4. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has released the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft) for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  5. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has released the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Third External Review Draft) for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  6. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced that the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  7. 2013 Final Report: Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is announcing the availability of the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Final Report). This document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  8. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants. This document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant science and will ultimately provide the scientific bases for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current national ambient air quality standards for ozone to protect human health, public welfare, and the environment. Critical evaluation and integration of the evidence on health and environmental effects of ozone to provide scientific support for the review of the NAAQS for ozone.

  9. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR OZONE AND RELATED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Act requires periodic (5-year) update revision of criteria and National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone. The previous revision of the criteria contained in the Air Quality Criteria Document (AQCD) for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants was co...

  10. Oxidation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in water. 1: Ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Encinar, J.M.; Rivas, J.; Ovejero, G.

    1995-05-01

    The oxidation of three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fluorene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene, in aqueous solution with ozone has been studied. The influence of hydroxyl radical inhibitors, pH, ozone partial pressure, and temperature was investigated. All the PAHs studied show high oxidation rates with ozone. The ozonation of fluorene seems to be due to both direct and hydroxyl radical reactions while for the rest of the PAHs the ozonation develops only through direct reactions with ozone. Rate constants for the direct reaction between these PAHs and ozone have also been calculated. The reactivity with ozone goes in the following order: fluorene < phenanthrene < acenaphthene. The contribution of radical reactions represents more than 90% in the ozonation of fluorene in most cases except in the presence of hydroxyl radical inhibitors. In a standard agitated reactor the kinetic regime of the absorption of ozone corresponds to a slow reaction in the case of fluorene and phenanthrene and to a fast reaction in the case of acenaphthene.

  11. 40 CFR 96.306 - Standard requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.306 Standard requirements. (a) Permit requirements. (1) The CAIR designated representative of each CAIR NOX Ozone Season source required to have a title V operating permit and each CAIR NOX Ozone Season unit required to have a title V operating...

  12. 40 CFR 96.306 - Standard requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.306 Standard requirements. (a) Permit requirements. (1) The CAIR designated representative of each CAIR NOX Ozone Season source required to have a title V operating permit and each CAIR NOX Ozone Season unit required to have a title V operating...

  13. 40 CFR 96.306 - Standard requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.306 Standard requirements. (a) Permit requirements. (1) The CAIR designated representative of each CAIR NOX Ozone Season source required to have a title V operating permit and each CAIR NOX Ozone Season unit required to have a title V operating...

  14. 40 CFR 96.306 - Standard requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.306 Standard requirements. (a) Permit requirements. (1) The CAIR designated representative of each CAIR NOX Ozone Season source required to have a title V operating permit and each CAIR NOX Ozone Season unit required to have a title V operating...

  15. 40 CFR 96.306 - Standard requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NOX Ozone Season Trading Program General Provisions § 96.306 Standard requirements. (a) Permit requirements. (1) The CAIR designated representative of each CAIR NOX Ozone Season source required to have a title V operating permit and each CAIR NOX Ozone Season unit required to have a title V operating...

  16. Effects of nitrogen oxide emission controls on Eastern US surface ozone: A comparison between urban cores and rural background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls have led to improved air quality over the past two decades, particularly over the Eastern US. In recent work we quantified the effects of the efforts to abate surface ozone (O3) pollution under the NOx State Implementation Plan (NOx SIP Call) for Eastern US background sites (available from the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET)) using methods from statistical extreme value theory (Rieder et al., 2013). Our analysis showed that the number of summer (JJA) days above the US national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) declined on average by a factor of two between 1988-1998 and 1999-2009 and that probabilistic 1-yr O3 return values declined by about 10 ppb between these two time periods. Here we extend the analysis to observations available from the US EPA Air Quality System (AQS), comprising sites ranging from polluted urban cores to rural sites. We focus on changes in (i) the seasonal and annual average number of days with maximum daily 8-hour average surface O3 above the NAAQS and (ii) probabilistic O3 return values following the NOx SIP Call. Particular focus is given on similarities and differences in surface O3 responses on regional to local level and on contrasting urban cores and rural background sites. References: Rieder H.E., Fiore A.M., Polvani L.M., Lamarque J.-F., Fang Y. (2013): Changes in the frequency and return level of high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States following emission controls, Environ. Res. Lett., 8, 014012, 2013.

  17. Total ozone trend significance from space time variability of daily Dobson data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Estimates of standard errors of total ozone time and area means, as derived from ozone's natural temporal and spatial variability and autocorrelation in middle latitudes determined from daily Dobson data are presented. Assessing the significance of apparent total ozone trends is equivalent to assessing the standard error of the means. Standard errors of time averages depend on the temporal variability and correlation of the averaged parameter. Trend detectability is discussed, both for the present network and for satellite measurements.

  18. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  19. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  20. The High Resolution Tropospheric Ozone Residual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    The co-flight of the MLS stratospheric limb sounder and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provides the capability of computing the Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) in much greater detail [Ziemke et al., 2006]. Using forward trajectory calculations of MLS ozone measurements combined with OMI column ozone we have developed a high horizontal resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) which can provide even more detail than the standard TOR product. HTOR is especially useful for extra-tropical studies of tropospheric ozone transport. We find that both the Pacific pollution corridor (East Asia to Alaska) and the Atlantic pollution corridor (North America east coast to Europe) are also preferred locations for strat-trop folds leading to systematic overestimates of pollution amounts. In fact, fold events appear to dominate extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere day-to-day maps of HTOR. Model estimates of the tropospheric column are in reasonable agreement with the HTOR amounts when offsets due to different tropopause height calculations are taken into consideration.

  1. Evidence for vertical ozone redistribution since 1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, R.; Doehler, W.; Kirsch, H.-J.; Plessing, P.; Goersdorf, U.

    1992-12-01

    Long-term measurements of ozone concentration in the vicinity of the city of Berlin have been performed with ground-based Dobson spectrophotometers and balloon borne systems. The respective experiments cover the past 24 yr. All data have been re-evaluated and corrected towards uniform calibration standards, leading to the longest lasting European data set of total column density, altitude-dependent ozone partial pressures and the corresponding temperatures. Smoothing algorithms reveal significant long-term trends. The analysis shows an increase of ozone concentration within the middle stratosphere (below 31 km height) as well as in the troposphere over the past 24 yr. On the contrary, ongoing ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere became evident. The large scale vertical redistribution of atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere seems to be in agreement with model calculations and trend predictions that have their roots in changes of the chemical composition and the ozone photochemistry due to anthropogenically induced tracer gas concentrations.

  2. The High Resolution Tropospheric Ozone Residual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Ziemke, J.; Bhartia, P.; Froidevaux, L.; Levelt, P.

    2006-12-01

    The co-flight of the MLS stratospheric limb sounder and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) provides the capability of computing the Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) in much greater detail [Ziemke et al., 2006]. Using forward trajectory calculations of MLS ozone measurements combined with OMI column ozone we have developed a high horizontal resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) which can provide even more detail than the standard TOR product. HTOR is especially useful for extra-tropical studies of tropospheric ozone transport. We find that both the Pacific pollution corridor (East Asia to Alaska) and the Atlantic pollution corridor (North America east coast to Europe) are also preferred locations for strat-trop folds leading to systematic over-estimates of pollution amounts. In fact, fold events appear to dominate extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere day-to-day maps of HTOR. Model estimates of the tropospheric column are in reasonable agreement with the HTOR amounts when offsets due to different tropopause height calculations are taken into consideration.

  3. Tropospheric Ozone Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Lefohn, A. S.; Scheel, H.; Brunke, E. G.; Claude, H.; Tarasick, D. W.; Galbally, I.; Bodeker, G.; Redondas, A.; Simmonds, P.; Koide, T.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Harris, J. M.; Johnson, B. J.; Davies, J.; Cuevas, E.; Meyer, C.; Shadwick, D.

    2008-12-01

    Growing recognition of the role of "background" tropospheric ozone on climate forcing and as a boundary condition for air quality changes highlights the importance of obtaining a broad picture of tropospheric ozone changes. Key surface and ozonesonde observing sites with tropospheric ozone measurement records longer than ~15 years have been selected to characterize longer term tropospheric ozone changes over broad geographic regions. The sites chosen vary from those with minimal impact by local ozone pollution sources to those that are in relatively close proximity to ozone precursor emissions and are thus affected in part by these sources. Consideration is given to the extent to which various time series represent broad geographic scales. Some series with more limited geographic representativeness can provide valuable information because of the length of the record, particularly in an underrepresented region. The vertical profile information from the ozonesonde stations, which have some of the longest tropospheric ozone records, provides a unique perspective on ozone in the free troposphere that is much less influenced by more local conditions. The general slowing or flattening of ozone increases seen at a number of locations beginning in the early 1990s has generally continued. At Naha, Japan there has been a significant increase in recent years that has not been seen at other Japanese ozonesonde locations. At high latitudes over North America a decade long decline in tropospheric ozone beginning in the 1980s has generally reversed with amounts now similar to those at the beginning of the record. In the S.H. several sites in the mid latitudes have shown significant increases. Although some overall patterns on changes emerge on regional scales and in some cases on continental scales, more general conclusions on hemispheric and global scales do not emerge. This is likely consistent with the varied pattern of ozone lifetimes, precursor emission changes, and

  4. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  5. Multi sensor reanalysis of total ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der A, R. J.; Allaart, M. A. F.; Eskes, H. J.

    2010-11-01

    A single coherent total ozone dataset, called the Multi Sensor Reanalysis (MSR), has been created from all available ozone column data measured by polar orbiting satellites in the near-ultraviolet Huggins band in the last thirty years. Fourteen total ozone satellite retrieval datasets from the instruments TOMS (on the satellites Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe), SBUV (Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, NOAA-11 and NOAA-16), GOME (ERS-2), SCIAMACHY (Envisat), OMI (EOS-Aura), and GOME-2 (Metop-A) have been used in the MSR. As first step a bias correction scheme is applied to all satellite observations, based on independent ground-based total ozone data from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Data Center. The correction is a function of solar zenith angle, viewing angle, time (trend), and effective ozone temperature. As second step data assimilation was applied to create a global dataset of total ozone analyses. The data assimilation method is a sub-optimal implementation of the Kalman filter technique, and is based on a chemical transport model driven by ECMWF meteorological fields. The chemical transport model provides a detailed description of (stratospheric) transport and uses parameterisations for gas-phase and ozone hole chemistry. The MSR dataset results from a 30-year data assimilation run with the 14 corrected satellite datasets as input, and is available on a grid of 1× 1 1/2° with a sample frequency of 6 h for the complete time period (1978-2008). The Observation-minus-Analysis (OmA) statistics show that the bias of the MSR analyses is less than 1% with an RMS standard deviation of about 2% as compared to the corrected satellite observations used.

  6. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In February 2006, EPA released the final document, Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Other Photochemical Oxidants. Tropospheric or surface-level ozone (O3) is one of six major air pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under the U.S. Clean Air Act. As mandated by the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must periodically review the scientific bases (or criteria) for the various NAAQS by assessing newly available scientific information on a given criteria air pollutant. This document, Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Other Photochemical Oxidants, is an updated revision of the 1996 Ozone Air Quality Criteria Document (O3 AQCD) that provided scientific bases for the current O3 NAAQS set in 1997. The Clean Air Act mandates periodic review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six common air pollutants, also referred to as criteria pollutants, including ozone.

