Science.gov

Sample records for 8-node solid elements

  1. An 8-node tetrahedral finite element suitable for explicit transient dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Stone, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Considerable effort has been expended in perfecting the algorithmic properties of 8-node hexahedral finite elements. Today the element is well understood and performs exceptionally well when used in modeling three-dimensional explicit transient dynamic events. However, the automatic generation of all-hexahedral meshes remains an elusive achievement. The alternative of automatic generation for all-tetrahedral finite element is a notoriously poor performer, and the 10-node quadratic tetrahedral finite element while a better performer numerically is computationally expensive. To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation extant today, the authors have explored the creation of a quality 8-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four midface nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular, they examine the 80node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element only samples constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hourglass modes. In this regard, it bears similarities to the 8-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the 8-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the 8-node hexahedral finite element and handbuilt meshes.

  2. A nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics - User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, B.N.

    1995-04-14

    This report provides a user`s manual for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Over twenty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a factorization method, for which case bandwidth minimization is optional. Data may be stored either in or out of core memory to allow for large analyses.

  3. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  4. Geometrical frustration in an element solid: (beta)-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, T; Gygi, F; Reed, J; Udagawa, M; Motome, Y; Schwegler, E; Galli, G

    2009-05-19

    Although a comprehensive understanding of the basic properties of most elemental solids has been achieved, there are still fundamental, open questions regarding simple substances, e.g. boron. Based on an Ising model that describes the intrinsic defect states in elemental boron, we show that this system is the only known element to exhibit geometrical frustration in its solid form. Interestingly, we find that the peculiar transport properties of boron that have been reported over the past forty years originate from the presence of geometrical frustration.

  5. Advanced solid elements for sheet metal forming simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataix, Vicente; Rossi, Riccardo; Oñate, Eugenio; Flores, Fernando G.

    2016-08-01

    The solid-shells are an attractive kind of element for the simulation of forming processes, due to the fact that any kind of generic 3D constitutive law can be employed without any additional hypothesis. The present work consists in the improvement of a triangular prism solid-shell originally developed by Flores[2, 3]. The solid-shell can be used in the analysis of thin/thick shell, undergoing large deformations. The element is formulated in total Lagrangian formulation, and employs the neighbour (adjacent) elements to perform a local patch to enrich the displacement field. In the original formulation a modified right Cauchy-Green deformation tensor (C) is obtained; in the present work a modified deformation gradient (F) is obtained, which allows to generalise the methodology and allows to employ the Pull-Back and Push-Forwards operations. The element is based in three modifications: (a) a classical assumed strain approach for transverse shear strains (b) an assumed strain approach for the in-plane components using information from neighbour elements and (c) an averaging of the volumetric strain over the element. The objective is to use this type of elements for the simulation of shells avoiding transverse shear locking, improving the membrane behaviour of the in-plane triangle and to handle quasi-incompressible materials or materials with isochoric plastic flow.

  6. A novel versatile multilayer hybrid stress solid-shell element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rah, K.; Van Paepegem, W.; Degrieck, J.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a versatile multilayer locking free hybrid stress solid-shell element that can be readily employed for a wide range of geometrically linear elastic structural analyses, i.e. from shell-like isotropic structures to multilayer anisotropic composites. This solid-shell element has eight nodes with only displacement degrees of freedom and a few internal parameters that provide the locking free behavior and accurate interlaminar stress resolution through the element thickness. These elements can be stacked on top of each other to model multilayer structures, fulfilling the interlaminar stress continuity at the interlayer surfaces and zero traction conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of composite laminates. The element formulation is based on the modified form of the well-known Fraeijs de Veubeke-Hu-Washizu (FHW) multifield variational principle with enhanced assumed strains (EAS formulation) and assumed natural strains (ANS formulation) to alleviate the different types of locking phenomena in solid-shell elements. The distinct feature of the present formulation is its ability to accurately calculate the interlaminar stress field in multilayer structures, which is achieved by incorporating an assumed stress field in a standard EAS formulation based on the FHW principle. To assess the present formulation's accuracy, a variety of popular numerical benchmark examples related to element patch tests, convergence, mesh distortion, shell and laminated composite analyses are investigated and the results are compared with those available in the literature. This assessment reveals that the proposed solid-shell formulation provides very accurate results for a wide range of structural analyses.

  7. Trace elements in cocoa solids and chocolate: an ICPMS study.

    PubMed

    Yanus, Rinat Levi; Sela, Hagit; Borojovich, Eitan J C; Zakon, Yevgeni; Saphier, Magal; Nikolski, Andrey; Gutflais, Efi; Lorber, Avraham; Karpas, Zeev

    2014-02-01

    The concentrations of eight trace elements: lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), arsenic (As), bismuth (Bi) and molybdenum (Mo), in chocolate, cocoa beans and products were studied by ICPMS. The study examined chocolate samples from different brands and countries with different concentrations of cocoa solids from each brand. The samples were digested and filtered to remove lipids and indium was used as an internal standard to correct matrix effects. A linear correlation was found between the level of several trace elements in chocolate and the cocoa solids content. Significant levels of Bi and As were found in the cocoa bean shells but not in the cocoa bean and chocolate. This may be attributed to environmental contamination. The presence of other elements was attributed to the manufacturing processes of cocoa and chocolate products. Children, who are big consumers of chocolates, may be at risk of exceeding the daily limit of lead; whereas one 10 g cube of dark chocolate may contain as much as 20% of the daily lead oral limit. Moreover chocolate may not be the only source of lead in their nutrition. For adults there is almost no risk of exceeding daily limits for trace metals ingestion because their digestive absorption of metals is very poor.

  8. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J.; Cramer, S.P.

    1991-12-31

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  9. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J. ); Cramer, S.P. . Dept. of Applied Science)

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  10. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  11. Elemental balance of SRF production process: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Oinas, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF), certain waste components have excessive influence on the quality of product. The proportion of rubber, plastic (hard) and certain textiles was found to be critical as to the elemental quality of SRF. The mass flow of rubber, plastic (hard) and textiles (to certain extent, especially synthetic textile) components from input waste stream into the output streams of SRF production was found to play the decisive role in defining the elemental quality of SRF. This paper presents the mass flow of polluting and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in SRF production. The SRF was produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) through mechanical treatment (MT). The results showed that of the total input chlorine content to process, 55% was found in the SRF and 30% in reject material. Of the total input arsenic content, 30% was found in the SRF and 45% in fine fraction. In case of cadmium, lead and mercury, of their total input content to the process, 62%, 38% and 30%, respectively, was found in the SRF. Among the components of MSW, rubber material was identified as potential source of chlorine, containing 8.0 wt.% of chlorine. Plastic (hard) and textile components contained 1.6 and 1.1. wt.% of chlorine, respectively. Plastic (hard) contained higher lead and cadmium content compared with other waste components, i.e. 500 mg kg(-1) and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively.

  12. Elemental balance of SRF production process: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Oinas, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF), certain waste components have excessive influence on the quality of product. The proportion of rubber, plastic (hard) and certain textiles was found to be critical as to the elemental quality of SRF. The mass flow of rubber, plastic (hard) and textiles (to certain extent, especially synthetic textile) components from input waste stream into the output streams of SRF production was found to play the decisive role in defining the elemental quality of SRF. This paper presents the mass flow of polluting and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in SRF production. The SRF was produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) through mechanical treatment (MT). The results showed that of the total input chlorine content to process, 55% was found in the SRF and 30% in reject material. Of the total input arsenic content, 30% was found in the SRF and 45% in fine fraction. In case of cadmium, lead and mercury, of their total input content to the process, 62%, 38% and 30%, respectively, was found in the SRF. Among the components of MSW, rubber material was identified as potential source of chlorine, containing 8.0 wt.% of chlorine. Plastic (hard) and textile components contained 1.6 and 1.1. wt.% of chlorine, respectively. Plastic (hard) contained higher lead and cadmium content compared with other waste components, i.e. 500 mg kg(-1) and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. PMID:26608898

  13. Metallic elements fractionation in municipal solid waste incineration residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Piotr R.; Kasina, Monika; Michalik, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues are represented by three main materials: bottom ash, fly ash and air pollution control (APC) residues. Among them ˜80 wt% is bottom ash. All of that materials are products of high temperature (>1000° C) treatment of waste. Incineration process allows to obtain significant reduction of waste mass (up to 70%) and volume (up to 90%) what is commonly used in waste management to reduce the amount need to be landfilled or managed in other way. Incineration promote accumulation non-combustible fraction of waste, which part are metallic elements. That type of concentration is object of concerns about the incineration residues impact on the environment and also gives the possibility of attempts to recover them. Metallic elements are not equally distributed among the materials. Several factors influence the process: melting points, volatility and place and forms of metallic occurrence in the incinerated waste. To investigate metallic elements distribution in MSWI residues samples from one of the biggest MSW incineration plant in Poland were collected in 2015. Chemical analysis with emphasis on the metallic elements content were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The bottom ash was a SiO2-CaO-Al2O3-Fe2O3-Na2O rich material, whereas fly ash and APC residues were mostly composed of CaO and SiO2. All of the materials were rich in amorphous phase occurring together with various, mostly silicate crystalline phases. In a mass of bottom ash 11 wt% were metallic elements but also in ashes 8.5 wt% (fly ash) and ˜4.5 wt% (APC residues) of them were present. Among the metallic elements equal distribution between bottom and fly ash was observed for Al (˜3.85 wt%), Mn (770 ppm) and Ni (˜65 ppm). In bottom ash Fe (5.5 wt%), Cr (590 ppm) and Cu (1250 ppm) were concentrated. These values in comparison to fly ash were 5-fold higher for Fe, 3-fold for Cu and 1.5-fold for

  14. Finite-element technique applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre-Ramirez, G.; Oden, J. T.

    1969-01-01

    Finite element method applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, using nonlinear constitutive equation for heat ABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGH

  15. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  16. Three isoparametric solid elements for NASTRAN. [for static, dynamic, buckling, and heat transfer analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. E.; Field, E. I.

    1973-01-01

    Linear, quadratic, and cubic isoparametric hexahedral solid elements have been added to the element library of NASTRAN. These elements are available for static, dynamic, buckling, and heat-transfer analyses. Because the isoparametric element matrices are generated by direct numerical integration over the volume of the element, variations in material properties, temperatures, and stresses within the elements are represented in the computations. In order to compare the accuracy of the new elements, three similar models of a slender cantilever were developed, one for each element. All elements performed well. As expected, however, the linear element model yielded excellent results only when shear behavior predominated. In contrast, the results obtained from the quadratic and cubic element models were excellent in both shear and bending.

  17. Mixed-Mode Decohesion Elements for Analyses of Progressive Delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; deMoura, Marcelo F.

    2001-01-01

    A new 8-node decohesion element with mixed mode capability is proposed and demonstrated. The element is used at the interface between solid finite elements to model the initiation and propagation of delamination. A single displacement-based damage parameter is used in a strain softening law to track the damage state of the interface. The method can be used in conjunction with conventional material degradation procedures to account for inplane and intra-laminar damage modes. The accuracy of the predictions is evaluated in single mode delamination tests, in the mixed-mode bending test, and in a structural configuration consisting of the debonding of a stiffener flange from its skin.

  18. Finite element analysis of monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Majumdar, S. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the stress and fracture behavior of a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) currently under joint development by Allied Signal Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory. The MSOFC is an all-ceramic fuel cell capable of high power density and tolerant of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, making it potentially attractive for stationary utility and mobile transportation systems. The monolithic design eliminates inactive structural supports, increases active surface area, and lowers voltage losses caused by internal resistance.

  19. Finite element analysis of monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A.; Majumdar, S.

    1992-04-01

    This paper investigates the stress and fracture behavior of a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) currently under joint development by Allied Signal Corporation and Argonne National Laboratory. The MSOFC is an all-ceramic fuel cell capable of high power density and tolerant of a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, making it potentially attractive for stationary utility and mobile transportation systems. The monolithic design eliminates inactive structural supports, increases active surface area, and lowers voltage losses caused by internal resistance.

  20. BOPACE 3-D (the Boeing Plastic Analysis Capability for 3-dimensional Solids Using Isoparametric Finite Elements)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The BOPACE 3-D is a finite element computer program, which provides a general family of three-dimensional isoparametric solid elements, and includes a new algorithm for improving the efficiency of the elastic-plastic-creep solution procedure. Theoretical, user, and programmer oriented sections are presented to describe the program.

  1. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part III. Finite Element Analysis in Nonlinear Solid Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, T.A.; Attaway, S.W.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1999-03-01

    This report outlines the application of finite element methodology to large deformation solid mechanics problems, detailing also some of the key technological issues that effective finite element formulations must address. The presentation is organized into three major portions: first, a discussion of finite element discretization from the global point of view, emphasizing the relationship between a virtual work principle and the associated fully discrete system, second, a discussion of finite element technology, emphasizing the important theoretical and practical features associated with an individual finite element; and third, detailed description of specific elements that enjoy widespread use, providing some examples of the theoretical ideas already described. Descriptions of problem formulation in nonlinear solid mechanics, nonlinear continuum mechanics, and constitutive modeling are given in three companion reports.

  2. Elements of informatics for combinatorial solid-state materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, S.; Ohnishi, T.; Lippmaa, M.; Koinuma, H.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of using combinatorial techniques for materials science studies is to achieve higher experimental throughput than what is possible when samples are synthesized and characterized one at a time. The instrumentation needed for performing high-throughput synthesis and characterization has seen rapid development in recent years. The software tools needed to connect all parts of the materials development process are still largely lacking. In this paper we discuss the requirements of a combinatorial informatics system for materials science experiments. Specifically, we focus on solid-state thin film synthesis. We also describe an implementation of such a system that is based on widely-available open-source software. The system offers features such as remote access via a Web browser, an electronic notebook-style Web interface, automatic upload of new measurement or processing results and rapid preview of experimental data.

  3. Partitioning of Si and platinum group elements between liquid and solid Fe-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Siebert, J.; Badro, J.

    2014-05-01

    Crystallization of the Earth's inner core fractionates major and minor elements between the solid and liquid metal, leaving physical and geochemical imprints on the Earth's core. For example, the density jump observed at the Inner Core Boundary (ICB) is related to the preferential partitioning of lighter elements in the liquid outer core. The fractionation of Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid during inner core crystallization has been invoked as a process that explains the observed Os isotopic signature of mantle plume-derived lavas (Brandon et al., 1998; Brandon and Walker, 2005) in terms of core-mantle interaction. In this article we measured partitioning of Si, Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid metal. Isobaric (2 GPa) experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder press at temperatures between 1250 °C and 1600 °C in which an imposed thermal gradient through the sample provided solid-liquid coexistence in the Fe-Si system. We determined the narrow melting loop in the Fe-Si system using Si partitioning values and showed that order-disorder transition in the Fe-Si solid phases can have a large effect on Si partitioning. We also found constant partition coefficients (DOs, DPt, DRe) between liquid and solid metal, for Si concentrations ranging from 2 to 12 wt%. The compact structure of Fe-Si liquid alloys is compatible with incorporation of Si and platinum group elements (PGEs) elements precluding solid-liquid fractionation. Such phase diagram properties are relevant for other light elements such as S and C at high pressure and is not consistent with inter-elemental fractionation of PGEs during metal crystallization at Earth's inner core conditions. We therefore propose that the peculiar Os isotopic signature observed in plume-derived lavas is more likely explained by mantle source heterogeneity (Meibom et al., 2002; Baker and Krogh Jensen, 2004; Luguet et al., 2008).

  4. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  5. Accelerated exploration of multi-principal element alloys with solid solution phases

    PubMed Central

    Senkov, O.N.; Miller, J.D.; Miracle, D.B.; Woodward, C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent multi-principal element, high entropy alloy (HEA) development strategies vastly expand the number of candidate alloy systems, but also pose a new challenge—how to rapidly screen thousands of candidate alloy systems for targeted properties. Here we develop a new approach to rapidly assess structural metals by combining calculated phase diagrams with simple rules based on the phases present, their transformation temperatures and useful microstructures. We evaluate over 130,000 alloy systems, identifying promising compositions for more time-intensive experimental studies. We find the surprising result that solid solution alloys become less likely as the number of alloy elements increases. This contradicts the major premise of HEAs—that increased configurational entropy increases the stability of disordered solid solution phases. As the number of elements increases, the configurational entropy rises slowly while the probability of at least one pair of elements favouring formation of intermetallic compounds increases more rapidly, explaining this apparent contradiction. PMID:25739749

  6. An automatic granular structure generation and finite element analysis of heterogeneous semi-solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Hamid; Larouche, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The quality of cast metal products depends on the capacity of the semi-solid metal to sustain the stresses generated during the casting. Predicting the evolution of these stresses with accuracy in the solidification interval should be highly helpful to avoid the formation of defects like hot tearing. This task is however very difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of the material. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of a metal during solidification using a mesh generation technique of the heterogeneous semi-solid material for a finite element analysis at the microscopic level. This task is done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain in which the granular structure of the solid phase is generated surrounded by an intergranular and interdendritc liquid phase. Some basic solid grains are first constructed and projected in the 2D domain with random orientations and scale factors. Depending on their orientation, the basic grains are combined to produce larger grains or separated by a liquid film. Different basic grain shapes can produce different granular structures of the mushy zone. As a result, using this automatic grain generation procedure, we can investigate the effect of grain shapes and sizes on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the semi-solid material. The granular models are automatically converted to the finite element meshes. The solid grains and the liquid phase are meshed properly using quadrilateral elements. This method has been used to simulate the microstructure of a binary aluminium-copper alloy (Al-5.8 wt% Cu) when the fraction solid is 0.92. Using the finite element method and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state for the liquid phase, the transient mechanical behaviour of the mushy zone under tensile loading has been investigated. The stress distribution and the bridges, which are formed during the tensile loading, have been detected.

  7. Finite element procedures for coupled linear analysis of heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Coupled finite element formulations for fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics are derived from the conservation laws for energy, mass, and momentum. To model the physics of interactions among the participating disciplines, the linearized equations are coupled by combining domain and boundary coupling procedures. Iterative numerical solution strategy is presented to solve the equations, with the partitioning of temporal discretization implemented.

  8. Trace element determination by combining solid-phase microextraction hyphenated to elemental and molecular detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Díez, Sergi; Bayona, Josep M

    2006-08-01

    The state of the art of analytical procedures based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and its applications to tin, mercury, arsenic, antimony, chromium, selenium, and lead determination in abiotic and biotic matrixes are critically reviewed from 1994 to present. First, sample pretreatment prior to SPME is evaluated, including a description of the most usual leaching procedures for sediment, soil, and biological samples. Because most organometallic species lack volatility, a derivatization step is mandatory prior to gas chromatographic (GC) determination, except for the volatile organometallics that can be directly extracted from the sample headspace or liquid phase by SPME. The most common derivatization procedures used in alkylation and hydridization reactions used for mercury, lead, and tin, as well as other procedures for the determination of total chromium and arsenic [i.e., trifluoroacetylacetonates for chromium (III) and thioglycol methylate for organic arsenic species] are reviewed. Critical variables usually evaluated along with the method development to improve the sensitivity of the extraction methods based on SPME, such as sampling size, stirring procedures, sampling temperature and pressure, polymer coating, and thermal desorption are reviewed. In addition, figures of merit of the different detection systems used in SPME combined with GC are evaluated. The validation of the reported analytical procedures with reference materials are also discussed in terms of precision and accuracy. Finally, future developments in the application of SPME to speciation are highlighted. Moreover, the capability of SPME automation for the derivatization-extraction procedures are also presented. PMID:16925944

  9. Characteristics of elements in waste ashes from a solid waste incinerator in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Wang, Chu-Fang; Mui, D T; Cheng, Man-Ting; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-06-15

    Incineration, one of the most effective methods used to treat solid wastes, reduces the volume of solid wastes significantly and enables recovery of thermal energy. However, during this waste treatment, a small amount of heavy metals can be present in the form of fly ash or vapor in the flue gas, becoming a threat to human health and other living organisms once emitted into the environment. This study focuses on the characteristics and behavior of elements contained in the combustion residues and their impact on various wastes at Taiwan's municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI). Three kinds of waste, municipal solid waste (MSW), industrial waste (IW), and biomass waste (BM), were analyzed to obtain their physical properties and elemental composition before incineration. The combustion residues were collected with a sampler at various locations such as the furnace bottom, a heat economizer, a semi-dry scrubber, a bag-house filter and a gas stack. Twenty-one elements were determined to establish the actual mass fraction and to estimate the possible impact on the environment. Owing to its volatility, Cd was found in high concentrations in bag-house filter ash. In addition, the mass fraction of Zn, As, Pb, Sb and V in bag-house filter ash was found greater than 20% for the three kinds of wastes. Iron (Fe) content was found to be high in MSW, S, Cd, Ni, Pb and Sb content were high in IW and Se content was high in BW. PMID:19046804

  10. A solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  11. Solid-gaseous phase transformation of elemental contaminants during the gasification of biomass.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Ameh, Abiba; Lei, Mei; Duan, Lunbo; Longhurst, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Disposal of plant biomass removed from heavy metal contaminated land via gasification achieves significant volume reduction and can recover energy. However, these biomass often contain high concentrations of heavy metals leading to hot-corrosion of gasification facilities and toxic gaseous emissions. Therefore, it is of significant interest to gain a further understanding of the solid-gas phase transition of metal(loid)s during gasification. Detailed elemental analyses (C, H, O, N and key metal/metalloid elements) were performed on five plant species collected from a contaminated site. Using multi-phase equilibria modelling software (MTDATA), the analytical data allows modelling of the solid/gas transformation of metal(loid)s during gasification. Thermodynamic modelling based on chemical equilibrium calculations was carried out in this study to predict the fate of metal(loid) elements during typical gasification conditions and to show how these are influenced by metal(loid) composition in the biomass and operational conditions. As, Cd, Zn and Pb tend to transform to their gaseous forms at relatively low temperatures (<1000°C). Ni, Cu, Mn and Co converts to gaseous forms within the typical gasification temperature range of 1000-1200°C. Whereas Cr, Al, Fe and Mg remain in solid phase at higher temperatures (>1200°C). Simulation of pressurised gasification conditions shows that higher pressures increase the temperature at which solid-to-gaseous phase transformations takes place. PMID:26603198

  12. Characteristics of elements in waste ashes from a solid waste incinerator in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Wang, Chu-Fang; Mui, D T; Cheng, Man-Ting; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-06-15

    Incineration, one of the most effective methods used to treat solid wastes, reduces the volume of solid wastes significantly and enables recovery of thermal energy. However, during this waste treatment, a small amount of heavy metals can be present in the form of fly ash or vapor in the flue gas, becoming a threat to human health and other living organisms once emitted into the environment. This study focuses on the characteristics and behavior of elements contained in the combustion residues and their impact on various wastes at Taiwan's municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI). Three kinds of waste, municipal solid waste (MSW), industrial waste (IW), and biomass waste (BM), were analyzed to obtain their physical properties and elemental composition before incineration. The combustion residues were collected with a sampler at various locations such as the furnace bottom, a heat economizer, a semi-dry scrubber, a bag-house filter and a gas stack. Twenty-one elements were determined to establish the actual mass fraction and to estimate the possible impact on the environment. Owing to its volatility, Cd was found in high concentrations in bag-house filter ash. In addition, the mass fraction of Zn, As, Pb, Sb and V in bag-house filter ash was found greater than 20% for the three kinds of wastes. Iron (Fe) content was found to be high in MSW, S, Cd, Ni, Pb and Sb content were high in IW and Se content was high in BW.

  13. Solid-gaseous phase transformation of elemental contaminants during the gasification of biomass.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Ameh, Abiba; Lei, Mei; Duan, Lunbo; Longhurst, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Disposal of plant biomass removed from heavy metal contaminated land via gasification achieves significant volume reduction and can recover energy. However, these biomass often contain high concentrations of heavy metals leading to hot-corrosion of gasification facilities and toxic gaseous emissions. Therefore, it is of significant interest to gain a further understanding of the solid-gas phase transition of metal(loid)s during gasification. Detailed elemental analyses (C, H, O, N and key metal/metalloid elements) were performed on five plant species collected from a contaminated site. Using multi-phase equilibria modelling software (MTDATA), the analytical data allows modelling of the solid/gas transformation of metal(loid)s during gasification. Thermodynamic modelling based on chemical equilibrium calculations was carried out in this study to predict the fate of metal(loid) elements during typical gasification conditions and to show how these are influenced by metal(loid) composition in the biomass and operational conditions. As, Cd, Zn and Pb tend to transform to their gaseous forms at relatively low temperatures (<1000°C). Ni, Cu, Mn and Co converts to gaseous forms within the typical gasification temperature range of 1000-1200°C. Whereas Cr, Al, Fe and Mg remain in solid phase at higher temperatures (>1200°C). Simulation of pressurised gasification conditions shows that higher pressures increase the temperature at which solid-to-gaseous phase transformations takes place.

  14. The effect of solid film lubricants on the stability of rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    A technique has been developed for modeling solid films in rolling element bearings. For a given bearing geometry an effective viscosity can be calculated for a solid film as a function of the film shear modulus and ball-race friction coefficient. The calculated effective viscosity can subsequently be used as an input to a numerical model of cage motion and stability. Results from a sample calculation of effective viscosity and prediction of cage stability for a turbopump bearing are presented for films of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and polytetrafluoroethylene ()PTFE).

  15. Application of solid phase extraction procedures for rare earth elements determination in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Pyrzynska, Krystyna; Kubiak, Anna; Wysocka, Irena

    2016-07-01

    Determination of rare earth elements in environmental samples requires often pre-concentration and separation step due to a low metal content and high concentration of the interfering matrix components. A solid phase extraction technique with different kind of solid sorbents offers a high enrichment factor, rapid phase separation and the possibility of its combination with various detection techniques used either in on-line or off-line mode. The recent developments in this area published over the last five years are presented and discussed in this paper.

  16. The Parameterization of Solid Metal-Liquid Metal Partitioning of Siderophile Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Jones, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    The composition of a metallic liquid can significantly affect the partitioning behavior of elements. For example, some experimental solid metal-liquid metal partition coefficients have been shown to increase by three orders of magnitude with increasing S-content of the metallic liquid. Along with S, the presence of other light elements, such as P and C, has also been demonstrated to affect trace element partitioning behavior. Understanding the effects of metallic composition on partitioning behavior is important for modeling the crystallization of magmatic iron meteorites and the chemical effects of planetary differentiation. It is thus useful to have a mathematical expression that parameterizes the partition coefficient as a function of the composition of the metal. Here we present a revised parameterization method, which builds on the theory of the current parameterization of Jones and Malvin and which better handles partitioning in multi-light-element systems.

  17. Numerical values of the surface free energies of solid chemical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, L. Z.; Giber, J.

    1984-10-01

    The applicability of a 'standard table' of values of surface free energies (or enthalpies) obtained by the CCSS (complex calculation of surface segregation) method is demonstrated by comparing calculated surface-free-energy values with several recently published experimental results. The investigation (encompassing temperatures from 1023 to 2075 K) shows that a simplified variation of the second step of CCSS is applicable in the calculation of the surface free energies of polycrystalline solid elements for any temperature of interest.

  18. Convective drying analysis of three-dimensional porous solid by mass lumping finite element technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, K.; Lo, D. C.; Young, D. L.; Chen, C. W.; Fan, C. M.

    2008-02-01

    A numerical analysis of convective drying of a 3D porous solid of brick material is carried out using the finite element method and mass lumping technique. The energy equation and moisture transport equations for the porous solid are derived based on continuum approach following Whitaker’s theory of drying. The governing equations are solved using the Galerkin’s weighted residual method, which convert the governing equations into discretized form of matrix equations. The resulting capacitance matrices are made diagonal matrices by following the classical row-sum mass lumping technique. Hence with the use of the Eulerian time marching scheme, the final equations are reduced to simple algebraic equations, which can be solved directly without using an equation solver. The proposed numerical scheme is initially validated with experimental results for 1D drying problem and then tested by application to convective drying of 3D porous solid of brick material for four different aspect ratios obtained by varying the cross section of the solid. The mass lumping technique could correctly predict the wet bulb temperature of the solid under evaporative drying conditions. A parametric study carried out for three different values of convective heat transfer coefficients, 15, 30 and 45 W/m2 K shows an increased drying rate with increase in area of cross section and convective heat transfer coefficient. The proposed numerical scheme could correctly predict the drying behavior shown in the form of temperature and moisture evolutions.

  19. Finite Element Vibration Analysis of Rectangular Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Lin, W. J.; Leung, A. Y. T.

    2010-05-01

    Some pre-tensioned 4-node rectangular elements and 8-node triangular elements are constructed for the free vibration analysis of membranes by finite element. The shape functions are given to derive the element stiffness and mass matrices in accordance with the minimum potential energy principle. Two typical examples show that the calculation by the 4-node rectangular element is very close to the theoretical solution, and 8-node rectangular element has higher accuracy than the 4-node rectangular element. For dense grid, the result is almost consistent with the theoretical solution.

  20. Superficial composition in binary solid solutions A(B): Drastic effect of pure element surface tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, A.; Aufray, B.

    1985-10-01

    This paper deals with a comparative study of surface segragation of Pb and Ni respectively from Ag(Pb)(111) and Ag(Ni)(111) solid solutions. A high level of segregation of the solute is observed for both systems characterized by very low solute solubility. However, the superficial composition strongly depends on the relative surface tensions of the pure elements: the solute atoms are strictly on superficial sites when γ solute is smaller than γ solvent; in contrast uppermost layer consists purely of solvent when γ solute is greater than γ solvent. Two schematic distributions in close proximity to the surface are proposed in the last case.

  1. Boundary effects on backscattering by a solid aluminum cylinder: experiment and finite element model comparisons (L).

    PubMed

    La Follett, Jon R; Williams, Kevin L; Marston, Philip L

    2011-08-01

    Backscattering of sound by a solid aluminum cylinder was measured in the free field and with the cylinder near a flat surface. The target was suspended just below the surface of a water tank to simulate some aspects of backscattering when resting on the seabed. Measurements were compared with predictions made by an approximate hybrid approach based on multiple two-dimensional finite element calculations and the use of images. Many of the spectral features present in the tank data were present in the model. Comparing numerical model predictions with experimental data serves to build credibility for the modeling approach and can assist in developing insight into the underlying physical processes. PMID:21877778

  2. Laser ablation in liquids as a new technique of sampling in elemental analysis of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravitskaya, E. V.; Rosantsev, V. A.; Belkov, M. V.; Ershov-Pavlov, E. A.; Klyachkovskaya, E. V.

    2009-02-01

    Laser ablation in liquid media is considered as a new sample preparation technique in the elemental composition analysis of materials using optical emission spectroscopy of inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). Solid samples are transformed into uniform colloidal solutions of nanosized analyte particles using laser radiation focused onto the sample surface. High homogeneity of the resulting solution allows performing the ICP-OES quantitative analysis especially for the samples, which are poorly soluble in acids. The technique is compatible with the conventional solution-based standards.

  3. Interactive computer graphic surface modeling of three-dimensional solid domains for boundary element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perucchio, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the boundary element method (BEM) as a valid tool for solving problems in structural mechanics and in other fields of applied physics is discussed. The development of an integrated interactive computer graphic system for the application of the BEM to three dimensional problems in elastostatics is described. The integration of interactive computer graphic techniques and the BEM takes place at the preprocessing and postprocessing stages of the analysis process, when, respectively, the data base is generated and the results are interpreted. The interactive computer graphic modeling techniques used for generating and discretizing the boundary surfaces of a solid domain are outlined.

  4. Numerical values of the surface free energies of solid chemical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, L. Z.; Giber, J.

    1984-10-01

    The knowledge of the surface free energies γ {i/o}of solid chemical elements is necessary in many practically important subjects. The description of the quantities γ {i/o}(more correctly termed as the surface free enthalpies) is a part of a new “complex calculation of surface segregation” (CCSS) method, proposed by the authors. Here the applicability of a “standard table” of the values of γ {/i o }, obtained in that part of CCSS is shown by comparing the calculated values of γ {/i o }with several recently published experimental results.

  5. An assessment of finite-element modeling techniques for thick-solid/thin-shell joints analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    The subject of finite-element modeling has long been of critical importance to the practicing designer/analyst who is often faced with obtaining an accurate and cost-effective structural analysis of a particular design. Typically, these two goals are in conflict. The purpose is to discuss the topic of finite-element modeling for solid/shell connections (joints) which are significant for the practicing modeler. Several approaches are currently in use, but frequently various assumptions restrict their use. Such techniques currently used in practical applications were tested, especially to see which technique is the most ideally suited for the computer aided design (CAD) environment. Some basic thoughts regarding each technique are also discussed. As a consequence, some suggestions based on the results are given to lead reliable results in geometrically complex joints where the deformation and stress behavior are complicated.

  6. Rolling-element bearings. [contact sliding friction study of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to hydrodynamic bearings, which depend for low-friction characteristics on a fluid film between the journal and the bearing surfaces, roller-element bearings employ a number of balls or rollers that roll in an annular space. The paper briefly outlines the advantages and disadvantages of roller-element bearings as compared to hydrodynamic bearings. The discussion covers bearing types, rolling friction, friction losses in rolling bearings, contact stresses, deformations, kinematics (normal and high speeds), bearing dynamics including elastohydrodynamics, load distribution, lubrication (grease, solid oil, oil-air mist), specific dynamic capacity and life, specific static capacity, and fatigue or wearout (elastohydrodynamics, wear). Rolling bearing wear factor as a function of operating environment is plotted and discussed.

  7. Solid phase biosensors for arsenic or cadmium composed of A trans factor and cis element complex.

    PubMed

    Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Kawakami, Yasunari; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2011-01-01

    The presence of toxic metals in drinking water has hazardous effects on human health. This study was conducted to develop GFP-based-metal-binding biosensors for on-site assay of toxic metal ions. GFP-tagged ArsR and CadC proteins bound to a cis element, and lost the capability of binding to it in their As- and Cd-binding conformational states, respectively. Water samples containing toxic metals were incubated on a complex of GFP-tagged ArsR or CadC and cis element which was immobilized on a solid surface. Metal concentrations were quantified with fluorescence intensity of the metal-binding states released from the cis element. Fluorescence intensity obtained with the assay significantly increased with increasing concentrations of toxic metals. Detection limits of 1 μg/L for Cd(II) and 5 μg/L for As(III) in purified water and 10 µg/L for Cd(II) and As(III) in tap water and bottled mineral water were achieved by measurement with a battery-powered portable fluorometer after 15-min and 30-min incubation, respectively. A complex of freeze dried GFP-tagged ArsR or CadC binding to cis element was stable at 4 °C and responded to 5 μg/L As(III) or Cd(II). The solid phase biosensors are sensitive, less time-consuming, portable, and could offer a protocol for on-site evaluation of the toxic metals in drinking water. PMID:22346629

  8. Instrument for elemental composition studies of solids on planetary surfaces with sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Current space instruments prove to be successful for a global chemical mapping of the entire planetary body or to perform a local chemical analysis, helpful in determination of modal mineralogy. Nevertheless, the sensitivity and low spatial resolution of these spectroscopic instruments limit the chemical analysis to the most abundant elements with some exceptions (e.g., measurements of Th, K, and H elements by Gamma and neutron spectrometers). Furthermore, the spectroscopic analysis typically provides the chemical composition of 1 micrometer of the uppermost surface layers, which are frequently affected by space weathering effects, again, with the exception of Gamma/neutron investigation where the composition of up to 1 m thick subsurface can be measured. New and recently accepted space instruments, such as Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometers (LIMS) are thought to improve these chemical analysis providing more localised chemical sampling with higher sensitivity and accuracy. We will demonstrate the performance of a highly miniaturised laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer designed for space research for the elemental analysis of solid materials (Rohner et al., 2003). The instrument enables mass spectrometric analysis with sub-ppm detection limits and a typical mass resolution of ~700, sufficient to detect all elements and their isotopes. The studies of NIST standards, minerals and meteoritic samples will be reviewed to emphasize its capability for quantitative analysis and chemical mapping of the inhomogeneous samples with a high spatial (vertical and lateral) resolution. LIMS measurements provide means for investigation of principal elements (metals, non-metals) and allow an analysis of trace elements distributed within a suite of soils and rocks. Thus, LIMS measurements will allow the identification of the mineralogical context of planetary surface and better understanding of the geologic/geochemical structure

  9. An inverse finite element method for determining residual and current stress fields in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartibi, M.; Steigmann, D. J.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2016-11-01

    The life expectancy of a solid component is traditionally predicted by assessing its expected stress cycle and comparing it to experimentally determined stress states at failure. The accuracy of this procedure is often compromised by unforeseen extremes in the loading cycle or material degradation. Residually stressed parts may either have longer or shorter lifespans than predicted. Thus, determination of the current state of stress (i.e., the residual stress in the absence of external loading) and material properties is particularly important. Typically, the material properties of a solid are determined by fitting experimental data obtained from the measured deformation response in the stress-free configuration. However, the characterization of the mechanical behavior of a residually stressed body requires, in principle, a method that is not restricted to specific constitutive models. Complementing a recently developed technique, known as the reversed updated Lagrangian finite element method (RULFEM), a new method called estimating the current state of stress (ECSS) is presented herein. ECSS is based on three-dimensional full-field displacement and force data of a body perturbed by small displacements and complements the first step of the incremental RULFEM method. The present method generates the current state of stress (or residual stress in the absence of external tractions) and the incremental elasticity tensor of each finite element used to discretize the deformable body. The validity of the ECSS method is demonstrated by two noise-free simulation cases.

  10. An inverse finite element method for determining residual and current stress fields in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartibi, M.; Steigmann, D. J.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2016-08-01

    The life expectancy of a solid component is traditionally predicted by assessing its expected stress cycle and comparing it to experimentally determined stress states at failure. The accuracy of this procedure is often compromised by unforeseen extremes in the loading cycle or material degradation. Residually stressed parts may either have longer or shorter lifespans than predicted. Thus, determination of the current state of stress (i.e., the residual stress in the absence of external loading) and material properties is particularly important. Typically, the material properties of a solid are determined by fitting experimental data obtained from the measured deformation response in the stress-free configuration. However, the characterization of the mechanical behavior of a residually stressed body requires, in principle, a method that is not restricted to specific constitutive models. Complementing a recently developed technique, known as the reversed updated Lagrangian finite element method (RULFEM), a new method called estimating the current state of stress (ECSS) is presented herein. ECSS is based on three-dimensional full-field displacement and force data of a body perturbed by small displacements and complements the first step of the incremental RULFEM method. The present method generates the current state of stress (or residual stress in the absence of external tractions) and the incremental elasticity tensor of each finite element used to discretize the deformable body. The validity of the ECSS method is demonstrated by two noise-free simulation cases.

  11. Modeling Trace Element Concentrations in the San Francisco Bay Estuary from Remote Measurement of Suspended Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, J.; Broughton, J.; Kudela, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Suspended and dissolved trace elements are key determinants of water quality in estuarine and coastal waters. High concentrations of trace element pollutants in the San Francisco Bay estuary necessitate consistent and thorough monitoring to mitigate adverse effects on biological systems and the contamination of water and food resources. Although existing monitoring programs collect annual in situ samples from fixed locations, models proposed by Benoit, Kudela, & Flegal (2010) enable calculation of the water column total concentration (WCT) and the water column dissolved concentration (WCD) of 14 trace elements in the San Francisco Bay from a more frequently sampled metric—suspended solids concentration (SSC). This study tests the application of these models with SSC calculated from remote sensing data, with the aim of validating a tool for continuous synoptic monitoring of trace elements in the San Francisco Bay. Using HICO imagery, semi-analytical and empirical SSC algorithms were tested against a USGS dataset. A single-band method with statistically significant linear fit (p < 0.001) was chosen as the proxy for SSC values. The numerical models for WCT and the distribution ratio D were applied in MATLAB with terms to account for regional and seasonal effects, and results were used to calculate WCD. The modeled results were assessed against in situ data from the San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program. Quantile regression was used to evaluate model sensitivity to the distribution of regions, and outliers displaying regional aberrations were removed before robust regression was applied. Statistically significant and highly correlated results for WCT were found for 10 elements, with goodness of fit greater than or equal to that of the original models of seven elements. WCD was successfully modeled for six elements, with goodness of fit for each exceeding that of the original models. Concentrations of Arsenic, Iron, and Lead in the southern region of the

  12. Availability of trace elements in solid waste from fluidized bed combustion of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Rope, S.K.; Jornitz, R.S.; Suhre, D.T.

