Science.gov

Sample records for 8-node solid shell

  1. Optimal low-order fully integrated solid-shell elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rah, K.; Paepegem, W. Van; Habraken, A. M.; Degrieck, J.; de Sousa, R. J. Alves; Valente, R. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents three optimal low-order fully integrated geometrically nonlinear solid-shell elements based on the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) method and the assumed natural strain method for different types of structural analyses, e.g. analysis of thin homogeneous isotropic and multilayer anisotropic composite shell-like structures and the analysis of (near) incompressible materials. The proposed solid-shell elements possess eight nodes with only displacement degrees of freedom and a few internal EAS parameters. Due to the 3D geometric description of the proposed elements, 3D constitutive laws can directly be employed in these formulations. The present formulations are based on the well-known Fraeijs de Veubeke-Hu-Washizu multifield variational principle. In terms of accuracy as well as efficiency point of view, the choice of the optimal EAS parameters plays a very critical role in the EAS method, therefore a systematic numerical study has been carried out to find out the optimal EAS parameters to alleviate different locking phenomena for the proposed solid-shell formulations. To assess the accuracy of the proposed solid-shell elements, a variety of popular numerical benchmark examples related to element convergence, mesh distortions, element aspect ratios and different locking phenomena are investigated and the results are compared with the well-known solid-shell formulations available in the literature. The results of our numerical assessment show that the proposed solid-shell formulations provide very accurate results, without showing any numerical problems, for a variety of geometrically linear and nonlinear structural problems.

  2. Nonlinear shell analysis of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, N. F., Jr.; Gillian, R. E.; Nemeth, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a 'snapshot picture' of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  3. Nonlinear shell analyses of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1989-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  4. A novel versatile multilayer hybrid stress solid-shell element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rah, K.; Van Paepegem, W.; Degrieck, J.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a versatile multilayer locking free hybrid stress solid-shell element that can be readily employed for a wide range of geometrically linear elastic structural analyses, i.e. from shell-like isotropic structures to multilayer anisotropic composites. This solid-shell element has eight nodes with only displacement degrees of freedom and a few internal parameters that provide the locking free behavior and accurate interlaminar stress resolution through the element thickness. These elements can be stacked on top of each other to model multilayer structures, fulfilling the interlaminar stress continuity at the interlayer surfaces and zero traction conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of composite laminates. The element formulation is based on the modified form of the well-known Fraeijs de Veubeke-Hu-Washizu (FHW) multifield variational principle with enhanced assumed strains (EAS formulation) and assumed natural strains (ANS formulation) to alleviate the different types of locking phenomena in solid-shell elements. The distinct feature of the present formulation is its ability to accurately calculate the interlaminar stress field in multilayer structures, which is achieved by incorporating an assumed stress field in a standard EAS formulation based on the FHW principle. To assess the present formulation's accuracy, a variety of popular numerical benchmark examples related to element patch tests, convergence, mesh distortion, shell and laminated composite analyses are investigated and the results are compared with those available in the literature. This assessment reveals that the proposed solid-shell formulation provides very accurate results for a wide range of structural analyses.

  5. Kl-impregnated Oyster Shells as a Solid Catalyst for Soybean Oil Transesterificaton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on inexpensive and green catalysts is needed for economical production of biodiesel. The goal of the research was to test KI-impregnated oyster shell as a solid catalyst for transesterification of soybean oil. Specific objectives were to characterize KI-impregnated oyster shell, determine t...

  6. An 8-node tetrahedral finite element suitable for explicit transient dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Stone, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Considerable effort has been expended in perfecting the algorithmic properties of 8-node hexahedral finite elements. Today the element is well understood and performs exceptionally well when used in modeling three-dimensional explicit transient dynamic events. However, the automatic generation of all-hexahedral meshes remains an elusive achievement. The alternative of automatic generation for all-tetrahedral finite element is a notoriously poor performer, and the 10-node quadratic tetrahedral finite element while a better performer numerically is computationally expensive. To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation extant today, the authors have explored the creation of a quality 8-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four midface nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular, they examine the 80node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element only samples constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hourglass modes. In this regard, it bears similarities to the 8-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the 8-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the 8-node hexahedral finite element and handbuilt meshes.

  7. Fully Integrated EAS-Based Solid-Shell Finite Elements in Implicit Sheet Metal Forming Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valente, R.A. Fontes; Cardoso, R.P.R.; Alves de Sousa, R.J.; Parente, M.P.L.; Jorge, R.M. Natal

    2005-08-05

    In this communication sheet metal forming problems are analyzed with the Finite Element Method and a fully-integrated solid-shell element, based on the Enhanced Assumed Strain (EAS) method. Among the solid-shell element's distinguish features, it should be mentioned the solely use of the EAS approach in dealing with either transverse and volumetric-based locking pathologies, thus avoiding the inclusion of other mixed methods into the formulation. The adopted methodology is then able to successfully deal with small thickness shell problems within the incompressible range, aspects commonly appearing in sheet metal forming modeling with solid elements.Simulations of this type of forming processes are mainly solved resorting to membrane and shell-type finite elements, included in explicit commercial programs. Nevertheless, the presented solid-shell formulation, within a fully implicit approach, provides reliable solutions when compared to experimental results. It is also worth mentioning that the present solid-shell formulation encompasses a minimum set of enhancing strain variables, if compared to other fully integrated hexahedral finite elements in the literature.In order to assess the performance of the presented formulation, the S-Rail Forming problem of an aluminum alloy is described and analyzed, with the results being compared to experimental and numerical simulation data.

  8. Torrefaction of almond shells: effects of torrefaction conditions on properties of solid and condensate products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond shells were torrefied in a fixed bed reactor and their solid and condensate products were collected for analysis. A central composite design and response surface methodology were used to examine effects of torrefaction temperature and time on mass and energy yields of solid products as well a...

  9. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-13

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization. PMID:26948023

  10. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  11. A solid-shell Cosserat point element (SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element (SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  12. A solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  13. Cloaking core-shell nanoparticles from conducting electrons in solids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bolin; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2012-09-21

    In this Letter, we aim at making nanoparticles embedded in a host semiconductor with a size comparable to electronic wavelengths "invisible" to the electron transport. Inspired by the recent progress made in optics and working within the framework of the expansion of partial waves, we demonstrate that the opposite effects imposed by potential barriers and wells of a core-shell nanoparticle on the phase shifts associated with the scattered electron wave could make the scattering cross section of the first two partial waves vanish simultaneously. We show that this is sufficient to cloak the nanoparticle from being detected by electrons with specific energy in the sense that a total scattering cross section smaller than 0.01% of the physical cross section can be obtained and a 4 orders of magnitude difference in the total scattering cross section can be presented within an energy range of only 40 meV, indicating possible applications of the "electron cloaks" as novel electronic switches and sensors, and in efficient energy harvesting and conversion technologies. PMID:23005976

  14. Cloaking Core-Shell Nanoparticles from Conducting Electrons in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bolin; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2012-09-01

    In this Letter, we aim at making nanoparticles embedded in a host semiconductor with a size comparable to electronic wavelengths “invisible” to the electron transport. Inspired by the recent progress made in optics and working within the framework of the expansion of partial waves, we demonstrate that the opposite effects imposed by potential barriers and wells of a core-shell nanoparticle on the phase shifts associated with the scattered electron wave could make the scattering cross section of the first two partial waves vanish simultaneously. We show that this is sufficient to cloak the nanoparticle from being detected by electrons with specific energy in the sense that a total scattering cross section smaller than 0.01% of the physical cross section can be obtained and a 4 orders of magnitude difference in the total scattering cross section can be presented within an energy range of only 40 meV, indicating possible applications of the “electron cloaks” as novel electronic switches and sensors, and in efficient energy harvesting and conversion technologies.

  15. Axisymmetric shell analysis of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 51-L) accident led to an intense investigation of the structural behavior of the solid rocket booster (SRB) tang and clevis field joints. The presence of structural deformations between the clevis inner leg and the tang, substantial enough to prevent the O-ring seals from eliminating hot gas flow through the joints, has emerged as a likely cause of the vehicle failure. This paper presents results of axisymmetric shell analyses that parametrically assess the structural behavior of SRB field joints subjected to quasi-steady-state internal pressure loading for both the original joint flown on mission STS 51-L and the redesigned joint recently flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Discussion of axisymmetric shell modeling issues and details is presented and a generic method for simulating contact between adjacent shells of revolution is described. Results are presented that identify the performance trends of the joints for a wide range of joint parameters.

  16. Template-Engaged Solid-State Synthesis of Barium Magnesium Silicate Yolk@Shell Particles and Their High Photoluminescence Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuncai; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-05-17

    This study presents a new synthetic method for fabricating yolk@shell-structured barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles through a template-engaged solid-state reaction. First, as the core template, (BaMg)CO3 spherical particles were prepared based on the coprecipitation of Ba(2+) and Mg(2+) . These core particles were then uniformly shelled with silica (SiO2 ) by using CTAB as the structure-directing template to form (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles with a core@shell structure. The (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles were then converted to yolk@shell barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles by an interfacial solid-state reaction between the (BaMg)CO3 (core) and the SiO2 (shell) at 750 °C. During this interfacial solid-state reaction, Kirkendall diffusion contributed to the formation of yolk@shell BMS particles. Thus, the synthetic temperature for the (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor is significantly reduced from 1200 °C with the conventional method to 750 °C with the proposed method. In addition, the photoluminescence intensity of the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor was found to be 9.8 times higher than that of the conventional (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor. The higher absorption of excitation light by the structure of the yolk@shell phosphor is induced by multiple light-reflection and -scattering events in the interstitial void between the yolk and the shell. When preparing the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor, a hydrogen environment for the solid-state reaction results in higher photoluminescence efficiency than nitrogen and air environments. The proposed synthetic method can be easily extended to the synthesis of other yolk@shell multicomponent metal silicates. PMID:27059894

  17. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  18. Finite-Element Modeling of Solid State Convection within Europa's Ice Shell: Implications for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R.

    2001-12-01

    Solid state convection within Europa's ice shell has important implications for astrobiology because it drives relatively swift, large scale vertical motion over geologically short time scales. On Europa, convection may occur within the lower portion of the floating ice shell. The strong dependence of the viscosity of ice on temperature leads to the formation of a stagnant lid at Europa's surface where convective motion ceases. Beneath the stagnant lid, convective motions facilitate cycling of nutrients through the ice shell. In upwelling areas, relatively nutrient-poor, but possibly microbe-containing and biochemically-modified ice is pushed toward the surface. Downwellings push near-surface ice modified by surface radiation down to the ocean. Dissipation of tidal heat within the ice shell is dependent on the viscosity of the ice: warm, low-viscosity ice will dissipate more energy than cold, brittle ice. This positive feedback between tidal heating and viscosity can result in isolated pockets of melting within Europa's ice shell [Wang & Stevenson, 2000]. These pockets of melt could potentially harbor isolated microbial communities for a finite amount of time. We are in the process of modifying a 3 dimensional finite-element code originally constructed to model Earth's mantle (Citcom) [Zhong, 1998] to apply to icy systems. This model will take into account tidal heating within the ice shell, and the presence of salts and partial melt within the ice. Results of our preliminary 2 dimensional modeling confirm that the convecting sub-layer of Europa's ice shell is recycled in 105 years, and confirm that isolated pockets of melt can be generated within Europa's ice shell by tidal heating. Our model can be used to calculate the mass of ice deposited beneath the stagnant lid as a function of position on Europa. These mass flux estimates coupled with models of the formation of surface features which involve breaching the stagnant lid will help identify the locations on

  19. Facile synthesis and microwave absorbability of C@Ni–NiO core–shell hybrid solid sphere and multi-shelled NiO hollow sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hongjing; Wu, Guanglei; Wu, Qiaofeng; Wang, Liuding

    2014-11-15

    We reported the preparation of C@Ni–NiO core–shell hybrid solid spheres or multi-shelled NiO hollow spheres by combining a facile hydrothermal route with a calcination process in H{sub 2} or air atmosphere, respectively. The synthesized C@Ni–NiO core–shell solid spheres with diameters of approximately 2–6 μm were in fact built from dense NiO nanoparticles coated by random two-dimensional metal Ni nanosheets without any visible pores. The multi-shelled NiO hollow spheres were built from particle-like ligaments and there are a lot of pores with size of several nanometers on the surface. Combined Raman spectra with X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), it suggested that the defects in the samples play a limited role in the dielectric loss. Compared with the other samples, the permeability of the samples calcined in H{sub 2} and air was increased slightly and the natural resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency (7, 11 and 14 GHz, respectively), leading to an enhancement of microwave absorption property. For the sample calcined in H{sub 2}, an optimal reflection loss less than − 10 was obtained at 7 GHz with a matching thickness of 5.0 mm. Our study demonstrated the potential application of C@Ni–NiO core–shell hybrid solid sphere or multi-shelled NiO hollow sphere as a more efficient electromagnetic (EM) wave absorber. - Highlights: • C@Ni–NiO core–shell hybrid solid sphere was synthesized by a facile method. • Multi-shelled NiO hollow sphere was synthesized by a facile method. • It suggested that the defects in the samples play a limited role in dielectric loss. • The permeability of the samples calcined in H{sub 2} and air was increased. • Microwave absorbability of C@Ni–NiO core–shell hybrid solid sphere was investigated.

  20. Negative axial radiation forces on solid spheres and shells in a Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L

    2007-12-01

    Prior computations predict that fluid spheres illuminated by an acoustic Bessel beam can be subjected to a radiation force directed opposite the direction of beam propagation. The prediction of negative acoustic radiation force is extended to the cases of a solid poly(methylmethacrylate) PMMA sphere in water and an empty aluminum spherical shell in water. Compared with the angular scattering patterns for plane wave illumination, the scattering into the back hemisphere is suppressed when the radiation force is negative. This investigation may be helpful in the development of acoustic tweezers and in the development of methods for manipulating objects during space flight. PMID:18247728

  1. Preliminary 2-D shell analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional shell model of an entire solid rocket booster (SRB) has been developed using the STAGSC-1 computer code and executed on the Ames CRAY computer. The purpose of these analyses is to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for the SRB when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. The mechanical loading conditions for the full SRB arise from the external tank (ET) attachment points, the solid rocket motor (SRM) pressure load, and the SRB hold down posts. The ET strut loads vary with time after the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) ignition. The SRM internal pressure varies axially by approximately 100 psi. Static analyses of the full SRB are performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. The field and factory joints are modeled by using equivalent stiffness joints instead of detailed models of the joint. As such, local joint behavior cannot be obtained from this global model.

  2. Axisymmetric shell analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 51-L) accident led to an intense investigation of the structural behavior of the solid rocket booster (SRB) tang and clevis field joints. Results are presented of axisymmetric shell analyses that parametrically assess the structural behavior of SRB field joints subjected to quasi-steady-state internal pressure loading for both the original joint flown on mission STS 51-L and the redesigned joint flown for the first time after the STS 51-L accident on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Discussion of axisymmetric shell modeling issues and details is presented and a generic method for simulating contact between adjacent shells of revolution is described. Results are presented that identify the performance trends of the joints for a wide range of joint parameters. An important finding is that the redesigned joint exhibits significantly smaller O-ring gap changes and much less sensitivity to joint clearances than the original joint. For a wide range of joint parameters, the result presented indicate that the redesigned joint provides a much better pressure seal than the original joint.

  3. Evaluation of Flygt Propeller Xixers for Double Shell Tank (DST) High Level Waste Auxiliary Solids Mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-07-20

    The River Protection Project (RPP) is planning to retrieve radioactive waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) underground at the Hanford Site. This waste will then be transferred to a waste treatment plant to be immobilized (vitrified) in a stable glass form. Over the years, the waste solids in many of the tanks have settled to form a layer of sludge at the bottom. The thickness of the sludge layer varies from tank to tank, from no sludge or a few inches of sludge to about 15 ft of sludge. The purpose of this technology and engineering case study is to evaluate the Flygt{trademark} submersible propeller mixer as a potential technology for auxiliary mobilization of DST HLW solids. Considering the usage and development to date by other sites in the development of this technology, this study also has the objective of expanding the knowledge base of the Flygt{trademark} mixer concept with the broader perspective of Hanford Site tank waste retrieval. More specifically, the objectives of this study delineated from the work plan are described.

  4. Core-shell electrospun polybutylene terephthalate/polypyrrole hollow nanofibers for micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Habib; Rezvani, Omid; Banihashemi, Solmaz

    2016-02-19

    In the present work, a new micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) sorbent as an extracting medium based on core-shell nanofibers was synthesized by electrospinning. The core-shell nanofibers of polyvinylpyrrolidone-Polybutylene terephthalate/polypyrrole (PVP-PBT/PPy) were electrospun and subsequently, modified hollow nanofibers were prepared by removing the central PVP moiety. Moreover, conventional PBT/PPy was also prepared for the comparison purposes. The homogeneity and the porous surface structure of the core-shell nanofibers were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The applicability of the fabricated nanofibers-coating was examined by immersed μ-SPE of some selected triazine herbicides from aqueous samples and wheat grains. Subsequently, the extracted analytes were transferred into a gas chromatography (GC) after solvent desorption. Influencing parameters on the morphology of nanofiber such as elctrospinning parameters and the weight ratio of components were optimized. In addition, effects of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency including extraction temperature, extraction time, ionic strength, sample pH, desorption temperature, and desorption time were investigated and optimized. Eventually, the developed method was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). At the optimum conditions, the relative standard deviation values for real water samples spiked with the selected triazines at 1 ng mL(-1) were 4-8% (n=3) and the limits of detection for the studied compounds were between 50 and 90 ng L(-1). The calibration curves for the selected triazines were in the range of 0.3-500 ng mL(-1) and regression coefficients (R(2)) were between 0.9985 and 0.9996. PMID:26810808

  5. Characterizing Solids in Residual Wastes from Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Heald, Steve M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2010-03-03

    Solid-phase characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from underground single-shell storage tanks 241-C-103, 241 C 106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112 at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. The results of studies completed to date show variability in the compositions of those residual wastes and the compositions, morphologies, and crystallinities of the individual phases that make up these wastes. These differences undoubtedly result from the various waste types stored and transferred into and out of each tank and the different sluicing and retrieval operations used for waste retrieval. The studies indicate that these residual wastes are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or coprecipitated within oxide/hydroxide phases. Depending on the specific tank, various solids (e.g., gibbsite; böhmite; dawsonite; cancrinite; Fe oxides/hydroxides such as hematite, goethite, and maghemite; rhodochrosite; lindbergite; whewellite; nitratine; and numerous amorphous or poorly crystalline phases) have been identified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in residual wastes studied to date. The studies also show that contact of residual wastes with Ca(OH)2- and CaCO3-saturated aqueous solutions, which were used as surrogates for the compositions of pore-fluid leachants derived from young and aged cements, respectively, may alter the composition of solid phases present in the contacted wastes. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual wastes studied to date. They occur in these wastes as discrete particles, particles intergrown within a matrix of other phases, and surface coatings on other particles or particle aggregates. These Fe oxides/hydroxides typically contain trace concentrations of other

  6. K-shell processes in heavy-ion collisions in solids and the local plasma approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhane, Umesh; Montanari, C. C.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2003-03-01

    We have investigated K-shell vacancy production due to ionization and electron transfer processes, in collisions of highly charged oxygen ions with various solid targets such as Cl, K, Ti, Fe, and Cu at energies between 1.5 and 6.0 MeV/u. The K-shell ionization cross sections were derived from the measured K x-ray cross sections. An ab initio theoretical model based on the local plasma approximation (LPA), which is an extension of the dielectric formalism to consider core electrons, provides an explanation of the measured data only qualitatively. In case of asymmetric collisions (Zp/Zt<0.35, Zp, Zt being the atomic numbers of the projectile and target, respectively) and at higher energies, the LPA model explains the data to some extent but deviates for more symmetric collision systems. On the other hand, a perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) calculation (ECPSSR), including the corrective terms due to energy (E) loss, Coulomb (C) deflection, and relativistic (R) wave functions designed for ion-atom collisions agree quite well with the data for different combinations of target and projectile elements. In addition, we have also measured the K(target)-K(projectile) electron transfer cross sections and compared them with a model based on perturbed-stationary-state approximation.

  7. Frequency Split Elimination Method for a Solid-State Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro with an Imperfect Axisymmetric-Shell Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Fu, Mengyin; Deng, Zhihong; Liu, Ning; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The resonator of a solid-state vibratory gyro is responsible for sensing angular motion. Frequency splitting of an axisymmetric-shell resonator is a common problem caused by manufacturing defects. The defect causes a frequency difference between two working modes which consist of two nodes and two antinodes. The difference leads to the loss of gyroscopic effect, and thus the resonator cannot sense angular motion. In this paper, the resonator based on an axisymmetric multi-curved surface shell structure is investigated and an approach to eliminate frequency splits is proposed. Since axisymmetric multi-curved surface shell resonators are too complex to be modeled, this paper proposes a simplified model by focusing on a common property of the axisymmetric shell. The resonator with stochastic imperfections is made equivalent to a perfect shell with an imperfect mass point. Rayleigh's energy method is used in the theoretical analysis. Finite element modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the elimination approach. In real cases, a resonator's frequency split is eliminated by the proposed approach. In this paper, errors in the theoretical analysis are discussed and steps to be taken when the deviation between assumptions and the real situation is large are figured out. The resonator has good performance after processing. The elimination approach can be applied to any kind of solid-state vibratory gyro resonators with an axisymmetric shell structure. PMID:25648707

  8. Estimate of the Distribution of Solids Within Mixed Hanford Double-Shell Tank AZ-101: Implications for AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Ressler, Jennifer J.

    2009-04-29

    This paper describes the current level of understanding of the suspension of solids in Hanford double-shell waste tanks while being mixed with the baseline configuration of two 300-horsepower mixer pumps. A mixer pump test conducted in Tank AZ-101 during fiscal year 2000 provided the basis for this understanding. Information gaps must be filled to demonstrate the capability of the baseline feed delivery system to effectively mix, sample, and deliver double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for vitrification.

  9. Geological evidence for solid-state convection in Europa's ice shell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pappalardo, R.T.; Head, J.W.; Greeley, R.; Sullivan, R.J.; Pilcher, C.; Schubert, G.; Moore, W.B.; Carr, M.H.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Belton, M.J.S.; Goldsby, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The ice-rich surface of the jovian satellite Europa is sparsely cratered, suggesting that this moon might be geologically active today. Moreover, models of the satellite's interior indicate that tidal interactions with Jupiter might produce enough heat to maintain a subsurface liquid water layer. But the mechanisms of interior heat loss and resurfacing are currently unclear, as is the question of whether Europa has (or had at one time) a liquid water ocean. Here we report on the morphology and geological interpretation of distinct surface features-pits, domes and spots-discovered in high-resolution images of Europa obtained by the Galileo spacecraft. The features are interpreted as the surface manifestation of diapirs, relatively warm localized ice masses that have risen buoyantly through the subsurface. We find that the formation of the features can be explained by thermally induced solid-state convection within an ice shell, possibly overlying a liquid water layer. Our results are consistent with the possibility that Europa has a liquid water ocean beneath a surface layer of ice, but further tests and observations are needed to demonstrate this conclusively.

  10. Disks solid phase extraction based polypyrrole functionalized core-shell nanofibers mat.

    PubMed

    Qi, FeiFei; Li, XiaoQing; Yang, BiYi; Rong, Fei; Xu, Qian

    2015-11-01

    A novel disks solid phase extraction (SPE) based on polypyrrole (PPy) functionalized core-shell electrospun nanofibers mat was proposed. The performance of the established disks SPE technique was evaluated in the extraction of trace polar analytes from environmental water samples. Disulphonated (acid yellow 9) and monosulphonated azo dyes (acid orange 7 and metanil yellow) were selected as typical model analytes. Under the optimum conditions, detection limits were 0.15-0.3 μg/L for all target analytes and the enrichment coefficients were 106-121. The recoveries of sulfonated azo dyes added to typical environmental water samples were 87.6-112.3%, suggesting that the interferences of the sample matrix did not affect the enrichment. Compared with existing methods, the device in this study showed higher recovery, lower detection limit and better precision. Moreover, the miniaturized disks SPE technique for sample preparation is simple and fast, with significantly reduced sorbent bed mass (2.5 mg) and eluent volume (500 μL). These results indicate that PPy nanofibers mat-based disks SPE may be a promising device that can effectively extract the polar species in water samples. PMID:26452802

  11. Geological evidence for solid-state convection in Europa's ice shell.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, R T; Head, J W; Greeley, R; Sullivan, R J; Pilcher, C; Schubert, G; Moore, W B; Carr, M H; Moore, J M; Belton, M J; Goldsby, D L

    1998-01-22

    The ice-rich surface of the jovian satellite Europa is sparsely cratered, suggesting that this moon might be geologically active today. Moreover, models of the satellite's interior indicate that tidal interactions with Jupiter might produce enough heat to maintain a subsurface liquid water layer. But the mechanisms of interior heat loss and resurfacing are currently unclear, as is the question of whether Europa has (or had at one time) a liquid water ocean. Here we report on the morphology and geological interpretation of distinct surface features-pits, domes and spots-discovered in high-resolution images of Europa obtained by the Galileo spacecraft. The features are interpreted as the surface manifestation of diapirs, relatively warm localized ice masses that have risen buoyantly through the subsurface. We find that the formation of the features can be explained by thermally induced solid-state convection within an ice shell, possibly overlying a liquid water layer. Our results are consistent with the possibility that Europa has a liquid water ocean beneath a surface layer of ice, but further tests and observations are needed to demonstrate this conclusively. PMID:9450750

  12. Hierarchical Conducting Polymer@Clay Core-Shell Arrays for Flexible All-Solid-State Supercapacitor Devices.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mingfei; Li, Zhenhua; Zhang, Ruikang; Ning, Fanyu; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2015-08-01

    A sophisticated hierarchical nanoarray consisting of a conducting polymer (polypyrrole, PPy) core and layered double hydroxide (LDH) shell are synthesized via a facile two-step electrosynthesis method. The obtained PPy@LDH-based flexible all-solid-state supercapacitor meets the requirements of both high energy/power output and long-term endurance, which can be potentially used in highly-efficient and stable energy storage. PMID:25788400

  13. Core-Shell Diamond as a Support for Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Gaurav; Jensen, David S.; Wiest, Landon A.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Lee, Milton L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2010-06-01

    We report the formation of core-shell diamond particles for solid phase extraction (SPE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) made by layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition. Their synthesis begins with the amine functionalization of microdiamond by its immersion in an aqueous solution of a primary amine-containing polymer (polyallylamine (PAAm)). The amine-terminated microdiamond is then immersed in an aqueous suspension of nanodiamond, which leads to adsorption of the nanodiamond. Alternating (self-limiting) immersions in the solutions of the amine-containing polymer and the suspension of nanodiamond are continued until the desired number of nanodiamond layers is formed around the microdiamond. Finally, the core-shell particles are cross-linked with 1,2,5,6-diepoxycyclooctane or reacted with 1,2-epoxyoctadecane. Layer-by-layer deposition of PAAm and nanodiamond is also studied on planar Si/SiO2 surfaces, which were characterized by SEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Core-shell particles are characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area and pore size measurements. Larger (ca. 50 μm) core-shell diamond particles have much higher surface areas, and analyte loading capacities in SPE than nonporous solid diamond particles. Smaller (ca. 3 μm), normal and reversed phase, core-shell diamond particles have been used for HPLC, with 36,300 plates per meter for mesitylene in a separation of benzene and alkyl benzenes on a C18 adsorbent, and 54,800 plates per meter for diazinon in a similar separation of two pesticides.

  14. A facile route to core-shell nanoparticulate formation of arsenic trioxide for effective solid tumor treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongjun; Liu, Hanyu; Zhou, Hualu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Shan, Hong; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity (57.9 wt%) and a prolonged pH-responsive releasing profile, which is crucial to increase the drug concentration at tumor sites and improve the drug efficacy. Based on these unique features, the nanodrugs significantly inhibit the growth of solid tumors without adverse side effects. Therefore, we anticipate that the arsenic-based nanodrugs generated by this facile synthetic route may be a powerful and alternative strategy for solid tumor therapy.Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a ``one-pot'' method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity

  15. Core-shell microcapsules of solid lipid nanoparticles and mesoporous silica for enhanced oral delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghoon; Diab, Roudayna; Joubert, Olivier; Canilho, Nadia; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-04-01

    Newly designed microcapsules (MC) combining a core of solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and a mesoporous silica shell have been developed and explored as oral delivery system of curcumin (CU). CU-loaded MC (MC-CU) are 2μm sized and have a mesoporous silica shell of 0.3μm thickness with a wormlike structure as characterized by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), nitrogen adsorption/desorption and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. It was found that SLN acts as reservoir of curcumin while the mesoporous shell insures the protection and the controlled release of the drug. MC-CU displayed a pH-dependent in vitro release profile with marked drug retention at pH 2.8. Neutral red uptake assay together with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed a good cell tolerance to MC-CU at relatively high concentration of inert materials. Besides, the cell-uptake test revealed that fluorescent-MC were well internalized into Caco-2 cells, confirming the possibility to use MC for gut cells targeting. These findings suggest that organic core-silica shell microcapsules are promising drug delivery systems with enhanced bioavailability for poorly soluble drugs. PMID:26752213

  16. Electrosprayed core–shell solid dispersions of acyclovir fabricated using an epoxy-coated concentric spray head

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe-Peng; Cui, Lei; Yu, Deng-Guang; Zhao, Zhuan-Xia; Chen, Lan

    2014-01-01

    A novel structural solid dispersion (SD) taking the form of core–shell microparticles for poorly water-soluble drugs is reported for the first time. Using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a hydrophilic polymer matrix, the SDs were fabricated using coaxial electrospraying (characterized by an epoxy-coated concentric spray head), although the core fluids were unprocessable using one-fluid electrospraying. Through manipulating the flow rates of the core drug-loaded solutions, two types of core–shell microparticles with tunable drug contents were prepared. They had average diameters of 1.36±0.67 and 1.74±0.58 μm, and were essentially a combination of nanocomposites with the active ingredient acyclovir (ACY) distributed in the inner core, and the sweeter sucralose and transmembrane enhancer sodium dodecyl sulfate localized in the outer shell. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results demonstrated that ACY, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and sucralose were well distributed in the PVP matrix in an amorphous state because of favorable second-order interactions. In vitro dissolution and permeation studies showed that the core–shell microparticle SDs rapidly freed ACY within 1 minute and promoted nearly eightfold increases in permeation rate across the sublingual mucosa compared with raw ACY powders. PMID:24790437

  17. Smoothed finite element method implemented in a resultant eight-node solid-shell element for geometrical linear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Élie-Dit-Cosaque, Xavier J.-G.; Gakwaya, Augustin; Naceur, Hakim

    2015-01-01

    A smoothed finite element method formulation for the resultant eight-node solid-shell element is presented in this paper for geometrical linear analysis. The smoothing process is successfully performed on the element mid-surface to deal with the membrane and bending effects of the stiffness matrix. The strain smoothing process allows replacing the Cartesian derivatives of shape functions by the product of shape functions with normal vectors to the element mid-surface boundaries. The present formulation remains competitive when compared to the classical finite element formulations since no inverse of the Jacobian matrix is calculated. The three dimensional resultant shell theory allows the element kinematics to be defined only with the displacement degrees of freedom. The assumed natural strain method is used not only to eliminate the transverse shear locking problem encountered in thin-walled structures, but also to reduce trapezoidal effects. The efficiency of the present element is presented and compared with that of standard solid-shell elements through various benchmark problems including some with highly distorted meshes.

  18. Characterization of solids in residual wastes from single-shell tanks at the Hanford site, Washington, USA.

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, K. M.; Cantrell, K. J.; Todd Schaef, H.; Arey, B. W.; Heald, S. M.; Deutsch, W. J.; Lindberg, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    Solid phase physical and chemical characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes from several single-shell underground waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Because these wastes are highly-radioactive dispersible powders and are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or co-precipitated within oxide phases, their detailed characterization offers an extraordinary technical challenge. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) are the two principal methods used, along with a limited series of analyses by synchrotron-based methods, to characterize solid phases and their contaminant associations in these wastes.

  19. A facile route to core-shell nanoparticulate formation of arsenic trioxide for effective solid tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongjun; Liu, Hanyu; Zhou, Hualu; Zhu, Xianglong; Zhao, Zhenghuan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Shan, Hong; Gao, Jinhao

    2016-02-21

    Arsenic trioxide has achieved great clinical success in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, it is difficult to replicate the success in other cancers, such as solid tumors, in part because of the rapid renal clearance and dose-limiting toxicity. Nanotechnology is expected to overcome these disadvantages through altering its pharmacokinetics and concentrating the drug at the desired sites. Herein, we report a "one-pot" method to develop arsenic-based nanodrugs by in situ coating the as-prepared arsenic nanocomplexes with porous silica shells. This process can be easily reproduced and scaled up because no complicated synthesis and purification steps are involved. This core-shell embedding method endows nanodrugs with high loading capacity (57.9 wt%) and a prolonged pH-responsive releasing profile, which is crucial to increase the drug concentration at tumor sites and improve the drug efficacy. Based on these unique features, the nanodrugs significantly inhibit the growth of solid tumors without adverse side effects. Therefore, we anticipate that the arsenic-based nanodrugs generated by this facile synthetic route may be a powerful and alternative strategy for solid tumor therapy. PMID:26840759

  20. Finite Element Technology In Forming Simulations - Theoretical Aspects And Practical Applications Of A New Solid-Shell Element

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, M.; Reese, S.

    2007-05-17

    Finite element simulations of sheet metal forming processes are highly non-linear problems. The non-linearity arises not only from the kinematical relations and the material formulation, furthermore the contact between workpiece and the forming tools leads to an increased number of iterations within the Newton-Raphson scheme. This fact puts high demands on the robustness of finite element formulations. For this reason we study the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) concept as proposed in [1]. The goal is to improve the robustness of the solid-shell formulation in deep drawing simulations.

  1. Optimizing the electric field around solid and core-shell alloy nanostructures for near-field applications.

    PubMed

    Montaño-Priede, Luis; Peña-Rodríguez, Ovidio; Rivera, Antonio; Guerrero-Martínez, Andrés; Pal, Umapada

    2016-08-21

    The near electric field enhancement around plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) is very important for applications like surface enhanced spectroscopies, plasmonic dye-sensitized solar cells and plasmon-enhanced OLEDs, where the interactions occur close to the surface of the NPs. In this work we have calculated the near-field enhancement around solid and core-shell alloy NPs as a function of their geometrical parameters and composition. We have found that the field enhancement is lower in the AuxAg1-x alloys with respect to pure Ag NPs, but it is still high enough for most near-field applications. The higher order modes have a stronger influence over the near-field due to a sharper spatial decay of the near electric field with the increase of the order of multipolar modes. For the same reason, in AuxAg1-x@SiO2 core-shell structures, the quadrupolar mode is dominant around the core, whereas the dipolar mode is predominant around the shell. The LSPR modes can have different behaviours in the near- and the far-field, particularly for larger particles with high Ag contents, which indicates that caution must be exercised for designing plasmonic nanostructures for near-field applications, as the variations of the LSPR in the near-field cannot be inferred from those observed in the far-field. These results have important implications for the application of gold-silver alloy NPs in surface enhanced spectroscopies and in the fabrication of plasmon-based optoelectronic devices, like dye-sensitized solar cells and plasmon-enhanced organic light-emitting diodes. PMID:27451969

  2. Optimizing the electric field around solid and core-shell alloy nanostructures for near-field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño-Priede, Luis; Peña-Rodríguez, Ovidio; Rivera, Antonio; Guerrero-Martínez, Andrés; Pal, Umapada

    2016-08-01

    The near electric field enhancement around plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) is very important for applications like surface enhanced spectroscopies, plasmonic dye-sensitized solar cells and plasmon-enhanced OLEDs, where the interactions occur close to the surface of the NPs. In this work we have calculated the near-field enhancement around solid and core-shell alloy NPs as a function of their geometrical parameters and composition. We have found that the field enhancement is lower in the AuxAg1-x alloys with respect to pure Ag NPs, but it is still high enough for most near-field applications. The higher order modes have a stronger influence over the near-field due to a sharper spatial decay of the near electric field with the increase of the order of multipolar modes. For the same reason, in AuxAg1-x@SiO2 core-shell structures, the quadrupolar mode is dominant around the core, whereas the dipolar mode is predominant around the shell. The LSPR modes can have different behaviours in the near- and the far-field, particularly for larger particles with high Ag contents, which indicates that caution must be exercised for designing plasmonic nanostructures for near-field applications, as the variations of the LSPR in the near-field cannot be inferred from those observed in the far-field. These results have important implications for the application of gold-silver alloy NPs in surface enhanced spectroscopies and in the fabrication of plasmon-based optoelectronic devices, like dye-sensitized solar cells and plasmon-enhanced organic light-emitting diodes.

  3. Characterization of Solids in Residual Wastes from Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 9277

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Heald, Steve M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-06-01

    Solid-phase characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from the underground single-shell storage tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112 at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. The results of studies completed to date show significant variability in the compositions of those residual wastes and the compositions, morphologies, and crystallinities of the individual phases that make up these wastes. These differences undoubtedly result from the various waste types stored and transferred in and out each tank and the sluicing and retrieval operations used for waste retrieval. Our studies indicate that these residual wastes are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or co-precipitated within oxide phases. Depending on the specific tank, various solids (e.g., gibbsite; boehmite; dawsonite; cancrinite; Fe oxides such as hematite, goethite, and maghemite; rhodochrosite; lindbergite; whewellite; nitratine; and numerous amorphous or poorly crystalline phases) have been identified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in residual wastes studied to date. Our studies also show that contact of residual wastes with Ca(OH)2- and CaCO3-saturated aqueous solutions, which were used as surrogates for the compositions of pore-fluid leachants derived from young and aged cements respectively, may alter the compositions of solid phases present in the contacted wastes. Fe oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual wastes studied to date. They occur in these wastes as discrete particles, particles intergrown within a matrix of other phases, and surface coatings on other particles or particle aggregates. These Fe oxides/hydroxides typically contain trace concentrations of other transition metals, such Cr, Mn

  4. Reconstruction of the Orientation Distribution Function in Single and Multiple Shell Q-Ball Imaging within Constant Solid Angle

    PubMed Central

    Aganj, Iman; Lenglet, Christophe; Sapiro, Guillermo; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Harel, Noam

    2010-01-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) technique which has been proven very successful in resolving multiple intravoxel fiber orientations in MR images. The standard computation of the orientation distribution function (ODF, the probability of diffusion in a given direction) from q-ball data uses linear radial projection, neglecting the change in the volume element along each direction. This results in spherical distributions that are different from the true ODFs. For instance, they are neither normalized nor as sharp as expected, and generally require post-processing, such as artificial sharpening. In this paper, a new technique is proposed that, by considering the solid angle factor, uses the mathematically correct definition of the ODF and results in a dimensionless and normalized ODF expression. Our model is flexible enough so that ODFs can be estimated either from single q-shell datasets, or by exploiting the greater information available from multiple q-shell acquisitions. We show that the latter can be achieved by using a more accurate multi-exponential model for the diffusion signal. The improved performance of the proposed method is demonstrated on artificial examples and high-resolution HARDI data acquired on a 7T magnet. PMID:20535807

  5. On the development of NURBS-based isogeometric solid shell elements: 2D problems and preliminary extension to 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouclier, R.; Elguedj, T.; Combescure, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work deals with the development of 2D solid shell non-uniform rational B-spline elements. We address a static problem, that can be solved with a 2D model, involving a thin slender structure under small perturbations. The plane stress, plane strain and axisymmetric assumption can be made. projection and reduced integration techniques are considered to deal with the locking phenomenon. The use of the approach leads to the implementation of two strategies insensitive to locking: the first strategy is based on a 1D projection of the mean strain across the thickness; the second strategy undertakes to project all the strains onto a suitably chosen 2D space. Conversely, the reduced integration approach based on Gauss points is less expensive, but only alleviates locking and is limited to quadratic approximations. The performance of the various 2D elements developed is assessed through several numerical examples. Simple extensions of these techniques to 3D are finally performed.