  7. Modeling of Regional Climate Change Effects on Ground-Level Ozone and Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheffield, Perry E.; Knowlton, Kim; Carr, Jessie L.; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The adverse respiratory effects of ground-level ozone are well-established. Ozone is the air pollutant most consistently projected to increase under future climate change. Purpose To project future pediatric asthma emergency department visits associated with ground-level ozone changes, comparing 1990s to 2020s. Methods This study assessed future numbers of asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years using (1) baseline New York City metropolitan area emergency department rates, (2) a dose–response relationship between ozone levels and pediatric asthma emergency department visits, and (3) projected daily 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations for the 2020s as simulated by a global-to-regional climate change and atmospheric chemistry model. Sensitivity analyses included population projections and ozone precursor changes. This analysis occurred in 2010. Results In this model, climate change could cause an increase in regional summer ozone-related asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years of 7.3% across the New York City metropolitan region by the 2020s. This effect diminished with inclusion of ozone precursor changes. When population growth is included, the projections of morbidity related to ozone are even larger. Conclusions The results of this analysis demonstrate that the use of regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models make possible the projection of local climate change health effects for specific age groups and specific disease outcomes – such as emergency department visits for asthma. Efforts should be made to improve on this type of modeling to inform local and wider-scale climate change mitigation and adaptation policy. PMID:21855738

  8. SMM mesospheric ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    The main objective was to understand the secular and seasonal behavior of ozone in the lower mesosphere, 50 to 70 km. This altitude region is important in understanding the factors which determine ozone behavior. A secondary objective is the study of stratospheric ozone in the polar regions. Use is made of results from the SBUV satellite borne instrument. In the Arctic the interaction between chlorine compounds and low molecular weight hydrocarbons is studied. More than 30,000 profiles were obtained using the UVSP instrument on the SMM spacecraft. Several orbits of ozone data per day were obtained allowing study of the current rise in solar activity from the minimum until the present. Analysis of Nimbus 7 SBUV data in Antarctic spring indicates that ozone is depleted within the polar vortex relative to ozone outside the vortex. This depletion confirms the picture of ozone loss at altitudes where polar stratospheric clouds exist. In addition, there is ozone loss above the cloud level indicating that there is another mechanism in addition to ozone loss initiated by heterogeneous chlorine reactions on cloud particles.

  9. Emission sources sensitivity study for ground-level ozone and PM2.5 due to oil sands development using air quality modeling system: Part I- model evaluation for current year base case simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sunny; McEachern, Preston; Morris, Ralph; Shah, Tejas; Johnson, Jeremiah; Nopmongcol, Uarporn

    2012-08-01

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) and the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) modeling systems were used to simulate emissions and air quality in North Eastern Alberta where a rapid rise in oil sands development has caused air quality concerns over the last decade. The models were run on a 36/12/4 km domain for the four month period of May through August 2002. A model performance evaluation was conducted by comparing the CMAQ model estimates against ambient air quality measurements. In the Alberta oil sands region, the model tended to achieve or nearly achieve ozone model performance goals, albeit with an underestimation bias. The magnitudes of the observed PM2.5 concentrations were matched by the modeling system, except when the observed PM2.5 concentrations were influenced by emissions from forest fires in which case the model underestimated the observed PM2.5 concentrations. The CMAQ-estimated 4th highest daily maximum 8-hour ozone concentrations in the oil sands region were below the 65 ppb Canada Wide Standard (CWS) as well as the 58 ppb Alberta Management Plan Trigger Level. The highest estimated ozone concentrations occurred near the oil sands development area just north of Fort McMurray with values approaching, but below, the 58 ppb Management Plan Trigger Level; estimated ozone concentrations are much lower in the farther northern portions of the oil sands region. The acute (i.e., maximum 3-day value) SUM60 vegetative ozone exposure metric was mostly less than 100 ppb h, which is below the threshold of concern for crops. However, just north of Fort McMurray there were small areas where the acute SUM60 metric exceeded the 500-700 ppb h threshold of concern for crops with maximum values in plumes from sources in the oil sands mine area of ˜900 ppb h. The maximum chronic (three-month average) SUM60 ozone exposure metric was below the thresholds of concern. The CMAQ-estimated maximum 98th percentile 24-hour average PM2.5 concentration

  10. 75 FR 31288 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for... data that show the area has monitored attainment of the 8-hour ozone NAAQS for the 2006-2008 monitoring period. In addition, quality-assured and certified ozone data for 2009, show that this area continues...

  11. 40 CFR 51.910 - What requirements for reasonable further progress (RFP) under sections 172(c)(2) and 182 apply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.910 Section 51.910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.910 What... nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What are the general requirements for RFP for an area...

  12. 40 CFR 51.910 - What requirements for reasonable further progress (RFP) under sections 172(c)(2) and 182 apply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.910 Section 51.910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.910 What... nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What are the general requirements for RFP for an area...

  13. 40 CFR 51.910 - What requirements for reasonable further progress (RFP) under sections 172(c)(2) and 182 apply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.910 Section 51.910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.910 What... nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What are the general requirements for RFP for an area...

  14. 40 CFR 51.910 - What requirements for reasonable further progress (RFP) under sections 172(c)(2) and 182 apply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.910 Section 51.910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.910 What... nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What are the general requirements for RFP for an area...

  15. 40 CFR 51.910 - What requirements for reasonable further progress (RFP) under sections 172(c)(2) and 182 apply...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hour ozone NAAQS? 51.910 Section 51.910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.910 What... nonattainment for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS? (a) What are the general requirements for RFP for an area...

  16. 76 FR 40624 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The rationale for this action is explained in this notice and... sections 110(a)(1) and (2) necessary to implement, maintain, and enforce the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. II... enforcement of the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. The rationale supporting EPA's proposed action is explained in...

  17. Ozone: Stage Two Vapor Recovery Rule and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page includes the guidance document, fact sheet, memorandum, and final rule on removing Stage II Gasoline Vapor Control Programs from State Implementation Plans (SIP) for the Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)

  18. Ozone trends in Atlanta, Georgia - Have emission controls been effective?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Chameldes, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nine years of summertime ozone data from the Atlanta metropolitan area are analyzed and compared to local emissions of volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides. Trends from 1979 to 1987 were studied for the number of days per year ozone exceeded the NAAQS standard, the second-highest ozone level observed per year, and the first quartile summertime average ozone observed, as well as the mean difference between the ozone level observed downwind and upwind of the city. Because this last parameter is sensitive to chemical factors but relatively insensitive to the number of days each year with meteorological conditions conducive to ozone formation, its trend may be best suited for determining how effective emission controls have been in reducing O3 in the Atlanta area. In spite of the fact that sizeable reductions have been claimed for volatile organic carbon emissions over the past several years, the data give no indication that ozone levels have decreased and in fact, imply that summertime ozone production may have increased. The results imply that either emissions have not decreased as much as has been claimed or that ozone is not sensitive to anthropogenic volatile organic carbon emissions.

  19. Vertical ozone characteristics in urban boundary layer in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Xu, Honghui; Meng, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Jing; Liu, Quan; Wang, Yuesi

    2013-07-01

    Vertical ozone and meteorological parameters were measured by tethered balloon in the boundary layer in the summer of 2009 in Beijing, China. A total of 77 tethersonde soundings were taken during the 27-day campaign. The surface ozone concentrations measured by ozonesondes and TEI 49C showed good agreement, albeit with temporal difference between the two instruments. Two case studies of nocturnal secondary ozone maxima are discussed in detail. The development of the low-level jet played a critical role leading to the observed ozone peak concentrations in nocturnal boundary layer (NBL). The maximum of surface ozone was 161.7 ppbv during the campaign, which could be attributed to abundant precursors storage near surface layer at nighttime. Vertical distribution of ozone was also measured utilizing conventional continuous analyzers on 325-m meteorological observation tower. The results showed the NBL height was between 47 and 280 m, which were consistent with the balloon data. Southerly air flow could bring ozone-rich air to Beijing, and the ozone concentrations exceeded the China's hourly ozone standard (approximately 100 ppb) above 600 m for more than 12 h.

  20. Ozone as a bioregulator. Pharmacology and toxicology of ozonetherapy today.

    PubMed

    Bocci, V

    1996-01-01

    The disinfectant activity of ozone is well recognized and ozone is used worldwide for sterilization of water. The use of ozone as a complementary medical approach is less known, because it has mostly been used in an empirical fashion without a rational basis and appropriate controls. In spite of this drawback, the use of judicious and standardized ozone dosages can elicit the formation of ROS acting as natural physiological activators of several biological functions. There is now a reasonable understanding of a few mechanisms of action and, using classical pharmacological concepts, it appears possible to formulate a rationale for optimizing clinical applications. A further exciting development is that ozone, being an oxidizer, can upregulate the intracellular anti-oxidant enzymes eventually inhibiting the constant, life-long oxidative stress responsible for degenerative diseases and aging. Among various routes for the administration of ozone, the autohemotransfusion procedure, consisting in exposing blood to ozone, i.e. to a calculated and brief oxidative stress, appears safe, simple, inexpensive and amenable to be adjusted to different pathological states It is hoped that this review will help to dispel prejudices, to clarify that ozone toxicity can be tamed, to show that ozone can act as a bioregulator and to encourage controlled clinical investigations to evaluate definitely the validity of ozonetherapy.

  1. The impact of meteorological persistence on the distribution and extremes of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenxiu; Hess, Peter; Liu, Chengji

    2017-02-01

    CASTNET (Clean Air Status and Trends Network) ozone and temperature data and large-scale meteorological analysis are used to quantify the extent to which meteorological events and their persistence impact ozone with an emphasis on the high end of the ozone distribution (greater than the 90th percentile). Ozone increases with each successive stagnation day in all regions of the U.S., with the highest increase in the Northeastern U.S. (0.4 standard deviation or ˜4.7 ppb per successive stagnation day). Ozone increases with days since cyclone passage only in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the U.S., but on average not enough to reach the 90th percentile concentration. Persistent high temperature does not result in further ozone increases in any region. On the interannual timescale there is little evidence that summers with large numbers of the above events increase ozone preferentially on the high end of the ozone distribution.

  2. An evaluation of electrochemical concentration Cell (ECC) sonde measurements of atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geraci, M. J.; Luers, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Using Dobson spectrophotometer measurements of total ozone as a comparison, an analysis of the electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde's measurement accuracy is presented. Days of conjunctive ECC-Dobson observations (from 1970 to 1976 at Wallops Flight Center) provide a set of 123 pairs of total ozone values. Sample set statistics are generated with means and standard deviations of total ozone values and differences being noted. An in-depth study of factors such as time assumptions used in calculating residual ozone, and other possible sources of errors are examined. A study of ECC ozone profiles is also presented with an evaluation of sonde measurement of seasonal trends, altitude or peak ozone concentration, and other important ozone parameters. Short-period changes in total ozone using Dobson data during the observational period are also described.