    1987-12-01

    This report presents data on the inorganic constituents (major and trace elements) of coal and solid waste from a coal-fired facility on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which uses the fluidized bed combustion process. Three factors were used to assess the potential environmental impacts of elements in coal waste: (1) the concentrations relative to those measured previously in surrounding soils of the INEL (the enrichment ratio); (2) the availability of elements from waste relative to soils; and (3) toxicity or essentiality to biota. Considering both enrichment and availability, Al, B, Be, Ca, Cr, Na, Mo, Se, Sr, and Ti are most likely to be affected in the local environment due to fly ash deposition and/or resuspension of FBC waste. Only B, Cr, Mo, and Se are likely to be of concern in terms of toxicity. The high concentrations of Cr and B in FBC waste are expected to be toxic to plants. Concentrations of Se and Mo present in FBC waste have been shown to produce levels in plants which can be toxic to herbivorous animals. 14 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. A nonlinear solid shell element formulation for analysis of composite panels under blast wave pressure loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hun

    A comprehensive methodology to accurately predict the dynamic response of composite panels under blast wave pressure loading has been successfully developed for the first time. It includes the modeling of geometrically nonlinear dynamic effect, progressive failure and strain-rate effect on constitutive equation and strength. For dynamic analysis, a nonlinear solid shell element formulation is combined with the trapezoidal rule for numerical integration in time. The progressive damage incorporates the effect of the material failure, such as fiber failure, matrix cracking and fiber-matrix shearing failure on the stiffness and strength. Material degradation models based on the rule of mixtures are proposed for each failure mode. To implement the strain-rate effect on the constitutive equation of the material, a viscoplastic model is adopted. In this model, three material parameters are determined by conducting uniaxial tension tests on off-axis specimen. The effect of strain rates on material strength is implemented via the linear least square fit of the test data. A key ingredient of the analysis is a geometrically nonlinear solid shell element based on the assumed strain formulation to alleviate element locking. In this approach, the composite shell is treated as a three-dimensional solid. Accordingly, the change of shell thickness is allowed and the kinematics of deformation is described by six vector components at a point on the shell midsurface. The mass matrix always remains constant during the analysis. Example problems under static and dynamic loadings are solved to investigate the behavior of composite panels undergoing large deformation while experiencing material damage. The analysis results are compared with the test data available. Results of the numerical analysis show that the effect of the progressive failure and strain-rates on structural responses are considerable. For a composite plate under static pressure loadings, maximum displacement and

  14. Development of Low-Cost Manufacturing Processes for Planar, Multilayer Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Tim Armstrong; Harlan Anderson; John Lannutti

    2001-09-30

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of this program, 'Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'. The objective of the program is to develop advanced ceramic manufacturing technologies for making planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. Phase II development work focused on three distinct manufacturing approaches (or tracks) for planar solid oxide fuel cell elements. Two development tracks, led by NexTech Materials and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, involved co-sintering of planar SOFC elements of cathode-supported and anode-supported variations. A third development track, led by the University of Missouri-Rolla, focused on a revolutionary approach for reducing operating temperature of SOFCs by using spin-coating to deposit ultra-thin, nano-crystalline YSZ electrolyte films. The work in Phase II was supported by characterization work at Ohio State University. The primary technical accomplishments within each of the three development tracks are summarized. Track 1--NexTech's targeted manufacturing process for planar SOFC elements involves tape casting of porous electrode substrates, colloidal-spray deposition of YSZ electrolyte films, co-sintering of bi-layer elements, and screen printing of opposite electrode coatings. The bulk of NexTech's work focused on making cathode-supported elements, although the processes developed at NexTech also were applied to the fabrication of anode-supported cells. Primary accomplishments within this track are summarized below: (1) Scale up of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode powder production process; (2) Development and scale-up of tape casting methods for cathode and anode substrates; (3) Development of automated ultrasonic-spray process for depositing YSZ films; (4) Successful co-sintering of flat bi-layer elements (both cathode and anode supported); (5) Development of anode and cathode screen-printing processes; and (6

  15. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  16. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds.

    PubMed

    Ciricosta, O; Vinko, S M; Barbrel, B; Rackstraw, D S; Preston, T R; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Cho, B I; Chung, H-K; Dakovski, G L; Engelhorn, K; Hájková, V; Heimann, P; Holmes, M; Juha, L; Krzywinski, J; Lee, R W; Toleikis, S; Turner, J J; Zastrau, U; Wark, J S

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. Here we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffected by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. The results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations.

  17. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Preston, T. R.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Cho, B. I.; Chung, H. -K.; Dakovski, G. L.; Engelhorn, K.; Hájková, V.; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. Here we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffected by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. The results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations. PMID:27210741

  18. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Preston, T. R.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Cho, B. I.; Chung, H.-K.; Dakovski, G. L.; Engelhorn, K.; Hájková, V.; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. Here we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffected by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. The results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations.

  19. Parallel algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations using finite elements and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.; Swegle, J.W.; Gardner, D.R.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1997-05-01

    An efficient, scalable, parallel algorithm for treating contacts in solid mechanics has been applied to interactions between particles in smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The algorithm uses three different decompositions within a single timestep: (1) a static FE-decomposition of mesh elements; (2) a dynamic SPH-decomposition of SPH particles; (3) and a dynamic contact-decomposition of contact nodes and SPH particles. The overhead cost of such a scheme is the cost of moving mesh and particle data between the decompositions. This cost turns out to be small in practice, leading to a highly load-balanced decomposition in which to perform each of the three major computational states within a timestep.

  20. Towards universal ambient ionization: direct elemental analysis of solid substrates using microwave plasma ionization.

    PubMed

    Evans-Nguyen, K M; Gerling, J; Brown, H; Miranda, M; Windom, A; Speer, J

    2016-06-21

    A microwave plasma was used for direct ambient ionization mass spectrometry of solid substrates, rapidly yielding atomic spectra without sample digestion or pre-treatment. Further, molecular spectra for the organic components of the substrate were obtained simultaneously, in an ambient ionization format. Initial characterization of the microwave plasma coupling to an ion trap mass spectrometer was carried out using solution standards and a microwave plasma torch (MPT) configuration. The configuration of the microwave plasma was then optimized for ambient ionization. The atomic and organic composition for samples applicable to nuclear and conventional forensic screening, including explosive/radionuclide mixtures and inorganic/organic gunshot residue component mixtures were successfully determined. The technologies employed are readily fieldable; the feasibility of a multimode ion source that could be coupled with a portable ion trap mass spectrometer for rapid, on-site, elemental, isotopic, and molecular screening of samples is demonstrated. PMID:26979768

  1. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model-Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2002-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts reflecting every detail of the finished product. Ideally, in the aerospace industry, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) provide numerical. control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in aircraft and space vehicles. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. Presently, the process of preparing CAD models for FEA consumes a great deal of the analyst's time.

  2. Towards universal ambient ionization: direct elemental analysis of solid substrates using microwave plasma ionization.

    PubMed

    Evans-Nguyen, K M; Gerling, J; Brown, H; Miranda, M; Windom, A; Speer, J

    2016-06-21

    A microwave plasma was used for direct ambient ionization mass spectrometry of solid substrates, rapidly yielding atomic spectra without sample digestion or pre-treatment. Further, molecular spectra for the organic components of the substrate were obtained simultaneously, in an ambient ionization format. Initial characterization of the microwave plasma coupling to an ion trap mass spectrometer was carried out using solution standards and a microwave plasma torch (MPT) configuration. The configuration of the microwave plasma was then optimized for ambient ionization. The atomic and organic composition for samples applicable to nuclear and conventional forensic screening, including explosive/radionuclide mixtures and inorganic/organic gunshot residue component mixtures were successfully determined. The technologies employed are readily fieldable; the feasibility of a multimode ion source that could be coupled with a portable ion trap mass spectrometer for rapid, on-site, elemental, isotopic, and molecular screening of samples is demonstrated.

  3. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds.

    PubMed

    Ciricosta, O; Vinko, S M; Barbrel, B; Rackstraw, D S; Preston, T R; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Cho, B I; Chung, H-K; Dakovski, G L; Engelhorn, K; Hájková, V; Heimann, P; Holmes, M; Juha, L; Krzywinski, J; Lee, R W; Toleikis, S; Turner, J J; Zastrau, U; Wark, J S

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. Here we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffected by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. The results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations. PMID:27210741

  4. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Preston, T. R.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Cho, B. I.; Chung, H. -K.; Dakovski, G. L.; et al

    2016-05-23

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. In this study, we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffectedmore » by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. Lastly, the results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations.« less

  5. Quantification of morphology of bacterial colonies using laser scatter measurements and solid element optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Bayraktar, Bülent; Venkatapathi, Murugesan; Hirleman, E. Dan; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul; Hassler, Richard; Smith, Linda; Rajwa, Bartek

    2007-02-01

    Traditional biological and chemical methods for pathogen identification require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Optical scattering technology has been used for identification of bacterial cells in suspension, but with only limited success. Our published reports have demonstrated that scattered light based identification of Listeria colonies growing on solid surfaces is feasible with proper pattern recognition tools. Recently we have extended this technique to classification of other bacterial genera including, Salmonella, Bacillus, and Vibrio. Our approach may be highly applicable to early detection and classification of pathogens in food-processing industry and in healthcare. The unique scattering patterns formed by colonies of different species are created through differences in colony microstructure (on the order of wavelength used), bulk optical properties, and the macroscopic morphology. While it is difficult to model the effect on scatter-signal patterns owing to the microstructural changes, the influence of bulk optical properties and overall shape of colonies can be modeled using geometrical optics. Our latest research shows that it is possible to model the scatter pattern of bacterial colonies using solid-element optical modeling software (TracePro), and theoretically assess changes in macro structure and bulk refractive indices. This study allows predicting the theoretical limits of resolution and sensitivity of our detection and classification methods. Moreover, quantification of changes in macro morphology and bulk refractive index provides an opportunity to study the response of colonies to various reagents and antibiotics.

  6. Pulsed microdischarge with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for elemental analysis on solid metal samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Yin, Zhibin; Cheng, Xiaoling; Hang, Wei; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Benli

    2015-05-01

    Pulsed microdischarge employed as source for direct solid analysis was investigated in N2 environment at atmospheric pressure. Compared with direct current (DC) microdischarge, it exhibits advantages with respect to the ablation and emission of the sample. Comprehensive evidence, including voltage-current relationship, current density (j), and electron density (ne), suggests that pulsed microdischarge is in the arc regime while DC microdischarge belongs to glow. Capability in ablating metal samples demonstrates that pulsed microdischarge is a viable option for direct solid sampling because of the enhanced instantaneous energy. Using optical spectrometer, only common emission lines of N2 can be acquired in DC mode, whereas primary atomic and ionic lines of the sample are obtained in the case of pulsed mode. Calculations show a significant difference in N2 vibrational temperatures between DC and pulsed microdischarge. Combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), pulsed microdischarge exhibits much better performances in calibration linearity and limits of detection (LOD) than those of DC discharge in direct analysis of samples of different matrices. To improve transmission efficiency, a mixture of Ar and N2 was employed as discharge gas as well as carrier gas in follow-up experiments, facilitating that LODs of most elements reached ng/g. PMID:25851038

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  8. Streamflow, dissolved solids, suspended sediment, and trace elements, San Joaquin River, California, June 1985-September 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, B.R.; Gilliom, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The 1985-88 study period included hydrologic extremes throughout most of central California. Except for an 11-month period during and after the 1986 flood, San Joaquin River streamflows during 1985-88 were generally less than median for 1975-88. The Merced Tuolumne, and Stanislaus Rivers together comprised 56 to 69 percent of the annual San Joaquin River flow, Salt and Mud Sloughs together comprised 6 to 19 percent, the upper San Joaquin River comprised 2 to 25 percent, and unmeasured sources from agricultural discharges and ground water accounted for 13 to 20 percent. Salt and Mud Sloughs and the unmeasured sources contribute most of the dissolved-solids load. The Merced, Tuolumne, and Stanislaus Rivers greatly dilute dissolved-solids concentrations. Suspended-sediment concentration peaked sharply at more than 600 milligrams per liter during the flood of February 1986. Concentrations and loads varied seasonally during low-flow conditions, with concentrations highest during the early summer irrigation season. Trace elements present primarily in dissolved phases are arsenic, boron, lithium, molybdenum, and selenium. Boron concentrations exceeded the irrigation water-quality criterion of 750 micrograms per liter more than 75 percent of the time in Salt and Mud Sloughs and more than 50 percent of the time at three sites on the San Joaquin River. Selenium concentrations exceeded the aquatic-life criterion of 5 micrograms per liter more than 75 percent of the time in Salt Slough and more than 50 percent of the time in Mud Slough and in the San Joaquin River from Salt Slough to the Merced River confluence. Concentrations of dissolved solids, boron, and selenium usually are highest during late winter to early spring, lower in early summer, higher again in mid-to-late summer, and the lowest in autumn, and generally correspond to seasonal inflows of subsurface tile-drain water to Salt and Mud Sloughs. Trace elements present primarily in particulate phases are aluminum

  9. Direct Transient Analysis of a Fuze Assembly by Axisymmetric Solid Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, C. C.; Yang, J. C. S.; Titus, J.

    1985-01-01

    A fuze assembly, which consists of three major parts, nose, collar and sleeve, was designed to survive severe transverse impact giving a maximum base acceleration of 20.000 G. It is shown that hoop failure occurred in the collar after the impact. They also showed that by bonding the collar to the nose, the collar was able to survive the same impact. To find out the effectiveness of the bonding quantitatively, axisymmetric solid elements TRAPAX and TRIAAX were used in modelling the fuze and direct transient analysis was performed. The dynamic stresses in selected elements on the bonded and unbonded collars were compared. The peak hoop stresses in the unbonded collar were found to be up to three times higher than those in the bonded collar. The NASTRAN results explained the observed hoop failure in the unbonded collar. In addition, static and eigenvalue runs were performed as checks on the models prior to the transient runs. The use of the MPCAX cards and the existence and contributors of the calculated first several nearly identical natural frequencies are addressed.

  10. The dissolution kinetics of major elements in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendz, David; Tüchsen, Peter L.; Christensen, Thomas H.

    2007-12-01

    Leaching and tracer experiments in batches at L/S 20 were performed with 3-month-old MSWI bottom ash separated into eight different particle sizes. The time-dependent leaching of major elements (Ca 2+, K +, Na +, Cl - and SO 4- 2 ) was monitored for up to 747 h. Physical properties of the particles, the specific surface (BET), pore volume and pore volume distribution over pore sizes (BJH) were determined for all particle classes by N 2 adsorption/desorption experiments. Some common features of physical pore structure for all particles were revealed. The specific surface and the particle pore volume were found to be negatively correlated with particle size, ranging from 3.2 m 2/g to 25.7 m 2/g for the surface area and from 0.0086 cm 3/g to 0.091 cm 3/g for the pore volume. Not surprisingly, the specific surface area was found to be the major material parameter that governed the leaching behavior for all elements (Ca 2+, K +, Na +, Cl - and SO 4- 2 ) and particle sizes. The diffusion resistance was determined independently by separate tracer (tritium) experiments. Diffusion gave a significant contribution to the apparent leaching kinetics for all elements during the first 10-40 h (depending on the particle size) of leaching and surface reaction was the overall rate controlling mechanism at late times for all particle sizes. For Ca 2+ and SO 4- 2 , the coupled effect of diffusion resistance and the degree of undersaturation in the intra particle pore volume was found to be a major rate limiting dissolution mechanism for both early and late times. The solubility control in the intra particulate porosity may undermine any attempt to treat bottom ash by washing out the sulfate. Even for high liquid/solid ratios, the solubility in the intra-particular porosity will limit the release rate.

  11. Study of the generation characteristics of laser converters with dye-based wide-aperture solid--liquid active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, A.S.; Zemskii, V.I.; Kolesnikov, Y.L.; Malinin, B.G.; Meshkovsky, I.K.; Savkin, N.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Shildyaev, V.S.

    1986-11-01

    The lasing characteristics of an active element, consisting of a fine porous silicate matrix, has been studied. Molecules of a dye (rhodamine 6G) and an ethanol solution of the same dye were introduced into the cells. It has been shown that under conditions of large heat release (when thermooptical distortions begin to appear in the dye solutions), the solid--liquid element preserves the stability of its own lasing characteristics.

  12. Finite Element Simulation of Solid Rocket Booster Separation Motors During Motor Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu. Weiping; Crane, Debora J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the toughest challenges facing Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) engineers is to ensure that any design changes made to the Shuttle-Derived Booster Separation Motors (BSM) for future space exploration vehicles is able to withstand the increasingly hostile motor firing environment without cracking its critical component - the graphite throat. This paper presents a critical analysis methodology and techniques for assessing effects of BSM design changes with great accuracy and precision. For current Space Shuttle operation, the motor firing occurs at SRB separation - approximately 125 seconds after Shuttle launch at an altitude of about 28 miles. The motor operation event lasts about two seconds, however, the surface temperature of the graphite throat increases approximately 3400 F in less than one second with a corresponding increase in surface pressure of approximately 2200 pounds per square inch (psi) in less than one-tenth of a second. To capture this process fully and accurately, a two-phase sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical finite element approach was developed. This method allows the time- and location-dependent pressure fields to interact with the spatial-temporal thermal fields throughout the operation. The material properties of graphite throat are orthotropic and temperature-dependent. The analysis involves preload and multiple body contacts.

  13. The rare earth elements in municipal solid waste incinerators ash and promising tools for their prospecting.

    PubMed

    Funari, Valerio; Bokhari, Syed Nadeem Hussain; Vigliotti, Luigi; Meisel, Thomas; Braga, Roberto

    2016-01-15

    Bottom and fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators (MSWI) are hazardous products that present concern for their safe management. An attractive option to reduce their impact both on the environment and the financial commitment is turning MSWI ashes into secondary raw materials. In this study we present the REE content and distribution of bottom and fly ashes from MSWI after a highly effective digestion method and samples analysis by ICP-MS. The chondrite-normalised REE patterns of MSWI bottom and fly ash are comparable with that of crustal averages, suggesting a main geogenic source. Deviations from typical crustal pattern (e.g., Eu, Tb) disclose a contribution of likely anthropogenic provenance. The correlation with major elements indicates possible sources for REE and facilitates a preliminary resource assessment. Moreover, magnetic susceptibility measurements can be a useful prospecting method in urban ores made of MSWI ashes. The relationship between REE and some influencing parameters (e.g., Pricing Influence Factor) emphasises the importance of MSWI ash as alternative source of REE and the need of further efforts for REE recovery and purification from low concentrations but high flows waste. PMID:26414924

  14. The rare earth elements in municipal solid waste incinerators ash and promising tools for their prospecting.

    PubMed

    Funari, Valerio; Bokhari, Syed Nadeem Hussain; Vigliotti, Luigi; Meisel, Thomas; Braga, Roberto

    2016-01-15

    Bottom and fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators (MSWI) are hazardous products that present concern for their safe management. An attractive option to reduce their impact both on the environment and the financial commitment is turning MSWI ashes into secondary raw materials. In this study we present the REE content and distribution of bottom and fly ashes from MSWI after a highly effective digestion method and samples analysis by ICP-MS. The chondrite-normalised REE patterns of MSWI bottom and fly ash are comparable with that of crustal averages, suggesting a main geogenic source. Deviations from typical crustal pattern (e.g., Eu, Tb) disclose a contribution of likely anthropogenic provenance. The correlation with major elements indicates possible sources for REE and facilitates a preliminary resource assessment. Moreover, magnetic susceptibility measurements can be a useful prospecting method in urban ores made of MSWI ashes. The relationship between REE and some influencing parameters (e.g., Pricing Influence Factor) emphasises the importance of MSWI ash as alternative source of REE and the need of further efforts for REE recovery and purification from low concentrations but high flows waste.

  15. Fluidized-bed column method for automatic dynamic extraction and determination of trace element bioaccessibility in highly heterogeneous solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Rosende, María; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2010-01-18

    Dynamic flow-through extraction/fractionation methods have recently drawn much attention as appealing alternatives to the batchwise steady-state counterparts for the evaluation of environmentally available pools of potentially hazardous trace elements in solid matrices. The most critical weakness of flow-based column approaches lies in the small amount of solid that can be handled, whereby their applicability has been merely limited to date to the extraction of trace elements in highly homogeneous solid substrates; otherwise the representativeness of the test portion might not be assured. To tackle this limitation, we have devised an automated flow-through system incorporating a specially designed extraction column with a large volume capacity, wherein up to 2 g of solid sample could be handled without undue backpressure. The assembled flow setup was exploited for fast screening of potentially hazardous trace elements (namely, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in highly inhomogeneous municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ashes. The pools of readily mobilizable metal forms were ascertained using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) based on the usage of 0.1 mol L(-1) CH(3)COOH as leachant and analysis of extracts by inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry. The application of a two-level full factorial (screening) design revealed that the effect of sample fluidization primarily but other experimental factors such as the solid to liquid ratio and extractant flow rate significantly influenced the leachability of given elements in raw bottom ashes at the 0.05 significance level. The analytical performance of the novel flow-based method capitalized on fluidized-bed extraction was evaluated in terms of accuracy, through the use of mass balance validation, reproducibility and operational time as compared to batchwise extraction and earlier flow injection/sequential injection microcolum-based leaching tests. PMID:20082772

  16. User's manuals for DYNA3D and DYNAP: nonlinear dynamic analysis of solids in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-07-01

    This report provides a user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. Post-processors for DYNA3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories. A user's manual for DYNAP is also provided in this report.

  17. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties.

  18. Heavy element accumulation in Evernia prunastri lichen transplants around a municipal solid waste landfill in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Nannoni, Francesco; Santolini, Riccardo; Protano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a biomonitoring study to evaluate the environmental impact of airborne emissions from a municipal solid waste landfill in central Italy. Concentrations of 11 heavy elements, as well as photosynthetic efficiency and cell membrane integrity were measured in Evernia prunastri lichens transplanted for 4months in 17 monitoring sites around the waste landfill. Heavy element contents were also determined in surface soils. Analytical data indicated that emissions from the landfill affected Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn concentrations in lichens transplanted within the landfill and along the fallout direction. In these sites moderate to severe accumulation of these heavy elements in lichens was coupled with an increase in cell membrane damage and decrease in photosynthetic efficiency. Nevertheless, results indicated that landfill emissions had no relevant impact on lichens, as heavy element accumulation and weak stress symptoms were detected only in lichen transplants from sites close to solid waste. The appropriate management of this landfill poses a low risk of environmental contamination by heavy elements.

  19. TSAAS: finite-element thermal and stress analysis of plane and axisymmetric solids with orthotropic temperature-dependent material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.V.; Anderson, C.A.

    1982-02-01

    The finite element method is used to determine the temperatures, displacements, stresses, and strains in axisymmetric solids with orthotropic, temperature-dependent material properties under axisymmetric thermal and mechanical loads. The mechanical loads can be surface pressures, surface shears, and nodal point forces as well as an axial or centripetal acceleration. The continuous solid is replaced by a system of ring elements with triangular or quadrilateral cross sections. Accordingly, the method is valid for solids that are composed of many different materials and that have complex geometry. Nonlinear mechanical behavior as typified by plastic, locking, or creeping materials can be approximated. Two dimensional mesh generation, plotting, and editing features allow the computer program to be readily used. In addition to a stress analysis program that is based on a modified version of the SAAS code, TSAAS can carry out a transient thermal analysis with the finite element mesh used in stress analysis. An implicit time differencing scheme allows the use of arbitrary time steps with consequent fast running times. At specified times, the program will return to SAAS for thermal stress analysis. Nonlinear thermal properties and Arrhenius reaction kinetics are also incorporated into TSAAS. Several versions of TSAAS are in use at Los Alamos, running on CDC-7600, CRAY-1 and VAX 11/780 computers. This report describes the nominal TSAAS; other versions may have some unique features.

  20. Study of Suspended Solid in Constructed Wetland Using Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Z. X. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Constructed wetland (CW) is one of the commonly used technologies in wastewater treatment. By means of the biochemical interactions among water, microscopic organism, aquatic plant and sediments in natural environment CW can remove biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammoniacal nitrogen, suspended solid (SS) and heavy metals. In this study, rare earth elements (REEs) were used as a natural tracer for the study of SS in the CW. The studied CW, Hebao Island free water surface CW, is located in Chiayi County, south Taiwan. The CW is designed for removing SS and BOD due to the pollution from livestock farms in the upstream area. However, the removal of SS was not effective. In some cases, the SS concentration of inflow is even higher than that of outflow. That the sediments on the slope were flushed into the CW was considered as the main problem. After all the refinement, the issue has not improved yet. In the study, the water samples were filtered with 1.0μm filter paper. Then, part of water samples were digested by ultrapure nitric acid to obtain the water representing the total of dissolved and suspended matters. The others were filtered by 0.1μm filter, which represent the matters in dissolved form. REEs and most of metals were subsequently measured with ICP-MS. REEs generally have a unique source and would fractionate in certain regular patterns during biochemical reactions due to lanthanide contraction. They can be an excellent natural tracer in the environmental researches. After normalized by North American Shale Composite, the REEs pattern for the samples with the total of dissolved and suspended matters is characterized by a middle REE (MREE) enrichment and light REE (LREE) depletion. According to the previous theoretical studies, the MREE enrichment could be achieved by a selected adsorption of MREEs by organic matters, which is generally humic substance in natural surface water. It is suggested that the refinement of removal efficiency of SS should focus on

  1. Augmented finite-element method for arbitrary cracking and crack interaction in solids under thermo-mechanical loadings.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Do, B C; Yang, Q D

    2016-07-13

    In this paper, a thermal-mechanical augmented finite-element method (TM-AFEM) has been proposed, implemented and validated for steady-state and transient, coupled thermal-mechanical analyses of complex materials with explicit consideration of arbitrary evolving cracks. The method permits the derivation of explicit, fully condensed thermal-mechanical equilibrium equations which are of mathematical exactness in the piece-wise linear sense. The method has been implemented with a 4-node quadrilateral two-dimensional (2D) element and a 4-node tetrahedron three-dimensional (3D) element. It has been demonstrated, through several numerical examples that the new TM-AFEM can provide significantly improved numerical accuracy and efficiency when dealing with crack propagation problems in 2D and 3D solids under coupled thermal-mechanical loading conditions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242303

  2. Experimental investigations on the chemical state of solid fission-product elements in U3Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugajin, M.; Itoh, A.

    1994-10-01

    The uranium silicide U3Si2 has a congruent melting point of 1665 C and possesses higher uranium density (11.3 g U/cc) and higher thermal conductivity than the uranium dioxide currently used in light water reactors. U3Si2 is in use as a research reactor fuel (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG-1313, July, 1988), representing a potentiality for power reactor fuel. A first attempt is made in this study to predict the chemical state of the solid fission-product elements comprising zirconium, molybdenum, rare earth elements, alkaline earth metals and elements of the platinum group. Ternary phase equilibria in the U-Mo-Si and U-Ru-Si systems are also investigated to supplement the fission product chemistry in U3Si2.

  3. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  4. Experimental productivity rate optimization of rare earth element separation through preparative solid phase extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Max-Hansen, Mark; Jönsson, Christian; Borg, Niklas; Nilsson, Bernt

    2014-06-27

    Separating individual rare earth elements from a complex mixture with several elements is difficult and this is emphasized for the middle elements: Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium. In this study we have accomplished an overloaded one-step separation of these rare earth elements through preparative ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with an bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid impregnated column and nitric acid as eluent. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry unit was used for post column element detection. The main focus was to optimize the productivity rate, subject to a yield requirement of 80% and a purity requirement of 99% for each element, by varying the flow rate and batch load size. The optimal productivity rate in this study was 1.32kgSamarium/(hmcolumn(3)), 0.38kgEuropium/(hmcolumn(3)) and 0.81kgGadolinium/(hmcolumn(3)).

  5. Setting up of in-vacuum PIXE system for direct elemental analysis of thick solid environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Rihawy, M S; Ismail, I M; Halloum, D

    2016-04-01

    Experimental set-up, development, characterization, and calibration of an in-vacuum PIXE system at the tandem accelerator facility of the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS) is described. The PIXE system calibration involved experimental characterization of the X-ray detector parameters and careful determination of the H-values that control dependence of the detector solid angle with the X-ray energies and correct imperfect values of the detector efficiency. Setting up of an electron flood gun to compensate charge built up and utilization of a beam profile monitor to perform indirect measurement of the beam charge, provide a direct PIXE measurement of thick insulating samples in-vacuum. The PIXE system has been subsequently examined to verify its ability to perform direct PIXE measurements on geological materials. A combination of minimum sample preparation procedures and specific experimental conditions applied enables simple and accurate elemental analysis. Elemental concentrations of several elements heavier than sodium in different reference geological samples, at about 5-10% absolute accuracy for most elements, have been determined. Comprehensive discussion of the obtained elemental concentration values, for most elements of visible X-ray peaks in the PIXE spectra, has been considered. PMID:26803668

  6. Precious metals and rare earth elements in municipal solid waste--sources and fate in a Swiss incineration plant.

    PubMed

    Morf, Leo S; Gloor, Rolf; Haag, Olaf; Haupt, Melanie; Skutan, Stefan; Di Lorenzo, Fabian; Böni, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    In Switzerland many kinds of waste, e.g. paper, metals, electrical and electronic equipment are separately collected and recycled to a large extent. The residual amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) has to be thermally treated before final disposal. Efforts to recover valuable metals from incineration residues have recently increased. However, the resource potential of critical elements in the waste input (sources) and their partitioning into recyclable fractions and residues (fate) is unknown. Therefore, a substance flow analysis (SFA) for 31 elements including precious metals (Au, Ag), platinum metal group elements (Pt, Rh) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, etc.) has been conducted in a solid waste incinerator (SWI) with a state-of-the-art bottom ash treatment according to the Thermo-Re® concept. The SFA allowed the determination of the element partitioning in the SWI, as well as the elemental composition of the MSW by indirect analysis. The results show that the waste-input contains substantial quantities of precious metals, such as 0.4 ± 0.2mg/kg Au and 5.3 ± 0.7 mg/kg Ag. Many of the valuable substances, such as Au and Ag are enriched in specific outputs (e.g. non-ferrous metal fractions) and are therefore recoverable. As the precious metal content in MSW is expected to rise due to its increasing application in complex consumer products, the results of this study are essential for the improvement of resource recovery in the Thermo-Re® process. PMID:23085306

  7. Precious metals and rare earth elements in municipal solid waste--sources and fate in a Swiss incineration plant.

    PubMed

    Morf, Leo S; Gloor, Rolf; Haag, Olaf; Haupt, Melanie; Skutan, Stefan; Di Lorenzo, Fabian; Böni, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    In Switzerland many kinds of waste, e.g. paper, metals, electrical and electronic equipment are separately collected and recycled to a large extent. The residual amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) has to be thermally treated before final disposal. Efforts to recover valuable metals from incineration residues have recently increased. However, the resource potential of critical elements in the waste input (sources) and their partitioning into recyclable fractions and residues (fate) is unknown. Therefore, a substance flow analysis (SFA) for 31 elements including precious metals (Au, Ag), platinum metal group elements (Pt, Rh) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, etc.) has been conducted in a solid waste incinerator (SWI) with a state-of-the-art bottom ash treatment according to the Thermo-Re® concept. The SFA allowed the determination of the element partitioning in the SWI, as well as the elemental composition of the MSW by indirect analysis. The results show that the waste-input contains substantial quantities of precious metals, such as 0.4 ± 0.2mg/kg Au and 5.3 ± 0.7 mg/kg Ag. Many of the valuable substances, such as Au and Ag are enriched in specific outputs (e.g. non-ferrous metal fractions) and are therefore recoverable. As the precious metal content in MSW is expected to rise due to its increasing application in complex consumer products, the results of this study are essential for the improvement of resource recovery in the Thermo-Re® process.

  8. Ginzburg-Landau theory for the solid-liquid interface of bcc elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W. H.; Wang, Z. Q.; Zeng, X. C.; Stroud, D.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is given to a simple order-parameter theory for the interfacial tension of body-centered-cubic solids in which the principal order parameter is the amplitude of the density wave at the smallest nonzero reciprocal-lattice vector of the solid. The parameters included in the theory are fitted to the measured heat of fusion, melting temperature, and solid-liquid density difference, and to the liquid structure factor and its temperature derivative at freezing. Good agreement is found with experiment for Na and Fe and the calculated anisotropy of the surface tension among different crystal faces is of the order of 2 percent. On the basis of various assumptions about the universal behavior of bcc crystals at melting, the formalism predicts that the surface tension is proportional to the heat of fusion per surface atom.

  9. Validation of discrete element simulations in the field of solids conveying in single-screw extruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessmann, Johann-Sebastian; Schoeppner, Volker

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with possibilities to validate DEM simulations in the solids conveying zone of single-screw extruders. Apart from determining coefficients of friction, the representation of the pellets' shape is crucial. On the basis of DEM simulations of the bulk density within the screw channel, it is shown that most common plastic pellets can be represented adequately by combining two spheres. Additionally, simulations of the feed opening's pellet flow during a solids conveying process are conducted and validated by comparisons with experimental studies. Good conformity is obtained if the pellets are represented by several spheres as described above. Furthermore, the throughput of simulations and experiments is compared, also yielding good conformity. All the mentioned solids conveying simulations have so far been conducted without pressure build-up. To obtain an initial indication of the situation when pressure build-up is taken into account, simulations and experimental compression tests were also conducted.

  10. Finite element method for viscoelastic medium with damage and the application to structural analysis of solid rocket motor grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Shen, ZhiBin; Duan, JingBo; Tang, GuoJin

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the damage-viscoelastic behavior of composite solid propellants of solid rocket motors (SRM). Based on viscoelastic theories and strain equivalent hypothesis in damage mechanics, a three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating with damage is developed. The resulting viscoelastic constitutive equations are numerically discretized by integration algorithm, and a stress-updating method is presented by solving nonlinear equations according to the Newton-Raphson method. A material subroutine of stress-updating is made up and embedded into commercial code of Abaqus. The material subroutine is validated through typical examples. Our results indicate that the finite element results are in good agreement with the analytical ones and have high accuracy, and the suggested method and designed subroutine are efficient and can be further applied to damage-coupling structural analysis of practical SRM grain.

  11. Discrete element simulations and validation tests investigating solids-conveying processes with pressure buildup in single screw extruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessmann, Johann-Sebastian; Schoeppner, Volker

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this contribution is to describe a method of simulating solids-conveying processes in single screw extruders which include a defined back pressure leading to a resulting pressure buildup in the screw channel. To do so, use is made of the Discrete Element Method. Material parameters are presented, as well as details concerning the contact model used and the simulation tool EDEM. Additionally, a test setup is presented which has been used to validate the solids-conveying simulations. Results are shown for both simulations and experimental tests. Comparing the results from simulations and measurements shows acceptable conformity. Such simulations and experimental tests are crucial in order to better understand the buildup of pressure in high-speed single-screw extruders.

  12. DETECTION OF SO2 AT HIGH TEMPERATURE WITH ELECTRICALLY BIASED, SOLID-ELECTROLYTE SENSING ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    West, David L; Montgomery, Fred C; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Design and operation of sensing elements for the detection of sulfur dioxide (SO2) at high temperature (800 900 oC) is described. The sensing elements consisted of three (two oxide and one Pt) electrodes on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates. To operate the elements, a constant current (usually on the order of 0.1 mA) was driven between two of the electrodes and the voltage between one of these electrodes and the third electrode was monitored and used as the sensing signal. In one example, 31 ppm SO2 caused an approximately 40% change in the element output, and 2 ppm of SO2 could be easily detected. The cross-sensitivity to several interferents such as NOx was evaluated and found to be relatively small in comparison to the SO2 response.

  13. FEATS - Finite element thermal stress analysis of plane or axisymmetric solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    FEATS computer code uses finite element analysis to calculate steady state temperature and thermal stress fields for either axisymmetric or plane two-dimensional bodies with boundary conditions, including specified displacements, loads, and thermal boundary conditions.

  14. Precious metals and rare earth elements in municipal solid waste – Sources and fate in a Swiss incineration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Morf, Leo S.; Gloor, Rolf; Haag, Olaf; Haupt, Melanie; Skutan, Stefan; Lorenzo, Fabian Di; Böni, Daniel

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► We carefully addressed all the very valuable comments and suggestions of the reviewers. ► We also have shortened the size of the paper and tried simplify it substantially, as requested by the reviewers (introduction 25% reduced!). ► We have decided to take the chance and have replaced the data for the “additional” elements (Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Sn, Cr, Ni, Fe, Al) of the earlier MFA (Morf, 2011) with data that belong to the samples of this study. ► We are convinced that with the revision the paper has significantly improved in quality and attractiveness. - Abstract: In Switzerland many kinds of waste, e.g. paper, metals, electrical and electronic equipment are separately collected and recycled to a large extent. The residual amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) has to be thermally treated before final disposal. Efforts to recover valuable metals from incineration residues have recently increased. However, the resource potential of critical elements in the waste input (sources) and their partitioning into recyclable fractions and residues (fate) is unknown. Therefore, a substance flow analysis (SFA) for 31 elements including precious metals (Au, Ag), platinum metal group elements (Pt, Rh) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, etc.) has been conducted in a solid waste incinerator (SWI) with a state-of-the-art bottom ash treatment according to the Thermo-Re® concept. The SFA allowed the determination of the element partitioning in the SWI, as well as the elemental composition of the MSW by indirect analysis. The results show that the waste-input contains substantial quantities of precious metals, such as 0.4 ± 0.2 mg/kg Au and 5.3 ± 0.7 mg/kg Ag. Many of the valuable substances, such as Au and Ag are enriched in specific outputs (e.g. non-ferrous metal fractions) and are therefore recoverable. As the precious metal content in MSW is expected to rise due to its increasing application in complex consumer products, the results of this study are

  15. Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L.

    2012-11-06

    The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

  16. On the Assumed Natural Strain method to alleviate locking in solid-shell NURBS-based finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseiro, J. F.; Valente, R. A. F.; Reali, A.; Kiendl, J.; Auricchio, F.; Alves de Sousa, R. J.

    2014-06-01

    In isogeometric analysis (IGA), the functions used to describe the CAD geometry (such as NURBS) are also employed, in an isoparametric fashion, for the approximation of the unknown fields, leading to an exact geometry representation. Since the introduction of IGA, it has been shown that the high regularity properties of the employed functions lead in many cases to superior accuracy per degree of freedom with respect to standard FEM. However, as in Lagrangian elements, NURBS-based formulations can be negatively affected by the appearance of non-physical phenomena that "lock" the solution when constrained problems are considered. In order to alleviate such locking behaviors, the Assumed Natural Strain (ANS) method proposed for Lagrangian formulations is extended to NURBS-based elements in the present work, within the context of solid-shell formulations. The performance of the proposed methodology is assessed by means of a set of numerical examples. The results allow to conclude that the employment of the ANS method to quadratic NURBS-based elements successfully alleviates non-physical phenomena such as shear and membrane locking, significantly improving the element performance.

  17. Reflection-free atomistic-continuum coupling for solid mechanics employing spacetime discontinuous finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, B.

    2005-03-01

    We present a means for coupling dynamic atomistic and continuum simulations via a spacetime discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) finite element method. Our scheme allows the SDG method to couple a general MD simulation using Verlet time-stepping through the flux conditions on the element boundaries at the interface. These flux conditions ensure weak balance of momentum and energy to achieve reflection-free transfer of disturbance across the interface. Our work is supported by the National Science Foundation (ITR grant DMR-0121695) on Process Simulation and Design and, in part, by the Materials Computation Center (FRG grant DMR-99-76550)

  18. TOPAZ - a finite element heat conduction code for analyzing 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    TOPAZ is a two-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat conduction analysis. This report provides a user's manual for TOPAZ and a description of the numerical algorithms used. Sample problems with analytical solutions are presented. TOPAZ has been implemented on the CRAY and VAX computers.