  6. Lumen pressure within obliquely insonated absorbent solid cylindrical shells with application to Doppler flow phantoms.

    PubMed

    Steel, Robin; Fish, Peter J

    2002-02-01

    Flow phantoms used in medical ultrasound usually employ a plastic tube as a blood vessel mimic. These tubes often have acoustic properties differing significantly from the tissue and blood-mimicking media, which results in distortion of the acoustic pressure field within the tubes and, hence, of the Doppler flow spectra. Previous analyses of this problem have used some form of the infinite plate transmission coefficient, although at least one ray-based analysis has considered a cylindrical interface but with zero wall thickness. In this paper, we compare these approximate pressure fields with the exact solution for oblique incidence on a viscoelastic cylindrical shell at 5 MHz to find for which materials the plate approximation is valid. The shell has water both inside and outside, but it can be modified to use a different fluid inside and also to include absorption in either fluid. We find the plate approximation is reasonable for soft tubes such as the copolymer Cflex (Cole-Palmer, Niles, IL) but much less so for hard tubes such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). PMID:11885684

  7. Effects and Mechanisms of Surface Topography on the Antiwear Properties of Molluscan Shells (Scapharca subcrenata) Using the Fluid-Solid Interaction Method

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Limei; Tian, Ximei; Hu, Guoliang; Wang, Yinci; Ren, Luquan

    2014-01-01

    The surface topography (surface morphology and structure) of the left Scapharca subcrenata shell differs from that of its right shell. This phenomenon is closely related to antiwear capabilities. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects and mechanisms of surface topography on the antiwear properties of Scapharca subcrenata shells. Two models are constructed—a rib morphology model (RMM) and a coupled structure model (CSM)—to mimic the topographies of the right and left shells. The antiwear performance and mechanisms of the two models are studied using the fluid-solid interaction (FSI) method. The simulation results show that the antiwear capabilities of the CSM are superior to those of the RMM. The CSM is also more conducive to decreasing the impact velocity and energy of abrasive particles, reducing the probability of microcrack generation, extension, and desquamation. It can be deduced that in the real-world environment, Scapharca subcrenata's left shell sustains more friction than its right shell. Thus, the coupled structure of the left shell is the result of extensive evolution. PMID:24982928

  8. Copper fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Batani, D.

    2015-03-15

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, copper is a material that has been often used in those experiments because it has a maximum total K-shell emission yield. Furthermore, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al., 2012), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the copper isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent copper ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 10 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic form proposed by Davies et al. (2013)

  9. Copper fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Batani, D.

    2015-03-01

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, copper is a material that has been often used in those experiments because it has a maximum total K-shell emission yield. Furthermore, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al., 2012), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the copper isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent copper ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 10 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic form proposed by Davies et al. (2013).

  10. Effects and mechanisms of surface topography on the antiwear properties of molluscan shells (Scapharca subcrenata) using the fluid-solid interaction method.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Tian, Ximei; Hu, Guoliang; Wang, Yinci; Ren, Luquan

    2014-01-01

    The surface topography (surface morphology and structure) of the left Scapharca subcrenata shell differs from that of its right shell. This phenomenon is closely related to antiwear capabilities. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects and mechanisms of surface topography on the antiwear properties of Scapharca subcrenata shells. Two models are constructed-a rib morphology model (RMM) and a coupled structure model (CSM)-to mimic the topographies of the right and left shells. The antiwear performance and mechanisms of the two models are studied using the fluid-solid interaction (FSI) method. The simulation results show that the antiwear capabilities of the CSM are superior to those of the RMM. The CSM is also more conducive to decreasing the impact velocity and energy of abrasive particles, reducing the probability of microcrack generation, extension, and desquamation. It can be deduced that in the real-world environment, Scapharca subcrenata's left shell sustains more friction than its right shell. Thus, the coupled structure of the left shell is the result of extensive evolution. PMID:24982928

  11. A nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics - User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, B.N.

    1995-04-14

    This report provides a user`s manual for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Over twenty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a factorization method, for which case bandwidth minimization is optional. Data may be stored either in or out of core memory to allow for large analyses.

  12. Exact geometry solid-shell element based on a sampling surfaces technique for 3D stress analysis of doubly-curved composite shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. M.; Mamontov, A. A.; Plotnikova, S. V.; Mamontov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid-mixed ANS four-node shell element by using the sampling surfaces (SaS) technique is developed. The SaS formulation is based on choosing inside the nth layer In not equally spaced SaS parallel to the middle surface of the shell in order to introduce the displacements of these surfaces as basic shell variables. Such choice of unknowns with the consequent use of Lagrange polynomials of degree In - 1 in the thickness direction for each layer permits the presentation of the layered shell formulation in a very compact form. The SaS are located inside each layer at Chebyshev polynomial nodes that allows one to minimize uniformly the error due to the Lagrange interpolation. To implement the efficient analytical integration throughout the element, the enhanced ANS method is employed. The proposed hybrid-mixed four-node shell element is based on the Hu-Washizu variational equation and exhibits a superior performance in the case of coarse meshes. It could be useful for the 3D stress analysis of thick and thin doubly-curved shells since the SaS formulation gives the possibility to obtain numerical solutions with a prescribed accuracy, which asymptotically approach the exact solutions of elasticity as the number of SaS tends to infinity.

  13. Vanadium fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Batani, D.

    2015-09-15

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al. (2012)), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the vanadium isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent vanadium ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 20 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic behavior of the modified relativistic binary encounter Bethe model (MRBEB) of Guerra et al. (2012) with the density-effect correction proposed by Davies et al. (2013)

  14. New surface-modified solid lipid nanoparticles using N-glutaryl phosphatidylethanolamine as the outer shell

    PubMed Central

    Kashanian, Soheila; Azandaryani, Abbas Hemati; Derakhshandeh, Katayoun

    2011-01-01

    Background Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are colloidal carrier systems which provide controlled-release profiles for many substances. In this study, we prepared aqueous dispersions of lipid nanoparticles using a modified, pH-sensitive derivative of phosphatidylethanolamine. Methods SLNs were prepared using polysorbate 80 as the surfactant and tripalmitin glyceride and N-glutaryl phosphatidylethanolamine as the lipid components. Particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential were examined by photon correlation spectroscopy. Morphological evaluation was performed using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Results Photon correlation spectroscopy revealed a particle hydrodynamic diameter of 165.8 nm and zeta potential of −41.6.0 mV for the drug-loaded nanoparticles. Atomic force microscopy investigation showed the nanoparticles to be 50–600 nm in length and 66.5 nm in height. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the majority of SLNs possessed less ordered arrangements of crystals compared with corresponding bulk lipids, which is favorable for improving drug-loading capacity. Drug-loading capacity and drug entrapment efficiency values for the SLNs were 25.32% and 94.32%, respectively. Conclusion The SLNs prepared in this study were able to control the release of triamcinolone acetonide under acidic conditions. PMID:22114489

  15. Metal-organic framework-immobilized polyhedral metal nanocrystals: reduction at solid-gas interface, metal segregation, core-shell structure, and high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aijaz, Arshad; Akita, Tomoki; Tsumori, Nobuko; Xu, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, this work presents surfactant-free monometallic and bimetallic polyhedral metal nanocrystals (MNCs) immobilized to a metal-organic framework (MIL-101) by CO-directed reduction of metal precursors at the solid-gas interface. With this novel method, Pt cubes and Pd tetrahedra were formed by CO preferential bindings on their (100) and (111) facets, respectively. PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals showed metal segregation, leading to Pd-rich core and Pt-rich shell. Core-shell Pt@Pd nanocrystals were immobilized to MIL-101 by seed-mediated two-step reduction, representing the first example of core-shell MNCs formed using only gas-phase reducing agents. These MOF-supported MNCs exhibited high catalytic activities for CO oxidation. PMID:24138338

  16. Study on size effect of the silica nanospheres with solid core and mesoporous shell on cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Peruzynska, M; Cendrowski, K; Barylak, M; Roginska, D; Tarnowski, M; Tkacz, M; Kurzawski, M; Machalinski, B; Mijowska, E; Drozdzik, M

    2015-12-01

    The properties of mesoporous silica nanoparticles including large surface area, large pore volume, easy surface functionalization and control of structure and pore size has made them promising drug carriers. In this study, the effect of different diameters (50 nm, 70 nm, 90 nm, 110 nm and 140 nm) of silica nanospheres with a solid core and mesoporous shell (mSiO2/SiO2) on cellular internalization in mouse fibroblast cells (L929) was evaluated. The physical properties of the nanostructures were characterized with various methods, such as transmission electron microscopy with x-ray dispersion spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and zeta potential. In order to define the cellular uptake, the nanostructures were labelled with fluorescent dye Alexa647, and imaging and quantitative methods were applied: laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and thermogravimetry. Our results indicate that cellular uptake of the studied nanospheres is size-dependent, and nanospheres of 90 nm in diameter showed the most efficient cell internalization. Thus, particle size is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake of nanoparticles and should be considered in designing drug delivery carriers. PMID:26586672

  17. On the Assumed Natural Strain method to alleviate locking in solid-shell NURBS-based finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseiro, J. F.; Valente, R. A. F.; Reali, A.; Kiendl, J.; Auricchio, F.; Alves de Sousa, R. J.

    2014-06-01

    In isogeometric analysis (IGA), the functions used to describe the CAD geometry (such as NURBS) are also employed, in an isoparametric fashion, for the approximation of the unknown fields, leading to an exact geometry representation. Since the introduction of IGA, it has been shown that the high regularity properties of the employed functions lead in many cases to superior accuracy per degree of freedom with respect to standard FEM. However, as in Lagrangian elements, NURBS-based formulations can be negatively affected by the appearance of non-physical phenomena that "lock" the solution when constrained problems are considered. In order to alleviate such locking behaviors, the Assumed Natural Strain (ANS) method proposed for Lagrangian formulations is extended to NURBS-based elements in the present work, within the context of solid-shell formulations. The performance of the proposed methodology is assessed by means of a set of numerical examples. The results allow to conclude that the employment of the ANS method to quadratic NURBS-based elements successfully alleviates non-physical phenomena such as shear and membrane locking, significantly improving the element performance.

  18. Growth mechanism and magnetic properties of monodisperse L1(0)-Co(Fe)Pt@C core-shell nanoparticles by one-step solid-phase synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Baoru; He, Jianghai; Du, Juan; Xia, Weixing; Zhang, Jian; Liu, J Ping; Li, Wei; Hu, Chunfeng; Yan, Aru

    2015-01-21

    In this report, we present a novel one-step solid-phase reaction method for the synthesis of L10-CoPt@C core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) using organic metal precursors without surfactants. The obtained CoPt@C NPs have a good face-centered tetragonal single crystal structure and regular shape. The mean size of CoPt is 14 nm with a uniform carbon shell. The evolution of the core-shell structure during the synthesizing process is investigated in detail. Firstly organic metal precursors are decomposed, followed by the formation of grains/clusters in a metal-carbon intermediate state. Then the metal-carbon small grains/clusters agglomerate and recrystallize into single crystal metal alloy NPs covered with a carbon layer. The carbon shell is effective in preventing the coalescence of L10-CoPt NPs during high temperature sintering. The prepared L10-FePt nanoparticles have a high coercivity of up to 12.2 kOe at room temperature. This one-step solid-state synthesizing method could also be employed for the preparation of other types of nanostructures with high crystallinity, monodispersity and chemically ordered phase. PMID:25462862

  19. Air-Stable, Near- to Mid-Infrared Emitting Solids of PbTe/CdTe Core-Shell Colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Protesescu, Loredana; Zünd, Tanja; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2016-03-01

    Light emitters and detectors operating in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions are important to many applications, such as telecommunications, high-resolution gas analysis, atmospheric pollution monitoring, medical diagnostics, and night vision. Various lead chalcogenides (binary, ternary, and quaternary alloys) in the form of quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells provide narrow bandgap energies that cover the broad infrared region corresponding to wavelengths of 1-30 μm. Here, we report an inexpensive, all-solution-based synthesis strategy to thin-film solids consisting of 5-16 nm PbTe QDs encapsulated by CdTe shells. Colloidally synthesized PbTe QDs were first converted into core-shell PbTe/CdTe QDs, and then deposited as thin films. The subsequent fusion of the CdTe shells is achieved by ligand removal and annealing in the presence of CdCl2 . Contrary to highly unstable bare PbTe QDs, PbTe/CdTe QD solids exhibit bright and stable near- to mid-infrared emission at wavelengths of 1-3 μm, which is also retained upon prolonged storage at ambient conditions for one year. PMID:26676076

  20. On the role of the porous shell of the solid core of the earth in the anomalous heat and mass flow to the mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A.

    2013-03-15

    The model of the pressure-induced first-order phase transition of a metal melt to the metallicglass state considers a thermodynamically nonequilibrium porous near-surface shell of the solid core of the Earth, which contacts cyclonic vortices in the liquid core. Anomalous flows of heat and light-material mass to the mantle from the solid core at these contact points are calculated. These anomalous flows are shown to be comparable with the observed ones under the assumption of a rapid increase in the melt viscosity at pressures of 1-10 Mbar, which is characteristic of a solid core. In this case, the porous layer permeability may be very low.

  1. Characterization and magnetic properties of nanoparticles based on FePt solid solution with an oxide shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpetnyi, I.; Kovalenko, A. S.; Klimenkov, M.; Protsenko, I. Yu.; Chernov, S. V.; Nepijko, S. A.; Elmers, H. J.; Schönhense, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of magnetic properties investigations of ferromagnetic nanoparticles which ensembled with ferromagnetic shell. The aim of this work is to study the connection of structure-phase composition and thermal treatment with the magnetic properties, partially, with the coercive force and the exchange bias field in a two-dimension spin system of core-shell type. It is found that the exchange bias field increases with the growth of the oxide shell thickness. This is realized by annealing in a dosed oxygen flow. The decrease of the coercive force with the increase of annealing temperature is connected with the concentration effect (the concentration of ferromagnetic particles decreases).

  2. Simulation of the solid state and the first and second hydration shell of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol: Structures obtained using DFT and MP2 methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Ros, M. C.; Alcolea Palafox, M.

    2016-05-01

    Allopurinol (AL) was investigated in the isolated state, solid state, and in the hydrated form through an exhaustive quantum-chemical analysis. Full geometry optimization and energy calculations of the 11 most stable tautomers in the isolated state were performed. The most stable one corresponds to AL-15 at all the levels of computation. Several weak bands of the experimental spectrum in Ar-matrix were tentatively assigned to tautomer AL-25. The crystal unit cell of the solid state was simulated by a heptamer form. Comparisons with the experimental values confirm that only tautomer AL-15 appears in the solid state. The hydration of the two most stable tautomers: AL-15 and AL-25 was carried out. Solvent effects were considered using the Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) and by the explicit model (EM) including a variable number of water molecules surrounding the base to simulate the first and second hydration shells. In this second hydration shell the calculated difference in the free energy between both tautomers is so small, that both tautomers can coexist in bull water. Some of the most important conclusions on the effects of the hydration on the molecular structure were presented. The deformation and interaction energies were corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) using the counterpoise (CP) procedure.

  3. Preparation of hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 coated by a carbon shell as a stable anode for optimized lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Song, Haili; Li, Honglin; Tan, Yinghua; Fu, Hao; Li, Chao; Lei, Xiang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-12-01

    A one-step hydrothermal method was successfully used to fabricate hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2. Then the as-prepared sS-MoS2 was decorated with a carbon shell using dopamine as a carbon source by a facile route, resulting in hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 decorated with carbon shell (sS-MoS2@C). A synergistic effect was observed for the two-component material, leading to new electrochemical processes for lithium storage, with improved electroconductivity and structural soundness, triggering an ascending capacity upon cycling. The as-prepared sS-MoS2@C exhibits optimized electrochemical behaviour with high specific capacity (1107 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1), superior high-rate capability (805 mA h g-1 at 5000 mA g-1) and good cycling stability (91.5% of capacity retained after 100 cycles), suggesting its potential application in high-energy lithium-ion batteries.A one-step hydrothermal method was successfully used to fabricate hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2. Then the as-prepared sS-MoS2 was decorated with a carbon shell using dopamine as a carbon source by a facile route, resulting in hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 decorated with carbon shell (sS-MoS2@C). A synergistic effect was observed for the two-component material, leading to new electrochemical processes for lithium storage, with improved electroconductivity and structural soundness, triggering an ascending capacity upon cycling. The as-prepared sS-MoS2@C exhibits optimized electrochemical behaviour with high specific capacity (1107 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1), superior high-rate capability (805 mA h g-1 at 5000 mA g-1) and good cycling stability (91.5% of capacity retained after 100 cycles), suggesting its potential application in high-energy lithium-ion batteries. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05595d

  4. Development of surface imprinted core-shell nanoparticles and their application in a solid-phase dispersion extraction matrix for methyl parathion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Li, Weiming; Li, He; Tang, Youwen

    2014-04-01

    Applying molecular imprinting techniques to the surface of functionalized SiO2 allows the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with accessible, high affinity and surface exposed binding sites. This paper demonstrates a new strategy for producing such hybrid organic-inorganic surface imprinted silica nanoparticles for specific recognition of methyl parathion. The technique provides surface grafting imprinting in chloroform using amino modified silica nanoparticles as supports, acrylamide as the functional monomer, γ-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxy silane as the grafting agent, and methyl parathion as a template. The amino propyl functional monomer layer directs the selective occurrence of imprinting polymerization at the silica surface through copolymerization of grafting agents with functional monomers, but also acts as an assistive monomer to drive the template into the formed polymer shells to create effective recognition sites. The resulting MIPs-SiO2 nanoparticles display three-dimensional core-shell architectures and large surface areas. The molecularly imprinted shell provides recognition sites for methyl parathion, with the materials exhibiting excellent performance for selecting the template. Using MIPs-SiO2 nanoparticles as a matrix of solid-phase dispersion extraction sorbents, trace amounts of methyl parathion are selectivity extracted from pear and green vegetable samples while simultaneously eliminating matrix interferences, attaining recoveries of 84.7-94.4% for the samples. PMID:24576608

  5. Preparation of hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 coated by a carbon shell as a stable anode for optimized lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Song, Haili; Li, Honglin; Tan, Yinghua; Fu, Hao; Li, Chao; Lei, Xiang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    A one-step hydrothermal method was successfully used to fabricate hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2. Then the as-prepared sS-MoS2 was decorated with a carbon shell using dopamine as a carbon source by a facile route, resulting in hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 decorated with carbon shell (sS-MoS2@C). A synergistic effect was observed for the two-component material, leading to new electrochemical processes for lithium storage, with improved electroconductivity and structural soundness, triggering an ascending capacity upon cycling. The as-prepared sS-MoS2@C exhibits optimized electrochemical behaviour with high specific capacity (1107 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), superior high-rate capability (805 mA h g(-1) at 5000 mA g(-1)) and good cycling stability (91.5% of capacity retained after 100 cycles), suggesting its potential application in high-energy lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26620104

  6. Equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and charge-state distribution of sulfur projectiles passing through solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Banas, D.; Polasik, M.; Slabkowska, K.; Koziol, K.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Choinski, J.

    2010-08-15

    In the present work, an alternative approach for the evaluation of the equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and the mean charge state q for projectiles passing through various targets has been proposed. The approach is based on measured K x-ray energy shifts and line intensity ratios and utilizes the theoretical analysis of projectile spectra using multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. It was applied for the satellite and hypersatellite K lines in the x-ray spectra emitted by sulfur projectiles passing with energies of 9.6-122 MeV through carbon, aluminium, titanium, and iron targets, recorded by a Si(Li) detector. It was found that only in the high projectile energy region there was significant dependence of mean equilibrium K-shell ionization on the target atomic number. The equilibrium L-shell ionization rises with the increase of sulfur energy until 32 MeV, but for higher energies the changes are very weak. The equilibrium M-shell ionization changes very weakly for low projectile energy while for higher energies this ionization is practically constant. For each target, the estimated value of q rises with the increase of the sulfur energy value. The dependence of the sulfur charge state on the target atomic number was discussed by taking into account the cross sections for ionization, decay, and electron capture processes. The data were compared with the experimental data measured by other authors and with the predictions of Shima's and Schiwietz and Grande's semiempirical formulas. The presented good agreement points out that this alternative approach delivers quantitative results.

  7. Equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and charge-state distribution of sulfur projectiles passing through solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braziewicz, J.; Polasik, M.; Słabkowska, K.; Majewska, U.; Banaś, D.; Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kozioł, K.; Kretschmer, W.; Choinski, J.

    2010-08-01

    In the present work, an alternative approach for the evaluation of the equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and the mean charge state q¯ for projectiles passing through various targets has been proposed. The approach is based on measured K x-ray energy shifts and line intensity ratios and utilizes the theoretical analysis of projectile spectra using multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. It was applied for the satellite and hypersatellite K lines in the x-ray spectra emitted by sulfur projectiles passing with energies of 9.6-122 MeV through carbon, aluminium, titanium, and iron targets, recorded by a Si(Li) detector. It was found that only in the high projectile energy region there was significant dependence of mean equilibrium K-shell ionization on the target atomic number. The equilibrium L-shell ionization rises with the increase of sulfur energy until 32 MeV, but for higher energies the changes are very weak. The equilibrium M-shell ionization changes very weakly for low projectile energy while for higher energies this ionization is practically constant. For each target, the estimated value of q¯ rises with the increase of the sulfur energy value. The dependence of the sulfur charge state on the target atomic number was discussed by taking into account the cross sections for ionization, decay, and electron capture processes. The data were compared with the experimental data measured by other authors and with the predictions of Shima’s and Schiwietz and Grande’s semiempirical formulas. The presented good agreement points out that this alternative approach delivers quantitative results.

  8. SPH modeling of fluid-solid interaction for dynamic failure analysis of fluid-filled thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleyron, F.; Combescure, A.; Faucher, V.; Potapov, S.

    2013-05-01

    This work concerns the prediction of failure of a fluid-filled tank under impact loading, including the resulting fluid leakage. A water-filled steel cylinder associated with a piston is impacted by a mass falling at a prescribed velocity. The cylinder is closed at its base by an aluminum plate whose characteristics are allowed to vary. The impact on the piston creates a pressure wave in the fluid which is responsible for the deformation of the plate and, possibly, the propagation of cracks. The structural part of the problem is modeled using Mindlin-Reissner finite elements (FE) and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) shells. The modeling of the fluid is also based on an SPH formulation. The problem involves significant fluid-structure interactions (FSI) which are handled through a master-slave-based method and the pinballs method. Numerical results are compared to experimental data.

  9. L-shell emission from high-Z solid targets by intense 10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2} irradiation with a 248nm laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.R.; Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.

    2000-01-05

    Efficient (1.2% yield) multikilovolt x-ray emission from Ba(L) (2.4--2.8{angstrom}) and Gd(L) (1.7--2.1{angstrom}) is produced by ultraviolet (248nm) laser-excited BaF{sub 2} and Gd solids. The high efficiency is attributed to an inner shell-selective collisional electron ejection. Much effort has been expended recently in attempts to develop an efficient coherent x-ray source suitable for high-resolution biological imaging. To this end, many experiments have been performed studying the x-ray emissions from high-Z materials under intense (>10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) irradiation, with the most promising results coming from the irradiation of Xe clusters with a UV (248nm) laser at intensities of 10{sup 18}--10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2}. In this paper the authors report the production of prompt x-rays with energies in excess of 5keV with efficiencies on the order of 1% as a result of intense irradiation of BaF{sub 2} and Gd targets with a terawatt 248nm laser. The efficiency is attributed to an inner shell-selective collisional electron ejection mechanism in which the previously photoionized electrons are ponderomotively driven into an ion while retaining a portion of their atomic phase and symmetry. This partial coherence of the laser-driven electrons has a pronounced effect on the collisional cross-section for the electron ion interaction.

  10. Applications of spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    A new technique of producing hollow spheres of many materials at a very rapid rate, at very low cost, and with high reproducibility of shell diameter and wall thickness has been developed. Shells formed of metal or of other solid materials are expected to find numerous technical and industrial applications. For example, metal shells might be used as inertial confinement fusion targets, or as the principal constituents in lightweight structural materials for NASA Space Stations or DOD large antennas and mirrors, or be employed as containers for phase-change heat-storage media, or serve as containers for hazardous materials, or be employed as catalytic surface agents.

  11. Thermo-responsive polymer tethered metal-organic framework core-shell magnetic microspheres for magnetic solid-phase extraction of alkylphenols from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuqian; Su, Hao; Wong, Y-L Elaine; Chen, Xiangfeng; Dominic Chan, T-W

    2016-07-22

    In this work, the thermo-responsive polymer PNIPAM tethered to Fe3O4@SiO2@MOF core-shell magnetic microspheres was first synthesized by a surface-selective post-synthetic strategy and underwent highly efficient magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of alkylphenols from aqueous samples. Alkylphenols, including 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), were selected as target compounds. The sample quantification was carried out using LC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitor (MRM) mode. Under optimal working conditions, the developed method showed good linearity in the range of 5-1000ngL(-1), a low limit of detection (1.5ngL(-1)), and good repeatability (relative standard deviation, <8%, n=5) for NP and OP. Owning to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic switchable properties of the nanocomposite, high recoveries (78.7-104.3%) of alkylphenols were obtained under different extraction conditions. The levels of OP and NP in environmental samples collected from local river, lake and pond waters were analyzed using the developed method. It was believed that the synthesized material with the thermo-responsive coating, large surface areas and magnetic properties should have great potential in the extraction and removal of alkylphenols from environmental samples. PMID:27318505

  12. ZnO@Ag2S core-shell nanowire arrays for environmentally friendly solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with panchromatic light capture and enhanced electron collection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Jindan; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Johansson, Erik M J

    2015-05-21

    A solid-state environmentally friendly Ag2S quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) is demonstrated. The photovoltaic device is fabricated by applying ZnO@Ag2S core-shell nanowire arrays (NWAs) as light absorbers and electron conductors, and poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) as a solid-state hole conductor. Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) were directly grown on the ZnO nanowires by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method to obtain the core-shell nanostructure. The number of SILAR cycles for QD formation and the length of the core-shell NWs significantly affect the photocurrent. The device with a core-shell NWAs photoanode shows a power conversion efficiency increase by 32% compared with the device based on a typical nanoparticle-based photoanode with Ag2S QDs. The enhanced performance is attributed to enhanced collection of the photogenerated electrons utilizing the ZnO nanowire as an efficient pathway for transporting the photogenerated electrons from the QD to the contact. PMID:25907247

  13. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  14. Radiography of magnetically-driven implosions of initially solid beryllium cylindrical shells for equation-of-state studies at the Z pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    The Z accelerator delivers approximately 4-MV, 26-MA electrical pulses with adjustable current rise times of 100--600 ns, as well as adjustable pulse waveforms. The magnetic pressure produced is used for various applications, including magnetically-driven implosions. The Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL) is a pulsed (0.3-1.5 ns), multi-kJ, TW-class Nd:glass laser system that provides x-ray radiography capabilities for Z experiments. This talk focuses primarily on the radiography diagnostic used to study the magnetically-driven implosions of initially solid cylindrical shells (also referred to as ``liners''). Specifically, we discuss the 6.151-keV monochromatic backlighting system and its use in obtaining radiographs of imploding beryllium (Be) liners. The high transmission efficiency of 6.151-keV photons in Be allowed us to obtain radiographs with finite transmission throughout the radial extent of the imploding liners. Abel inverting these data, we have obtained time-resolved measurements of the imploding liner's density as a function of both axial and radial location throughout the field of view. These data are allowing us to study magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) growth for inertial-confinement-fusion applications, as well as compression-wave propagation for equation-of-state studies (see talks by R.L. Lemke and M.R. Martin). Additionally, Z's pulse-shaping capabilities have enabled us to obtain data for both shock- and quasi-isentropically-compressed Be. Example data from MRT, shock-compression, and quasi-isentropic-compression experiments will be shown. We will also discuss planned upgrades to 25-keV radiography that will allow us to study materials with opacities beyond that of beryllium. This work was done in collaboration with R.W. Lemke, M.R. Martin, J.-P. Davis, M.D. Knudson, D.B. Sinars, S.A. Slutz, C.A. Jennings, M.E. Cuneo, D.G. Flicker, and M.C. Herrmann. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin company, for the US

  15. Cloud point-dispersive μ-solid phase extraction of hydrophobic organic compounds onto highly hydrophobic core-shell Fe₂O₃@C magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Zhu, Qing; Pan, Qinmin; Chisvert, Alberto

    2012-08-17

    A novel two-step extraction technique combining cloud point extraction (CPE) with dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) is presented in this work for the first time. The method involves initial extraction of the target analytes by CPE in the micelles of a non-ionic surfactant medium; then highly hydrophobic polysiloxane-coated core-shell Fe(2)O(3)@C magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are used to retrieve the micellar phase. In that manner, the micellar phase containing the analytes is the target of the D-μ-SPE step rather than the analytes directly. MNPs are then collected by the application of an adscititious magnetic field overcoming the need for specific steps associated with CPE such as centrifugation to separate the surfactant-rich phase, refrigeration of the condensed micellar phase to reduce its viscosity or appropriate apparatus that enable direct sampling of the surfactant-rich phase. A noteworthy feature of the method is the introduction of highly oleophilic MNPs, which afford rapid and quantitative mass transfer of the surfactant phase, as opposed to other more conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles. In that manner, fast and reproducible extraction is accomplished, lending improved analytical features compared to conventional CPE, such as reduced analysis time and relative inertness to surfactant concentration and equilibration temperature. The analytes were recovered from the surface of MNPs by ultrasound-assisted back-extraction in a water-immiscible organic solvent where analytes are readily partitioned but the surfactant has limited solubility, thus minimizing its interference during chromatographic detection. As an analytical demonstration, different UV absorbing chemicals with various physico-chemical properties were used as model organic compounds for optimizing the parameters associated with this novel two-step extraction approach. The proposed method, combining two different and efficient techniques, offers satisfactory analytical

  16. Statistical mechanics of thin spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Nelson, David R.

    We explore how thermal fluctuations affect the mechanics of thin amorphous spherical shells via renormalization group calculations. It is well known that for flat solid membranes thermal fluctuations effectively increase the bending rigidity and reduce the bulk and shear moduli. This is still true for spherical shells. However, the additional coupling between the shell curvature, the local in-plane stretching modes and the local out-of-plane undulations leads to novel phenomena. In spherical shells thermal fluctuations effectively produce negative surface tension, which is equivalent to applying external pressure. We find that small spherical shells are stable, but for sufficiently large shells this thermally generated ``pressure'' becomes big enough to crush spherical shells. Such shells can be reinflated by increasing internal pressure, where the effective shell size grows non-linearly as a function of internal pressure with a power law exponent characteristic for thermally fluctuating flat membranes under uniform tension.

  17. NIKE3D a nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics user's manual update summary

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Maker, B N; Ferencz, R M; Hallquist, J O

    2000-03-24

    This report provides the NIKE3D user's manual update summary for changes made from version 3.0.0 April 24, 1995 to version 3.3.6 March 24,2000. The updates are excerpted directly from the code printed output file (hence the Courier font and formatting), are presented in chronological order and delineated by NIKE3D version number. NIKE3D is a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Thirty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a direct factorization method.

  18. MVC Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Zachary; McCain, Jonathan; Bauer, Travis

    2008-06-03

    Provides the shell of a plugin based application environment that builds on MVC Framework to allow one to rapidly construct an application by using a collection of plugins. The MVC Shell is implemented in C# as a .NET 2.0 application that can then be used as a shell for building a plugin based application. The infrastructure allows for dynamically processing a specified collection of plugins in order to determine the functionality of the application, where all plugins operate within the context of the underlying MVC Framework environment.

  19. MVC Shell

    2008-06-03

    Provides the shell of a plugin based application environment that builds on MVC Framework to allow one to rapidly construct an application by using a collection of plugins. The MVC Shell is implemented in C# as a .NET 2.0 application that can then be used as a shell for building a plugin based application. The infrastructure allows for dynamically processing a specified collection of plugins in order to determine the functionality of the application, wheremore » all plugins operate within the context of the underlying MVC Framework environment.« less

  20. Upgrade of repetitive fast-heating fusion driver HAMA to implode a shell target by using diode pumped solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MORI, Yoshitaka; SEKINE, Takashi; KOMEDA, Osamu; NISHIMURA, Yasuhiko; SUNAHARA, Atsushi; MIURA, Eisuke; Nakayama, Suisei; HANAYAMA, Ryohei; ISHII, Katsuhiro; SATO, Nakahiro; KURITA, Takashi; KAWASHIMA, Toshiyuki; KAN, Hirofumi; NAKAMURA, Naoki; KONDO, Takuya; FUJINE, Manabu; AZUMA, Hirozumi; HIOKI, Tatsumi; KAKENO, Mitsutaka; KAJINO, Tsutomu; MOTOHIRO, Tomoyoshi; SENTOKU, Yasuhiko; KITAGAWA, Yoneyoshi

    2016-03-01

    The HAMA is 1-Hz fast heating fusion driver pumped by a 10 J second-harmonic of diode-pumped Nd:glass laser: KURE-1. We have upgraded HAMA to realize an implosion of spherical shell target by using a remaining fundamental beam from KURE-1. This beam of 6 J/1 Hz is transported to the current counter irradiation system. The resulting beam includes three pulses in sequence: 2.2 J/15 ns and 0.7 J/300 ps for implosion, and 0.5 J/ 190 fs for heating. We estimate the implosion dynamics from 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code (START- 1D). It indicates a possibility of tailored-pulse implosion by optimizing the beam spot sizes of imploding beams on the target surface. This upgrade leads to a demonstration of repetitive implosion and additional heating of a spherical shell target in accordance with a repetition of laser operation and that of a target injection system.

  1. Shelled opisthobranchs.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Paula M

    2002-01-01

    In his contributions to the monographic series "Manual of Conchology", Henry Pilsbry reviewed the subgroup Tectibranchiata, comprising those opisthobranch snails that (at least primitively) still possess a shell (Pilsbry, 1894-1896). Exemplified by the Cephalaspidea (bubble shells), others included in this group at Pilsbry's time and since were Anaspidea (sea hares) and the shelled members of Notaspidea (side-gilled slugs) and Sacoglossa (leaf slugs). Pilsbry (and others since his time) considered tectibranchs to be the "root stock" from which more advanced gastropods such as Nudibranchia and Pulmonata were derived. Tectibranch systematics is firmly based on conchology and most species were originally described from empty shells. However, soft-anatomical characters were acknowledged quite early on as equally important in tectibranchs, due to the reduction of their shells and their evolutionary proximity to unshelled gastropods. Today, Tectibranchiata is not recognized as a natural taxon although the word "tectibranch" (like "prosobranch" and "mesogastropod") continues in vernacular use. Shelled opisthobranchs have been redistributed among various taxa, including several new ones--the unresolved basal opisthobranchs (Architectibranchia) and the "lower Heterobranchia", an enigmatic and currently much-studied group of families considered basal to all of Euthyneura (Opisthobranchia and landsnails (Pulmonata)). Despite their polyphyletic status, shelled opisthobranchs remain important subjects in evolutionary studies of gastropods--as the most basal members of nearly every opisthobranch clade and as organisms with mosaic combinations of primitive and derived features within evolutionary "trends" (e.g., loss of the shell, detorsion, concentration of the nervous system, ecological specialization, etc.). Although they play a pivotal role, the shelled opisthobranchs have received minimal attention in more comprehensive gastropod studies, often relegated to token

  2. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of anode material with titanium-silicon alloy solid core/nanoporous silicon shell structures for lithium rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Bae; Ham, Jun-Sik; Shin, Min-Seon; Park, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Ju; Lee, Sung-Man

    2015-12-01

    Composite materials composed of titanium-silicon alloy (Ti-Si alloy) core and porous Si shell (core-shell (C/S) composite) are prepared, and their electrochemical performance as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries is reported. The C/S composites are fabricated by selective etching of the titanium silicide phase in the surface region of a Ti-Si alloy that consists of titanium silicide and Si phases. The Ti-Si alloy is mechanically alloyed (MA) by ball-milling a mixture containing elemental Si and TiH2. Prior to the etching treatment, some of the MA samples are annealed at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 °C to further develop the crystalline structure; annealing leads to the increase in the crystallite size of the Si and silicide phases. Thereby, the core and shell structure of the C/S composites and their electrochemical behaviors are controlled. Electrodes prepared by blending the C/S composites with graphite show good cycle performance and rate capability.