  3. Ozone NAAQS Review: Risk/Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is one of the six major air pollutants for which EPA has issued air quality criteria and established national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) based on those criteria. The Clear Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, existing air ...

  4. Sensitivity analysis of ground level ozone in India using WRF-CMAQ models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Chatani, Satoru; Mahtta, Richa; Goel, Anju; Kumar, Atul

    2016-04-01

    Ground level ozone is emerging as a pollutant of concern in India. Limited surface monitoring data reveals that ozone concentrations are well above the prescribed national standards. This study aims to simulate the regional and urban scale ozone concentrations in India using WRF-CMAQ models. Sector-specific emission inventories are prepared for the ozone precursor species at a finer resolution (36 × 36 km2) than used in previous studies. Meteorological fields developed using the WRF model are fed into the CMAQ model along with the precursor emissions to simulate ozone concentrations at a regional scale. The model is validated using observed ozone dataset. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to understand the effect of different precursor species and sources on prevailing ozone concentrations in India. The results show that NOx sensitive conditions prevail in India and control of NOx will result in more reduction in ozone than VOCs. However, further growth in the transport and power sector and decreasing VOC emissions from the residential sector may increase the sensitivity of VOCs towards ozone in the future. At the urban scale, presence of high NOx emissions form VOC limited conditions and reduction of NOx results in increase in ozone concentrations. However, this will help in improving regional scale ozone pollution in the downwind regions. A non-linear response has been observed while assessing the sectoral sensitivities of ozone formation. Transport sector is found to have the maximum potential for reducing ozone concentrations in India.

  5. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Fioletov, Vitali; Bishop, Lane; Godin, Sophie; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Kirchhoff, Volker; Chanin, Marie-Lise; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Chu, William

    1991-01-01

    An update of the extensive reviews of the state of knowledge of measured ozone trends published in the Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel is presented. The update contains a review of progress since these reports, including reviewing of the ozone records, in most cases through March 1991. Also included are some new, unpublished reanalyses of these records including a complete reevaluation of 29 stations located in the former Soviet Union. The major new advance in knowledge of the measured ozone trend is the existence of independently calibrated satellite data records from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAG) instruments. These confirm many of the findings, originally derived from the Dobson record, concerning northern mid-latitude changes in ozone. We now have results from several instruments, whereas the previously reported changes were dependent on the calibration of a single instrument. This update will compare the ozone records from many different instruments to determine whether or not they provide a consistent picture of the ozone change that has occurred in the atmosphere. The update also briefly considers the problem of stratospheric temperature change. As in previous reports, this problem received significantly less attention, and the report is not nearly as complete. This area needs more attention in the future.

  6. Saving Our Ozone Shield.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoste, Beatrice

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and continued use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as related to stratospheric ozone depletion. Presents the characteristics of CFCs conducive to the chemical reaction with ozone, the history of CFC use and detection of related environmental problems, health hazards, and alternatives to CFC use. (MCO)

  7. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  8. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  9. Observing trends in total ozone and extreme ozone events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-05-01

    The ozone layer in the stratosphere has been recovering since the 1989 Montreal Protocol reduced the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Fitzka et al. observed trends in total ozone levels and the vertical distribution of ozone at Hoher Sonnblick, a mountain in Austria, from 1994 to 2011.

  10. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  11. Air sampling of aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of ozone by solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Gouhua; Koziel, Jacek A; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2004-01-30

    Effects of ozone on air sampling of standard gas mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons were tested using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Standard concentrations of ozone ranging from 10 ppb (v/v) to 6400 ppm (v/v) were generated using an in-house built ozone generator based on corona discharge. Effects of temperature, discharge voltage, and oxygen flow on the ozone generation were tested. The working dc voltage had the greatest effect on generated ozone concentration and was proportional to the ozone concentration. Generation temperature and oxygen flow rate were inversely proportional to ozone concentrations. Produced ozone was mixed with standard benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) gas at less than 100 ppb (v/v). Air samples were collected with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) 100 microm SPME fibers and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detection (FID) and GC-MS. Significant reductions of BTEX concentrations were observed. In addition, some products of BTEX-ozone-oxygen reactions were identified. SPME worked well as a rapid sampler for BTEX and BTEX-ozone-oxygen reaction products. No significant deterioration of the PDMS coating and no significant reduction of absorption capacity were observed after repeated exposure to ozone.

  12. The ASSET intercomparison of ozone analyses: method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H. J.; Fonteyn, D.; Jackson, D. R.; Juckes, M. N.; Massart, S.; Peuch, V.-H.; Rharmili, S.; Segers, A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims to summarise the current performance of ozone data assimilation (DA) systems, to show where they can be improved, and to quantify their errors. It examines 11 sets of ozone analyses from 7 different DA systems. Two are numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems based on general circulation models (GCMs); the other five use chemistry transport models (CTMs). The systems examined contain either linearised or detailed ozone chemistry, or no chemistry at all. In most analyses, MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) ozone data are assimilated; two assimilate SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) observations instead. Analyses are compared to independent ozone observations covering the troposphere, stratosphere and lower mesosphere during the period July to November 2003. Biases and standard deviations are largest, and show the largest divergence between systems, in the troposphere, in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere, in the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere, and the Antarctic ozone hole region. However, in any particular area, apart from the troposphere, at least one system can be found that agrees well with independent data. In general, none of the differences can be linked to the assimilation technique (Kalman filter, three or four dimensional variational methods, direct inversion) or the system (CTM or NWP system). Where results diverge, a main explanation is the way ozone is modelled. It is important to correctly model transport at the tropical tropopause, to avoid positive biases and excessive structure in the ozone field. In the southern hemisphere ozone hole, only the analyses which correctly model heterogeneous ozone depletion are able to reproduce the near-complete ozone destruction over the pole. In the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere (above 5 hPa), some ozone photochemistry schemes caused large but easily remedied biases. The diurnal cycle of ozone in the

  13. The Two Faces of Ozone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Provides answers to questions regarding the ozone problem: (1) nature of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere; (2) possibility of sending the excess ozone at ground level to the stratosphere; (3) possibility of producing pure ozone and carrying it to the stratosphere; and (4) banning chlorofluorocarbons. (YP)

  14. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using ozone involves the introduction of ozone gas (O3) into the subsurface to degrade organic contaminants of concern. Ozone is tri-molecular oxygen (O2) that is a gas under atmospheric conditions and is a strong oxidant. Ozone may react with ...

  15. Long-Term Ozone Exposure Attenuates 1-Nitronaphthalene–Induced Cytotoxicity in Nasal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myong Gyong; Wheelock, Åsa M.; Boland, Bridget; Plopper, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    1-Nitronaphthalene (1-NN) and ozone are cytotoxic air pollutants commonly found as components of photochemical smog. The mechanism of toxicity for 1-NN involves bioactivation by cytochrome P450s and subsequent adduction to proteins. Previous studies have shown that 1-NN toxicity in the lung is considerably higher in rats after long-term exposure to ozone compared with the corresponding filtered air–exposed control rats. The aim of the present study was to establish whether long-term exposure to ozone alters the susceptibility of nasal mucosa to the bioactivated toxicant, 1-NN. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air or 0.8 ppm ozone for 8 hours per day for 90 days, followed by a single treatment with 0, 12.5, or 50.0 mg/kg 1-NN by intraperitoneal injection. The results of the histopathologic analyses show that the nasal mucosa of rats is a target of systemic 1-NN, and that long-term ozone exposure markedly lessens the severity of injury, as well as the protein adduct formation by reactive 1-NN metabolites. The antagonistic effects were primarily seen in the nasal transitional epithelium, which corresponds to the main site of histologic changes attributed to ozone exposure (goblet cell metaplasia and hyperplasia). Long-term ozone exposure did not appear to alter susceptibility to 1-NN injury in other nasal regions. This study shows that long-term ozone exposure has a protective effect on the susceptibility of nasal transitional epithelium to subsequent 1-NN, a result that clearly contrasts with the synergistic toxicological effect observed in pulmonary airway epithelium in response to the same exposure regimen. PMID:17901409

  16. A video atlas of TOMS ozone data, 1978-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Krueger, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), on-board NASA's Nimbus-7 weather satellite, has been observing ozone over the earth once daily for the last 10 yr. A time-lapse atlas of 3440 color-coded images drawn from the TOMS archive from 1978 to 1988 has been visualized on a standard VHS videotape that is now available from NASA. The rapid and complex ozone variations presented demonstrate the difficulty of separating man-induced climate changes from natural variability. This article presents a few images from the atlas and describes interesting features in the animation, such as the correlation between ozone and 'the weather', and the recent deepening of the annual ozone hole over the South Pole. Originally intended as a browsing tool for the TOMS digital database, the videotape is a vivid presentation of the earth's atmospheric dynamics and chemistry that is recommended for scientists, educators, policy makers, and citizens concerned about the global environment.

  17. Minireview: the health implications of water treatment with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, N.G.; Winder, C.; Borges, S.H.; Backhouse, B.L.; Lewis, P.D.

    1982-01-11

    Ozone is a highly efficient disinfectant which may have significant advantages in water treatment compared to chlorine. It has, however, been shown that mutagenic and possibly carcinogenic byproducts may be produced under certain conditions of ozonation. Light chlorination following ozonization may meet the highest standards of disinfection. In addition the destruction of much of the organic matter by prior ozone treatment may well result in less harmful chlorinated and brominated products in the finished water. In many cases ozone treatment alone may suffice. It would be desirable to test with long term in vivo experiments which of the alternatives produces the best combination of microbiologically clean and pleasant water with minimum mutagenic and carcinogenic effect.