  19. Comparison of the bending performance of solid and cannulated spinal pedicle screws using finite element analyses and biomechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Yu, Shan-Chuen; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2015-09-01

    Spinal pedicle screw fixations have been used extensively to treat fracture, tumor, infection, or degeneration of the spine. Cannulated spinal pedicle screws with bone cement augmentation might be a useful method to ameliorate screw loosening. However, cannulated spinal pedicle screws might also increase the risk of screw breakage. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the bending performance of different spinal pedicle screws with either solid design or cannulated design. Three-dimensional finite element models, which consisted of the spinal pedicle screw and the screw's hosting material, were first constructed. Next, monotonic and cyclic cantilever bending tests were both applied to validate the results of the finite element analyses. Finally, both the numerical and experimental approaches were evaluated and compared. The results indicated that the cylindrical spinal pedicle screws with a cannulated design had significantly poorer bending performance. In addition, conical spinal pedicle screws maintained the original bending performance, whether they were solid or of cannulated design. This study may provide useful recommendations to orthopedic surgeons before surgery, and it may also provide design rationales to biomechanical engineers during the development of spinal pedicle screws. PMID:26208430

  20. Determination of trace elements in lithium niobate crystals by solid sampling and solution-based spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Bencs, László; György, Krisztina; Kardos, Márta; Osán, János; Alföldy, Bálint; Varga, Imre; Ajtony, Zsolt; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Stefánka, Zsolt; Széles, Eva; Kovács, László

    2012-05-13

    Solid sampling (SS) graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and solution-based (SB) methods of GFAAS, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were elaborated and/or optimized for the determination of Cr, Fe and Mn trace elements used as dopants in lithium niobate optical crystals. The calibration of the SS-GFAAS analysis was possible with the application of the three-point-estimation standard addition method, while the SB methods were mostly calibrated against matrix-matched and/or acidic standards. Spectral and non-spectral interferences were studied in SB-GFAAS after digestion of the samples. The SS-GFAAS method required the use of less sensitive spectral lines of the analytes and a higher internal furnace gas (Ar) flow rate to decrease the sensitivity for crystal samples of higher (doped) analyte content. The chemical forms of the matrix produced at various stages of the graphite furnace heating cycle, dispensed either as a solid sample or a solution (after digestion), were studied by means of the X-ray near-edge absorption structure (XANES). These results revealed that the solid matrix vaporized/deposited in the graphite furnace is mostly present in the metallic form, while the dry residue from the solution form mostly vaporized/deposited as the oxide of niobium. PMID:22541007

  1. Mass spectrometric methods for the direct elemental and isotopic analysis of solid material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, A. A.; Gubal, A. R.; Potapov, S. V.; Agafonova, N. N.; Nemets, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the direct analysis of solids have a number of undeniable advantages over the methods that require preliminary dissolution of samples. High sensitivity and selectivity make the direct mass spectrometric techniques the most in-demand. The review concerns spark source mass spectrometry, laser ionization mass spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, secondary neutral mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry. Basic principles, analytical characteristics and trends in the development of these techniques are discussed. Particular attention is given to applications of the techniques as well as to their competitive advantages and drawbacks. The bibliography includes 123 references.

  2. Water impact analysis of space shuttle solid rocket motor by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyukozturk, O.; Hibbitt, H. D.; Sorensen, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary analysis showed that the doubly curved triangular shell elements were too stiff for these shell structures. The doubly curved quadrilateral shell elements were found to give much improved results. A total of six load cases were analyzed in this study. The load cases were either those resulting from a static test using reaction straps to simulate the drop conditions or under assumed hydrodynamic conditions resulting from a drop test. The latter hydrodynamic conditions were obtained through an emperical fit of available data. Results obtained from a linear analysis were found to be consistent with results obtained elsewhere with NASTRAN and BOSOR. The nonlinear analysis showed that the originally assumed loads would result in failure of the shell structures. The nonlinear analysis also showed that it was useful to apply internal pressure as a stabilizing influence on collapse. A final analysis with an updated estimate of load conditions resulted in linear behavior up to full load.

  3. MHOST: An efficient finite element program for inelastic analysis of solids and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient finite element program for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components was constructed and validated. A novel mixed iterative solution strategy is derived from the augmented Hu-Washizu variational principle in order to nodally interpolate coordinates, displacements, deformation, strains, stresses and material properties. A series of increasingly sophisticated material models incorporated in MHOST include elasticity, secant plasticity, infinitesimal and finite deformation plasticity, creep and unified viscoplastic constitutive model proposed by Walker. A library of high performance elements is built into this computer program utilizing the concepts of selective reduced integrations and independent strain interpolations. A family of efficient solution algorithms is implemented in MHOST for linear and nonlinear equation solution including the classical Newton-Raphson, modified, quasi and secant Newton methods with optional line search and the conjugate gradient method.

  4. Generation of multi-million element meshes for solid model-based geometries: The Dicer algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Melander, D.J.; Benzley, S.E.; Tautges, T.J.

    1997-06-01

    The Dicer algorithm generates a fine mesh by refining each element in a coarse all-hexahedral mesh generated by any existing all-hexahedral mesh generation algorithm. The fine mesh is geometry-conforming. Using existing all-hexahedral meshing algorithms to define the initial coarse mesh simplifies the overall meshing process and allows dicing to take advantage of improvements in other meshing algorithms immediately. The Dicer algorithm will be used to generate large meshes in support of the ASCI program. The authors also plan to use dicing as the basis for parallel mesh generation. Dicing strikes a careful balance between the interactive mesh generation and multi-million element mesh generation processes for complex 3D geometries, providing an efficient means for producing meshes of varying refinement once the coarse mesh is obtained.

  5. Calculations of stopping powers of 100 eV-30 keV electrons in 31 elemental solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tanuma, S.; Powell, C. J.; Penn, D. R.

    2008-03-15

    We present calculated electron stopping powers (SPs) for 31 elemental solids (Li, Be, glassy C, graphite, diamond, Na, Mg, K, Sc, Ti, V, Fe, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, In, Sn, Cs, Gd, Tb, Dy, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Bi). These SPs were determined with an algorithm previously used for the calculation of electron inelastic mean free paths and from energy-loss functions (ELFs) derived from experimental optical data. The SP calculations were made for electron energies between 100 eV and 30 keV and supplement our earlier SP calculations for ten additional solids (Al, Si, Cr, Ni, Cu, Ge, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au). Plots of SP versus atomic number for the group of 41 solids show clear trends. Multiple peaks and shoulders are seen that result from the contributions of valence-electron and various inner-shell excitations. Satisfactory agreement was found between the calculated SPs and values from the relativistic Bethe SP equation with recommended values of the mean excitation energy (MEE) for energies above 10 keV. We determined effective MEEs versus maximum excitation energy from the ELFs for each solid. Plots of effective MEE versus atomic number showed the relative contributions of valence-electron and different core-electron excitations to the MEE. For a maximum excitation energy of 30 keV, our effective MEEs agreed well for Be, graphite, Na, Al, and Si with recommended MEEs; a difference for Li was attributed to sample oxidation in the SP measurements for the recommended MEE. Substantially different effective MEEs were found for the three carbon allotropes (graphite, diamond, and glassy C)

  6. Processing of a porous titanium alloy from elemental powders using a solid state isothermal foaming technique.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Aris W; Leadbeater, Garry; Davies, Ian J

    2010-12-01

    The authors have conducted a preliminary investigation with regard to the potential to manufacture porous titanium alloys for biomedical applications using toxic-free elemental powders, i.e., Ti, Nb, Ta, Zr, in combination with the pressurised gas bubble entrapment method and in contrast to standard processing routes that generally utilise prealloyed powder containing potentially toxic elements. Elemental powder compacts were either hot isostatic pressed (HIP-ed) at 1000°C and then foamed at 1150°C or else HIP-ed at 1100°C and foamed at 1350°C. Porous α + β alloys containing up to 45 vol% of porosity in the size range 20-200 μm were successfully produced, thus highlighting the potential of this manufacturing route. It was expected that further optimisation of the processing route would allow full development of the preferred β-Ti phase (from the point of view of elastic modulus compatibility between implant and bone) with this being the subject of future work by the authors. PMID:20960037

  7. Uptake of elements from seawater by ferromanganese crusts: Solid-phase associations and seawater speciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koschinsky, A.; Hein, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Marine Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide crusts form by precipitation of dissolved components from seawater. Three hydrogenetic crust samples (one phosphatized) and two hydrothermal Mn-oxide samples were subjected to a sequential-leaching procedure in order to determine the host phases of 40 elements. Those host-phase associations are discussed with respect to element speciation in seawater. The partitioning of elements between the two major phases, Mn oxide and Fe oxyhydroxide, can in a first-order approximation be explained by a simple sorption model related to the inorganic speciation of the elements in seawater, as has been proposed in earlier models. Free and weakly complexed cations, such as alkali and alkaline earth metals, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, T1(I), and partly Y, are sorbed preferentially on the negatively charged surface of the MnO2 in hydrogenetic crusts. The driving force is a strong coulombic interaction. All neutral or negatively charged chloro (Cd, Hg, T1), carbonate (Cu, Y, Pb, and U), and hydroxide (Be, Sc, Ti, Fe, Zr, Nb, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hf, Ta, Bi, Th, and T1(III)) complexes and oxyanions (V, Cr, As, Se, Mo, and W) bind to the slightly positively charged surface of the amorphous FeOOH phase. While coulombic interaction can explain the sorption of the negatively charged species, the binding of neutral species is based on specific chemical interaction. Organic complexation of elements in deep-ocean water seems to be at most of minor importance. Surface oxidation can explain some strong metal associations, e.g. of Co and T1 with the MnO2 and Te with the FeOOH. Sorption reactions initially driven by coulombic forces are often followed by the formation of specific bonds between the adsorbate and the atoms of the oxide surface. Differences in the associations of some metals between the non-phosphatized and phosphatized hydrogenetic crusts and between the hydrogenetic and the hydrothermal samples reflect the different physico-chemical environments of formation and

  8. Direct potentiometric quantification of histamine using solid-phase imprinted nanoparticles as recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Basozabal, Itsaso; Guerreiro, Antonio; Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Aranzazu Goicolea, M; Barrio, Ramón J

    2014-08-15

    A new potentiometric sensor based on molecularly imprinted nanoparticles produced via the solid-phase imprinting method was developed. For histamine quantification, the nanoparticles were incorporated within a membrane, which was then used to fabricate an ion-selective electrode. The use of nanoparticles with high affinity and specificity allowed for label-free detection/quantification of histamine in real samples with short response times. The sensor could selectively quantify histamine in presence of other biogenic amines in real wine and fish matrices. The limit of detection achieved was 1.12×10(-6)molL(-1), with a linear range between 10(-6) and 10(-2)molL(-1) and a response time below 20s, making the sensor as developed a promising tool for direct quantification of histamine in the food industry.

  9. On the Interconnection of Incompatible Solid Finite Element Meshes Using Multipoint Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Incompatible meshes, i.e., meshes that physically must have a common boundary, but do not necessarily have coincident grid points, can arise in the course of a finite element analysis. For example, two substructures may have been developed at different times for different purposes and it becomes necessary to interconnect the two models. A technique that uses only multipoint constraints, i.e., MPC cards (or MPCS cards in substructuring), is presented. Since the method uses only MPC's, the procedure may apply at any stage in an analysis; no prior planning or special data is necessary.

  10. Elemental X-ray Imaging Using the Maia Detector Array: The Benefits and Challenges of Large Solid-Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, C.G.; De Geronimo, G.; Kirkham, R.; Hough, R.M.; Moorhead, G.; Siddons, D.P.; de Jonge, M.D.; Paterson, D.J.; Howard, D.L.; Cleverley, J.S.

    2009-11-13

    The fundamental parameter method for quantitative SXRF and PIXE analysis and imaging using the dynamic analysis method is extended to model the changing X-ray yields and detector sensitivity with angle across large detector arrays. The method is implemented in the GeoPIXE software and applied to cope with the large solid-angle of the new Maia 384 detector array and its 96 detector prototype developed by CSIRO and BNL for SXRF imaging applications at the Australian and NSLS synchrotrons. Peak-to-background is controlled by mitigating charge-sharing between detectors through careful optimization of a patterned molybdenum absorber mask. A geological application demonstrates the capability of the method to produce high definition elemental images up to {approx}100 M pixels in size.

  11. Hydrogen isotope and light element profiling in solid tritium targets used for neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earwaker, L. G.; England, J. B. A.; Goldie, D. J.

    1987-04-01

    Five targets consisting of titanium tritide layers on copper backings have been investigated using nuclear reaction analysis. As these targets are commonly used to produce monoenergetic neutrons via the T(p, n) 3 He and T(d, n) 4 He reactions, it is important to know of the presence of other elements which may produce neutrons at different energies. The thicknesses of the titanium tritide layers were measured by observing the T(p, n) 3 He threshold yield curve and also the energy spread of the neutrons using a 3He-filled gridded ion chamber. Elastic recoil analysis with a particle identifying system was used to measure the hydrogen, deuterium, tritium and 3He content, and elastic scattering was used to study the carbon and oxygen. Surprisingly high concentrations of both hydrogen and oxygen were found on all targets, including the three which had never been used. Also surprising was the 3He content which was approximately the same for targets of all ages and conditions of use. As expected, the carbon content increased strongly with use, originating no doubt, from vacuum pump oil. Up to 3% deuterium atoms were observed in unused targets with much higher contents being recorded in used targets.

  12. Cohesive-zone-model formulation and implementation using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method for homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Távara, Luis; Mantič, Vladislav; Salvadori, Alberto; Gray, Leonard J.; París, Federico

    2013-04-01

    A new symmetric boundary integral formulation for cohesive cracks growing in the interior of homogeneous linear elastic isotropic media with a known crack path is developed and implemented in a numerical code. A crack path can be known due to some symmetry implications or the presence of a weak or bonded surface between two solids. The use of a two-dimensional exponential cohesive law and of a special technique for its inclusion in the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method allows us to develop a simple and efficient formulation and implementation of a cohesive zone model. This formulation is dependent on only one variable in the cohesive zone (relative displacement). The corresponding constitutive cohesive equations present a softening branch which induces to the problem a potential instability. The development and implementation of a suitable solution algorithm capable of following the growth of the cohesive zone and subsequent crack growth becomes an important issue. An arc-length control combined with a Newton-Raphson algorithm for iterative solution of nonlinear equations is developed. The boundary element method is very attractive for modeling cohesive crack problems as all nonlinearities are located along the boundaries (including the crack boundaries) of linear elastic domains. A Galerkin approximation scheme, applied to a suitable symmetric integral formulation, ensures an easy treatment of cracks in homogeneous media and excellent convergence behavior of the numerical solution. Numerical results for the wedge split and mixed-mode flexure tests are presented.

  13. Solid-state synthesis of monazite-type compounds containing tetravalent elements.

    PubMed

    Bregiroux, Damien; Terra, Olivier; Audubert, Fabienne; Dacheux, Nicolas; Serin, Virgine; Podor, Renaud; Bernache-Assollant, Didier

    2007-11-26

    On the basis of optimized grinding/heating cycles developed for several phosphate-based ceramics, the preparation of brabantite and then monazite/brabantite solid solutions loaded with tetravalent thorium, uranium, and cerium (as a plutonium surrogate) was examined versus the heating temperature. The chemical reactions and transformations occurring when heating the initial mixtures of AnO2/CeO2, CaHPO(4).2H2O (or CaO), and NH4H2PO4 were identified through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis experiments. The incorporation of thorium, which presents only one stabilized oxidation state, occurs at 1100 degrees C. At this temperature, all the thorium-brabantite samples appear to be pure and single phase as suggested by XRD, electron probe microanalyses, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. By the same method, tetravalent uranium can be also stabilized in uranium-brabantite, i.e., Ca0.5U0.5PO4, after heating at 1200 degrees C. Both brabantites, Ca0.5Th0.5PO4 and Ca0.5U0.5PO4, begin to decompose when increasing the temperature to 1400 and 1300 degrees C, respectively, leading to a mixture of CaO and AnO2 by the volatilization of P4O10. In contrast to the cases of thorium and uranium, cerium(IV) is not stabilized during the heating treatment at high temperature. Indeed, the formation of Ca0.5Ce0.5PO4 appears impossible, due to the partial reduction of cerium(IV) into cerium(III) above 840 degrees C. Consequently, the systems always appear polyphase, with compositions of CeIII1-2xCeIVxCaxPO4 and Ca2P2O7. The same conclusion can be also given when discussing the incorporation of cerium(IV) into La1-2xCeIIIx-yCeIVyCay(PO4)1-x+y. This incomplete incorporation of cerium(IV) confirms the results obtained when trying to stabilize tetravalent plutonium in Ca0.5PuIV0.5PO4 samples. PMID:17963377

  14. Solid extractant on the base of bifunctional extractants and solvating diluents for recovery of rare-earth and actinide elements from strongly acidic media

    SciTech Connect

    Romanovskii, V.N.; Smirnov, I.V.

    1996-12-31

    Diphosphine dioxides of different structure were synthesized and studied with the goal of using as a base for preparation of solid extractants. Of all the studied compounds, DPDO-11 was chosen. The solid extractant on its base was prepared by impregnation of divinylbenzene - styrol matrix with the solution of 0.8 M DPDO in fluoropol-1083. The investigation of extraction and physico-chemical properties of this solid extractant shows that it can be used for selective recovery of actinide and rare-earth elements from aqueous solutions in the wide range of acidity.

  15. Analysis of Large Quasistatic Deformations of Inelastic Solids by a New Stress Based Finite Element Method. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Kenneth W.

    1992-01-01

    A new hybrid stress finite element algorithm suitable for analyses of large quasistatic deformation of inelastic solids is presented. Principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin. The finite element equations which result are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. Consistent reformulation of the constitutive equation and accurate and stable time integration of the stress are discussed at length. Examples which bring out the feasibility and performance of the algorithm conclude the work.

  16. Modeling of Interior Ballistic Gas-Solid Flow Using a Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2013-05-01

    In conventional models for two-phase reactive flow of interior ballistic, the dynamic collision phenomenon of particles is neglected or empirically simplified. However, the particle collision between particles may play an important role in dilute two-phase flow because the distribution of particles is extremely nonuniform. The collision force may be one of the key factors to influence the particle movement. This paper presents the CFD-DEM approach for simulation of interior ballistic two-phase flow considering the dynamic collision process. The gas phase is treated as a Eulerian continuum and described by a computational fluid dynamic method (CFD). The solid phase is modeled by discrete element method (DEM) using a soft sphere approach for the particle collision dynamic. The model takes into account grain combustion, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, interphase drag and heat transfer between gas and solid phases. The continuous gas phase equations are discretized in finite volume form and solved by the AUSM+-up scheme with the higher order accurate reconstruction method. Translational and rotational motions of discrete particles are solved by explicit time integrations. The direct mapping contact detection algorithm is used. The multigrid method is applied in the void fraction calculation, the contact detection procedure, and CFD solving procedure. Several verification tests demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this approach. The simulation of an experimental igniter device in open air shows good agreement between the model and experimental measurements. This paper has implications for improving the ability to capture the complex physics phenomena of two-phase flow during the interior ballistic cycle and to predict dynamic collision phenomena at the individual particle scale.

  17. The materials and elements production practice of counter-erosional and thermal protection system of the SPR-solid-propellant sustainer nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenko, V. M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the production scheme for heat- and erosion-protective carbon plastic materials for heat shield elements of solid-propellant nozzles. Attention is also given the method of manufacturing adhesive joint assemblies, and the production scheme is included.

  18. Modelling magnetic anomalies of solid and fractal bodies with defined boundaries using the finite cube elements method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Mostafa E.

    2009-04-01

    The finite cube elements method (FCEM) is a numerical tool designed for modelling gravity anomalies and estimating structural index (SI) of solid and fractal bodies with defined boundaries, tilted or in normal position and with variable density contrast. In this work, we apply FCEM to modelling magnetic anomalies and estimating SI of bodies with non-uniform magnetization having variable magnitude and direction. In magnetics as in gravity, FCEM allows us to study the spatial distribution of SI of the modelled bodies on contour maps and profiles. We believe that this will impact the forward and inverse modelling of potential field data, especially Euler deconvolution. As far as the author knows, this is the first time that gravity and magnetic anomalies, as well as SI, of self similar fractal bodies such as Menger sponges and Sierpinsky triangles are calculated using FCEM. The SI patterns derived from different order sponges and triangles are perfectly overlapped. This is true for bodies having variable property distributions (susceptibility or density contrast) under different field conditions (in case of magnetics) regardless of their orientation and depth of burial. We therefore propose SI as a new universal fractal-order-invariant measure which can be used in addition to the fractal dimensions for formulating potential field theory of fractal objects.

  19. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  20. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, S M; Chen, C R; Xu, Z H; Nelson, P N; Boyd, S E; Meszaros, I; Chan, K Y

    2013-11-01

    Using solid state (13)C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  1. Trapped Melt in IIIAB Irons: Solid/Liquid Elemental Partitioning During the Fractionation of the IIIAB Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Group IIIAB, the largest iron-meteorite group, shows compositional trends (including a three-order-of-magnitude It concentration range) indicating that it formed by fractional crystallization of a metallic magma. Because about 200 irons are available, and all degrees of crystallization are well represented, IIIAB offers an excellent set of samples for the study of crystallization at all depths of the asteroidal core. On log-log Ir-Au, and Ir-As diagrams IIIAB forms a broad band; the breadth represents real meteorite-to-meteorite variations, far outside experimental or sampling uncertainties. A successful model must explain the width of this band; I suggest that it mainly resulted from the trapping of parental magma within the crystallizing solid. Because S is essentially insoluble in metal, the abundance of FeS is a measure of the fraction of trapped liquid. The trapped-melt model is supported by the observation that irons having higher S contents plot closer to the inferred composition of the magmatic parental liquid. The lowest S values are found in the irons occupying the left envelope of the IIIAB Ir-Au or Ir-As compositional fields, thus it is this set of irons that should be interpreted as the solid products of a fractionating magma. This simplifies the modeling of the crystallization process and allows inferences regarding the distribution ratios for other elements in the evolved IIIAB system. The large (multiton) Cape York irons show wide variations in their trapped-melt fractions; their compositions seem best understood in terms of a low initial S content of the IIIAB magma, about 20 mg/g. The inferred initial IIIAB distribution coefficient for Ir, 4.6, is much higher than published values based on laboratory studies of low-S systems; I suggest that low-S (and low-P) partition-ratio measurements tend to err in the direction of unity. In IIIAB distribution coefficients for Au, As, and Ni were still < 1 when the most evolved IIIAB irons formed, another

  2. The effect of thread design on stress distribution in a solid screw implant: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Oğuz; Inan, Ozgür

    2010-08-01

    The biomechanical behavior of implant thread plays an important role on stresses at implant-bone interface. Information about the effect of different thread profiles upon the bone stresses is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different implant thread designs on stress distribution characteristics at supporting structures. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) stress-analysis method was used. Four types of 3D mathematical models simulating four different thread-form configurations for a solid screw implant was prepared with supporting bone structure. V-thread (1), buttress (2), reverse buttress (3), and square thread designs were simulated. A 100-N static axial occlusal load was applied to occlusal surface of abutment to calculate the stress distributions. Solidworks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FE modeling/analysis. The analysis of the von Mises stress values revealed that maximum stress concentrations were located at loading areas of implant abutments and cervical cortical bone regions for all models. Stress concentration at cortical bone (18.3 MPa) was higher than spongious bone (13.3 MPa), and concentration of first thread (18 MPa) was higher than other threads (13.3 MPa). It was seen that, while the von Mises stress distribution patterns at different implant thread models were similar, the concentration of compressive stresses were different. The present study showed that the use of different thread form designs did not affect the von Mises concentration at supporting bone structure. However, the compressive stress concentrations differ by various thread profiles.

  3. TECHNICAL NOTE: The formulation of a refined hybrid enhanced assumed strain solid shell element and its application to model smart structures containing distributed piezoelectric sensors/actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijie; Wang, Xinwei; Chen, Wanji

    2004-08-01

    In the present paper, a novel refined hybrid piezoelectric element formulation is developed for mechanical analysis and active vibration control of laminated structures bonded to piezoelectric sensors and actuators. By invoking the electrical field potential equation, a 'quasi-decoupling' method for treating the coupling electromechanical effects is presented and a modified generalized variational principle with a weaker interelement continuity condition is proposed. On the basis of this functional, a general formulation for a refined hybrid piezoelectric element method is established by incorporating an orthogonal interpolation approach and enhanced assumed strain (EAS) modes. A linearly distributed transverse EAS in the thickness direction is adopted to overcome the thickness locking of solid shell elements. Compared with the conventional incompatible brick element approach, the present formulation is very reliable, more accurate, computationally efficient and can be used to model the response of thin plates and shell structures.

  4. Effects of complexometric compounds found in liquid and solid oil shale waste products on release of chemical elements from retorted shale

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, E.; Carroll, R.B.; Jackson, L.P.

    1985-05-01

    Complexometric compounds found in oil shale wastes may have the ability to increase the release of trace elements from retorted oil shale when the solid and liquid wastes are codisposed. A laboratory investigation was conducted on the effects of various complexing agents found in liquid and solid oil shale wastes on the leachability of retorted shales. In batch experiments retorted shale samples were contacted with deionized-distilled water (DDW) and 10 different aqueous solutions of complexing agents. These agents included sodium-oxalate, ammonium-carbonate, sodium-thiosulfate, 2-pyridone, 2-hydroxy-6-methylpyridine, potassium-thiocyanate, acetonitrile, sodium-acetate, acetamide, and nicotinic acid. DDW leachate results were used as a baseline to compare with the results for aqueous complexometric leachates. Some of these agents aided in higher release of arsenic, boron, selenium, lead, and vanadium from the solids. The same complexing agents had different effects on different retorted shales, indicating that the results for one retorted shale may or may not be representative of other retorted shales. This is due to differences in mineralogical residence of elements in various retorted shales and differences in leachate chemical systems of various retorted shales. Concentration of cadium and cobalt did not exceed the quantitation limits of these elements in any of the leachates in this study. 10 refs., 15 tabs.

  5. Microwave assisted EDTA extraction-determination of pseudo total contents of distinct trace elements in solid environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Öztan, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2012-09-15

    Quantitative determination of metals in environmental matrices became important in the past few decades because of increasing pollutant concentrations in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The extraction phase in the process of determining metals is crucial but very time-consuming. Consequently, new extraction techniques for extractable metals have been developed which probably will substitute conventional procedures in the future. The aim of this study was to improve a closed vessel microwave assisted extraction (MAE) by using EDTA as an exclusive extraction agent (MAE-EDTA) for the determination of pseudo total metal contents in solid environmental samples. For this purpose, a large set of soil and compost samples were analyzed. MAE-EDTA was compared with both closed vessel microwave assisted aqua regia extraction (MAE-AR) and a conventional aqua regia extraction (AR) method for the determination of pseudo total Cd, Cu, Mn, and Pb contents of soil and compost samples. Certified reference materials were used for comparison of recovery rates from different extraction protocols. Metal concentrations in soil and compost extracts were determined by ICP-OES. MAE-AR which was considered as a reference MAE method for further steps of the study, showed the same extraction yields in the determination of pseudo total metal contents of the investigated elements (As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, Zn) in soil and compost samples as the conventional AR. MAE-EDTA gave similar values as the reference methods in the determination of Cd, Cu, and Pb amounts in soil samples and Cd, Mn, and Pb amounts in compost samples. The recovery rates ranged between 89.0-117.1% for soil samples and 93.5-104.0% for compost samples. MAE-EDTA provides fast processing of the samples that is less than one hour, including time for cooling of the samples. Apart from significantly less processing time, minimal consumption of sample and reagent chemicals is a strategic characteristic of MAE

  6. Microwave assisted EDTA extraction-determination of pseudo total contents of distinct trace elements in solid environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Öztan, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2012-09-15

    Quantitative determination of metals in environmental matrices became important in the past few decades because of increasing pollutant concentrations in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The extraction phase in the process of determining metals is crucial but very time-consuming. Consequently, new extraction techniques for extractable metals have been developed which probably will substitute conventional procedures in the future. The aim of this study was to improve a closed vessel microwave assisted extraction (MAE) by using EDTA as an exclusive extraction agent (MAE-EDTA) for the determination of pseudo total metal contents in solid environmental samples. For this purpose, a large set of soil and compost samples were analyzed. MAE-EDTA was compared with both closed vessel microwave assisted aqua regia extraction (MAE-AR) and a conventional aqua regia extraction (AR) method for the determination of pseudo total Cd, Cu, Mn, and Pb contents of soil and compost samples. Certified reference materials were used for comparison of recovery rates from different extraction protocols. Metal concentrations in soil and compost extracts were determined by ICP-OES. MAE-AR which was considered as a reference MAE method for further steps of the study, showed the same extraction yields in the determination of pseudo total metal contents of the investigated elements (As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, Zn) in soil and compost samples as the conventional AR. MAE-EDTA gave similar values as the reference methods in the determination of Cd, Cu, and Pb amounts in soil samples and Cd, Mn, and Pb amounts in compost samples. The recovery rates ranged between 89.0-117.1% for soil samples and 93.5-104.0% for compost samples. MAE-EDTA provides fast processing of the samples that is less than one hour, including time for cooling of the samples. Apart from significantly less processing time, minimal consumption of sample and reagent chemicals is a strategic characteristic of MAE

  7. Imaging of elements in leaves of tobacco by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Plants take up and store elements according to the environment in which they are growing. Because plants are at the base of the food chain, the determination of essential elements or toxic elements in plant materials is of importance. However, it is assumed that the element content determined on selected tissues may provide more specific information than that derived from the whole plant analysis. In this work, we assessed the feasibility of solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry analyses for quantitative imaging of Cd and Mg in plant leaves. Leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were selected to be used as samples. To produce a two dimensional image, sections cut from leaf samples were analyzed. Cellulose doped with multi-element solution standards was used as calibration samples. Two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 1547 Peach Leaves and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato leaves) were used to verify the accuracy of measurements with good agreement between the measured concentrations and the certified values. Quantitative imaging revealed the inhomogeneous distribution of the selected elements. Excess of Cd and Mg tended to be focused on peripheral regions and the tip of the leaf.

  8. On the dissolution of non-metallic solid elements (sulfur, selenium, tellurium and phosphorus) in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Boros, Eva; Earle, Martyn J; Gîlea, Manuela A; Metlen, Andreas; Mudring, Anja-Verena; Rieger, Franziska; Robertson, Allan J; Seddon, Kenneth R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Trusov, Lev; Vyle, Joseph S

    2010-02-01

    Ionic liquids are shown to be good solvents for elemental sulfur, selenium, phosphorus and tellurium, and can be designed to maximise the solubility of these elements. The presence of the [S(3)](*-) radical anion in diluted solutions of sulfur in some ionic liquids has been confirmed, and is the origin of their intense blue colour (cf. lapis lazuli). PMID:20087497

  9. On the dissolution of non-metallic solid elements (sulfur, selenium, tellurium and phosphorus) in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Boros, Eva; Earle, Martyn J; Gîlea, Manuela A; Metlen, Andreas; Mudring, Anja-Verena; Rieger, Franziska; Robertson, Allan J; Seddon, Kenneth R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Trusov, Lev; Vyle, Joseph S

    2010-02-01

    Ionic liquids are shown to be good solvents for elemental sulfur, selenium, phosphorus and tellurium, and can be designed to maximise the solubility of these elements. The presence of the [S(3)](*-) radical anion in diluted solutions of sulfur in some ionic liquids has been confirmed, and is the origin of their intense blue colour (cf. lapis lazuli).

  10. Fractionation of Volatile Elements by Heating of Solid Allende: Implications for the Source Material of Earth, Moon, and the Eucrite Parent Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, K. P.; Palme, H.

    1993-07-01

    CI-chondrites have average solar-system abundances of moderately volatile (Na, K, Rb, Sn, etc.) and highly volatile (Cs, Pb, etc.) elements. In most other types of chondrites and in samples from differentiated planetary bodies, these elements are more or less depleted relative to CI chondrites. Volatile-element fractionation occurred either by evaporation or incomplete condensation [1]. Recent data on the isotopic composition of K indicate that depletion of volatiles did not occur by evaporation from a melt of CI-chondritic composition [2]. Evaporative loss from a solid, however, would not necessarily lead to isotopic fractionation of K in the residue [e.g., 3]. In order to study loss of volatile elements from solids, we performed a series of heating experiments under variable oxygen fugacities at temperatures of 1050 degrees C to 1300 degrees C. Residues were analyzed by INAA [4]. We report here additional analyses (K, Rb, Cs, Sn, Pb) of these residues by isotope dilution-SSMS. Results (including Na data from INAA) are shown in Fig. 1. Results at other oxygen fugacities are similar, i.e., there is no strong dependence on fO2, contrary to the results for Au, As, and Zn [4]. Elements are arranged in the order of decreasing condensation temperatures. Depletions increase with increasing temperature and, at least for the 1050 degrees C experiment, with decreasing condensation temperature. The CI- normalized Allende pattern has no strong depletions of Cs and Pb, unlike the experimental results, indicating that evaporation from a solid cannot produce patterns observed in volatile-element-depleted meteorites. Even heating at temperatures as low as 1050 degrees C, affecting alkali elements only slightly, leads to large losses of lead, which are an order of magnitude greater than required for producing CV chondrite patterns. Depletions of these elements apparently occurred in the solar nebula before accretion by incomplete condensation or removal of gas during condensation

  11. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saqib, Naeem Bäckström, Mattias

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Different solids waste incineration is discussed in grate fired and fluidized bed boilers. • We explained waste composition, temperature and chlorine effects on metal partitioning. • Excessive chlorine content can change oxide to chloride equilibrium partitioning the trace elements in fly ash. • Volatility increases with temperature due to increase in vapor pressure of metals and compounds. • In Fluidized bed boiler, most metals find themselves in fly ash, especially for wood incineration. - Abstract: Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine

  12. A Comparison between the Properties of Solid Cylinders and Tube Products in Multi-Pass Hot Radial Forging Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedian, A.; Poursina, M.; Golestanian, H.

    2007-05-01

    Radial forging is an open die forging process used for reducing the diameter of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, and creating internal profiles for tubes such as rifling of gun barrels. In this work, a comprehensive study of multi-pass hot radial forging of short hollow and solid products are presented using 2-D axisymmetric finite element simulation. The workpiece is modeled as an elastic-viscoplastic material. A mixture of Coulomb law and constant limit shear is used to model the die-workpiece and mandrel-workpiece contacts. Thermal effects are also taken in to account. Three-pass radial forging of solid cylinders and tube products are considered. Temperature, stress, strain and metal flow distribution are obtained in each pass through thermo-mechanical simulation. The numerical results are compared with available experimental data and are in good agreement with them.

  13. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Naeem; Bäckström, Mattias

    2014-12-01

    Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine content have significant effects on partitioning characteristics by increasing the formation and vaporization of highly volatile metal chlorides. Zinc and cadmium concentrations in fly ash increase with the incineration temperature. PMID:25263218

  14. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Naeem; Bäckström, Mattias

    2014-12-01

    Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine content have significant effects on partitioning characteristics by increasing the formation and vaporization of highly volatile metal chlorides. Zinc and cadmium concentrations in fly ash increase with the incineration temperature.

  15. Novel solid-phase epitaxy for multi-component materials with extremely high vapor pressure elements: An application to KFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Taisuke; Sato, Hikaru; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel solid-phase epitaxy technique applicable to high annealing temperatures up to 1000 °C without re-vaporization of alkali metal elements with high vapor pressures. This technique is demonstrated through the successful growth of high-quality KFe2As2 epitaxial films. The key factors are employing a custom-designed alumina vessel/cover and sealing it in a stainless tube with a large amount of atmospheric KFe2As2 powder in tightly closed sample spaces. This technique can also be effective for other materials composed of elements with very high vapor pressures, such as alkali metals, and can lead to the realization of spintronics devices in the future using KFe2As2.

  16. Solid solubility in 1:13 phase of doping element for La(Fe,Si)13 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, S. T.; Wang, C. L.; Long, Y.; Fu, B.; Shi, J. M.; Han, J.; Zhao, Y. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The influences of Ni, Cr and Nb as substitution elements for Fe were investigated. The change in microstructure and the magnetic properties have been discussed in detail. Substitution elements Ni, Cr and Nb not only have limited solubility in NaZn13-type (1:13) phase, but also hinder the peritectoid reaction. Ni element mainly enters into La-rich phase while Cr element mainly concentrates in α-Fe phase, which both have detriment effect on the peritectoid reaction, leading to a large residual of impurity phases after annealing and a decrease of magnetic entropy change. Besides, Ni and Cr participated in peritectoid reaction by entering parent phases but slightly entering 1:13 phase, which would cause the disappearance of first order magnetic phase transition. A new phase (Fe,Si)2Nb was found when Nb element substitutes Fe in La(Fe,Si)13, suggesting that Nb does not participate in peritectoid reaction and only exists in (Fe,Si)2Nb phase after annealing. The alloy with Nb substitution maintains the first order magnetic phase transition character.

  17. Dynamic steady-state analysis of crack propagation in rubber-like solids using an extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a computational framework for studying high-speed crack growth in rubber-like solids under conditions of plane stress and steady-state is proposed. Effects of inertia, viscoelasticity and finite strains are included. The main purpose of the study is to examine the contribution of viscoelastic dissipation to the total work of fracture required to propagate a crack in a rubber-like solid. The computational framework builds upon a previous work by the present author (Kroon in Int J Fract 169:49-60, 2011). The model was fully able to predict experimental results in terms of the local surface energy at the crack tip and the total energy release rate at different crack speeds. The predicted distributions of stress and dissipation around the propagating crack tip are presented. The predicted crack tip profiles also agree qualitatively with experimental findings.

  18. Immobilization of trace elements in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash by producing calcium sulphoaluminate cement after carbonation and washing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jamro, Imtiaz Ali; Chen, Qi; Li, Shaobai; Luan, Jingde; Yang, Tianhua

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of producing calcium sulphoaluminate cement (CSA) by adding municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash to raw meal was investigated. After subjecting MSWI fly ash to accelerated carbonation and washing with water (ACW), various amounts (i.e., 5, 10 and 15 wt%) of the treated ash were added to raw meal composed of a mixture of bauxite, limestone and gypsum. The mixtures were sintered in a laboratory-scale muffle furnace at temperatures of 1250°, 1300°, 1325° and 1350 °C for various durations. The influence of different quantities of MSWI fly ash on the mineralogy, major phase composition and strength development of the resulting clinker was studied, as was the effect of ash treatments on leaching and volatilization of trace elements. The ACW treatment reduced the volatilization ratio of trace elements during the clinkerization process. Volatilization ratios for lead, cadmium and zinc were 21.5%, 33.6% and 16.3%, respectively, from the ACW fly ash treatment, compared with ratios of 97.5%, 93.1% and 85.2% from untreated fly ash. The volatilization ratios of trace elements were ordered as follows: untreated fly ash > carbonated fly ash > carbonated and water-washed fly ash. The ACW process also reduced the chloride content in the MSWI fly ash by 90 wt% and prevented high concentrations of trace elements in the effluents. PMID:26644396

  19. Chelating resin immobilizing carboxymethylated polyethyleneimine for selective solid-phase extraction of trace elements: Effect of the molecular weight of polyethyleneimine and its carboxymethylation rate.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Shigehiro; Kajiwara, Takehiro; Gemmei-Ide, Makoto; Kamichatani, Waka; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-15

    The effect of the molecular weight of polyethyleneimine (PEI), defined as a compound having two or more ethyleneamine units, and of its carboxymethylation rate (CM/N), represented by the ratio of ion-exchange capacity to the amount of N on the resin, on the selective solid-phase extraction ability of the chelating resin immobilizing carboxymethylated (CM) PEI was investigated. The chelating resins (24 types) were prepared by immobilization of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, tetraethylenepentamine, pentaethylenehexamine, PEI300 (MW=ca. 300), and PEI600 (MW=ca. 600) on methacrylate resins, followed by carboxymethylation with various amounts of sodium monochloroacetate. When resins with approximately the same CM/N ratio (0.242-0.271) were used, the recovery of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Ti, Zn, and alkaline earth elements increased with increasing the molecular weight of PEIs under acidic and weakly acidic conditions; however, the extraction behavior of Mo and V was only slightly affected. This was probably due to the increase in N content of the resin, resulting in an increase in carboxylic acid groups; the difference in the molecular weight of PEIs immobilized on the resin exerts an insignificant influence on the selective extraction ability. The CM/N ratio considerably affected the extraction behavior for various elements. Under acidic and neutral conditions, the recovery of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Ti, and Zn increased with increasing CM/N values. However, under these conditions, the recovery of alkaline earth elements was considerably low when a resin with low CM/N ratio was used. This is presumably attributed to the different stability constants of the complexes of these elements with aminocarboxylic acids and amines, and to the electrostatic repulsion between the elements and the protonated amino groups in the CM-PEI. The recovery of Mo and V decreased or varied with increasing CM/N values, suggesting that the extraction of these elements occurred mainly

  20. Chelating resin immobilizing carboxymethylated polyethyleneimine for selective solid-phase extraction of trace elements: Effect of the molecular weight of polyethyleneimine and its carboxymethylation rate.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Shigehiro; Kajiwara, Takehiro; Gemmei-Ide, Makoto; Kamichatani, Waka; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-15

    The effect of the molecular weight of polyethyleneimine (PEI), defined as a compound having two or more ethyleneamine units, and of its carboxymethylation rate (CM/N), represented by the ratio of ion-exchange capacity to the amount of N on the resin, on the selective solid-phase extraction ability of the chelating resin immobilizing carboxymethylated (CM) PEI was investigated. The chelating resins (24 types) were prepared by immobilization of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, tetraethylenepentamine, pentaethylenehexamine, PEI300 (MW=ca. 300), and PEI600 (MW=ca. 600) on methacrylate resins, followed by carboxymethylation with various amounts of sodium monochloroacetate. When resins with approximately the same CM/N ratio (0.242-0.271) were used, the recovery of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Ti, Zn, and alkaline earth elements increased with increasing the molecular weight of PEIs under acidic and weakly acidic conditions; however, the extraction behavior of Mo and V was only slightly affected. This was probably due to the increase in N content of the resin, resulting in an increase in carboxylic acid groups; the difference in the molecular weight of PEIs immobilized on the resin exerts an insignificant influence on the selective extraction ability. The CM/N ratio considerably affected the extraction behavior for various elements. Under acidic and neutral conditions, the recovery of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Ti, and Zn increased with increasing CM/N values. However, under these conditions, the recovery of alkaline earth elements was considerably low when a resin with low CM/N ratio was used. This is presumably attributed to the different stability constants of the complexes of these elements with aminocarboxylic acids and amines, and to the electrostatic repulsion between the elements and the protonated amino groups in the CM-PEI. The recovery of Mo and V decreased or varied with increasing CM/N values, suggesting that the extraction of these elements occurred mainly

  1. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics, User manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.