  3. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  4. Superparamagnetic Fe3 O4 @SiO2 core-shell composite nanoparticles for the mixed hemimicelle solid-phase extraction of benzodiazepines from hair and wastewater samples before high-performance liquid chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili-Shahri, Effat; Es'haghi, Zarrin

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic Fe3 O4 /SiO2 composite core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and applied for the surfactant-assisted solid-phase extraction of five benzodiazepines diazepam, oxazepam, clonazepam, alprazolam, and midazolam, from human hair and wastewater samples before high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The nanocomposite was synthesized in two steps. First, Fe3 O4 nanoparticles were prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method of Fe(III) and Fe(II) as reaction substrates and NH3 /H2 O as precipitant. Second, the surface of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles was modified with shell silica by Stober method using tetraethylorthosilicate. The Fe3 O4 /SiO2 composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. To enhance their adsorptive tendency toward benzodiazepines, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was added, which was adsorbed on the surface of the Fe3 O4 /SiO2 nanoparticles and formed mixed hemimicelles. The main parameters affecting the efficiency of the method were thoroughly investigated. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.10-15 μgmL(-1) . The relative standard deviations ranged from 2.73 to 7.07%. The correlation coefficients varied from 0.9930 to 0.9996. PMID:26412451

  5. Core-shell SiO2 -coated Fe3 O4 with a surface molecularly imprinted polymer coating of folic acid and its applicable magnetic solid-phase extraction prior to determination of folates in tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Areerob, Yonrapach; Sricharoen, Phitchan; Limchoowong, Nunticha; Chanthai, Saksit

    2016-08-01

    A novel core-shell magnetic surface molecularly imprinted polymer with folic acid as a template was successfully synthesized by the sol-gel method. To generate Lewis acid sites in the silica matrix for the interaction of the metal coordinate with the template, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was used as a functional monomer, tetraethyl orthosilicate as a cross-linker, and aluminum ions as a dopant. The magnetite encapsulated by the silica shell plays an important role as a magnetic-coated polymer. The synthesized product was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The powder X-ray diffraction patterns, FTIR and UV/Vis spectra confirmed the characteristics of the as-prepared silica coated magnetite and folic acid molecularly imprinted polymer. It was successfully applied for magnetic solid-phase extraction prior to the determination of folates in tomato samples using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. The detection limit of the proposed method was 1.67 μg/L, and results were satisfactory, with a relative standard deviation of < 3.94%. PMID:27296679

  6. Metal-organic framework UiO-66 modified magnetite@silica core-shell magnetic microspheres for magnetic solid-phase extraction of domoic acid from shellfish samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenmin; Yan, Zhiming; Gao, Jia; Tong, Ping; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Lan

    2015-06-26

    Fe3O4@SiO2@UiO-66 core-shell magnetic microspheres were synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, vibrating sample magnetometry, nitrogen adsorption porosimetry and zeta potential analyzer. The synthesized Fe3O4@SiO2@UiO-66 microspheres were first used for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of domoic acid (DA) in shellfish samples. Combined with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), a fast, simple and sensitive method for the determination of DA was established successfully. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method showed short analysis time, good linearity (r(2) = 0.9990), low limit of detection (1.45 pg mL(-1); S/N = 3:1), low limit of quantification (4.82 pg mL(-1); S/N = 10:1), and good extraction repeatability (RSD ≤ 5.0%; n = 5). Real shellfish samples were processed using the developed method, and trace level of DA was detected. The results demonstrate that Fe3O4@SiO2@UiO-66 core-shell magnetic microspheres are the promising sorbents for rapid and efficient extraction of polar analytes from complex biological samples. PMID:25997847

  7. Designed Functional Systems for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries Anode: From Solid to Hollow, and to Core-Shell NiCo2O4 Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Ultrathin Carbon Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Ling; Bai, Yuanjuan; Wang, Yu

    2016-02-24

    Binary metal oxides have been considered as ideal and promising anode materials, which can ameliorate and enhance the electrochemical performances of the single metal oxides, such as electronic conductivity, reversible capacity, and structural stability. In this research, we report a rational method to synthesize some novel sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C nanosheets arrays for the first time. The nanostructures exhibit the unique features of solid, hollow, and even core-shell NiCo2O4 nanoparticles encapsulated inside and a graphitized carbon layers coating outside. Compared to the previous reports, these composites demonstrate more excellent electrochemical performances, including superior rate capability and excellent cycling capacity. Therefore, the final conclusion would be given that these multifarious sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C composites could be highly qualified candidates for lithium-ion battery anodes in some special field, in which good capability and high capacity are urgently required. PMID:26835912

  8. Shell Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bill

    1982-01-01

    The author critiques the program design and educational aspects of the Shell Games, a program developed by Apple Computer, Inc., which can be used by the teacher to design objective tests for adaptation to specific assessment needs. (For related articles, see EC 142 959-962.) (Author)

  9. Solid-state effects and atomiclike effects on shallow inner-shell-electron energy-loss spectra of a cation p or d hole in sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Youichi

    1994-03-01

    Inner-shell-electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies have been done for the systems in which a shallow p or d core hole exists in the final state of a cation. Optically allowed and forbidden transitions have been distinguished from spectral variations due to the breakdown of dipole selection rules. The Ti and V M2,3 spectra and the Zr, Nb, and Mo M4,5 spectra in layered transition-metal disulfides and related misfit-layer compounds are well explained in terms of the energy-band structures. The overall structures of the Pb and Bi O4,5 spectra are understood within the atomic model containing j-j coupling. The Sn N4,5 spectra in SnS and SnS2 are intermediate between them. A reasonable explanation is given by both the atomic model and the band-structure model.

  10. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  11. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  12. Computational design and fabrication of core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of rhodamine 6G.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin; Xie, Jie; Deng, Jian; Fang, Xiangfang; Zhao, Haiqing; Qian, Duo; Wang, Hongjuan

    2016-06-01

    A novel core-shell magnetic nano-adsorbent with surface molecularly imprinted polymer coating was fabricated and then applied to dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction followed by determination of rhodamine 6G using high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecularly imprinted polymer coating was prepared by copolymerization of dopamine and m-aminophenylboronic acid (functional monomers), in the presence of rhodamine 6G (template). The selection of the suitable functional monomers was based on the interaction between different monomers and the template using the density functional theory. The ratios of the monomers to template were further optimized by an OA9 (3(4) ) orthogonal array design. The binding performances of the adsorbent were evaluated by static, kinetic, and selective adsorption experiments. The results reveal that the adsorbent possesses remarkable affinity and binding specificity for rhodamine 6G because of the enhanced Lewis acid-base interaction between the B(Ш) embedded in the imprinted cavities and the template. The nano-adsorbent was successfully applied to dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the trace determination of rhodamine 6G in samples with a detection limit of 2.7 nmol/L. Spiked recoveries ranged from 93.0-99.1, 89.5-92.7, and 86.9-105% in river water, matrimony vine and paprika samples, respectively, with relative standard deviations of less than 4.3%. PMID:27120290

  13. Shell worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  14. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A core–shell anode consisting of nickel–gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni–GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm–2, which is higher than that of a conventional NiO–GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm–2 and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni–GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully. PMID:26615816

  15. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A core-shell anode consisting of nickel-gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni-GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm(-2), which is higher than that of a conventional NiO-GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm(-2) and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni-GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully. PMID:26615816

  16. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    A core-shell anode consisting of nickel-gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni-GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm-2, which is higher than that of a conventional NiO-GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm-2 and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni-GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully.

  17. New chrysin-functionalized silica-core shell magnetic nanoparticles for the magnetic solid phase extraction of copper ions from water samples.

    PubMed

    Abd Ali, Layth Imad; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sulaiman, Azli; Kamboh, Muhammad Afzal; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-02-01

    This study describes the synthesis, characterization and application of a new chrysin-based silica core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-N-chrysin) as an adsorbent for the preconcentration of Cu(II) from aqueous environment. The morphology, thermal stability and magnetic property of Fe3O4@SiO2-N-chrysin were analyzed using FTIR, FESEM, TEM, XRD, thermal analysis and VSM. The extraction efficiency of Fe3O4@SiO2-N-chrysin was analyzed using the batch wise method with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Parameters such as the pH, the sample volume, the adsorption-desorption time, the concentration of the desorption solvent, the desorption volume, the interference effects and the regeneration of the adsorbent were optimized. It was determined that Cu(II) adsorption is highly pH-dependent, and a high recovery (98%) was achieved at a pH 6. The limit of detection (S/N=3), the limit of quantification (S/N=10), the preconcentration factor and the relative standard deviation for Cu(II) extraction were 0.3 ng mL(-1), 1 ng mL(-1), 100 and 1.9% (concentration=30 ng mL(-1), n=7), respectively. Excellent relative recoveries of 97-104% (%RSD<3.12) were achieved from samples from a spiked river, a lake and tap water. The MSPE method was also validated using certified reference materials SLRS-5 with good recovery (92.53%). PMID:26653440

  18. Magnetic solid phase extraction using ionic liquid-coated core-shell magnetic nanoparticles followed by high-performance liquid chromatography for determination of Rhodamine B in food samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieping; Zhu, Xiashi

    2016-06-01

    Three hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) (1-butyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6), 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazole hexafluoro-phosphate ([HMIM]PF6), and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazole hexafluorophosphate ([OMIM]PF6)) were used to coat Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) with core-shell structures to prepare magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) agents (Fe3O4@SiO2@IL). A novel method of MSPE coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the separation/analysis of Rhodamine B was then established. The results showed that Rhodamine B was adsorbed rapidly on Fe3O4@SiO2@[OMIM]PF6 and was released using ethanol. Under optimal conditions, the pre-concentration factor for the proposed method was 25. The linear range, limit of detection (LOD), correlation coefficient (R), and relative standard deviation (RSD) were found to be 0.50-150.00 μgL(-1), 0.08 μgL(-1), 0.9999, and 0.51% (n=3, c=10.00 μgL(-1)), respectively. The Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs could be re-used up to 10 times. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Rhodamine B in food samples. PMID:26830554

  19. Core-shell polydopamine magnetic nanoparticles as sorbent in micro-dispersive solid-phase extraction for the determination of estrogenic compounds in water samples prior to high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Socas-Rodríguez, Bárbara; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Salazar, Pedro; Martín, Miriam; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2015-06-01

    In this work, core-shell Fe3O4@poly(dopamine) magnetic nanoparticles (m-NPs) were prepared and characterized in our laboratory and applied as sorbents for the magnetic-micro solid phase extraction (m-μSPE) of twelve estrogenic compounds of interest (i.e. 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, estrone, hexestrol, 17α-ethynylestradiol, diethylstibestrol, dienestrol, zearalenone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol and β-zearalenol) from different water samples. Separation, determination and quantification were achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. NPs@poly(dopamine) were synthesized by a chemical coprecipitation procedure and characterized by different surface characterization techniques (X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, microelectrophoresis and adsorption/desorption isotherms). Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of m-μSPE (i.e. polymerization time, pH of the sample, extraction and elution conditions) were studied and optimized. The methodology was validated for Milli-Q, mineral, tap and wastewater using 2-methoxyestradiol as internal standard, obtaining recoveries ranging from 70 to 119% with relative standard deviation values lower than 20% and limits of quantification in the range 0.02-1.1 μg/L. PMID:25917309

  20. Solid Phase Characterization of Solids Recovered from Failed Sluicer Arm

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Gary A.

    2015-03-09

    The Enclosure to this memo discusses the solid phase characterization of a solid sample that was retrieved from the single-shell Tank 241-C-111 extended reach sluicer #2. This sluicer, removed from riser #3 on September 25, 2014, was found to have approximately 0.4 gallons of solid tank waste adhering to the nozzle area.

  1. Prediction of Path Deviation in Robot Based Incremental Sheet Metal Forming by Means of a New Solid-Shell Finite Element Technology and a Finite Elastoplastic Model with Combined Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliclar, Yalin; Laurischkat, Roman; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Reese, Stefanie

    2011-08-01

    The presented project deals with a robot based incremental sheet metal forming process, which is called roboforming and has been developed at the Chair of Production Systems. It is characterized by flexible shaping using a freely programmable path-synchronous movement of two industrial robots. The final shape is produced by the incremental infeed of the forming tool in depth direction and its movement along the part contour in lateral direction. However, the resulting geometries formed in roboforming deviate several millimeters from the reference geometry. This results from the compliance of the involved machine structures and the springback effects of the workpiece. The project aims to predict these deviations caused by resiliences and to carry out a compensative path planning based on this prediction. Therefore a planning tool is implemented which compensates the robots's compliance and the springback effects of the sheet metal. The forming process is simulated by means of a finite element analysis using a material model developed at the Institute of Applied Mechanics (IFAM). It is based on the multiplicative split of the deformation gradient in the context of hyperelasticity and combines nonlinear kinematic and isotropic hardening. Low-order finite elements used to simulate thin sheet structures, such as used for the experiments, have the major problem of locking, a nonphysical stiffening effect. For an efficient finite element analysis a special solid-shell finite element formulation based on reduced integration with hourglass stabilization has been developed. To circumvent different locking effects, the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) and the assumed natural strain (ANS) concepts are included in this formulation. Having such powerful tools available we obtain more accurate geometries.

  2. Indentation of pressurized viscoplastic polymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, V.; Needleman, A.

    2016-08-01

    The indentation response of polymer spherical shells is investigated. Finite deformation analyses are carried out with the polymer characterized as a viscoelastic/viscoplastic solid. Both pressurized and unpressurized shells are considered. Attention is restricted to axisymmetric deformations with a conical indenter. The response is analyzed for various values of the shell thickness to radius ratio and various values of the internal pressure. Two sets of material parameters are considered: one set having network stiffening at a moderate strain and the other having no network stiffening until very large strains are attained. The transition from an indentation type mode of deformation to a structural mode of deformation involving bending that occurs as the indentation depth increases is studied. The results show the effects of shell thickness, internal pressure and polymer constitutive characterization on this transition and on the deformation modes in each of these regimes.

  3. Photon upconversion in core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Peng, Denfeng; Ju, Qiang; Wang, Feng

    2015-03-21

    Photon upconversion generally results from a series of successive electronic transitions within complex energy levels of lanthanide ions that are embedded in the lattice of a crystalline solid. In conventional lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles, the dopant ions homogeneously distributed in the host lattice are readily accessible to surface quenchers and lose their excitation energy, giving rise to weak and susceptible emissions. Therefore, present studies on upconversion are mainly focused on core-shell nanoparticles comprising spatially confined dopant ions. By doping upconverting lanthanide ions in the interior of a core-shell nanoparticle, the upconversion emission can be substantially enhanced, and the optical integrity of the nanoparticles can be largely preserved. Optically active shells are also frequently employed to impart multiple functionalities to upconversion nanoparticles. Intriguingly, the core-shell design introduces the possibility of constructing novel upconversion nanoparticles by exploiting the energy exchange interactions across the core-shell interface. In this tutorial review, we highlight recent advances in the development of upconversion core-shell nanoparticles, with particular emphasis on the emerging strategies for regulating the interplay of dopant interactions through core-shell nanostructural engineering that leads to unprecedented upconversion properties. The improved control over photon energy conversion will open up new opportunities for biological and energy applications. PMID:25058157

  4. Validation and application of sub-2 μm core-shell UHPLC-UV-ESI-Orbitrap MS for identification and quantification of β-carotene and selected cleavage products with preceding solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Martano, G; Bojaxhi, E; Forstenlehner, I C; Huber, C G; Bresgen, N; Eckl, P M; Stutz, H

    2014-05-01

    A validated ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography method using 1.7 μm core-shell particles is presented for the identification and quantification of β-carotene (BC) and related cleavage products (CPs) in primary cell culture media. Besides BC, apo-4'-, apo-8'-, apo-10'-, and apo-12'-carotenals, as well as 5,6-epoxy-β-carotene, were selected as target analytes. Detection was performed via an 80-Hz diode array detector and an electrospray ionization-linear quadrupole ion trap-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer, both hyphenated in series. Total analysis time was below 6 min with peak widths <12 s. Addition of trifluoroacetic acid and tetrahydrofuran to the mobile phase allowed for the mass spectrometric detection of BC and related CPs and reduced peak tailing due to improved solubility of hydrophobic analytes. Intra-day and inter-day precision for UV and mass spectrometric detection were ≤1.5 % for retention times and ≤5.1 % for peak areas. Instrumental linearity was confirmed by Mandel's fitting test between 0.25 (or 1.00 μg/mL) and 5.00 μg/mL for UV detection. The higher sensitivity of mass spectrometric detection allowed for the coverage of three concentration domains between 0.025 and 5.00 μg/mL in linearity testing. Homoscedasticity was confirmed between 0.10 and 5.00 μg/mL for Orbitrap XL MS. The limits of quantification were between 52.6 and 889.4 ng/mL for UV detection and between 19.3 and 102.4 ng/L for mass spectrometric detection. Offline solid-phase extraction from culture media fortified with BC and CPs provided intra- and inter-day recoveries between 65.8 and 102.4 % with coefficients of variation ≤6.2 %. Primary rat hepatocyte cultures treated with BC and subjected to different oxidative stress conditions contained 5,6-epoxy-BC and apo-4'-carotenal besides residual BC. Apparently, 5,6-epoxy-BC was formed in the medium via autoxidation of BC by ambient oxygen. PMID:24652151

  5. Shell Worlds: The Question of Shell Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, K. L.; Kennedy, R. G., III; Fields, D. E.

    The initial idea of shell worlds was first proposed in the January 2009 edition of JBIS. In that paper the stability of the shell around a central world was not discussed at any length except to say that it was stable due to forces induced by gravity. This paper demonstrates in a qualitative and quantitative manner that a material shell supported by atmospheric pressure around a moon or small planet is indeed stable and does not require active measures to remain centered, provided that the central body is large enough. The minimal size of the central body to provide this stability is discussed.

  6. The adsorption of rare earth ions using carbonized polydopamine nano shells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Liu, Rui; Hou, Xisen; Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-07

    Herein we report the structure effects of nano carbon shells prepared by carbonized polydopamine for rare earth elements (REEs) adsorption for the first time. The solid carbon sphere, 60 nm carbon shell and 500 nm carbon shell were prepared and investigated for adsorption and desorption of REEs. The adsorption of carbon shells for REEs was found to be better than the solid carbon sphere. The effect of acidities on the adsorption and desorption properties was discussed in this study. The good adsorption performance of carbon shells can be attributed to their porous structure, large specific surface area, amine group andmore » carbonyl group of dopamine.« less

  7. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  8. Lithography-free shell-substrate isolation for core-shell GaAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    Haggren, Tuomas; Perros, Alexander Pyymaki; Jiang, Hua; Huhtio, Teppo; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Dhaka, Veer; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri

    2016-07-01

    A facile and scalable lithography-free technique(5) for the rapid construction of GaAs core-shell nanowires incorporating shell isolation from the substrate is reported. The process is based on interrupting NW growth and applying a thin spin-on-glass (SOG) layer to the base of the NWs and resuming core-shell NW growth. NW growth occurred in an atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) system with gold nanoparticles used as catalysts for the vapour-liquid-solid growth. It is shown that NW axial core growth and radial shell growth can be resumed after interruption and even exposure to air. The SOG residues and native oxide layer that forms on the NW surface are shown to prevent or perturb resumption of epitaxial NW growth if not removed. Both HF etching and in situ annealing of the air-exposed NWs in the MOVPE were shown to remove the SOG residues and native oxide layer. While both procedures are shown capable of removing the native oxide and enabling resumption of epitaxial NW growth, in situ annealing produced the best results and allowed construction of pristine core-shell NWs. No growth occurred on SOG and it was observed that axial NW growth was more rapid when a SOG layer covered the substrate. The fabricated p-core/n-shell NWs exhibited diode behaviour upon electrical testing. The isolation of the NW shells from the substrate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and electrical measurements. The crystal quality of the regrown core-shell NWs was verified with a high resolution transmission electron microscope. The reported technique potentially provides a pathway using MOVPE for scalable and high-throughput production of shell-substrate isolated core-shell NWs on an industrial scale. PMID:27242347

  9. Lithography-free shell-substrate isolation for core–shell GaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggren, Tuomas; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Jiang, Hua; Huhtio, Teppo; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Dhaka, Veer; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri

    2016-07-01

    A facile and scalable lithography-free technique5 for the rapid construction of GaAs core–shell nanowires incorporating shell isolation from the substrate is reported. The process is based on interrupting NW growth and applying a thin spin-on-glass (SOG) layer to the base of the NWs and resuming core–shell NW growth. NW growth occurred in an atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) system with gold nanoparticles used as catalysts for the vapour‑liquid‑solid growth. It is shown that NW axial core growth and radial shell growth can be resumed after interruption and even exposure to air. The SOG residues and native oxide layer that forms on the NW surface are shown to prevent or perturb resumption of epitaxial NW growth if not removed. Both HF etching and in situ annealing of the air-exposed NWs in the MOVPE were shown to remove the SOG residues and native oxide layer. While both procedures are shown capable of removing the native oxide and enabling resumption of epitaxial NW growth, in situ annealing produced the best results and allowed construction of pristine core–shell NWs. No growth occurred on SOG and it was observed that axial NW growth was more rapid when a SOG layer covered the substrate. The fabricated p-core/n-shell NWs exhibited diode behaviour upon electrical testing. The isolation of the NW shells from the substrate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and electrical measurements. The crystal quality of the regrown core–shell NWs was verified with a high resolution transmission electron microscope. The reported technique potentially provides a pathway using MOVPE for scalable and high-throughput production of shell-substrate isolated core–shell NWs on an industrial scale.

  10. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  11. Imperfection Insensitive Thin Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin

    The buckling of axially compressed cylindrical shells and externally pressurized spherical shells is extremely sensitive to even very small geometric imperfections. In practice this issue is addressed by either using overly conservative knockdown factors, while keeping perfect axial or spherical symmetry, or adding closely and equally spaced stiffeners on shell surface. The influence of imperfection-sensitivity is mitigated, but the shells designed from these approaches are either too heavy or very expensive and are still sensitive to imperfections. Despite their drawbacks, these approaches have been used for more than half a century. This thesis proposes a novel method to design imperfection-insensitive cylindrical shells subject to axial compression. Instead of following the classical paths, focused on axially symmetric or high-order rotationally symmetric cross-sections, the method in this thesis adopts optimal symmetry-breaking wavy cross-sections (wavy shells). The avoidance of imperfection sensitivity is achieved by searching with an evolutionary algorithm for smooth cross-sectional shapes that maximize the minimum among the buckling loads of geometrically perfect and imperfect wavy shells. It is found that the shells designed through this approach can achieve higher critical stresses and knockdown factors than any previously known monocoque cylindrical shells. It is also found that these shells have superior mass efficiency to almost all previously reported stiffened shells. Experimental studies on a design of composite wavy shell obtained through the proposed method are presented in this thesis. A method of making composite wavy shells and a photogrametry technique of measuring full-field geometric imperfections have been developed. Numerical predictions based on the measured geometric imperfections match remarkably well with the experiments. Experimental results confirm that the wavy shells are not sensitive to imperfections and can carry axial compression

  12. Iridescence color of shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2002-06-01

    Some shells from both salt water and fresh water show the phenomenon of iridescence color. Pearls and mother-of-pearls also display this phenomenon. In the past, the cause of the iridescence color was attributed to interference. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to study the surface structure of the shell of the mollusk Pinctada Margaritifera. There is a groove structure of reflection grating on the surface area in where the iridescence color appears. An optic experiment with a laser obtained a diffraction pattern produced by the reflection grating structure of the shell. The study led to a conclusion that the iridescence color of the shell is caused by diffraction. A SEM image of the shells of an abalone Haliotis Rufescens (red abalone) showed a statistically regularly arranged tile structure that serves as a two-dimensional grating. This grating structure causes the iridescence color of the shell of red abalone. The dominant color of the iridescence of shells is caused by the uneven grating efficiency in the visible wavelength range when a shell functions as a reflection grating. The wavelength of the dominant color should be at or near the wavelength of the maximum efficiency of the grating.

  13. Method of altering the effective bulk density of solid material and the resulting product

    DOEpatents

    Kool, Lawrence B.; Nolen, Robert L.; Solomon, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of adjustably tailoring the effective bulk density of a solid material in which a mixture comprising the solid material, a film-forming polymer and a volatile solvent are sprayed into a drying chamber such that the solvent evaporates and the polymer dries into hollow shells having the solid material captured within the shell walls. Shell density may be varied as a function of solid/polymer concentration, droplet size and drying temperature.

  14. Cohesive Elements for Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  15. Failure of Viral Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, William S.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Michel, Jean-Philippe; Knobler, Charles M.; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2006-12-01

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the structural failure of viral shells under mechanical stress. We find that discontinuities in the force-indentation curve associated with failure should appear when the so-called Föppl von Kármán (FvK) number exceeds a critical value. A nanoindentation study of a viral shell subject to a soft-mode instability, where the stiffness of the shell decreases with increasing pH, confirms the predicted onset of failure as a function of the FvK number.

  16. Endoliths in Lithophaga lithophaga shells--Variation in intensity of infestation and species occurrence.

    PubMed

    Peharda, Melita; Calcinai, Barbara; Puljas, Sanja; Golubić, Stjepko; Arapov, Jasna; Thébault, Julien

    2015-07-01

    Pronounced differences with respect to the extent of infestation and the degree of Lithophaga lithophaga shell damage inflicted by euendolithic taxa at two sites in the Adriatic Sea representing different productivity conditions, are described. Shells collected from the eastern part of Kaštela Bay, which is characterized by higher primary productivity, have significantly more shell damage then the shell collected from a site on the outer coast of the island of Čiovo exposed to the oligotrophic Adriatic Sea. The presence of endoliths and their perforations were detected in different layers of the shell, including solidly mineralized parts of the skeleton and within the organic lamellae incorporated into the shell. Phototrophic endoliths were not observed in the specimens. The most serious damage to L. lithophaga shells was the boring clionaid sponge Pione vastifica, which was more common in shells collected from Kaštela. PMID:25982321

  17. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  18. C-Shell Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Malcolm J.

    This cookbook describes the fundamentals of writing scripts using the UNIX C shell. It shows how to combine Starlink and private applications with shell commands and constructs to create powerful and time-saving tools for performing repetitive jobs, creating data-processing pipelines, and encapsulating useful recipes. The cookbook aims to give practical and reassuring examples to at least get you started without having to consult a UNIX manual. However, it does not offer a comprehensive description of C-shell syntax to prevent you from being overwhelmed or intimidated. The topics covered are: how to run a script, defining shell variables, prompting, arithmetic and string processing, passing information between Starlink applications, obtaining dataset attributes and FITS header information, processing multiple files and filename modification, command-line arguments and options, and loops. There is also a glossary.

  19. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  20. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Hollow shells of high uniformity are formed by emitting liquid through an outer nozzle and gas through an inner nozzle, to form a hollow extrusion, by flowing the gas at a velocity between about 1.3 and 10 times the liquid velocity. The natural breakup rate of the extrusion can be increased to decrease shell size by applying periodic perturbations to one of the materials prior to exiting the nozzles, to a nozzle, or to the extrusion.

  1. Shells and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  2. Evolving dust shells

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, H.P.

    1981-06-15

    The reduction of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner canonical formulation of general relativity developed in the first paper of this series is applied to the full time-evolution problem for spherically symmetric charged dust shells. Detailed pictures of shell evolution are produced. Among other things, it is found that under certain well-defined circumstances the asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurfaces of constant time ''pinch off'' and become completely closed, the closure point being a locally naked singularity.

  3. Stress Localization in Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, Sarah; Evans, Arthur; Bende, Nakul; Hayward, Ryan; Santangelo, Christian

    Upon indentation, thin shells react by localizing strain energy in polygonal structures as opposed to a uniform axisymmetric distribution. While the formation of these localized structures are well-characterized for perfect shells, a change in shell thickness or the introduction of a crease fundamentally changes the nature of the shell deformation. We perform finite element simulations, in tandem with experiments to explore the effect of different shell geometries on the energy landscape. We find that the crease induces a new symmetry-breaking localization that does not appear in perfect shells, and we explore the deformation characteristics of the creased shell over a wide range of crease radii, and crease orientations.

  4. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  5. Liquid-drop technique for generation of organic glass and metal shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-12-23

    We have for several years utilized the technique of capillary wave synchronization of the break-up of single and multiple component jets to produce uniform sized liquid drops and solid particles, and hollow liquid and solid shells. The technique has also been used to encapsulate a number of liquids in impermeable spherical shells. Highly uniform glass shells have been made by generating uniform drops of glass forming materials in an aqueous solution, subsequently evaporating the water, and then fusing and blowing the remaining solids in a high temperature vertical tube furnace. Experimental results will be presented and the critical problems in further research in this field will be discussed.

  6. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity.

  7. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  8. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Andreas J; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  9. Direct imaging the upconversion nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level: shell thickness dependence in upconverting optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Che, Renchao; Li, Xiaomin; Yao, Chi; Yang, Jianping; Shen, Dengke; Hu, Pan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2012-06-13

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles have shown considerable promise in solid-state lasers, three-dimensional flat-panel displays, and solar cells and especially biological labeling and imaging. It has been demonstrated extensively that the epitaxial coating of upconversion (UC) core crystals with a lattice-matched shell can passivate the core and enhance the overall upconversion emission intensity of the materials. However, there are few papers that report a precise link between the shell thickness of core/shell nanoparticles and their optical properties. This is mainly because rare earth fluoride upconversion core/shell structures have only been inferred from indirect measurements to date. Herein, a reproducible method to grow a hexagonal NaGdF(4) shell on NaYF(4):Yb,Er nanocrystals with monolayer control thickness is demonstrated for the first time. On the basis of the cryo-transmission electron microscopy, rigorous electron energy loss spectroscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field investigations on the core/shell structure under a low operation temperature (96 K), direct imaging the NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) nanocrystal core/shell structure at the subnanometer level was realized for the first time. Furthermore, a strong linear link between the NaGdF(4) shell thickness and the optical response of the hexagonal NaYF(4):Yb,Er@NaGdF(4) core/shell nanocrystals has been established. During the epitaxial growth of the NaGdF(4) shell layer by layer, surface defects of the nanocrystals can be gradually passivated by the homogeneous shell deposition process, which results in the obvious enhancement in overall UC emission intensity and lifetime and is more resistant to quenching by water molecules. PMID:22545710

  10. An immersed-shell method for modelling fluid-structure interactions.

    PubMed

    Viré, A; Xiang, J; Pain, C C

    2015-02-28

    The paper presents a novel method for numerically modelling fluid-structure interactions. The method consists of solving the fluid-dynamics equations on an extended domain, where the computational mesh covers both fluid and solid structures. The fluid and solid velocities are relaxed to one another through a penalty force. The latter acts on a thin shell surrounding the solid structures. Additionally, the shell is represented on the extended domain by a non-zero shell-concentration field, which is obtained by conservatively mapping the shell mesh onto the extended mesh. The paper outlines the theory underpinning this novel method, referred to as the immersed-shell approach. It also shows how the coupling between a fluid- and a structural-dynamics solver is achieved. At this stage, results are shown for cases of fundamental interest. PMID:25583857

  11. An immersed-shell method for modelling fluid–structure interactions

    PubMed Central

    Viré, A.; Xiang, J.; Pain, C. C.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a novel method for numerically modelling fluid–structure interactions. The method consists of solving the fluid-dynamics equations on an extended domain, where the computational mesh covers both fluid and solid structures. The fluid and solid velocities are relaxed to one another through a penalty force. The latter acts on a thin shell surrounding the solid structures. Additionally, the shell is represented on the extended domain by a non-zero shell-concentration field, which is obtained by conservatively mapping the shell mesh onto the extended mesh. The paper outlines the theory underpinning this novel method, referred to as the immersed-shell approach. It also shows how the coupling between a fluid- and a structural-dynamics solver is achieved. At this stage, results are shown for cases of fundamental interest. PMID:25583857

  12. Switching closed-shell to open-shell phenalenyl: toward designing electroactive materials.

    PubMed

    Pariyar, Anand; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Bhunia, Mrinal; Dey, Suman Kr; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2015-05-13

    Open-shell phenalenyl chemistry started more than half a century back, and the first solid-state phenalenyl radical was realized only 15 years ago highlighting the synthetic challenges associated in stabilizing carbon-based radical chemistry, though it has great promise as building blocks for molecular electronics and multifunctional materials. Alternatively, stable closed-shell phenalenyl has tremendous potential as it can be utilized to create an in situ open-shell state by external spin injection. In the present study, we have designed a closed-shell phenalenyl-based iron(III) complex, Fe(III)(PLY)3 (PLY-H = 9-hydroxyphenalenone) displaying an excellent electrocatalytic property as cathode material for one compartment membraneless H2O2 fuel cell. The power density output of Fe(III)(PLY)3 is nearly 15-fold higher than the structurally related model compound Fe(III)(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate) and nearly 140-fold higher than an earlier reported mononuclear Fe(III) complex, Fe(III)(Pc)Cl (Pc = pthalocyaninate), highlighting the role of switchable closed-shell phenalenyl moiety for electron-transfer process in designing electroactive materials. PMID:25933051

  13. Shell Biorefinery: Dream or Reality?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yang, Huiying; Yan, Ning

    2016-09-12

    Shell biorefinery, referring to the fractionation of crustacean shells into their major components and the transformation of each component into value-added chemicals and materials, has attracted growing attention in recent years. Since the large quantities of waste shells remain underexploited, their valorization can potentially bring both ecological and economic benefits. This Review provides an overview of the current status of shell biorefinery. It first describes the structural features of crustacean shells, including their composition and their interactions. Then, various fractionation methods for the shells are introduced. The last section is dedicated to the valorization of chitin and its derivatives for chemicals, porous carbon materials and functional polymers. PMID:27484462

  14. Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock into the receiving room housed in the 1965 concrete block addition. - J.C. Lore Oyster House, 14430 Solomons Island Road, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  15. Electron-impact-induced {ital K} plus {ital M} shell ionization in solid targets of medium-{ital Z} elements studied by means of high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ludziejewski, T.; Rymuza, P.; Sujkowski, Z.; Dousse, J.; Rheme, C.; Polasik, M.

    1996-07-01

    The {ital K}{beta}{sub 2} x-ray spectra of zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, and palladium bombarded by 150 and 300 keV electrons were measured with a high-resolution transmission curved crystal spectrometer. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations were used for the decomposition of the experimental spectra into the {ital K}{beta}{sub 2}{ital M}{sup 0} (diagram) and {ital K}{beta}{sub 2}{ital M}{sup 1} (satellite) components. The probabilities of energy dependent (direct Coulomb and two-step) processes were estimated from the differences in the satellite line yields for electrons and photons. The satellite yields are found to be considerably enhanced in comparison with those for the proton-induced ionization recently measured and analyzed in the same way [T. Ludziejewski {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. A {bold 52}, 2791 (1995)]. This result indicates the importance of multielectron effects in the {ital K} plus {ital M} shell ionization by energetic projectiles. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Solid phase extraction of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions based on a novel functionalized Fe3O4@ SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles with the aid of multivariate optimization methodology.

    PubMed

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Abbaszadeh, Abolfazl; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Shekari, Nafiseh; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar

    2015-04-01

    This work describes novel Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles functionalized with phenyl isothiocyanate and its application in the preconcentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions. The parameters affecting the preconcentration procedure were optimized by a Box-Behnken design through response surface methodology. Three variables (extraction time, magnetic sorbent amount, and pH value) were selected as the main factors affecting the sorption step, while four variables (type, volume and concentration of the eluent; and elution time) were selected as effective factors of elution step in the optimization study. Following the sorption and elution, the ions were quantified by FAAS. The limits of detection were 0.05 and 0.9ngmL(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions, respectively. The relative standard deviations were less than 6.4%. The sorption capacity (in mg g(-1)) of this new sorbent is 179 for Cd(II) and 156 for Pb(II). Finally, this nanocomposite was successfully applied to the rapid extraction of trace quantities of heavy metal ions from fish, sediment, soil, and water samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:25686967

  17. Solid phase extraction using magnetic core mesoporous shell microspheres with C18-modified interior pore-walls for residue analysis of cephalosporins in milk by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodan; Yu, Yingjia; Zhao, Meiyan; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Yan; Duan, Gengli

    2014-05-01

    A fast and effective extraction method has been developed for measuring the residue of cephalosporins (cefalexin, cefazolin, cefoperazone) in milk by using magnetic core-mesoporous shell microspheres with C18-functionalized interior pore-walls (C18-Fe3O4@mSiO2) as adsorbent. With no need for any protein precipitation procedure, the cephalosporins were directly adsorbed onto the C18-Fe3O4@mSiO2 microspheres through hydrophobic interaction with C18-groups (Octadecyl functional groups) functionalized in the interior walls of mesopore channels while the abundant proteins in milk sample were excluded out of the channel due to the size exclusion effect. Thereafter, the cephalosporins-absorbed C18-Fe3O4@mSiO2 microspheres were rapidly isolated by placing a magnet, and followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis after eluted by methanol. Various parameters which could affect the extraction performance were optimised. The newly developed extraction method was successfully applied in determination of cephalosporin residues in milk samples, offering a valuable alternative to simplify and speed up the sample preparation step. PMID:24360441

  18. Shell Creek Summers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Mark; Goedeken, Suzy

    2005-01-01

    In 2002 Shell Creek Watershed Improvement Group turned to the Newman Grove Public Schools' science department to help educate the public on water quality in the watershed and to establish a monitoring system that would be used to improve surface and groundwater quality in the creek's watershed. Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality provided…

  19. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  20. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function of the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.

  1. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function ofmore » the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.« less

  2. Elastic guided waves in a coated spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Song; Shang, Xinchun; Pan, Ernian

    2016-04-01

    Elastic-guided wave inspection technique is important in non-destructive detection of coated shell structures. It is based on the wave propagation characteristics and various factors which influences it. In this paper, the dispersion equations of the spherical shell are derived by the decomposition approach in order to investigate the influences of the coating thickness and viscoelastic damping on the dispersion characteristics. The viscoelastic properties of the coating layer are modelled by the standard linear solid with two damping factors in the Láme constants. The dispersion equation of the coated shell is deduced by the transfer matrix method, and the dispersion and attenuation curves for different thicknesses and damping factors are calculated. The frequency range which is less affected by coating is identified by comparing the dispersion curves of the bare shell to those of the coated shell with different coating thicknesses. The effect of damping factors on the mode shapes is also examined. The present numerical results on the elastic guided wave in coated spherical shell would provide a theoretical basis for non-destructive inspections in layered spherical shell structures.

  3. 7 CFR 51.2002 - Split shell.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....2002 Split shell. Split shell means a shell having any crack which is open and conspicuous for a distance of more than one-fourth the circumference of the shell, measured in the direction of the crack....

  4. Analytical and computational models of shells; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 10-15, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Editor); Belytschko, Ted (Editor); Simo, Juan C. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Topics presented include asymptotic analysis and computation for shells, the edge effects in the Reissner-Mindlin plate theory, nonlinear problems of geometrically exact shell theories, and developments in variational methods for high performance plate and shell elements. Also presented are an assumed strain solid element model for geometrically nonlinear shell analysis, shell finite elements with six degrees of freedom per node, hierarchic plate and shell models based on p-extension, and a simple shell element formulation for large-scale elastoplastic analysis. Also discussed are the assessment of computational models for multilayered composite cylinders, shell models for impact analysis, analysis of shell structures subjected to contact-impacts, and the application of shell theory to cardiac mechanics.