  18. Ozone - plant surface reactions an important ozone loss term?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Canaval, Eva; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billions dollar per year. Plant injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: How much ozone enters the plant through open stomata and how much ozone is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? Until now surface losses are estimated from measured total ozone deposition fluxes and calculated stomatal conductance values. While stomatal conductance of CO2 and H2O is well understood and extensively used in describing plant atmosphere gas exchange, stomatal conductance of ozone is not well known. Here we use different Nicotiana tabacum varieties and find that surface reactions of ozone with diterpenoids synthesized by glandular trichomes reduce ozone flux through open stomata. Our measurements reveal that fast ozone loss at the plant surface is accompanied with prompt release of oxygenated volatile compounds. In the ozone fumigation experiments of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties the release of specific volatile oxy-VOCs allowed to identify the semi volatile precursor compounds at the plant surface. Ozone fumigation experiments with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), two common species in the Northern Hemisphere, show also a significant ozone loss at the plant surface for Picea abies. Fluid dynamic calculations of ozone transport in the diffusive leaf boundary layer reveal a vertical but no horizontal ozone gradient thus reducing ozone fluxes through the pores in case of efficient ozone scavenging plant surfaces. We explain this efficient ozone protection mechanism by the porous surface architecture of plants in combination with unsaturated semi-volatile compounds deposited at the plant surface. These results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at

  19. Who is More Affected by Ozone Pollution? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Michelle L.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Dominici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Ozone is associated with adverse health; however, less is known about vulnerable/sensitive populations, which we refer to as sensitive populations. We systematically reviewed epidemiologic evidence (1988–2013) regarding sensitivity to mortality or hospital admission from short-term ozone exposure. We performed meta-analysis for overall associations by age and sex; assessed publication bias; and qualitatively assessed sensitivity to socioeconomic indicators, race/ethnicity, and air conditioning. The search identified 2,091 unique papers, with 167 meeting inclusion criteria (73 on mortality and 96 on hospitalizations and emergency department visits, including 2 examining both mortality and hospitalizations). The strongest evidence for ozone sensitivity was for age. Per 10-parts per billion increase in daily 8-hour ozone concentration, mortality risk for younger persons, at 0.60% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40, 0.80), was statistically lower than that for older persons, at 1.27% (95% CI: 0.76, 1.78). Findings adjusted for publication bias were similar. Limited/suggestive evidence was found for higher associations among women; mortality risks were 0.39% (95% CI: −0.22, 1.00) higher than those for men. We identified strong evidence for higher associations with unemployment or lower occupational status and weak evidence of sensitivity for racial/ethnic minorities and persons with low education, in poverty, or without central air conditioning. Findings show that some populations, especially the elderly, are particularly sensitive to short-term ozone exposure. PMID:24872350

  20. Record low global ozone in 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, J.F. ); Bhartia, P.K.; Herman, J.R.; McPeters, R.; Newman, P.; Stolarski, R.S. ); Flynn, L. ); Labow, G.; Larko, D.; Seftor, C.; Wellemeyer, C. ); Komhyr, W.D. ); Miller, A.J.; Planet, W. )

    1993-04-23

    The 1992 global average total ozone, measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on the Nimbus-7 satellite, was 2 to 3 percent lower than any earlier year observed by TOMS (1979 to 1991). Ozone amounts were low in a wide range of latitudes in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres, and the largest decreases were in the regions from 10[degrees]S to 20[degrees]S and 10[degrees]N to 60[degrees]N. Global ozone in 1992 is at least 1.5 percent lower than would be predicted by a statistical model that includes a linear trend and accounts for solar cycle variation and the quasi-biennial oscillation. These results are confirmed by comparisons with data from other ozone monitoring instruments: the SBUV/2 instrument on the NOAA-11 satellite, the TOMS instrument on the Russian Meteor-3 satellite, the World Standard Dobson instrument 83, and a collection of 22 ground-based Dobson instruments.

  1. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  2. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  3. Decadal evolution of atmospheric ozone and remote sensing of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yibo

    1997-09-01

    In chapter 1, the decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole is studied by using ozone column amounts obtained by the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) in the southern polar region during late austral winter and spring (Days 240-300) for 1980-1991 using area- mapping techniques and area-weighted vortex averages. The vortex here is defined using the -50 PVU contour on the 500 K isentropic surface. There is a distinct change after 1985 in the vortex averaged column ozone depletion rate during September and October, the period of maximum ozone loss. The mean ozone depletion rate in the vortex between Day 240 and the day of minimum vortex-averaged ozone is about 1 DU/day at the beginning of the decade, increasing to about 1.8 DU/day by 1985, and then apparently saturating thereafter. The vortex-average column ozone during September and October has declined at the rate of 11.3 DU/yr (3.8%) from 1980 to 1987 and at a smaller rate of 2 DU/yr (0.9%) from 1987 to 1991. In chapter 2, we show that standard deviation of column ozone from the zonal mean (COSDZ) provides a measure of the longitudinal inhomogeneity in column ozone and dynamical wave activities in the atmosphere. Simulation of this quantity by three-dimensional (3-D) models could provide a sensitive check on the wave activities in the stratosphere that are responsible for ozone transport. Analysis of the TOMS data shows a profound secular change in COSDZ from 1979 to 1992. In the southern higher latitudes, COSDZ shows a significant increase around 65o in August and September, whereas the changes are much smaller in the northern higher latitudes in the boreal spring. In chapter 3, an estimate of tropospheric ozone levels over tropical pacific South America is obtained from the difference in the TOMS data between the high Andes and the Pacific Ocean. From 1979 to 1992 tropospheric ozone apparently increased by 1.47 ± 0.40 %/yr or 0.21 ± 0.06 DU/yr over South America and the surrounding oceans. We model

  4. Photoenhanced degradation of veratraldehyde upon the heterogeneous ozone reactions.

    PubMed

    Net, Sopheak; Gligorovski, Sasho; Pietri, Sylvia; Wortham, Henri

    2010-07-21

    Light-induced heterogeneous reactions between gas-phase ozone and veratraldehyde adsorbed on silica particles were performed. At an ozone mixing ratio of 250 ppb, the loss of veratraldehyde largely increased from 1.81 x 10(-6) s(-1) in the dark to 2.54 x 10(-5) s(-1) upon exposure to simulated sunlight (lambda > 300 nm). The observed rates of degradation exhibited linear dependence with the ozone in the dark ozonolysis experiments which change in the non-linear Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence in the experiments with simultaneous ozone and light exposure of the coated particles. When the coated silica particles were exposed only to simulated sunlight in absence of ozone the loss of veratraldehyde was about three times higher i.e. 5.97 x 10(-6) s(-1) in comparison to the ozonolysis experiment under dark conditions at 250 ppb ozone mixing ratio, 1.81 x 10(-6) s(-1).These results clearly show that the most important loss of veratraldehyde occurs under simultaneous ozone and light exposure of the coated silica particles. The main identified product in the heterogeneous reactions between gaseous ozone and adsorbed veratraldehyde under dark conditions and in presence of light was veratric acid.Carbon yields of veratric acid were calculated and the obtained results indicated that at low ozone mixing ratio (250 ppb) the carbon yield obtained under dark conditions is 70% whereas the carbon yield obtained in the experiments with simultaneous ozone and light exposure of the coated particles is 40%. In both cases the carbon yield of veratric acid exponentially decayed leading to the plateau ( approximately 35% of carbon yield) at an ozone mixing ratio of 6 ppm. Two reaction products i.e. 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid were identified (confirmed with the standards) only in the experiments performed under simultaneous ozonolysis and light irradiation of the particles.

  5. Ozone Profiles and Tropospheric Ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Sioris, C. E.; Sparr, R. J. D.; Kuregm, T. P.; Martin, R. V.; Newchurch, M. J.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ozone profiles are derived from backscattered radiances in the ultraviolet spectra (290-340 nm) measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment using optimal estimation. Tropospheric O3 is directly retrieved with the tropopause as one of the retrieval levels. To optimize the retrieval and improve the fitting precision needed for tropospheric O3, we perform extensive wavelength and radiometric calibrations and improve forward model inputs. Retrieved O3 profiles and tropospheric O3 agree well with coincident ozonesonde measurements, and the integrated total O3 agrees very well with Earth Probe TOMS and Dobson/Brewer total O3. The global distribution of tropospheric O3 clearly shows the influences of biomass burning, convection, and air pollution, and is generally consistent with our current understanding.

  6. Multi-model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to Ozone Concentrations over the United States (CMAS Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Qua...

  7. 75 FR 232 - Finding of Failure To Submit Certain State Implementation Plans Required for the 1-Hour Ozone NAAQS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Ozone NAAQS AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The EPA is... Implementation Plans (SIPs) for three ozone nonattainment areas to satisfy certain requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA) for the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). To accompany...

  8. Polar Ozone Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, a great deal of attention has been focused on the polar regions to both identify the chemistry and physics of the large losses, and to provide an understanding of the future of polar ozone. In this review talk, I will discuss the secular trends of ozone in both the Antarctic and Arctic regions, and I will review some of the principal research results of the last few years. In particular, I will emphasize some of the results from the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign that occurred over the course of the winter of 1999-2000.

  9. Tropical tropospheric ozone: Processes highlighted by covariations of ozone and its sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, R.; Guan, H.; Thompson, A.; Hudson, R.; Witte, J.

    2003-04-01

    Wavelet and spectral analyses techniques provide promising early results which empirically highlight those processes which determine upper tropospheric ozone. Tropical and subtropical tropospheric ozone are important radiatively active species, with particularly large effects in the upper third of the troposphere. Atmospheric chemistry investigations using 3-D models and local analyses have corroborated roles for large scale dynamics, vertical mixing and redistribution through convection, and advection of pollution ozone or its precursors. Temporal variability of O_3 has proved difficult to simulate. Thus, individual roles of lightning, biomass burning, and other pollution in providing precursor NO_x, radicals, and chain carriers (CO, hydrocarbons) remain unquantified by simulation, and it is theoretically reasonable that individual roles are magnified by a joint synergy. We report on empirical studies linking time variations apparent in several datasets: a TTO (Tropical Tropospheric Ozone) product derived from TOMS (the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer), the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network stations (Nairobi, Fiji), and auxiliary series with power to explain ozone-deterimining processes. These auxliary series are The OTD/LIS (Optical Transient Detector/Lightning Imaging Sensor) measurements of the lightning NO_x source, the OLR (Outgoing Longwave Radiation) measurement of high-topped clouds, and standard meteorological variables from the United States NCEP and Data Assimilation Office analyses. Concentrating on equatorial ozone, we compare the statistical evidence on the variability of tropospheric ozone. Important variations occur on approximately two-week, two-month (Madden-Julian Oscillation) and annual scales. We report initial results defining relative roles of the processed mentioned affecting O_3 using their covariance properties.

  10. Response of Federal Land Management Agencies to ozone impacts on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Musselman, R.C.; Fisher, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    The FLAG (Federal Land Manager's AQRV WorkGroup) Ozone Subgroup was organized to compile information known about response of vegetation to ozone in federally managed parks, forests, and wildlife refuges; to document areas of agreement among federal agencies regarding identification of ozone sensitive Air Quality Related Values (AQRVs); and standardize agency responses to New Source Review (NSR) permit applications. Subgroup members included air resource managers and ozone effects scientists from several agencies that manage federal lands. The subgroup identified sensitive AQRV receptors, determined information needed to evaluate permit applications under the NSR process, determined the form of an ozone parameter to use to relate plant response to ambient ozone, and agreed on specific definitions for vegetation injury and damage from ozone. The subgroup developed specific protocols for federal agencies to follow in response to NSR permit applications. These protocols were based on (1) ambient levels of ozone as measured by the W126 ozone metric and the number of peak ozone concentrations $100 ppb (N100), and (2) the presence or absence of ozone sensitive plant species and ozone-induced damage to vegetation.

  11. Forecasting of daily total atmospheric ozone in Isfahan.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, H; Karimi, M; Hejazizadeh, Z

    2009-10-01

    A neural network combined to an artificial neural network model is used to forecast daily total atmospheric ozone over Isfahan city in Iran. In this work, in order to forecast the total column ozone over Isfahan, we have examined several neural networks algorithms with different meteorological predictors based on the ozone-meteorological relationships with previous day's ozone value. The meteorological predictors consist of temperatures (dry and dew point) and geopotential heights at standard levels of 100, 50, 30, 20 and 10 hPa with their wind speed and direction. These data together with previous day total ozone forms the input matrix of the neural model that is based on the back propagation algorithm (BPA) structure. The output matrix is the daily total atmospheric ozone. The model was build based on daily data from 1997 to 2004 obtained from Isfahan ozonometric station data. After modeling these data we used 3 year (from 2001 to 2003) of daily total ozone for testing the accuracy of model. In this experiment, with the final neural network, the total ozone are fairly well predicted, with an Agreement Index 76%.