  2. Ginzburg-Landau theory for the solid-liquid interface of bcc elements. II - Application to the classical one-component plasma, the Wigner crystal, and He-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, X. C.; Stroud, D.

    1989-01-01

    The previously developed Ginzburg-Landau theory for calculating the crystal-melt interfacial tension of bcc elements to treat the classical one-component plasma (OCP), the charged fermion system, and the Bose crystal. For the OCP, a direct application of the theory of Shih et al. (1987) yields for the surface tension 0.0012(Z-squared e-squared/a-cubed), where Ze is the ionic charge and a is the radius of the ionic sphere. Bose crystal-melt interface is treated by a quantum extension of the classical density-functional theory, using the Feynman formalism to estimate the relevant correlation functions. The theory is applied to the metastable He-4 solid-superfluid interface at T = 0, with a resulting surface tension of 0.085 erg/sq cm, in reasonable agreement with the value extrapolated from the measured surface tension of the bcc solid in the range 1.46-1.76 K. These results suggest that the density-functional approach is a satisfactory mean-field theory for estimating the equilibrium properties of liquid-solid interfaces, given knowledge of the uniform phases.

  3. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages

  4. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code.

  5. Effect of Degeneration on Fluid–Solid Interaction within Intervertebral Disk Under Cyclic Loading – A Meta-Model Analysis of Finite Element Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Mohammad; Khalaf, Kinda; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The risk of low back pain resulted from cyclic loadings is greater than that resulted from prolonged static postures. Disk degeneration results in degradation of disk solid structures and decrease of water contents, which is caused by activation of matrix digestive enzymes. The mechanical responses resulted from internal solid–fluid interactions of degenerative disks to cyclic loadings are not well studied yet. The fluid–solid interactions in disks can be evaluated by mathematical models, especially the poroelastic finite element (FE) models. We developed a robust disk poroelastic FE model to analyze the effect of degeneration on solid–fluid interactions within disk subjected to cyclic loadings at different loading frequencies. A backward analysis combined with in vitro experiments was used to find the elastic modulus and hydraulic permeability of intact and enzyme-induced degenerated porcine disks. The results showed that the averaged peak-to-peak disk deformations during the in vitro cyclic tests were well fitted with limited FE simulations and a quadratic response surface regression for both disk groups. The results showed that higher loading frequency increased the intradiscal pressure, decreased the total fluid loss, and slightly increased the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. Enzyme-induced degeneration decreased the intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss, and barely changed the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. The increase of intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss with loading frequency was less sensitive after the frequency elevated to 0.1 Hz for the enzyme-induced degenerated disk. Based on this study, it is found that enzyme-induced degeneration decreases energy attenuation capability of disk, but less change the strength of disk. PMID:25674562

  6. NIKE2D: a vectorized, implicit, finite-deformation, finite-element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1983-02-01

    This report provides a user's manual for NIKE2D and a brief description of the implicit algorithm. Sample applications are presented including a simulation of the necking of a uniaxial tension specimen, a static analysis of an O-ring seal, and a cylindrical bar impacting a rigid wall. NIKE2D is a fully vectorized, implicit, finite-deformation, large-strain, finite-element code for analyzing the response of two-dimensional axisymmetric and plane-strain solids. A variety of loading conditions can be handled including traction boundary conditions, displacement boundary conditions, concentrated nodal point laods, body force loads due to base accelerations, and body-force loads due to spinning. Slide-lines with interface friction are available. Elastic, orthotropic-elastic-plastic, thermo-elastic-plactic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, thermo-orthotropic elastic, and elastic-creep materials models are implemented. Nearly incompressible behavior that arises in plasticity problems and elasticity problems with Poisson's ratio approaching 0.5 is accounted for in the element formulation to preclude mesh lock-ups and associated anomalous stress states. Four-node isoparametric elements are used for the spatial discretization, and profile (bandwidth) minimization is optional.

  7. A finite element model of conduction, convection, and phase change near a solid/melt interface. Ph.D. Thesis - Michigan Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed understanding of heat transfer and fluid flow is required for many aerospace thermal systems. These systems often include phase change and operate over a range of accelerations or effective gravitational fields. An approach to analyzing such systems is presented which requires the simultaneous solution of the conservation laws of energy, momentum, and mass, as well as an equation of state. The variable property form of the governing equations are developed in two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates for a Newtonian fluid. A numerical procedure for solving the governing equations is presented and implemented in a computer program. The Galerkin form of the finite element method is used to solve the spatial variation of the field variables, along with the implicit Crank-Nicolson time marching algorithm. Quadratic Langrangian elements are used for the internal energy and the two components of velocity. Linear Lagrangian elements are used for the pressure. The location of the solid/liquid interface as well as the temperatures are determined form the calculated internal energy and pressure. This approach is quite general in that it can describe heat transfer without phase change, phase change with a sharp interface, and phase change without an interface. Analytical results from this model are compared to those of other researchers studying transient conduction, convection, and phase change and are found to be in good agreement. The numerical procedure presented requires significant computer resources, but this is not unusual when compared to similar studies by other researchers. Several methods are suggested to reduce the computational times.

  8. Determination of Gibbs Free Energy of Formation from Elements for Ca4Fe9O17 by Solid-state Galvanic Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Yu; Guo, Xing-Min

    2015-02-01

    Aiming to fill the thermodynamic blank in CaO-FeO-Fe2O3 system, the determination of the Gibbs free energy of formation from elements for ternary Ca4Fe9O17 was carried out using a solid-state galvanic cell with air and calcium zirconate material, respectively, as the reference electrode and electrolyte. The ternary system Ca2Fe2O5-CaFe2O4-Ca4Fe9O17 was selected as the measuring electrode and its equilibrium was confirmed. The essential thermodynamic data of Ca2Fe2O5 and CaFe2O4 were cited from the reassessed data from a previous investigation. The reversible electromotive forces of the cell were determined from 1273 K to 1473 K (1000 °C to 1200 °C). The Gibbs free energy of formation from elements for Ca4Fe9O17 was derived and given by: The increment of enthalpy and entropy of formation from elements for Ca4Fe9O17 at 298 K (25 °C) are calculated to be and . The Ellingham diagram was developed in temperature range 1273 K to 1473 K (1000 °C to 1200 °C). The oxygen potential of Ca4Fe9O17 was found to be slightly higher than CaFe2O4 and much higher than Ca2Fe2O5.

  9. Trace elemental analysis of glass and paint samples of forensic interest by ICP-MS using laser ablation solid sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almirall, Jose R.; Trejos, Tatiana; Hobbs, Andria; Furton, Kenneth G.

    2003-09-01

    The importance of small amounts of glass and paint evidence as a means to associate a crime event to a suspect or a suspect to another individual has been demonstrated in many cases. Glass is a fragile material that is often found at the scenes of crimes such as burglaries, hit-and-run accidents and violent crime offenses. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of elemental analysis by solution ICP-MS of small amounts of glass for the comparison between a fragment found at a crime scene to a possible source of the glass. The multi-element capability and the sensitivity of ICP-MS combined with the simplified sample introduction of laser ablation prior to ion detection provides for an excellent and relatively non-destructive technique for elemental analysis of glass fragments. The direct solid sample introduction technique of laser ablation (LA) is reported as an alternative to the solution method. Direct solid sampling provides several advantages over solution methods and shows great potential for a number of solid sample analyses in forensic science. The advantages of laser ablation include the simplification of sample preparation, thereby reducing the time and complexity of the analysis, the elimination of handling acid dissolution reagents such as HF and the reduction of sources of interferences in the ionization plasma. Direct sampling also provides for essentially "non-destructive" sampling due to the removal of very small amounts of sample needed for analysis. The discrimination potential of LA-ICP-MS is compared with previously reported solution ICP-MS methods using external calibration with internal standardization and a newly reported solution isotope dilution (ID) method. A total of ninety-one different glass samples were used for the comparison study using the techniques mentioned. One set consisted of forty-five headlamps taken from a variety of automobiles representing a range of twenty years of manufacturing dates. A second set consisted of forty

  10. Innovative instrumentation for mineralogical and elemental analyses of solid extraterrestrial surfaces: The Backscatter Moessbauer Spectrometer/X Ray Fluorescence analyzer (BaMS/XRF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelfer, T. D.; Morris, Richard V.; Nguyen, T.; Agresti, D. G.; Wills, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a four-detector research-grade backscatter Moessbauer spectrometer (BaMS) instrument with low resolution x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) capability. A flight-qualified instrument based on this design would be suitable for use on missions to the surfaces of solid solar-system objects (Moon, Mars, asteroids, etc.). Target specifications for the flight instrument are as follows: mass less than 500 g; volumes less than 300 cu cm; and power less than 2 W. The BaMS/XRF instrument would provide data on the oxidation state of iron and its distribution among iron-bearing mineralogies and elemental composition information. This data is a primary concern for the characterization of extraterrestrial surface materials.

  11. ELM - A SIMPLE TOOL FOR THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET FUEL ELEMENTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ELM is a simple computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Written for the nuclear propulsion project of the Space Exploration Initiative, ELM evaluates the various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition. In the past, these correlations were found in different reactor analysis codes, but now comparisons are possible within one program. The logic of ELM is based on the one-dimensional conservation of energy in combination with Newton's Law of Cooling to determine the bulk flow temperature and the wall temperature across a control volume. Since the control volume is an incremental length of tube, the corresponding pressure drop is determined by application of the Law of Conservation of Momentum. The size, speed, and accuracy of ELM make it a simple tool for use in fuel element parametric studies. ELM is a machine independent program written in FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled on an IBM PC compatible running MS-DOS using Lahey FORTRAN 77, a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, and a Sun4 series computer running SunOS UNIX. ELM requires 565K of RAM under SunOS 4.1, 360K of RAM under VMS 5.4, and 406K of RAM under MS-DOS. Because this program is machine independent, no executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ELM is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. ELM was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  12. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Chung, H.-K.; Gutt, C.; Huang, L. G.; Zacharias, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength, and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (resonant coherent X-ray diffraction). In this case, the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribution, charge state distribution, and plasma temperature with such high spatial and temporal resolution will make a vast number of processes in shortpulse laser-solid interaction accessible for direct experimental observation, e.g., hole-boring and shock propagation, filamentation and instability dynamics, electron transport, heating, and ultrafast ionization dynamics.

  13. Thermodynamic estimation of minor element distribution between immiscible liquids in Fe-Cu-based metal phase generated in melting treatment of municipal solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Nakajima, K.; Sakanakura, H.; Matsubae, K.; Bai, H.; Nagasaka, T.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two liquids separation of metal occurs in the melting of municipal solid waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of PGMs etc. between two liquid metal phases is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quite simple thermodynamic model is applied to predict the distribution ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au and Ag originated from WEEE are found to be concentrated into Cu-rich phase. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become an important target in managing material cycles from the viewpoint of not only waste management and control of environmental pollution but also resource conservation. This study investigated the distribution tendency of trace elements in municipal solid waste (MSW) or incinerator ash, including valuable non-ferrous metals (Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ti, V, W, Zr), precious group metals (PGMs) originated from WEEE (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt), and others (Al, B, Pb, Si), between Fe-rich and Cu-rich metal phases by means of simple thermodynamic calculations. Most of the typical alloying elements for steel (Co, Cr, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, and W) and Rh were preferentially distributed into the Fe-rich phase. PGMs, such as Au, Ag, and Pd, were enriched in the Cu-rich phase, whereas Pt was almost equally distributed into both phases. Since the primary metallurgical processing of Cu is followed by an electrolysis for refining, and since PGMs in crude copper have been industrially recovered from the resulting anode slime, our results indicated that Ag, Au, and Pd could be effectively recovered from MSW if the Cu-rich phase could be selectively collected.

  14. Solid solubility of rare earth elements (Nd, Eu, Tb) in In2-xSnxO3 - effect on electrical conductivity and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Sunde, T O L; Lindgren, M; Mason, T O; Einarsrud, M-A; Grande, T

    2014-07-01

    Wide band-gap semiconductors doped with luminescent rare earth elements (REEs) have attracted recent interest due to their unique optical properties. Here we report on the synthesis of the transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) indium oxide and indium tin oxide (ITO) doped with neodymium, europium and terbium. The solid solubility in the systems was investigated and isothermal phase diagrams at 1400 °C were proposed. The solubility of the REEs in In2O3 is mainly determined by the size of the rare earth dopant, while in ITO the solid solubility was reduced due to a strong tendency of the tin and REE co-dopants to form a pyrochlore phase. The effect of the REE-doping on the conductivity of the host was determined and optical activity of the REE dopants were investigated in selected host materials. The conductivity of sintered materials of REE-doped In2O3 was significantly reduced, even at small doping concentrations, due to a decrease in carrier mobility. The same decrease in mobility was not observed in thin films of the material processed at lower temperatures. Strong emissions at around 611 nm were observed for Eu-doped In2O3, demonstrating the possibility of obtaining photoluminescence in a TCO host, while no emissions was observed for Nd- and Tb-doping. PMID:24832103

  15. TerraFERMA: The Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler for multi-physics problems in the solid Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, M. W.; Wilson, C. R.; Van Keken, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    We announce the release of a new software infrastructure, TerraFERMA, the Transparent Finite Element Rapid Model Assembler for the exploration and solution of coupled multi-physics problems. The design of TerraFERMA is driven by two overarching computational needs in Earth sciences. The first is the need for increased flexibility in both problem description and solution strategies for coupled problems where small changes in model assumptions can often lead to dramatic changes in physical behavior. The second is the need for software and models that are more transparent so that results can be verified, reproduced and modified in a manner such that the best ideas in computation and earth science can be more easily shared and reused. TerraFERMA leverages three advanced open-source libraries for scientific computation that provide high level problem description (FEniCS), composable solvers for coupled multi-physics problems (PETSc) and a science neutral options handling system (SPuD) that allows the hierarchical management of all model options. TerraFERMA integrates these libraries into an easier to use interface that organizes the scientific and computational choices required in a model into a single options file, from which a custom compiled application is generated and run. Because all models share the same infrastructure, models become more reusable and reproducible. TerraFERMA inherits much of its functionality from the underlying libraries. It currently solves partial differential equations (PDE) using finite element methods on simplicial meshes of triangles (2D) and tetrahedra (3D). The software is particularly well suited for non-linear problems with complex coupling between components. We demonstrate the design and utility of TerraFERMA through examples of thermal convection and magma dynamics. TerraFERMA has been tested successfully against over 45 benchmark problems from 7 publications in incompressible and compressible convection, magmatic solitary waves

  16. heterogeneous equilibration between solid and liquid phases in research on the lower oxidation states of the actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Kamenskaya, A.N.; Konovalova, N.A.; Kulyukhin, S.A.; Rumer, I.A.

    1986-07-01

    Measurements have been made on the cocrystallization of Fe/sup 2 +/ and Md/sup +/ with NaCl and KCl in water-ethanol solutions in the presence of divalent lanthanides. A thermodynamic consideration showed that mendelevium is reduced to the 1+ oxidation state at the Eu/sup 2 +/ potential and cocrystallizes with KCl and NaCl isomorphously. Fermium in the same medium is reduced by Sm/sup 2 +/ only to the 2/sup +/ oxidation state and forms anomalous mixed crystals AMC with KCl, with the cocrystallization coefficient increasing linearly with (Cl/sup -/). These relationships show that Md/sup +/ and Fm/sup 2 +/ do not form stable chloride, complexes, and in that respect they are analogs of the alkali and alkaline-earth elements. The cocrystallization of Md/sup +/ with SmF/sub 2/ and YbF/sub 2/ shows that AMC are formed as when Ag/sup +/ cocrystallizes with SrF/sub 2/.

  17. Photochemically Generated Elemental Selenium Forms Conjugates with Serum Proteins that Are Preferentially Cytotoxic to Leukemia and Selected Solid Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daziano, Jean-Pierre; Günther, Wolfgang H.H.; Krieg, Marianne; Tsujino, Ichiro; Miyagi, Kiyoko; Anderson, Gregory S.; Sampson, Reynée W.; Ostrowski, Martin D.; Muir, Sarah A.; Bula, Raymond J.; Sieber, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if and how photoproducts contribute to the anti-tumor effect of merocyanine-mediated PDT. A panel of barbituric, thiobarbituric and selenobarbituric acid analogues of Merocyanine 540 was photobleached, and the resulting photoproducts were characterized by absorption, fluorescence emission, mass, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and tested for cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines and freshly explanted bone marrow cells. While all dyes were readily photobleached, only photoproducts of selone dyes showed cytotoxic activity. One-hour incubations with micromolar concentrations of selone-derived photoproducts were sufficient to reduce leukemia/lymphoma cells ≥10,000 fold while preserving virtually all normal CD34-positive bone marrow cells. Of 6 multi-drug resistant tumor cell lines tested, 5 were as sensitive or more sensitive to photoproducts than the corresponding wild-type lines. Physicochemical characterizations of the cytotoxic activity indicated that it consisted of conjugates of subnano particles of elemental selenium and (lipo)proteins. The discovery of cytotoxic Se-protein conjugates provides a rare example of photoproducts contributing substantially to the anti-tumor effect of PDT and challenges the long-held view that Se in oxidation state zero is biologically inert. Agents modeled after our Se-protein conjugates may prove useful for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:22211823

  18. Finite-element analyses of blade and slot coating flows using an implicit pseudo-solid domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Schunk, P.R.; Sackinger, P.A.

    1994-12-04

    In coating processes (e.g. in blade coating) the flow domain inherently contains free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and characteristic length scales of flow features in the dimension transverse to the web-movement vary by an order of magnitude or more from a fraction of a millimeter or more to tens of microns or less). The presence of free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and the sudden changes of flow geometry and directions create difficulties in theoretical analyses of such flows. Though simulations of coating flows via finite-element methods using structured grids have been reportedly demonstrated in the literature, achieving high efficiency of such numerical experiments remains a grand challenge -- mainly due to difficulties in local mesh-refinement and in avoiding unacceptably distorted grids. High efficiency of computing steady flow fields under various process conditions is crucial in shortening turn-around time in design and optimization of coating-flow processes. In this paper we employ a fully-implicit, pseudo-solid, domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured meshes to analyze blade and slot coating flows using Galerkin`s method with finite element basis functions. We demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our unique technique in circumventing shortcomings of mesh-motion schemes currently being used in the coating-flow research community. Our goal is to develop an efficient numerical tool, together with a suitable optimization toolkit, that can be used routinely in design and optimization of coating-flow processes.

  19. Predicting the Dynamic Crushing Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber Using Solid-Element-Based Models in LS-DYNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical study that was performed as part of the development of an externally deployable energy absorber (DEA) concept. The concept consists of a composite honeycomb structure that can be stowed until needed to provide energy attenuation during a crash event, much like an external airbag system. One goal of the DEA development project was to generate a robust and reliable Finite Element Model (FEM) of the DEA that could be used to accurately predict its crush response under dynamic loading. The results of dynamic crush tests of 50-, 104-, and 68-cell DEA components are presented, and compared with simulation results from a solid-element FEM. Simulations of the FEM were performed in LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark) to compare the capabilities of three different material models: MAT 63 (crushable foam), MAT 26 (honeycomb), and MAT 126 (modified honeycomb). These material models are evaluated to determine if they can be used to accurately predict both the uniform crushing and final compaction phases of the DEA for normal and off-axis loading conditions

  20. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  1. Calculations of atomic sputtering and displacement cross-sections in solid elements by electrons with energies from threshold to 1. 5 MV

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, C.R.

    1988-12-01

    The kinetics of knock-on collisions of relativistic electrons with nuclei and details of the numerical evaluation of differential, recoil, and total Mott cross-sections are reviewed and discussed. The effects of electron beam induced displacement and sputtering, in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) environment, on microanalysis are analyzed with particular emphasis placed on the removal of material by knock-on sputtering. The mass loss predicted due to transmission knock-on sputtering is significant for many elements under conditions frequently encountered in microanalysis. Total Mott cross-sections are tabulated for all naturally occurring solid elements up to Z = 92 at displacement energies of one, two, four, and five times the sublimation energy and for accelerating voltages accessible in the transmission electron microscope. Fortran source code listings for the calculation of the differential Mott cross-section as a function of electron scattering angle (dMottCS), as a function of nuclear recoil angle (RECOIL), and the total Mott cross-section (TOTCS) are included. 48 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Trace element-bearing phases during the solid transport: in-situ characterization and temporal variability in the Loire bed-sediments (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbois, Cécile; Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra; Dhivert, Elie; Desmet, Marc; Kunz, Martin

    2013-04-01

    trace element mobility during the solid transport. Trace element-bearing phases were identified at a micron scale during both <1900-1950 and 1950-1980 contamination periods with respect to maximum contamination peaks. The most frequent trace element-bearing phases were aggregates of various fine clay particles and they were characterized at both contamination periods. According to in-situ chemical composition and µ-XRD patterns, mineralogy of these aggregates match with chlorite-phlogopite-illite-kaolinite assemblages. Iron and Mn oxyhydroxides were another type of trace element-bearing phases but appeared less frequent than clay aggregates. They were present as discrete particles or associated to clay minerals in aggregates. The majority of clay aggregates and (Fe, Mn) oxyhydroxides reflect mechanical erosion and solid transport. However, some others also reflect post-depositional mechanisms like authigenic pyrites and Fe hydroxides into clay layers.

  3. Determination of Gibbs Free Energy of Formation from Elements for Ca4Fe9O17 by Solid-state Galvanic Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Yu; Guo, Xing-Min

    2014-09-01

    Aiming to fill the thermodynamic blank in CaO-FeO-Fe2O3 system, the determination of the Gibbs free energy of formation from elements for ternary Ca4Fe9O17 was carried out using a solid-state galvanic cell with air and calcium zirconate material, respectively, as the reference electrode and electrolyte. The ternary system Ca2Fe2O5-CaFe2O4-Ca4Fe9O17 was selected as the measuring electrode and its equilibrium was confirmed. The essential thermodynamic data of Ca2Fe2O5 and CaFe2O4 were cited from the reassessed data from a previous investigation. The reversible electromotive forces of the cell were determined from 1273 K to 1473 K (1000 °C to 1200 °C). The Gibbs free energy of formation from elements for Ca4Fe9O17 was derived and given by: Δ_{{f}} G_{{m}}^{circ } ({{Ca}}4 {{Fe}}9 {{O}}_{17} ) = -6218.862 × 103 + 1247.762T + 31.32T ln T ± 2694({{J}} {{mol}}^{-1} ) The increment of enthalpy and entropy of formation from elements for Ca4Fe9O17 at 298 K (25 °C) are calculated to be Δ_{{f}} H_{{{{m}},298}}^{ circ } = -6209.529 × 103 ({{J}} {{mol}}^{-1} ) and Δ_{{f}} S_{{{{m}},298}}^{ circ } = -1038.009({{J}} {{mol}}^{-1} {{K}}^{-1} ) . The Ellingham diagram was developed in temperature range 1273 K to 1473 K (1000 °C to 1200 °C). The oxygen potential of Ca4Fe9O17 was found to be slightly higher than CaFe2O4 and much higher than Ca2Fe2O5.

  4. Partitioning of platinum-group elements (PGE) and chalcogens (Se, Te, As, Sb, Bi) between monosulfide-solid solution (MSS), intermediate solid solution (ISS) and sulfide liquid at controlled fO2-fS2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanan; Brenan, James

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the behavior of highly siderophile elements (HSEs: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Au, Re), Ag, Pb and chalcogens (As, Se, Sb, Te and Bi) during the solidification of sulfide magmas, we have conducted a series of experiments to measure partition coefficients (D values) between monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and sulfide melt, as well as MSS and intermediate solid solution (ISS), at 0.1 MPa and 860-926 °C, log fS2 -3.0 to -2.2 (similar to the Pt-PtS buffer), with fO2 controlled at the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. The IPGEs (Os, Ir, Ru), Rh and Re are found to be compatible in MSS relative to sulfide melt with D values ranging from ∼20 to ∼5, and DRe/DOs of ∼0.5. Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, Pb, as well as the chalcogens, are incompatible in MSS, with D values ranging from ∼0.1 to ∼1 × 10-3. For the same metal/sulfur ratio, D values for the IPGEs, Rh and Re are systematically larger than most past studies, correlating with higher oxygen content in the sulfide liquid, reflecting the significant effect of oxygen on increasing the activity coefficients for these elements in the melt phase. MSS/ISS partitioning experiments reveal that Ru, Os, Ir, Rh and Re are partitioned into MSS by a factor of >50, whereas Pd, Pt, Ag, Au and the chalcogens partition from weakly (Se, As) to strongly (Ag, Au) into ISS. Uniformly low MSS- and ISS- melt partition coefficients for the chalcogens, Pt, Pd, Ag and Au will lead to enrichment in the residual sulfide liquid, but D values are generally too large to reach early saturation in Pt-Pd-chalcogen-rich accessory minerals, based on current solubility estimates. Instead, these phases likely precipitate at the last dregs of crystallization. Modeled evolution curves for the PGEs and chalcogens are in reasonably good agreement with whole-rock sulfide compositions for the McCreedy East deposit (Sudbury, Ontario), consistent with an origin by crystallization of MSS, then MSS + ISS from sulfide magma.

  5. Finite element model predictions of static deformation from dislocation sources in a subduction zone: Sensitivities to homogeneous, isotropic, Poisson-solid, and half-space assumptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Dislocation models can simulate static deformation caused by slip along a fault. These models usually take the form of a dislocation embedded in a homogeneous, isotropic, Poisson-solid half-space (HIPSHS). However, the widely accepted HIPSHS assumptions poorly approximate subduction zone systems of converging oceanic and continental crust. This study uses three-dimensional finite element models (FEMs) that allow for any combination (including none) of the HIPSHS assumptions to compute synthetic Green's functions for displacement. Using the 1995 Mw = 8.0 Jalisco-Colima, Mexico, subduction zone earthquake and associated measurements from a nearby GPS array as an example, FEM-generated synthetic Green's functions are combined with standard linear inverse methods to estimate dislocation distributions along the subduction interface. Loading a forward HIPSHS model with dislocation distributions, estimated from FEMs that sequentially relax the HIPSHS assumptions, yields the sensitivity of predicted displacements to each of the HIPSHS assumptions. For the subduction zone models tested and the specific field situation considered, sensitivities to the individual Poisson-solid, isotropy, and homogeneity assumptions can be substantially greater than GPS. measurement uncertainties. Forward modeling quantifies stress coupling between the Mw = 8.0 earthquake and a nearby Mw = 6.3 earthquake that occurred 63 days later. Coulomb stress changes predicted from static HIPSHS models cannot account for the 63-day lag time between events. Alternatively, an FEM that includes a poroelastic oceanic crust, which allows for postseismic pore fluid pressure recovery, can account for the lag time. The pore fluid pressure recovery rate puts an upper limit of 10-17 m2 on the bulk permeability of the oceanic crust. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Hedges, John I.

    1990-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed.

  7. Early diagenesis of mangrove leaves in a tropical estuary: Bulk chemical characterization using solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benner, R.; Hatcher, P.G.; Hedges, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) leaves during decomposition in tropical estuarine waters were characterized using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and elemental (CHNO) analysis. Carbohydrates were the most abundant components of the leaves accounting for about 50 wt% of senescent tissues. Tannins were estimated to account for about 20 wt% of leaf tissues, and lipid components, cutin, and possibly other aliphatic biopolymers in leaf cuticles accounted for about 15 wt%. Carbohydrates were generally less resistant to decomposition than the other constituents and decreased in relative concentration during decomposition. Tannins were of intermediate resistance to decomposition and remained in fairly constant proportion during decomposition. Paraffinic components were very resistant to decomposition and increased in relative concentration as decomposition progressed. Lignin was a minor component of all leaf tissues. Standard methods for the colorimetric determination of tannins (Folin-Dennis reagent) and the gravimetric determination of lignin (Klason lignin) were highly inaccurate when applied to mangrove leaves. The N content of the leaves was particularly dynamic with values ranging from 1.27 wt% in green leaves to 0.65 wt% in senescent yellow leaves attached to trees. During decomposition in the water the N content initially decreased to 0.51 wt% due to leaching, but values steadily increased thereafter to 1.07 wt% in the most degraded leaf samples. The absolute mass of N in the leaves increased during decomposition indicating that N immobilization was occurring as decomposition progressed. ?? 1990.

  8. Placing three-dimensional isoparametric elements into NASTRAN. [alterations in matrix assembly to simplify generation of higher order elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M. B.; Filstrup, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Linear (8 node), parabolic (20 node), cubic (32 node) and mixed (some edges linear, some parabolic and some cubic) have been inserted into NASTRAN, level 15.1. First the dummy element feature was used to check out the stiffness matrix generation routines for the linear element in NASTRAN. Then, the necessary modules of NASTRAN were modified to include the new family of elements. The matrix assembly was changed so that the stiffness matrix of each isoparametric element is only generated once as the time to generate these higher order elements tends to be much longer than the other elements in NASTRAN. This paper presents some of the experiences and difficulties of inserting a new element or family of elements into NASTRAN.

  9. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  10. Chemical analysis of solid materials by a LIMS instrument designed for space research: 2D elemental imaging, sub-nm depth profiling and molecular surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-García, Pavel; Grimaudo, Valentine; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B.; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Direct quantitative chemical analysis with high lateral and vertical resolution of solid materials is of prime importance for the development of a wide variety of research fields, including e.g., astrobiology, archeology, mineralogy, electronics, among many others. Nowadays, studies carried out by complementary state-of-the-art analytical techniques such as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Glow Discharge Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GD-TOF-MS) or Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provide extensive insight into the chemical composition and allow for a deep understanding of processes that might have fashioned the outmost layers of an analyte due to its interaction with the surrounding environment. Nonetheless, these investigations typically employ equipment that is not suitable for implementation on spacecraft, where requirements concerning weight, size and power consumption are very strict. In recent years Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) has re-emerged as a powerful analytical technique suitable not only for laboratory but also for space applications.[1-3] Its improved performance and measurement capabilities result from the use of cutting edge ultra-short femtosecond laser sources, improved vacuum technology and fast electronics. Because of its ultimate compactness, simplicity and robustness it has already proven to be a very suitable analytical tool for elemental and isotope investigations in space research.[4] In this contribution we demonstrate extended capabilities of our LMS instrument by means of three case studies: i) 2D chemical imaging performed on an Allende meteorite sample,[5] ii) depth profiling with unprecedented sub-nm vertical resolution on Cu electrodeposited interconnects[6,7] and iii) preliminary molecular desorption of polymers without assistance of matrix or functionalized substrates.[8] On the whole

  11. The Ca element effect on the enhancement performance of Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5O6-δ perovskite as cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jinshuo; Chen, Wenjun; Wang, Wenyi; Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Wang; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Kening

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the partial substitution of atomic elements from the A site of a perovskite is investigated in order to develop cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Herein, Sr2-xCaxFe1.5Mo0.5O6-δ (SCFM), compounds were investigated by characterizing structural properties, chemical compatibility, electrical properties, electrochemical performance and stability. Thermal expansion coefficients were found to decrease when increasing the Ca content. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggests that Ca doping significantly affects the Fe2+/Fe3+ and Mo6+/Mo5+ ratios. For a doping level of x = 0.4, the sample showed the lowest interface polarization (Rp), the highest conductivity and a maximum power density of 1.26 W cm-2 at 800 °C. These results suggest that SCFM cathode materials are excellent candidates for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells applications.

  12. Fluorine-ion conductivity of different technological forms of solid electrolytes R 1- y M y F3- y (LaF3 Type ) ( M = Ca, Sr, Ba; R Are Rare Earth Elements)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, N. I.; Sobolev, B. P.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the conductivity of some representatives of different technological forms of fluoride-conducting solid electrolytes R 1- y M y F3- y ( M = Ca, Sr, Ba; R are rare earth elements) with an LaF3 structure: single crystals, cold- and hot-pressing ceramics based on a charge prepared in different ways (mechanochemical synthesis, solid-phase synthesis, and fragmentation of single crystals), polycrystalline alloys, etc. It is shown (by impedance spectroscopy), that different technological forms of identical chemical composition ( R, M, y) exhibit different electrical characteristics. The maximum conductivity is observed for the single-crystal form of R 1- y M y F3- y tysonite phases, which provides (in contrast to other technological forms) the formation of true volume ion-conducting characteristics.

  13. SEC-ICP-MS studies for elements binding to different molecular weight fractions of humic substances in compost extract obtained from urban solid waste.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Baki B M; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Kannamkumarath, Sasi S; Castillo, J R; Caruso, J A

    2002-12-01

    In this work, the speciation of elements in compost was studied with emphasis on their binding to humic substances. In order to assess the distribution of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, U, Th and Zn among molecular weight fractions of humic substances, the compost extract (extracted by 0.1 mol l(-1) sodium pyrophosphate) was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography coupled on-line with UV-Vis spectrophotometric and ICP-MS detection. Similar chromatograms were obtained for standard humic acid (Fluka) and for compost extract (254 nm, 400 nm) and three size fractions were operationally defined that corresponded to the apparent molecular weight ranges > 15 kDa, 1-15 kDa and < 1 kDa. The percentage of total element content in compost that was leached to the extract ranged from 30% up to 100% for different elements. The elution profiles of Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb (ICP-MS) followed that of humic substances, while for other elements the bulk elution peak matched the retention time observed for the element in the absence of compost extract. Spiking experiments were carried out to confirm elements' binding and to estimate the affinity of individual elements for humic substances derived from compost. The results obtained indicated the following order of decreasing affinity: Cu > Ni > Co > Pb > Cd > (Cr, U, Th) > (As, Mn, Mo, Zn). After standard addition, further binding of Cu, Ni and Co with the two molecular weight fractions of humic substances was observed, indicating that humic substances derived from compost were not saturated with these elements.

  14. Evaluation of performance of three different hybrid mesoporous solids based on silica for preconcentration purposes in analytical chemistry: From the study of sorption features to the determination of elements of group IB.

    PubMed

    Kim, Manuela Leticia; Tudino, Mabel Beatríz

    2010-08-15

    Several studies involving the physicochemical interaction of three silica based hybrid mesoporous materials with metal ions of the group IB have been performed in order to employ them for preconcentration purposes in the determination of traces of Cu(II), Ag(I) and Au(III). The three solids were obtained from mesoporous silica functionalized with 3-aminopropyl (APS), 3-mercaptopropyl (MPS) and N-[2-aminoethyl]-3-aminopropyl (NN) groups, respectively. Adsorption capacities for Au, Cu and Ag were calculated using Langmuir's isotherm model and then, the optimal values for the retention of each element onto each one of the solids were found. Physicochemical data obtained under thermodynamic equilibrium and under kinetic conditions - imposed by flow through experiments - allowed the design of simple analytical methodologies where the solids were employed as fillings of microcolumns held in continuous systems coupled on-line to an atomic absorption spectrometry. In order to control the interaction between the filling and the analyte at short times (flow through conditions) and thus, its effect on the analytical signal and the presence of interferences, the initial adsorption velocities were calculated using the pseudo second order model. All these experiments allowed the comparison of the solids in terms of their analytical behaviour at the moment of facing the determination of the three elements. Under optimized conditions mainly given by the features of the filling, the analytical methodologies developed in this work showed excellent performances with limits of detection of 0.14, 0.02 and 0.025 microg L(-1) and RSD % values of 3.4, 2.7 and 3.1 for Au, Cu and Ag, respectively. A full discussion of the main findings on the interaction metal ions/fillings will be provided. The analytical results for the determination of the three metals will be also presented.

  15. GOMA - A full-Newton finite element program for free and moving boundary problems with coupled fluid/solid momentum, energy, mass, and chemical species transport: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, P.R.; Sackinger, P.A.; Rao, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    GOMA is a two- and three-dimensional finite element program which excels in analyses of manufacturing processes, particularly those involving free or moving interfaces. Specifically, the full-Newton-coupled heat, mass, momentum, and pseudo-solid mesh motion algorithm makes GOMA ideally suited for simulating processes in which the bulk fluid transport is closely coupled to the interfacial physics. Examples include, but are not limited to, coating and polymer processing flows, soldering, crystal growth, and solid-network or solution film drying. The code is based on the premise that any boundary can be (1) moving or free, with an apriori unknown position dictated by the distinguishing physics, (2) fixed, according to a global analytical representation, or (3) moving in time and space under user-prescribed kinematics. The goal is to enable the user to predict boundary position or motion simultaneously with the physics of the problem being analyzed and to pursue geometrical design studies and fluid-structure interaction problems. The moving mesh algorithm treats the entire domain as a computational Lagrangian solid that deforms subject to the physical principles which dictate boundary position. As an added benefit, the same Lagrangian solid mechanics can be exploited to solve multi-field problems for which the solid motion and stresses interact with other transport phenomena, either within the same material phase (e.g. shrinking coating) or in neighboring material phases (e.g. flexible blade coating). Thus, analyses of many fluid-structure interaction problems and deformable porous media problems are accessible. This document serves as a user`s guide and reference for GOMA and provides a brief overview of GOMA`s capabilities, theoretical background, and classes of problems for which it is targeted.

  16. Geochemical modeling research related to the surface disposal of processed oil shale solid waste. [Elements and compounds in oil shale wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. J.; Drever, J. I.

    1987-10-01

    Several geochemical codes are available in the literature to model chemical processes such as oxidation-reduction, precipitation-dissolution, formation of solution complex, adsorption, and ion exchange. However, these models differ in the environments to which they apply. The objective of this research was to evaluate the applicability of existing geochemical codes to predict water quality from an oil shale solid waste environment. We selected EQ3/EQ6, GEOCHEM, MINTEQ, PHREEQE, SOLMNEQ, and WATEQFC geochemical models for further evaluation. We concluded that all these models lack thermodynamic data for minerals and solution complexes which are important for oil shale solid waste studies. Selection of any one of the models would require development of a more reliable thermodynamic database, and this report describes the initiation of that work. So far, critical evaluation of thermodynamic data has been completed for Sr, F, Mo, and Se. 64 refs., 15 tabs.