  5. A computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements using symbolic integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. M.; Bowen, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements with variable curvature is described. A listing of the program is presented together with printed output for a sample case. Computation times and central memory requirements are given for several different elements. The program is based on a stiffness (displacement) finite-element model in which the fundamental unknowns consist of both the displacement and the rotation components of the reference surface of the shell. Two triangular and four quadrilateral elements are implemented in the program. The triangular elements have 6 or 10 nodes, and the quadrilateral elements have 4 or 8 nodes. Two of the quadrilateral elements have internal degrees of freedom associated with displacement modes which vanish along the edges of the elements (bubble modes). The triangular elements and the remaining two quadrilateral elements do not have bubble modes. The output from the program consists of arrays corresponding to the stiffness, the geometric stiffness, the consistent mass, and the consistent load matrices for individual elements. The integrals required for the generation of these arrays are evaluated by using symbolic (or analytic) integration in conjunction with certain group-theoretic techniques. The analytic expressions for the integrals are exact and were developed using the symbolic and algebraic manipulation language.

  6. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  7. Spectroscopy of Mn atoms isolated in solid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Moroshkin, P. Lebedev, V.; Weis, A.

    2014-06-07

    We present an experimental study of the laser-induced luminescence spectra of Mn atoms in solid helium matrices. We observe transitions of the valence electron and of inner-shell electrons. We find that the Mn-He interaction perturbs the inner-shell transitions to a lesser extent than the valence-electron transitions. The observed lineshapes of the inner-shell transitions of Mn are similar to those of an inner-shell transition in Ba studied earlier. At the same time, they are more strongly perturbed than the corresponding transitions in Au and Cu under the same conditions. We suggest a qualitative explanation of these observations based on the atomic bubble model. Our results also suggest that the inner-shell transitions of Mn in solid He are more strongly perturbed than the same lines of Mn isolated in solid Ar or Kr matrices.

  8. Optimum shell design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Comparison of two methods, namely Nedler and Mead's (1965) simplex method and Davidon's (1959) variable metric method, for achieving optimum design in terms of minimum weight for rotational shells under certain constraints. The superiority of one of the methods over the other is shown to depend, among other things, upon the form of the function to be minimized, and whether or not it is continuous everywhere in values and derivatives.

  9. Liquid drop technique for generation of organic glass and metal shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    It was found that liquid drop techniques are very useful in several diverse areas. For producing very uniform metallic, organic, inorganic and, on particular, glassy shells, the liquid jet method is the most reproducible and exceptionally useful of all the techniques studied. The technique of capillary wave synchronization of the break-up of single and multiple component jets was utilized to produce uniform sized liquid drops and solid particles, and hollow liquid and solid shells. The technique was also used to encapsulate a number of liquids in impermeable spherical shells. Highly uniform glass shells were made by generating uniform drops of glass forming materials in an aqueous solution, subsequently evaporating the water, and then fusing and blowing the remaining solids in a high temperature vertical tube furnace. Experimental results are presented and the critical problems in further research in this field are discussed.

  10. Encapsulation of emulsion droplets by organo-silica shells.

    PubMed

    Zoldesi, C I; Steegstra, P; Imhof, A

    2007-04-01

    Surfactant-stabilized emulsion droplets were used as templates for the synthesis of hollow colloidal particles. Monodisperse silicone oil droplets were prepared by hydrolysis and polymerization of dimethyldiethoxysiloxane monomer, in the presence of surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, anionic) or Triton X-100 (non-ionic). A sharp decrease in the average droplet radius with increasing surfactant concentration was found, with a linear dependence of the droplet radius on the logarithm of the surfactant concentration. The surfactant-stabilized oil droplets were then encapsulated with a solid shell using tetraethoxysilane, and hollow particles were obtained by exchange of the liquid core. The size and polydispersity of the oil droplets and the thickness of the shell were determined using static light scattering, and hollow particles were characterized by electron microscopy. Details on the composition of the shell material were obtained from energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. In the case of sodium dodecyl sulphate, the resulting shells were relatively thin and rough, while when Triton X-100 was used, smooth shells were obtained which could be varied in thickness from very thick ( approximately 150 nm) to very thin shells ( approximately 17 nm). Finally, hexane droplets were encapsulated using the same procedure, showing that our method can in principle be extended to a wide range of emulsions. PMID:17240392

  11. Natural melting within a spherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed on the melting of a phase change medium in a spherical shell. Free expansion of the medium into a void space within the sphere was permitted. A step function temperature jump on the outer shell wall was imposed and the timewise evolution of the melting process and the position of the solid-liquid interface was photographically recorded. Numerical integration of the interface position data yielded information about the melted mass and the energy of melting. It was found that the rate of melting and the heat transfer were significantly affected by the movement of the solid medium to the base of the sphere due to gravity. The energy transfer associated with melting was substantially higher than that predicted by the conduction model. Furthermore, the radio of the measured values of sensible energy in the liquid melt to the energy of melting were nearly proportional to the Stefan number. The experimental results are in agreement with a theory set forth in an earlier paper.

  12. Em Response of a Conductive, Permeable Spherical Shell

    2005-10-24

    This code calculates the spectral response of conductive, permeable, shell in a conductive whole space using a closed form solution. The source is either a uniform field (approximately valid when the size of the sphere is small compared to the distance to the source) or the field of dipole (and by superposition, the field of a finite loop). The code is particularly useful in showing that the typical UXO (usually shells), the response is significantlymore » different at intermediate to late times compared to solids of the same materials.« less

  13. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  14. Shell structure from nuclear observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, I.; Rodríguez, Y. Colón; Cunningham, S.; Aprahamian, A.

    2016-04-01

    The appearance and disappearance of shells and subshells are determined using a previously introduced method of structural analysis. This work extends the approach and applies it to protons, in addition to neutrons, in an attempt to provide a more complete understanding of shell structure in nuclei. Experimental observables including the mean-square charge radius, as well as other spectroscopic and mass related quantities are analyzed for extrema. This analysis also uses differential observables among adjacent even-even nuclei to serve as the derivatives for these quantities of interest. Local extrema in these quantities indicate shell structure and the lack of local extrema indicate missing shell closures. The shell structure of low-mass nuclei is inconsistent likely as a consequence of the single-particle structure. Additionally, multiple shell features occurring in midshell regions are determined by combining information from two or more observables. Our results near stability complement previous observations further out.

  15. The structure of circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This document provides a report on research activities carried out with the support of NASA grant NAG 5-1174, the Structure of Circumstellar Shells, funded under the Astrophysics Data Program. The research carried out with the support of this grant is a study of the properties of circumstellar dust shells for which spectra are available through IRAS low resolution spectrometry (LRS). This research consisted of the development and application of models of axisymmetric circumstellar shells and a preliminary survey of the applicability of neural nets for analysis of the IRAS LRS spectra of circumstellar dust shells.

  16. Automated shell theory for rotating structures (ASTROS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing axisymmetric shells with inertial forces caused by rotation about the shell axis is developed by revising the STARS II shell program. The basic capabilities of the STARS II shell program, such as the treatment of the branched shells, stiffened wall construction, and thermal gradients, are retained.

  17. STUDIES ON SHELL FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1961-01-01

    Details of crystal growth in the calcitostracum of Crassostrea virginica have been studied with the purpose of analyzing the formation of the overlapping rows of oriented tabular crystals characteristic of this part of the shell. Crystal elongation, orientation, and dendritic growth suggest the presence of strong concentration gradients in a thin layer of solution in which crystallization occurs. Formation of the overlapping rows can be explained by three processes observed in the shell: a two-dimensional tree-like dendritic growth in which one set of crystal branchings creeps over an adjacent set of branchings; three-dimensional dendritic growth; and growth by dislocation of crystal surfaces. Multilayers of crystals may thus be formed at one time. This is favored by infrequent secretion of a covering organic matrix which would inhibit crystal growth. The transitional zone covering the outer part of the calcitostracum and the inner part of the prismatic region is generally characterized by aggregates of small crystals with definite orientation. Growth in this zone appears to take place in a relatively homogeneous state of solution without strong concentration gradients. Thin membranes and bands of organic matrix were commonly observed in the transitional zone bordering the prismatic region. The membrane showed a very fine oriented network pattern. PMID:13783329

  18. Studies on Shell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Sharp, D. Gordon; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1958-01-01

    Electron microscope observations have been made by means of the replica method on growth processes of calcite crystals of the nacreous layer of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Layer formation is initiated by the secretion of a conchiolin matrix and the deposition of rounded crystal seeds on or in this material. In some areas crystal seeds are elongate and within a given area show a similar orientation, probably due to slower deposition. The seeds appear to increase in size by dendritic growth, and smaller seeds become incorporated into larger ones which come into contact to form a single layer. With further growth, crystals overlap, forming a step-like arrangement. The direction of growth is frequently different in neighboring regions. Crystal seeds deposited on crystal surfaces are usually elongate and oriented. Well developed crystals have a tabular idiomorphic form and are parallel in their growth. Rounded and irregular crystals were also observed. The crystals show reticular structure with units of the order of 100 A and striations corresponding with the rhombohedral axes of the crystals. The role of the mantle is discussed in relation to the growth patterns of crystals and shell structure. PMID:13549499

  19. Hi shells, supershells, shell-like objects, and ''worms''

    SciTech Connect

    Heiles, C.

    1984-08-01

    We present photographic representations of the combination of two Hi surveys, so as to eliminate the survey boundaries at Vertical BarbVertical Bar = 10/sup 0/. We also present high-contrast photographs for particular velocities to exhibit weak Hi features. All of these photographs were used to prepare a new list of Hi shells, supershells, and shell-like objects. We discuss the structure of three shell-like objects that are associated with high-velocity gas, and with gas at all velocities that is associated with radio continuum loops I, II, and III. We use spatial filtering to find wiggly gas filaments: ''worms'': crawling away from the galactic plane in the inner Galaxy. The ''worms'' are probably parts of shells that are open at the top; such shells should be good sources of hot gas for the galactic halo.

  20. Biomechanics of turtle shells: how whole shells fail in compression.

    PubMed

    Magwene, Paul M; Socha, John J

    2013-02-01

    Turtle shells are a form of armor that provides varying degrees of protection against predation. Although this function of the shell as armor is widely appreciated, the mechanical limits of protection and the modes of failure when subjected to breaking stresses have not been well explored. We studied the mechanical properties of whole shells and of isolated bony tissues and sutures in four species of turtles (Trachemys scripta, Malaclemys terrapin, Chrysemys picta, and Terrapene carolina) using a combination of structural and mechanical tests. Structural properties were evaluated by subjecting whole shells to compressive and point loads in order to quantify maximum load, work to failure, and relative shell deformations. The mechanical properties of bone and sutures from the plastral region of the shell were evaluated using three-point bending experiments. Analysis of whole shell structural properties suggests that small shells undergo relatively greater deformations before failure than do large shells and similar amounts of energy are required to induce failure under both point and compressive loads. Location of failures occurred far more often at sulci than at sutures (representing the margins of the epidermal scutes and the underlying bones, respectively), suggesting that the small grooves in the bone created by the sulci introduce zones of weakness in the shell. Values for bending strength, ultimate bending strain, Young's modulus, and energy absorption, calculated from the three-point bending data, indicate that sutures are relatively weaker than the surrounding bone, but are able to absorb similar amounts of energy due to higher ultimate strain values. PMID:23203474

  1. Three dimensional sound transmission through poroelastic cylindrical shells in the presence of subsonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebitooti, R.; Daneshjou, K.; Kornokar, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an extension of the full method to investigate sound transmission through poroelastic cylindrical shell. The "extended full method" is presented based on Biot theory with considering the 3-D wave propagation in a cylindrical shell. Contrary to previous methods, it could be applicable for both poroelastic cylindrical shells and double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic materials with an excellent accuracy. In the extended full method, the well-known Helmholtz decomposition is used to obtain the displacement fields, solid stresses and the fluid pressure. In order to verify the results of the poroelastic cylindrical shell the porosity goes into zero with eliminating the fluid phase of the poroelastic material. Thus, the results are compared with those of TLs for isotropic shell with high accuracy. The results also indicate that enhancing the porosity of the poroelastic cylindrical shells efficiently leads into decreasing the TL. It is also designated that with doubling the thickness of the poroelastic shell, the TL is improved about 6 dB in a broad-band frequency. Also, the present method is investigated for the case of a double-walled cylindrical shell composed of isotropic skins and poroelastic core. The first-order shear deformation theory is applied to modeling the isotropic shells. The results indicate that presented method is more accurate than simplified method, particularly in the case of small radius cylindrical shells. Moreover, the results indicate that with increasing the radius of the shell, the double-walled cylindrical shell behaves in a same trend as a double-walled flat plate.

  2. Biomineralisation in Mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, Y.; Cuif, J. P.; Salomé, M.; Williams, C. T.

    2009-04-01

    The main components of Mollusc shells are carbonate minerals: calcite and aragonite. ACC is present in larval stages. Calcite and aragonite can be secreted simultaneously by the mantle. Despite the small number of varieties, the arrangement of the mineral components is diverse, and dependant upon the taxonomy. They are also associated with organic components much more diverse, the diversity of which reflects the large taxonomic diversity. From TGA analyses, the organic content (water included) is high (>5% in some layers). The biomineralisation process is not a passive precipitation process, but is strongly controlled by the organism. The biological-genetic control is shown by the constancy of the arrangement of the layers, the mineralogy and the microstructure in a given species. Microstructural units (i.e. tablets, prisms etc.) have shapes that do not occur in non-biogenic counterparts. Nacreous tablets, for example, are flattened on their crystallographic c axis, which is normally the axis of maximum growth rate for non-biogenic aragonite. Morever, their inner structure is species-specific: the arrangements of nacreous tablets in Gastropoda - Cephalopoda, and in Bivalvia differ, and the inner arrangement of the nacreous tablets is different in ectocochlear and endocochlear Cephalopoda. The organic-mineral ratios also differ in the various layers of a shell. Differences in chemical composition also demonstrates the biological-genetic control: for example, aragonite has a low Sr content unknown in non-biogenic samples; two aragonitic layers in a shell have different Sr and Mg contents, S is higher in calcitic layers. Decalcification releases soluble (SOM) and insoluble (IOM) organic components. Insoluble components form the main part of the intercrystalline membranes, and contain proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. Soluble phases are present within the crystals and the intercrystalline membranes. These phases are composed of more or less glycosylated proteins

  3. detached_shells_carbon_stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hony, Sacha; Bouwman, Jeroen; Waters, Laurens

    2004-09-01

    We propose to obtain 19-37 micrometer IRS spectra of the detached shells around nearby carbon-stars. We have selected a small (11) sample of bright, well studied, carbon-stars with known detached shells. The sample covers a range of angular diameters of the detached shells from 8-200" and stellar effective temperatures between 800-2600 K. With the spectra of the dust in the detached shell we aim to establish: i) The location of the shell. ii) The chemistry of the shell in order to constrain it's origin. iii) Test the MgS identification for the ``30'' micrometer emission feature. iv) Determine observationally the relationship between the ``30'' micrometer feature peak-position and the distance to the star. These observations will contribute greatly to the understanding AGB-star mass loss, in general, and the phenomenon of detached shells around carbon-stars, in particular. They will also be used to develop a diagnostic tool that allows to study detached shell properties of distant carbon-stars, that cannot be spatially resolved, based on their IR spectrum alone. The total requested time is 2.5h.

  4. Manufacturing Complicated Shells And Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobol, Paul J.; Faucher, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    Explosive forming, wax filling, and any one of welding, diffusion bonding, or brazing used in method of manufacturing large, complicated shell-and-liner vessels or structures. Method conceived for manufacture of film-cooled rocket nozzles but applicable to joining large coaxial shells and liners in general.

  5. Summary compilation of shell element performance versus formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Heinstein, Martin Wilhelm; Hales, Jason Dean; Breivik, Nicole L.; Key, Samuel W.

    2011-07-01

    This document compares the finite element shell formulations in the Sierra Solid Mechanics code. These are finite elements either currently in the Sierra simulation codes Presto and Adagio, or expected to be added to them in time. The list of elements are divided into traditional two-dimensional, plane stress shell finite elements, and three-dimensional solid finite elements that contain either modifications or additional terms designed to represent the bending stiffness expected to be found in shell formulations. These particular finite elements are formulated for finite deformation and inelastic material response, and, as such, are not based on some of the elegant formulations that can be found in an elastic, infinitesimal finite element setting. Each shell element is subjected to a series of 12 verification and validation test problems. The underlying purpose of the tests here is to identify the quality of both the spatially discrete finite element gradient operator and the spatially discrete finite element divergence operator. If the derivation of the finite element is proper, the discrete divergence operator is the transpose of the discrete gradient operator. An overall summary is provided from which one can rank, at least in an average sense, how well the individual formulations can be expected to perform in applications encountered year in and year out. A letter grade has been assigned albeit sometimes subjectively for each shell element and each test problem result. The number of A's, B's, C's, et cetera assigned have been totaled, and a grade point average (GPA) has been computed, based on a 4.0-system. These grades, combined with a comparison between the test problems and the application problem, can be used to guide an analyst to select the element with the best shell formulation.

  6. Improved Connector Shell for Cable Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, A. L.; Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Cable connector shell improves electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by electrically connecting cable braid around entire circumference. Connector cable braid is slipped over ferrule and sleeve is slipped over braid, clamping it tightly to shell. Connector shell completely shields cable conductors.

  7. Core-shell nanostructured catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Lee, Ilkeun; Joo, Ji Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong

    2013-08-20

    Novel nanotechnologies have allowed great improvements in the syn-thesis of catalysts with well-controlled size, shape, and surface properties. Transition metal nanostructures with specific sizes and shapes, for instance, have shown great promise as catalysts with high selectivities and relative ease of recycling. Researchers have already demonstrated new selective catalysis with solution-dispersed or supported-metal nanocatalysts, in some cases applied to new types of reactions. Several challenges remain, however, particularly in improving the structural stability of the catalytic active phase. Core-shell nanostructures are nanoparticles encapsulated and protected by an outer shell that isolates the nanoparticles and prevents their migration and coalescence during the catalytic reactions. The synthesis and characterization of effective core-shell catalysts has been at the center of our research efforts and is the focus of this Account. Efficient core-shell catalysts require porous shells that allow free access of chemical species from the outside to the surface of nanocatalysts. For this purpose, we have developed a surface-protected etching process to prepare mesoporous silica and titania shells with controllable porosity. In certain cases, we can tune catalytic reaction rates by adjusting the porosity of the outer shell. We also designed and successfully applied a silica-protected calcination method to prepare crystalline shells with high surface area, using anatase titania as a model system. We achieved a high degree of control over the crystallinity and porosity of the anatase shells, allowing for the systematic optimization of their photocatalytic activity. Core-shell nanostructures also provide a great opportunity for controlling the interaction among the different components in ways that might boost structural stability or catalytic activity. For example, we fabricated a SiO₂/Au/N-doped TiO₂ core-shell photocatalyst with a sandwich structure that showed

  8. Shell forming apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Granett, Dan (Inventor); Akutagawa, Wesley M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A nozzle assembly is described for use in a system that forms small gas-filled shells, which avoids the need for holding a miniature inner nozzle precisely concentric with a miniature outer nozzle. The outer nozzle has a diameter which is less than about 0.7 millimeter, which results in fluid passing through the nozzle having a progressively greater velocity at locations progressively further from the walls of the outer nozzle across most of the nozzle. This highly variable velocity profile automatically forces gas to the center of the outer nozzle. The end of the inner nozzle, which emits gas, is spaced upstream from the tip of the outer nozzle, to provide a distance along which to center the gas. This self-centering characteristic permits the inner nozzle to be positioned so its axis is not concentric with the axis of the outer nozzle.

  9. Composite shell spacecraft seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barackman, Victor J. (Inventor); Pulley, John K. (Inventor); Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); McKee, Sandra D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A two-part seat (10) providing full body support that is specific for each crew member (30) on an individual basis. The two-part construction for the seat (10) can accommodate many sizes and shapes for crewmembers (30) because it is reconfigurable and therefore reusable for subsequent flights. The first component of the two-part seat construction is a composite shell (12) that surrounds the crewmember's entire body and is generically fitted to their general size in height and weight. The second component of the two-part seat (10) is a cushion (20) that conforms exactly to the specific crewmember's entire body and gives total body support in more complex environment.

  10. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  11. Au-Cu2O core-shell nanowire photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oener, S. Z.; Mann, S. A.; Sciacca, B.; Sfiligoj, C.; Hoang, J.; Garnett, E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are among the most promising candidates for next generation photovoltaics. This is due to their outstanding optical and electrical properties which provide large optical cross sections while simultaneously decoupling the photon absorption and charge carrier extraction length scales. These effects relax the requirements for both the minority carrier diffusion length and the amount of semiconductor needed. Metal-semiconductor core-shell nanowires have previously been predicted to show even better optical absorption than solid semiconductor nanowires and offer the additional advantage of a local metal core contact. Here, we fabricate and analyze such a geometry using a single Au-Cu2O core-shell nanowire photovoltaic cell as a model system. Spatially resolved photocurrent maps reveal that although the minority carrier diffusion length in the Cu2O shell is less than 1 μm, the radial contact geometry with the incorporated metal electrode still allows for photogenerated carrier collection along an entire nanowire. Current-voltage measurements yield an open-circuit voltage of 600 mV under laser illumination and a dark diode turn-on voltage of 1 V. This study suggests the metal-semiconductor core-shell nanowire concept could be extended to low-cost, large-scale photovoltaic devices, utilizing for example, metal nanowire electrode grids coated with epitaxially grown semiconductor shells.

  12. Fabrication of iron (III) oxide doped polystyrene shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Pei-Jun; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Lin; Du, Kai; Feng, Chang-Gen

    2004-03-01

    A type of iron (III) oxide doped plastic shell used for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been fabricated by emulsion techniques. Three different phases of solution (W1, O, and W2) are used for the fabrication process. The W1 phase is a 1 wt % of sodium lauryl sulfate in water. This W1 phase solution is mixed with a 3 wt % Fe2O3-polystyrene (PS) solution in benzene-dichloroethane (O phase) while stirring. The resulting emulsion (W1/O) is poured into a 3 wt % aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution (W2 phase) while stirring. The resulting emulsion (W1/O/W2) is then heated to evaporate benzene and dichloroethane, and thus a solid Fe2O3-PS shell is formed. The diameter and wall thickness of the shells range from 150 to 500 μm and 5 to 15 μm, respectively. The average surface roughness of the shells is 40 nm, similar to that of the usual PS shells. .

  13. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.; Nolen, R. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres (shells), which are used for inertial confinement fusion targets, were formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a vertical furnace. As a result of the rapid pyrolysis caused by the furnace, the gel is transformed to a shell in five distinct stages: (a) surface closure of the porous gel; (b) generation of a closed-cell foam structure in the gel; (c) spheridization of the gel and further expansion of the foam; (d) coalescence of the closed-cell foam to a single-void shell; and (e) fining of the glass shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the falling gel particle was modeled to determine the effective heating rate of the gel. The model predicts the temperature history for a particle as a function of mass, dimensions, specific heat, and absorptance as well as furnace temperature profile and thermal conductivity of the furnace gas. A model was developed that predicts the gravity-induced degradation of shell concentricity in falling molten shells as a function of shell characteristics and time.

  14. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  15. Optimum rotationally symmetric shells for flywheel rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel rim support formed from two shell halves. Each of the shell halves has a disc connected to the central shaft. A first shell element connects to the disc at an interface. A second shell element connects to the first shell element. The second shell element has a plurality of meridional slits. A cylindrical shell element connects to the second shell element. The cylindrical shell element connects to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim support having a disc connected an outer diameter of a shaft. Two optimally shaped shell elements connect to the optimally shaped disc at an interface. The interface defines a discontinuity in a meridional slope of said support. A cylindrical shell element connects to the two shell elements. The cylindrical shell element has an outer surface for connecting to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim casing includes an annular shell connected to the central shaft. The annular shell connects to the flywheel rim. A composite shell surrounds the shaft, annular shell and flywheel rim.

  16. MicroShell Minimalist Shell for Xilinx Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werne, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroShell is a lightweight shell environment for engineers and software developers working with embedded microprocessors in Xilinx FPGAs. (MicroShell has also been successfully ported to run on ARM Cortex-M1 microprocessors in Actel ProASIC3 FPGAs, but without project-integration support.) Micro Shell decreases the time spent performing initial tests of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) designs, simplifies running customizable one-time-only experiments, and provides a familiar-feeling command-line interface. The program comes with a collection of useful functions and enables the designer to add an unlimited number of custom commands, which are callable from the command-line. The commands are parameterizable (using the C-based command-line parameter idiom), so the designer can use one function to exercise hardware with different values. Also, since many hardware peripherals instantiated in FPGAs have reasonably simple register-mapped I/O interfaces, the engineer can edit and view hardware parameter settings at any time without stopping the processor. MicroShell comes with a set of support scripts that interface seamlessly with Xilinx's EDK tool. Adding an instance of MicroShell to a project is as simple as marking a check box in a library configuration dialog box and specifying a software project directory. The support scripts then examine the hardware design, build design-specific functions, conditionally include processor-specific functions, and complete the compilation process. For code-size constrained designs, most of the stock functionality can be excluded from the compiled library. When all of the configurable options are removed from the binary, MicroShell has an unoptimized memory footprint of about 4.8 kB and a size-optimized footprint of about 2.3 kB. Since MicroShell allows unfettered access to all processor-accessible memory locations, it is possible to perform live patching on a running system. This can be useful, for instance, if a bug is

  17. Comparative study of shell swab and shell crush methods for the recovery of Salmonella from shell eggs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swabbing (SW) is the standard methodology for the recovery of resident microorganisms from shell eggs in Japan. A comparative study of shell swab (SW) and a shell crush (CR) technique was performed to recover the laboratory-inoculated Salmonella from shell eggs. It was found that the recovery of ...

  18. K-shell and L-shell plasma spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Charatis, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Detailed atomic level populations in high temperature and dense plasmas have become increasingly important in laser generated plasmas. Certain spectral line intensity ratios are density-dependent while others are temperature-dependent. Both can be used to extract information concerning population kinetics and ion level populations. In order to be useful these dependencies must be characterized by independent means. In laser produced plasmas this can be done via holographic interferometry for electron density determinations and via the slope of the H-like free-bound continuum of K-shell lines for electron temperature determinations. The characterization of density- and temperature-dependent L-shell lines can be accomplished in ionization balance experiments in which laser irradiance is varied on targets which contain both K-shell and L-shell emitters. The K-shell free-bound continua provide the local temperature determination while holographic interferometry yields density profile information, from which the temperature and density dependent L-shell lines can be characterized. This paper discusses these concepts.

  19. Direct formulation of a 4-node hybrid shell element with rotational degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple 4-node assumed-stress hybrid quadrilateral shell element with rotational or drilling degrees of freedom is formulated. The element formulation is based directly on a 4-node element. This direct formulation requires fewer computations than a similar element that is derived from an internal 8-node isoparametric element in which the midside degrees of freedom are eliminated in favor of rotational degree of freedom at the corner nodes. The formulation is based on the principle of minimum complementary energy. The membrane part of the element has 12 degrees of freedom including rotational degrees of freedom. The bending part of the element also has 12 degrees of freedom. The bending part of the quadratic variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement fields and linear variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane rotation fields are assumed along the edges of the element. The element Cartesian-coordinate system is chosen such as to make the stress field invariant with respect to node numbering. The membrane part of the stress field is based on a 9-parameter equilibrating stress field, while the bending part is based on a 13-parameter equilibrating stress field. The element passes the patch test, is nearly insensitive to mesh distortion, does not lock, possesses the desirable invariance properties, has no spurious modes, and produces accurate and reliable results.

  20. Investigation of polymer-shelled microbubble motions in acoustophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Satya V V N; Wiklund, Martin; Janerot-Sjoberg, Birgitta; Paradossi, Gaio; Grishenkov, Dmitry

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to explore the trajectory motion of microsize (typically smaller than a red blood cell) encapsulated polymer-shelled gas bubbles propelled by radiation force in an acoustic standing-wave field and to compare the corresponding movements of solid polymer microbeads. The experimental setup consists of a microfluidic chip coupled to a piezoelectric crystal (PZT) with a resonance frequency of about 2.8MHz. The microfluidic channel consists of a rectangular chamber with a width, w, corresponding to one wavelength of the ultrasound standing wave. It creates one full wave ultrasound of a standing-wave pattern with two pressure nodes at w/4 and 3w/4 and three antinodes at 0, w/2, and w. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the electrical potential over the PZT was varied between 1 and 10V. The study is limited to no-flow condition. From Gor'kov's potential equation, the acoustic contrast factor, Φ, for the polymer-shelled microbubbles was calculated to about -60.7. Experimental results demonstrate that the polymer-shelled microbubbles are translated and accumulated at the pressure antinode planes. This trajectory motion of polymer-shelled microbubbles toward the pressure antinode plane is similar to what has been described for other acoustic contrast particles with a negative Φ. First, primary radiation forces dragged the polymer-shelled microbubbles into proximity with each other at the pressure antinode planes. Then, primary and secondary radiation forces caused them to quickly aggregate at different spots along the channel. The relocation time for polymer-shelled microbubbles was 40 times shorter than that for polymer microbeads, and in contrast to polymer microbeads, the polymer-shelled microbubbles were actuated even at driving voltages (proportional to radiation forces) as low as 1V. In short, the polymer-shelled microbubbles demonstrate the behavior attributed to the negative acoustic contrast factor particles and thus can be trapped at the

  1. Studies on Shell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Tadashi; Sharp, D. Gordon; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1958-01-01

    The submicroscopic structure of the growing surface of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was studied by means of shadowed replicas. The outer edge of the prismatic region consists of a fine grained matrix enclosing crystals, the surfaces of which show a finely pebbled structure. Crystal size varies continously from 0.01 µ to 8 µ. The matrix surface shows no evidence of fibrous structure. The outer portions of the prismatic region exhibit a tile-like arrangement of large crystals separated by granular matrix 0.02 to 0.08 µ in thickness. The exposed crystal surfaces have indentations of varying form which appear as roughly parallel grooves spaced at intervals of approximately 0.3 µ. The final form of this region is believed to result from the random distribution of crystal seeds, which grow without orientation and through coalescence and growth come into contact, producing polygonal areas. The crystal arrangement of the nacreous region is one of overlapping rows of crystals in side to side contact, and with one end of each crystal free, permitting continued increase in length. Crystal angles and plane indices are presented. PMID:13549498

  2. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, P.A.; Anderson, A.T.; Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-20

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dielectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections is disclosed. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections. 4 figs.

  3. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Phillip A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dialectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections.

  4. Recovery of Salmonella from commercial shell eggs by shell rinse and shell crush methodologies.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M T; Jones, D R; Northcutt, J K; Harrison, M A; Cox, N A; Ingram, K D; Hinton, A J

    2005-12-01

    Salmonella is the most important human pathogen associated with shell eggs. Salmonella Enteritidis is the serotype most often implicated in outbreaks, although other serotypes have been recovered from eggs and from the commercial shell egg washing environment. Many sample methods are used to recover microorganisms from eggshells and membranes. A shell rinse and modified shell-and-membrane crush method for recovery of Salmonella were compared. Eggs were collected from 3 commercial shell-washing facilities (X, Y, and Z) during 3 visits. Twelve eggs were collected from each of 10 to 12 locations along the egg processing chain. After being transported back to the laboratory, each egg was sampled first by a shell rinse method and then by a shell crush method. For each technique (rinse or crush), 2 pools of 5 eggs per location sampled were selectively enriched for the recovery of Salmonella. Presumptive samples positive for Salmonella were confirmed serologically. Overall, there were 10.1% (40/396) Salmonella-positive pooled samples. Salmonella were recovered by the shell rinse and shell crush techniques (4.8 vs. 5.3%, respectively). Plant X yielded 21.5% Salmonella positives, whereas less than 5% of samples from plants Y and Z were found to be contaminated with the organism (4.2 and 4.5%, respectively). Salmonella was recovered more often from unwashed eggs (15.8%) than from washed eggs (8.3%). For some eggs, Salmonella was only recovered by one of the methods. Use of both approaches in the same experiment increased sampling sensitivity, although in most cases, crushing provided more sensitive Salmonella recovery. PMID:16479955

  5. Collapsing thin shells with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, Térence; Rocha, Jorge V.; Santarelli, Raphael

    2014-06-01

    We construct exact solutions describing the motion of rotating thin shells in a fully backreacted five-dimensional rotating black hole spacetime. The radial equation of motion follows from the Darmois-Israel junction conditions, where both interior and exterior geometries are taken to be equal angular momenta Myers-Perry solutions. We show that rotation generates anisotropic pressures and momentum along the shell. Gravitational collapse scenarios including rotation are analyzed and a new class of stationary solutions is introduced. Energy conditions for the anisotropic matter shell are briefly discussed. We find that the weak energy condition is not violated for the collapse scenario where the shell starts at rest from infinity, nor for the new class of stationary solutions in anti-de Sitter. We further prove that the cosmic censorship conjecture is always satisfied in our setup.

  6. Shell Scores with Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemke, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Documents Shell Oil's success with interactive video training (IVT) and identifies the costs involved in this long-term investment. Provides guidelines for judging the effectiveness of IVT programs. (SK)

  7. Intergalactic shells at large redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. M.; Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    The intergalactic shells produced by galactic explosions at large redshift, whose interiors cool by inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic background radiation, have a characteristic angular size of about 1 arcmin at peak brightness. At z values lower than 2, the shells typically have a radius of 0.5 Mpc, a velocity of about 50 km/sec, a metal abundance of about 0.0001 of cosmic values, and strong radiation in H I(Lyman-alpha), He II 304 A, and the IR fine-structure lines of C II and Si II. The predicted extragalactic background emission from many shells, strongly peaked toward the UV, sets an upper limit to the number of exploding sources at z values of about 10. Shell absorption lines of H I, C II, Si II, and Fe II, which may be seen at more recent epochs in quasar spectra, may probe otherwise invisible explosions in the early universe.

  8. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  9. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  10. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  11. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  12. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  13. Nematic textures in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, V.; Nelson, D. R.

    2006-08-01

    The equilibrium texture of nematic shells is studied as a function of their thickness. For ultrathin shells the ground state has four short (1)/(2) disclination lines but, as the thickness of the film increases, a three-dimensional escaped configuration composed of two pairs of half-hedgehogs becomes energetically favorable. We derive an exact solution for the nematic ground state in the one Frank constant approximation and study the stability of the corresponding texture against thermal fluctuations.

  14. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  15. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  16. User's manuals for DYNA3D and DYNAP: nonlinear dynamic analysis of solids in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-07-01

    This report provides a user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. Post-processors for DYNA3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories. A user's manual for DYNAP is also provided in this report.

  17. Tri-soft shell technique.

    PubMed

    Arshinoff, Steve A; Norman, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Soft-shell techniques exist for lower viscosity dispersive with higher viscosity cohesive ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVDs) (soft-shell technique [SST]), viscoadaptive OVDs with balanced salt solution (ultimate soft-shell technique), intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome (soft-shell bridge), and many specific modifications for disinserted zonular fibers, frayed iris strands, Fuchs endothelial dystrophy, small holes in the posterior capsule with protruding vitreous, capsular dye use, and others. Soft-shell techniques exist because it is rheologically impossible to control the surgical environment with a single OVD as well as with an ordered combination of rheologically different OVDs. Surgeons frequently confuse these techniques because of their multitude. This paper unifies all SSTs into a single improved tri-soft shell technique (TSST), from which basic specific applications to unusual circumstances are simple and intuitive. As shown with previous SSTs, the TSST allows surgeons to perform complex tasks with greater surgical facility and to protect endothelial cells better than with single OVDs. PMID:23889867

  18. XPRT: An expert system shell

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrell, G.D.

    1988-09-01

    XPRT is a rule-based expert system shell written in the C programming language. This report contains a detailed description of the commands available in XPRT and also describes the syntax rules needed to construct a knowledge base. The shell's source code uses standard ANSI C, which allows it to run on any computer that can compile a C program. The executable code occupies 70K of PC memory. XPRT's inference engine can be commanded to backward chain or forward chain. Heuristics may be employed to reduce the search space of knowledge base rules. XPRT can read and write external files and spawn processes. The shell is mainly a symbolic processor but can handle numerical data as well. A mechanism of weighted facts and rules is used as an approach for handling uncertainty. XPRT is a no-frills shell with some very practical commands. The shell was used to write an expert system that is currently scheduling over a dozen software programs to maintain and manage a large departmental database. XPRT continues to evolve, and our organization is finding the shell to be a valuable programming tool. 6 refs.

  19. Gasification of carbonaceous solids

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Ralph L.

    1976-10-26

    A process and apparatus for converting coal and other carbonaceous solids to an intermediate heating value fuel gas or to a synthesis gas. A stream of entrained pulverized coal is fed into the combustion stage of a three-stage gasifier along with a mixture of oxygen and steam at selected pressure and temperature. The products of the combustion stage pass into the second or quench stage where they are partially cooled and further reacted with water and/or steam. Ash is solidified into small particles and the formation of soot is suppressed by water/steam injections in the quench stage. The design of the quench stage prevents slag from solidifying on the walls. The products from the quench stage pass directly into a heat recovery stage where the products pass through the tube, or tubes, of a single-pass, shell and tube heat exchanger and steam is generated on the shell side and utilized for steam feed requirements of the process.

  20. Critical shell thickness for InAs-Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As(P) core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Haapamaki, C. M.; LaPierre, R. R.; Baugh, J.

    2012-12-15

    InAs nanowires with Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P or Al{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As shells were grown on GaAs substrates by the Au-assisted vapour-liquid-solid method in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy system. Core diameters and shell thicknesses were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These measurements were then related to selected area diffraction patterns to verify either interface coherency or relaxation through misfit dislocations. A theoretical strain model is presented to determine the critical shell thickness for given core diameters. Zincblende stiffness parameters are transformed to their wurtzite counterparts via a well known tensor transformation. An energy criterion is then given to determine the shell thickness, at which coherency is lost and dislocations become favourable. Our model only considers axial strain relieved by edge dislocations since they were the only type of dislocation observed directly by TEM.

  1. Evidence for variable crystallinity in bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    ]. Remnants of ACC can be traced by Raman spectroscopy and allow insight into the processes of biomineralization in bivalves. The crystallinity of solid materials can be quantified Raman spectroscopy by comparison of the FWHM of the ν1- Raman peak. We developed a Raman crystallinity index in order to get a measure of the degree of crystallinity [4]. Results presented for shells from several different marine and freshwater bivalve species and compare these with synthetically ACC and stable ACC from Porcellio scaber. The crystalline fraction in the different ACC-areas in shells and pearls supports the hypothesis that ACC acts as a transient precursor to crystalline CaCO3, in which the polymorph is already moulded into nanoclusters. The distribution and the state of crystallization of the calcium carbonate polymorphs in most of the ACC areas are not homogenous and the term ACC includes structurally different material. [1] Jacob et al., 2008, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 229, [2] Jacob et al., 2011; J. Struct. Biol. 173 (2), 241, [3] Addadi et al., Adv. Mater. 2003; (15), 959, [4] Wehrmeister et al., 2011. J. Raman Spectrosc. 42, (5), 926.