  12. Increasing Springtime Ozone Mixing Ratios in the Free Troposphere Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, O. R.; Parrish, D. D.; Stohl, A.; Trainer, M.; Nedelec, P.; Thouret, V.; Cammas, J. P.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Tarasick, D.; Leblanc, T.; McDermid, I. S.; Jaffe, D.; Gao, R.; Stith, J.; Ryerson, T.; Aikin, K.; Campos, T.; Weinheimer, A.; Avery, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    In the lowermost layer of the atmosphere - the troposphere - ozone is an important source of the hydroxyl radical, an oxidant that breaks down most pollutants and some greenhouse gases. High concentrations of tropospheric ozone are toxic, however, and have a detrimental effect on human health and ecosystem productivity1. Moreover, tropospheric ozone itself acts as an effective greenhouse gas. Much of the present tropospheric ozone burden is a consequence of anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors resulting in widespread increases in ozone concentrations since the late 1800s. At present, east Asia has the fastest-growing ozone precursor emissions. Much of the springtime east Asian pollution is exported eastwards towards western North America. Despite evidence that the exported Asian pollution produces ozone, no previous study has found a significant increase in free tropospheric ozone concentrations above the western USA since measurements began in the late 1970s. Here we compile springtime ozone measurements from many different platforms across western North America. We show a strong increase in springtime ozone mixing ratios during 1995-2008 and we have some additional evidence that a similar rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio has occurred since 1984. We find that the rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio is greatest when measurements are more heavily influenced by direct transport from Asia. Our result agrees with previous modelling studies, which indicate that global ozone concentrations should be increasing during the early part of the twenty-first century as a result of increasing precursor emissions, especially at northern mid-latitudes, with western North America being particularly sensitive to rising Asian emissions. We suggest that the observed increase in springtime background ozone mixing ratio may hinder the USA s compliance with its ozone air quality standard.

  13. Altitude troposphere ozone profiles over Kyiv-Goloseyev station by simultaneous Umkehr and FTIR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Shavrina, Angelina; Udodov, Evgeny; Liptuga, Anatoly; Kyslyi, Volodymyr; Danylevsky, Vassyl; Kravchenko, Volodymyr; Ivanov, Yuri; Synyavski, Ivan; Romanyuk, Yaroslav; Pavlenko, Yakov; Veles, Oleksandr

    2016-04-01

    Total ozone column and ozone profile data have been obtained from both: (1) standard Dobson measurements and Umkehr method, and (2) using modeling of the ozone absorption spectral band profile near 9.6 microns with the MODTRAN4.3 Atmospheric Radiation Transfer Model based on the HITRAN molecular absorption database from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) observations. The simultaneous ground-based Dobson/Umkehr and FTIR ozone observations have been performed in 2014-2015 at the mid-latitude Kyiv-Goloseyev KGV GAW station for joint altitude troposphere ozone profiles analysis. To retrieve ozone column estimates and ozone profiles from FTIR observations, we used the satellite Aqua-AIRS water vapor, temperature and ozone profiles, and the simultaneous with FTIR observations the Umkehr ozone profiles and surface ozone measurements as input a priori information for the MODTRAN4.3 model. The altitude ozone profiles retrieved from Umkehr method and satellite measurements are in good correspondence in stratosphere layer. However the troposphere part of ozone profiles is uncertain and reproduced with large errors. Therefore we use the MODTRAN4.3 model for interpretation of observed FTIR absorption spectrum to retrieve and improve the troposphere part of ozone altitude distribution. The synergy of Umkehr, satellite and FTIR simultaneous observations including surface ozone measurements allows rendering the ozone profile features in troposphere that indicate the stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes. Season ozone profile variations observed from Umkehr measurements are discussed as well. This work was partly supported by the Polar FORCeS project no. 4012 of the Australian Antarctic Science Program.

  14. Increasing springtime ozone mixing ratios in the free troposphere over western North America.

    PubMed

    Cooper, O R; Parrish, D D; Stohl, A; Trainer, M; Nédélec, P; Thouret, V; Cammas, J P; Oltmans, S J; Johnson, B J; Tarasick, D; Leblanc, T; McDermid, I S; Jaffe, D; Gao, R; Stith, J; Ryerson, T; Aikin, K; Campos, T; Weinheimer, A; Avery, M A

    2010-01-21

    In the lowermost layer of the atmosphere-the troposphere-ozone is an important source of the hydroxyl radical, an oxidant that breaks down most pollutants and some greenhouse gases. High concentrations of tropospheric ozone are toxic, however, and have a detrimental effect on human health and ecosystem productivity. Moreover, tropospheric ozone itself acts as an effective greenhouse gas. Much of the present tropospheric ozone burden is a consequence of anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors resulting in widespread increases in ozone concentrations since the late 1800s. At present, east Asia has the fastest-growing ozone precursor emissions. Much of the springtime east Asian pollution is exported eastwards towards western North America. Despite evidence that the exported Asian pollution produces ozone, no previous study has found a significant increase in free tropospheric ozone concentrations above the western USA since measurements began in the late 1970s. Here we compile springtime ozone measurements from many different platforms across western North America. We show a strong increase in springtime ozone mixing ratios during 1995-2008 and we have some additional evidence that a similar rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio has occurred since 1984. We find that the rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio is greatest when measurements are more heavily influenced by direct transport from Asia. Our result agrees with previous modelling studies, which indicate that global ozone concentrations should be increasing during the early part of the twenty-first century as a result of increasing precursor emissions, especially at northern mid-latitudes, with western North America being particularly sensitive to rising Asian emissions. We suggest that the observed increase in springtime background ozone mixing ratio may hinder the USA's compliance with its ozone air quality standard.

  15. An investigation on the origin of regional springtime ozone episodes in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalabokas, Pavlos; Hjorth, Jens; Foret, Gilles; Dufour, Gaëlle; Eremenko, Maxim; Siour, Guillaume; Cuesta, Juan; Beekmann, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    photochemically produced ozone there, resulting in exceedances of the 60 ppb standard.

  16. Tropical tropospheric ozone from total ozone mapping spectrometer by a modified residual method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Robert D.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1998-09-01

    A modified residual method for deriving time-averaged tropical tropospheric ozone (TTO) from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) has been refined [cf Kim et al., 1996] and applied to a 2-year period, 1991-1992. This period was selected because of the availability of a unique sonde record at tropical Atlantic and near-Atlantic sites: Natal, Brazil; Ascension Island; and Brazzaville. The essentials of the modified-residual method are (1) Fourier analysis to identify the latitude range for use of the method; (2) use of the wave-like pattern to estimate stratospheric ozone column and a background tropospheric ozone column, which is defined as the amount of ozone expected in the absence of chemical pollution; (3) assumption that the wave-one feature is tropospheric; and (4) the stratospheric and background tropospheric ozone amounts consistent with the constraint of the three station ozonesonde measurements for total tropospheric ozone. An excess ozone (pollution) signal is also derived from TOMS total ozone. Parameters derived from the modified residual method are evaluated with independent data to verify the quality of the TTO. Derived tropical stratospheric column ozone for 1991-1992 agrees very well with the corresponding UARS Microwave Limb Sounder and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment records (to within 5 Dobson units (DU) for the latter). Background tropospheric ozone, which exhibits a seasonally in 1991-1992, has a 24±4.8 DU mean value at wave maximum (˜0° longitude) and a 15.2±6.0 DU mean value at 180° longitude. The Atlantic value is remarkably similar to the climatological 26 DU previously inferred from subtropical sondes [Kim et al., 1996; Komhyr et al., 1989]. The ˜5 DU standard deviation is the accuracy of the modified-residual method and is the best that can be achieved given the 15-day averaging of the sondes (1σ = 5.3 DU). The wave-like pattern in 1991-1992 has a semiannual periodicity with zero wave amplitude in June and December.

  17. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  18. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  19. Ozone Correlative Measurements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the necessary parameters for the correlation of data on Earth ozone. Topics considered were: (1) measurement accuracy; (2) equipment considerations (SBUV); and (3) ground based measurements to support satellite data.

  20. The ozone backlash

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-06-11

    While evidence for the role of chlorofluorocarbons in ozone depletion grows stronger, researchers have recently been subjected to vocal public criticism of their theories-and their motives. Their understanding of the mechanisms of ozone destruction-especially the annual ozone hole that appears in the Antarctic-has grown stronger, yet everywhere they go these days, they seem to be confronted by critics attacking their theories as baseless. For instance, Rush Limbaugh, the conservative political talk-show host and now-best-selling author of The Way Things Ought to Be, regularly insists that the theory of ozone depletion by CFCs is a hoax: bladerdash and poppycock. Zoologist Dixy Lee Ray, former governor of the state of Washington and former head of the Atomic Energy Commission, makes the same argument in her book, Trashing the Planet. The Wall Street Journal and National Review have run commentaries by S. Fred Singer, a former chief scientists for the Department of Transportation, purporting to shoot holes in the theory of ozone depletion. Even the June issue of Omni, a magazine with a circulation of more than 1 million that publishes a mixture of science and science fiction, printed a feature article claiming to expose ozone research as a politically motivated scam.

  1. Ensuring equity in reducing regional ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, S.F.

    1996-12-31

    Substantial progress has been made in improving air quality throughout the US over the last 25 years. Nonetheless, ozone nonattainment remains a concern, especially in california and the eastern US. What is especially clear fin the eastern half of the US is that the long-distance transport of ozone and its precursors from one area to another may make it impossible for some areas to meet the federal health standard by taking actions only in their jurisdiction. The air coming into some metropolitan areas already is near or above the standard, even before local pollution is added. The Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) has been established as a cooperative effort among 37 states, EPA, and many private interests to address the phenomenon of regional ozone pollution in the eastern half of the US. Discussions about how to achieve this goal also have focused on the concept of equity as a consideration in shaping the best strategy and suite of specific control programs. These discussions have been conceptual to date; no concrete definition of equity has emerged. The purpose of this paper is to suggest some key elements of what equity might mean in the OTAG context.

  2. Influence of daily variations in baseline ozone on urban air quality in the United States Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigder, Nicole L.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Herron-Thorpe, Farren L.; Vaughan, Joseph K.