  17. Hard X-Ray Spectro Microprobe Analysis of Inhomogeneous Solids: A Case Study. Element Distribution and Speciation in Selected Iron Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Cavell, R.G.; Feng, R.; Barnes, E.M.; Cavell, P.A.; McCready, A.J.; Webb, M.A.

    2007-06-08

    The hard X-ray microprobe provides an effective methodology for the non-destructive analysis of inhomogeneous materials. Application of X-ray absorption/fluroescence spectroscopy techniques (XANES and EXAFS) permits the speciation of the elements and yields information about the local structural environment. Microfocussed, monochromatic, tunable X-rays allows examination of small areas of micrometer dimensions with spectroscopic procedures. Typically the materials which are presented are thick and cannot be altered for the experiment. This condition introduces difficulties which may compromise the results. Herein we discuss those difficulties and show that the system can yield reliable results in spite of the compromises. Some results are presented on the two iron meteorites we have examined. These specimens are representative of highly inhomogeneous materials and illustrate the difficulties encountered with compositional variations which may occur at sub-millimeter dimensions and also illustrate the difficulties presented by the need to analyze components present at ppm concentration levels in a concentrated matrix. In these particular samples the major constituent is Fe which ranges from 90% to 70%, balanced by Ni which ranges from 10% to 30%. The critical diagnostic trace elements Ga and Ge which must also be analyzed are present at the 80 and 340 ppm level respectively. These diagnostic elements have been shown by EXAFS to be substitutionally placed in the matrix of the major element species in these meteorite samples.

  18. Solid-state 207pb nmr studies of lead-group 16 and mixedtransition-metal-lead-group 16 element-containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bramer, S.E.; Glatfelter, A.; Bai, S.; Dybowksi, C.; GNeue,G.; Perry, D.L.

    2005-08-26

    207Pb solid-state NMR studies have been conducted on binarylead-group 16 and mixed transition-metal/lead group 16 materials,correlating the NMR chemical shifts of the materials with theirstructures. The experimental results show that the 207Pb chemical shiftsare strongly influenced by the local electronic structure. Data arereported for lead selenide, lead selenate, calcium plumbate, strontiumplumbite, barium plumbite, lead borate, lead zirconate, lead tungstate,lead meta-tantalate, lead niobate, lead molybdate, lead meta-vanadate,lead sulfite, and lead sulfate.

  19. Statistics of Interatomic Ni-Ni Bonds in Ni-BASED Ternary Solid Solutions with Non-Magnetic Elements and Their Magnetic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosma, I.; Culea, E.; Fechete, R.; NicoarǍ, S.

    The drop of ferromagnetic moment in the ternary solid solutions Ni1-x-yCuxDy, (D = Zn, Si, Au, Al) is analyzed in terms of the statistical model of the environment-dependent moments. This probabilistic model shows that the disappearing of one Ni atom ferromagnetic moment can be assigned to the replacement of at least four Ni-Ni bindings, out of twelve, in pure nickel. This paper aims at discussing all these features that, from the point of view of macroscopic equilibrium states, are related to the distribution of local bonds, provided by the peripheral electrons of the substitute atoms dissolved in the Ni matrix.

  20. Solid solution alloy nanoparticles of immiscible Pd and Ru elements neighboring on Rh: changeover of the thermodynamic behavior for hydrogen storage and enhanced CO-oxidizing ability.

    PubMed

    Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Takata, Masaki; Toh, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Sumi, Naoya; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Pd(x)Ru(1-x) solid solution alloy nanoparticles were successfully synthesized over the whole composition range through a chemical reduction method, although Ru and Pd are immiscible at the atomic level in the bulk state. From the XRD measurement, it was found that the dominant structure of Pd(x)Ru(1-x) changes from fcc to hcp with increasing Ru content. The structures of Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles in the Pd composition range of 30-70% consisted of both solid solution fcc and hcp structures, and both phases coexist in a single particle. In addition, the reaction of hydrogen with the Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles changed from exothermic to endothermic as the Ru content increased. Furthermore, the prepared Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles demonstrated enhanced CO-oxidizing catalytic activity; Pd0.5Ru0.5 nanoparticles exhibit the highest catalytic activity. This activity is much higher than that of the practically used CO-oxidizing catalyst Ru and that of the neighboring Rh, between Ru and Pd.

  1. Exact geometry solid-shell element based on a sampling surfaces technique for 3D stress analysis of doubly-curved composite shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. M.; Mamontov, A. A.; Plotnikova, S. V.; Mamontov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid-mixed ANS four-node shell element by using the sampling surfaces (SaS) technique is developed. The SaS formulation is based on choosing inside the nth layer In not equally spaced SaS parallel to the middle surface of the shell in order to introduce the displacements of these surfaces as basic shell variables. Such choice of unknowns with the consequent use of Lagrange polynomials of degree In - 1 in the thickness direction for each layer permits the presentation of the layered shell formulation in a very compact form. The SaS are located inside each layer at Chebyshev polynomial nodes that allows one to minimize uniformly the error due to the Lagrange interpolation. To implement the efficient analytical integration throughout the element, the enhanced ANS method is employed. The proposed hybrid-mixed four-node shell element is based on the Hu-Washizu variational equation and exhibits a superior performance in the case of coarse meshes. It could be useful for the 3D stress analysis of thick and thin doubly-curved shells since the SaS formulation gives the possibility to obtain numerical solutions with a prescribed accuracy, which asymptotically approach the exact solutions of elasticity as the number of SaS tends to infinity.

  2. Multi-element microelectropolishing method

    DOEpatents

    Lee, P.J.

    1994-10-11

    A method is provided for microelectropolishing a transmission electron microscopy nonhomogeneous multi-element compound foil. The foil is electrolyzed at different polishing rates for different elements by rapidly cycling between different current densities. During a first portion of each cycle at a first voltage a first element electrolyzes at a higher current density than a second element such that the material of the first element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the second element and creates a solid surface film, and such that the solid surface film is removed at a faster rate than the first element leaves the anode foil. During a second portion of each cycle at a second voltage the second element electrolyzes at a higher current density than the first element, and the material of the second element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the first element and creates a solid surface film, and the solid surface film is removed at a slower rate than the second element leaves the foil. The solid surface film is built up during the second portion of the cycle, and removed during the first portion of the cycle. 10 figs.

  3. Multi-element microelectropolishing method

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for microelectropolishing a transmission electron microscopy nonhomogeneous multi-element compound foil. The foil is electrolyzed at different polishing rates for different elements by rapidly cycling between different current densities. During a first portion of each cycle at a first voltage a first element electrolyzes at a higher current density than a second element such that the material of the first element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the second element and creates a solid surface film, and such that the solid surface film is removed at a faster rate than the first element leaves the anode foil. During a second portion of each cycle at a second voltage the second element electrolyzes at a higher current density than the first element, and the material of the second element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the first element and creates a solid surface film, and the solid surface film is removed at a slower rate than the second element leaves the foil. The solid surface film is built up during the second portion of the cycle, and removed during the first portion of the cycle.

  4. Prediction of Path Deviation in Robot Based Incremental Sheet Metal Forming by Means of a New Solid-Shell Finite Element Technology and a Finite Elastoplastic Model with Combined Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliclar, Yalin; Laurischkat, Roman; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Reese, Stefanie

    2011-08-01

    The presented project deals with a robot based incremental sheet metal forming process, which is called roboforming and has been developed at the Chair of Production Systems. It is characterized by flexible shaping using a freely programmable path-synchronous movement of two industrial robots. The final shape is produced by the incremental infeed of the forming tool in depth direction and its movement along the part contour in lateral direction. However, the resulting geometries formed in roboforming deviate several millimeters from the reference geometry. This results from the compliance of the involved machine structures and the springback effects of the workpiece. The project aims to predict these deviations caused by resiliences and to carry out a compensative path planning based on this prediction. Therefore a planning tool is implemented which compensates the robots's compliance and the springback effects of the sheet metal. The forming process is simulated by means of a finite element analysis using a material model developed at the Institute of Applied Mechanics (IFAM). It is based on the multiplicative split of the deformation gradient in the context of hyperelasticity and combines nonlinear kinematic and isotropic hardening. Low-order finite elements used to simulate thin sheet structures, such as used for the experiments, have the major problem of locking, a nonphysical stiffening effect. For an efficient finite element analysis a special solid-shell finite element formulation based on reduced integration with hourglass stabilization has been developed. To circumvent different locking effects, the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) and the assumed natural strain (ANS) concepts are included in this formulation. Having such powerful tools available we obtain more accurate geometries.

  5. Bulk Stable Isotope Analysis of Carbon from Solids and Liquids using an Elemental Analyzer Coupled to a Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Rella, C.; van Pelt, A.

    2009-04-01

    We report here on the novel employment of a small footprint Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) interfaced to an elemental analyzer for the measurement of the bulk isotopic carbon signature in plants and food products. The current system provides an inexpensive alternative with unparalleled ease-of-use as compared to standard methods using the more complex analytical instrumentation of isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A precision of carbon isotopic ratio measurements of less than 1 permil was achieved in minutes of measurement time. Such precision readily distinguishes the isotopic carbon signatures of a variety of environmental and agricultural products from different origins, providing information about food authenticity and climate changes effect on plant physiology.

  6. Paramagnetic interactions in 31P NMR spectroscopy as a probe for short-range order/disorder of flux-grown rare earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.; Boatner, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Many models of inorganic solid solutions relevant to earth scientists start with the assumption of a completely random distribution of substitutional species. This is, in large part, due to the difficulty of obtaining robust experimental confirmation of short-range order/disorder using standard diffraction techniques that provide information about long-range order. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has long been used in this capacity, as the technique is characteristically sensitive to variations in local atomic structure around specific NMR-active nuclei. NMR studies of geologically important inorganic materials have historically concentrated on diamagnetic systems in which the complicating effects of unpaired electrons from paramagnetic species (most ions of the transition metals or rare-earth elements) can be ignored. In these diamagnetic materials, variations in small-scale atomic structure in the solid state typically cause shifts in the frequencies of NMR peaks of up to a few tens of ppm. However, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly being applied to inorganic solid solutions in which one of the end members is paramagnetic. In many cases, this leads to the observation of parmagnetically-shifted peaks. Paramagnetic interactions can be much stronger than in ordinary diamagnetic materials and these peaks are typically shifted from tens to thousands of ppm. In this study we present the results of a 31P NMR investigation of a series of flux-grown solid solutions of La1-xCexPO4 ('x' between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y1-xMxPO4 (M = Vn+, Ce3+, Nd3+, 'x' between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted resonances were observed in the spectra of all samples shifted by up to -204 ppm due to the presence of paramagnetic Vn+, Ce3+, or Nd3+ in the diamagnetic host phase - either LaPO4 or YPO4. Analysis of the spectra and comparison to the crystal structures leads to the

  7. Solid phase extraction of rare earth elements in seawater and estuarine water with 4-(2-thiazolylazo) resorcinol immobilized Chromosorb 106 for determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zereen, Fahmida; Yilmaz, Vedat; Arslan, Zikri

    2013-01-01

    A solid phase preconcentration method has been developed using new chelating resin prepared by immobilization of 4-(2-thiazolylazo) resorcinol (TAR) on Chromosorb 106. The method was optimized for determination of rare earth elements (REEs) in seawater and estuarine water samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The effects of various experimental parameters, such as load pH, eluent concentration, sample and eluent flow rates were examined to find the optimum operating conditions. The REEs were quantitatively retained from saline solutions on a minicolumn Chromosorb 106-TAR resin at pH 5.0 and then eluted with 1.0 mL of 1% (v/v) HNO3. The resin possesses large sorption capacity for REEs ranging from 81.1 µmol g−1 for Lu and 108 µmol g−1 for Nd. Detection limits (3s) varied between 0.06 ng L−1 for Pr to 0.31 for Ce for preconcentration of 5.0 mL blank solutions (pH 5.0). The relative standard deviation for triplicate measurements was less than 5% at 0.1 µg L−1 level. The method was validated by analysis Nearshore seawater certified reference material (CASS–4). The elemental results were comparable with the values reported in literature. The method was verified by analysis of spiked and unspiked coastal seawater and estuarine water samples. PMID:24000264

  8. Dithizone modified magnetic nanoparticles for fast and selective solid phase extraction of trace elements in environmental and biological samples prior to their determination by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guihong; He, Man; Peng, Hanyong; Hu, Bin

    2012-01-15

    A fast and simple method for analysis of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) in environmental and biological samples was developed by combining magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) detection. Dithizone modified silica-coated magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (H(2)Dz-SCMNPs) were prepared and used for MSPE of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The prepared magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The factors affecting the extraction of the target metal ions such as pH, sample volume, eluent, and interfering ions had been investigated and the adsorption mechanism of the target metals on the self-prepared H(2)Dz-SCMNPs was investigated by FT-IR and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of the developed method for Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) were 35, 11, 62, and 8ngL(-1), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, c=10μgL(-1), n=7) were in the range of 1.7-3.1% and the linear range was 0.1-100μgL(-1). The proposed method had been validated by two certified reference materials (GSBZ50009-88 environmental water and GBW07601 human hair), and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also applied for the determination of trace metals in real water and human hair samples with recoveries in the range of 85-110% for the spiked samples. The developed MSPE-ICP-OES method has the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, selectivity, high extraction efficiency and is suitable for the analysis of samples with large volume and complex matrix. PMID:22265534

  9. Solid Phase Extraction of Trace Elements in Waterand Tissue Samples on a Mini Column with Diphenylcarbazone Impregnated Nano-TiO2 and Their Determination by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Baytak, Sıtkı; Arslan, Zikri

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a simple, robust and environmentally friendly solid phase preconcentration procedure for multielement determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) using diphenylcarbazone (DPC) impregnated TiO2 nanopowder (n-TiO2). DPC was successfully impregnated onto n-TiO2 in colloidal solution. A number of elements, including Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II) and Zn(II) were quantitatively preconcentrated from aqueous solutions between pH 8 and 8.5 at a flow rate of 2 mL min−1, and then eluted with 2 mL of 5% (v/v) HNO3. A mini-column packed with 0.12 g DPC impregnated n-TiO2 retained all elements quantitatively from up to 250 mL multielement solution (2.5 μg per analyte) affording an enrichment factor of 125. The limits of detection (LOD) for preconcentration of 50 mL blank solutions (n = 12) were 0.28, 0.15, 0.25, 0.22, 0.12, and 0.10 μg L−1 for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate determinations was 0.8, 3.4, 2.6, 2.2, 1.2 and 3.3% for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn, respectively, at 5 μg L−1 level. The method was validated with analysis of Freshwater (SRM 1643e) and Lobster hepatopancreas (TORT-2) certified reference materials, and then applied to the determination of the elements from tap water and lake water samples by ICP-OES. PMID:26236403

  10. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  11. Simple formulas for strain-energy release rates with higher order and singular finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    A general finite element procedure for obtaining strain-energy release rates for crack growth in isotropic materials is presented. The procedure is applicable to two-dimensional finite element analyses and uses the virtual crack-closure method. The procedure was applied to non-singular 4-noded (linear), 8-noded (parabolic), and 12-noded (cubic) elements and to quarter-point and cubic singularity elements. Simple formulas for strain-energy release rates were obtained with this procedure for both non-singular and singularity elements. The formulas were evaluated by applying them to two mode I and two mixed mode problems. Comparisons with results from the literature for these problems showed that the formulas give accurate strain-energy release rates.

  12. Calculation of strain-energy release rates with higher order and singular finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    A general finite element procedure for obtaining strain-energy release rates for crack growth in isotropic materials is presented. The procedure is applicable to two-dimensional finite element analyses and uses the virtual crack-closure method. The procedure was applied to nonsingular 4-noded (linear), 8-noded (parabolic), and 12-noded (cubic) elements and to quarter-point and cubic singularity elements. Simple formulas for strain-energy release rates were obtained with this procedure for both nonsingular and singularity elements. The formulas were evaluated by applying them to two mode I and two mixed mode problems. Comparisons with results from the literature for these problems showed that the formulas give accurate strain-energy release rates.

  13. Determination of trace/ultratrace rare earth elements in environmental samples by ICP-MS after magnetic solid phase extraction with Fe3O4@SiO2@polyaniline-graphene oxide composite.

    PubMed

    Su, Shaowei; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Hu, Bin; Xiao, Zuowei

    2014-02-01

    A novel Fe3O4@SiO2@polyaniline-graphene oxide composite (MPANI-GO) was prepared through a simple noncovalent method and applied to magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in tea leaves and environmental water samples followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. The prepared MPANI-GO was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Various parameters affecting MPANI-GO MSPE of REEs have been investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, 3σ) for REEs were in the range of 0.04-1.49 ng L(-1) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, c=20 ng L(-1), n=7) were 1.7-6.5%. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated by analyzing a Certified Reference Material of GBW 07605 tea leaves. The method was also successfully applied for the determination of trace REEs in tea leaves and environmental water samples. The developed MPANI-GO MSPE-ICP-MS method has the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, high enrichment factor and is suitable for the analysis of trace REEs in samples with complex matrix.

  14. Application of Organic Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, S.

    1982-01-01

    If ions are considered to be solid material which transport electric charges, polymer materials can then be considered as organic solid electrolytes. The role of these electrolytes is discussed for (1) ion concentration sensors; (2) batteries using lithium as the cathode and a charge complex of organic material and iodine in the anode; and (3) elements applying electrical double layer capability.

  15. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  16. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  17. Solid propellants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Hutchison, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The basic principles underlying propulsion by rocket motor are examined together with the configuration of a solid propellant motor. Solid propellants and their preparation are discussed, giving attention to homogeneous propellants, composite propellants, energetic considerations in choosing a solid propellant, the processing of composite propellants, and some examples of new developments. The performance of solid propellants is investigated, taking into account characteristics velocity, the specific impulse, and performance calculations. Aspects of propellant development considered include nonperformance requirements for solid propellants, the approach to development, propellant mechanical properties, and future trends.

  18. A 4-node assumed-stress hybrid shell element with rotational degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1990-01-01

    An assumed-stress hybrid/mixed 4-node quadrilateral shell element is introduced that alleviates most of the deficiencies associated with such elements. The formulation of the element is based on the assumed-stress hybrid/mixed method using the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle. The membrane part of the element has 12 degrees of freedom including rotational or drilling degrees of freedom at the nodes. The bending part of the element also has 12 degrees of freedom. The bending part of the element uses the Reissner-Mindlin plate theory which takes into account the transverse shear contributions. The element formulation is derived from an 8-node isoparametric element. This process is accomplished by assuming quadratic variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement fields and linear variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane rotation fields along the edges of the element. In addition, the degrees of freedom at midside nodes are approximated in terms of the degrees of freedom at corner nodes. During this process the rotational degrees of freedom at the corner nodes enter into the formulation of the element. The stress field are expressed in the element natural-coordinate system such that the element remains invariant with respect to node numbering.

  19. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  20. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  1. A computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements using symbolic integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. M.; Bowen, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements with variable curvature is described. A listing of the program is presented together with printed output for a sample case. Computation times and central memory requirements are given for several different elements. The program is based on a stiffness (displacement) finite-element model in which the fundamental unknowns consist of both the displacement and the rotation components of the reference surface of the shell. Two triangular and four quadrilateral elements are implemented in the program. The triangular elements have 6 or 10 nodes, and the quadrilateral elements have 4 or 8 nodes. Two of the quadrilateral elements have internal degrees of freedom associated with displacement modes which vanish along the edges of the elements (bubble modes). The triangular elements and the remaining two quadrilateral elements do not have bubble modes. The output from the program consists of arrays corresponding to the stiffness, the geometric stiffness, the consistent mass, and the consistent load matrices for individual elements. The integrals required for the generation of these arrays are evaluated by using symbolic (or analytic) integration in conjunction with certain group-theoretic techniques. The analytic expressions for the integrals are exact and were developed using the symbolic and algebraic manipulation language.

  2. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  3. Direct formulation of a 4-node hybrid shell element with rotational degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple 4-node assumed-stress hybrid quadrilateral shell element with rotational or drilling degrees of freedom is formulated. The element formulation is based directly on a 4-node element. This direct formulation requires fewer computations than a similar element that is derived from an internal 8-node isoparametric element in which the midside degrees of freedom are eliminated in favor of rotational degree of freedom at the corner nodes. The formulation is based on the principle of minimum complementary energy. The membrane part of the element has 12 degrees of freedom including rotational degrees of freedom. The bending part of the element also has 12 degrees of freedom. The bending part of the quadratic variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement fields and linear variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane rotation fields are assumed along the edges of the element. The element Cartesian-coordinate system is chosen such as to make the stress field invariant with respect to node numbering. The membrane part of the stress field is based on a 9-parameter equilibrating stress field, while the bending part is based on a 13-parameter equilibrating stress field. The element passes the patch test, is nearly insensitive to mesh distortion, does not lock, possesses the desirable invariance properties, has no spurious modes, and produces accurate and reliable results.

  4. An assumed-stress hybrid 4-node shell element with drilling degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    An assumed-stress hybrid/mixed 4-node quadrilateral shell element is introduced that alleviates most of the deficiencies associated with such elements. The formulation of the element is based on the assumed-stress hybrid/mixed method using the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle. The membrane part of the element has 12 degrees of freedom including rotational or 'drilling' degrees of freedom at the nodes. The bending part of the element also has 12 degrees of freedom. The bending part of the element uses the Reissner-Mindlin plate theory which takes into account the transverse shear contributions. The element formulation is derived from an 8-node isoparametric element by expressing the midside displacement degrees of freedom in terms of displacement and rotational degrees of freedom at corner nodes. The element passes the patch test, is nearly insensitive to mesh distortion, does not 'lock', possesses the desirable invariance properties, has no hidden spurious modes, and for the majority of test cases used in this paper produces more accurate results than the other elements employed herein for comparison.

  5. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  6. A Six-Node Curved Triangular Element and a Four-Node Quadrilateral Element for Analysis of Laminated Composite Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. Wayne; Breiner, David M.; Gupta, Kajal K. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical development and some computed results are presented for Mindlin plate and shell elements, suitable for analysis of laminated composite and sandwich structures. These elements use the conventional 3 (plate) or 5 (shell) nodal degrees of freedom, have no communicable mechanisms, have no spurious shear energy (no shear locking), have no spurious membrane energy (no membrane locking) and do not require arbitrary reduction of out-of-plane shear moduli or under-integration. Artificial out-of-plane rotational stiffnesses are added at the element level to avoid convergence problems or singularity due to flat spots in shells. This report discusses a 6-node curved triangular element and a 4-node quadrilateral element. Findings show that in regular rectangular meshes, the Martin-Breiner 6-node triangular curved shell (MB6) is approximately equivalent to the conventional 8-node quadrilateral with integration. The 4-node quadrilateral (MB4) has very good accuracy for a 4-node element, and may be preferred in vibration analysis because of narrower bandwidth. The mathematical developments used in these elements, those discussed in the seven appendices, have been applied to elements with 3, 4, 6, and 10 nodes and can be applied to other nodal configurations.

  7. Molecular beam epitaxy of III-P{sub x}As{sub 1−x} solid solutions: Mechanism of composition formation in the sublattice of a group V element

    SciTech Connect

    Emelyanov, E. A. Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R.; Feklin, D. F.; Preobrazhensky, V. V.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of substrate temperature, As{sub 2} and P{sub 2} molecular flux densities, and growth rate on the composition of III-P{sub x}As{sub 1−x} solid solution layers prepared by molecular beam epitaxy is experimentally investigated. Experimental data in a wide range of growth conditions are analyzed. The results obtained are presented in the form of a kinetic model for describing the process of formation of the composition in the Group V sublattice of the III-P{sub x}As{sub 1−x} solid solution upon molecular beam epitaxy. The model can be used for choosing the growth conditions of the III-P{sub x}As{sub 1−x} (001) solid-solution layers of a specified composition.

  8. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  9. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  10. Solid electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed

    1993-06-15

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  11. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  12. FUEL ELEMENT CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-08-01

    Fuel elements having a solid core of fissionable material encased in a cladding material are described. A conversion material is provided within the cladding to react with the fission products to form stable, relatively non- volatile compounds thereby minimizing the migration of the fission products into the coolant. The conversion material is preferably a metallic fluoride, such as lead difluoride, and may be in the form of a coating on the fuel core or interior of the cladding, or dispersed within the fuel core. (AEC)

  13. Nonlinear explicit transient finite element analysis on the Intel Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J. ); Ramirez, M.R.; Gupta, S. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Many large scale finite element problems are intractable on current generation production supercomputers. High-performance computer architectures offer effective avenues to bridge the gap between computational needs and the power of computational hardware. The biggest challenge lies in the substitution of the key algorithms in an application program with redesigned algorithms which exploit the new architectures and use better or more appropriate numerical techniques. A methodology for implementing nonlinear finite element analysis on a homogeneous distributed processing network is discussed. The method can also be extended to heterogeneous networks comprised of different machine architectures provided that they have a mutual communication interface. This unique feature has greatly facilitated the port of the code to the 8-node Intel Touchstone Gamma and then the 512-node Intel Touchstone Delta. The domain is decomposed serially in a preprocessor. Separate input files are written for each subdomain. These files are read in by local copies of the program executable operating in parallel. Communication between processors is addressed utilizing asynchronous and synchronous message passing. The basic kernel of message passing is the internal force exchange which is analogous to the computed interactions between sections of physical bodies in static stress analysis. Benchmarks for the Intel Delta are presented. Performance exceeding 1 gigaflop was attained. Results for two large-scale finite element meshes are presented.

  14. Nonlinear explicit transient finite element analysis on the Intel Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J.; Ramirez, M.R.; Gupta, S.

    1993-03-01

    Many large scale finite element problems are intractable on current generation production supercomputers. High-performance computer architectures offer effective avenues to bridge the gap between computational needs and the power of computational hardware. The biggest challenge lies in the substitution of the key algorithms in an application program with redesigned algorithms which exploit the new architectures and use better or more appropriate numerical techniques. A methodology for implementing nonlinear finite element analysis on a homogeneous distributed processing network is discussed. The method can also be extended to heterogeneous networks comprised of different machine architectures provided that they have a mutual communication interface. This unique feature has greatly facilitated the port of the code to the 8-node Intel Touchstone Gamma and then the 512-node Intel Touchstone Delta. The domain is decomposed serially in a preprocessor. Separate input files are written for each subdomain. These files are read in by local copies of the program executable operating in parallel. Communication between processors is addressed utilizing asynchronous and synchronous message passing. The basic kernel of message passing is the internal force exchange which is analogous to the computed interactions between sections of physical bodies in static stress analysis. Benchmarks for the Intel Delta are presented. Performance exceeding 1 gigaflop was attained. Results for two large-scale finite element meshes are presented.

  15. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  16. An automated dynamic fracture procedure and a continuum damage mechanics based model for finite element simulations of delamination failure in laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminjikarai Vedagiri, Srinivasa Babu

    An active field of research that has developed due to the increasing use of computational techniques like finite element simulations for analysis of highly complex structural mechanics problems and the increasing use of composite laminates in varied industries such as aerospace, automotive, bio-medical, etc. is the development of numerical models to capture the behavior of composite materials. One of the big challenges not yet overcome convincingly in this field is the modeling of delamination failure which is one of the primary modes of damage in composite laminates. Hence, the primary aim of this work is to develop two numerical models for finite element simulations of delamination failure in composite laminates and implement them in the explicit finite element software DYNA3D/LS-DYNA. Dynamic fracture mechanics is an example of a complex structural analysis problem for which finite element simulations seem to be the only possible way to extract detailed information on sophisticated physical quantities of the crack-tip at any instant of time along a highly transient history of fracture. However, general purpose, commercial finite element software which have capabilities to do fracture analyses are still limited in their use to stationary cracks and crack propagation along trajectories known a priori. Therefore, an automated dynamic fracture procedure capable of simulating dynamic propagation of through-thickness cracks in arbitrary directions in linear, isotropic materials without user-intervention is first developed and implemented in DYNA3D for its default 8-node solid (brick) element. Dynamic energy release rate and stress intensity factors are computed in the model using integral expressions particularly well-suited for the finite element method. Energy approach is used to check for crack propagation and the maximum circumferential stress criterion is used to determine the direction of crack growth. Since the re-meshing strategy used to model crack growth

  17. Path-integral simulation of solids.

    PubMed

    Herrero, C P; Ramírez, R

    2014-06-11

    The path-integral formulation of the statistical mechanics of quantum many-body systems is described, with the purpose of introducing practical techniques for the simulation of solids. Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics methods for distinguishable quantum particles are presented, with particular attention to the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. Applications of these computational techniques to different types of solids are reviewed, including noble-gas solids (helium and heavier elements), group-IV materials (diamond and elemental semiconductors), and molecular solids (with emphasis on hydrogen and ice). Structural, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of these materials are discussed. Applications also include point defects in solids (structure and diffusion), as well as nuclear quantum effects in solid surfaces and adsorbates. Different phenomena are discussed, as solid-to-solid and orientational phase transitions, rates of quantum processes, classical-to-quantum crossover, and various finite-temperature anharmonic effects (thermal expansion, isotopic effects, electron-phonon interactions). Nuclear quantum effects are most remarkable in the presence of light atoms, so that especial emphasis is laid on solids containing hydrogen as a constituent element or as an impurity.

  18. Path-integral simulation of solids.

    PubMed

    Herrero, C P; Ramírez, R

    2014-06-11

    The path-integral formulation of the statistical mechanics of quantum many-body systems is described, with the purpose of introducing practical techniques for the simulation of solids. Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics methods for distinguishable quantum particles are presented, with particular attention to the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. Applications of these computational techniques to different types of solids are reviewed, including noble-gas solids (helium and heavier elements), group-IV materials (diamond and elemental semiconductors), and molecular solids (with emphasis on hydrogen and ice). Structural, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of these materials are discussed. Applications also include point defects in solids (structure and diffusion), as well as nuclear quantum effects in solid surfaces and adsorbates. Different phenomena are discussed, as solid-to-solid and orientational phase transitions, rates of quantum processes, classical-to-quantum crossover, and various finite-temperature anharmonic effects (thermal expansion, isotopic effects, electron-phonon interactions). Nuclear quantum effects are most remarkable in the presence of light atoms, so that especial emphasis is laid on solids containing hydrogen as a constituent element or as an impurity. PMID:24810944

  19. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  20. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  1. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  2. Rarefied solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, D. A.; Nikora, V. I.

    1994-01-01

    One important limit to creating low density materials is the objects' own weight. As a solid or colloidal matrix becomes more rarefied, gravity acts destructively to compress its suporting skeleton. We describe experimental results and propose a model which matches the low gravity behavior of rarefied or fractal solids. On parabolic airplane flights, we sought to demonstrate a key component of producing higher surface area fractals. Flight paths were selected to give a range of gravity levels: 0.01 g/g(sub 0) (low), 0.16 g(sub 0) (Lunar), 0.33 g/g(sub 0) (Martian), 1 g/g(sub 0) (Earth) and 1.8 g/g(sub 0) (high) (where g(sub 0) = 980 cm/sq s). Results using the model material of hydrophobic silica indicated that stable agglomeration of such tenuous objects can increase markedly in reduced gravity. Optical characterization revealed that fractal dimension changed directly with varying gravity. As measured by fractal dimension, effective surface area and roughness increased by 40% in low gravity. This finding supports the conclusion that relieving internal weight stresses on delicate aggregates can enhance their overall size (by two orders of magnitude) and internal surface area. We conclude that gravitational restructuring limits the overall size and void content of low-density solids. These sparse colloidal regimes may present new and technologically attractive physics, ranging from improved insulators, liquid-like tension in a 'solid' matrix, and characteristically low conductivities for sound and (8 to 14 micrometers wavelength) infrared radiation.

  3. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  4. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  5. JAC2D: A two-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.; Blanford, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    JAC2D is a two-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equations. The method is implemented in a two-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. A four-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic/plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  6. JAC3D -- A three-dimensional finite element computer program for the nonlinear quasi-static response of solids with the conjugate gradient method; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biffle, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    JAC3D is a three-dimensional finite element program designed to solve quasi-static nonlinear mechanics problems. A set of continuum equations describes the nonlinear mechanics involving large rotation and strain. A nonlinear conjugate gradient method is used to solve the equation. The method is implemented in a three-dimensional setting with various methods for accelerating convergence. Sliding interface logic is also implemented. An eight-node Lagrangian uniform strain element is used with hourglass stiffness to control the zero-energy modes. This report documents the elastic and isothermal elastic-plastic material model. Other material models, documented elsewhere, are also available. The program is vectorized for efficient performance on Cray computers. Sample problems described are the bending of a thin beam, the rotation of a unit cube, and the pressurization and thermal loading of a hollow sphere.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR AND FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.; Young, G.J.

    1958-03-01

    This patent relates to a reactor design of the type which employs solid fuel elements disposed in channels within the moderator through which channels and around the fuel elements is conveyed a coolant fiuid. The coolant channels are comprised of aluminum tubes extending through a solid moderator such as graphite and the fuel elements are comprised of an elongated solid body of natural uranium jacketed in an aluminum jacket with the ends thereof closed by aluminum caps of substantially greater thickness than the jacket was and in good thermal contact with the fuel material to facilitate the conduction of heat from the central portion of said ends to the coolant surrounding the fuel element to prevent overheating of said central portion.

  8. Analysis of biogenic carbonates by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Flow injection on-line solid-phase preconcentration for trace element determination in fish otoliths.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Z; Paulson, A J

    2002-04-01

    The aragonite deposits within the ear bones (otoliths) of teleost fish retain a chemical signal reflecting the life history of fish (similar to rings of trees) and the nature of fish habitats. Otoliths dissolved in acid solutions contain high concentrations of calcium and a variety of proteins. Elimination of matrix salts and organic interferences during preconcentration is essential for accurate determination of trace elements in otolith solutions by inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry. An iminodiacetate-based chelating resin (Toyopearl AF-Chelate 650 M) has been used for on-line preconcentration and matrix separation for the determination of 31 transition and rare elements. Successful preconcentration of the elements was achieved at pH 5 by on-line buffering, except Mn which required pH 8.8. Sample solutions were loaded on to the column for 1 min at 3.2 mL min(-1), and then eluted directly into the mass spectrometer with 4% v/v nitric acid. This procedure enabled up to 25-fold preconcentration with successful removal of the calcium matrix. The effect of heat-assisted oxidation with concentrated nitric acid was investigated to eliminate the organic matrix. It was found that heating to dryness after dissolution and further mineralization with the acid significantly improved the retention of the transition elements. The method was validated by analysis of a certified reference material produced from saggittal otoliths of emperor snapper ( Lutjanus sebae), and then applied to the determination of trace metal concentrations in juvenile bluefin tuna ( Thunnus thynnus) from the Western Pacific Ocean.

  9. Solid/FEM integration at SNLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Patrick F.

    1987-01-01

    The effort at Sandia National Labs. on the methodologies and techniques being used to generate strict hexahedral finite element meshes from a solid model is described. The functionality of the modeler is used to decompose the solid into a set of nonintersecting meshable finite element primitives. The description of the decomposition is exported, via a Boundary Representative format, to the meshing program which uses the information for complete finite element model specification. Particular features of the program are discussed in some detail along with future plans for development which includes automation of the decomposition using artificial intelligence techniques.

  10. Finite element dependence of stress evaluation for human trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Depalle, B; Chapurlat, R; Walter-Le-Berre, H; Bou-Saïd, B; Follet, H

    2013-02-01

    Numerical simulation using finite element models (FEM) has become more and more suitable to estimate the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. The size and kind of elements involved in the models, however, may influence the results. The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of hexahedral elements formulation on the evaluation of mechanical stress applied to trabeculae bone during a compression test simulation. Trabecular bone cores were extracted from 18 L2 vertebrae (12 women and 6 men, mean age: 76 ± 11, BV/TV=7.5 ± 1.9%). Samples were micro-CT scanned at 20 μm isotropic voxel size. Micro-CT images have been sub-sampled (20, 40 and 80 μm) to create 5.6 mm cubic FEM. For each sample, a compression test FEM has been created, using either 8-nodes linear hexahedral elements with full or reduced integration or 20-nodes quadratic hexahedral elements fully integrated, resulting in nine models per samples. Bone mechanical properties have been assumed isotropic, homogenous and to follow a linear elastic behavior law (Young modulus: 8 GPa, Poisson ratio: 0.3). Despite micro-architecture modifications (loss of connectivity, trabeculae thickening) due to voxel size increase, apparent mechanical properties calculated with low resolution models are significantly correlated with high resolution results, no matter the element formulation. However, stress distributions are more sensitive to both resolution and element formulation modifications. With linear elements, increasing voxel size leads to an alteration of stress concentration areas due to stiffening errors. On the opposite, the use of reduced integration induces severe smoothing and underestimation of stress fields resulting in stress raisers loss. Notwithstanding their high computational cost, quadratic elements are most appropriate for stress prediction in low resolution trabecular bone FEM. These observations are dependent on trabecular bone micro-architecture, and are more significant for low

  11. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  12. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  13. Synthesis and application of a new functionalized resin for use in an on-line, solid phase extraction system for the determination of trace elements in waters and reference cereal materials by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karadaş, Cennet; Turhan, Onur; Kara, Derya

    2013-11-15

    The synthesis and characterization of the resin Amberlite XAD-4 functionalized with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde and its application in an on-line system for the preconcentration of cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead and manganese prior to determination using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is proposed. Metal ions retained on the modified resin were eluted using 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution and aspirated directly to the nebulizer-burner system of a FAAS instrument using a flow injection system. Detection limits (3σ) were determined to be 0.13 μg L(-1) for Cd, 0.29 μg L(-1) for Cu, 0.23 μg L(-1) for Mn, 0.58 μg L(-1) for Co and 2.19 μg L(-1) for Pb using a 10 mL of water sample loading volume. The limits of detection would be 100 times higher with units of μg kg(-1) for the solid samples in which their dilution ratios as (volume/weight) were 100. Enrichment factors ranged from 23.6 to 28.9 (for Co and Mn, respectively). The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of the analytes in natural water samples and certified reference materials.

  14. Synthesis and application of a new functionalized resin for use in an on-line, solid phase extraction system for the determination of trace elements in waters and reference cereal materials by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karadaş, Cennet; Turhan, Onur; Kara, Derya

    2013-11-15

    The synthesis and characterization of the resin Amberlite XAD-4 functionalized with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehyde and its application in an on-line system for the preconcentration of cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead and manganese prior to determination using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is proposed. Metal ions retained on the modified resin were eluted using 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution and aspirated directly to the nebulizer-burner system of a FAAS instrument using a flow injection system. Detection limits (3σ) were determined to be 0.13 μg L(-1) for Cd, 0.29 μg L(-1) for Cu, 0.23 μg L(-1) for Mn, 0.58 μg L(-1) for Co and 2.19 μg L(-1) for Pb using a 10 mL of water sample loading volume. The limits of detection would be 100 times higher with units of μg kg(-1) for the solid samples in which their dilution ratios as (volume/weight) were 100. Enrichment factors ranged from 23.6 to 28.9 (for Co and Mn, respectively). The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of the analytes in natural water samples and certified reference materials. PMID:23790831

  15. Trace Elements in River Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardet, J.; Viers, J.; Dupré, B.

    2003-12-01

    Trace elements are characterized by concentrations lower than 1 mg L-1 in natural waters. This means that trace elements are not considered when "total dissolved solids" are calculated in rivers, lakes, or groundwaters, because their combined mass is not significant compared to the sum of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H4SiO4, HCO3-, CO32-, SO42-, Cl-, and NO3-. Therefore, most of the elements, except about ten of them, occur at trace levels in natural waters. Being trace elements in natural waters does not necessarily qualify them as trace elements in rocks. For example, aluminum, iron, and titanium are major elements in rocks, but they occur as trace elements in waters, due to their low mobility at the Earth's surface. Conversely, trace elements in rocks such as chlorine and carbon are major elements in waters.The geochemistry of trace elements in river waters, like that of groundwater and seawater, is receiving increasing attention. This growing interest is clearly triggered by the technical advances made in the determination of concentrations at lower levels in water. In particular, the development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has considerably improved our knowledge of trace-element levels in waters since the early 1990s. ICP-MS provides the capability of determining trace elements having isotopes of interest for geochemical dating or tracing, even where their dissolved concentrations are extremely low.The determination of trace elements in natural waters is motivated by a number of issues. Although rare, trace elements in natural systems can play a major role in hydrosystems. This is particularly evident for toxic elements such as aluminum, whose concentrations are related to the abundance of fish in rivers. Many trace elements have been exploited from natural accumulation sites and used over thousands of years by human activities. Trace elements are therefore highly sensitive indexes of human impact from local to global scale. Pollution

  16. Solid state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a solid state television camera using a new charge-coupled imaging device are reported. An RCA charge-coupled device arranged in a 512 by 320 format and directly compatible with EIA format standards was the sensor selected. This is a three-phase, sealed surface-channel array that has 163,840 sensor elements, which employs a vertical frame transfer system for image readout. Included are test results of the complete camera system, circuit description and changes to such circuits as a result of integration and test, maintenance and operation section, recommendations to improve the camera system, and a complete set of electrical and mechanical drawing sketches.