  2. Thermochromic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Jeffrey G.

    1998-01-01

    Thermochromism is the reversible change of color of a solid when it is heated or cooled. Previous reported examples of thermochromic solids involve color changes due to changes of stereochemistry. Salts of mercuric iodide, M2HgI4 [M=Cu(I), Ag(I)] are easily prepared and exhibit sharp, reversible thermochromic transitions at moderately low temperatures. The Ag(I) solid changes color from yellow to orange at 50 °C and the Cu(I) solid at 67 °C. The color changes are due to subtle changes in crystal structure. Signs can be prepared for lecture demonstrations using pieces of filter paper saturated in the solids

  3. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for forming gas-filled spheres of metal, glass or other material, which produces spheres (12) of uniform size and wall thickness in a relatively simple system. The system includes concentric nozzles, including an inner nozzle (18) through which gas flows and and an outer nozzle (20), which jointly define an annular passageway (50) through which a liquid flows. The flow rates are adjusted so that the gas flows at greater velocity than does the liquid, out of their respective nozzles, e.g. three times as great, in order to produce an extrusion (30) which undergoes axisymmetric oscillations resulting in the pinch off into hollow spheres with very uniform spacing. The system is useful not only where gas-filled spheres are required, but also is useful to accurately control the dispensing of solid, liquid, or gaseous materials.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Shell Formation in Thin Slab Casting of Funnel-Type Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhrushev, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.; Tang, Y.; Hackl, G.; Nitzl, G.

    2014-06-01

    The key issue for modeling thin slab casting (TSC) process is to consider the evolution of the solid shell including fully solidified strand and partially solidified dendritic mushy zone, which strongly interacts with the turbulent flow and in the meantime is subject to continuous deformation due to the funnel-type mold. Here an enthalpy-based mixture solidification model that considers turbulent flow [Prescott and Incropera, ASME HTD, 1994, vol. 280, pp. 59-69] is employed and further enhanced by including the motion of the solidifying and deforming solid shell. The motion of the solid phase is calculated with an incompressible rigid viscoplastic model on the basis of an assumed moving boundary velocity condition. In the first part, a 2D benchmark is simulated to mimic the solidification and motion of the solid shell. The importance of numerical treatment of the advection of latent heat in the deforming solid shell (mushy zone) is specially addressed, and some interesting phenomena of interaction between the turbulent flow and the growing mushy zone are presented. In the second part, an example of 3D TSC is presented to demonstrate the model suitability. Finally, techniques for the improvement of calculation accuracy and computation efficiency as well as experimental evaluations are also discussed.

  5. Washing of the AW-101 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta

    2000-03-31

    BNFL Inc. (BNFL) is under contract with the US Department of Energy, River Protection Project (DOE-RPP) to design, construct, and operate facilities for treating wastes stored in the single-shell and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The DOE-BNFL RPP contract identifies two feeds to the waste treatment plant: (1) primarily liquid low-activity waste (LAW) consisting of less than 2 wt% entrained solids and (2) high-level waste (HLW) consisting of 10 to 200 g/L solids slurry. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AW-101 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-9, Rev. 0, LAW Entrained Solids Water Wash and Caustic Leach Testing. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan. Based on the results of the 0.01 M NaOH washing, a decision was made by BNFL to not proceed with the caustic leaching test. The composition of the washed solids was such that caustic leaching would not result in significant reduction in the immobilized HLW volume.

  6. Semiclassical environment of collapsing shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kinjal; Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-12-01

    We explore in detail the semiclassical environment of collapsing shells of matter, and determine the semiclassical flux measured by a variety of observers. This study is a preliminary step in a broader investigation of thermodynamic properties of the geometry of collapsing objects. Specifically, in this paper we consider spherically symmetric null and timelike collapsing shells which form an event horizon, and calculate the flux measured by observers both inside and outside the shell, and both inside and outside the event horizon, and find nontrivial results in most of the cases. Additionally, we also investigate the environment of a shell which collapses but does not form a horizon, halting at some radius larger than the Schwarzschild radius, and find that such an object generically gives rise to a pulse of radiation which is sharply peaked as it travels inwards and is reflected at the origin, and eventually emerges from the shell in a thermalized form. Our results have potential consequences in addressing questions pertaining, e.g. to black hole entropy and backreaction.

  7. Foam shell project: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-03-25

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

  8. Vibration of perforated cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousseau, Peter L.

    For a credible design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target chamber, the vibration characteristics of the chamber must be completely understood. Target chambers are usually cylindrical or spherical in shape and contain hundreds of perforations (called ports) to allow access to the inside of the chamber. The fusion reaction within the chamber creates a uniform impulsive loading, which the chamber walls must be designed to contain. Also prior to an implosion, a delicate alignment process of the drivers and diagnostics takes place. The vibration of the chamber from rotating machinery, e.g., vacuum pumps, and ambient sources must be completely understood and accounted for during these alignment procedures. This dissertation examines the vibration characteristics of perforated cylindrical shells. Because the target chambers' thickness-to-radius ratio is small, such chambers can be modeled as thin shells. Included in the text is a literature review of perforated plates and shells and examples of the use of perforated structures in constructed and proposed ICF target chambers. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of perforated and unperforated cylindrical shells are studied analytically, numerically (via finite elements) and experimentally. Conclusions and comparisons between the different solution methods are made for both the perforated and unperforated cases. In addition, the dynamic response of perforated cylindrical shells to an axisymmetric impulsive loading has been identified. A demonstration showing how the convolution integral can be used to determine the response of a cylinder to a non-impulsive loading is presented.

  9. Shell-NASA Vibration-Based Damage Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollins, John M.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes collaborative research between Shell International Exploration and Production (IE&P) scientists and ISAG personnel to investigate the feasibility of ultrasonic-based characterization of spacecraft tile damage for in-space inspection applications. The approach was proposed by Shell personnel in a Shell-NASA "speed-matching" session in early 2011 after ISAG personnel described challenges inherent in the inspection of MMOD damage deep within spacecraft thermal protection system (TPS) tiles. The approach leveraged Shell's relevant sensor and analytical expertise. The research addressed the difficulties associated with producing 3D models of MMOD damage cavities under the surface of a TPS tile, given that simple image-based sensing is constrained by line of sight through entry holes that have diameters considerably smaller than the underlying damage cavities. Damage cavity characterization is needed as part of a vehicle inspection and risk reduction capability for long-duration, human-flown space missions. It was hoped that cavity characterization could be accomplished through the use of ultrasonic techniques that allow for signal penetration through solid material.

  10. Physical quality and composition of retail shell eggs.

    PubMed

    Jones, D R; Musgrove, M T; Anderson, K E; Thesmar, H S

    2010-03-01

    There are a number of specialty shell eggs available to consumers in the US retail market. A survey consisting of white and brown large shell eggs with various production and nutritional differences (traditional, cage-free, free-roaming, pasteurized, nutritionally enhanced, and fertile) was conducted to determine if physical quality and compositional differences exist. Identical brands of eggs were purchased from the same retail outlets on 3 occasions (replicates) in a single city. The average range of time from processing to purchase for all eggs was 7.67 to 25.33 d, with traditional white eggs in retail having the shortest time. Haugh unit values ranged from 66.67 (cage-free, docosahexaenoic acid, and n-3 enhanced) to 84.42 (traditional white). Albumen height followed a similar pattern. Egg weight was greater for brown eggs (61.12 vs. 58.85 g). Brown eggs also had greater static compression shell strength than white eggs (4,130.61 vs. 3,690.31 g force). Vitelline membrane strength was greatest for traditional brown eggs (2.24 g force). Percentage of total solids and crude fat was greatest in the cage-free, n-3-enhanced white eggs (25.07 and 11.71%, respectively). Although significant differences were found between white and brown shell eggs and production methods, average values for quality attributes varied without one egg type consistently maintaining the highest or lowest values. PMID:20181877

  11. Shell Coal Gasification Project. Final report on eighteen diverse feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.N.; Kiszka, M.B.; Mahagaokar, U.; Krewinghaus, A.B.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the overall performance of the Shell Coal Gasification Process at SCGP-1 in Deer Park, Texas. It covers the four year demonstration and experimental program jointly conducted by Shell oil and Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij, with support from the Electric Power Research Institute. The report describes coal properties and gasification results on eighteen feeds which include seventeen diverse coals from domestic and international markets, and petroleum coke. Comparisons between design premises and actual performance on two key feeds, Illinois No. 5 coal and Texas lignite demonstrate that the plant met and exceeded design targets on all key process parameters. Equipment performance results are discussed for all areas of the plant based on periodic interim inspections, and the final inspection conducted in April 1991 after the end of operations. The report describes process control tests conducted in gasifier lead and turbine lead configurations, demonstrating the ability of the process to meet utility requirements for load following. Environmental result on the process for a wide variety of feedstocks are documented. These results underscore the inherent strength of the SCGP technology in meeting and exceeding all environmental standards for air, water and solids. The excellent applicability of the Shell Coal Gasification Process in integrated combined cycle power generation systems is described in view of the high efficiency derived from this process.

  12. Contaminant exposures at the 4H shell mounds in the Santa Barbara Channel.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Charles R; Salazar, Michael H; Salazar, Sandra M; Snyder, Barry J

    2006-12-01

    exhibit clear spatial gradients with distance from the shell mounds. Despite a number of storm events during the mussel exposures, maximum currents were 34 cm s(-1) and unlikely to erode materials from the shell mounds. Thus, Ba distributions in bottom sediments probably were due to episodic disturbance such as platform removal or trawling rather than ongoing erosion and dispersion of shell mound solids by near-bottom currents. These results suggest that, in the absence of physical disturbances, contaminants are expected to remain sequestered in the shell mounds. PMID:16919301

  13. Shell corrections in stopping powers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichsel, H.

    2002-05-01

    One of the theories of the electronic stopping power S for fast light ions was derived by Bethe. The algorithm currently used for the calculation of S includes terms known as the mean excitation energy I, the shell correction, the Barkas correction, and the Bloch correction. These terms are described here. For the calculation of the shell corrections an atomic model is used, which is more realistic than the hydrogenic approximation used so far. A comparison is made with similar calculations in which the local plasma approximation is utilized. Close agreement with the experimental data for protons with energies from 0.3 to 10 MeV traversing Al and Si is found without the need for adjustable parameters for the shell corrections.

  14. Asymptotic safety goes on shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in quantum field theory that the off-shell effective action depends on the gauge choice and field parametrization used in calculating it. Nevertheless, the typical scheme in which the scenario of asymptotically safe gravity is investigated is an off-shell version of the functional renormalization group equation. Working with the Einstein-Hilbert truncation as a test bed, we develop a new scheme for the analysis of asymptotically safe gravity in which the on-shell part of the effective action is singled out and we show that the beta function for the essential coupling has no explicit gauge dependence. In order to reach our goal, we introduce several technical novelties, including a different decomposition of the metric fluctuations, a new implementation of the ghost sector and a new cut-off scheme. We find a nontrivial fixed point, with a value of the cosmological constant that is independent of the gauge-fixing parameters.

  15. Chemical Analysis Of Beryllium Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, J; Cook, R

    2005-11-17

    There is a need to understand the level of high-Z impurities in Beryllium shells prepared by sputter coating. The Ignition Point Design Requirements state the following: ''Except for allowed ingredients, as listed in the ablator composition entries, the ablator material in all layers shall contain sufficiently low impurity levels that the sum over all impurities of atom fraction*Z{sup 2} shall be less than or equal to 0.2''. This is a tight specification that requires careful materials analysis. Early in the first quarter of FY06, we undertook a study of Be shell impurities via ICP-MS{sup 2} and determined that the impurity levels in the sputtered shells are very close to the specification.

  16. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Koonin, S.E.; Dean, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of {gamma}-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs.

  17. Diverse melting modes and structural collapse of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles: a perspective from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  18. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  19. Time-varying creeping flow in an elastic shell enveloping a slender rigid center-body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, Shai; Gat, Amir

    2014-11-01

    Flows in contact with elastic structures apply stress at the fluid-solid interface and thus create deformation fields in the solid. We study the time-varying interaction between elastic structures, subject to external forces, and an internal viscous liquid. We neglect inertia in the liquid and solid and focus on axi-symmetric annular flow enclosed by a thin-walled slender elastic shell and internally bounded by a variable cross-section rigid center-body. We employ elastic shell theory and the lubrication approximation to show that the problem is governed by the forced porous medium equation with regard to fluid pressure. We present several solutions of the flow-field and solid-deformation for various time-varying inlet pressure and external forces. The presented interaction between viscosity and elasticity may be applied to fields such as soft-robotics and micro-swimmers. Israel Science Foundation 818/13.

  20. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  1. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L., Jr.; Ebner, M. A.; Downs, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A heat transfer model was developed that mathematically describes the heating and calculates the thermal history of a gel particle in free-fall through the furnace. The model parameters that greatly affect the calculations were found to be gel particle mass, geometry, specific heat, and furnace gas. Empirical testing of the model has commenced. The code calculations and the initial empirical testing results both indicate that the gel-to-shell transformation occurs early and rapidly in the thermal history of the gel particle, and that for current work the heat transfer rate is not a limitation in shell production.

  2. On Closed Shells in Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M. G.

    1948-02-01

    It has been suggested in the past that special numbers of neutrons or protons in the nucleus form a particularly stable configuration.{sup1} The complete evidence for this has never been summarized, nor is it generally recognized how convincing this evidence is. That 20 neutrons or protons (Ca{sup40}) form a closed shell is predicted by the Hartree model. A number of calculations support this fact.{sup2} These considerations will not be repeated here. In this paper, the experimental facts indicating a particular stability of shells of 50 and 82 protons and of 50, 82, and 126 neutrons will be listed.

  3. The Shell-Model Code NuShellX@MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.A.; Rae, W.D.M.

    2014-06-15

    Use of the code NuShellX@MSU is outlined. It connects to the ENSDF data files for automatic comparisons to energy level data. Operator overlaps provide predictions for spectroscopic factors, two-nucleon transfer amplitudes, nuclear moments, gamma decay and beta decay.

  4. Hollow ruthenium nanoparticles with small dimensions derived from Ni@Ru core@shell structure: synthesis and enhanced catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guozhu; Desinan, Stefano; Rosei, Renzo; Rosei, Federico; Ma, Dongling

    2012-08-18

    Hollow Ru nanoparticles with ~14 nm diameter and ~2 nm shell thickness are reported for the first time, by removal of Ni from the delicately designed Ni@Ru core@shell NPs. Such hollow Ru NPs exhibit enhanced catalytic activity in the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane with respect to solid ones. PMID:22773309

  5. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Delaminated Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provided a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with shell finite elements. Double Cantilever Beam, End Notched Flexure, and Single Leg Bending specimens were analyzed first using full 3D finite element models to obtain reference solutions. Mixed mode strain energy release rate distributions were computed using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses were repeated using the shell/3D technique to study the feasibility for pure mode I, mode II and mixed mode I/II cases. Specimens with a unidirectional layup and with a multidirectional layup were simulated. For a local 3D model, extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential for reducing the model size, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  6. Thermo-Chemical Convection in Europa's Icy Shell with Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, L.; Showman, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    Europa's icy surface displays numerous pits, uplifts, and chaos terrains that have been suggested to result from solid-state thermal convection in the ice shell, perhaps aided by partial melting. However, numerical simulations of thermal convection show that plumes have insufficient buoyancy to produce surface deformation. Here we present numerical simulations of thermochemical convection to test the hypothesis that convection with salinity can produce Europa's pits and domes. Our simulations show that domes (200-300 m) and pits (300-400 m) comparable to the observations can be produced in an ice shell of 15 km thick with 5-10% compositional density variation if the maximum viscosity is less than 10(exp 18) Pa sec. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  7. Emulsion-templated liquid core-polymer shell microcapsule formation.

    PubMed

    Ao, Zhuo; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Jianfang; Zhang, Guangzhao; Ngai, To

    2009-03-01

    The fabrication of hollow microspheres to encapsulate functional molecules, such as drugs, insecticides, and proteins, is of ever-increasing importance. Many chemical and physicochemical methods have been tested for various specific encapsulations, but most of them have not been developed into an industrial process. In this work, we present a straightforward method to prepare liquid core-polymer shell microcapsules by first templating an oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by an interfacial monolayer of polystyrene latex particles (often referred to as "Pickering emulsion"), and subsequently locking the assembled particles into a robust polymeric shell through the precipitation of a biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) at the interface. The resultant microcapsules that have a solid polymeric enveloped around the oil droplets are stable and retain their integrity during the drying in air. Therefore, they should have great potential to serve as vehicles for encapsulating functional molecules especially hydrophobic in nature. PMID:19437681

  8. The metrology of spherical shells using synchrotron x ray microtomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.; Allen, James L.; Damico, Kevin L.

    1990-01-01

    With recent advances in solid state imaging technology and the increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray radiation sources, synchrotron x-ray microtomography is emerging as a nondestructive technique for the evaluation of the structure and composition of small specimens with spatial resolution in the micron range. Synchrotron radiation offers the following advantages over conventional x-ray sources: high brightness, continuous emission which is tunable over a large energy range, faster data collection rates, and a highly collimated beam of large cross section permitting the illumination of large specimens. Synchrotron x-ray microtomography enables the structure of individual spheres to be evaluated in order to reveal the concentricity and sphericity of the internal void and the uniformity of the shell wall in the case of high quality spherical shells for Sandia National Laboratories' Inertial Confinement Fusion project.

  9. Engineering of Hollow Core-Shell Interlinked Carbon Spheres for Highly Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; He, Bin; Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-08-25

    We report engineered hollow core-shell interlinked carbon spheres that consist of a mesoporous shell, a hollow void, and an anchored carbon core and are expected to be ideal sulfur hosts for overcoming the shortage of Li-S batteries. The hollow core-shell interlinked carbon spheres were obtained through solution synthesis of polymer spheres followed by a pyrolysis process that occurred in the hermetical silica shell. During the pyrolysis, the polymer sphere was transformed into the carbon core and the carbonaceous volatiles were self-deposited on the silica shell due to the blocking effect of the hermetical silica shell. The gravitational force and the natural driving force of lowering the surface energy tend to interlink the carbon core and carbon/silica shell, resulting in a core-shell interlinked structure. After the SiO2 shell was etched, the mesoporous carbon shell was generated. When used as the sulfur host for Li-S batteries, such a hierarchical structure provides access to Li(+) ingress/egress for reactivity with the sulfur and, meanwhile, can overcome the limitations of low sulfur loading and a severe shuttle effect in solid carbon-supported sulfur cathodes. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy images provide visible evidence that sulfur is well-encapsulated in the hollow void. Importantly, such anchored-core carbon nanostructures can simultaneously serve as a physical buffer and an electronically connecting matrix, which helps to realize the full potential of the active materials. Based on the many merits, carbon-sulfur cathodes show a high utilization of sulfur with a sulfur loading of 70 wt % and exhibit excellent cycling stability (i.e., 960 mA h g(-1) after 200 cycles at a current density of 0.5 C). PMID:26182333

  10. GaAs Core/SrTiO3 Shell Nanowires Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Becdelievre, J; Meunier, B; Benali, A; Saint-Girons, G; Bachelet, R; Regreny, P; Botella, C; Grenet, G; Blanchard, N P; Jaurand, X; Silly, M G; Sirotti, F; Chauvin, N; Gendry, M; Penuelas, J

    2016-04-13

    We have studied the growth of a SrTiO3 shell on self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates. To control the growth of the SrTiO3 shell, the GaAs nanowires were protected using an arsenic capping/decapping procedure in order to prevent uncontrolled oxidation and/or contamination of the nanowire facets. Reflection high energy electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to determine the structural, chemical, and morphological properties of the heterostructured nanowires. Using adapted oxide growth conditions, it is shown that most of the perovskite structure SrTiO3 shell appears to be oriented with respect to the GaAs lattice. These results are promising for achieving one-dimensional epitaxial semiconductor core/functional oxide shell nanostructures. PMID:27008537

  11. Controlling optical properties of metallic multi-shell nanoparticles through suppressed surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Acapulco, Jesus A I; Hong, Soonchang; Kim, Seong Kyu; Park, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the surface plasmon resonance of plasmonic multi-shell nanoparticles compared to bimetallic Ag/Au hollow nanospheres of similar final size, shape, and percent composition. The surface plasmon resonance of solid and hollow nanoparticles exhibited a quadrupole mode that was particularly prominent around the 100 nm size regime, while multi-shell nanoparticles did not show a quadrupole mode at a similar size. In the latter case, the quadrupole mode of the outermost nanoshell was suppressed by the dipole modes of the inner shells, and the suppression of the quadrupole mode was not affected by the shape of the inner nanostructures. Light interaction of the multi-shell nanoparticle was investigated through simulated electromagnetic field distribution obtained by finite-difference time domain (FDTD) calculations which were in a good agreement with the results of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). PMID:26414420

  12. Hierarchical CO2-protective shell for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Liang, Fengli; Shao, Zongping; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2012-01-01

    The widespread application of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells is mainly being hurdled by the cathode's low efficiency on oxygen reduction reaction and poor resistance to carbon dioxide impurity. Here we report the fabrication of a hierarchical shell-covered porous cathode through infiltration followed by microwave plasma treatment. The hierarchical shell consists of a dense thin-film substrate with cones on the top of the substrate, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) heterostructured electrode. The shell allows the cathode working stably in CO2-containing air, and significantly improving the cathode's oxygen reduction reactivity with an area specific resistance of ∼0.13 Ωcm2 at 575°C. The method is also suitable for fabricating functional shell on the irregularly shaped substrate in various applications. PMID:22439104

  13. Bases for solid waste volume estimates for tank waste remediation system

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This document presents the background and basis for the Tank Waste Remediation System forecast for solid waste submitted in June 1996. The forecast was generated for single-shell tank and double-shell tank activities including operations through retrieval and disposal of chemical tank waste.

  14. Method and apparatus for an inflatable shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of assembling an inflatable shell of a structure comprises folding a plurality of shell sections about a set of fold lines and integrating the plurality of shell sections together with one another to form the shell. In another embodiment, an inflatable shell comprises a plurality of shell sections, each shell section having two pairs of fold lines for folding into stowage comprising a first gore section having a plurality of first gore panels layered and collectively folded about at a first set of fold lines. Each layer of the first gore panels and second gore panels are configured such that, once the first gore panel and second gore panel are attached to one another at the respective side edges of each panel, the lines of attachment forming a second set of fold lines for the shell section. A system and method for fabricating gore panels is also disclosed.

  15. Shell Games: Uncovering Periodic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes activities (demonstrations/experiments) used to introduce history of periodic properties--without electrons, orbitals, filling shells, or any conception of atoms beyond Dalton's model. Activities supplement first chapter in a currently available chemistry text. Indicates potential danger of experiments if proper safety precautions are…

  16. Solutocapillary convection in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Pravin; Zebib, Abdelfattah; McQuillan, Barry

    2005-01-01

    A linear stability study of solutocapillary driven Marangoni instabilities in small spherical shells is presented. The shells contain a binary fluid with an evaporating solvent. The viscosity is a strong function of the solvent concentration, the inner surface of the shell is assumed impermeable and stress free, while nonlinear boundary conditions are modeled and prescribed at the receding outer boundary. A time-dependent diffusive state is possible and may lose stability through the Marangoni mechanism due to surface tension dependence on solvent concentration (buoyant forces are negligible in this microscale problem). A frozen-time or quasisteady state linear stability analysis is performed to compute the critical Reynolds number and degree of surface harmonics, as well as the maximum growth rate of perturbations at specified parameters. The development of maximum growth rates in time was also computed by solving the initial value problem with random initial conditions. Results from both approaches are in good agreement except at short times where there is dependence on initial conditions. The physical problem models the manufacturing of spherical shells used as targets in inertial confinement fusion experiments where perfect sphericity is demanded for efficient fusion ignition. It is proposed that the Marangoni instability might be the source of observed surface roughness. Comparisons with the available experiments are made with reasonable qualitative and quantitative agreement.

  17. Shell structures for biogas plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sasse, L.

    1982-01-01

    The shell structures designed for biogas plants of the fixed-dome type by the Bremen Overseas Research and Development Association are described. Biogas digesters of the design described have been successfully tested in Rwanda and India without structural or contractural problems.

  18. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core-Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; D Su; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  19. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

    2012-04-19

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  20. Carbon-Supported IrNi Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Synthesis Characterization and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; L Barrio; D Su; A Frenkel; N Marinkovic; D Mahajan; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized carbon-supported IrNi core-shell nanoparticles by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing in H{sub 2}, and verified the formation of Ir shells on IrNi solid solution alloy cores by various experimental methods. The EXAFS analysis is consistent with the model wherein the IrNi nanoparticles are composed of two-layer Ir shells and IrNi alloy cores. In situ XAS revealed that the Ir shells completely protect Ni atoms in the cores from oxidation or dissolution in an acid electrolyte under elevated potentials. The formation of Ir shell during annealing due to thermal segregation is monitored by time-resolved synchrotron XRD measurements, coupled with Rietveld refinement analyses. The H{sub 2} oxidation activity of the IrNi nanoparticles was found to be higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. This is predominantly due to Ni-core-induced Ir shell contraction that makes the surface less reactive for IrOH formation, and the resulting more metallic Ir surface becomes more active for H{sub 2} oxidation. This new class of core-shell nanoparticles appears promising for application as hydrogen anode fuel cell electrocatalysts.

  1. Industrial mixing techniques for Hanford double-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Daymo, E.A.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps are currently the baseline technology for sludge mobilization and mixing in one-million gallon double-shell tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. Improvements to the baseline jet mixer pump technology are sought because jet mixer pumps have moving parts that may fail or require maintenance. Moreover, jet mixers are relatively expensive, they heat the waste, and, in some cases, may not mobilize enough of the sludge. This report documents a thorough literature search for commercially available applicable mixing technologies that could be used for double-shell tank sludge mobilization and mixing. Textbooks, research articles, conference proceedings, mixing experts, and the Thomas Register were consulted to identify applicable technologies. While there are many commercial methods that could be used to mobilize sludge or mix the contents of a one-million gallon tank, few will work given the geometrical constraints (e.g., the mixer must fit through a 1.07-m-diameter riser) or the tank waste properties (e.g., the sludge has such a high yield stress that it generally does not flow under its own weight). Pulsed fluid jets and submersible Flygt mixers have already been identified at Hanford and Savannah River Sites for double-shell tank mixing applications. While these mixing technologies may not be applicable for double-shell tanks that have a thick sludge layer at the bottom (since too many of these mixers would need to be installed to mobilize most of the sludge), they may have applications in tanks that do not have a settled solids layer. Retrieval projects at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy sites are currently evaluating the effectiveness of these mixing techniques for tank waste applications. The literature search did not reveal any previously unknown technologies that should be considered for sludge mobilization and mixing in one-million gallon double-shell tanks.

  2. NMR and ESR characterization of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large number of solid-state NMR and ESR experiments were explored as potential tools to study chemical structure, mobility, and pore volume of activated carbon. We used a model system where pecan shells were activated with phosphoric acid, and carbonized at 450ºC for 4 h with varying amounts of ai...

  3. Recent advances in shell theory. [application of asymptotic approach to thin walled shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The results reviewed are divided into two categories: those that relate two-dimensional shell theory to three-dimensional elasticity theory and those concerned with shell theory per se. In the second category results for general elastic systems that carry over, by specialization or analogy, to shells and results that are unique to shell theory itself are considered.

  4. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  5. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  6. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  7. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  8. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  9. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  10. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  11. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  12. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  13. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  14. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  15. 7 CFR 51.2002 - Split shell.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....2002 Split shell. Split shell means a shell having any crack which is open and conspicuous for a... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1 2...

  16. Site-specific carbon deposition for hierarchically ordered core/shell-structured graphitic carbon with remarkable electrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yingying; Wu, Zhangxiong; Qian, Xufang; Fang, Yin; Feng, Dan; Xia, Yongyao; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    A fascinating core-shell-structured graphitic carbon material composed of ordered microporous core and uniform mesoporous shell is fabricated for the first time through a site-specific chemical vapor deposition process by using a nanozeolite@mesostructured silica composite molecular sieve as the template. The mesostructure-directing agent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide in the shell of the template can be either burned off or carbonized so that it is successfully utilized as a pore switch to turn the shell of the template "on" or "off" to allow selective carbon deposition. The preferred carbon deposition process can be performed only in the inner microporous zeolite cores or just within the outer mesoporous shells, resulting in a zeolite-like ordered microporous carbon or a hollow mesoporous carbon. Full carbon deposition in the template leads to the new core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon with a nanographene-constructed framework for fast electron transport, a microporous nanocore with large surface area for high-capacity storage of lithium ions, a mesoporous shell with highly opened mesopores as a transport layer for lithium ions and electron channels to access inner cores. The ordered micropores are protected by the mesoporous shell, avoiding pore blockage as the formation of solid electrolyte interphase layers. Such a unique core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon material represents a newly established lithium ion storage model, demonstrating high reversible energy storage, excellent rate capability, and long cyclic stability. PMID:24039038

  17. Vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells Shallow versus deep shell theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Leissa, A. W.; Wang, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Free vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells having rectangular planforms are studied in this paper by means of the Ritz method. The deep shell theory of Novozhilov and Goldenveizer is used and compared with the usual shallow shell theory for a wide range of shell parameters. A thorough convergence study is presented along with comparisons to previously published finite element solutions and experimental results. Accurately computed frequency parameters and mode shapes for various shell configurations are presented. The present paper appears to be the first comprehensive study presenting rigorous comparisons between the two shell theories in dealing with free vibrations of cantilevered cylindrical shells.

  18. Solid electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed

    1993-06-15

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  19. Shell Model Depiction of Isospin Mixing in sd Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Yi Hua; Smirnova, Nadya A.; Caurier, Etienne

    2011-11-30

    We constructed a new empirical isospin-symmetry breaking (ISB) Hamiltonian in the sd(1s{sub 1/2}, 0d{sub 5/2} and 0d{sub 3/2}) shell-model space. In this contribution, we present its application to two important case studies: (i){beta}-delayed proton emission from {sup 22}Al and (ii) isospin-mixing correction to superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +}{beta}-decay ft-values.

  20. On chaotic behavior of gravitating stellar shells.

    PubMed

    Barkov, M V; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S; Neishtadt, A I; Belinski, V A

    2005-03-01

    Motion of two gravitating spherical stellar shells around a massive central body is considered. Each shell consists of point particles with the same specific angular momenta and energies. In the case when one can neglect the influence of gravitation of one ("light") shell onto another ("heavy") shell ("restricted problem") the structure of the phase space is described. The scaling laws for the measure of the domain of chaotic motion and for the minimal energy of the light shell sufficient for its escape to infinity are obtained. PMID:15836258

  1. Molecular phylogeny of the acorn barnacle family Tetraclitidae (Cirripedia: Balanomorpha: Tetraclitoidea): validity of shell morphology and arthropodal characteristics in the systematics of Tetraclitid barnacles.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Chu, Ka Hou; Achituv, Yair; Chan, Benny Kwok Kan

    2015-01-01

    Shell structure is a crucial aspect of barnacle systematics. Within Tetraclitidae, the diametric and monometric growth patterns and number of rows of parietal tubes in the shells are key characteristics used to infer evolutionary trends. We used molecular analysis based on seven genes (mitochondrial COI, 16S and 12S rRNA, and nuclear EF1, RPII, H3, and 18S rRNA) to test two traditional phylogenetic hypothesis: (1) Tetraclitid barnacles are divided into two major lineages, which are distinguished according to monometric and diametric shell growth patterns, and (2) the evolutionary trend in shell parietal development began with a solid shell, which developed into a single tubiferous shell, which then developed into multitubiferous shells. The results indicated that Tetraclitinae and Newmanellinae are not monophyletic, but that Austrobalaninae and Tetraclitellinae are. The phylogram based on the genetic data suggested that Bathylasmatidae is nested within the Tetraclitidae, forming a sister relationship with the Austrobalaninae and Tetraclitinae/Newmanellinae clade. Within the Tetraclitinae/Newmanellinae clade, the genera Tetraclita (multitubiferous shell), Tesseropora (single tubiferous shell), and Yamaguchiella (multitubiferous shell) are polyphyletic. The results suggested that shell morphology and growth patterns do not reflect the evolutionary history of Tetraclitidae, whereas the arthropodal characteristics are informative. PMID:25263422

  2. Pressure Shell Approach to Integrated Environmental Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of exploration mission human systems will require environmental protection such as radiation protection that is effective and efficient. In order to continue human exploration, habitat systems will require special shells to protect astronauts from hostile environments. The Pressure Shell Approach to integrated environmental (radiation) protection is a multi-layer shell that can be used for multifunctional environmental protection. Self-healing, self-repairing nano technologies and sensors are incorporated into the shell. This shell consists of multiple layers that can be tailored for specific environmental protection needs. Mainly, this innovation focuses on protecting crew from exposure to micrometeorites, thermal, solar flares, and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) radiation. The Pressure Shell Approach consists of a micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta protection layer; a thin, composite shell placed in between two layers that is non-structural; an open cavity layer that can be filled with water, regolith, or polyethylene foam; a thicker composite shell that is a structural load bearing that is placed between two layers; and a bladder coating on the interior composite shell. This multi-layer shell creates an effective radiation protection system. Most of its layers can be designed with the materials necessary for specific environments. In situ materials such as water or regolith can be added to the shell design for supplemental radiation protection.

  3. Turbine blade with spar and shell

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Daniel O.; Peterson, Ross H.

    2012-04-24

    A turbine blade with a spar and shell construction in which the spar and the shell are both secured within two platform halves. The spar and the shell each include outward extending ledges on the bottom ends that fit within grooves formed on the inner sides of the platform halves to secure the spar and the shell against radial movement when the two platform halves are joined. The shell is also secured to the spar by hooks extending from the shell that slide into grooves formed on the outer surface of the spar. The hooks form a serpentine flow cooling passage between the shell and the spar. The spar includes cooling holes on the lower end in the leading edge region to discharge cooling air supplied through the platform root and into the leading edge cooling channel.

  4. The shell coal gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Koenders, L.O.M.; Zuideveld, P.O.

    1995-12-01

    Future Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) power plants will have superior environmental performance and efficiency. The Shell Coal Gasification Process (SCGP) is a clean coal technology, which can convert a wide range of coals into clean syngas for high efficiency electricity generation in an ICGCC plant. SCGP flexibility has been demonstrated for high-rank bituminous coals to low rank lignites and petroleum coke, and the process is well suited for combined cycle power generation, resulting in efficiencies of 42 to 46% (LHV), depending on choice of coal and gas turbine efficiency. In the Netherlands, a 250 MWe coal gasification combined cycle plant based on Shell technology has been built by Demkolec, a development partnership of the Dutch Electricity Generating Board (N.V. Sep). The construction of the unit was completed end 1993 and is now followed by start-up and a 3 year demonstration period, after that the plant will be part of the Dutch electricity generating system.

  5. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L.; Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres, which are used for inertial-confinement fusion targets, are formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a drop-tower furnace. The modelling of this gel-to-sphere transformation has consisted of three phases: gel thermochemistry, furnance-to-gel heat transfer, and gravity-driven degradation of the concentricity of the molten shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the free-falling gel particle was modelled with forced convection. The gel mass, dimensions, and specific heat as well as furnace temperature profile and furnace gas conductivity, were controlled variables. This model has been experimentally verified. In the third phase, a mathematical model was developed to describe the gravity-driven degradation of concentricity in molten glass shells.

  6. Inner-shell excitation spectroscopy of peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, K. L.; Kalirai, S.; Hayes, R.; Ju, V.; Cooper, G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Thompson, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    O 1s inner-shell excitation spectra of a number of vapor phase molecules containing peroxide bonds - hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), di-t-butylperoxide (tBuOtBu), benzoyl peroxide, ((C6H5(CO)O)2), luperox-F [1,3(4)-bis(tertbutylperoxyisopropyl) benzene], and analogous, non-peroxide compounds - water, t-butanol and benzoic acid have been measured. C 1s spectra are also reported. O 1s spectra of solid benzoic acid, di-t-butylperoxide and luperox-F recorded using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope, are also reported, and compared to the corresponding gaseous spectra. Spectral interpretation was aided by comparing the spectra of the peroxide and non-peroxide counterparts and with ab initio calculations. A characteristic O 1s → σ∗O-O transition at 533.0(3) eV is identified in each peroxide species, which is absent in the corresponding non-peroxide counterpart species. The energy and intensity of the 533 eV peroxide feature is stable and thus useful for analysis of peroxides in mixtures, such as tracking residual peroxide initiators, or peroxides produced in fuel cells.

  7. Atomic inner-shell transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Mark, H.

    1984-01-01

    Atomic inner-shell processes have quite different characteristics, in several important aspects, from processes in the optical regime. Energies are large, e.g., the 1s binding energy reaches 100 keV at Z = 87; relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic effects therefore are strong. Radiationless transitions vastly dominate over photon emission in most cases. Isolated inner-shell vacancies have pronounced single-particle character, with correlations generally contributing only approximately 1 eV to the 1s and 2p binding energies; the structure of such systems is thus well tractable by independent-particle self-consistent-field atomic models. For systems containing multiple deep inner-shell vacancies, or for highly stripped ions, the importance of relativistic intermediate coupling and configuration interaction becomes pronounced. Cancellation of the Coulomb interaction can lead to strong manifestations of the Breit interaction in such phenomena as multiplet splitting and hypersatellite X-ray shifts. Unique opportunities arise for the test of theory.

  8. Isogeometric Kirchhoff-Love shell formulations for biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tepole, Adrián Buganza; Kabaria, Hardik; Bletzinger, Kai-Uwe; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of thin biological membranes can aid the design of better medical devices. Remarkable biological membranes include skin, alveoli, blood vessels, and heart valves. Isogeometric analysis is ideally suited for biological membranes since it inherently satisfies the C1-requirement for Kirchhoff-Love kinematics. Yet, current isogeometric shell formulations are mainly focused on linear isotropic materials, while biological tissues are characterized by a nonlinear anisotropic stress-strain response. Here we present a thin shell formulation for thin biological membranes. We derive the equilibrium equations using curvilinear convective coordinates on NURBS tensor product surface patches. We linearize the weak form of the generic linear momentum balance without a particular choice of a constitutive law. We then incorporate the constitutive equations that have been designed specifically for collagenous tissues. We explore three common anisotropic material models: Mooney-Rivlin, May Newmann-Yin, and Gasser-Ogden-Holzapfel. Our work will allow scientists in biomechanics and mechanobiology to adopt the constitutive equations that have been developed for solid three-dimensional soft tissues within the framework of isogeometric thin shell analysis. PMID:26251556

  9. Micro-actuation characteristics of rocket conical shell sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, W. K.; Han, Y.; Higuchi, K.; Tzou, H. S.