    2013-04-01

    We examine the influence of daily variations in baseline ozone (O3) on urban air quality in the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) during 2004 to 2010 through two analyses: (1) transport of free tropospheric (FT) O3 from Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) to Boise, Idaho; and (2) transport of marine boundary layer (MBL) O3 from Cheeka Peak (CP) to Enumclaw, Washington. Both Boise and Enumclaw experience days with maximum daily 8 hour averages of O3 (MDA8) exceeding U.S. standards. Backward trajectory cluster analyses identify days when FT and MBL O3 strongly influence MDA8 in Boise and Enumclaw. On these days, MBO and CP O3 observations explain 40% and 69% of the variations in Boise and Enumclaw MDA8, respectively. Bivariate regressions for Boise/MBO and Enumclaw/CP have slopes of 0.52 ± 0.16 and 1.04 ± 0.08, respectively, representing the differing interplay of O3 dilution, production, and loss during FT to boundary layer transport (Boise/MBO) and fast boundary layer transport (Enumclaw/CP). AIRPACT-3/CMAQ (Air Indicator Report for Public Access and Community Tracking version 3/Community Multi-scale Air Quality model) high-resolution air-quality simulation results demonstrate how transport of O3 from the FT above MBO contributes to elevated O3 at Boise. Average MDA8 O3 in Boise is higher than in Enumclaw due to site elevation and greater entrainment of FT air masses, a finding likely applicable to other PNW sites. Days with high baseline influence at Boise and Enumclaw have lower average MDA8 O3 than other days; however, some of these days would still exceed the U.S. standard if it is substantially tightened in 2013, highlighting the increasing importance of FT O3 influence on urban MDA8.

  3. Leaf gas exchange along a light graident in a sugar maple forest canopy experimentally exposed to ozone pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Tjoelker, M.G.; Volin, J.C.; Oleksyn, J.; Reich, P.B. )

    1993-06-01

    The impact of ozone on leaf gas exchange in a forest canopy as influenced by light environment was studied in a 35-year-old stand of sugar maple (Acer sacchharum) in southern Wisconsin. We developed a chamberless system to expose branches to elevated concentrations of ozone. Ten branches and ten paired controls in the upper canopy (14 to 16 m) were selected along a light gradient, ranging from sunlit (14.5 mol m[sup [minus]2] day[sup [minus]1] PPFD) to deeply shaded (0.6 mol m[sup [minus]2] day[sup [minus]1] PPFD). The branches were exposed for 8 hours each day to ozone concentrations averaging 95 nl 1[sup [minus]1](+/-13 SD), about twice the ambient levels between June and September. Among the branches, area-based rates of light-saturated photosynthesis and dark respiration were positively correlated with mean daily integrated PPFD. Light-saturated rates of photosynthesis and chlorophyll concentrations declined while dark respiration increased with increasing ozone dose. Over time stomatal conductance became uncoupled from light-saturated photosynthesis rates in exposed branches. Photosynthesis and quantum yield were reduced more in a shaded branch than in a sunlit branch in response to ozone treatment. In general, shaded branches were more sensitive to ozone than sunlit branches.

  4. A 15-Year Analysis of Surface Ozone Pollution in the Context of Hot Spells Episodes over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzewska, Joanna; Jefimow, Maciej

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of summertime temperature characteristics and ozone exposure indexes were carried out for eight locations in Poland for a 15-year period (1997-2011). The number of days with the maximum temperature exceeding 25°C and 30°C was calculated for each year. The analysis covered the 8-hour running average and daily maximum of near surface ozone concentrations. Also, the accumulated exposure when ozone concentrations were above 120 μg/m3 (AOT60) was calculated as a diagnostic indicator of adverse health effects for each year. Although high ozone concentrations are associated with hot temperatures, the exposure to values higher than 120 μg /m3 is correlated with the length of the hot weather period rather than with the occurrence of days with extremely high temperatures. In most cases the elevated ozone concentrations occurred during days when the maximum temperature was higher than 24°C. Episodes of very high ozone concentrations, exceeding 180 μg /m3, were not associated with heat wave periods at analysed locations.

  5. Treatment of Ammonia Nitrogen Wastewater in Low Concentration by Two-Stage Ozonization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xianping; Yan, Qun; Wang, Chunying; Luo, Caigui; Zhou, Nana; Jian, Chensheng

    2015-09-23

    Ammonia nitrogen wastewater (about 100 mg/L) was treated by two-stage ozone oxidation method. The effects of ozone flow rate and initial pH on ammonia removal were studied, and the mechanism of ammonia nitrogen removal by ozone oxidation was discussed. After the primary stage of ozone oxidation, the ammonia removal efficiency reached 59.32% and pH decreased to 6.63 under conditions of 1 L/min ozone flow rate and initial pH 11. Then, the removal efficiency could be over 85% (the left ammonia concentration was lower than 15 mg/L) after the second stage, which means the wastewater could have met the national discharge standards of China. Besides, the mechanism of ammonia removal by ozone oxidation was proposed by detecting the products of the oxidation: ozone oxidation directly and ·OH oxidation; ammonia was mainly transformed into NO₃(-)-N, less into NO₂(-)-N, not into N₂.

  6. 77 FR 14715 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...; Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard AGENCY: Environmental... available control technology (RACT) for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) set forth by the Clean Air Act (CAA) with respect to the 1997 8-hour ozone standard. The intended effect...

  7. 75 FR 64949 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... 40 CFR 51.918), the determination that the area is attaining the standard suspends the requirements...; Determination of Attainment of the 1997 Ozone Standard for the Providence, RI Area AGENCY: Environmental... Rhode Island) moderate 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour...

  8. 40 CFR 51.373 - Implementation deadlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Inspection/Maintenance Program... basic I/M as a result of designation under the 8-hour ozone standard, the required program shall be... the 8-hour ozone standard. (c) All requirements related to enhanced I/M programs shall be...

  9. 75 FR 62470 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designations of Areas for Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Quality Planning Purposes; Tennessee: Knoxville; Determination of Attaining Data for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone... 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) has attained these standards based on quality assured, quality controlled monitoring data from 2007 through 2009. The Knoxville 1997...

  10. 76 FR 77950 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designations of Areas for Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... is the air quality in the Atlanta area for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS for the 2008-2010 monitoring... the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) by its applicable attainment date... air quality as of the attainment date, whether the area attained the standard by that date.''...

  11. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  12. The Ozone Problem | Ground-level Ozone | New England | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    Many factors impact ground-level ozone development, including temperature, wind speed and direction, time of day, and driving patterns. Due to its dependence on weather conditions, ozone is typically a summertime pollutant and a chief component of summertime smog.

  13. Ozone risk for crops and pastures in present and future climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrer, Jürg

    2009-02-01

    most at risk from ozone in a future climate and to set robust effect-based ozone standards.

  14. The ASSET intercomparison of ozone analyses: method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H. J.; Fonteyn, D.; Jackson, D. R.; Juckes, M. N.; Massart, S.; Peuch, V.-H.; Rharmili, S.; Segers, A.

    2006-06-01

    This paper examines 11 sets of ozone analyses from 7 different data assimilation systems. Two are numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems based on general circulation models (GCMs); the other five use chemistry transport models (CTMs). These systems contain either linearised or detailed ozone chemistry, or no chemistry at all. In most analyses, MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) ozone data are assimilated. Two examples assimilate SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) observations. The analyses are compared to independent ozone observations covering the troposphere, stratosphere and lower mesosphere during the period July to November 2003. Through most of the stratosphere (50 hPa to 1 hPa), biases are usually within ±10% and standard deviations less than 10% compared to ozonesondes and HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). Biases and standard deviations are larger in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere, in the troposphere, the mesosphere, and the Antarctic ozone hole region. In these regions, some analyses do substantially better than others, and this is mostly due to differences in the models. At the tropical tropopause, many analyses show positive biases and excessive structure in the ozone fields, likely due to known deficiencies in assimilated tropical wind fields and a degradation in MIPAS data at these levels. In the southern hemisphere ozone hole, only the analyses which correctly model heterogeneous ozone depletion are able to reproduce the near-complete ozone destruction over the pole. In the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere (above 5 hPa), some ozone photochemistry schemes caused large but easily remedied biases. The diurnal cycle of ozone in the mesosphere is not captured, except by the one system that includes a detailed treatment of mesospheric chemistry. In general, similarly good results are obtained no matter what the assimilation method (Kalman filter, three or

  15. Recovery of the Ozone Layer: The Ozone Depleting Gas Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, David J.; Montzka, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone layer, through absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, protects all biological systems on Earth. In response to concerns over the depletion of the global ozone layer, the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 mandates that NASA and NOAA monitor stratospheric ozone and ozone-depleting substances. This information is critical for assessing whether the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer, an international treaty that entered into force in 1989 to protect the ozone layer, is having its intended effect of mitigating increases in harmful ultraviolet radiation. To provide the information necessary to satisfy this congressional mandate, both NASA and NOAA have instituted and maintained global monitoring programs to keep track of ozone-depleting gases as well as ozone itself. While data collected for the past 30 years have been used extensively in international assessments of ozone layer depletion science, the language of scientists often eludes the average citizen who has a considerable interest in the health of Earth's protective ultraviolet radiation shield. Are the ozone-destroying chemicals declining in the atmosphere? When will these chemicals decline to pre-ozone hole levels so that the Antarctic ozone hole might disappear? Will this timing be different in the stratosphere above midlatitudes?

  16. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  17. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  18. Achievements in Stratospheric Ozone Protection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes achievements in protecting the ozone layer, the benefits of these achievements, and strategies involved (e.g., using alternatives to ozone-depleting substances, phasing out harmful substances, and creating partnerships).

  19. Air Quality Guide for Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Air Quality Guide for Ozone Ground-level ozone is one ... exposure and protect your health. For your local air quality, visit www.airnow.gov View or print guide ...

  20. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  1. Health Effects of Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Inhaling ozone can cause coughing, shortness of breath, worse asthma or bronchitis symptoms, and irritation and damage to airways.You can reduce your exposure to ozone pollution by checking air quality where you live.

  2. "OZONE SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN CMAQ'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone source attribution has been used to support various policy purposes including interstate transport (Cross State Air Pollution Rule) by U.S. EPA and ozone nonattainment area designations by State agencies. Common scientific applications include tracking intercontinental tran...

  3. Ozone concentrations near roadways - results of a field study in Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.; Weaver, M.; Mozier, J.

    1997-12-31

    In evaluating alternative versions of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model (pNEM/O3) to estimate the relative ozone exposures of urban populations. This model simulates the movement of susceptible population groups through various microenvironmental (ME) settings and uses ambient monitoring data and ME adjustments to estimate a sequence of exposures for each group. One ME is defined as {open_quotes}outdoors near roadway.{close_quotes} To obtain an improved modeling database for this ME, researchers conducted a two-phase field study in Cincinnati, Ohio during the summers of 1994 and 1995. Technicians measured ozone and nitric oxide from automobile exhaust at upwind and downwind locations near a variety of roadways in areas with historically high ozone levels. During the 1995 phase, measurements were taken at 2 and 10-meter elevations along a downwind pathway at right angles to each roadway. Statistical analyses of the ozone concentrations measured at these locations indicated that height above the ground was always a very significant predictor of ozone, with ozone levels at 10 m above the ground tending to be higher than those at 2 m. Ozone varied significantly as a quadratic function of distance from the road at 2 m, but not at 10 m. Downwind ozone decreased with increasing levels of downwind NO, consistent with the hypothesis that ozone is scavenged by NO from automobile exhaust. Downwind ozone levels increased with increasing temperature.