  17. Solid lubrication design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, B. B.; Yonushonis, T. M.; Bovenkerk, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A single element traction rig was used to measure the traction forces at the contact of a ball against a flat disc at room temperature under combined rolling and sliding. The load and speed conditions were selected to match those anticipated for bearing applications in adiabatic diesel engines. The test program showed that the magnitude of traction forces were almost the same for all the lubricants tested; a lubricant should, therefore, be selected on the basis of its ability to prevent wear of the contact surfaces. Traction vs. slide/roll ratio curves were similar to those for liquid lubricants but the traction forces were an order of magnitude higher. The test data was used to derive equations to predict traction force as a function of contact stress and rolling speed. Qualitative design guidelines for solid lubricated concentrated contacts are proposed.

  18. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  19. Generic element processor (application to nonlinear analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Gary

    1989-01-01

    The focus here is on one aspect of the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed: finite element technology. The approach involves a Generic Element Processor: a command-driven, database-oriented software shell that facilitates introduction of new elements into the testbed. This shell features an element-independent corotational capability that upgrades linear elements to geometrically nonlinear analysis, and corrects the rigid-body errors that plague many contemporary plate and shell elements. Specific elements that have been implemented in the Testbed via this mechanism include the Assumed Natural-Coordinate Strain (ANS) shell elements, developed with Professor K. C. Park (University of Colorado, Boulder), a new class of curved hybrid shell elements, developed by Dr. David Kang of LPARL (formerly a student of Professor T. Pian), other shell and solid hybrid elements developed by NASA personnel, and recently a repackaged version of the workhorse shell element used in the traditional STAGS nonlinear shell analysis code. The presentation covers: (1) user and developer interfaces to the generic element processor, (2) an explanation of the built-in corotational option, (3) a description of some of the shell-elements currently implemented, and (4) application to sample nonlinear shell postbuckling problems.

  20. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1999-03-30

    The elastic modulus E of wet granular material was found to be of the order of 0.25 MPa, this value does not compare well with the value predicted for a cubic array of spheres under Hertzian contact were the predicted values were in the order of 250 MPa . The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and requires accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained. New information was found to support the experimental finding and a first theory to explain the very small elastic modulus is presented. A new model based on the used of the finite element method is being developed.

  1. For nanowire growth, vapor-solid-solid (vapor-solid) mechanism is actually vapor-quasisolid-solid (vapor-quasiliquid-solid) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Noor Mohammad, S

    2009-12-14

    Vapor-phase mechanisms [e.g., vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid, oxide-assisted growth, and the self-catalytic growth mechanisms] for the unidirectional nanowire (NW) growth are not yet well understood. For this understanding, growths of GaN and InN NWs in our laboratory, without and with the assistance of foreign element catalytic agents (FECAs), such as Au and In, were performed. GaN NW growth, in the presence of FECA identical withNi, was possible at temperatures below the Ni/Ga eutectic temperature. InN NWs were grown, in the presence of Au, and at temperatures in the vicinity of Au/In eutectic temperature. They were found to have Au at the NW tip, NW base, and NW sidewalls. Extensive investigation of the fundamentals underlying these anomalies has been carried out. The temperature dependence of the VLS mechanism has also been elucidated. A large number of available elemental and compound semiconductor NWs exhibiting similar characteristics have been considered for the investigation. Based on this investigation, a chemicophysical mechanism called the vapor-quasisolid-solid (VQS) (or vapor-semisolid-solid, or vapor-quasiliquid-solid, or vapor-semiliquid-solid) mechanism has been proposed. The cause of temperature dependence of the VLS growth under different growth conditions and growth environments, and the possible relationship between the VLS and the VQS mechanisms has been presented. To better describe the vapor-phase mechanisms, including the VQS mechanism, a unified definition of droplets has been proposed. A series of experimental evidences has been set forth to substantiate the validity of the proposed mechanism, and to justify the definition of the unified droplet model. They together appear to explain the fundamental basis of the NW growth by various mechanisms, including the VQS mechanisms. They also provide solutions of many known problems, conflicts, confusions, and controversies involving NW growth.

  2. For nanowire growth, vapor-solid-solid (vapor-solid) mechanism is actually vapor-quasisolid-solid (vapor-quasiliquid-solid) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor Mohammad, S.

    2009-12-01

    Vapor-phase mechanisms [e.g., vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid, oxide-assisted growth, and the self-catalytic growth mechanisms] for the unidirectional nanowire (NW) growth are not yet well understood. For this understanding, growths of GaN and InN NWs in our laboratory, without and with the assistance of foreign element catalytic agents (FECAs), such as Au and In, were performed. GaN NW growth, in the presence of FECA≡Ni, was possible at temperatures below the Ni/Ga eutectic temperature. InN NWs were grown, in the presence of Au, and at temperatures in the vicinity of Au/In eutectic temperature. They were found to have Au at the NW tip, NW base, and NW sidewalls. Extensive investigation of the fundamentals underlying these anomalies has been carried out. The temperature dependence of the VLS mechanism has also been elucidated. A large number of available elemental and compound semiconductor NWs exhibiting similar characteristics have been considered for the investigation. Based on this investigation, a chemicophysical mechanism called the vapor-quasisolid-solid (VQS) (or vapor-semisolid-solid, or vapor-quasiliquid-solid, or vapor-semiliquid-solid) mechanism has been proposed. The cause of temperature dependence of the VLS growth under different growth conditions and growth environments, and the possible relationship between the VLS and the VQS mechanisms has been presented. To better describe the vapor-phase mechanisms, including the VQS mechanism, a unified definition of droplets has been proposed. A series of experimental evidences has been set forth to substantiate the validity of the proposed mechanism, and to justify the definition of the unified droplet model. They together appear to explain the fundamental basis of the NW growth by various mechanisms, including the VQS mechanisms. They also provide solutions of many known problems, conflicts, confusions, and controversies involving NW growth.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, Charles C.; Nelson, Paul A.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed therebetween, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material.

  4. SolidShperal

    2013-12-22

    SolidSpheral is an extension of the Spheral open source meshless hydrodynamics method. SolidSpheral adds the capability to model solid materials using analytic equations of state, and a simple damage model to allow for the modeled materials to undergo dynamic damage evolution. SolidSpheral is a distributed parallel code employing MPI for the parallel framework.

  5. Solids fluidizer-injector

    DOEpatents

    Bulicz, Tytus R.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and process for fluidizing solid particles by causing rotary motion of the solid particles in a fluidizing chamber by a plurality of rotating projections extending from a rotatable cylinder end wall interacting with a plurality of fixed projections extending from an opposite fixed end wall and passing the solid particles through a radial feed orifice open to the solids fluidizing chamber on one side and a solid particle utilization device on the other side. The apparatus and process are particularly suited for obtaining intermittent feeding with continual solids supply to the fluidizing chamber. The apparatus and process are suitable for injecting solid particles, such as coal, to an internal combustion engine.

  6. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  7. Close-cycle Solid Sorption Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C. Boelman, Elisa; Kashiwagi, Takao

    An overview is given of closed cycle solid sorption cooling applications for air-conditioning, refrigeration and cryogenics. The main applications are outlined, and the suitability of sorbent refrigerant pairs to temperature ranges is indicated. The use of cycles with heat recovery and with near-environmental temperature heat sources is discussed. Development efforts on cycles, coolers and elemental technologies are also outlined.

  8. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite-element analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Chermahini, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Fatigue cracks are a major problem in designing structures subjected to cyclic loading. Cracks frequently occur in structures such as aircraft and spacecraft. The inspection intervals of many aircraft structures are based on crack-propagation lives. Therefore, improved prediction of propagation lives under flight-load conditions (variable-amplitude loading) are needed to provide more realistic design criteria for these structures. The main thrust was to develop a three-dimensional, nonlinear, elastic-plastic, finite element program capable of extending a crack and changing boundary conditions for the model under consideration. The finite-element model is composed of 8-noded (linear-strain) isoparametric elements. In the analysis, the material is assumed to be elastic-perfectly plastic. The cycle stress-strain curve for the material is shown Zienkiewicz's initial-stress method, von Mises's yield criterion, and Drucker's normality condition under small-strain assumptions are used to account for plasticity. The three-dimensional analysis is capable of extending the crack and changing boundary conditions under cyclic loading.

  9. Condensed matter physics at surfaces and interfaces of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    This research program is focused on structural and elastic properties of crystalline solids and interfaces between solids. We are particularly interested in novel forms of structural ordering and the effects of this ordering on the lattice dynamical properties. We are currently studying structural and vibrational properties of the surfaces of the elemental alkaline earths (particularly Be), and structural phenomena in the doped fullerites.

  10. Solid fuel heating device

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J.S.; Eavenson, B.; Eavenson, G.; Bryson, T.A.

    1986-08-26

    A heating device is described which consists of: a forced air stove adapted to burn solid fuel; the stove being at least partially made of a double-wall construction forming an air space so that air may be forced along the hot portions of the stove; a metal box defining a partial parallel piped shaped enclosure, the front of the box being open for receiving the stove, with the front of the stove substantially filling the front open space of the box; the top of the box having a hole therein for venting smoke and gases from the stove; a layer of thermal insulation attached to and covering substantially the entire inside surface of the box; the stove being removably positioned within the box so as to leave a second air space at least between the thermal insulation on the respective side, top and rear walls of the box, and the outer side, top and rear walls of the stove, there being no substantial heat conducting connecting elements between the insulation and the walls of the stove.

  11. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  12. ISRO's solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagappa, R.; Kurup, M. R.; Muthunayagam, A. E.

    1989-08-01

    Solid rocket motors have been the mainstay of ISRO's sounding rockets and the first generation satellite launch vehicles. For the new launch vehicle under development also, the solid rocket motors contribute significantly to the vehicle's total propulsive power. The rocket motors in use and under development have been developed for a variety of applications and range in size from 30 mm dia employing 450 g of solid propellant—employed for providing a spin to the apogee motors—to the giant 2.8 m dia motor employing nearly 130 tonnes of solid propellant. The initial development, undertaken in 1967 was of small calibre motor of 75 mm dia using a double base charge. The development was essentially to understand the technological elements. Extruded aluminium tubes were used as a rocket motor casing. The fore and aft closures were machined from aluminium rods. The grain was a seven-pointed star with an enlargement of the port at the aft end and was charged into the chamber using a polyester resin system. The nozzle was a metallic heat sink type with graphite throat insert. The motor was ignited with a black powder charge and fired for 2.0 s. Subsequent to this, further developmental activities were undertaken using PVC plastisol based propellants. A class of sounding rockets ranging from 125 to 560 mm calibre were realized. These rocket motors employed improved designs and had delivered lsp ranging from 2060 to 2256 Ns/kg. Case bonding could not be adopted due to the higher cure temperatures of the plastisol propellants but improvements were made in the grain charging techniques and in the design of the igniters and the nozzle. Ablative nozzles based on asbestos phenolic and silica phenolic with graphite inserts were used. For the larger calibre rocket motors, the lsp could be improved by metallic additives. In the early 1970s designs were evolved for larger and more efficient motors. A series of 4 motors for the country's first satellite launch vehicle SLV-3 were

  13. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  14. ROTARY BULK SOLIDS DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer JR., Richard P.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  15. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  16. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1997-06-25

    Tetraphenylborate solids are a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene. This report discusses current testing of the stability of tetraphenylborate solids.

  17. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  18. Element by Element Abundances in Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, Guy; Serven, Jedidiah

    2006-02-01

    Element-by-element abundances will be derived from high quality long slit KPNO 4m spectra of nearby elliptical galaxies that span the range of velocity dispersion. Analysis of these spectra will give the abundances of 18 individual elements to bring to extragalactic astronomy the same luxurious situation now enjoyed only by stellar spectroscopists. These spectra will reveal the basic element ratio behavior as a function of galaxy velocity dispersion. For example, [Mg/Fe] is seen to be enhanced in large galaxies, but not small ones. We propose to expand our purview from 2 elements (Mg and Fe) to 18 elements. This, in turn, will tie directly to chemical evolution and chemical enrichment mechanisms. As a byproduct, we also decrease the stellar population age uncertainty by about a factor of ten from today's Balmer-metal index diagram techniques.

  19. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.; Edwards, T.B.

    1997-12-19

    Tetraphenylborate solids provide a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene.

  20. Thermal dryers for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, C.H.

    1993-12-01

    This article describes an indirect thermal dryer added to dewater solids before incineration of sewage sludge at a Buffalo, New York waste water treatment plant. In the first three months of operation, the solids inventory was reduced from about 799 tons to 250 tons. The solids processed in the plant's multiple hearth incinerators varied from 12 to 14 tons per hour.

  1. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  2. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  3. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  4. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  5. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program...

  6. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program...

  7. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program...

  8. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program...

  9. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program...

  10. Elements of Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobker, Lee R.

    A film is the successful combination of two distinct groups of elements: (1) the technical elements by which the film is made (camera, lighting, sound and editing) and (2) the esthetic elements that transform the craft into an art. This book attempts to combine the study of these elements by providing technical information about the process of…

  11. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Wang, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a literature review on methods used to analyze organic elements. Topic areas include methods for: (1) analyzing carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen; (2) analyzing oxygen, sulfur, and halogens; (3) analyzing other elements; (4) simultaneously determining several elements; and (5) determing trace elements. (JN)

  12. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  13. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-05-03

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system.

  14. Solid expellant plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H. (Inventor); Poe, Garrett D. (Inventor); Rood, Robert (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved solid expellant plasma generator has been developed. The plasma generator includes a support housing, an electrode rod located in the central portion of the housing, and a mass of solid expellant material that surrounds the electrode rod within the support housing. The electrode rod and the solid expellant material are made of separate materials that are selected so that the electrode and the solid expellant material decompose at the same rate when the plasma generator is ignited. This maintains a point of discharge of the plasma at the interface between the electrode and the solid expellant material.

  15. Superheavy element flerovium (element 114) is a volatile metal.

    PubMed

    Yakushev, Alexander; Gates, Jacklyn M; Türler, Andreas; Schädel, Matthias; Düllmann, Christoph E; Ackermann, Dieter; Andersson, Lise-Lotte; Block, Michael; Brüchle, Willy; Dvorak, Jan; Eberhardt, Klaus; Essel, Hans G; Even, Julia; Forsberg, Ulrika; Gorshkov, Alexander; Graeger, Reimar; Gregorich, Kenneth E; Hartmann, Willi; Herzberg, Rolf-Dietmar; Hessberger, Fritz P; Hild, Daniel; Hübner, Annett; Jäger, Egon; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kindler, Birgit; Kratz, Jens V; Krier, Jörg; Kurz, Nikolaus; Lommel, Bettina; Niewisch, Lorenz J; Nitsche, Heino; Omtvedt, Jon Petter; Parr, Edward; Qin, Zhi; Rudolph, Dirk; Runke, Jörg; Schausten, Brigitta; Schimpf, Erwin; Semchenkov, Andrey; Steiner, Jutta; Thörle-Pospiech, Petra; Uusitalo, Juha; Wegrzecki, Maciej; Wiehl, Norbert

    2014-02-01

    The electron shell structure of superheavy elements, i.e., elements with atomic number Z ≥ 104, is influenced by strong relativistic effects caused by the high Z. Early atomic calculations on element 112 (copernicium, Cn) and element 114 (flerovium, Fl) having closed and quasi-closed electron shell configurations of 6d(10)7s(2) and 6d(10)7s(2)7p1/2(2), respectively, predicted them to be noble-gas-like due to very strong relativistic effects on the 7s and 7p1/2 valence orbitals. Recent fully relativistic calculations studying Cn and Fl in different environments suggest them to be less reactive compared to their lighter homologues in the groups, but still exhibiting a metallic character. Experimental gas-solid chromatography studies on Cn have, indeed, revealed a metal-metal bond formation with Au. In contrast to this, for Fl, the formation of a weak bond upon physisorption on a Au surface was inferred from first experiments. Here, we report on a gas-solid chromatography study of the adsorption of Fl on a Au surface. Fl was produced in the nuclear fusion reaction (244)Pu((48)Ca, 3-4n)(288,289)Fl and was isolated in-flight from the primary (48)Ca beam in a physical recoil separator. The adsorption behavior of Fl, its nuclear α-decay product Cn, their lighter homologues in groups 14 and 12, i.e., Pb and Hg, and the noble gas Rn were studied simultaneously by isothermal gas chromatography and thermochromatography. Two Fl atoms were detected. They adsorbed on a Au surface at room temperature in the first, isothermal part, but not as readily as Pb and Hg. The observed adsorption behavior of Fl points to a higher inertness compared to its nearest homologue in the group, Pb. However, the measured lower limit for the adsorption enthalpy of Fl on a Au surface points to the formation of a metal-metal bond of Fl with Au. Fl is the least reactive element in the group, but still a metal. PMID:24456007

  16. Subdue solids in towers

    SciTech Connect

    Sloley, A.W.; Martin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Many distillation, absorption, and stripping columns operate with solids present in the system. The presence of solids may be either intentional or unintentional. But, in all cases, the solids must be handled or tolerated by the vapor/liquid mass-transfer equipment. Such solids should be dealt with by a combination of four methods. From most favorable to least favorable, these are: (1) keep the solids out; (2) keep the solids moving; (3) put the solids somewhere harmless; and (4) make it easier to clean the hardware. The key precept for all these approaches is the realization that solids present in a system just don't disappear. In this article, the authors review the techniques and design issues involved in making a vapor/liquid mass-transfer system operate with solids present. They assume that the solids cannot be kept out, eliminating the first choice. The type of mass-transfer service does not matter. The same principles apply equally well to distillation, adsorption, and stripping. They include equipment design criteria based on the methods outlined above, as well as detailed recommendations for each of the major equipment choices that can be made for mass-transfer devices. Then, they illustrate the approach via an example--a vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) unit having solids as an inherent part of its feed.

  17. Solids fluidizer-injector

    DOEpatents

    Bulicz, T.R.

    1990-04-17

    An apparatus and process are described for fluidizing solid particles by causing rotary motion of the solid particles in a fluidizing chamber by a plurality of rotating projections extending from a rotatable cylinder end wall interacting with a plurality of fixed projections extending from an opposite fixed end wall and passing the solid particles through a radial feed orifice open to the solids fluidizing chamber on one side and a solid particle utilization device on the other side. The apparatus and process are particularly suited for obtaining intermittent feeding with continual solids supply to the fluidizing chamber. The apparatus and process are suitable for injecting solid particles, such as coal, to an internal combustion engine. 3 figs.

  18. A New Axi-Symmetric Element for Thin Walled Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Yoon, Jeong Whan; Dick, Robert E.

    2010-06-01

    A new axi-symmetric finite element for sheet metal forming applications is presented in this work. It uses the solid-shell element's concept with only a single element layer and multiple integration points along the thickness direction. The cross section of the element is composed of four nodes with two degrees of freedom each. The proposed formulation overcomes major locking pathologies including transverse shear locking, Poisson's locking and volumetric locking. Some examples are shown to demonstrate the performance and accuracy of the proposed element with special focus on the numerical simulations for the beverage can industry.

  19. Superconductivity in the metallic elements at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    Although the highest superconducting critical temperature, Tc , found in an elemental solid at ambient pressure is 9.2 K (niobium), under the application of ultra-high pressures, several elements exhibit Tc values near or above 20 K. This review includes a survey of the occurrence and understanding of pressure-induced superconductivity in the subset of elements that are metallic at ambient pressure. A particular focus is directed towards those elements that display the highest superconducting critical temperatures or exhibit substantial increases in Tc with pressure. A separate article in this issue by Shimizu will cover pressure-induced superconductivity in elements that are insulating at ambient pressure.

  20. Strain energy release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtual crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finte-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  1. Strain-energy-release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; Obrien, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtural crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finite-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  2. Trace element partitioning between ionic crystal and liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Philpotts, J. A.; Yin, L.

    1978-01-01

    The partitioning of trace elements between ionic crystals and the melt has been correlated with lattice energy of the host. The solid-liquid partition coefficient has been expressed in terms of the difference in relative ionic radius of the trace element and the homogeneous and heterogeneous strain of the host lattice. Predictions based on this model appear to be in general agreement with data for alkali nitrates and for rare-earth elements in natural garnet phenocrysts.

  3. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  4. Synchrotron FTIR microscopy of Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers and polyelectrolyte multilayers at the solid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Beattie, David A; Beaussart, Audrey; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Harmer, Sarah L; Thierry, Benjamin; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark

    2012-01-24

    Synchrotron FTIR microscopy has been used to probe the structure of model boundary lubricant layers confined at the solid-solid interface. The combination of high brightness of the IR source and a novel contact geometry that uses a hemispherical internal reflection element as the means for light delivery has enabled the detection of <2.5 nm thin monolayer lubricant layers in the solid-solid contact, in addition to allowing for spectral acquisition from specific regions of the contact. Spectra of hydration water from within a confined polyelectrolyte multilayer film have also been acquired, highlighting the altered hydrogen bonding environment within the polymer layer. PMID:22225512

  5. Synchrotron FTIR microscopy of Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers and polyelectrolyte multilayers at the solid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Beattie, David A; Beaussart, Audrey; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Harmer, Sarah L; Thierry, Benjamin; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark

    2012-01-24

    Synchrotron FTIR microscopy has been used to probe the structure of model boundary lubricant layers confined at the solid-solid interface. The combination of high brightness of the IR source and a novel contact geometry that uses a hemispherical internal reflection element as the means for light delivery has enabled the detection of <2.5 nm thin monolayer lubricant layers in the solid-solid contact, in addition to allowing for spectral acquisition from specific regions of the contact. Spectra of hydration water from within a confined polyelectrolyte multilayer film have also been acquired, highlighting the altered hydrogen bonding environment within the polymer layer.

  6. Thermal dryer dewaters solids

    SciTech Connect

    DiMascio, F.J.; Burrowes, P.A.

    1993-09-01

    Solids incineration is traditionally an energy-intensive solids handling process at wastewater treatment plants. To reduce energy costs, the Buffalo (N.Y.) Sewer Authority has added an indirect thermal dryer to its treatment plant to dewater solids before incineration. In the first 3 months of operation, the authority reduced its solids inventory from 634,400 to 227,300 kg. Solids processed in the plant`s multiple-hearth incinerators varied from 11 to 12.75 wet Mg/hr at feed concentrations averaging 21% total solids. And, the dryer was operated with less than 5% downtime. The cost of this indirect thermal dryer system, including construction and equipment, was $995,000. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Solid propellant rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; Shafer, J. I.; Behm, J. W.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of a solid propellant rocket engine with a controlled rate of thrust buildup to a desired thrust level are discussed. The engine uses a regressive burning controlled flow solid propellant igniter and a progressive burning main solid propellant charge. The igniter is capable of operating in a vacuum and sustains the burning of the propellant below its normal combustion limit until the burning propellant surface and combustion chamber pressure have increased sufficiently to provide a stable chamber pressure.

  8. Element-ary Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamp, Homer W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historic development of the periodic table from the four-element theory to the Lavoisier's table. Presents a table listing the old and new names of chemicals and the Lavoisier's table of elements. Lists two references. (YP)

  9. Trace Elements and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettyjohn, Wayne A.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the effects of arsenic, lead, zinc, mercury, and cadmium on human health, indicates the sources of the elements in water, and considers the possibility of students in high schools analyzing water for trace amounts of the elements. (AL)

  10. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  11. Orthotropic hole element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, J. W.; Smith, C. V.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element was developed to adequately represent the state of stress in the region around a circular hole in orthotropic material experiencing reasonably general loading. This has been achieved through a complementary virtual work formulation of the stiffness and stress matrices for a square element with a center circular hole. The element has been incorporated into COSMIC/NASTRAN as a dummy element. Sample problems have been solved and these results are presented.

  12. Sample Results from MCU Solids Outage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Oji, L.; Coleman, C.; Poirier, M.

    2014-09-22

    additional details are provided below as recommendations. From this point on, IC-Anions analyses of the DSSHT should be part of the monthly routine analysis in order to spot negative trends in the oxalate leaving the MCU system. Care must be taken to monitor the oxalate content to watch for sudden precipitation of oxalate salts in the system; Conduct a study to optimize the cleaning strategy at ARP-MCU through decreasing the concentration or entirely eliminating the oxalic acid; The contents of the SSFT should remain unagitated. Routine visual observation should be maintained to ensure there is not a large buildup of solids. As water with agitation provided sufficient removal of the solids in the feed tank, it should be considered as a good means for dissolving oxalate solids if they are found in the future; Conduct a study to improve prediction of oxalate solubility in salt batch feed materials. As titanium and mercury have been found in various solids in this report, evaluate if either element plays a role in oxalate solubility during processing; Salt batch characterization focuses primarily on characterization and testing of unaltered Tank 21H material; however, non-typical feeds are developed through cleaning, washing, and/or sump transfers. As these solutions are processed through MCU, they may precipitate solids or reduce performance. Salt batch characterization and testing should be expanded to encompass a broader range of feeds that may be processed through ARPMCU.

  13. Elemental Chemical Puzzlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nicholas C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides nine short chemically based puzzles or problems extensible for use with students from middle school to college. Some of these will strengthen students' recognition of individual elements and element names. Others require students to focus on the salient properties of given chemical elements.

  14. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Gutterson, Milton

    1980-01-01

    Reviews general developments in computerization and data processing of organic elemental analyses; carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen analyzers; procedures for determining oxygen, sulfur, and halogens, as well as other nometallic elements and organometallics. Selected papers on trace analysis of nonmetals and determination of metallic elements are…

  15. Solid Waste: Health Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duel, Ward

    1975-01-01

    In this article the means of disposing solid wastes are discussed with reference to their health hazards and environmental desirability. Included in the discussion are solid waste dumps, landfills, incinerators, and grinders. Some attention is given to the reclamation of mineral resources from trash. (MA)

  16. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  17. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  18. Solid adenocarcinoma —

    Cancer.gov

    Uniformly solid character of the lesions is usually indicative of a well differentiated tumor. No solid adenocarcinomas have observed in our series. However, rare cases have been described by others. In human pathology this diagnosis is usually based on detection of mucin after periodic acid-Schiff reaction with diastase (α-amylase) digestion.

  19. Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

  20. Bi-Directional Evolutionary Topology Optimization Using Element Replaceable Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. H.; Zhang, W. H.; Qiu, K. P.

    2007-06-01

    In the present paper, design problems of maximizing the structural stiffness or natural frequency are considered subject to the material volume constraint. A new element replaceable method (ERPM) is proposed for evolutionary topology optimization of structures. Compared with existing versions of evolutionary structural optimization methods, contributions are twofold. On the one hand, a new automatic element deletion/growth procedure is established. The deletion of a finite element means that a solid element is replaced with an orthotropic cellular microstructure (OCM) element. The growth of an element means that an OCM element is replaced with a solid element of full materials. In fact, both operations are interchangeable depending upon how the value of element sensitivity is with respect to the objective function. The OCM design strategy is beneficial in preventing artificial modes for dynamic problems. Besides, the iteration validity is greatly improved with the introduction of a check position (CP) technique. On the other hand, a new checkerboard control algorithm is proposed to work together with the above procedure. After the identification of local checkerboards and detailed structures over the entire design domain, the algorithm will fill or delete elements depending upon the prescribed threshold of sensitivity values. Numerical results show that the ERPM is efficient and a clear and valuable material pattern can be achieved for both static and dynamic problems.

  1. Lubrication with solids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Brief discussion of the historical background, variety range, chemistry, physics, and other properties of solid lubricants, and review of their current uses. The widespread use of solid lubricants did not occur until about 1947. At present, they are the object of such interest that a special international conference on their subject was held in 1971. They are used at temperatures beyond the useful range of conventional lubricating oils and greases. Their low volatility provides them with the capability of functioning effectively in vacuum and invites their use in space applications. Their high load carrying ability makes them useful with heavily loaded components. Solid lubricants, however, do lack some of the desirable properties of conventional lubricants. Unlike oils and greases, which have fluidity and can continuously be carried back into contact with lubricated surfaces, solid lubricants, because of their immobility, have finite lives. Also, oils and greases can carry away frictional heat from contacting surfaces, while solid lubricants cannot.

  2. Chemistry of superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The number of chemical elements has increased considerably in the last few decades. Most excitingly, these heaviest, man-made elements at the far-end of the Periodic Table are located in the area of the long-awaited superheavy elements. While physical techniques currently play a leading role in these discoveries, the chemistry of superheavy elements is now beginning to be developed. Advanced and very sensitive techniques allow the chemical properties of these elusive elements to be probed. Often, less than ten short-lived atoms, chemically separated one-atom-at-a-time, provide crucial information on basic chemical properties. These results place the architecture of the far-end of the Periodic Table on the test bench and probe the increasingly strong relativistic effects that influence the chemical properties there. This review is focused mainly on the experimental work on superheavy element chemistry. It contains a short contribution on relativistic theory, and some important historical and nuclear aspects.

  3. Cohesive Elements for Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  4. The synthetic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    Prior to 1940, the heaviest element known was uranium, discovered in 1789. Since that time the elements 93 through 109 have been synthesized and identified and the elements 43, 61, 85, and 87 which were missing form the periodic tables of the 1930's have been discovered. The techniques and problems involved in these discoveries and the placement of the transuranium elements in the periodic table will be discussed. The production and positive identification of elements heavier than Md (Z=101), which have very short half-lives and can only be produced an atom-at-a-time, are very difficult and there have been controversies concerning their discovery. Some of the new methods which have been developed and used in these studies will be described. The prospects for production of still heavier elements will be considered.

  5. Solid lubrication design methodology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallini, R. A.; Wedeven, L. D.; Ragen, M. A.; Aggarwal, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    The high temperature performance of solid lubricated rolling elements was conducted with a specially designed traction (friction) test apparatus. Graphite lubricants containing three additives (silver, phosphate glass, and zinc orthophosphate) were evaluated from room temperature to 540 C. Two hard coats were also evaluated. The evaluation of these lubricants, using a burnishing method of application, shows a reasonable transfer of lubricant and wear protection for short duration testing except in the 200 C temperature range. The graphite lubricants containing silver and zinc orthophosphate additives were more effective than the phosphate glass material over the test conditions examined. Traction coefficients ranged from a low of 0.07 to a high of 0.6. By curve fitting the traction data, empirical equations for slope and maximum traction coefficient as a function of contact pressure (P), rolling speed (U), and temperature (T) can be developed for each lubricant. A solid lubricant traction model was incorporated into an advanced bearing analysis code (SHABERTH). For comparison purposes, preliminary heat generation calculations were made for both oil and solid lubricated bearing operation. A preliminary analysis indicated a significantly higher heat generation for a solid lubricated ball bearing in a deep groove configuration. An analysis of a cylindrical roller bearing configuration showed a potential for a low friction solid lubricated bearing.

  6. Solid propellant motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1960-09-13

    A novel composite neutronic reactor control element is offered. The element comprises a multiplicity of sections arranged in end-to-end relationship, each of the sections having a markedly different neutron-reactive characteristic. For example, a three-section control element could contain absorber, moderator, and fuel sections. By moving such an element longitudinally through a reactor core, reactivity is decreased by the absorber, increased slightly by the moderator, or increased substantially by the fuel. Thus, control over a wide reactivity range is provided.

  8. Practical Applications and Uses of Solid Lubricant Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stupp, B. C.

    1984-01-01

    Practical applications are illustrated with discussions covering the reasons for use of solid lubricants, required performance, lubricant selection, and results obtained for the various examples shown. The applications described cover a broad range of solid lubricants. Included are soft lamellar compounds, organic polymers, soft elemental metals, oxides and compounds for high temperature use. The illustrations selected cover a broad range of lubricant application techniques delineating the reasons for the different processing procedures which include bonded films, plasma spraying, sputtering, ion plating and electrodeposition.

  9. Solid and Gaseous Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Hyman; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review covers methods of sampling, analyzing, and testing coal, coke, and coal-derived solids and methods for the chemical, physical, and instrumental analyses of gaseous fuels. The review covers from October 1986, to September 1988. (MVL)

  10. The solid waste dilemma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, E.B.; Russell, J.A.; Hurdelbrink, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    In 1976, the U.S. Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to further address the problem of increasing industrial and municipal waste. The main objectives of RCRA were to responsibly manage hazardous and solid waste and to procure materials made from recovered wastes. To fulfill these objectives, four main programs of waste management were developed. These programs were defined under Subtitle C, the Hazardous Waste Program; Subtitle D, the Solid Waste Program; Subtitle I, the Underground Storage Tank Program; and Subtitle J, the Medical Waste Program. Subtitle D illustrates the solid waste dilemma occurring in the United States. Under this program, states are encouraged to develop and implement their own waste management plans. These plans include the promotion of recycling solid wastes and the closing and upgrading of all environmentally unsound dumps. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  11. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOEpatents

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  12. Solid adenoma —

    Cancer.gov

    Round to oval cells fill alveolar spaces. Fixation of the lung without inflation results in predominance of solid over alveolar pattern. Cells usually have abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with fine granularity and/or vacuoles.

  13. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  14. Solid Earth: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, R.

    1991-10-01

    The principles of the solid Earth program are introduced. When considering the study of solid Earth from space, satellites are used as beacons, inertial references, free fall probes and carrying platforms. The phenomenon measured by these satellites and the processes which can be studied as a result of these measurements are tabulated. The NASA solid Earth program focusses on research into surface kinematics, Earth rotation, land, ice, and ocean monitoring. The ESA solid Earth program identifies as its priority the Aristoteles mission for determining the gravity and magnetic field globally, with high spatial resolution and high accuracy. The Aristoteles mission characteristics and goals are listed. The benefits of the improved gravity information that will be provided by this mission are highlighted. This information will help in the following research: geodesy, orbit mechanics, geodynamics, oceanography, climate sea level, and the atmosphere.

  15. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  16. Solid Waste Treatment Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershaft, Alex

    1972-01-01

    Advances in research and commercial solid waste handling are offering many more processing choices. This survey discusses techniques of storage and removal, fragmentation and sorting, bulk reduction, conversion, reclamation, mining and mineral processing, and disposal. (BL)

  17. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, K.M.; Alamgir, M.; Choe, H.S.

    1995-12-12

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li{sup +}) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiAsF{sub 6}, and LiClO{sub 4}. 2 figs.

  18. Solid polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed; Choe, Hyoun S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of poly(vinyl sulfone) and lithium salts, and their use in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The lithium salts comprise low lattice energy lithium salts such as LiN(CF.sub.3 SO.sub.2).sub.2, LiAsF.sub.6, and LiClO.sub.4.

  19. Solid electrolyte cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A solid electrolyte cell including a body of solid ionized gas-conductive electrolyte having mutually spaced surfaces and on which is deposited a multiplicity of mutually spaced electrodes is described. Strips and of bare substances are interposed between electrodes, so that currents of ionic gas may be established between the electrodes via the bare strips, whereby electrical resistance for the cells is lowered and the gas conductivity is enhanced.

  20. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  1. Solid State Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.; Walker, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    What is TSW and USW? TSW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and non-rotating containment plates Independent heating, stirring and forging controls Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW. USW is a solid state weld process consisting of an induction coil heating source, a stir rod, and a non-rotating containment plate; Ultrasonic energy integrated into non-rotating containment plate and stir rod; Independent heating, stirring and forging controls; Decouples the heating, stirring and forging process elements of FSW.

  2. Summary compilation of shell element performance versus formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Heinstein, Martin Wilhelm; Hales, Jason Dean; Breivik, Nicole L.; Key, Samuel W.

    2011-07-01

    This document compares the finite element shell formulations in the Sierra Solid Mechanics code. These are finite elements either currently in the Sierra simulation codes Presto and Adagio, or expected to be added to them in time. The list of elements are divided into traditional two-dimensional, plane stress shell finite elements, and three-dimensional solid finite elements that contain either modifications or additional terms designed to represent the bending stiffness expected to be found in shell formulations. These particular finite elements are formulated for finite deformation and inelastic material response, and, as such, are not based on some of the elegant formulations that can be found in an elastic, infinitesimal finite element setting. Each shell element is subjected to a series of 12 verification and validation test problems. The underlying purpose of the tests here is to identify the quality of both the spatially discrete finite element gradient operator and the spatially discrete finite element divergence operator. If the derivation of the finite element is proper, the discrete divergence operator is the transpose of the discrete gradient operator. An overall summary is provided from which one can rank, at least in an average sense, how well the individual formulations can be expected to perform in applications encountered year in and year out. A letter grade has been assigned albeit sometimes subjectively for each shell element and each test problem result. The number of A's, B's, C's, et cetera assigned have been totaled, and a grade point average (GPA) has been computed, based on a 4.0-system. These grades, combined with a comparison between the test problems and the application problem, can be used to guide an analyst to select the element with the best shell formulation.

  3. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  4. Lyophilization -Solid Waste Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litwiller, Eric; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Reinhard, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a solid waste treatment system that has been designed for a Mars transit exploration mission. The technology described is an energy-efficient lyophilization technique that is designed to recover water from spacecraft solid wastes. Candidate wastes include feces, concentrated brines from water processors, and other solid wastes that contain free water. The system is designed to operate as a stand-alone process or to be integrated into the International Space Station Waste Collection System. In the lyophilization process, water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, separating the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. The sublimed water is then condensed in a solid ice phase and then melted to generate a liquid product. In the subject system the waste solids are contained within a 0.2 micron bio-guard bag and after drying are removed from the system and stored in a secondary container. This technology is ideally suited to applications such as the Mars Reference Mission, where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO2 is not. The system is designed to minimize power consumption through the use of thermoelectric heat pumps. The results of preliminary testing of a prototype system and testing of the final configuration are provided. A mathematical model of the system is also described.

  5. Keep solids in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Gladki, H.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Mixing is an important operation in the CPI. It is not synonymous with agitation. Mixing is a random distribution into and through one another of two or more initially separate phases. Within that broad definition is the important specialty area of liquid-solid dispersion. This paper addresses the dispersion of solids in lower concentrations that don`t affect the rheological properties of the fluid. The just suspended condition represents the lowest grade of complete suspension, but this level of agitation is the most efficient for solids-liquid agitation. Higher mixing speeds waste energy. Undersized mixers need replacing. The top-entering mixer has a long history in the CPI and the environmental area. Many suspension studies were run with this type. These papers result in empirical correlations for just suspension conditions to scale up from laboratory measurement. Variables considered are the agitation speed, liquid and solids physical properties, solids concentration, system geometry and impeller type. Lately, submersible mixers are becoming more popular, but there are no published sizing methods. This article will explain how to define the critical hydraulic conditions in the tank to reach just solids suspension for a submersible agitator of the type described here as FJFA (Free Jet Flow Agitator).

  6. Elemental Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan

    2005-01-01

    One of the first tasks students learn in chemistry is to pronounce and spell the names of elements and learn their corresponding chemical symbols. Repetitive oral recitation is commonly used to learn this information, but games and puzzles can make this task creative, variable, and fun. Elemental Food for Thought is a puzzlelike activity that…

  7. MOLDED SEALING ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bradford, B.W.; Skinner, W.J.

    1959-03-24

    Molded sealing elements suitable for use under conditions involving exposure to uranium hexafluoride vapor are described. Such sealing elements are made by subjecting graphitic carbons to a preliminary treatment with uranium hexafluoride vapor, and then incorporating polytetrafluorethylene in them. The resulting composition has good wear resistant and frictional properties and is resistant to disintegration by uranium hexafluoride over long periods of exposure.

  8. The Elements Drawing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dkeidek, Iyad M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an educational game designed for first- or second-year high school students who have already studied themes related to the periodic table elements, such as their symbols, electronic configurations, properties, and uses. The game is designed to help students learn the symbols of the elements and their properties or uses in a fun, engaging…

  9. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  10. Movies and Literary Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rodney D.