    2006-05-01

    Rocket fairings, load-carrying structures of solid rocket motor case, e.g., inter-stage joint, satellite-rocket joint, etc., usually take the shape of conical shell sections. This paper is to evaluate spatially distributed microscopic control characteristics of distributed actuator patches bonded on conical shell surfaces. The converse effect of piezoelectric materials has been recognized as one of the best electromechanical effects for precision distributed control applications. The resultant control forces and micro-control actions induced by the distributed actuators depend on applied voltages, geometrical (e.g., spatial segmentation and shape) and material (i.e., various actuator materials) properties. Mathematical models and modal domain governing equations of the conical shell section laminated with distributed actuator patches are presented first, followed by formulations of distributed control forces and micro-control actions which can be divided into longitudinal/circumferential membrane and bending control components. Spatially distributed electromechanical microscopic actuation characteristics and control effects resulting from various longitudinal/circumferential actions of actuator patches are evaluated.

  10. Analysis of Composite Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique and Submodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin (Technical Monitor); Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to tension and three-point bending was studied. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to model the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/3D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlation of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents. In addition, the application of the submodeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond was also studied. Global models made of shell elements and solid elements were studied. Solid elements were used for local submodels, which extended between three and six specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front to model the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from the simulations using the submodeling technique were not in agreement with results obtained from full solid models.

  11. Rarefied solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, D. A.; Nikora, V. I.

    1994-01-01

    One important limit to creating low density materials is the objects' own weight. As a solid or colloidal matrix becomes more rarefied, gravity acts destructively to compress its suporting skeleton. We describe experimental results and propose a model which matches the low gravity behavior of rarefied or fractal solids. On parabolic airplane flights, we sought to demonstrate a key component of producing higher surface area fractals. Flight paths were selected to give a range of gravity levels: 0.01 g/g(sub 0) (low), 0.16 g(sub 0) (Lunar), 0.33 g/g(sub 0) (Martian), 1 g/g(sub 0) (Earth) and 1.8 g/g(sub 0) (high) (where g(sub 0) = 980 cm/sq s). Results using the model material of hydrophobic silica indicated that stable agglomeration of such tenuous objects can increase markedly in reduced gravity. Optical characterization revealed that fractal dimension changed directly with varying gravity. As measured by fractal dimension, effective surface area and roughness increased by 40% in low gravity. This finding supports the conclusion that relieving internal weight stresses on delicate aggregates can enhance their overall size (by two orders of magnitude) and internal surface area. We conclude that gravitational restructuring limits the overall size and void content of low-density solids. These sparse colloidal regimes may present new and technologically attractive physics, ranging from improved insulators, liquid-like tension in a 'solid' matrix, and characteristically low conductivities for sound and (8 to 14 micrometers wavelength) infrared radiation.

  12. Real structure of lattice matched GaAs-Fe3Si core-shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenichen, B.; Hilse, M.; Herfort, J.; Trampert, A.

    2015-01-01

    GaAs nanowires and GaAs-Fe3Si core-shell nanowire structures were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on oxidized Si(111) substrates and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ga droplets were formed on the oxide surface, and the semiconducting GaAs nanowires grew epitaxially via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism as single-crystals from holes in the oxide film. We observed two stages of growth of the GaAs nanowires, first the regular growth and second the residual growth after the Ga supply was finished. The magnetic Fe3Si shells were deposited in an As-free chamber. They completely cover the GaAs cores although they consist of small grains. High-resolution TEM micrographs depict the differently oriented grains in the Fe3Si shells. Selected area diffraction of electrons and XRD gave further evidence that the shells are textured and not single crystals. Facetting of the shells was observed, which lead to thickness inhomogeneities of the shells.

  13. A Yolk-Shell Design for Stabilized and Scalable Li-Ion Battery Alloy Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nian; Wu, Hui; McDowell, Matthew T.; Yao, Yan; Wang, Chongmin; Cui, Yi

    2012-05-02

    Silicon is regarded as one of the most promising anode materials for next generation lithium-ion batteries. For use in practical applications, a Si electrode must have high capacity, long cycle life, high efficiency, and the fabrication must be industrially scalable. Here, we design and fabricate a yolk-shell structure to meet all these needs. The fabrication is carried out without special equipment and mostly at room temperature. Commercially available Si nanoparticles are completely sealed inside conformal, thin, self-supporting carbon shells, with rationally designed void space in between the particles and the shell. Finally, the well-defined void space allows the Si particles to expand freely without breaking the outer carbon shell, therefore stabilizing the solid-electrolyte interphase on the shell surface. High capacity (~2800 mAh/g at C/10), long cycle life (1000 cycles with 74% capacity retention), and high Coulombic efficiency (99.84%) have been realized in this yolk-shell structured Si electrode.

  14. Dual functional sensing mechanism in SnO₂-ZnO core-shell nanowires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Woo; Katoch, Akash; Sun, Gun-Joo; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sang Sub

    2014-06-11

    We report a dual functional sensing mechanism for ultrasensitive chemoresistive sensors based on SnO2-ZnO core-shell nanowires (C-S NWs) for detection of trace amounts of reducing gases. C-S NWs were synthesized by a two-step process, in which core SnO2 nanowires were first prepared by vapor-liquid-solid growth and ZnO shell layers were subsequently deposited by atomic layer deposition. The radial modulation of the electron-depleted shell layer was accomplished by controlling its thickness. The sensing capabilities of C-S NWs were investigated in terms of CO, which is a typical reducing gas. At an optimized shell thickness, C-S NWs showed the best CO sensing ability, which was quite superior to that of pure SnO2 nanowires without a shell. The dual functional sensing mechanism is proposed as the sensing mechanism in these nanowires and is based on the combination of the radial modulation effect of the electron-depleted shell and the electric field smearing effect. PMID:24836937

  15. A yolk-shell design for stabilized and scalable li-ion battery alloy anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Wu, Hui; McDowell, Matthew T; Yao, Yan; Wang, Chongmin; Cui, Yi

    2012-06-13

    Silicon is regarded as one of the most promising anode materials for next generation lithium-ion batteries. For use in practical applications, a Si electrode must have high capacity, long cycle life, high efficiency, and the fabrication must be industrially scalable. Here, we design and fabricate a yolk-shell structure to meet all these needs. The fabrication is carried out without special equipment and mostly at room temperature. Commercially available Si nanoparticles are completely sealed inside conformal, thin, self-supporting carbon shells, with rationally designed void space in between the particles and the shell. The well-defined void space allows the Si particles to expand freely without breaking the outer carbon shell, therefore stabilizing the solid-electrolyte interphase on the shell surface. High capacity (∼2800 mAh/g at C/10), long cycle life (1000 cycles with 74% capacity retention), and high Coulombic efficiency (99.84%) have been realized in this yolk-shell structured Si electrode. PMID:22551164

  16. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-03-27

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE`s Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities

  17. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelale, F.

    1982-01-01

    A shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. Extensive results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform inplane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  18. Flow past a porous approximate spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the creeping flow of an incompressible viscous liquid past a porous approximate spherical shell is considered. The flow in the free fluid region outside the shell and in the cavity region of the shell is governed by the Navier Stokes equation. The flow within the porous annulus region of the shell is governed by Darcy’s Law. The boundary conditions used at the interface are continuity of the normal velocity, continuity of the pressure and Beavers and Joseph slip condition. An exact solution for the problem is obtained. An expression for the drag on the porous approximate spherical shell is obtained. The drag experienced by the shell is evaluated numerically for several values of the parameters governing the flow.

  19. SPSM and its application in cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wu; Zhou, Su-Lian; Peng, Hui

    2008-03-01

    In naval architectures, the structure of prismatic shell is used widely. But there is no suitable method to analyze this kind of structure. Stiffened prismatic shell method (SPSM) presented in this paper, is one of the harmonic semi-analytic methods. Theoretically, strong stiffened structure can be analyzed economically and accurately. SPSM is based on the analytical solution of the governing differential equations for orthotropic cylindrical shells. In these differential equations, the torsional stiffness, bending stiffness and the exact position of each stiffener are taken into account with the Heaviside singular function. An algorithm is introduced, in which the actions of stiffeners on shells are replaced by external loads at each stiffener position. Stiffened shells can be computed as non-stiffened shells. Eventually, the displacement solution of the equations is acquired by the introduction of Green function. The stresses in a corrugated transverse bulkhead without pier base of an oil tanker are computed by using SPSM.

  20. Thermal stresses in thick laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides an analytical formulation to investigate the thermomechanical behavior of thick composite shells subjected to a temperature distribution which varies arbitrarily in the radial direction. For illustrative purposes, shells under uniform temperature change are presented. It is found that thermal twist would occur even for symmetric laminated shells. Under uniform temperature rise, results for off-axis graphite/epoxy shells show that extensional-shear coupling can cause tensile radial stress throughout the shell and tensile hoop stress in the inner region. Laminated graphite/epoxy shells can exhibit negative effective thermal expansion coefficients in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Finally, the stacking sequence has a strong influence on the thermal stress distributions.

  1. Shell boosts recovery at Kernridge

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.

    1984-01-01

    Since acquiring the Kernridge property in December 1979, Shell Oil Co. has drilled more than 1,800 wells and steadily increased production from 42,000 to 89,000 b/d of oil. Currently, the Kernridge Production Division of Shell California Production Inc. (SCPI), a newly formed subsidiary of Shell Oil Co., is operator for the property. The property covers approximately 35,000 mostly contiguous net acres, with production concentrated mainly on about 5,500 net acres. SCPI's four major fields in the area are the North and South Belridge, Lost Hills, and Antelope Hills. Most of the production comes from the North and South Belridge fields, which were previously held by the Belridge Oil Co. Productive horizons in the fields are the Tulare, Diatomite, Brown Shale, Antelope Shale, 64 Zone, and Agua sand. The Tulare and Diatomite are the two major reservoirs SCPI is developing. The Tulare, encountered between 400 and 1,300 ft, is made up of fine- to coarse-grained, unconsolidated sands with interbedded shales and silt stones and contains 13 /sup 0/ API oil. Using steam drive as the main recovery method, SCPI estimates an ultimate recovery from the Tulare formation of about 60% of the original 1 billion barrels in place. The Diatomite horizon, found between 800 and 3,500 ft and containing light, 28 /sup 0/ API oil, has high porosity (more than 60%), low permeability (less than 1 md), and natural fractures. Because of the Diatomite's low permeability, fracture stimulation is being used to increase well productivity. SCPI anticipates that approximately 5% of the almost 2 billion barrels of oil originally in place will be recovered by primary production.

  2. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  3. Monodisperse functional colloidosomes with tailored nanoparticle shells.

    PubMed

    Sander, J S; Studart, A R

    2011-04-01

    We report the assembly of monodisperse colloidosomes containing a wide range of functional nanoparticles in the outer shell using a double emulsion templating method in a microfluidic device. By selecting nanoparticles of specific functionalities, hollow capsules with inert, magnetic, photocatalytic, and potentially biocompatible and piezoelectric shells are easily obtained. Proper control over the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles forming the shell and of the liquid interfaces involved is key to enable the assembly of colloidosomes using this double emulsification route. PMID:21384846

  4. Electron Shell as a Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2002-11-01

    Main principles of the resonance effect arising in the electron shells in interaction of the nuclei with electromagnetic radiation are analyzed and presented in the historical aspect. Principles of NEET are considered from a more general position, as compared to how this is usually presented. Characteristic features of NEET and its reverse, TEEN, as internal conversion processes are analyzed, and ways are offered of inducing them by laser radiation. The ambivalent role of the Pauli exclusion principles in NEET and TEEN processes is investigated.

  5. Nanostructure and strain properties of core-shell GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehagias, Th; Florini, N.; Kioseoglou, J.; Pavloudis, Th; Komninou, Ph; Walther, T.; Moratis, K.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Pelekanos, N. T.

    2015-11-01

    GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires (NWs) were grown on Si(111) by Ga-assisted molecular beam epitaxy via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. High-resolution and scanning transmission electron microscopy observations showed that NWs were predominantly zinc-blende single crystals of hexagonal shape, grown along the [111] direction. GaAs core NWs emerged from the Si surface and subsequently, the NW growth front advanced by a continuous sequence of (111) rotational twins, while the AlGaAs shell lattice was perfectly aligned with the core lattice. Occasionally, single or multiple stacking faults induced wurtzite structure NW pockets. The AlGaAs shell occupied at least half of the NW’s projected diameter, while the average Al content of the shell, estimated by energy dispersive x-ray analysis, was x = 0.35. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations of hexagonal cross-section NW slices, under a new parametrization of the Tersoff interatomic potential for AlAs, showed increased atom relaxation at the hexagon vertices of the shell. This, in conjunction with the compressively strained Al0.35Ga0.65As shell close to the GaAs core, can trigger a kinetic surface mechanism that could drive Al adatoms to accumulate at the relaxed sites of the shell, namely along the diagonals of the shell’s hexagon. Moreover, the absence of long-range stresses in the GaAs/Al0.35Ga0.65As core-shell system may account for a highly stable heterostructure. The latter was consolidated by temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  6. The fragmentation of expanding shells - I. Limitations of the thin-shell approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, James E.; Wünsch, Richard; Whitworth, Anthony; Palouš, Jan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the gravitational fragmentation of expanding shells in the context of the linear thin-shell analysis. We make use of two very different numerical schemes; the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code and a version of the Benz smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the agreement between the two codes is excellent. We use our numerical results to test the thin-shell approximation and we find that the external pressure applied to the shell has a strong effect on the fragmentation process. In cases where shells are not pressure-confined, the shells thicken as they expand and hydrodynamic flows perpendicular to the plane of the shell suppress fragmentation at short wavelengths. If the shells are pressure-confined internally and externally, so that their thickness remains approximately constant during their expansion, the agreement with the analytical solution is better.

  7. Silver-silver oxide core-shell nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation: core and shell sizing by extinction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Videla, F. A.; Torchia, G. A.; Moreno, P.; Roso, L.

    2009-11-01

    The generation of small silver metal nanoparticles (Nps) by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation has been an active area of research in recent years due to their interest in several fields of applied research such as biotechnology and material research, in particular those with sizes smaller than 10 nm. In general, laser ablation tends to produce environmentally clean metal Nps compared with wet chemical methods. However, since silver may be oxidized in the presence of water or ethanol, core-shell silver-silver oxide (Ag-Ag2O) Nps can be formed, whose size and thickness must be determined and characterized for functionalization related to future applications. This work analyses the size characteristics of core-shell Ag-Ag2O colloid nanostructures (smaller than 10 nm) obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of solid silver targets in different liquid media (water or ethanol) through the study of their optical extinction spectra. A fit of full experimental spectrum using Mie theory allows the determination of core size and shell thickness distributions as a function of fluence. The red-shift of the plasmon peak wavelength with respect to the bare-core peak wavelength at 400 nm, produced by the oxide shell, may be easily measured even for very small thicknesses. It was found that the dominant Ag2O effective thickness is inversely proportional to the fluence, reaching a maximum of 0.2 nm for a fluence of 60 J cm-2 and a minimum of 0.04 nm for a fluence of 1000 J cm-2.

  8. Thin-shell instability in collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Bret, A.; Ynnerman, A.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Thin-shell instability is one process which can generate entangled structures in astrophysical plasma on collisional (fluid) scales. It is driven by a spatially varying imbalance between the ram pressure of the inflowing upstream plasma and the downstream's thermal pressure at a nonplanar shock. Here we show by means of a particle-in-cell simulation that an analog process can destabilize a thin shell formed by two interpenetrating, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma clouds. The amplitude of the shell's spatial modulation grows and saturates after about ten inverse proton plasma frequencies, when the shell consists of connected piecewise linear patches.

  9. Plans for Double Shell Experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Gunderson, M. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Watt, R. G.; Kline, J. L.; Hayes, A. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Boswell, M.; Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-11-01

    Double-shells are an alternative approach to achieving indirect drive ignition. These targets consist of a low-Z ablatively-driven outer shell that impacts a high-Z inner shell filled with DT fuel. In contrast to single-shell designs, double-shell targets burn the fuel via volume ignition, albeit with a lower gain. While double-shell capsules are complicated to fabricate, their design includes several beneficial metrics such as a low convergence pusher (C.R. < 10), low implosion speed (~ 250 km/s), a simple few-ns laser drive in a vacuum hohlraum, less sensitivity to hohlraum asymmetries, and low expected laser-plasma instabilities. We present preliminary double-shell capsule designs for NIF using a cryogenic gas DT fill which are optimized for yield and minimized for fall-line mix. Challenges will be discussed, as well as uncertainties and trade-offs in the physics issues compared to single-shells. A development path for double-shell experiments on NIF will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  10. Core/shell colloidal semiconductor nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Benoit; Nadal, Brice; Bouet, Cecile; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoit

    2012-11-14

    We have recently synthesized atomically flat semiconductor colloidal nanoplatelets with quasi 2D geometry. Here, we show that core/shell nanoplatelets can be obtained with a 2D geometry that is conserved. The epitaxial growth of the shell semiconductor is performed at room temperature. We report the detailed synthesis of CdSe/CdS and CdSe/CdZnS structures with different shell thicknesses. The shell growth is characterized both spectroscopically and structurally. In particular, the core/shell structure appears very clearly on high-resolution, high-angle annular dark-field transmission electron microscope images, thanks to the difference of atomic density between the core and the shell. When the nanoplatelets stand on their edge, we can precisely count the number of atomic planes forming the core and the shell. This provides a direct measurement, with atomic precision, of the core nanoplatelets thickness. The constraints exerted by the shell growth on the core is analyzed using global phase analysis. The core/shell nanoplatelets we obtained have narrow emission spectra with full-width at half-maximum close to 20 nm, and quantum yield that can reach 60%. PMID:23057684

  11. Fracture Mitigation Strategies in Gastropod Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Christopher; Kisailus, David

    2013-04-01

    For hundreds of millions of years, gastropods have been evolving, modifying their external calcified shells for defense against shell-breaking and drilling predators. They have evolved primarily to use two different aragonitic microstructures: the evolutionary older Nacre (mother of pearl) structure and the more recently developed crossed-lamellar structure. By using both of these structures, gastropods are able to produce shells that are significantly tougher then geologic aragonite. However, the crossed-lamellar structure allows for a wider variety of shell morphologies, ensuring its increasing presence since the Mesozoic Marine Revolution more than 200 million years ago.

  12. Shell appraising deepwater discovery off Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, M. ); Lambers, E.J.T.; Steffens, G.S. )

    1993-05-10

    Shell International Petroleum Co. Ltd. negotiated a farmout in 1990 from Occidental International Exploration and Production Co. for Block SC-38 in the South China Sea off Palawan, Philippines, following Oxy's discovery of gas in 1989 in a Miocene Nido limestone buildup. Under the terms of the farmout agreement, Shell became operator with a 50% share. Following the disappointing well North Iloc 1, Shell was successful in finding oil and gas in Malampaya 1. Water 700-1,000 m deep, remoteness, and adverse weather conditions have imposed major challenges for offshore operations. The paper describes the tectonic setting; the Nido limestone play; the Malampaya discovery; and Shell's appraisal studies.

  13. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  14. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia; Richard, Monique N.; Dehne, Aaron; Phillips, Jonathan; Stamm, Kimber L.; Fanson, Paul T.

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  15. Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Marceau; J. J. Sharpe

    2006-12-21

    During monitoring of remedial activities at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2 on August 19, 2005, a concentration of mussel shell was discovered in the west wall of a trench in the northen section of the waste site.

  16. Transitional nuclei near shell closures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, G.

    2014-08-14

    High spin states in Bismuth and Thallium nuclei near the Z = 82 shell closure and Cesium nuclei near the N = 82 shell closure in A = 190 and A = 130 regions, respectively, have been experimentally investigated using heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction and by detecting the gamma rays using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA). Interesting shape properties in these transitional nuclei have been observed. The results were compared with the neighboring nuclei in these two regions. The total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations have been performed for a better understanding of the observed properties. In mass region A = 190, a change in shape from spherical to deformed has been observd around neutron number N = 112 for the Bi (Z = 83) isotopes with proton number above the magic gap Z = 82, whereas, the shape of Tl (Z = 81) isotopes with proton number below the magic gap Z = 82 remains stable as a function of neutron number. An important transition from aplanar to planar configuration of angular momentum vectors leading to the occurance of nuclar chirality and magnetic rotation, respectively, has been proposed for the unique parity πh{sub 11/2}⊗νh{sub 11/2} configuration in Cs isotopes in the mass region A ∼ 130 around neutron number N = 79. These results are in commensurate with the TRS calculations.

  17. Lead behavior in abalone shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Akikazu; Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Maeda, Masaru; Kimura, Kan

    1994-08-01

    In order to gain information about the behavior of heavy metals in biological assimilation processes in a marine food chain and to investigate the possibility that lead pollution in a marine environment can be estimated by measurement of a small number of key materials from such a food chain, muscle and shell were analyzed from abalone ( Haliotis) from a shallow water locality in a Japanese coastal region. Lead concentrations in muscle were about 26 ppb for abalone of approximately 3 years old and decreased systematically with increasing age of animals sampled, to about 3.3 ppb for a specimen approximately 8 years old. Lead concentrations in shell material gradually decreased also, from 150 ppb to 82 ppb in the oldest specimen. The decrease of concentration in tissues with increasing age indicates that a mechanism for exclusion of lead during tissue growth becomes more efficient with age. Along the food chain in which abalone is the final stage, lead was enriched at the first stage, from seawater to algae, by a factor of 100. Lead was diminished at all subsequent stages of the chain. Tissue of artificially cultured abalone had four times higher lead values compared to abalone grown in natural conditions, and this appears to reflect the fact that lead concentration was three times higher in seawater in the cultured environment.

  18. Lead behavior in abalone shell

    SciTech Connect

    Hirao, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Akikazu; Kimura, Kan ); Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Maeda, Masaru )

    1994-08-01

    In order to gain information about the behavior of heavy metals in biological assimilation processes in a marine food chain and to investigate the possibility that lead pollution in a marine environment can be estimated by measurement of a small number of key materials from such a food chain, muscle and shell were analyzed from abalone (Haliotis) from a shallow water locality in a Japanese coastal region. Lead concentrations in muscle were about 26 ppb for abalone approximately 3 years old and decreased systematically with increasing age of animals sampled, to about 3.3 ppb for a specimen approximately 8 years old. Lead concentrations in shell material gradually decreased also, from 150 ppb to 82 ppb in the oldest specimen. The decrease of concentration in tissues with increasing age indicates that a mechanism for exclusion of lead during tissue growth becomes more efficient with age. Along the food chain in which abalone is the final stage, lead was enriched at the first stage, from seawater to algae, by a factor of 100. Lead was diminished at all subsequent stages of the chain. Tissue of artificially cultured abalone had four times higher lead values compared to abalone grown in natural conditions, and this appears to reflect the fact that lead concentration was three times higher in seawater in the cultured environment.

  19. Apparatus and methods for installing, removing and adjusting an inner turbine shell section relative to an outer turbine shell section

    DOEpatents

    Leach, David; Bergendahl, Peter Allen; Waldo, Stuart Forrest; Smith, Robert Leroy; Phelps, Robert Kim

    2001-01-01

    A turbine includes upper and lower inner shell sections mounting the nozzles and shrouds and which inner shell is supported by pins secured to a surrounding outer shell. To disassemble the turbine for access to the inner shell sections and rotor, an alignment fixture is secured to the lower outer shell section and has pins engaging the inner shell section. To disassemble the turbine, the inner shell weight is transferred to the lower outer shell section via the alignment fixture and cradle pins. Roller assemblies are inserted through access openings vacated by support pins to permit rotation of the lower inner shell section out of and into the lower outer shell section during disassembly and assembly. The alignment fixture includes adjusting rods for adjusting the inner shell axially, vertically, laterally and about a lateral axis. A roller over-cage is provided to rotate the inner shell and a dummy shell to facilitate assembly and disassembly in the field.

  20. Vibrational modes of metal nanoshells and bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kirakosyan, Arman S.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically study the spectrum of radial vibrational modes in composite metal nanostructures such as bimetallic core-shell particles and metal nanoshells with dielectric core in an environment. We calculate frequencies and damping rates of fundamental (breathing) modes for these nanostructures along with those of two higher-order modes. For metal nanoshells, we find that the breathing mode frequency is always lower than the one for solid particles of the same size, while the damping is higher and increases with a reduction in the shell thickness. We identify two regimes that can be characterized as weakly damped and overdamped vibrations in the presence of external medium. For bimetallic particles, we find periodic dependence of frequency and damping rate on the shell thickness with period being determined by the mode number. For both types of nanostructures, the frequency of higher modes is nearly independent of the environment, while the damping rate shows a strong sensitivity to the outside medium. PMID:18647039

  1. Lithography-Free Fabrication of Core-Shell GaAs Nanowire Tunnel Diodes.

    PubMed

    Darbandi, A; Kavanagh, K L; Watkins, S P

    2015-08-12

    GaAs core-shell p-n junction tunnel diodes were demonstrated by combining vapor-liquid-solid growth with gallium oxide deposition by atomic layer deposition for electrical isolation. The characterization of an ensemble of core-shell structures was enabled by the use of a tungsten probe in a scanning electron microscope without the need for lithographic processing. Radial tunneling transport was observed, exhibiting negative differential resistance behavior with peak-to-valley current ratios of up to 3.1. Peak current densities of up to 2.1 kA/cm(2) point the way to applications in core-shell photovoltaics and tunnel field effect transistors. PMID:26189994

  2. Experimental analysis of the six-channel cyclone with spiral shell.

    PubMed

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Platova, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Experimental analysis is conducted in order to estimate the distribution of air (gas) flow velocity in the advanced six-channel cyclone with spiral shell, and to measure the resistance and purifying effectiveness of the cyclone with spiral shell. The device is used for separating the minuscule solid particles from contaminated air (gas) flow. The multifunctional measuring instrument TESTO-452 with the attached Pito-Prandtl tube was used for carrying out the experiments. The air (gas) velocity in all six-cyclone channels, the resistance of six-channel cyclone with spiral shell and the effectiveness of air (gas) flow purification, depending on the position of curvilinear semi-rings and the average air (gas) flow velocity in the cyclone channels, were measured during the experiments. PMID:26370836

  3. Single-Shell tank system description

    SciTech Connect

    FIELD, J.G.

    2003-03-04

    The Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) system consists of 149 underground SSTs and processing equipment designed and constructed between 1940 and 1964 to transport and store radioactive hazardous/dangerous wastes generated from irradiated nuclear fuel processing. The tanks, designed to store waste, vary in size from between 190,000 to 3,800,000 L (50,000 gal to 1,000,000 gal) and contain a variety of solid and liquid waste. The system also includes miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUST). In addition to the tanks, there is a large amount of ancillary equipment associated with the system and although not designed to store wastes, the ancillary equipment is contaminated through contact with the waste. Waste was routed to the tanks through a network of underground piping, with interconnections provided in concrete pits that allowed changes to the routing through instrumentation. Processing vaults used during waste handling operations, evaporators used to reduce the waste stored in the system, and other miscellaneous structures used for a variety of waste handling operations are also included in the system. The SST system was taken out of service in 1980 and no additional waste has been added to the tanks. The SSTs and ancillary equipment were designed and constructed before promulgation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1986. The purpose of this document is to describe the SST system for use in performing an engineering and compliance assessment in support of M-23 milestones (Ecology, et al. 2000). This system description provides estimated locations and volumes of waste within the SST system, including storage tanks, transfer systems, evaporators aid miscellaneous support facilities.

  4. Solid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Endlich, Solomon; Nicolis, Alberto; Wang, Junpu E-mail: nicolis@phys.columbia.edu

    2013-10-01

    We develop a cosmological model where primordial inflation is driven by a 'solid', defined as a system of three derivatively coupled scalar fields obeying certain symmetries and spontaneously breaking a certain subgroup of these. The symmetry breaking pattern differs drastically from that of standard inflationary models: time translations are unbroken. This prevents our model from fitting into the standard effective field theory description of adiabatic perturbations, with crucial consequences for the dynamics of cosmological perturbations. Most notably, non-gaussianities in the curvature perturbations are unusually large, with f{sub NL} ∼ 1/(εc{sub s}{sup 2}), and have a novel shape: peaked in the squeezed limit, with anisotropic dependence on how the limit is approached. Other unusual features include the absence of adiabatic fluctuation modes during inflation — which does not impair their presence and near scale-invariance after inflation — and a slightly blue tilt for the tensor modes.

  5. Layzer type models for pressure driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A

    2004-09-16

    Models for the nonlinear instability of finite thickness shells driven by pressure are constructed in the style of Layzer. Equations for both Cartesian and cylindrically convergent/divergent geometries are derived. The resulting equations are appropriate for incompressible shells with unity Atwood number. Predictions from the equations compare well with two-dimensional simulations.

  6. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  7. A Well-Defined Bipolar Outflow Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Taoling; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Patel, Nimesh

    1992-12-01

    A well-defined "eggplant-shaped" thin shell is revealed in the Mon R2 central core region by CO and (13) CO J=1-0 maps obtained with QUARRY. This thin shell outlines the extended blue lobe of the massive bipolar outflow. The projected length and width of the shell are about 5.7 pc and 2.5 pc respectively, and the averaged projected thickness of the shell is ~ 0.3 pc. The shape of this shell can be satisfactorily accounted for quantitatively in terms of limb-brightening within the framework of the Shu et al shell model with radially directed wind, although the model seems to be oversimplified with respect to the complexity that our data reveal. The outflow shell's symmetry axis is estimated to be inclined by ~ 70(deg) with respect to the line of sight. We suggest that the coincident blue- and red-shifted emission and the bending of the red-shifted lobe are the result of the red-shifted shell being compressed, rather than having a second bipolar outflow aligned roughly perpendicular to the axis of the first bipolar outflow.

  8. Torsion and transverse sensing of conical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chen, Z. B.; Tzou, H. S.

    2010-10-01

    Conical shells are widely used as payload/rocket adapters in rocket fairing systems. Generally, the conical shells are clamped at the major end and free at the minor end, where the payload is mounted. This study focuses on the dynamic sensing of conical shells with fix-free boundary conditions (BCs) by using distributed piezoelectric helical sensors. Two types of motion are studied, i.e., the transverse modes and the torsion modes. The shear-type sensors for shells sensing are presented first. Formulations of sensing signals of a general shell of revolution are presented, and then simplified to conical shells. For sensing of transverse vibrations, thin piezoelectric sensors are laminated on the top surface. Two types of sensor distribution are considered: a fully distributed and a helical or diagonal laminated. The total signal consists of four components resulting from the four strain components, and each of them is evaluated in detail. For sensing of torsion vibrations, a meridional polarized shear-type sensor with side electrodes is layered on the top surface of the shell structure. Sensing signals of natural shell modes are also evaluated. Analyses show that, in low order modes, the sensing signals induced by the circumferential membrane strains are the primary components of the total signal generations. The numerical results indicate the optimal location of the sensors. The proposed method is capable of determining the modal participation factors, while the testing signal is available; it is also capable of determining the mode shapes by using several distributed sensor segments.

  9. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  10. A Geometric Theory of Nonlinear Morphoelastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik, Souhayl; Angoshtari, Arzhang; Goriely, Alain; Yavari, Arash

    2016-08-01

    Many thin three-dimensional elastic bodies can be reduced to elastic shells: two-dimensional elastic bodies whose reference shape is not necessarily flat. More generally, morphoelastic shells are elastic shells that can remodel and grow in time. These idealized objects are suitable models for many physical, engineering, and biological systems. Here, we formulate a general geometric theory of nonlinear morphoelastic shells that describes both the evolution of the body shape, viewed as an orientable surface, as well as its intrinsic material properties such as its reference curvatures. In this geometric theory, bulk growth is modeled using an evolving referential configuration for the shell, the so-called material manifold. Geometric quantities attached to the surface, such as the first and second fundamental forms, are obtained from the metric of the three-dimensional body and its evolution. The governing dynamical equations for the body are obtained from variational consideration by assuming that both fundamental forms on the material manifold are dynamical variables in a Lagrangian field theory. In the case where growth can be modeled by a Rayleigh potential, we also obtain the governing equations for growth in the form of kinetic equations coupling the evolution of the first and the second fundamental forms with the state of stress of the shell. We apply these ideas to obtain stress-free growth fields of a planar sheet, the time evolution of a morphoelastic circular cylindrical shell subject to time-dependent internal pressure, and the residual stress of a morphoelastic planar circular shell.

  11. Microbial Populations Associated with Restricted Shell Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restricted shell eggs are found in all shell egg processing facilities. The manner with which companies handle them can vary greatly. In most cases, restricted eggs are diverted to further processing. Some facilities do not rewash eggs, choosing instead to include dirts in restricted eggs. Eggs ...

  12. Heterogeneous core/shell fluoride nanocrystals with enhanced upconversion photoluminescence for in vivo bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shuwei; Yang, Liming; Qiu, Hailong; Fan, Rongwei; Yang, Chunhui; Chen, Guanying

    2015-06-01

    We report on heterogeneous core/shell CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+@NaGdF4 nanocrystals of 17 nm with efficient upconversion (UC) photoluminescence (PL) for in vivo bioimaging. Monodisperse core/shell nanostructures were synthesized using a seed-mediated growth process involving two quite different approaches of liquid-solid-solution and thermal decomposition. They exhibit green emission with a sharp band around 540 nm when excited at ~980 nm, which is about 39 times brighter than the core CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+ nanoparticles. PL decays at 540 nm revealed that such an enhancement arises from efficient suppression of surface-related deactivation from the core nanocrystals. In vivo bioimaging employing water-dispersed core/shell nanoparticles displayed high contrast against the background.We report on heterogeneous core/shell CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+@NaGdF4 nanocrystals of 17 nm with efficient upconversion (UC) photoluminescence (PL) for in vivo bioimaging. Monodisperse core/shell nanostructures were synthesized using a seed-mediated growth process involving two quite different approaches of liquid-solid-solution and thermal decomposition. They exhibit green emission with a sharp band around 540 nm when excited at ~980 nm, which is about 39 times brighter than the core CaF2:Yb3+/Ho3+ nanoparticles. PL decays at 540 nm revealed that such an enhancement arises from efficient suppression of surface-related deactivation from the core nanocrystals. In vivo bioimaging employing water-dispersed core/shell nanoparticles displayed high contrast against the background. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02287h

  13. Semiclassical shell structure in rotating Fermi systems

    SciTech Connect

    Magner, A. G.; Sitdikov, A. S.; Khamzin, A. A.; Bartel, J.

    2010-06-15

    The collective moment of inertia is derived analytically within the cranking model for any rotational frequency of the harmonic-oscillator potential well and at a finite temperature. Semiclassical shell-structure components of the collective moment of inertia are obtained for any potential by using the periodic-orbit theory. We found semiclassically their relation to the free-energy shell corrections through the shell-structure components of the rigid-body moment of inertia of the statistically equilibrium rotation in terms of short periodic orbits. The shell effects in the moment of inertia exponentially disappear with increasing temperature. For the case of the harmonic-oscillator potential, one observes a perfect agreement of the semiclassical and quantum shell-structure components of the free energy and the moment of inertia for several critical bifurcation deformations and several temperatures.

  14. Engineered Magnetic Core-Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Alavi Nikje, Mir Mohammad; Vakili, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, engineered magnetic core-shell structures are playing an important role in the wide range of various applications. These magnetic core-shell structures have attracted considerable attention because of their unique properties and various applications. Also, the synthesis of engineered magnetic core-shell structures has attracted practical interest because of potential applications in areas such as ferrofluids, medical imaging, drug targeting and delivery, cancer therapy, separations, and catalysis. So far a large number of engineered magnetic core-shell structures have been successfully synthesized. This review article focuses on the recent progress in synthesis and characterization of engineered magnetic core-shell structures. Also, this review gives a brief description of the various application of these structures. It is hoped that this review will play some small part in helping future developments in important field. PMID:26377655

  15. Scattering functions of Platonic solids

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Shew, Chwen-Yang; He, Lilin; Meilleur, Flora; Myles, Dean A A; Liu, Emily; Zhang, Yang; Smith, Greg; Herwig, Kenneth W; Pynn, Roger; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The single-particle small-angle scattering properties of five Platonic solids, including the tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron, are systematically investigated. For each given geometry, the Debye spatial autocorrelation function, pair distance distribution function and intraparticle structure factor (form factor) are calculated and compared with the corresponding scattering function of a spherical reference system. From the theoretical models, the empirical relationship between the dodecahedral and icosahedral structural characteristics and those of the equivalent spheres is found. Moreover, the single-particle scattering properties of icosahedral and spherical shells with identical volume are investigated, and the prospect of using different data analysis approaches to explore their structural differences is presented and discussed.

  16. Scattering functions of Platonic solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Herwig, Kenneth W; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily; Pynn, Roger; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Gregory Scott; Myles, Dean A A; He, Lilin; Meilleur, Flora

    2011-01-01

    In this report the single-particle scattering properties of five Platonic solids, including tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron, are investigated in a systematic manner. For each given geometry, the Debye spatial autocorrelation function (r), pair distance distribution function (PDDF) p (r) and intraparticle structure factor (form factor) P (Q) are respectively calculated and compared to the corresponding scattering function of the spherical referential system. Based on our theoretical models, the empirical relationship between the dodecahedral and icosahedral structural characteristics and those of the equivalent spheres is found. Moreover, the single-particle scattering properties of the icosahedral and the spherical shells with the same volume are further investigated and the prospect of using different data analysis approaches to explore their structural difference is also presented and discussed.

  17. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for Delaminations in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a plate or shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provide a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with plate or shell finite elements. For simple double cantilever beam (DCB), end notched flexure (ENF), and single leg bending (SLB) specimens, mixed mode energy release rate distributions were computed across the width from nonlinear finite element analyses using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses served to test the accuracy of the shell/3D technique for the pure mode I case (DCB), mode II case (ENF) and a mixed mode I/II case (SLB). Specimens with a unidirectional layup where the delamination is located between two 0 plies, as well as a multidirectional layup where the delamination is located between two non-zero degree plies, were simulated. For a local 3D model extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses in front of and behind the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures modeled with plate elements, the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  18. Application of the Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; O'Brien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2002-01-01

    The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to three-point bending is demonstrated. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to capture the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/13D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlations of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents.

  19. Electroformation of uranium hemispherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.L.; Redey, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Vissers, D.R.