  4. Mars ozone: Mariner 9 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of the UV spectroscopy technique used by Mariner 9 to remotely measure ozone abundance at Mars is discussed. Previously-inferred ozone abundances could be underestimated by as much as a factor of 3, and much of the observed variability in the ozone abundance could be due to temporal and spatial variability in cloud and dust amount.

  5. Ames ER-2 ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R., Jr.; Vedder, James F.; Starr, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study ozone (O3) in the stratosphere. Measurements of the ozone mixing ratio at 1 s intervals are obtained with an ultraviolet photometer which flies on the ER-2 aircraft. The photometer determines the amount of ozone in air by measuring the transmission of ultraviolet light through a fixed path with and without ambient O3 present.

  6. ADEOS Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R.; Herman, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Jaross, G.; Seftor, C.; Torres, O.; Labow, G.; Byerly, W.; Moy, L.; Taylor, S.; Swissler, T.; Cebula, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (ADEOS/TOMS) have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The ADEOS/ TOMS began taking measurements on September 11, 1996, and ended on June 29, 1997. The instrument measured backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio was used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the reflectivity of the solar diffuser used for the irradiance measurement were monitored using a carousel of three diffusers, each exposed to the degrading effects of solar irradiation at different rates. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is less than 0.5 percent over the 9-month data record. The Level 2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level 3 product contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in a 1-degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level 3 files containing estimates of UVB at the Earth surface and tropospheric aerosol information will also be available. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CDROM product are provided.

  7. Projected changes in high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States over the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, A. M.; Rieder, H.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past few decades, thresholds for the United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (O3), established to protect public health and welfare, have been lowered repeatedly. We recently applied methods from extreme value theory (EVT) to maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3) observed by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) to quantify the significant decline in both frequency and magnitude of high O3 pollution events over the Eastern US from 1988 to 2009. These improvements to Eastern US air quality have been reported in prior studies and result from changes in air quality regulations and subsequent control measures (e.g., the 'NOx SIP Call') as demonstrated by our analysis of 1-year and 5-year return levels. Here we extend this analysis to future projections of high O3 pollution events spanning the course of the 21st century. To this aim, we analyze simulations from the GFDL CM3 chemistry-climate model under selected Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (representing a moderate and strong climate warming with a global mean temperature change by 2100 compared to present day of +2.3K and +4.5K, respectively). Under both scenarios, NOx emissions decrease by ~80% over North America by 2100 under the assumption of aggressive ozone pollution controls. A third scenario, termed RCP4.5_WMGG, in which well-mixed greenhouse gases follow the RCP4.5 scenario but O3 and aerosol precursor emissions are held at 2005 levels, enables us to isolate the role of climate change from that of emission reductions. As we find a positive bias in GFDL CM3 MDA8 O3 compared to the Eastern US CASTNet O3 measurements during summer (a common feature in the current generation of models), we develop a correction method based on quantile-mapping. This bias correction effectively removes the model bias while preserving the temporal changes in MDA8 O3 as simulated under different RCPs over the course of the 21st

  8. Projected changes in high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States over the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Horrowitz, Larry W.; Naik, Vaishali

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few decades, thresholds for the United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (O3), established to protect public health and welfare, have been lowered repeatedly. We recently applied methods from extreme value theory (EVT) to maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3) observed by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) to quantify the significant decline in both frequency and magnitude of high O3 pollution events over the Eastern US from 1988 to 2009. These improvements to Eastern US air quality have been reported in prior studies and result from changes in air quality regulations and subsequent control measures (e.g., the "NOx SIP Call") as demonstrated by our analysis of 1-year and 5-year return levels. Here we extend this analysis to future projections of high O3 pollution events spanning the course of the 21st century. To this aim, we analyze simulations from the GFDL CM3 chemistry-climate model under selected Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (representing a moderate and strong climate warming with a global mean temperature change by 2100 compared to present day of +2.3K and +4.5K, respectively). Under both scenarios, NOx emissions decrease by ~80% over North America by 2100 under the assumption of aggressive ozone pollution controls. A third scenario, termed RCP4.5_WMGG, in which well-mixed greenhouse gases follow the RCP4.5 scenario but O3 and aerosol precursor emissions are held at 2005 levels, enables us to isolate the role of climate change from that of emission reductions. As we find a positive bias in GFDL CM3 MDA8 O3 compared to the Eastern US CASTNet O3 measurements during summer (a common feature in the current generation of models), we develop a correction method based on quantile-mapping. This bias correction effectively removes the model bias while preserving the temporal changes in MDA8 O3 as simulated under different RCPs over the course of the 21st

  9. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  10. Normally Expected Aberrations in the 8-hour Dynamic EKG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, R. L.; Arnoldi, L. B.; Townsend, J. C.; Tonesk, X.

    1970-01-01

    The establishment of norms for interpreting long term dynamic electrocardiograms is attempted by correlating a completely disease symptom and cardiac risk factor free sample with a non-pure sample in the direction of normality on various variables. Out of a population of 362 subjects exposed to dynamic electrocardiogram testing, a discrimination between normals and abnormals in terms of traditional risk factors was observed. The two groups differed significantly on the following variables: cholesterol, smoking, systolic blood pressure, white blood count, fasting blood sugar, uric acid, resting EKG, year of birth, and coronary insufficiency.

  11. Physicochemical patterns of ozone absorption by wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Results from studying aspen and pine wood ozonation are presented. The effect the concentration of ozone, the reagent residence time, and the content of water in a sample of wood has on ozone consumption rate and ozone demand are analyzed. The residence time is shown to determine the degree of ozone conversion degree and the depth of substrate destruction. The main patterns of ozone absorption by wood with different moisture content are found. Ways of optimizing the ozonation of plant biomass are outlined.

  12. Total Ozone Prediction: Stratospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Ramdy; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The correct prediction of total ozone as a function of latitude and season is extremely important for global models. This exercise tests the ability of a particular model to simulate ozone. The ozone production (P) and loss (L) will be specified from a well- established global model and will be used in all GCMs for subsequent prediction of ozone. This is the "B-3 Constrained Run" from M&MII. The exercise mostly tests a model stratospheric dynamics in the prediction of total ozone. The GCM predictions will be compared and contrasted with TOMS measurements.

  13. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  14. Ozone pollution in China: A review of concentrations, meteorological influences, chemical precursors, and effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xue, Likun; Brimblecombe, Peter; Lam, Yun Fat; Li, Li; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    High concentrations of ozone in urban and industrial regions worldwide have long been a major air quality issue. With the rapid increase in fossil fuel consumption in China over the past three decades, the emission of chemical precursors to ozone-nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds-has increased sharply, surpassing that of North America and Europe and raising concerns about worsening ozone pollution in China. Historically, research and control have prioritized acid rain, particulate matter, and more recently fine particulate matter (PM2.5). In contrast, less is known about ozone pollution, partly due to a lack of monitoring of atmospheric ozone and its precursors until recently. This review summarizes the main findings from published papers on the characteristics and sources and processes of ozone and ozone precursors in the boundary layer of urban and rural areas of China, including concentration levels, seasonal variation, meteorology conducive to photochemistry and pollution transport, key production and loss processes, ozone dependence on nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, and the effects of ozone on crops and human health. Ozone concentrations exceeding the ambient air quality standard by 100-200% have been observed in China's major urban centers such as Jing-Jin-Ji, the Yangtze River delta, and the Pearl River delta, and limited studies suggest harmful effect of ozone on human health and agricultural corps; key chemical precursors and meteorological conditions conductive to ozone pollution have been investigated, and inter-city/region transport of ozone is significant. Several recommendations are given for future research and policy development on ground-level ozone.

  15. Approach to forecasting daily maximum ozone levels in St. Louis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prior, E. J.; Schiess, J. R.; Mcdougal, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements taken in 1976 from the St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS) data base, conducted by EPA, were analyzed to determine an optimum set of air-quality and meteorological variables for predicting maximum ozone levels for each day in 1976. A 'leaps and bounds' regression analysis was used to identify the best subset of variables. Three particular variables, the 9 a.m. ozone level, the forecasted maximum temperature, and the 6-9 a.m. averaged wind speed, have useful forecasting utility. The trajectory history of air masses entering St. Louis was studied, and it was concluded that transport-related variables contribute to the appearance of very high ozone levels. The final empirical forecast model predicts the daily maximum ozone over 341 days with a standard deviation of 11 ppb, which approaches the estimated error.

  16. Winter rain and summer ozone: a predictive relationship.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, J S; Basso, M J; Okin, B A

    1978-06-02

    Insights from dendrochronology have provided a new seasonal predictor for air pollution meteorology. In the San Francisco Bay Area summer ozone excesses over the federal ozone standard are correlated (correlation coefficient r = .87) with precipitation for the two preceding winters, a factor related to tree-ring width in a precipitation-stressed climate. The hypothesis that reactive hydrocarbon emissions from vegetative biomass affects these ozone excesses was supported by a similar correlation between summer hydrocarbon average maximums and the two-winter precipitation factor, reaching r = .88 at suburban stations. A weak tendency for hot summers to follow wet winters (in 16 years of California data) explains only a minor part of the ozone-rain relationship in multiple correlations.

  17. Ozone and other air pollutants from photocopying machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.B.; Andersen, B.

    1986-10-01

    The ozone emission from 69 different photocopying machines was determined by a described standard procedure. The emission rates were in the range of 0 to 1350 ..mu..g/min. The concentration in the breathing zone of 19 operators was found to be between less than or equal to 0.001 and 0.15 ppm. Technical conditions for the amount of ozone generated by photocopiers are described, as well as conditions for the rate of decomposition of ozone. The efficiencies of three different types of ozone filters were tested: activated carbon granulate; polyester; and polyurethane impregnated with activated carbon. Other pollutants levels from the copying process (selenium and cadmium) were less than the limit of detection. Dust concentrations (toner) in the air exhausted from photocopies were found in the same magnitude as normal dust concentrations in offices. Vapors from the resin in the toner were often present in concentrations and gave operators an unpleasant feeling.

  18. High efficiency ozone generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.L.

    1990-01-09

    This final report entails research prepared to verify the workings and the efficiency of producing ozone with the ELK'' Ozone Generator, which operates at an elevated gas pressure of up to 20 MPA (3000 psi) and is an improvement of the corona discharge ozone generator. The increased pressure produces an increase in the density of oxygen gas fed into the generator. This, in turn, leads to an increased yield of ozone in the ozone oxygen gas mixture leaving the generator. The design of this new ozone generator incorporates a novel positioning of the dielectric to preserve its mechanical integrity at high operating pressures and also incorporates a novel heat removal technique. A large number of ozone production runs have been made at different pressures. Large populations of data such as, temperature points throughout the generator, gas flow, cooling water flow parameters, operating gas pressure, ozone concentration, and data on the dielectric cooling, have been compiled and fed into our computer. This new data indicates not only that high pressures used in a controlled fashion will produce more ozone per watt hour but also indicates what problems exist when pressures are increased, such as the generation of high temperatures not only in the area of ozone generation but within the dielectric. The data also shows the necessary residence time for maximum ozone production at a particular pressure, voltage, temperature and electrode spacing. 14 refs., 22 figs.