    Showing ten-minute movie clips can be an effective way to motivate students to read literature and to teach elements of fiction, namely plot, character, setting, symbol, irony, and theme. A clip from "And Then There Were None" may be used to teach various elements of plot, including conflict and the four types of conflict (man vs. man, man vs.…

  11. Proceedings of transuranium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The identification of the first synthetic elements was established by chemical evidence. Conclusive proof of the synthesis of the first artificial element, technetium, was published in 1937 by Perrier and Segre. An essential aspect of their achievement was the prediction of the chemical properties of element 43, which had been missing from the periodic table and which was expected to have properties similar to those of manganese and rhenium. The discovery of other artificial elements, astatine and francium, was facilitated in 1939-1940 by the prediction of their chemical properties. A little more than 50 years ago, in the spring of 1940, Edwin McMillan and Philip Abelson synthesized element 93, neptunium, and confirmed its uniqueness by chemical means. On August 30, 1940, Glenn Seaborg, Arthur Wahl, and the late Joseph Kennedy began their neutron irradiations of uranium nitrate hexahydrate. A few months later they synthesized element 94, later named plutonium, by observing the alpha particles emitted from uranium oxide targets that had been bombarded with deuterons. Shortly thereafter they proved that is was the second transuranium element by establishing its unique oxidation-reduction behavior. The symposium honored the scientists and engineers whose vision and dedication led to the discovery of the transuranium elements and to the understanding of the influence of 5f electrons on their electronic structure and bonding. This volume represents a record of papers presented at the symposium.

  12. Trace element emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  13. Monolithic freeform element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiontke, Sven R.

    2015-09-01

    For 10 years there has been the asphere as one of the new products to be accepted by the market. All parts of the chain design, production and measurement needed to learn how to treat the asphere and what it is helpful for. The aspheric optical element now is established and accepted as an equal optical element between other as a fast growing part of all the optical elements. Now we are focusing onto the next new element with a lot of potential, the optical freeform surface. Manufacturing results will be shown for fully tolerance optic including manufacturing, setup and optics configurations including measurement setup. The element itself is a monolith consisting of several optical surfaces that have to be aligned properly to each other. The freeform surface is measured for surface form tolerance (irregularity, slope, Zernike, PV).

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  15. Active element pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1994-08-01

    This review article will discuss the use of the active element pattern for prediction of the scan performance of large phased array antennas. The introduction and application of the concept of the active element pattern goes back at least 30 years (1) -(6) , but the subject is generally not covered in modern antenna engineering textbooks or handbooks, and many contemporary workers are unfamiliar with this simple but powerful idea. In addition, early references on this subject do not provide a rigorous discussion or derivation of the active element pattern, relying instead on a more qualitative interpretation. The purpose of this communication is to make the technique of active element patterns more accessible to antenna engineers, and to provide a new derivation of the basic active element pattern relations in terms of scattering parameters.

  16. Lanthanide Series And Transition Metal Solid-State Lasers Meeting New Objectives With Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1986-06-01

    Ater the initial introduction of the first solid-state laser, there was a flurry of research directed toward the discovery of new lasers. Activity during this period of time produced the Cr:Al2O3 laser and the Nd:YAG laser. For a relatively long time after this, research directed toward the discovery of new solid-state lasers appeared to subside. Over the past several years, this trend seemed to reverse itself. Cr:BeAl2O4 was one of the first of the new lasers to be introduced. Rather than concentrate either on this laser or on Nd-based lasers, this talk will be directed toward other new solid-state lasers. New lasers, or rediscovery of old lasers, has concentrated on two groups of elements, the lanthanide series elements and the transition metal elements. A substantial difference exists between the solid-state lasers depending on the group of elements of which the active atom is a member. Differences and similarities will be highlighted as the methods used in solid-state laser engineering to meet new objectives are explored.

  17. Predicting mouse vertebra strength with micro-computed tomography-derived finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Makowski, Alexander J; Rowland, Barbara J; Merkel, Alyssa R; Sterling, Julie A; Bredbenner, Todd L; Perrien, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    As in clinical studies, finite element analysis (FEA) developed from computed tomography (CT) images of bones are useful in pre-clinical rodent studies assessing treatment effects on vertebral body (VB) strength. Since strength predictions from microCT-derived FEAs (μFEA) have not been validated against experimental measurements of mouse VB strength, a parametric analysis exploring material and failure definitions was performed to determine whether elastic μFEAs with linear failure criteria could reasonably assess VB strength in two studies, treatment and genetic, with differences in bone volume fraction between the control and the experimental groups. VBs were scanned with a 12-μm voxel size, and voxels were directly converted to 8-node, hexahedral elements. The coefficient of determination or R2 between predicted VB strength and experimental VB strength, as determined from compression tests, was 62.3% for the treatment study and 85.3% for the genetic study when using a homogenous tissue modulus (Et) of 18 GPa for all elements, a failure volume of 2%, and an equivalent failure strain of 0.007. The difference between prediction and measurement (that is, error) increased when lowering the failure volume to 0.1% or increasing it to 4%. Using inhomogeneous tissue density-specific moduli improved the R2 between predicted and experimental strength when compared with uniform Et=18 GPa. Also, the optimum failure volume is higher for the inhomogeneous than for the homogeneous material definition. Regardless of model assumptions, μFEA can assess differences in murine VB strength between experimental groups when the expected difference in strength is at least 20%. PMID:25908967

  18. Predicting mouse vertebra strength with micro-computed tomography-derived finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Makowski, Alexander J; Rowland, Barbara J; Merkel, Alyssa R; Sterling, Julie A; Bredbenner, Todd L; Perrien, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    As in clinical studies, finite element analysis (FEA) developed from computed tomography (CT) images of bones are useful in pre-clinical rodent studies assessing treatment effects on vertebral body (VB) strength. Since strength predictions from microCT-derived FEAs (μFEA) have not been validated against experimental measurements of mouse VB strength, a parametric analysis exploring material and failure definitions was performed to determine whether elastic μFEAs with linear failure criteria could reasonably assess VB strength in two studies, treatment and genetic, with differences in bone volume fraction between the control and the experimental groups. VBs were scanned with a 12-μm voxel size, and voxels were directly converted to 8-node, hexahedral elements. The coefficient of determination or R (2) between predicted VB strength and experimental VB strength, as determined from compression tests, was 62.3% for the treatment study and 85.3% for the genetic study when using a homogenous tissue modulus (E t) of 18 GPa for all elements, a failure volume of 2%, and an equivalent failure strain of 0.007. The difference between prediction and measurement (that is, error) increased when lowering the failure volume to 0.1% or increasing it to 4%. Using inhomogeneous tissue density-specific moduli improved the R (2) between predicted and experimental strength when compared with uniform E t=18 GPa. Also, the optimum failure volume is higher for the inhomogeneous than for the homogeneous material definition. Regardless of model assumptions, μFEA can assess differences in murine VB strength between experimental groups when the expected difference in strength is at least 20%.

  19. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Kingston, W.E.; Kopelman, B.; Hausner, H.H.

    1963-07-01

    A fuel element consisting of uranium nitride and uranium carbide in the form of discrete particles in a solid coherent matrix of a metal such as steel, beryllium, uranium, or zirconium and clad with a metal such as steel, aluminum, zirconium, or beryllium is described. The element is made by mixing powdered uranium nitride and uranium carbide with powdered matrix metal, then compacting and sintering the mixture. (AEC)

  20. HEAT2. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Finite Element Code

    SciTech Connect

    Charman, C.

    1993-08-01

    HEAT2 is a finite element program for the transient and steady-state, thermal analysis of two-dimensional solids. Calculates detailed temperature distributions in MHTGR prismatic fuel elements side reflector and core support blocks. Non-linear effects of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions, and heat source generation and material properties are included with user supplied subroutines NPBC, QAREA, SOURCE, and MPROP.

  1. The heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-05-02

    How long does an atom need to exist before it's possible to do any meaningful chemistry on it Is it possible to learn anything at all about the reactions of an element for which no more than a few dozen atoms have ever existed simultaneously These are some of the questions colleagues in a few laboratories worldwide attempt to answer as they investigate the chemistry of the heaviest elements--elements produced one atom at a time in accelerators by bombarding radioactive targets with high-intensity beams of heavy ions. All of these elements spontaneously decay; the most stable of them have half-lives of only a few minutes, some that are less stable exist for only milliseconds. So far, no chemical studies have been performed on elements whose longest lived isotopes last only milliseconds because the difficulties of doing chemistry on this time scale under highly radioactive conditions are enormous. Over the past 10 years, however, nuclear chemists have developed new techniques or adapted existing ones to begin to probe the chemical properties of those very heavy elements that have half-lives in the range of seconds to minutes. Although the classic experiments are now nearly 40 years old, they are worth describing, as they were the first of their kind and illustrate many of the techniques that are still used and essential in studying these very short-lived, radioactive elements.

  2. Effect of solid distribution on elastic properties of open-cell cellular solids using numerical and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2014-09-01

    Effect of solid distribution between edges and vertices of three-dimensional cellular solid with an open-cell structure was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Finite element analysis (FEA) with continuum elements and appropriate periodic boundary condition was employed to calculate the elastic properties of cellular solids using tetrakaidecahedral (Kelvin) unit cell. Relative densities between 0.01 and 0.1 and various values of solid fractions were considered. In order to validate the numerical model, three scaffolds with the relative density of 0.08, but different amounts of solid in vertices, were fabricated via 3-D printing technique. Good agreement was observed between numerical simulation and experimental results. Results of numerical simulation showed that, at low relative densities (<0.03), Young׳s modulus increased by shifting materials away from edges to vertices at first and then decreased after reaching a critical point. However, for the high values of relative density, Young׳s modulus increased monotonically. Mechanisms of such a behavior were discussed in detail. Results also indicated that Poisson׳s ratio decreased by increasing relative density and solid fraction in vertices. By fitting a curve to the data obtained from the numerical simulation and considering the relative density and solid fraction in vertices, empirical relations were derived for Young׳s modulus and Poisson׳s ratio. PMID:24956160

  3. Injector element characterization methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Characterization of liquid rocket engine injector elements is an important part of the development process for rocket engine combustion devices. Modern nonintrusive instrumentation for flow velocity and spray droplet size measurement, and automated, computer-controlled test facilities allow rapid, low-cost evaluation of injector element performance and behavior. Application of these methods in rocket engine development, paralleling their use in gas turbine engine development, will reduce rocket engine development cost and risk. The Alternate Turbopump (ATP) Hot Gas Systems (HGS) preburner injector elements were characterized using such methods, and the methodology and some of the results obtained will be shown.

  4. Elements of discovery.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2008-01-01

    I understand discovery as the essence of thinking man, or to paraphrase the notable French philosopher René Descartes, "I think, therefore I discover." In this study, I introduce discovery as the foundation of modern science. Discovery consists of six stages or elements, including: concept, belief, ability, support, proof, and protection. Each element is discussed within the context of the whole discovery enterprise. Fundamental tenets for understanding discovery are given throughout the paper, and a few examples illustrate the significance of some of the most important elements. I invite clinicians, researchers, and/or clinical researchers to integrate themselves into the active process of discovery. Remember--I think, therefore I discover.

  5. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  6. Discovery of element 112

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.

    1996-12-31

    The new elements 110, 111, and 112 were synthesized and unambiguously identified in experiments at SHIP. Due to strong shell effects the dominant decay mode is not fission, but emission of alpha particles. Theoretical investigations predict that maximum shell effects should exist in nuclei near proton number 114 and neutron number 184. Measurements give hope that isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical Superheavy Elements could be produced by fusion reactions using {sup 118}Pb as target. systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that transfer of nucleons is the important process to initiate the fusion.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Shackleford, M.H.

    1958-12-16

    A fuel element possessing good stability and heat conducting properties is described. The fuel element comprises an outer tube formed of material selected from the group consisting of stainhess steel, V, Ti. Mo. or Zr, a fuel tube concentrically fitting within the outer tube and containing an oxide of an isotope selected from the group consisting of U/sup 235/, U/sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/, and a hollow, porous core concentrically fitting within the fuel tube and formed of an oxide of an element selected from the group consisting of Mg, Be, and Zr.

  8. Dual-element needle transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Williams, Jay A.; Yoon, Changhan; Kang, Bong Jin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Shung, K. Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A dual-element needle transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. A low-frequency element and a high-frequency element were integrated into one device to obtain images which conveyed both low- and high-frequency information from a single scan. The low-frequency element with a center frequency of 48 MHz was fabricated from the single crystal form of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate solid solution with two matching layers (MLs) and the high frequency element with a center frequency of 152 MHz was fabricated from lithium niobate with one ML. The measured axial and lateral resolutions were 27 and 122  μm, respectively, for the low-frequency element, and 14 and 40  μm, respectively, for the high-frequency element. The performance of the dual-element needle transducer was validated by imaging a tissue-mimicking phantom with lesion-mimicking area, and ex vivo rabbit aortas in water and rabbit whole blood. The results suggest that a low-frequency element effectively provides depth resolved images of the whole vessel and its adjacent tissue, and a high-frequency element visualizes detailed structure near the surface of the lumen wall in the presence of blood within the lumen. The advantages of a dual-element approach for intravascular imaging are also discussed. PMID:26158118

  9. Anisotropy in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Ricciardone, Angelo; Peloso, Marco E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-08-01

    In the model of solid / elastic inflation, inflation is driven by a source that has the field theoretical description of a solid. To allow for prolonged slow roll inflation, the solid needs to be extremely insensitive to the spatial expansion. We point out that, because of this property, the solid is also rather inefficient in erasing anisotropic deformations of the geometry. This allows for a prolonged inflationary anisotropic solution, providing the first example with standard gravity and scalar fields only which evades the conditions of the so called cosmic no-hair conjecture. We compute the curvature perturbations on the anisotropic solution, and the corresponding phenomenological bound on the anisotropy. Finally, we discuss the analogy between this model and the f(φ)F{sup 2} model, which also allows for anisotropic inflation thanks to a suitable coupling between the inflaton φ and a vector field. We remark that the bispectrum of the curvature perturbations in solid inflation is enhanced in the squeezed limit and presents a nontrivial angular dependence, as had previously been found for the f(φ)F{sup 2} model.

  10. Defects in flexoelectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sheng; Purohit, Prashant K.

    2015-11-01

    A solid is said to be flexoelectric when it polarizes in proportion to strain gradients. Since strain gradients are large near defects, we expect the flexoelectric effect to be prominent there and decay away at distances much larger than a flexoelectric length scale. Here, we quantify this expectation by computing displacement, stress and polarization fields near defects in flexoelectric solids. For point defects we recover some well known results from strain gradient elasticity and non-local piezoelectric theories, but with different length scales in the final expressions. For edge dislocations we show that the electric potential is a maximum in the vicinity of the dislocation core. We also estimate the polarized line charge density of an edge dislocation in an isotropic flexoelectric solid which is in agreement with some measurements in ice. We perform an asymptotic analysis of the crack tip fields in flexoelectric solids and show that our results share some features from solutions in strain gradient elasticity and piezoelectricity. We also compute the energy release rate for cracks using simple crack face boundary conditions and use them in classical criteria for crack growth to make predictions. Our analysis can serve as a starting point for more sophisticated analytic and computational treatments of defects in flexoelectric solids which are gaining increasing prominence in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  11. Multi-Element Airfoil System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); McKenney, Martin J. (Inventor); Atherley, Raymond D. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-element airfoil system includes an airfoil element having a leading edge region and a skin element coupled to the airfoil element. A slat deployment system is coupled to the slat and the skin element, and is capable of deploying and retracting the slat and the skin element. The skin element substantially fills the lateral gap formed between the slat and the airfoil element when the slat is deployed. The system further includes an uncoupling device and a sensor to remove the skin element from the gap based on a critical angle-of-attack of the airfoil element. The system can alternatively comprise a trailing edge flap, where a skin element substantially fills the lateral gap between the flap and the trailing edge region of the airfoil element. In each case, the skin element fills a gap between the airfoil element and the deployed flap or slat to reduce airframe noise.

  12. Rock in Its Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCluskey, Thomas

    1969-01-01

    A discussion of the following musical elements of rock: rhythm, melody, harmony, and form. A impromptu analysis made at a session of the Youth Music Symposium, July 25, 1969. Remarks transcribed from tape. (Author/AP)

  13. Solid state cell with anolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, L. H.; Liang, C. C.

    1985-06-25

    A solid state cell having a solid cathode, a solid electrolyte, and a solid anolyte comprised of at least 50% by volume of ionically conductive materials such as the electrolye and 50% or less by volume of an active metal. The anolyte is either the cell anode or alternatively the anolyte is an additional structural member within said cell positioned between an anode, comprised of the same active metal, and the solid electrolyte.

  14. Impact of solids on composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronson, Arturo; Maldonado, Jerry; Chern, Tzong; Martinez, Francisco; Mccord-Medrano, Johnnie; Roschke, Paul N.

    1987-01-01

    The failure modes of composite materials as a result of low velocity impact were investigated by simulating the impact with a finite element analysis. An important facet of the project is the modeling of the impact of a solid onto cylindrical shells composed of composite materials. The model under development will simulate the delamination sustained when a composite material encounters impact from another rigid body. The computer equipment was installed, the computer network tested, and a finite element method model was developed to compare results with known experimental data. The model simulated the impact of a steel rod onto a rotating shaft. Pre-processing programs (GMESH and TANVEL) were developed to generate node and element data for the input into the three dimensional, dynamic finite element analysis code (DYNA3D). The finite element mesh was configured with a fine mesh near the impact zone and a coarser mesh for the impacting rod and the regions surrounding the impacting zone. For the computer simulation, five impacting loads were used to determine the time history of the stresses, the scribed surface areas, and the amount of ridging. The processing time of the computer codes amounted from 1 to 4 days. The calculated surface area were within 6-12 percent, relative error when compated to the actual scratch area.

  15. COMPOSITE FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Hurford, W.J.; Gordon, R.B.; Johnson, W.A.

    1962-12-25

    A sandwich-type fuel element for a reactor is described. This fuel element has the shape of an elongated flat plate and includes a filler plate having a plurality of compartments therein in which the fuel material is located. The filler plate is clad on both sides with a thin cladding material which is secured to the filler plate only to completely enclose the fuel material in each compartment. (AEC)

  16. JACKETED FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Szilard, L.; Creutz, E.C.

    1959-02-01

    These fuel elements are comprised of a homogeneous metallic uranium body completely enclosed and sealed in an aluminum cover. The uranium body and aluminum cover are bonded together by a layer of zinc located between them. The bonding layer serves to improve transfer of heat, provides an additional protection against corrosion of the uranium by the coolant, and also localizes any possible corrosion by preventing travel of corrosive material along the surface of the fuel element.

  17. Drainage fracture networks in elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafver, Andreas; Kobchenko, Maya; Jettestuen, Espen; Renard, Francois; Galland, Olivier; Mathhiesen, Joachim; Meakin, Paul; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2013-04-01

    Several geological processes generate large fluid pressures pervasively inside the solid and the fluid is drained out of the solid volume and transported towards the surface by buoyancy. Important examples of this includes dehydrating subducting slabs, hydrocarbon producing kerogen rich shales and partially molten magmas. Such internal production and exsolution of fluids may induce mechanical failure of the solid rock. The resulting fractures provide drainage pathways for the fluid releasing the large fluid pressures. We have performed analogue 2D experiments with uniform gas production in gelatine. We observe fracture patterns that are topologically intermediate between the tree-like structure of river networks and the hierarchical patterns observed in other transport controlled fracture processes, exemplified by cracks in drying mud, hexagonal columnar joints formed in cooling basalts or sequential splitting of igneous rock due to weathering. We propose a simple two-parmeter statistical model that captures the essential features of the gelatine experiments and that is able to produce fracture networks ranging in topology from tree-like to hierarchical. The model is explored and compared with the experiments to gain insight into this class of drainage fracture processes. We also present a discrete element model which is used to investigate the effect of fluid-solid coupling on fracture network topology and fluid expulsion.

  18. Spectral Element Agglomerate AMGe

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, T; Falgout, R; Henson, V E; Jones, J E; Vassilevski, P S; Manteuffel, T A; McCormick, S F; Ruge, J W

    2005-05-20

    The purpose of this note is to describe an algorithm resulting from the uniting of two ideas introduced and applied elsewhere. For many problems, AMG has always been difficult due to complexities whose natures are difficult to discern from the entries of matrix A alone. Element-based interpolation has been shown to be an effective method for some of these problems, but it requires access to the element matrices on all levels. One way to obtain these has been to perform element agglomeration to form coarse elements, but in complicated situations defining the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is not easy. The spectral approach to coarse dof selection is very attractive due to its elegance and simplicity. The algorithm presented here combines the robustness of element interpolation, the ease of coarsening by element agglomeration, and the simplicity of defining coarse dofs through the spectral approach. As demonstrated in the numerical results, the method does yield a reasonable solver for the problems described. It can, however, be an expensive method due to the number and cost of the local, small dense linear algebra problems; making it a generally competitive method remains an area for further research.

  19. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1999-07-01

    The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and requires accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained.

  20. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1998-03-30

    The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and may require accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained.

  1. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  2. Solid handling valve

    DOEpatents

    Williams, William R.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a solids handling valve for use in combination with lock hoppers utilized for conveying pulverized coal to a coal gasifier. The valve comprises a fluid-actuated flow control piston disposed within a housing and provided with a tapered primary seal having a recessed seat on the housing and a radially expandable fluid-actuated secondary seal. The valve seals are highly resistive to corrosion, erosion and abrasion by the solids, liquids, and gases associated with the gasification process so as to minimize valve failure.

  3. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution.

  4. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  5. Local Solid Shape.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-10-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches-essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures-of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  6. NOVEL OXIDANT FOR ELEMENTAL MERCURY CONTROL FROM FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study is to develop and test advanced noncarbonaceous solid sorbent materials suitable for removing the elemental form of mercury from power plant emissions. An efficient and cost-effective novel Hg(0) oxidant was evaluated in a lab-scale fixed-bed ...

  7. Magnetoelectric effect in organic molecular solids

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Makoto; Ishihara, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    The Magnetoelectric (ME) effect in solids is a prominent cross correlation phenomenon, in which the electric field (E) controls the magnetization (M) and the magnetic field (H) controls the electric polarization (P). A rich variety of ME effects and their potential in practical applications have been investigated so far within the transition-metal compounds. Here, we report a possible way to realize the ME effect in organic molecular solids, in which two molecules build a dimer unit aligned on a lattice site. The linear ME effect is predicted in a long-range ordered state of spins and electric dipoles, as well as in a disordered state. One key of the ME effect is a hidden ferroic order of the spin-charge composite object. We provide a new guiding principle of the ME effect in materials without transition-metal elements, which may lead to flexible and lightweight multifunctional materials. PMID:26876424

  8. Modified Immersed Finite Element Method For Fully-Coupled Fluid-Structure Interations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we develop a "modified" immersed finite element method (mIFEM), a non-boundary-fitted numerical technique, to study fluid-structure interactions. Using this method, we can more precisely capture the solid dynamics by solving the solid governing equation instead of imposing it based on the fluid velocity field as in the original immersed finite element (IFEM). Using the IFEM may lead to severe solid mesh distortion because the solid deformation is been over-estimated, especially for high Reynolds number flows. In the mIFEM, the solid dynamics is solved using appropriate boundary conditions generated from the surrounding fluid, therefore produces more accurate and realistic coupled solutions. We show several 2-D and 3-D testing cases where the mIFEM has a noticeable advantage in handling complicated fluid-structure interactions when the solid behavior dominates the fluid flow.

  9. Electrical connection structure for a superconductor element

    SciTech Connect

    Lallouet, Nicolas; Maguire, James

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical connection structure for a superconductor element cooled by a cryogenic fluid and connected to an electrical bushing, which bushing passes successively through an enclosure at an intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and the temperature of the cryogenic fluid, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, said bushing projecting outside the ambient temperature enclosure. According to the invention, said intermediate enclosure is filled at least in part with a solid material of low thermal conductivity, such as a polyurethane foam or a cellular glass foam. The invention is applicable to connecting a superconductor cable at cryogenic temperature to a device for equipment at ambient temperature.

  10. Solid Effect DNP in a Rapid-melt setup.

    PubMed

    van Bentum, P J M; Sharma, M; van Meerten, S G J; Kentgens, A P M

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has become a key element in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Recently, we developed a novel approach to DNP enhanced liquid-state NMR based on rapid melting of a solid hyperpolarized sample followed by 'in situ' liquid-state NMR detection. This method allows (1)H detection with fast cycling options for signal averaging. In nonpolar solvents, doped with BDPA radicals, proton enhancement factors were achieved of up to 400. A short recycling delay of about 5s allows for a fast determination of the hyper-polarization dynamics as function of the microwave frequency and power. Here, we use the rapid melt dnp method to study the mechanisms for DNP in the solid phase in more detail. Solid Effect, Cross Effect, Solid Overhauser and Liquid-state (supercritical) Overhauser DNP enhancement can be observed in the same setup. In this paper, we concentrate on Solid Effect DNP observed with both homogeneous narrow line radicals such as BDPA and with wide line anisotropic nitroxide radicals such as TEMPOL. We find indications that BDPA protons play an important role in Solid Effect DNP with this radical. A simplified spin diffusion model for BDPA can give a semi-quantitative description of the enhancements as function of the microwave power and as function of the proton concentration in the solid solution. For aqueous frozen samples we observe a similar Solid Effect DNP enhancement, which is analyzed within the simplified spin diffusion model.

  11. Teaching and Learning about Solid Waste: Aspects of Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinquetti, Heloisa Chalmers Sisla; de Carvalho, Luiz Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates aspects of content knowledge related to teaching and learning about solid waste, focusing on the processes of learning and teaching by Elementary School teachers in Brazil, in two modalities of continuing education: courses and school-based meetings. We analyse elements of teachers' reflections whilst referring to three…

  12. MERCURY MEASUREMENTS FOR SOLIDS MADE RAPIDLY, SIMPLY, AND INEXPENSIVELY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While traditional methods for determining mercury in solid samples involve the use of aggressive chemicals to dissolve the matrix and the use of other chemicals to properly reduce the mercury to the volatile elemental form, pyrolysis-based analyzers can be used by directly weighi...

  13. Solid state electro-optic color filter and iris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test results obtained have confirmed the practicality of the solid state electro-optic filters as an optical control element in a television system. Neutral-density control range in excess of 1000:1 has been obtained on sample filters. Test results, measurements in a complete camera system, discussions of problem areas, analytical comparisons, and recommendations for future investigations are included.

  14. Solid-State Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  15. Solid polymer electrolyte compositions

    DOEpatents

    Garbe, James E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Hamrock, Steven J.; Le, Dinh Ba

    2001-01-01

    An electrolyte composition is featured that includes a solid, ionically conductive polymer, organically modified oxide particles that include organic groups covalently bonded to the oxide particles, and an alkali metal salt. The electrolyte composition is free of lithiated zeolite. The invention also features cells that incorporate the electrolyte composition.

  16. Solid-Waste Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Consists of excerpts from a forthcoming publication of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Student's Guide to Solid-Waste Management.'' Discusses the sources of wastes from farms, mines, factories, and communities, the job of governments, ways to collect trash, methods of disposal, processing, and suggests possible student action.…

  17. Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-03-30

    The article discusses solid state lighting technologies. This topic was covered in two previous ASHRAE Journal columns (2010). This article covers advancements in technologies and the associated efficacies. The life-cycle, energy savings and market potential of these technologies are addressed as well.

  18. A new solid lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Friction and wear life studies on burnished films of the compound graphite fluoride have demonstrated its potential as a solid lubricant material. It is effective in moist air, dry air, or in dry argon at temperatures up to approximately 400 degrees C.

  19. Solid fuel oil mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Rutter, P.R.; Veal, C.J.

    1984-11-27

    Fuel composition comprises 15 to 60% be weight, preferably 40 to 55%, of a friable solid fuel, e.g. coal, a stabilizing additive composition and a fuel oil. The additive comprises the combination of a polymer containing functional groups, e.g., maleinized polybutadiene, and a surfactant. The composition is suitable for use as a liquid fuel for industrial burners.

  20. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-01-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  1. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  2. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-02-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  3. Solid electrolyte structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1984-01-01

    A solid electrolyte structure for fuel cells and other electrochemical devices providing oxygen ion transfer by a multiplicity of exposed internal surfaces made of a composition containing an oxide of a multivalent transition metal and forming small pore-like passages sized to permit oxygen ion transfer while limiting the transfer of oxygen gas.

  4. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  5. Complete Subsurface Elemental Composition Measurements With PING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument will measure the complete bulk elemental composition of the subsurface of Mars as well as any other solid planetary body. PING can thus be a highly effective tool for both detailed local geochemistry science investigations and precision measurements of Mars subsurface reSOurces in preparation for future human exploration. As such, PING is thus fully capable of meeting a majority of both ncar and far term elements in Challenge #1 presented for this conference. Measuring the ncar subsurface composition of Mars will enable many of the MEPAG science goals and will be key to filling an important Strategic Knowledge Gap with regard to In situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) needs for human exploration. [1, 2] PING will thus fill an important niche in the Mars Exploration Program.

  6. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  7. Interface Limited Lithium Transport in Solid-State Batteries.

    PubMed

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Qian, Danna; McGilvray, Thomas; Wang, Ziying; Wang, Feng; Camino, Fernando; Graetz, Jason; Dudney, Nancy; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2014-01-16

    Understanding the role of interfaces is important for improving the performance of all-solid-state lithium ion batteries. To study these interfaces, we present a novel approach for fabrication of electrochemically active nanobatteries using focused ion beams and their characterization by analytical electron microscopy. Morphological changes by scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and correlated elemental concentration changes by electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping are presented. We provide first evidence of lithium accumulation at the anode/current collector (Si/Cu) and cathode/electrolyte (LixCoO2/LiPON) interfaces, which can be accounted for the irreversible capacity losses. Interdiffusion of elements at the Si/LiPON interface was also witnessed with a distinct contrast layer. These results highlight that the interfaces may limit the lithium transport significantly in solid-state batteries. Fabrication of electrochemically active nanobatteries also enables in situ electron microscopy observation of electrochemical phenomena in a variety of solid-state battery chemistries.

  8. Solid electrolytes strengthened by metal dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Morgan, Chester S.

    1983-01-01

    An improvement in solid electrolytes of advanced secondary batteries of the sodium-sulfur, sodium-halogen, and like combinations is achieved by providing said battery with a cermet electrolyte containing a metal dispersion ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 vol. % of a substantially nonreactive metal selected from the group consisting essentially of Pt, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Nb, their alloys, and their physical mixtures in the elemental or uncombined state, the remainder of said cermet being an ion-conductive ceramic material.

  9. Solid electrolytes strengthened by metal dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Morgan, C.S.

    1981-10-05

    An improvement in solid electrolytes of advanced secondary batteries of the sodium-sulfur, sodium-halogen, and like combinations is achieved by providing said battery with a cermet electrolyte containing a metal dispersion ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 vol. % of a substantially nonreactive metal selected from the group consisting essentially of Pt, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Nb, their alloys, and their physical mixtures in the elemental or uncombined state, the remainder of said cermet being an ion-conductive ceramic material.

  10. Internal fuse modules for solid tantalum capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dematos, H. V.

    1981-01-01

    Miniature fuse modules were designed for and incorporated into two styles of solid tantalum capacitors. One is an epoxy molded, radial leaded, high frequency decoupling capacitor; the other is an hermetically sealed device with axial lead wires. The fusible element for both devices consists of a fine bimetallic wire which reacts exothermically upon reaching a critical temperature and then disintegrates. The desirability of having fused devices is discussed and design constraints, in particular those which minimize inductance and series resistance while optimizing fuse actuation characteristics, are reviewed. Factors affecting the amount of energy required to actuate the fuse and reliability of acuation are identified.

  11. Evaluation of Strip Footing Bearing Capacity Built on the Anthropogenic Embankment by Random Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczynska-Kozlowska, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    One of a geotechnical problem in the area of Wroclaw is an anthropogenic embankment layer delaying to the depth of 4-5m, arising as a result of historical incidents. In such a case an assumption of bearing capacity of strip footing might be difficult. The standard solution is to use a deep foundation or foundation soil replacement. However both methods generate significant costs. In the present paper the authors focused their attention on the influence of anthropogenic embankment variability on bearing capacity. Soil parameters were defined on the basis of CPT test and modeled as 2D anisotropic random fields and the assumption of bearing capacity were made according deterministic finite element methods. Many repeated of the different realizations of random fields lead to stable expected value of bearing capacity. The algorithm used to estimate the bearing capacity of strip footing was the random finite element method (e.g. [1]). In traditional approach of bearing capacity the formula proposed by [2] is taken into account. qf = c'Nc + qNq + 0.5γBN- γ (1) where: qf is the ultimate bearing stress, cis the cohesion, qis the overburden load due to foundation embedment, γ is the soil unit weight, Bis the footing width, and Nc, Nq and Nγ are the bearing capacity factors. The method of evaluation the bearing capacity of strip footing based on finite element method incorporate five parameters: Young's modulus (E), Poisson's ratio (ν), dilation angle (ψ), cohesion (c), and friction angle (φ). In the present study E, ν and ψ are held constant while c and φ are randomized. Although the Young's modulus does not affect the bearing capacity it governs the initial elastic response of the soil. Plastic stress redistribution is accomplished using a viscoplastic algorithm merge with an elastic perfectly plastic (Mohr - Coulomb) failure criterion. In this paper a typical finite element mesh was assumed with 8-node elements consist in 50 columns and 20 rows. Footings width B

  12. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  13. Recovery of phosphates from elemental phosphorus bearing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.E.; Moore, O.E.; Sullivan, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    A process for oxidizing aqueous elemental phosphorus containing residues (sludges) to produce orthophosphate containing slurries suitable for subsequent reaction with ammonia to produce nitrogen and phosphate containing fertilizer products is presented. It comprises reacting aqueous elemental phosphorus containing residues with certain special mixtures of concentrated nitric acid and sulfuric acid to effect the conversion of the elemental phosphorus into mostly orthophosphoric acid and very little orthophosphorus acid with the relative ratios of the two acids being dependent upon the mole ratio of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:HNO{sub 3} employed in the processing. The resulting aqueous reaction intermediate is neutralized with ammonia during processing to a fluid or solid fertilizer product. Prior to the conversion to products, the aqueous reaction intermediate may be subjected to a solids separation step to remove insoluble salts of certain environmentally undesirable metals, such as Pb, Cd, Ba, and Cr.

  14. Alternative ways for formulation of hybrid stress elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.; Chen, D.-P.

    1982-01-01

    An element stiffness matrix can be derived by the conventional potential energy principle and, indirectly, also by generalized variational principles, such as the Hu-Washizu principle and the Hellinger-Reissner principle. The present investigation has the objective to show an approach which is concerned with the formulation of incompatible elements for solid continuum and for plate bending problems by the Hellinger-Reissner principle. It is found that the resulting scheme is equivalent to that considered by Tong (1982) for the construction of hybrid stress elements. In Tong's scheme the inversion of a large flexibility matrix can be avoided. It is concluded that the introduction of additional internal displacement modes in mixed finite element formulations by the Hellinger-Reissner principle and the Hu-Washizu principle can lead to element stiffness matrices which are equivalent to the assumed stress hybrid method.

  15. p-version finite element modeling for NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Camille A.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    The formulation for the quadrilateral element of a p-version FEM for NDE is presented. Nodal shape, side shape, and internal shape functions are derived. The problem of wave propagation in solids is investigated using a Newmark direct integration scheme applied to p-version FEM meshes. It is found that numerical noise prevails for all the time steps and along the whole structure, and that there is no apparent wave propagation phenomenon in the displacement time-history. The numerical noise suggests that the abrupt change in the element material properties between the different layers of composite material and glue resin is a fatal modeling defect. The negative effect of using higher order p-version elements and the abrupt change of the element material properties should be countered by using a greater number of elements to model each layer and higher order mapping functions in the mapping process.

  16. Nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Zocher, Roy W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  17. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  18. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  19. Elemental analysis in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Hann, Stephan; Dernovics, Mihaly; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2015-02-01

    This article focuses on analytical strategies integrating atomic spectroscopy in biotechnology. The rationale behind developing such methods is inherently linked to unique features of the key technique in elemental analysis, which is inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: (1) the high sensitivity and selectivity of state of the art instrumentation, (2) the possibility of accurate absolute quantification even in complex matrices, (3) the capability of combining elemental detectors with chromatographic separation methods and the versatility of the latter approach, (4) the complementarity of inorganic and organic mass spectrometry, (5) the multi-element capability and finally (6) the capability of isotopic analysis. The article highlights the most recent bio-analytical developments exploiting these methodological advantages and shows the potential in biotechnological applications.

  20. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a (6)Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m(2), is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security. PMID:26133869

  1. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a {sup 6}Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m{sup 2}, is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  2. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a 6Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m2, is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  3. Intelligent Elements for ISHM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzel, John L.; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Figueroa, Fernando; Oostdyk, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of architecture models for implementing Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) capabilities. For example, approaches based on the OSA-CBM and OSA-EAI models, or specific architectures developed in response to local needs. NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) has developed one such version of an extensible architecture in support of rocket engine testing that integrates a palette of functions in order to achieve an ISHM capability. Among the functional capabilities that are supported by the framework are: prognostic models, anomaly detection, a data base of supporting health information, root cause analysis, intelligent elements, and integrated awareness. This paper focuses on the role that intelligent elements can play in ISHM architectures. We define an intelligent element as a smart element with sufficient computing capacity to support anomaly detection or other algorithms in support of ISHM functions. A smart element has the capabilities of supporting networked implementations of IEEE 1451.x smart sensor and actuator protocols. The ISHM group at SSC has been actively developing intelligent elements in conjunction with several partners at other Centers, universities, and companies as part of our ISHM approach for better supporting rocket engine testing. We have developed several implementations. Among the key features for these intelligent sensors is support for IEEE 1451.1 and incorporation of a suite of algorithms for determination of sensor health. Regardless of the potential advantages that can be achieved using intelligent sensors, existing large-scale systems are still based on conventional sensors and data acquisition systems. In order to bring the benefits of intelligent sensors to these environments, we have also developed virtual implementations of intelligent sensors.

  4. FUEL ELEMENT CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Simnad, M.T.

    1961-08-15

    A method of preventing diffusible and volatile fission products from diffusing through a fuel element container and contaminating reactor coolant is described. More specifically, relatively volatile and diffusible fission products either are adsorbed by or react with magnesium fluoride or difluoride to form stable, less volatile, less diffusible forms. The magnesium fluoride or difluoride is disposed anywhere inwardly from the outer surface of the fuel element container in order to be contacted by the fission products before they reach and contaminate the reactor coolant. (AEC)

  5. General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket Motor Segments in the Surge Building of the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building and subsequent mounting and assembly on the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Solid Phase Characterization of Solids Recovered from Failed Sluicer Arm

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Gary A.

    2015-03-09

    The Enclosure to this memo discusses the solid phase characterization of a solid sample that was retrieved from the single-shell Tank 241-C-111 extended reach sluicer #2. This sluicer, removed from riser #3 on September 25, 2014, was found to have approximately 0.4 gallons of solid tank waste adhering to the nozzle area.

  7. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Weems, S.J.

    1963-09-24

    >A rib arrangement and an end construction for nuclearfuel elements laid end to end in a coolant tube are described. The rib arrangement is such that each fuel element, when separated from other fuel elements, fits loosely in the coolant tube and so can easily be inserted or withdrawn from the tube. The end construction of the fuel elements is such that the fuel elements when assembled end to end are keyed against relative rotation, and the ribs of each fuel element cooperate with the ribs of the adjacent fuel elements to give the assembled fuel elements a tight fit with the coolant tube. (AEC)

  8. DWPF DECON FRIT: SUMP AND SLURRY SOLIDS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Peeler, D.; Click, D.

    2010-10-20

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to perform analyses on samples of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) decon frit slurry (i.e., supernate samples and sump solid samples). Four 1-L liquid slurry samples were provided to SRNL by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) from the 'front-end' decon activities. Additionally, two 1-L sump solids samples were provided to SRNL for compositional and physical analysis. In this report, the physical and chemical characterization results of the slurry solids and sump solids are reported. Crawford et al. (2010) provide the results of the supernate analysis. The results of the sump solids are reported on a mass basis given the samples were essentially dry upon receipt. The results of the slurry solids were converted to a volume basis given approximately 2.4 grams of slurry solids were obtained from the {approx}4 liters of liquid slurry sample. Although there were slight differences in the analytical results between the sump solids and slurry solids the following general summary statements can be made. Slight differences in the results are also captured for specific analysis. (1) Physical characterization - (a) SEM/EDS analysis suggested that the samples were enriched in Li and Si (B and Na not detectable using the current EDS system) which is consistent with two of the four principle oxides of Frit 418 (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O and SiO{sub 2}). (b) SEM/EDS analysis also identified impurities which were elementally consistent with stainless steel (i.e., Fe, Ni, Cr contamination). (c) XRD results indicated that the sump solids samples were amorphous which is consistent with XRD results expected for a Frit 418 based sample. (d) For the sump solids, SEM/EDS analysis indicated that the particle size of the sump solids were consistent with that of an as received Frit 418 sample from a current DWPF vendor. (e) For the slurry solids, SEM/EDS analysis indicated that the particle size range

  9. Curved mesh generation and mesh refinement using Lagrangian solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.-O.; Peraire, J.