    1989-11-01

    This effort was directed at developing an electrochemical process for forming uniform and dendrite-free deposits of uranium from molten salts. This process is to be used for the electroformation of free-standing hemispherical shells of uranium for nuclear applications. Electrodeposition of uranium onto a substrate was accomplished with a fused chloride mixture containing 42 wt% UCl{sub 3} and a fused chloride-fluoride mixture containing 4 wt % UF{sub 4}. Under pulsed potential control at 504{degree}C, the chloride-fluoride mixture yielded the widest range of plating conditions for which dendrites could be avoided. Bipolar current pulse plating with both electrolytes gave good results, and successful application of this technique to a large tubular cathode has been demonstrated. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  20. The EOS TPC analysis shell

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.L.

    1991-03-01

    Key features of the general purpose event-based-data analysis shell (TAS) for the EOS TPC at LBL are described including the code development/code management procedures used. The architecture is designed with a view towards a distributed and multi-processing environment. TAS is interfaced seamlessly with the CERN PAW program and provides a consistent environment for both on-line and off-line analysis. The data model used is relational tables and the data structure definitions are maintained in a commercial database (INFORMIX). The interface for analysis modules is specified and enhances group participation in the development process. The use of commercial database as a data dictionary for both the table definitions and parameters used in the TAS kernel is extremely useful and productive. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Faraday Wave Turbulence on a Spherical Liquid Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-08-01

    Millimeter-radius liquid shells are acoustically levitated in an ultrasonic field. Capillary waves are observed on the shells. At low energies (minimal acoustic amplitude, thick shell) a resonance is observed between the symmetric and antisymmetric thin film oscillation modes. At high energies (high acoustic pressure, thin shell) the shell becomes fully covered with high-amplitude waves. Temporal spectra of scattered light from the shell in this regime exhibit a power-law decay indicative of turbulence.

  2. Faraday Wave Turbulence on a Spherical Liquid Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-01-01

    Millimeter-radius liquid shells are acoustically levitated in an ultrasonic field. Capillary waves are observed on the shells. At low energies (minimal acoustic amplitude, thick shell) a resonance is observed between the symmetric and antisymmetric thin film oscillation modes. At high energies (high acoustic pressure, thin shell) the shell becomes fully covered with high-amplitude waves. Temporal spectra of scattered light from the shell in this regime exhibit a power-law decay indicative of turbulence.

  3. Chemistry and processing of polymer shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Emmanuel Limjuco

    The fabrication of high-quality spherical shells, used as fuel capsules in fusion experiments, is essential to the progress of the inertial confinement fusion program. Two types of shell were produced: (1) Polystyrene shells were made in a microencapsulation method. The yield, diameter, wall thickness, vacuole content, and surface finish were determined for shells prepared with an organic phase of toluene and 1,2-dichloroethane with polystyrene concentrations varied from 5 to 13 wt% and an internal water phase that sometimes contained surfactants. (2) Polyimide shells were made by vapor-phase deposition onto depolymerizable spherical mandrels. High-aspect-ratio polyimide shells with diameters ranging from 700 to 1000 mum and wall thicknesses from 2 to 13 mum have been fabricated. Estimates of the composition, surface roughness, burst and buckle pressures, elastic modulus, tensile strength, permeability, and film stress have been obtained. These shells have been characterized in terms of morphological properties: the shell dimensions (diameter and wall thickness), sphericity, wall structure, outer and inner surface finish, and transparency. The structure of the outer surface and wall cross section varied strongly with the processing conditions (e.g., deposition temperatures, system pressure), while the inner surface was shown to be very smooth. The transparency of near-stoichiometric polyimide shells and flat films was demonstrated. Rutherford backscattering and nuclear resonance analysis techniques were used to provide the elemental composition and density, which were very near the theoretical values. Polyimide shells' minimum tensile strengths and moduli were determined from burst and buckle pressure tests. The tensile strength approached that reported for Kapton-HN film. The elastic moduli varied with processing conditions. The vapor-deposited polyimide was found to possess mechanical strength properties similar to commercially available polyimides. The room

  4. Mechanisms of morphological evolution on faceted core-shell nanowire surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Aqua, Jean-Noël; Voorhees, Peter W.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2016-06-01

    Core-shell nanowires with radial heterostructures hold great promise in photonic and electronic applications and controlling the formation of these heterostructures in the core-shell conguration remains a challenge. Recently, GaAs nanowires have been used as substrates to create AlGaAs shells. The deposition of the AlGaAs layer leads to the spontaneous formation of Al-rich stripes along certain crystallographic directions and quantum dots near the apexes of the shell. A general two-dimensional model has been developed for the motion of the faceted solid-vapor interfaces for pure materials that accounts for capillarity and deposition. With this model, the growth processes and morphological evolution of shells of nanowires around hexagonal cores (six small facets {112} in the corners of six equivalent facets {110}) are investigated in detail both analytically and numerically. It is found that deposition can yield facets that are not present on the Wulff shape. These small facets can have slowly time-varying sizes that can lead to stripe structures and quantum dots depending on the balances between diffusion and deposition. The effects of deposition rates and polarity (or asymmetry) on planes {112} on the development of the configurations of nanowires are discussed. The numerical results are compared with experimental results giving almost quantitative agreement, despite the fact that only pure materials are treated herein whereas the experiments deal with alloys.

  5. Au-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell nanowire photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Oener, S. Z.; Mann, S. A.; Sciacca, B.; Sfiligoj, C.; Hoang, J.; Garnett, E. C.

    2015-01-12

    Semiconductor nanowires are among the most promising candidates for next generation photovoltaics. This is due to their outstanding optical and electrical properties which provide large optical cross sections while simultaneously decoupling the photon absorption and charge carrier extraction length scales. These effects relax the requirements for both the minority carrier diffusion length and the amount of semiconductor needed. Metal-semiconductor core-shell nanowires have previously been predicted to show even better optical absorption than solid semiconductor nanowires and offer the additional advantage of a local metal core contact. Here, we fabricate and analyze such a geometry using a single Au-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell nanowire photovoltaic cell as a model system. Spatially resolved photocurrent maps reveal that although the minority carrier diffusion length in the Cu{sub 2}O shell is less than 1 μm, the radial contact geometry with the incorporated metal electrode still allows for photogenerated carrier collection along an entire nanowire. Current-voltage measurements yield an open-circuit voltage of 600 mV under laser illumination and a dark diode turn-on voltage of 1 V. This study suggests the metal-semiconductor core-shell nanowire concept could be extended to low-cost, large-scale photovoltaic devices, utilizing for example, metal nanowire electrode grids coated with epitaxially grown semiconductor shells.

  6. Single-crystal apatite nanowires sheathed in graphitic shells: synthesis, characterization, and application.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Namjo; Cha, Misun; Park, Yun Chang; Lee, Kyung Mee; Lee, Jae Hyup; Park, Byong Chon; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-07-23

    Vertically aligned one-dimensional hybrid structures, which are composed of apatite and graphitic structures, can be beneficial for orthopedic applications. However, they are difficult to generate using the current method. Here, we report the first synthesis of a single-crystal apatite nanowire encapsulated in graphitic shells by a one-step chemical vapor deposition. Incipient nucleation of apatite and its subsequent transformation to an oriented crystal are directed by derived gaseous phosphorine. Longitudinal growth of the oriented apatite crystal is achieved by a vapor-solid growth mechanism, whereas lateral growth is suppressed by the graphitic layers formed through arrangement of the derived aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. We show that this unusual combination of the apatite crystal and the graphitic shells can lead to an excellent osteogenic differentiation and bony fusion through a programmed smart behavior. For instance, the graphitic shells are degraded after the initial cell growth promoted by the graphitic nanostructures, and the cells continue proliferation on the bare apatite nanowires. Furthermore, a bending experiment indicates that such core-shell nanowires exhibited a superior bending stiffness compared to single-crystal apatite nanowires without graphitic shells. The results suggest a new strategy and direction for bone grafting materials with a highly controllable morphology and material conditions that can best stimulate bone cell differentiation and growth. PMID:23755838

  7. Piezoelectric constants for ZnO calculated using classical polarizable core-shell potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shuangxing; Dunn, Martin L.; Park, Harold S.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using classical atomistic simulations, i.e. molecular dynamics and molecular statics, to study the piezoelectric properties of ZnO using core-shell interatomic potentials. We accomplish this by reporting the piezoelectric constants for ZnO as calculated using two different classical interatomic core-shell potentials: that originally proposed by Binks and Grimes (1994 Solid State Commun. 89 921-4), and that proposed by Nyberg et al (1996 J. Phys. Chem. 100 9054-63). We demonstrate that the classical core-shell potentials are able to qualitatively reproduce the piezoelectric constants as compared to benchmark ab initio calculations. We further demonstrate that while the presence of the shell is required to capture the electron polarization effects that control the clamped ion part of the piezoelectric constant, the major shortcoming of the classical potentials is a significant underprediction of the clamped ion term as compared to previous ab initio results. However, the present results suggest that overall, these classical core-shell potentials are sufficiently accurate to be utilized for large scale atomistic simulations of the piezoelectric response of ZnO nanostructures.

  8. Empirical calibration of shell chemistry of Cyprideis torosa (Jones, 1850) (Crustacea: Ostracoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco-Barba, J.; Ito, E.; Carbonell, E.; Mesquita-Joanes, F.

    2012-09-01

    Cyprideis torosa is a species of ostracode that inhabits a wide range of aquatic habitats in which its low Alk/Ca requirement is met. Its fossil remains are widely used in palaeoecological studies of coastal environments and inland salt lakes. We collected C. torosa from 20 water bodies near Valencia, Spain. Temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, electrical conductivity, and the concentration of major ions and oxygen isotopes were measured at each site. Between 2 and 20 live individuals of C. torosa were collected per site, their instar stage and sex determined and their shell chemistry (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and carbon and oxygen isotope composition) analyzed. Three of these sites were sampled monthly for one year, and ostracode population structure and shell chemistry (20-40 shells) were analyzed. The water chemistry varied widely between sites. TDS (total dissolved solids) ranged from 0.5 to 71.8 g/L but chloride was always the dominant anion. There is a significant positive relationship between ostracode and water δ18O except at high TDS (>20 g/L) when shell δ18O values are lower than expected. No effect of either temperature or water Mg/Ca is observed on the Mg/Ca in the ostracode calcite in waters with Mg/Ca < 6 (molar ratio). Ostracode shell Sr/Ca is strongly and significantly related to water Sr/Ca. δ13C values in C. torosa shells are ˜2‰ lower than observed δ13CDIC. These results provide new and more accurate quantification tools to reconstruct past hydrochemistry from C. torosa shells.

  9. Process-Dependent Properties in Colloidally Synthesized “Giant” Core/Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Dennis, Allison M.; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Park, Young-Shin; Kundu, Janardan; Htoon, Han

    2012-06-07

    Due to their characteristic bright and stable photoluminescence, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) have attracted much interest as efficient light emitters for applications from single-particle tracking to solid-state lighting. Despite their numerous enabling traits, however, NQD optical properties are frustratingly sensitive to their chemical environment, exhibit fluorescence intermittency ('blinking'), and are susceptible to Auger recombination, an efficient nonradiative decay process. Previously, we showed for the first time that colloidal CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) comprising ultrathick shells (number of shell monolayers, n, > 10) grown by protracted successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) leads to remarkable photostability and significantly suppressed blinking behavior as a function of increasing shell thickness. We have also shown that these so-called 'giant' NQDs (g-NQDs) afford nearly complete suppression of non-radiative Auger recombination, revealed in our studies as long biexciton lifetimes and efficient multiexciton emission. The unique behavior of this core/shell system prompted us to assess correlations between specific physicochemical properties - beyond shell thickness - and functionality. Here, we demonstrate the ability of particle shape/faceting, crystalline phase, and core size to determine ensemble and single-particle optical properties (quantum yield/brightness, blinking, radiative lifetimes). Significantly, we show how reaction process parameters (surface-stabilizing ligands, ligand:NQD ratio, choice of 'inert' solvent, and modifications to the SILAR method itself) can be tuned to modify these function-dictating NQD physical properties, ultimately leading to an optimized synthetic approach that results in the complete suppression of blinking. We find that the resulting 'guiding principles' can be applied to other NQD compositions, allowing us to achieve non-blinking behavior in the near

  10. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of intraply hybrid composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right next to the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10% at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  11. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right below the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10 percent at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  12. Geographical variation in shell shape of the pod razor shell Ensis siliqua (Bivalvia: Pharidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufino, Marta M.; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Pereira, Fábio; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Darriba, Susana; Méndez, Josefina; Gaspar, Miguel B.

    2013-03-01

    The present study assessed the existence of variation in the shell shape of the pod razor shell ( Ensis siliqua) throughout its distributional range in the north-eastern Atlantic. Shells of E. siliqua caught at seven collecting sites (three in Portugal, three in Spain and one in Ireland) were studied by geometric morphometric methods, using both landmark- and contour-based methods. Both approaches (landmarks inside the valves and shell outline) discriminated the shells from Aveiro (centre of Portugal) and Strangford Lough (Ireland) from those caught in the nearby localities (remaining Portuguese and Spanish sites, maximum distance of 550 km by sea). Landmark analysis revealed that shells from Aveiro were more similar to shells from Ireland (~1,500 km far away). Contour analysis revealed that shells from Aveiro had a shape with a comparatively larger height-to-width ratio, whereas shells from Ireland showed a slightly more curved outline than in the remaining sites. Landmark- and contour-based methods provided coherent complementary information, confirming the usefulness of geometric morphometric analyses for discerning differences in shell shape among populations of E. siliqua. A brief review of previous applications of geometric morphometric methods to modern bivalve species is also provided.

  13. A comparison of shell theories for large-amplitude vibrations of circular cylindrical shells: Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, M.

    2003-07-01

    Large-amplitude (geometrically non-linear) vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to radial harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of the lowest resonances are investigated. The Lagrange equations of motion are obtained by an energy approach, retaining damping through Rayleigh's dissipation function. Four different non-linear thin shell theories, namely Donnell's, Sanders-Koiter, Flügge-Lur'e-Byrne and Novozhilov's theories, which neglect rotary inertia and shear deformation, are used to calculate the elastic strain energy. The formulation is also valid for orthotropic and symmetric cross-ply laminated composite shells. The large-amplitude response of perfect and imperfect, simply supported circular cylindrical shells to harmonic excitation in the spectral neighbourhood of the lowest natural frequency is computed for all these shell theories. Numerical responses obtained by using these four non-linear shell theories are also compared to results obtained by using the Donnell's non-linear shallow-shell equation of motion. A validation of calculations by comparison with experimental results is also performed. Both empty and fluid-filled shells are investigated by using a potential fluid model. The effects of radial pressure and axial load are also studied. Boundary conditions for simply supported shells are exactly satisfied. Different expansions involving from 14 to 48 generalized co-ordinates, associated with natural modes of simply supported shells, are used. The non-linear equations of motion are studied by using a code based on an arclength continuation method allowing bifurcation analysis.

  14. 1/12-Scale scoping experiments to characterize double-shell tank slurry uniformity: Test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

    1994-10-01

    Million gallon double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford are used to store transuranic, high-level, and low-level wastes. These wastes generally consist of a large volume of salt-laden solution covering a smaller volume of settled sludge primarily containing metal hydroxides. These wastes will be retrieved and processed into immobile waste forms suitable for permanent disposal. The current retrieval concept is to use submerged dual-nozzle pumps to mobilize the settled solids by creating jets of fluid that are directed at the tank solids. The pumps oscillate, creating arcs of high-velocity fluid jets that sweep the floor of the tank. After the solids are mobilized, the pumps will continue to operate at a reduced flow rate sufficient to maintain the particles in a uniform suspension. The objectives of these 1/12-scale scoping experiments are to determine how Reynolds number, Froude number, and gravitational settling parameter affect the degree of uniformity achieved during jet mixer pump operation in the full-scale double-shell tanks; develop linear models to predict the degree of uniformity achieved by jet mixer pumps operating in the full-scale double-shell tanks; apply linear models to predict the degree of uniformity that will be achieved in tank 241-AZ-101 and determine whether contents of that tank will be uniform to within {+-} 10% of the mean concentration; and obtain experimental concentration and jet velocity data to compared with the TEMPEST computational and modeling predictions to guide further code development.

  15. Color fields on the light-shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, Howard; Kestin, Greg; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-02-01

    We study the classical color radiation from very high energy collisions that produce colored particles. In the extreme high energy limit, the classical color fields are confined to a light-shell expanding at c and are associated with a non-linear σ-model on the 2D light-shell with specific symmetry breaking terms. We argue that the quantum version of this picture exhibits asymptotic freedom and may be a useful starting point for an effective light-shell theory of the structure between the jets at a very high energy collider.

  16. On the vibration of axisymmetric shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppler, G. R.; Wahl, L.

    1989-05-01

    The application of nonconventional basis functions to the linear vibration problem is explored. By employing shell coordinates the elements allow the exact geometrical modelling of shells of revolution with arbitrary meridians and the elements are able to reproduce strain free states under an arbitrary rigid body motion due to the use of these special basis functions. A generalization of the Reissner Mindlin plate theories is used because they have a broader range of applicability than the usual thin/shallow shell theories and also the trial functions need only be of class C(sup 0). The geometry treated is a hyperbola of revolution, in two configurations.

  17. Thermoluminescence analysis of irradiated oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Marcazzó, J; Della Monaca, S; Boniglia, C; Gargiulo, R; Bortolin, E

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis performed on the oyster shells powder. TL response of (60)Co gamma-rays irradiated samples were studied in the range from 80 Gy to 8 kGy doses. TL signal of irradiated shell powder was higher as compared to the unirradiated control samples, which allowed to identify the irradiated oysters. Results show that the oyster shells have good TL properties and can be useful for the identification of irradiated seafood as well as for the evaluation of the treatment dose. PMID:22341648

  18. The off-shell c-map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; de Wit, Bernard; Katmadas, Stefanos

    2016-01-01

    The off-shell version of the c-map is presented, based on a systematic off-shell reduction from four to three space-time dimensions for supergravity theories with eight supercharges. In the reduction, the R-symmetry group is enhanced to local [SU(2)× SU(2)]/{{Z}}_2=SO(4) and the c-map is effected by a parity transformation in the internal space that interchanges the two SU(2) factors. Vector and tensor supermultiplets are each others conjugate under the c-map and both can be dualized in three dimensions to (on-shell) hypermultiplets.

  19. Photon propagator in light-shell gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, Howard; Kestin, Greg; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-05-01

    We derive the photon propagator in light-shell gauge (LSG) vμAμ=0 , where vμ=(1,r ^ ) μ . This gauge is an important ingredient of the light-shell effective theory—an effective theory for describing high energy jet processes on a 2-dimensional spherical shell expanding at the speed of light around the point of the initial collision producing the jets. Since LSG is a noncovariant gauge, we cannot calculate the LSG propagator by using the standard procedure for covariant gauges. We therefore employ a new technique for computing the propagator, which we hope may be of relevance in other gauges as well.

  20. Laminated anisotropic reinforced plastic plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korolev, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Basic technical theories and engineering calculation equations for anisotropic plates and shells made of rigid reinforced plastics, mainly laminated fiberglass, are presented and discussed. Solutions are given for many problems of design of structural plates and shells, including curved sections and tanks, as well as two chapters on selection of the optimum materials, are given. Accounting for interlayer shearing and transverse separation, which are new engineering properties, are discussed. Application of the results obtained to thin three ply plates and shells wth a light elastic filler is presented and discussed.

  1. Synthesis of stiffened shells of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Computer programs for the synthesis of shells of various configurations were developed. The conditions considered are: (1) uniform shells (mainly cones) using a membrane buckling analysis, (2) completely uniform shells (cones, spheres, toroidal segments) using linear bending prebuckling analysis, and (3) revision of second design process to reduce the number of design variables to about 30 by considering piecewise uniform designs. A perturbation formula was derived and this allows exact derivatives of the general buckling load to be computed with little additional computer time.

  2. Vacuum energy of a spherical plasma shell

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Khusnutdinov, N.

    2008-04-15

    We consider the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field interacting with a spherical plasma shell together with a model for the classical motion of the shell. We calculate the heat kernel coefficients, especially that for the TM mode, and carry out the renormalization by redefining the parameters of the classical model. It turns out that this is possible and results in a model which, in the limit of the plasma shell becoming an ideal conductor, reproduces the vacuum energy found by Boyer in 1968.

  3. Gross shell structure of moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Deleplanque, M.A.; Frauendorf, S.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, A.

    2002-07-01

    Average yrast moments of inertia at high spins, where the pairing correlations are expected to be largely absent, were found to deviate from the rigid-body values. This indicates that shell effects contribute to the moment of inertia. We discuss the gross dependence of moments of inertia and shell energies on the neutron number in terms of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory. We show that the ground-state shell energies, nuclear deformations and deviations from rigid-body moments of inertia are all due to the same periodic orbits.

  4. Magnetic-Plasmonic Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Carly S.; Hofmann, Cristina; Ali, Tamer A.; Kelly, Anna T.; Morosan, Emilia; Nordlander, Peter; Whitmire, Kenton H.; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles composed of magnetic cores with continuous Au shell layers simultaneously possess both magnetic and plasmonic properties. Faceted and tetracubic nanocrystals consisting of wüstite with magnetite-rich corners and edges retain magnetic properties when coated with an Au shell layer, with the composite nanostructures showing ferrimagnetic behavior. The plasmonic properties are profoundly influenced by the high dielectric constant of the mixed-iron-oxide nanocrystalline core. A comprehensive theoretical analysis that examines the geometric plasmon tunability over a range of core permittivities enables us to identify the dielectric properties of the mixed-oxide magnetic core directly from the plasmonic behavior of the core-shell nanoparticle. PMID:19441794

  5. THE PYTHON SHELL FOR THE ORBIT CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Gorlov, Timofey V; Holmes, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    A development of a Python driver shell for the ORBIT simulation code is presented. The original ORBIT code uses the SuperCode shell to organize accelerator-related simulations. It is outdated, unsupported, and it is an obstacle to future code development. The necessity and consequences of replacing the old shell language are discussed. A set of core modules and extensions that are currently in PyORBIT are presented. They include particle containers, parsers for MAD and SAD lattice files, a Python wrapper for MPI libraries, space charge calculators, TEAPOT trackers, and a laser stripping extension module.

  6. Effective Interactions from No Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, E.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Barrett, B. R.; Navratil, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-11-11

    We construct the many-body effective Hamiltonian for pf-shell by carrying out 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}. NCSM calculations at the 2-body cluster level. We demonstrate how the effective Hamiltonian derived from realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials for the 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM space should be modified to properly account for the many-body correlations produced by truncating to the major pf-shell. We obtain two-body effective interactions for the pf-shell by using direct projection and use them to reproduce the results of large scale NCSM for other light Ca isotopes.

  7. On-shell scattering and temperature-reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGady, David A.

    Merging Einstein's relativity with quantum mechanics leads almost inexorably to relativistic quantum field theory (QFT). Although relativity and non-relativistic quantum mechanics have been on solid mathematical footing for nearly a century, many aspects of relativistic QFT remain elusive and poorly understood. In this thesis, we study two fundamentally important objects in quantum field theory: the S-matrix of a given QFT, which quantifies how quantum states interact and scatter off of each other, and the partition function, a quantity which defines observables of a given QFT. In chapters 2--6, we study generic properties of the S-matrix between on-shell massless states in four- and six-dimensions. S-matrix analysis performed with on-shell probes differ from more conventional analysis, with Feynman diagrams, in two important ways: (1) on-shell calculations are automatically gauge-invariant from start to finish, and (2) on-shell probes are inherently delocalized through all of space and time, i.e. they are "long distance'' probes. In chapter 2, we note that one-loop scattering amplitudes have ultraviolet divergences that dictate how coupling constants in QFT "run'' and evolve at finite distance. We show that on-shell techniques, which use exclusively long distance probes, are nevertheless sensitive to these important finite distance effects. In chapters 3--4, we show how the manifestly gauge-invariant on-shell S-matrix can be sensitive to what are called "gauge anomalies'' in more conventional discussions of relativistic quantum systems, i.e. in local formulations of quantum field theory. In chapter 5 we use the basic tools of the analytic S-matrix program in an exhaustive study of the simplest non-trivial scattering processes in massless theories in four-dimensions. From the most basic incarnations of locality and unitarity, we derive many classic results, such as the Weinberg--Witten theorem, the equivalence theorem, supersymmetry, and the exclusion of "higher

  8. Supramolecular core-shell nanoparticles for photoconductive device applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Chia; Chen, Jem-Kun; Shieh, Yeong-Tarng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-08-12

    We report a breakthrough discovery involving supramolecular-based strategies to construct novel core-shell heterojunction nanoparticles with hydrophilic adenine-functionalized polythiophene (PAT) as the core and hydrophobic phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the shell, which enables the conception of new functional supramolecular assemblies for constructing functional nanomaterials for applications in optoelectronic devices. The generated nanoparticles exhibit uniform spherical shape, well-controlled tuning of particle size with narrow size distributions, and excellent electrochemical stability in solution and the solid state owing to highly efficient energy transfer from PAT to PCBM. When the PAT/PCBM nanoparticles were fabricated into a photoconducting layer in an electronic device, the resulting device showed excellent electric conduction characteristics, including an electrically-tunable voltage-controlled switch, and high short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage. These observations demonstrate how the self-assembly of PAT/PCBM into specific nanostructures may help to promote efficient charge generation and transport processes, suggesting potential for a wide variety of applications as a promising candidate material for bulk heterojunction polymer devices. PMID:27353003

  9. Fluid-structure effects of cloaking a submerged spherical shell.

    PubMed

    Scandrett, C L; Vieira, A M

    2013-09-01

    Backscattering from a cloaked submerged spherical shell is analyzed in the low, mid, and high frequency regimes. Complex poles of the scattered pressure amplitudes using Cauchy residue theory are evaluated in an effort to explain dominant features of the scattered pressure and how they are affected by the introduction of a cloak. The methodology used is similar to that performed by Sammelmann and Hackman [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 114-124 (1989); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 2096-2103 (1991); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2705-2717 (1991)] in a series of papers written on scattering from an uncloaked spherical shell. In general, it is found that cloaking has the effect of diminishing the amplitude and shifting tonal backscatter responses. Extreme changes of normal and tangential fluid phase velocities at the fluid-solid interface when cloaking is employed leads to elimination of the "mid-frequency enhancement" near the coincidence frequency for even modestly effective cloaks, while reduction of the "high-frequency enhancement" resulting from the "thickness quasi-resonance" near the cut-off frequency of the symmetric (S2(B)) mode requires more effective cloaking, but can be practically eliminated by employing a cloak that creates tangential acoustic velocities in excess of the S2(B) mode phase speed near cutoff. PMID:23967924

  10. Supramolecular core–shell nanoparticles for photoconductive device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Chia; Chen, Jem-Kun; Shieh, Yeong-Tarng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-08-01

    We report a breakthrough discovery involving supramolecular-based strategies to construct novel core–shell heterojunction nanoparticles with hydrophilic adenine-functionalized polythiophene (PAT) as the core and hydrophobic phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the shell, which enables the conception of new functional supramolecular assemblies for constructing functional nanomaterials for applications in optoelectronic devices. The generated nanoparticles exhibit uniform spherical shape, well-controlled tuning of particle size with narrow size distributions, and excellent electrochemical stability in solution and the solid state owing to highly efficient energy transfer from PAT to PCBM. When the PAT/PCBM nanoparticles were fabricated into a photoconducting layer in an electronic device, the resulting device showed excellent electric conduction characteristics, including an electrically-tunable voltage-controlled switch, and high short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage. These observations demonstrate how the self-assembly of PAT/PCBM into specific nanostructures may help to promote efficient charge generation and transport processes, suggesting potential for a wide variety of applications as a promising candidate material for bulk heterojunction polymer devices.

  11. Stress Recovery and Error Estimation for 3-D Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, H. R.

    2000-01-01

    The C1-continuous stress fields obtained from finite element analyses are in general lower- order accurate than are the corresponding displacement fields. Much effort has focussed on increasing their accuracy and/or their continuity, both for improved stress prediction and especially error estimation. A previous project developed a penalized, discrete least squares variational procedure that increases the accuracy and continuity of the stress field. The variational problem is solved by a post-processing, 'finite-element-type' analysis to recover a smooth, more accurate, C1-continuous stress field given the 'raw' finite element stresses. This analysis has been named the SEA/PDLS. The recovered stress field can be used in a posteriori error estimators, such as the Zienkiewicz-Zhu error estimator or equilibrium error estimators. The procedure was well-developed for the two-dimensional (plane) case involving low-order finite elements. It has been demonstrated that, if optimal finite element stresses are used for the post-processing, the recovered stress field is globally superconvergent. Extension of this work to three dimensional solids is straightforward. Attachment: Stress recovery and error estimation for shell structure (abstract only). A 4-node, shear-deformable flat shell element developed via explicit Kirchhoff constraints (abstract only). A novel four-node quadrilateral smoothing element for stress enhancement and error estimation (abstract only).

  12. Determination of aflatoxin B1 in pistachio kernels and shells.

    PubMed

    Scholten, J M; Spanjer, M C

    1996-01-01

    A method was developed for accurate measurement of aflatoxin B1 in the edible portion of pistachio nuts. Twenty-nine samples of kernels with and without their shells were slurried with a Mega Ultra Turrax. A subsample of the homogenate was extracted with water-methanol, defatted with petroleum ether, purified with a silica solid-phase extraction column, and redissolved in methanol. After separation on an octadecyl column and postcolumn reaction with on-line electrochemically generated bromine, the aflatoxin B1 derivative was detected fluorometrically. The shells contained less than 1% of the aflatoxin B1 found in the edible kernel, and they accounted for 41.7-46.8% of the weight of the whole pistachio. These observations indicate it is possible to analyze an entire sample, up to 25 kg, as a whole and still be able to judge whether it meets the legal tolerance limit of 5 micrograms aflatoxin B1/kg edible part, as set by the Dutch Food Act. PMID:8946714

  13. Deformation and failure of curved colloidal crystal shells

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Carlotta; Sellerio, Alessandro L.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Designing and controlling particle self-assembly into robust and reliable high-performance smart materials often involves crystalline ordering in curved spaces. Examples include carbon allotropes like graphene, synthetic materials such as colloidosomes, or biological systems like lipid membranes, solid domains on vesicles, or viral capsids. Despite the relevance of these structures, the irreversible deformation and failure of curved crystals is still mostly unexplored. Here, we report simulation results of the mechanical deformation of colloidal crystalline shells that illustrate the subtle role played by geometrically necessary topological defects in controlling plastic yielding and failure. We observe plastic deformation attributable to the migration and reorientation of grain boundary scars, a collective process assisted by the intermittent proliferation of disclination pairs or abrupt structural failure induced by crack nucleating at defects. Our results provide general guiding principles to optimize the structural and mechanical stability of curved colloidal crystals. PMID:26553975

  14. Deformation and failure of curved colloidal crystal shells.

    PubMed

    Negri, Carlotta; Sellerio, Alessandro L; Zapperi, Stefano; Miguel, M Carmen

    2015-11-24

    Designing and controlling particle self-assembly into robust and reliable high-performance smart materials often involves crystalline ordering in curved spaces. Examples include carbon allotropes like graphene, synthetic materials such as colloidosomes, or biological systems like lipid membranes, solid domains on vesicles, or viral capsids. Despite the relevance of these structures, the irreversible deformation and failure of curved crystals is still mostly unexplored. Here, we report simulation results of the mechanical deformation of colloidal crystalline shells that illustrate the subtle role played by geometrically necessary topological defects in controlling plastic yielding and failure. We observe plastic deformation attributable to the migration and reorientation of grain boundary scars, a collective process assisted by the intermittent proliferation of disclination pairs or abrupt structural failure induced by crack nucleating at defects. Our results provide general guiding principles to optimize the structural and mechanical stability of curved colloidal crystals. PMID:26553975

  15. Comparison on pore development of activated carbon produced from palm shell and coconut shell.

    PubMed

    Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan; Ali, Wan Shabuddin Wan

    2004-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to compare the pore development in palm-shell and coconut-shell-based activated carbons produced under identical experimental conditions. Carbonization and activation processes were carried out at 850 degrees C using a fluidized bed reactor. Within the range of burn-off studied, at any burn-off, the micropore and mesopore volumes created in palm-shell-based activated carbon were always higher than those of coconut-shell-based activated carbon. On macropore volume, for palm-shell-based activated carbon, the volume increased with increase in burn-off up to 30% and then decreased. However, for coconut-shell-based activated carbon, the change in macropore volume with burn-off was almost negligible but the absolute macropore volume decreased with burn-off. PMID:14987722

  16. Vibration characteristics of 1/8-scale dynamic models of the space-shuttle solid-rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leadbetter, S. A.; Stephens, W.; Sewall, J. L.; Majka, J. W.; Barret, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Vibration tests and analyses of six 1/8 scale models of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters are reported. Natural vibration frequencies and mode shapes were obtained for these aluminum shell models having internal solid fuel configurations corresponding to launch, midburn (maximum dynamic pressure), and near endburn (burnout) flight conditions. Test results for longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies are compared with analytical predictions derived from thin shell theory and from finite element plate and beam theory. The lowest analytical longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies were within + or - 10 percent of experimental values. The effects of damping and asymmetric end skirts on natural vibration frequency were also considered. The analytical frequencies of an idealized full scale space shuttle solid rocket boosted structure are computed with and without internal pressure and are compared with the 1/8 scale model results.

  17. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  18. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Shell

    1999-04-20

    SUNS (Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Shell) is a 32-bit application that runs under Windows 95/98 and Windows NT. It is designed to aid in statistical analyses for a broad range of applications. The class of problems for which SUNS is suitable is generally defined by two requirements: 1. A computer code is developed or acquired that models some processes for which input is uncertain and the user is interested in statistical analysis of the outputmore » of that code. 2. The statistical analysis of interest can be accomplished using the Monte Carlo analysis. The implementation then requires that the user identify which input to the process model is to be manipulated for statistical analysis. With this information, the changes required to loosely couple SUNS with the process model can be completed. SUNS is then used to generate the required statistical sample and the user-supplied process model analyses the sample. The SUNS post processor displays statistical results from any existing file that contains sampled input and output values.« less

  19. Shape Transformations of Epithelial Shells.

    PubMed

    Misra, Mahim; Audoly, Basile; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2016-04-12

    Regulated deformations of epithelial sheets are frequently foreshadowed by patterning of their mechanical properties. The connection between patterns of cell properties and the emerging tissue deformations is studied in multiple experimental systems, but the general principles remain poorly understood. For instance, it is in general unclear what determines the direction in which the patterned sheet is going to bend and whether the resulting shape transformation will be discontinuous or smooth. Here these questions are explored computationally, using vertex models of epithelial shells assembled from prismlike cells. In response to rings and patches of apical cell contractility, model epithelia smoothly deform into invaginated or evaginated shapes similar to those observed in embryos and tissue organoids. Most of the observed effects can be captured by a simpler model with polygonal cells, modified to include the effects of the apicobasal polarity and natural curvature of epithelia. Our models can be readily extended to include the effects of multiple constraints and used to describe a wide range of morphogenetic processes. PMID:27074691

  20. Oyster Shell Proteins Originate from Multiple Organs and Their Probable Transport Pathway to the Shell Formation Front

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yabing; Du, Yishuai; Song, Xiaorui; Chen, Yuanxin; Huang, Ronglian; Que, Huayong; Fang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guofan

    2013-01-01

    Mollusk shell is one kind of potential biomaterial, but its vague mineralization mechanism hinders its further application. Mollusk shell matrix proteins are important functional components that are embedded in the shell, which play important roles in shell formation. The proteome of the oyster shell had been determined based on the oyster genome sequence by our group and gives the chance for further deep study in this area. The classical model of shell formation posits that the shell proteins are mantle-secreted. But, in this study, we further analyzed the shell proteome data in combination with organ transcriptome data and we found that the shell proteins may be produced by multiple organs though the mantle is still the most important organ for shell formation. To identify the transport pathways of these shell proteins not in classical model of shell formation, we conducted a shell damage experiment and we determined the shell-related gene set to identify the possible transport pathways from multiple organs to the shell formation front. We also found that there may exist a remodeling mechanism in the process of shell formation. Based on these results along with some published results, we proposed a new immature model, which will help us think about the mechanism of shell formation in a different way. PMID:23840499

  1. Shell deformation studies using holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmerter, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The buckling of shallow spherical shells under pressure has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental papers. Experimental data above the theoretical buckling load of Huang have given rise to speculation that shallow shell theory may not adequately predict the stability of nonsymmetric modes in higher-rise shells which are normally classified as shallow by the Reissner criterion. This article considers holographic interferometry as a noncontact, high-resolution method of measuring prebuckling deformations. Prebuckling deformations of a lambda = 9, h/b = 0.038 shell are Fourier-analyzed. Buckling is found to occur in an N = 5 mode as predicted by Huang's theory. The N = 4 mode was unusually stable, suggesting that even at this low value of h/b, stabilizing effects may be at work.

  2. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-06-15

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  3. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  4. On the Calculation of Shallow Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambartsumyan, S. A.

    1956-01-01

    This paper considers a sufficiently thin shallow shell of nonzero Gaussian curvature. It also presents a system of symmetrically constructed differential equations, constructed by the mixed method through the stress function and the displpacement function.

  5. SU(3) in shell-model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Millener, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    The essential steps in the formalism for performing multi-shell calculations in an SU(3) basis are outlined and examples of applications in which the SU(3) classification aids in the physical interpretation of structure calculation are given.

  6. Shell Eggs from Farm to Table

    MedlinePlus

    ... and stored and transported under refrigeration and ambient temperature of no greater than 45 °F. USDA also ... transported under refrigeration at an ambient (surrounding) air temperature not to exceed 45 °F; All packed shell ...

  7. The stability of a collisionless cosmological shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The P3 M technique is used here to simulate the evolution of collisionless shells in an Omega = 1 universe. Starting from the spherical similarity solution, a bootstrap technique is used to follow the evolution over very large expansion factors. It is found that the overall structure follows the similarity solution for a long period during which bound clumps grow within the shell. At late times the growth of structure depends on induced velocity perturbations in material outside the shell. If such perturbations are suppressed, structure on the shell becomes self-similar. When induced motions in the background medium are included, the evolution at late times is dominated by large-scale modes as predicted by linear stability analysis. The stable final state appears to consist of one or two massive clumps on the edge of a spherical void. The possible application of these results to the origin of galaxies and large-scale structure is discussed.