  19. Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Winslow, N.; Wargan, K.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Rood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will discuss assimilation of ozone data from satellite-borne instruments. Satellite observations of ozone total columns and profiles have been measured by a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instruments, and more recently by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. Additional profile data are provided by instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by occultation instruments on other platforms. Instruments on Envisat' and future EOS Aura satellite will supply even more comprehensive data about the ozone distribution. Satellite data contain a wealth of information, but they do not provide synoptic global maps of ozone fields. These maps can be obtained through assimilation of satellite data into global chemistry and transport models. In the ozone system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) any combination of TOMS, SBUV, and Microwave Limb sounder (MLS) data can be assimilated. We found that the addition of MLS to SBUV and TOMS data in the system helps to constrain the ozone distribution, especially in the polar night region and in the tropics. The assimilated ozone distribution in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is sensitive also to finer changes in the SBUV and TOMS data selection and to changes in error covariance models. All results are established by comparisons of assimilated ozone with independent profiles from ozone sondes and occultation instruments.

  20. Updated ozone absorption cross section will reduce air quality compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Evans, M. J.; Lewis, A. C.

    2015-07-01

    Photometric ozone measurements rely upon an accurate value of the ozone absorption cross section at 253.65 nm. This has recently been reevaluated by Viallon et al. (2015) as 1.8 % smaller than the accepted value (Hearn, 1961) used for the preceding fifty years. Thus, ozone measurements that applied the older cross section systematically underestimate the amount of ozone in air. We correct the reported historical surface data from North America and Europe and find that this modest change in cross section has a significant impact on the number of locations that are out of compliance with air quality regulations if the air quality standards remain the same. We find 18, 23, and 20 % increases in the number of sites that are out of compliance with current US, Canadian, and European ozone air quality health standards for the year 2012. Should the new cross section value be applied, it would impact attainment of air quality standards and compliance with relevant clean air acts, unless the air quality target values themselves were also changed proportionately. We draw attention to how a small change in gas metrology has a global impact on attainment and compliance with legal air quality standards. We suggest that further laboratory work to evaluate the new cross section is needed and suggest three possible technical and policy responses should the new cross section be adopted.

  1. Updated ozone absorption cross section will reduce air quality compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Evans, M. J.; Lewis, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Photometric ozone measurements rely upon an accurate value of the ozone absorption cross section at 253.65 nm. This has recently been re-evaluated by Viallon et al. (2015) as 1.8 % smaller than the accepted value (Hearn, 1961) used for the preceding 50 years. Thus, ozone measurements that applied the older cross section systematically underestimate the amount of ozone in air. We correct the reported historical surface data from North America and Europe and find that this modest change in cross section has a significant impact on the number of locations that are out of compliance with air quality regulations if the air quality standards remain the same. We find 18, 23, and 20 % increases in the number of sites that are out of compliance with current US, Canadian, and European ozone air quality health standards for the year 2012. Should the new cross-section value be applied, it would impact attainment of air quality standards and compliance with relevant clean air acts, unless the air quality target values themselves were also changed proportionately. We draw attention to how a small change in gas metrology has a global impact on attainment and compliance with legal air quality standards. We suggest that further laboratory work to evaluate the new cross section is needed and suggest three possible technical and policy responses should the new cross section be adopted.

  2. Ozone Cross-Section Measurement by Gas Phase Titration.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Flores, Edgar; Wielgosz, Robert I

    2016-11-01

    Elevated values of ground-level ozone damage health, vegetation, and building materials and are the subject of air quality regulations. Levels are monitored by networks using mostly ultraviolet (UV) absorption instruments, with traceability to standard reference photometers, relying on the UV absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have redetermined the ozone cross-section at this wavelength based on gas phase titration (GPT) measurements. This is a well-known chemical method using the reaction of ozone (O3) with nitrogen monoxide (NO) resulting in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen (O2). The BIPM GPT facility uses state-of-the-art flow measurement, chemiluminescence for NO concentration measurements, a cavity phase shift analyzer (CAPS) for NO2 measurements, and a UV ozone analyzer. The titration experiment is performed over the concentration range 100-500 nmol/mol, with NO and NO2 reactants/calibrants diluted down from standards with nominal mole fractions of 50 μmol/mol. Accurate measurements of NO, NO2, and O3 mole fractions allow the calculation of ozone absorption cross section values at 253.65 nm, and we report a value of 11.24 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.8% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen monoxide titration values and a value of 11.22 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.4% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen dioxide titration values. The excellent agreement between these values and recently published absorption cross-section measurements directly on pure ozone provide strong evidence for revising the conventionally accepted value of ozone cross section at 253.65 nm.

  3. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  4. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  5. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  6. Dobson ozone spectrophotometer modification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a modified version of the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer in which several outdated electronic design features have been replaced by circuitry embodying more modern design concepts. The resulting improvement in performance characteristics has been obtained without changing the principle of operation of the original instrument.

  7. Ozone, CFCs and aerosols.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are, from the chemist's point of view, unique compounds with very valuable properties. They are inert, cheap and stable. But they also have devastating effects on the environment, destroying the ozone layer and adding to global warming or the greenhouse effect.

  8. Ozone Layer Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide has been developed through a collaborative effort involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the results of scientific research on ozone depletion are…

  9. Ozone and Cavitation Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, Ernestina; Traversoni, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    From laboratory measurements it is well known that the addition of ozone and cavitation enhances the properties of both, understanding for that the ones related to disinfection and carbon removal from waste water. This paper shows modeling of such phenomena that gives some light to the understanding of it and also provides the opportunity to improve the effectiveness of the current procedures.

  10. Validation of OMI total ozone retrievals from the SAO ozone profile algorithm and three operational algorithms with Brewer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, J.; Liu, X.; Kim, J. H.; Chance, K.; Haffner, D. P.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of total ozone computed from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) optimal estimation (OE) ozone profile algorithm (SOE) applied to the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is assessed through comparisons with ground-based Brewer spectrometer measurements from 2005 to 2008. We also compare the three OMI operational ozone products, derived from the NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) algorithm, the KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute) differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm, and KNMI's Optimal Estimation (KOE) algorithm. The best agreement is observed between SAO and Brewer, with a mean difference of within 1% at most individual stations. The KNMI OE algorithm systematically overestimates Brewer total ozone by 2% at low and mid-latitudes and 5% at high latitudes while the TOMS and DOAS algorithms underestimate it by ~1.65% on average. Standard deviations of ~1.8% are calculated for both SOE and TOMS, but DOAS and KOE have higher values of 2.2% and 2.6%, respectively. The stability of the SOE algorithm is found to have insignificant dependence on viewing geometry, cloud parameters, or total ozone column. In comparison, the KOE-Brewer differences are significantly correlated with solar and viewing zenith angles and show significant deviations depending on cloud parameters and total ozone amount. The TOMS algorithm exhibits similar stability to SOE with respect to viewing geometry and total column ozone, but has stronger cloud parameter dependence. The dependence of DOAS on observational geometry and geophysical conditions is marginal compared to KOE, but is distinct compared to the SOE and TOMS algorithms. Comparisons of all four OMI products with Brewer show no apparent long-term drift, but seasonal features are evident, especially for KOE and TOMS. The substantial differences in the KOE vs. SOE algorithm performance cannot be sufficiently explained by the use of soft calibration (in SOE) and the use of

  11. 77 FR 65151 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designation of Areas for Air Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ...EPA is proposing to approve: the State of New Hampshire's request to redesignate the Boston-Manchester-Portsmouth (SE), New Hampshire moderate 8-hour ozone nonattainment area to attainment for the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS); a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision containing a 10-year maintenance plan for this area; a 2008 comprehensive emissions......

  12. 76 FR 6590 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Pennsylvania; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... (see 40 CFR 51.918), if EPA issues a determination that an area is attaining the relevant standard... the Pittsburgh Area is attaining the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. In accordance with 40 CFR 51.918, if EPA...; Determination of Attainment for the Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley 8-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area...

  13. 75 FR 36316 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ...-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1997 8-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS... monitoring data that show the area has monitored attainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS since the 2006... requirements for this area to submit an attainment demonstration, a reasonable further progress...

  14. 40 CFR 51.912 - What requirements apply for reasonably available control technology (RACT) and reasonably...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.912 What requirements apply for... than 27 months after designation for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS, except that for a State subject to...

  15. 77 FR 28338 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Reasonably Available...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Reasonably Available Control Technology for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard AGENCY... for meeting reasonably available control technology (RACT) for the 1997 8-hour ozone national...

  16. 77 FR 14691 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... declarations for the Plan for the 8-Hour Ozone page number following Control National Ambient Air Quality where... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard AGENCY:...

  17. 76 FR 54465 - Proposed Settlement Agreement, Clean Air Act Citizen Suit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... given of a proposed settlement agreement to address a lawsuit filed by Sierra Club and WildEarth..., Arizona, Florida and Georgia with regard to the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards..., Nevada, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arizona with regard to the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS. The...

  18. Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Final Report, 2006)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In February 2006, EPA released the final document, Air Quality Criteria for Ozone and Other Photochemical Oxidants. Tropospheric or surface-level ozone (O3) is one of six major air pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) under the U.S...

  19. Formation and transport of secondary air pollutants: ozone and aerosols in the St. Louis urban plume.

    PubMed

    White, W H; Anderson, J A; Blumenthal, D L; Husar, R B; Gillani, N V; Husar, J D; Wilson, W E

    1976-10-08

    Emissions from metropolitan St. Louis caused reduced visibilities and concentrations of ozone in excess of the federal ambient standard (0.08 part per million) 160 kilometers or more downwind of the city on 18 July 1975. Atmospheric production of ozone and visibility-reducing aerosols continues long after their primary precursors have been diluted to low concentrations.

  20. Removal of nalidixic acid and its degradation products by an integrated MBR-ozonation system.

    PubMed

    Pollice, A; Laera, G; Cassano, D; Diomede, S; Pinto, A; Lopez, A; Mascolo, G

    2012-02-15

    Chemical-biological degradation of a widely spread antibacterial (nalidixic acid) was successfully obtained by an integrated membrane bioreactor (MBR)-ozonation process. The composition of the treated solution simulated the wastewater from the production of the target pharmaceutical, featuring high salinity and a relevant concentration of sodium acetate. Aim of treatment integration was to exploit the synergistic effects of chemical oxidation and bioprocesses, by adopting the latter to remove most of the COD and the ozonation biodegradable products. Integration was achieved by placing ozonation in the recirculation stream of the bioreactor effluent. The recirculation flow rate was three-fold the MBR feed, and the performance of the integrated system was compared to the standard polishing configuration (single ozonation step after the MBR). Results showed that the introduction of the ozonation step did not cause relevant drawbacks to both biological and filtration processes. nalidixic acid passed undegraded through the MBR and was completely removed in the ozonation step. Complete degradation of most of the detected ozonation products was better achieved with the integrated MBR-ozonation process than using the sequential treatment configuration, i.e. ozone polishing after MBR, given the same ozone dosage.