    2008-12-31

    We propose a method for generating well-shaped curved unstructured meshes using a nonlinear elasticity analogy. The geometry of the domain to be meshed is represented as an elastic solid. The undeformed geometry is the initial mesh of linear triangular or tetrahedral elements. The external loading results from prescribing a boundary displacement to be that of the curved geometry, and the final configuration is determined by solving for the equilibrium configuration. The deformations are represented using piecewise polynomials within each element of the original mesh. When the mesh is sufficiently fine to resolve the solid deformation, this method guarantees non-intersecting elements even for highly distorted or anisotropic initial meshes. We describe the method and the solution procedures, and we show a number of examples of two and three dimensional simplex meshes with curved boundaries. We also demonstrate how to use the technique for local refinement of non-curved meshes in the presence of curved boundaries.

  10. How to Reduce Solid Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, George; Clapp, Leallyn B.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the problem of solid waste disposal in the United States, suggests ways in which solid wastes might be reduced, and proposes a number of related topics for student debate in classes or in science clubs. (JR)

  11. Ion-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasi, Michael; Mayer, James; Hirvonen, James K.

    2004-12-01

    Modern technology depends on materials with precisely controlled properties. Ion beams are an excellent way to achieve controlled modification of surface and near-surface regions. In every integrated circuit production line, for example, there are ion implantation systems. In addition to integrated circuit technology, ion beams can modify the mechanical, tribological, and chemical properties of metal, intermetallic, and ceramic materials without altering their bulk properties. Ion-solid interactions are the foundation that underlies the broad application of ion beams to the modification of materials. This text covers the fundamentals and applications of ion-solid interactions, and is aimed at graduate students and researchers interested in electronic devices, surface engineering, reactor and nuclear engineering, and materials science issues associated with metastable phase synthesis.

  12. Solid polymer membrane program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented for a solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell development program. Failure mechanism was identified and resolution of the mechanism experienced in small stack testing was demonstrated. The effect included laboratory analysis and evaluation of a matrix of configurations and operational variables for effects on the degree of hydrogen fluoride released from the cell and on the degree of blistering/delamination occurring in the reactant inlet areas of the cell and to correlate these conditions with cell life capabilities. The laboratory evaluation tests were run at conditions intended to accelerate the degradation of the solid polymer electrolyte in order to obtain relative evaluations as quick as possible. Evaluation of the resolutions for the identified failure mechanism in space shuttle configuration cell assemblies was achieved with the fabrication and life testing of two small stack buildups of four cell assemblies and eight cells each.

  13. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  14. Movies and Literary Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rodney D.

    1987-01-01

    Recommends using movie clips to stimulate students' interest in reading a novel as well as to teach elements of fiction such as plot, character, setting, symbol, irony, and theme. Describes each clip and provides study questions. Includes a listing of movies made from books. (NH)

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Sanz, M.C.; Scully, C.N.

    1961-06-27

    The patented fuel element is a hexagonal graphite body having an axial channel therethrough. The graphite is impregnated with uranium which is concentrated near the axial channel. Layers of tantalum nitride and tantalum carbide are disposed on the surface of the body confronting the channel.

  16. Heating element support clip

    DOEpatents

    Sawyer, William C.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for supporting a heating element in a channel formed in a heater base is disclosed. A preferred embodiment includes a substantially U-shaped tantalum member. The U-shape is characterized by two substantially parallel portions of tantalum that each have an end connected to opposite ends of a base portion of tantalum. The parallel portions are each substantially perpendicular to the base portion and spaced apart a distance not larger than a width of the channel and not smaller than a width of a graphite heating element. The parallel portions each have a hole therein, and the centers of the holes define an axis that is substantially parallel to the base portion. An aluminum oxide ceramic retaining pin extends through the holes in the parallel portions and into a hole in a wall of the channel to retain the U-shaped member in the channel and to support the graphite heating element. The graphite heating element is confined by the parallel portions of tantalum, the base portion of tantalum, and the retaining pin. A tantalum tube surrounds the retaining pin between the parallel portions of tantalum.

  17. Heating element support clip

    DOEpatents

    Sawyer, W.C.

    1995-08-15

    An apparatus for supporting a heating element in a channel formed in a heater base is disclosed. A preferred embodiment includes a substantially U-shaped tantalum member. The U-shape is characterized by two substantially parallel portions of tantalum that each have an end connected to opposite ends of a base portion of tantalum. The parallel portions are each substantially perpendicular to the base portion and spaced apart a distance not larger than a width of the channel and not smaller than a width of a graphite heating element. The parallel portions each have a hole therein, and the centers of the holes define an axis that is substantially parallel to the base portion. An aluminum oxide ceramic retaining pin extends through the holes in the parallel portions and into a hole in a wall of the channel to retain the U-shaped member in the channel and to support the graphite heating element. The graphite heating element is confined by the parallel portions of tantalum, the base portion of tantalum, and the retaining pin. A tantalum tube surrounds the retaining pin between the parallel portions of tantalum. 6 figs.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Picklesimer, M.L.; Thurber, W.C.

    1961-01-01

    A chemically nonreactive fuel composition for incorporation in aluminum- clad, plate type fuel elements for neutronic reactors is described. The composition comprises a mixture of aluminum and uranium carbide particles, the uranium carbide particles containing at least 80 wt.% UC/sub 2/.

  19. The Transuranium Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaborg, Glenn T.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the unusual chemistry of the transuranium elements as well as their impact on the periodic table. Also considers the practical applications of transuranium isotopes, such as their use in nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity. (JN)

  20. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  1. TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

  2. Elements affecting runway traction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The five basic elements affecting runway traction for jet transport aircraft operation are identified and described in terms of pilot, aircraft system, atmospheric, tire, and pavement performance factors or parameters. Where possible, research results are summarized, and means for restoring or improving runway traction for these different conditions are discussed.

  3. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Stacy, J.T.

    1958-12-01

    A reactor fuel element having a core of molybdenum-uranium alloy jacketed in stainless steel is described. A barrier layer of tungsten, tantalum, molybdenum, columbium, or silver is interposed between the core and jacket to prevent formation of a low melting eutectic between uranium and the varlous alloy constituents of the stainless steel.

  5. CEDS Addresses: Rubric Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) Version 4 introduced a common data vocabulary for defining rubrics in a data system. The CEDS elements support digital representations of both holistic and analytic rubrics. This document shares examples of holistic and analytic project rubrics, available CEDS Connections, and a logical model showing the…

  6. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  7. JACKETED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1958-12-01

    A fuel element is described for fast reactors comprised of a core of uranium metal containing material and a jacket around the core, the jacket consisting of from 2.5 to 15 percent of titanium, from 1 to 5 percent of niobium, and from 80 to 96.5 percent of vanadium.

  8. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, J.; Testori, A.

    1999-10-12

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Powell, R.W.; Fox, M.

    1959-11-24

    A nuclear fuel element comprising a plurality of nuclear fuel bearing strips is presented. The strips are folded along their longitudinal axes to an angle of about 60 deg and are secured at each end by ferrule to form an elongated assembly suitable for occupying a cylindrical coolant channel.

  10. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  11. Elemental Chem Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  12. Solid state electrochemical current source

    DOEpatents

    Potanin, Alexander Arkadyevich; Vedeneev, Nikolai Ivanovich

    2002-04-30

    A cathode and a solid state electrochemical cell comprising said cathode, a solid anode and solid fluoride ion conducting electrolyte. The cathode comprises a metal oxide and a compound fluoride containing at least two metals with different valences. Representative compound fluorides include solid solutions of bismuth fluoride and potassium fluoride; and lead fluoride and potassium fluoride. Representative metal oxides include copper oxide, lead oxide, manganese oxide, vanadium oxide and silver oxide.

  13. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  14. Compressibility of solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinet, P.; Ferrante, J.; Rose, J. H.; Smith, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A universal form is proposed for the equation of state (EOS) of solids. Good agreement is found for a variety of test data. The form of the EOS is used to suggest a method of data analysis, which is applied to materials of geophysical interest. The isothermal bulk modulus is discussed as a function of the volume and of the pressure. The isothermal compression curves for materials of geophysical interest are examined.

  15. Solid phase extraction membrane

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Kurt C [Nashville, TN; Langer, Roger L [Hudson, WI

    2002-11-05

    A wet-laid, porous solid phase extraction sheet material that contains both active particles and binder and that possesses excellent wet strength is described. The binder is present in a relatively small amount while the particles are present in a relatively large amount. The sheet material is sufficiently strong and flexible so as to be pleatable so that, for example, it can be used in a cartridge device.

  16. Solar solids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yudow, B.D.

    1986-02-24

    A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

  17. Solar solids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yudow, Bernard D.

    1987-01-01

    A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

  18. SOLID WASTE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    PAUL G. ORTIZ - COLEMAN RESEARCH CORP /COMPA INDUSTRIES

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to study the solid waste issues brought about by a Type C Investigation; ``Disposal of Inappropriate Material in the Los Alamos County Landfill'' (May 28, 1993). The study was completed in August 1995 by Coleman Research Corporation, under subcontract number 405810005-Y for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The study confirmed the issues identified in the Type C investigation, and also ascertained further issues or problems. During the course of this study two incidents involving hazardous waste resulted in the inappropriate disposal of the waste. An accidental spill, on June 8, 1995, at one of Laboratory buildings was not handled correctly, and ended up in the LAC Landfill. Hazardous waste was disposed of in a solid waste container and sent to the Los Alamos County Landfill. An attempt to locate the hazardous waste at the LAC Landfill was not successful. The second incident involving hazardous waste was discovered by the FSS-8, during a random dumpster surveillance. An interim dumpster program managed by FSS-8 discovered hazardous waste and copper chips in the solid waste, on August 9, 1995. The hazardous waste and copper chips would have been transported to the LAC Landfill if the audit team had not brought the problem to the awareness of the facility waste management personnel.

  19. Solid propellant environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Le, M.D.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of the Solid Propellant Environmental Issues (SPEI) project is to demonstrate environmentally acceptable technologies that will enhance the continued production of solid rocket motors (SRMs) by complying with current and anticipated environmental regulations. Phase 1 of the project identifies current and anticipated environmental regulations that may affect SRMs manufacturing in the future and identify emerging process technologies which comply with these regulations. Phase 2 of the project established a baseline database by fabricating a 363 kg motor using the current manufacturing process. In Phase 3, environmentally acceptable process technologies were evaluated, ranked, and selected for demonstration using criteria developed by the team. The results for Phase 1--3 have previously been presented. This paper will present data obtained to date on Phase 4. In Phase 4, the alternate process technologies were evaluated for compatibility, cleaning effectiveness, and waste minimization/pollution prevention. The best performing candidate for each application area was selected for demonstration. The selected process technologies will be inserted into the baseline manufacturing process from Phase 2. The new manufacturing process will be demonstrated and evaluated through the scale-up and fabrication of two 363 kg solid rocket motors.

  20. Optimization of membrane elements' array in industrial reverse osmosis units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobinkin, V. V.; Larionov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, A. A.; Shapovalov, D. A.; Shilov, M. M.

    2015-10-01

    It is stated that membrane elements, due to axial concentration and flow exhaustion during filtration, work in different operation conditions that differ according to various characteristics. Designing of multistage units is based on technical characteristics' identity of all membrane elements. It is explored that the difference in individual characteristics of membrane elements can take place. This can essentially affect the operation characteristics of a whole industrial unit. Particularly, it could lead to degradation of the permeate quality and the unit performance. Research on packaging the membrane elements in reverse osmosis units has shown that a simple replacement of membrane elements without the consideration of the individual characteristics can degrade the performance characteristics and affect the constancy of the unit operation. An optimization system of membrane elements' array was suggested to solve these problems and to upgrade the performance of reverse osmosis plants. The first step of the system is determination of individual characteristics of membrane elements. For the calculations using the individualized data, it is suggested to use the method of approximate calculation and the balance equations for water flows (source water, permeate, and retentate), and for the concentrations of the dissolved solids. The suggested optimization system of a membrane elements' array allowed the configuration of the membrane elements in the housings of one stage in such a way that the symmetry of the flows and of the pressure difference was achieved. The optimum value of the performance and the selectivity was achieved considering the hydraulic characteristics in one stage.

  1. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  2. Modules for estimating solid waste from fossil-fuel technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, M.A.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Morris, S.C.

    1980-10-01

    Solid waste has become a subject of increasing concern to energy industries for several reasons. Increasingly stringent air and water pollution regulations result in a larger fraction of residuals in the form of solid wastes. Control technologies, particularly flue gas desulfurization, can multiply the amount of waste. With the renewed emphasis on coal utilization and the likelihood of oil shale development, increased amounts of solid waste will be produced. In the past, solid waste residuals used for environmental assessment have tended only to include total quantities generated. To look at environmental impacts, however, data on the composition of the solid wastes are required. Computer modules for calculating the quantities and composition of solid waste from major fossil fuel technologies were therefore developed and are described in this report. Six modules have been produced covering physical coal cleaning, conventional coal combustion with flue gas desulfurization, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification using the Lurgi process, coal liquefaction using the SRC-II process, and oil shale retorting. Total quantities of each solid waste stream are computed together with the major components and a number of trace elements and radionuclides.

  3. Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. Andrew

    2013-05-01

    pBEAM (Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module) is a finite element code for beam-like structures. The methodology uses Euler? Bernoulli beam elements with 12 degrees of freedom (3 translation and 3 rotational at each end of the element).

  4. Parallel contact detection algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations using PRONTO3D

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    An efficient, scalable, parallel algorithm for treating material surface contacts in solid mechanics finite element programs has been implemented in a modular way for MIMD parallel computers. The serial contact detection algorithm that was developed previously for the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO3D has been extended for use in parallel computation by devising a dynamic (adaptive) processor load balancing scheme.

  5. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  6. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  7. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore » of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  8. Carbon Nanotube Memory Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are among the most cited prototypical materials for nanoelectronics and information storage devices, a dominant position that originates from their intrinsic structural and electronic properties. In this chapter we review the developments in memory elements that directly exploit the unique properties of carbon nanotubes. Fundamental operational principles and characteristics are examined for the different types of carbon nanotube-based memory devices along with the current status of experimental fabrication and scalability. These include memory elements based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFET), nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), and electromigration. Many of these devices show tremendous promise for providing enhanced densities, lower power requirements, more efficient read/write processes, and non-volatility of data.

  9. Production of transuranium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, R.M.; Chattin, F.R.; Knauer, J.B.

    1993-12-31

    The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) has the programmatic responsibility for the Department of Energy`s Transuranium Element Program. Principle elements from the program are einsteinium, berkelium, and fermium. Targets containing curium oxide mixed with aluminum powder are fabricated by the REDC and irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor. Following an irradiation period of 6-12 months, targets are returned to the REDC for chemical processing. Processing operations consists of aluminum dejacketing in a caustic-nitrate solution, filtration, acid dissolution, solvent extraction, anion exchange, and finally a cation exchange to recover the actinides. The processing operations take place in heavily shielded hot cell facilities and all operations are carried out remotely. The chemistry for the separations has been well established over the 26-yr. operating life of the facility.

  10. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Wellman, G.; Gartling, D.

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.

  11. Illinois solid waste management legislation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    Contents include: Degradable Plastic Act; Energy Assistance Act of 1989; Hazardous and Solid Waste Recycling and Treatment Act; Household Hazardous Waste Collection Program Act; Illinois Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act; Illinois Environmental Facilities Financing Act; Illinois Procurement Code; Illinois Solid Waste Management Act; Intergovernmental Cooperation Act; Junkyard Act; Litter Control Act; Local Solid Waste Disposal Act; Metro East Solid Waste Disposal and Energy Producing Service Act; Recycled Newsprint Use Act; Responsible Property Transfer Act of 1988; Solid Waste Disposal District Act; Solid Waste Planning and Recycling Act; Solid Waste Site Operator Certification Law; Township Refuse Collection and Disposal Act; Toxic Pollution Prevention Act; Used Motor Oil Recycling Act; Waste Oil Recovery Act; and Water Supply, Drainage and Flood Control Act.

  12. The individual element test revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of the patch test for finite elements retains several unsettled aspects. In particular, the issue of one-element versus multielement tests needs clarification. Following a brief historical review, we present the individual element test (IET) of Bergan and Hanssen in an expanded context that encompasses several important classes of new elements. The relationship of the IET to the multielement forms A, B, and C of the patch test and to the single element test are clarified.

  13. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Smith, M.; Sjaardema, G.

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or to another format.

  14. OXIDATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1959-02-17

    A method is reported for oxidizing neptunium or plutonium in the presence of cerous values without also oxidizing the cerous values. The method consists in treating an aqueous 1N nitric acid solution, containing such cerous values together with the trivalent transuranic elements, with a quantity of hydrogen peroxide stoichiometrically sufficient to oxidize the transuranic values to the hexavalent state, and digesting the solution at room temperature.

  15. Electrochemical Circuit Elements.

    PubMed

    Maier, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of electrochemical processes can be modelled by resistors and capacitors. These will then be, in addition to usual circuit elements, electrochemical and chemical resistors or chemical capacitors. The paper shows the significance of understanding these parameters and their connections in given systems for a variety of timely scientific examples. This rationale mirrors one of the intellectual facets, if not the most important one, of Janko Jamnik's scientific work. PMID:27640384

  16. Nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Meadowcroft, Ronald Ross; Bain, Alastair Stewart

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element wherein a tubular cladding of zirconium or a zirconium alloy has a fission gas plenum chamber which is held against collapse by the loops of a spacer in the form of a tube which has been deformed inwardly at three equally spaced, circumferential positions to provide three loops. A heat resistant disc of, say, graphite separates nuclear fuel pellets within the cladding from the plenum chamber. The spacer is of zirconium or a zirconium alloy.

  17. Traction free finite elements with the assumed stress hybrid model. M.S. Thesis, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafie, Kurosh

    1991-01-01

    An effective approach in the finite element analysis of the stress field at the traction free boundary of a solid continuum was studied. Conventional displacement and assumed stress finite elements were used in the determination of stress concentrations around circular and elliptical holes. Specialized hybrid elements were then developed to improve the satisfaction of prescribed traction boundary conditions. Results of the stress analysis indicated that finite elements which exactly satisfy the free stress boundary conditions are the most accurate and efficient in such problems. A general approach for hybrid finite elements which incorporate traction free boundaries of arbitrary geometry was formulated.

  18. C deg continuity elements by Hybrid Stress method. M.S. Thesis, 1982 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, David Sung-Soo

    1991-01-01

    An intensive study of the assumed variable distribution necessary for the Assumed Displacement Formulation, the Hellinger-Reissner Formulation, and the Hu-Washizu Formulation is made in a unified manner. With emphasis on physical explanation, a systematic method for the Hybrid Stress element construction is outlined. The numerical examples use four and eight node plane stress elements and eight and twenty node solid elements. Computation cost study indicates that the hybrid stress element derived using recently developed Uncoupled Stress Formulation is comparable in CPU time to the Assumed Displacement element. Overall, main emphasis is placed on providing a broader understanding of the Hybrid Stress Formulation.

  19. Trace element emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The predicting of inorganic transformations (major and minor components) during coal combustion has long been the focus of many research programs (Zygarlicke et al., 1992; Wilemski et al., 1992; Baxter, 1992). In the program described in this paper, the predictive techniques that have been applied to combustion are being modified to predict inorganic transformations under gasification conditions. Many of the current trace element predictive techniques are based on the assumption of equilibrium conditions and not on actual kinetically constrained transformations that occur during coal utilization. The approach used in this program is to combine inorganic transformation algorithms and the thermochemical equilibrium calculations (Ramanathan et al., 1989, 1991). These techniques will be developed to predict the particle-size and composition distribution of the resulting coal ash particulate, along with the state of the vapor species at selected conditions for major, minor, and trace constituents. Many of the computer models recently to predict the evolution of major developed and minor elements during coal gasification were made possible by the development on a highly quantitative analytical technique for coal analysis, CCSEM (Steadman et al., 1990). CCSEM provides a particle-size and composition distribution for the mineral contents of a particular coal for twelve major and minor elements. These raw CCSEM data are the primary input to the newest computer models of ash formation.

  20. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  1. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  2. Chemically Layered Porous Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Aerogels and other porous solids in which surfaces of pores have chemical properties varying with depth below macroscopic surfaces prepared by sequences of chemical treatments. Porous glass or silica bead treated to make two depth zones having different chemical properties. Beads dropped along tube filled with flowing gas containing atomic oxygen, generated in microwave discharge. General class of materials treatable include oxides of aluminum, silicon, zirconium, tin, titanium, and nickel, and mixtures of these oxides. Potential uses of treated materials include chromatographic separations, membrane separations, controlled releases of chemicals, and catalysis.

  3. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  4. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  5. Solid Earth: The priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquet, P.

    1991-10-01

    The European Space Agency's strategy concerning the solid Earth program is reviewed. Improvement of current knowledge of the global geopotential fields, both gravity and magnetic, was stressed as the highest priority. It was agreed that the objectives and goals of the planned Aristoteles mission correspond to this priority, and the need to realize this part of the program was stated. The interdisciplinary links of the program were identified, and it was decided that this program could make substantial contributions to research of oceans, climate and global change, atmosphere, ice and land surfaces.

  6. Diffusion from solid cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Nestor, C.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The problem considered is the diffusion of material from a solid cylinder initially containng a uniform concentration and immersed in a well-stirred bath which maintains the external concentration at zero. The Fourier-Bessel series form of the fraction of the original material removed from the cylinder as a function of time converges very slowly for small time. An alternate form was obtained, which converges reasonably rapidly for small time. The convergence acceleration method of P. Wynn was also used to provide an efficient method for computation. Numerical examples and program listings are included.

  7. Solid electrolyte battery

    SciTech Connect

    Cipriano, R.A.; Snelgrove, R.V.; McCullough, F.P. Jr.

    1990-08-28

    This patent describes a primary rechargeable electrical storage device, a housing, at least one cell position in the housing, each cell comprising an anode consisting of a metal selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metal, alkaline earth metal alloy, alkali metal, alkali metal alloy and alkali metal eutectic mixtures, a separator surrounding the anode. The separator being capable of transporting or passing ionic species and electrically isolating the anode, a cathode, and an electrolyte associated with the cathode. The electrolyte comprising a membrane of a non-porous solid polymeric material containing a sulfonic acid group.

  8. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1997-03-31

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in flat bottomed silo. This was done by for dry materials introducing mustard seeds and poppy seeds as tracer particles and imaging them using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128*128 to 256*256 pixels were generated for each image. The size of the silo was limited by the size of the high resolution NMR imager available. Cross-sections of 150mm flat bottomed silos, with the tracer layers immobilized by a gel, showed similar qualitative patterns for both dry and wet granular solids.

  9. Solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Solid State Device research program is directed toward developing innovative devices for space remote and in-situ sensing, and for data processing. Innovative devices can result from the standard structures in innovative materials such as low and high temperature superconductors, strained layer superlattices, or diamond films. Innovative devices can also result from innovative structures achieved using electron tunneling or nanolithography in standard materials. A final step is to use both innovative structures and innovative materials. A new area of emphasis is the miniaturization of sensors and instruments molded by using the techniques of electronic device fabrication to micromachine silicon into micromechanical and electromechanical sensors and actuators.

  10. The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C. |

    1996-07-26

    Beginning in the 1930`s, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs.

  11. Basic research needs and opportunities at the solid-solid interface - Adhesion, abrasion and polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowkes, F. M.; Butler, B. L.; Schissel, P.; Butler, G. B.; Hartman, J. S.; Hoffman, R. W.; Inal, O. T.; Miller, W. G.; Tompkins, H. G.; Delollis, N. J.

    1982-04-01

    Solid-solid interfaces in solar technologies such as photovoltaics, mirrored surfaces, and absorbers in flate plate collectors are examined theoretically along with degradation and protective measures. The energetics of adhesion are modeled in terms of intermolecular forces such as covalent and electrostatic bonds. Finite element analyses are noted to be useful for calculating the stress fields in layered solar cells, although inclusion of plastic flow and relaxation processes is not yet possible. The effects of physical degradation of protective coatings and front surfaces of reflectors are outlined, and research in abrasion-erosion resistance, particulate deposition resistance, and detergents for washing solar surfaces is indicated. Finally, polymeric coatings are discussed for solar cells and for wind turbine blades for providing environmental protection.

  12. Solids flow mapping in gas-solid risers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhusarapu, Satish Babu

    Gas-solid risers are extensively used in many industrial processes for gas-solid reactions (e.g. coal combustion and gasification) and for solid catalyzed gas phase reactions (e.g. fluid catalytic cracking, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride). Ab initio prediction of the complex multiphase fluid dynamics in risers is not yet possible, which makes reactor modeling difficult. In particular, quantification of solids flow and mixing is important. Almost all the experimental techniques used to characterize solids flow lead to appreciable errors in measured variables in large scale, high mass flux systems. In addition, none of the experimental techniques provide all the relevant data required to develop a satisfactory solids flow model. In this study, non-invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) is employed to visualize and quantify the solids dynamics and mixing in the gas-solid riser of a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB). A single radioactive tracer particle is monitored during its multiple visits to the riser and with an assumption of ergodicity, the following flow parameters are estimated: (a) Overall solids mass flux in the CFB loop. (b) Solids residence time distribution in the riser and down-comer. (c) Lagrangian and Eulerian solids velocity fields in a fully-developed section of the riser. This includes velocity fluctuations and components of the diffusivity tensor. The existing CARPT technique is extended to large scale systems. A new algorithm, based on a cross-correlation search, is developed for position rendition from CARPT data. Two dimensional solids holdup profiles are estimated using gamma-ray computed tomography. The image quality from the tomography data is improved by implementing an alternating minimization algorithm. This work establishes for the first time a reliable database for local solids dynamic quantities such as time-averaged velocities, Reynolds stresses, eddy diffusivities and turbulent kinetic energy. In addition

  13. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Newick, Kheng; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias). This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment. PMID:27162934

  14. Solid state electrochromic smart windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-03-01

    The structure under development at EIC Laboratories consists of a multilayer stack of thin films, incorporating the two principal electrochemically active elements, the electrochromic (EC) and counter electrode (CE) layers, respectively. The EC layer changes from colorless to a state of reduced transmission on reduction while the CE layer has the opposite (complementary) behavior (or is colorless in both oxidized and reduced states). These are separated by an ion conducting electrolyte. The stack is completed with top and bottom transparent electrodes. The major achievements are as follows: (1) Tunable thermal emittance for the EC layer over a range of 0.2 to 0.8 was demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of surfaces with adjustable heat transfer properties. (2) Thin film ion conductors based on the Li2O/B2O3 and LiNbO3 were developed using thermal and electron beam evaporation with ionic conductivities greater than 10(exp -8) S/cm, fulfilling a major requirement for this component. (3) A variety of improved vanadium oxide-based counter electrode materials were demonstrated and patented which undergo reversible electrochemical Li insertion reactions and which increase their solar transmission on reduction. (4) Devices incorporating a laminated Li+ conducting polymer electrolyte were demonstrated with bleached state visible transmittance of greater than 65 percent and colored state transmittance of less than 15 percent. These devices were tested for greater than 10(exp 4) complete cycles. (5) An all thin film solid state device was demonstrated with a visible transmission range of 65/13 percent, using the component materials developed on this program. The device was tested for greater than 3000 complete cycles without degradation. A fabrication sequence was specified which forms the basis of initial production cost estimates. (6) Window modeling studies have been used to compare the relative performance of amorphous and crystalline WO3-based electrochromic

  15. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  16. Spontaneous fission of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-04-01

    Although spontaneous fission was discovered in /sup 238/U in 1940, detailed studies of the process were first made possible in the 1960's with the availability of milligram quantities of /sup 252/Cf. The advent of solid-state detectors made it possible to perform measurements of coincident fission fragments from even very short-lived spontaneous fission activities or those available in only very small quantities. Until 1971 it was believed that the main features of the mass and kinetic-energy distributions were essentially the same as those for thermal neutron-induced fission and that all low-energy fission proceeded via asymmetric mass division with total kinetic energies which could be derived by linear extrapolation from those of lighter elements. In 1971, measurements of /sup 257/Fm showed an increase in symmetric mass division with anomalously high TKE's. Subsequent experiments showed that in /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, the most probable mass split was symmetric with very high total kinetic energy. Measurements for the heavier elements have shown symmetric mass distributions with both high and low total kinetic energies. Recent results for spontaneous fission properties of the heaviest elements are reviewed and compared with theory. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Solid fuel burning stove

    SciTech Connect

    Good, L.D.

    1982-07-13

    A solid fuel burning stove includes a firebox having an insulated bottom chamber in which fuel is burned. The bottom chamber includes an insulated bottom surface and walls which provides for heat retention when fuel is burn therein thereby creating high temperatures. The bottom chamber of the firebox is divided from a top chamber by a horizontally extending baffle which directs flow of exhaust gases from the bottom to the top of the firebox. The exhaust gases are burned in the top portion of the firebox by means of the heat generated within the lower chamber and the introduction of fresh combustion air. This fresh combustion air is drawn in through an orificed pipe extending along the length of the firebox. After the gases are burned in the top portion of the stove, they are communicated to a heat saver including an inverted v-shaped flow diverter which reduces the velocity of the exiting gases and provides for greater recovery of heat therefrom. The stove in accordance with the invention provides for a two-stage burning process wherein solid fuel is burned in the first stage and the volatile gases released by the fuel are burned in the second stage. In this way, the fuel is consumed in a most efficient manner.

  18. Wetting of Porous Solids.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Saket; Chaudhuri, Parag

    2013-01-10

    This paper presents a simple, three stage method to simulate the mechanics of wetting of porous solid objects, like sponges and cloth, when they interact with a fluid. In the first stage, we model the absorption of fluid by the object when it comes in contact with the fluid. In the second stage, we model the transport of absorbed fluid inside the object, due to diffusion, as a flow in a deforming, unstructured mesh. The fluid diffuses within the object depending on saturation of its various parts and other body forces. Finally, in the third stage, over-saturated parts of the object shed extra fluid by dripping. The simulation model is motivated by the physics of imbibition of fluids into porous solids in the presence of gravity. It is phenomenologically capable of simulating wicking and imbibition, dripping, surface flows over wet media, material weakening and volume expansion due to wetting. The model is inherently mass conserving and works for both thin 2D objects like cloth and for 3D volumetric objects like sponges. It is also designed to be computationally efficient and can be easily added to existing cloth, soft body and fluid simulation pipelines. PMID:23319518

  19. Wetting of porous solids.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Saket; Chaudhuri, Parag

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a simple, three stage method to simulate the mechanics of wetting of porous solid objects, like sponges and cloth, when they interact with a fluid. In the first stage, we model the absorption of fluid by the object when it comes in contact with the fluid. In the second stage, we model the transport of absorbed fluid inside the object, due to diffusion, as a flow in a deforming, unstructured mesh. The fluid diffuses within the object depending on saturation of its various parts and other body forces. Finally, in the third stage, oversaturated parts of the object shed extra fluid by dripping. The simulation model is motivated by the physics of imbibition of fluids into porous solids in the presence of gravity. It is phenomenologically capable of simulating wicking and imbibition, dripping, surface flows over wet media, material weakening, and volume expansion due to wetting. The model is inherently mass conserving and works for both thin 2D objects like cloth and for 3D volumetric objects like sponges. It is also designed to be computationally efficient and can be easily added to existing cloth, soft body, and fluid simulation pipelines. PMID:23846102

  20. Method and apparatus for acoustic plate mode liquid-solid phase transition detection

    DOEpatents

    Blair, Dianna S.; Freye, Gregory C.; Hughes, Robert C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a liquid-solid phase transition event is provided which comprises an acoustic plate mode detecting element placed in contact with a liquid or solid material which generates a high-frequency acoustic wave that is attenuated to an extent based on the physical state of the material is contact with the detecting element. The attenuation caused by the material in contact with the acoustic plate mode detecting element is used to determine the physical state of the material being detected. The method and device are particularly suited for detecting conditions such as the icing and deicing of wings of an aircraft. In another aspect of the present invention, a method is provided wherein the adhesion of a solid material to the detecting element can be measured using the apparatus of the invention.

  1. Method of securing filter elements

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Erik P.; Haslam, Jeffery L.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2016-10-04

    A filter securing system including a filter unit body housing; at least one tubular filter element positioned in the filter unit body housing, the tubular filter element having a closed top and an open bottom; a dimple in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element; and a socket in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element that receives the dimple in either the filter unit body housing or the top of the tubular filter element to secure the tubular filter element to the filter unit body housing.

  2. CONCENTEIC TUBULAR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, C.W.

    1960-08-16

    An improved fuel element for an organic-moderated reactor was designed that comprises an inner and an outer container tube, a plurality of spaced, concentric fuel tubes positioned between the container tubes, each of the fuel tubes comprising a core of fissionable material with cladding on the sides thereof, each of the sides having a plurality of fins, the fuel tubes and the container tubes defining annular spaces for coolant flow, and the inner container tube defining a channel for a reactor moderator.

  3. [Healthcare marketing elements].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Marketing puts its foundation on a few key concepts: need-demand, product-service, satisfaction, exchange, market, or business structure manufacturing / supply. The combination of these elements allows you to build an effective marketing strategy. Crucial in this respect is to remember the Porter matrix, which shows that for a correct analysis of the relevant market is necessary to refer to the "five forces at play", ie: customers, competitors, new entrants and substitutes threat. Another key lever for proper marketing oriented approach is the continuous and constant monitoring of the application, anticipating their dissatisfactions. PMID:24777920

  4. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

  5. TWISTED RIBBON FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Schultz, A.B.

    1961-06-01

    A reactor core formed of bundles of parallel fuel elements in the form of ribbons is patented. The fuel ribbons are twisted about their axes so as to have contact with one another at regions spaced lengthwise of the ribbons and to be out of contact with one another at locations between these spaced regions. The contact between the ribbons is sufficient to allow them to be held together in a stable bundle in a containing tube without intermediate support, while permitting enough space between the ribbon for coolant flowing.

  6. [Healthcare marketing elements].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Marketing puts its foundation on a few key concepts: need-demand, product-service, satisfaction, exchange, market, or business structure manufacturing / supply. The combination of these elements allows you to build an effective marketing strategy. Crucial in this respect is to remember the Porter matrix, which shows that for a correct analysis of the relevant market is necessary to refer to the "five forces at play", ie: customers, competitors, new entrants and substitutes threat. Another key lever for proper marketing oriented approach is the continuous and constant monitoring of the application, anticipating their dissatisfactions.

  7. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Forsythe, C.

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases into a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Carl E.; Crouthamel, Carl E.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of oxygen gettering material on the inner surface of the cladding. The gettering material reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core thereby preventing the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is an improved method for coating the inner surface of the cladding with a layer of gettering material.

  9. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore » a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  10. Ring-laser gyroscope system using dispersive element(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A ring-laser gyroscope system includes a ring-laser gyroscope (RLG) and at least one dispersive element optically coupled to the RLG's ring-shaped optical path. Each dispersive element has a resonant frequency that is approximately equal to the RLG's lasing frequency. A group index of refraction defined collectively by the dispersive element(s) has (i) a real portion that is greater than zero and less than one, and (ii) an imaginary portion that is less than zero.

  11. Element-by-element Solution Procedures for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. J. R.; Winget, J. M.; Levit, I.

    1984-01-01

    Element-by-element approximate factorization procedures are proposed for solving the large finite element equation systems which arise in nonlinear structural mechanics. Architectural and data base advantages of the present algorithms over traditional direct elimination schemes are noted. Results of calculations suggest considerable potential for the methods described.

  12. Higher order finite element analysis of thick composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, J.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    A higher order, sub-parametric, laminated, 3D solid finite element was used for the analysis of very thick laminated composite plates. The geometry of this element is defined by four nodes in the X-Y plane which define a prism of material through the thickness of the laminate. There are twenty-four degrees of freedom at each node; translations at the upper and lower surfaces of the laminate in each of the three coordinate directions, and the derivatives of these translations with respect to each coordinate. This choice of degrees of freedom leads to displacement and strain compatibility at the corners. Stacking sequence effects are accounted for by explicitly integrating the strain energy density through the thickness of the element. The laminated solid element was combined with a gap-contact element to analyze thick laminated composite lugs loaded through flexible pins. The resulting model accounts for pin bending effects that produce non-uniform bearing stresses through the thickness of the lug. A thick composite lug experimental test program was performed, and provided data that was used to validate the analytical model. Two lug geometries and three stacking sequences were tested.

  13. Adsorption of heavy metals by road deposited solids.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodawatta, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    The research study discussed in the paper investigated the adsorption/desorption behaviour of heavy metals commonly deposited on urban road surfaces, namely, Zn, Cu, Cr and Pb, for different particle size ranges of solids. The study outcomes, based on field studies and batch experiments, confirmed that road deposited solids particles contain a significantly high amount of vacant charge sites with the potential to adsorb additional heavy metals. Kinetic studies and adsorption experiments indicated that Cr is the most preferred metal element to associate with solids due to the relatively high electronegativity and high charge density of trivalent cation (Cr(3+)). However, the relatively low availability of Cr in the urban road environment could influence this behaviour. Comparing total adsorbed metals present in solids particles, it was found that Zn has the highest capacity for adsorption to solids. Desorption experiments confirmed that a low concentration of Cu, Cr and Pb in solids was present in water-soluble and exchangeable form, whilst a significant fraction of adsorbed Zn has a high likelihood of being released back into solution. Among heavy metals, Zn is considered to be the most commonly available metal among road surface pollutants.

  14. Structure-Property Relationships of Solids in Pharmaceutical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of solid dosage forms is witnessing a seismic shift in the recent years. In contrast to the earlier days when drug development was empirical, now there is a significant emphasis on a more scientific and structured development process, primarily driven by the Quality-by-Design (QbD) initiatives of US Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA). Central to such an approach is the enhanced understanding of solid materials using the concept of Materials Science Tetrahedron (MST) that probes the interplay between four elements, viz., the structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials. In this thesis work, we have investigated the relationships between the structure and those properties of pharmaceutical solids that influence their processing behavior. In all cases, we have used material-sparing approaches to facilitate property assessment using very small sample size of materials, which is a pre-requisite in the early stages of drug development when the availability of materials, drugs in particular, is limited. The influence of solid structure, either at the molecular or bulk powder levels, on crystal plasticity and powder compaction, powder flow, and solid-state amorphization during milling, has been investigated in this study. Through such a systematic evaluation, we have captured the involvement of structure-property correlations within a wide spectrum of relevant processing behaviors of pharmaceutical solids. Such a holistic analysis will be beneficial for addressing both regulatory and scientific issues in drug development.

  15. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, Mohamed; Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.

    1993-01-01

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

  16. Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

    1993-10-12

    This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

  17. Position sensitive solid state detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnatterly, S. E.; Husk, D.

    1986-05-01

    Solid state detectors have been used for years as high quantum efficiency detectors for visible light. In this paper the use of PDA and CCD, solid state detectors, in the X-ray region will be discussed. In particular examples of data in the soft X-ray region are presented. Finally the use of phosphor coatings to enhance the sensitivity of solid state detectors is described.

  18. The CEBAF Element Database

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce

    2011-03-01

    With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element Database (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the database will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective database schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the database history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.

  19. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  20. Process for purification of solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzer, H.; Rath, H. J.; Schmidt, D.

    1981-01-01

    A process for purifying solids, especially silicon, by melting and subsequent resolidification, is described. Silicon used in solar cell manufacturing is processed more efficiently and cost effectively.