  8. Damping control of 'smart' piezoelectric shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.

    Advanced 'smart' structures with self-sensation and control capabilities have attracted much attention in recent years. 'Smart' piezoelectric structures (conventional structures integrated with piezoelectric sensor and actuator elements) possessing self-monitoring and adaptive static and/or dynamic characteristics are very promising in many applications. This paper presents a study on 'smart' piezoelectric shell structures. A generic piezoelastic vibration theory for a thin piezoelectric shell continuum made of a hexagonal piezoelectric material is first derived. Piezoelastic system equation and electrostatic charge equation are formulated using Hamilton's principle and Kirchhoff-Love thin shell assumptions. Dynamic adaptivity, damping control, of a simply supported cylindrical shell structure is demonstrated in a case study. It shows that the system damping increases with the increase of feedback voltage for odd modes. The control scheme is ineffective for all even modes because of the symmetrical boundary conditions.

  9. Shell nuclear explosions in degenerate dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O. A.; Tutukov, A. V.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    1989-08-01

    Numerical gas dynamics simulations are used to study shell nuclear explosions of degenerate carbon-oxygen dwarfs with masses of 1.17, 1.36, and 1.42 solar masses. It is assumed that the calorific capacity of the burning shell matter is between 5 X 10 to the 17th and 5 X 10 to the 18th erg/g. It is shown that, at a low calorific capacity, a remnant may form if the mass of the shell is less than 90 percent of the mass of the degenerate dwarf. In the case of high calorific capacity, a remnant may form only if the mass of the shell is less than half of the dwarf's mass.

  10. Experimental study of upper sd shell nuclei and evolution of sd-fp shell gap

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, M. Saha

    2012-06-27

    The intruder orbitals from the fp shell play important role in the structure of nuclei around the line of stability in the upper sd shell. Experimentally we have studied {sup 35}Cl, {sup 30}P, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 37}Ar and {sup 34}Cl in this mass region using the INGA setup. Large basis cross-shell shell model calculations have indicated the need for change of the sd-fp energy gap for reliable reproduction of negative parity and high spin positive parity states. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. Theoretical interpretation of these states has been discussed.

  11. Shell-model study for neutron-rich sd-shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Kazunari; Sun Yang; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Munetake

    2011-01-15

    The microscopic structure of neutron-rich sd-shell nuclei is investigated by using the spherical-shell model in the sd-pf valence space with the extended pairing plus quadrupole-quadrupole forces accompanied by the monopole interaction (EPQQM). The calculation reproduces systematically the known energy levels for even-even and odd-mass nuclei including the recent data for {sup 43}S, {sup 46}S, and {sup 47}Ar. In particular, the erosion of the N=28 shell closure in {sup 42}Si can be explained. Our EPQQM results are compared with other shell-model calculations with the SDPF-NR and SDPF-U effective interactions.

  12. A circumferential crack in a cylindrical shell under tension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan-Fama, M. E.; Sanders, J. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A closed cylindrical shell under uniform internal pressure has a slit around a portion of its circumference. Linear shallow shell theory predicts inverse square-root-type singularities in certain of the stresses at the crack tips. This paper reports the computed strength of these singularities for different values of a dimensionless parameter based on crack length, shell radius and shell thickness.

  13. Static structural analysis of shell-type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, E. H.; Cappelli, A. P.; Kovalevsky, L.; Rish, F. L.; Verrette, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Shell analysis manual provides methods for determining static deflections and internal load and stress distributions in shells under various loading conditions, and methods of analyzing static instability of shell structures. Also included are methods for determining the lightest shell wall for various constructions.

  14. Double shell tank waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mulkey, C.H.; Jones, J.M.

    1994-12-15

    Waste analysis plan for the double shell tanks. SD-WM-EV-053 is Superseding SD-WM-EV-057.This document provides the plan for obtaining information needed for the safe waste handling and storage of waste in the Double Shell Tank Systems. In Particular it addresses analysis necessary to manage waste according to Washington Administrative Code 173-303 and Title 40, parts 264 and 265 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

  15. Singular Shell Embedded into a Cosmological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøn, Øyvind; Rippis, Peter D.

    2003-12-01

    We generalize Israel's formalism to cover singular shells embedded in a non-vacuum Universe. That is, we deduce the relativistic equation of motion for a thin shell embedded in a Schwarzschild/Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime. Also, we review the embedding of a Schwarzschild mass into a cosmological model using ``curvature'' coordinates and give solutions with (Sch/FLRW) and without the embedded mass (FLRW).

  16. Structural durability of stiffened composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Rivers, James M.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The durability of a stiffened composite cylindrical shell panel is investigated under several loading conditions. An integrated computer code is utilized for the simulation of load induced structural degradation. Damage initiation, growth, and accumulation up to the stage of propagation to fracture are included in the computational simulation. Results indicate significant differences in the degradation paths for different loading cases. The effects of combined loading on structural durability and ultimate structural strength of a stiffened shell are assessed.

  17. Trapping of intense light in hollow shell

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Shixia; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Weng, Suming; Wang, Jingwei; Xu, Han; Zhuo, Hongbin; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-09-15

    A small hollow shell for trapping laser light is proposed. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that under appropriate laser and plasma conditions a part of the radiation fields of an intense short laser pulse can enter the cavity of a small shell through an over-critical density plasma in an adjacent guide channel and become trapped. The trapped light evolves into a circulating radial wave pattern until its energy is dissipated.

  18. Experiments on shells under base excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicano, Francesco; Barbieri, Marco; Zippo, Antonio; Strozzi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is a deep experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of circular cylindrical shells. The specific problem regards the response of circular cylindrical shells subjected to base excitation. The shells are mounted on a shaking table that furnishes a vertical vibration parallel to the cylinder axis; a heavy rigid disk is mounted on the top of the shells. The base vibration induces a rigid body motion, which mainly causes huge inertia forces exerted by the top disk to the shell. In-plane stresses due to the aforementioned inertias give rise to impressively large vibration on the shell. An extremely violent dynamic phenomenon suddenly appears as the excitation frequency varies up and down close to the linear resonant frequency of the first axisymmetric mode. The dynamics are deeply investigated by varying excitation level and frequency. Moreover, in order to generalise the investigation, two different geometries are analysed. The paper furnishes a complete dynamic scenario by means of: (i) amplitude frequency diagrams, (ii) bifurcation diagrams, (iii) time histories and spectra, (iv) phase portraits and Poincaré maps. It is to be stressed that all the results presented here are experimental.

  19. Buckling of conical shell with local imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.; Dexter, C. B.

    1974-01-01

    Small geometric imperfections in thin-walled shell structures can cause large reductions in buckling strength. Most imperfections found in structures are neither axisymmetric nor have the shape of buckling modes but rather occur locally. This report presents the results of a study of the effect of local imperfections on the critical buckling load of a specific axially compressed thin-walled conical shell. The buckling calculations were performed by using a two-dimensional shell analysis program referred to as the STAGS (Structural Analysis of General Shells) computer code, which has no axisymmetry restrictions. Results show that the buckling load found from a bifurcation buckling analysis is highly dependent on the circumferential arc length of the imperfection type studied. As the circumferential arc length of the imperfection is increased, a reduction of up to 50 percent of the critical load of the perfect shell can occur. The buckling load of the cone with an axisymmetric imperfections is nearly equal to the buckling load of imperfections which extended 60 deg or more around the circumference, but would give a highly conservative estimate of the buckling load of a shell with an imperfection of a more local nature.

  20. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  1. New developments of the nuclear shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, Alfredo

    2002-04-01

    More than fifty years ago, the independent particle model of the nucleus was proposed by M. Goeppert-Mayer and H. Jensen. The label "shell model" has since changed meaning and nowadays it applies mainly to the description of the nucleus that results of the mixing of many Slater determinants by an effective "in medium" interaction, usually limited to one and two-body terms. The advent of efficient new algorithms to solve the secular problem, together with the increase in speed and storage capacity of modern computers, has brought into the reach of large scale shell model calculations entire regions of nuclei and of nuclear phenomena traditionally considered to be out of the shell model realm. This enormous extension of its field of practical applications has occurred simultaneously with a regain of experimental interest in the nuclear spectroscopy, in particular in very neutron rich and N=Z nuclei. The shell model work in large model spaces demands a very complete understanding of the effective nuclear interaction, a basic goal of the nuclear theory. Besides, the huge increase of dimensionality that occurs when many valence orbits and valence particles are involved, is a formidable challenge for both the direct diagonalization shell model codes and for the many different approximations, based most often in physically guided truncations of the full shell model basis. In this talk I aim to transmit the effervescence of the field by highlighting the most important recent advances and applications.

  2. Batdorf parameter for the spherical shells tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kazuhei; Nagahama, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    The buckling phenomena of the subducting lithosphere due to the sphericity of the earth has been studied as spherical shell tectonics which happen the megaquake along the boundary of subducting lithosphere. The earthquake scale is decided by slab length or arc length. However, a relationship between slab length and the normalized hydrostatic pressure along the bottom circumferential edge of a hemispherical shell has not been clear yet. So, by using the data set of the geometrical parameters for subducting lithosphere andBuckingham's Pi-theorem, we found out a new linear relationship between Batdorf parameter Z = L2(l - v2)0.5/(Rh) for the measurement of the slab length L and the normalized hydrostatic pressure along the bottom circumferential edge of a hemispherical shell Q = qRL2/(π2D), where D = Eh3/[12(1 - v2)] with E = modulus of elasticity of lithosphere, R is Earth radius, q is the hydrostatic pressure along the bottom circumferential edge of a hemispherical shell, and h is the thickness of subducting lithosphere. In the engineering sciences, a similar relationship between Batdorf parameter for the panel length and normalized hydrostatic pressure was proposed for the buckling of partially liquid-filled circular cylindrical shells under hydrostatic pressure. Moreover, by previous researches, the slab length is approximately proportional to the arc length or the lithosphere thickness related to lithosphere age. Therefore, the Batdorf parameter for subducting lithosphere is an important parameter for the spherical shells tectonics.

  3. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  4. Non-planar on-shell diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Galloni, Daniele; Penante, Brenda; Wen, Congkao

    2015-06-01

    We initiate a systematic study of non-planar on-shell diagrams in SYM and develop powerful technology for doing so. We introduce canonical variables generalizing face variables, which make the d log form of the on-shell form explicit. We make significant progress towards a general classification of arbitrary on-shell diagrams by means of two classes of combinatorial objects: generalized matching and matroid polytopes. We propose a boundary measurement that connects general on-shell diagrams to the Grassmannian. Our proposal exhibits two important and non-trivial properties: positivity in the planar case and it matches the combinatorial description of the diagrams in terms of generalized matroid polytopes. Interestingly, non-planar diagrams exhibit novel phenomena, such as the emergence of constraints on Plücker coordinates beyond Plücker relations when deleting edges, which are neatly captured by the generalized matching and matroid polytopes. This behavior is tied to the existence of a new type of poles in the on-shell form at which combinations of Plücker coordinates vanish. Finally, we introduce a prescription, applicable beyond the MHV case, for writing the on-shell form as a function of minors directly from the graph.

  5. Creation of optically-thin solid-density plasmas using LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, T.; Vinko, S. M.; Ciricosta, O.; Hollebon, P.; Wark, J. S.; Burian, T.; Chalupsky, J.; Vozda, V.; Minitti, M.; Dakovski, G.; Hall, F.; Spindloe, C.; Zastrau, U.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of X-ray free-electron-lasers such as LCLS provides the capability to truly isochorically heat solid-density matter on femtosecond time-scales. K-shell emission from such plasmas has provided new information on ionization potential depression and collisional ionisation rates. However, in previous work the targets were 1- μm thick, resulting in high-opacity on the K-shell transitions. We report here results of a detailed study of K-shell emission from exactly solid-density Mg plasmas with thicknesses ranging from 500 down to 25 nm - just over 100 atoms across. A curve-of-growth analysis exhibits text-book behavior, and confirms peak optical depths for the thinnest targets well below unity, in excellent agreement with simulations. The rich data-set provides information on line-widths, collisional dynamics, and radiation transfer in solid density plasmas.

  6. "Auctoritas" psychiatric expert system shell.

    PubMed

    Kovács, M; Juranovics, J

    1995-01-01

    We present a short description of a complex psychiatric computer expert system, including functions that help the physicians and the hospital staff in the administrative, diagnostic, therapeutic, statistical, and scientific work. There are separate data-storing, health insurance-supporting, or simple advisory programs, but we can not avail a system--in our country--that provides us with all these functions together. Hence the aim of our program is to produce a universal computer system that makes the patients' long distance follow-up possible. Our diagnostic expert system shell, which is appropriate for using the symptoms and criteria scheme of the internationally accepted diagnostic systems such as DSM and ICD, helps to archive homogeneous, up-to-date psychiatric nosology; this is essential for the correct diagnostic, statistical, and scientific work. Let us introduce our expert system. It consists of four parts: administration, diagnostic decision support system, activities concerning treatment, and statistics. The part called "Administration" contains all data about actual and emitted in-patients and out-patients, including their particulars and data necessary for health insurance (duration of treatment, diagnosis); here we find and edit medical documents. The most important part of the "Auctoritas" system is the "Diagnostic decision support system." In practice, expert systems use decision trees with yes-no logic, fuzzy logic, and pattern matching on the basis of the method of deduction; and backward chaining or forward chaining on the basis of the direction of deduction. Our system uses the methods of fuzzy logic and backward chaining. In other medical disciplines, good results are achieved by applying the pattern matching method; to make validity and verification researches, however, these systems are inappropriate. The diagnoses relying on the up-to-date psychiatric diagnostic systems--DSM-IV and ICD-X--are based on classical logic and can be correctly

  7. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  8. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  9. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  10. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  11. 50 CFR 648.50 - Shell-height standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Shell-height standard. 648.50 Section 648... Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.50 Shell-height standard. (a) Minimum shell height. The minimum shell height for in-shell scallops that may be landed, or possessed at or after landing, is 3.5 inches (8.9...

  12. SolidShperal

    2013-12-22

    SolidSpheral is an extension of the Spheral open source meshless hydrodynamics method. SolidSpheral adds the capability to model solid materials using analytic equations of state, and a simple damage model to allow for the modeled materials to undergo dynamic damage evolution. SolidSpheral is a distributed parallel code employing MPI for the parallel framework.

  13. Efficient and bright colloidal quantum dot light-emitting diodes via controlling the shell thickness of quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huaibin; Lin, Qinli; Wang, Hongzhe; Qian, Lei; Yang, Yixing; Titov, Alexandre; Hyvonen, Jake; Zheng, Ying; Li, Lin Song

    2013-11-27

    In this paper, we use a simple device architecture based on solution-processed ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) as the electron injection/transport layer and bilayer structure of poly(ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/poly[9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-[4-(3-methylpropyl)]-diphenylamine] (TFB) as the hole injection/transport layer to assess the effect of shell thickness on the properties of quantum-dot-based light emitting diodes (QD-LEDs), comprising CdSe/CdS/ZnS core-shell QDs as the emitting layer. QDs with varying shell thickness were assessed to determine the best option of shell thickness, and the best improvement in device performance was observed when the shell thickness was 2.1 nm. Thereafter, different emissions of QDs, but with optimized same shell thickness (∼2.1 nm), were selected as emitters to be fabricated into same structured QD-LEDs. Highly bright orange-red and green QD-LEDs with peak luminances up to ∼30 000 and ∼52 000 cd m(-2), and power efficiencies of 16 and 19.7 lm W(-1), respectively, were demonstrated successfully. These results may demonstrate a striking basic prototype for the commercialization of QD-based displays and solid-state lightings. PMID:24191742

  14. Fabrication of poly(glycerol sebacate) fibrous membranes by coaxial electrospinning: Influence of shell and core solutions.

    PubMed

    You, Zhi-Rong; Hu, Ming-Hsien; Tuan-Mu, Ho-Yi; Hu, Jin-Jia

    2016-10-01

    Although poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) has enjoyed great success in soft tissue engineering, it remains challenging to fabricate PGS fibers. In this study, coaxial electrospinning, in which polylactide (PLA) was used to confine and draw PGS prepolymer, was used to fabricate PGS fibrous membranes. Specifically, effects of adding poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), which was removed prior to curing, in the shell were investigated. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to confirm core-shell structure and morphology of fibers, respectively. Both the removal of PEO or PLA in the shell and the efficacy of PGS curing were verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical properties of the membranes with different shell and core contents were examined. We found that the addition of PEO to the shell reduced Young׳s modulus of the resulting cured membrane and increased its elongation at break significantly, the latter indicating better PGS curing. Moreover, with the addition of PEO, increasing PGS prepolymer concentration further increased the elongation at break and appeared to enhance the structural integrity of fibers; PGS fibrous membranes (with no PLA shell) were thus successfully fabricated after the removal of PLA. The Young׳s modulus of the PGS fibrous membrane was ~0.47MPa, which is similar to that of PGS solid sheets and some soft tissues. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the electrospun membranes was validated by Alamar blue and LDH assays. PMID:27429071

  15. Synthesis of Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) core/shell nanocomposite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Sheng; Xie Jin; Sun Shouheng

    2008-07-15

    Monodispersed cobalt nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable size (8-14 nm) have been synthesized using thermal decomposition of dicobaltoctacarbonyl in organic solvent. The as-synthesized high magnetic moment (125 emu/g) Co NPs are dispersible in various organic solvents, and can be easily transferred into aqueous phase by surface modification using phospholipids. However, the modified hydrophilic Co NPs are not stable as they are quickly oxidized, agglomerated in buffer. Co NPs are stabilized by coating the MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) ferrite shell. Core/shell structured bimagnetic Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites are prepared with tunable shell thickness (1-5 nm). The Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites retain the high magnetic moment density from the Co core, while gaining chemical and magnetic stability from the ferrite shell. Compared to Co NPs, the nanocomposites show much enhanced stability in buffer solution at elevated temperatures, making them promising for biomedical applications. - Graphical abstract: The 10 nm/3 nm Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) bimagnetic core/shell nanocomposites are synthesized from the surface coating of ferrite shell over 10 nm Co nanoparticle seeds. The nanocomposites show much enhanced chemical and magnetic stability in solid state, organic solution and aqueous phase, and are promising for biomedical applications.

  16. Random three-dimensional jammed packings of elastic shells acting as force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jissy; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2016-06-01

    In a jammed solid of granular particles, the applied stress is in-homogeneously distributed within the packing. A full experimental characterization requires measurement of all the interparticle forces, but so far such measurements are limited to a few systems in two and even fewer in three dimensions. Particles with the topology of (elastic) shells are good local force sensors as relatively large deformations of the shells result from relatively small forces. We recently introduced such fluorescent shells as a model granular system in which force distributions can be determined in three dimensions using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. An interesting aspect about these shells that differentiates them from other soft deformable particles is their buckling behavior at higher compression. This leads to deformations that do not conserve the inner volume of the particle. Here we use this system to accurately measure the contact forces in a three-dimensional packing of shells subjected to a static anisotropic compression and to shear. At small deformations forces are linear, however, for a buckled contact, the restoring force is related to the amount of deformation by a square root law, as follows from the theory of elasticity of shells. Near the unjamming-jamming transition (point J ), we found the probability distribution of the interparticle forces P (f ) to decay nearly exponentially at large forces, with little evidence of long-range force chains in the packings. As the packing density is increased, the tail of the distribution was found to crossover to a Gaussian, in line with other experimental and simulation studies. Under a small shear strain, up to 0.216, applied at an extremely low shear rate, we observed a shear-induced anisotropy in both the pair correlation function and contact force network; however, no appreciable change was seen in the number of contacts per particle.

  17. Random three-dimensional jammed packings of elastic shells acting as force sensors.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jissy; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2016-06-01

    In a jammed solid of granular particles, the applied stress is in-homogeneously distributed within the packing. A full experimental characterization requires measurement of all the interparticle forces, but so far such measurements are limited to a few systems in two and even fewer in three dimensions. Particles with the topology of (elastic) shells are good local force sensors as relatively large deformations of the shells result from relatively small forces. We recently introduced such fluorescent shells as a model granular system in which force distributions can be determined in three dimensions using confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. An interesting aspect about these shells that differentiates them from other soft deformable particles is their buckling behavior at higher compression. This leads to deformations that do not conserve the inner volume of the particle. Here we use this system to accurately measure the contact forces in a three-dimensional packing of shells subjected to a static anisotropic compression and to shear. At small deformations forces are linear, however, for a buckled contact, the restoring force is related to the amount of deformation by a square root law, as follows from the theory of elasticity of shells. Near the unjamming-jamming transition (point J), we found the probability distribution of the interparticle forces P(f) to decay nearly exponentially at large forces, with little evidence of long-range force chains in the packings. As the packing density is increased, the tail of the distribution was found to crossover to a Gaussian, in line with other experimental and simulation studies. Under a small shear strain, up to 0.216, applied at an extremely low shear rate, we observed a shear-induced anisotropy in both the pair correlation function and contact force network; however, no appreciable change was seen in the number of contacts per particle. PMID:27415341

  18. Sound Transmission through Two Concentric Cylindrical Sandwich Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper solves the problem of sound transmission through a system of two infinite concentric cylindrical sandwich shells. The shells are surrounded by external and internal fluid media and there is fluid (air) in the annular space between them. An oblique plane sound wave is incident upon the surface of the outer shell. A uniform flow is moving with a constant velocity in the external fluid medium. Classical thin shell theory is applied to the inner shell and first-order shear deformation theory is applied to the outer shell. A closed form for transmission loss is derived based on modal analysis. Investigations have been made for the impedance of both shells and the transmission loss through the shells from the exterior into the interior. Results are compared for double sandwich shells and single sandwich shells. This study shows that: (1) the impedance of the inner shell is much smaller than that of the outer shell so that the transmission loss is almost the same in both the annular space and the interior cavity of the shells; (2) the two concentric sandwich shells can produce an appreciable increase of transmission loss over single sandwich shells especially in the high frequency range; and (3) design guidelines may be derived with respect to the noise reduction requirement and the pressure in the annular space at a mid-frequency range.

  19. Solids fluidizer-injector

    DOEpatents

    Bulicz, Tytus R.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and process for fluidizing solid particles by causing rotary motion of the solid particles in a fluidizing chamber by a plurality of rotating projections extending from a rotatable cylinder end wall interacting with a plurality of fixed projections extending from an opposite fixed end wall and passing the solid particles through a radial feed orifice open to the solids fluidizing chamber on one side and a solid particle utilization device on the other side. The apparatus and process are particularly suited for obtaining intermittent feeding with continual solids supply to the fluidizing chamber. The apparatus and process are suitable for injecting solid particles, such as coal, to an internal combustion engine.

  20. Nanostructure and composition of bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Soldati, A. L.; Wirth, R.; Huth, J.; Wehrmeister, U.; Hofmeister, W.

    2009-04-01

    Shells and pearls of unionid mussels (Hyriopsis cumingii, Margaritifera margaritifera, Diplodon chilensis patagonicus) were studied by high resolution microbeam methods and -computer tomography to gather insight into the nanostructure and chemical composition of nacre and prism layers. Natural and cultured pearls are formed by many mollusc species and their generation is very similar to that of shells resulting in identical prismatic and nacreous structures of shells and pearls. Basic difference is, however that pearl culturing methods induce biomineralisation of CaCO3 around a crystalline bead which results in a reverse structural organisation compared to bivalve shells. Bivalve shell growth starts from a thick organic matrix (the periostracum; Eyster and Morse, 1984) which is followed towards the inside by two variously thick layers consisting of prismatic CaCO3 aggregations and layers of CaCO3 platelets, respectively. Platelets and prisms are individually covered by a chitinous organic matrix which lends structural support and is thought to exert control over the mineralization process. The minerals within the organic sheaths are highly-aligned poly-twinned crystals with a slightly distorted lattice due to inclusions of organic molecules (Pokroy et al., 2006). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Raman Microscopy analyses of the shells and pearls show that both structures, prisms and platelets, consist of nanometre-sized organic membrane-coated granules of CaCO3 (Jacob et al., 2008). In the vicinity of the periostracum, the granules consist of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), but the crystallinity increases with increasing distance from the periostracum. The transition from disordered (amorphous) to crystalline CaCO3 is gradual within a few micrometers and coincides with a decrease in porosity. Concentrations of sulphur and phosphorus are higher in ACC than in aragonite indicating a

  1. Polypyrrole hollow fiber for solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Deng, Jianjun; Xie, Zhuoying; Zhao, Yuanjin; Feng, Zhangqi; Kang, Xuejun; Gu, Zhongze

    2012-04-21

    We have developed a solid-phase extraction method based on conductive polypyrrole (PPy) hollow fibers which were fabricated by electrospinning and in situ polymerization. The electrospun poly (e-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers were employed as templates for the in situ surface polymerization of PPy under mechanical stirring or ultrasonication to obtain burr-shaped or smooth fiber shells, respectively. Hollow PPy fibers, achieved by removing the PCL templates, were the ideal sorbents for solid phase extraction of polar compounds due to their inherent multi-functionalities. By using the hollow PPy fibers, two important neuroendocrine markers of behavioural disorders, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid and homovanillic acid, were successfully extracted. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute recoveries of the above two neuroendocrine markers were 90.7% and 92.4%, respectively, in human plasma. Due to its simplicity, selectivity and sensitivity, the method may be applied to quantitatively analyse the concentrations of polar species in complex matrix samples. PMID:22398754

  2. An integrated process to produce ethanol, vanillin, and xylooligosaccharides from Camellia oleifera shell.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Faxian; Xu, Yong; Ouyang, Jia; Yu, Shiyuan

    2013-12-15

    This study aims to present an integrated process that can be used to produce ethanol, vanillin, and xylooligosaccharides from Camellia oleifera shell. After the shell was pretreated with NaOH, two fractions were obtained: solid and liquid fractions. The solid fraction was hydrolyzed with cellulase and then fermented with Pichia stipitis to produce ethanol. The liquid fraction was subjected to oxidation to prepare vanillin or hydrolysis with xylanase to prepare xylooligosaccharides. The optimal pretreatment conditions of an orthogonal test were as follows: 12% NaOH concentration; 120°C; 150 min; and liquid-solid ratio of 10.0. After pretreatment, the solid fraction containing cellulose and a small part of xylan at 10% substance concentration via enzymatic hydrolysis and glucose-xylose cofermentation could obtain 17.35 g/L of ethanol, 80.90% of the theoretical yield. The liquid fraction was initially hydrolyzed with xylanase to produce 1758.63 mg/L of xylooligosaccharides (DP2-6) and then oxidized to produce 322.07 mg/L of vanillin. PMID:24188806

  3. Thin Shell Manufacturing for large Wavefront correctors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Eric; Poutriquet, Florence

    2011-09-01

    One of the major key elements in large adaptive optical systems is the thin shell, used as a deformable mirror. Although the optical prescriptions are relaxed with respect to a passive mirror, especially in the low spatial frequency domain, other requirements, such as the cosmetic defects (scratch & dig), the tight control of the thickness uniformity and of course the fragility of the piece having an aspect ratio up to 1000:1, generate new problems during the manufacturing, testing and handling of such optics. Moreover, the optical surface has to be tested in two different ways: a classical optical test bench allows us to create a surface map of the mirror. This map is then computed to determine the force required by the actuators to flatten the mirror and this becomes also a specification for polishing and implies a good interaction with the voice coil manufacturer. More than twenty years ago Sagem - Reosc developed the first meter class thin shell for early adaptive optics experiments. Since then, large thin shell have been used as the optical part in composite mirrors and more recently the aspheric shell for the VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror has been polished and prototypes, up to scale 1, of the E-ELT M4 Adaptive Mirror have been delivered to ESO in 2010. This paper will present some recent results in the manufacturing and testing technologies of large this shell, especially focusing on the development of the 1,1 meter convex aspherical shell for the VLT M2 mirror and on the results obtained on the largest thin shell produced so far (2,5 meter in diameter) developed as a demonstrator for the future E-ELT M4.

  4. Solids mass flow determination

    DOEpatents

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  5. Sub-2-μm seeded growth mesoporous thin shell particles for high-performance liquid chromatography: Synthesis, functionalisation and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Langsi, Victor K; Ashu-Arrah, Benjamin A; Glennon, Jeremy D

    2015-07-10

    Nanometer control over the porous shell thickness of sub-2-μm-shell particles is investigated. Three seeded growth mesoporous thin shell particles for HPLC were prepared, with 0.05μm (or 50nm) porous shell layers: particle sizes 1.5μm (solid core diameters 1.4μm), 1.7μm (solid core diameter 1.6μm), 1.9μm (solid core diameter 1.8μm) and compared with a fourth 1.7μm particle (solid core diameter 1.4μm) surrounded by 0.15μm (or 150nm) porous shell thickness. The thin shell particles were functionalised using a mono-functional octadecyldimethylchlorosilane ligand (C20H43SiCl) under optimised reflux conditions and packed in-house in narrow bore columns (2.1 I.D.×50mm) denoted as TS1.5-50-C18, TS1.7-50-C18, and TS1.9-50-C18 respectively. The synthesised thin shell particles and bonded materials were comprehensively characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, BET analysis, elemental analysis (CHN), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Experimental data from inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC) was used to measure external, internal and total column porosities. Five probe analytes (uracil, naphthalene, acetophenone, benzene and toluene) were chosen for the chromatographic performance analysis of these columns. Column evaluation and measurements of height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) data were performed on naphthalene using 55% acetonitile in water. The retention coefficients for the thin shell particles (TS1.9-50-C18, TS1.7-50-C18, TS1.5-50-C18) were in the range 1.26-1.35 and 5.6 for the core-shell particle (EiS1.7-150-C18). The minimum reduced plate heights range from 3.89 to 4.26 for the thin shell particles and 2.03 for the core-shell particle. PMID:26028512

  6. Simplified dispersion curves for circular cylindrical shells using shallow shell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sonti, Venkata R.

    2009-04-01

    An alternative derivation of the dispersion relation for the transverse vibration of a circular cylindrical shell is presented. The use of the shallow shell theory model leads to a simpler derivation of the same result. Further, the applicability of the dispersion relation is extended to the axisymmetric mode and the high frequency beam mode.

  7. Comparative study of the shell development of hard- and soft-shelled turtles

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Mari; Ueno, Shintaro; Kamezaki, Naoki; Sato, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    The turtle shell provides a fascinating model for the investigation of the evolutionary modifications of developmental mechanisms. Different conclusions have been put forth for its development, and it is suggested that one of the causes of the disagreement could be the differences in the species of the turtles used – the differences between hard-shelled turtles and soft-shelled turtles. To elucidate the cause of the difference, we compared the turtle shell development in the two groups of turtle. In the dorsal shell development, these two turtle groups shared the gene expression profile that is required for formation, and shared similar spatial organization of the anatomical elements during development. Thus, both turtles formed the dorsal shell through a folding of the lateral body wall, and the Wnt signaling pathway appears to have been involved in the development. The ventral portion of the shell, on the other hand, contains massive dermal bones. Although expression of HNK-1 epitope has suggested that the trunk neural crest contributed to the dermal bones in the hard-shelled turtles, it was not expressed in the initial anlage of the skeletons in either of the types of turtle. Hence, no evidence was found that would support a neural crest origin. PMID:24754673

  8. Shell-in-Shell TiO2 hollow microspheres and optimized application in light-trapping perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongxia; Ruan, Peng; Bao, Zhongqiu; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Xingfu

    2015-02-01

    The shell-in-shell structured TiO2 hollow microspheres with enhanced light scattering ability were synthesized via a facile one step hydrothermal process. The diameter of the microsphere is about 1.5 μm, the core of the unique shell-in-shell structure is composed of TiO2 nanoparticles with a diameter of about 15 nm, while the shell is constructed with ∼50 nm TiO2 nanocubes. The hollow space between the outer shell and the inner shell is about 230 nm. The formation mechanism of the unique shell-in-shell structure is interpreted. The design and the optimized application of shell-in-shell structured TiO2 hollow microspheres in the light-trapping perovskite solar cells are also investigated. Owing to the light scattering properties of the shell-in-shell structure of the hollow microsphere, the optimized photoelectrode exhibits an enhanced photoelectric conversion efficiency of 4.29% using perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 as the sensitizer. The shell-in-shell hollow TiO2 microsphere shows a 21.2% increase in conversion efficiency when compared with P25 nanoparticels photoanode. The conversion efficiency enhancement is mainly attributed to the increase of short-current density induced by the light scattering effect.

  9. Size-selective yolk-shell nanoreactors with nanometer-thin porous polymer shells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ying; Shmakov, Sergey N; Register, Paul; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2015-09-01

    Yolk-shell nanoreactors with metal nanoparticle core and ultrathin porous polymer shells are effective catalysts for heterogeneous reactions. Polymer shells provide size-selectivity and improved reusability of catalyst. Nanocapsules with single-nanometer porous shells are prepared by vesicle-templated directed assembly. Metal nanoparticles are formed either by selective initiation in pre-fabricated nanocapsules or simultaneously with the creation of a crosslinked polymer shell. In this study, we investigated the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde catalyzed by gold nanoparticles and hydrogenation of cyclohexene catalyzed by platinum nanoparticles. Comparison of newly created nanoreactors with commercially available nanoparticles revealed superior reusability and size selectivity in nanoreactors while showing no negative effect on reaction kinetics. PMID:26223572

  10. Dynamics of dusty radiation-pressure-driven shells and clouds: fast outflows from galaxies, star clusters, massive stars, and AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-05-01

    It is typically assumed that radiation-pressure-driven winds are accelerated to an asymptotic velocity of v∞ ≃ vesc, where vesc is the escape velocity from the central source. We note that this is not the case for dusty shells and clouds. Instead, if the shell or cloud is initially optically thick to the UV emission from the source of luminosity L, then there is a significant boost in v∞ that reflects the integral of the momentum absorbed as it is accelerated. For shells reaching a generalized Eddington limit, we show that v∞ ≃ (4RUVL/Mshc)1/2, in both point-mass and isothermal-sphere potentials, where RUV is the radius where the shell becomes optically thin to UV photons, and Msh is the mass of the shell. The asymptotic velocity significantly exceeds vesc for typical parameters, and can explain the ˜1000-2000 km s-1 outflows observed from rapidly star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) if the surrounding halo has low gas density. Similarly fast outflows from massive stars can be accelerated on ˜few-103 yr time-scales. These results carry over to clouds that subtend only a small fraction of the solid angle from the source of radiation and that expand as a consequence of their internal sound speed. We further consider the dynamics of shells that sweep up a dense circumstellar or circumgalactic medium. We calculate the `momentum ratio' dot{M} v/(L/c) in the shell limit and show that it can only significantly exceed ˜2 if the effective optical depth of the shell to re-radiated far-infrared photons is much larger than unity. We discuss simple prescriptions for the properties of galactic outflows for use in large-scale cosmological simulations. We also briefly discuss applications to the dusty ejection episodes of massive stars, the disruption of giant molecular clouds, and AGN.

  11. Mesoporous core–shell Fenton nanocatalyst: a mild, operationally simple approach to the synthesis of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Patra, Astam K; Dutta, Arghya; Bhaumik, Asim

    2013-09-01

    Mesoporous nanoparticles composed of γ-Al2O3 cores and α-Fe2O3 shells were synthesized in aqueous medium. The surface charge of γ-Al2O3 helps to form the core–shell nanocrystals. The core–shell structure and formation mechanism have been investigated by wide-angle XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and elemental mapping by ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The N2 adsorption–desorption isotherm of this core–shell materials, which is of type IV, is characteristic of a mesoporous material having a BET surface area of 385 m2 g(−1) and an average pore size of about 3.2 nm. The SEM images revealed that the mesoporosity in this core–shell material is due to self-aggregation of tiny spherical nanocrystals with sizes of about 15–20 nm. Diffuse-reflectance UV/Vis spectra, elemental mapping by UHRTEM, and wide-angle XRD patterns indicate that the materials are composed of aluminum oxide cores and iron oxide shells. These Al2O3@Fe2O3 core–shell nanoparticles act as a heterogeneous Fenton nanocatalyst in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, and show high catalytic efficiency for the one-pot conversion of cyclohexanone to adipic acid in water. The heterogeneous nature of the catalyst was confirmed by a hot filtration test and analysis of the reaction mixture by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The kinetics of the reaction was monitored by gas chromatography and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The new core–shell catalyst remained in a separate solid phase, which could easily be removed from the reaction mixture by simple filtration and the catalyst reused efficiently. PMID:24167824

  12. Hollow Pollen Shells to Enhance Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Diego-Taboada, Alberto; Beckett, Stephen T.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Mackenzie, Grahame

    2014-01-01

    Pollen grain and spore shells are natural microcapsules designed to protect the genetic material of the plant from external damage. The shell is made up of two layers, the inner layer (intine), made largely of cellulose, and the outer layer (exine), composed mainly of sporopollenin. The relative proportion of each varies according to the plant species. The structure of sporopollenin has not been fully characterised but different studies suggest the presence of conjugated phenols, which provide antioxidant properties to the microcapsule and UV (ultraviolet) protection to the material inside it. These microcapsule shells have many advantageous properties, such as homogeneity in size, resilience to both alkalis and acids, and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 250 °C. These hollow microcapsules have the ability to encapsulate and release actives in a controlled manner. Their mucoadhesion to intestinal tissues may contribute to the extended contact of the sporopollenin with the intestinal mucosa leading to an increased efficiency of delivery of nutraceuticals and drugs. The hollow microcapsules can be filled with a solution of the active or active in a liquid form by simply mixing both together, and in some cases operating a vacuum. The active payload can be released in the human body depending on pressure on the microcapsule, solubility and/or pH factors. Active release can be controlled by adding a coating on the shell, or co-encapsulation with the active inside the shell. PMID:24638098

  13. Thick or Thin Ice Shell on Europa?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Scientists are all but certain that Europa has an ocean underneath its icy surface, but they do not know how thick this ice might be. This artist concept illustrates two possible cut-away views through Europa's ice shell. In both, heat escapes, possibly volcanically, from Europa's rocky mantle and is carried upward by buoyant oceanic currents. If the heat from below is intense and the ice shell is thin enough (left), the ice shell can directly melt, causing what are called 'chaos' on Europa, regions of what appear to be broken, rotated and tilted ice blocks. On the other hand, if the ice shell is sufficiently thick (right), the less intense interior heat will be transferred to the warmer ice at the bottom of the shell, and additional heat is generated by tidal squeezing of the warmer ice. This warmer ice will slowly rise, flowing as glaciers do on Earth, and the slow but steady motion may also disrupt the extremely cold, brittle ice at the surface. Europa is no larger than Earth's moon, and its internal heating stems from its eccentric orbit about Jupiter, seen in the distance. As tides raised by Jupiter in Europa's ocean rise and fall, they may cause cracking, additional heating and even venting of water vapor into the airless sky above Europa's icy surface. (Artwork by Michael Carroll.)

  14. Hollow pollen shells to enhance drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Diego-Taboada, Alberto; Beckett, Stephen T; Atkin, Stephen L; Mackenzie, Grahame

    2014-01-01

    Pollen grain and spore shells are natural microcapsules designed to protect the genetic material of the plant from external damage. The shell is made up of two layers, the inner layer (intine), made largely of cellulose, and the outer layer (exine), composed mainly of sporopollenin. The relative proportion of each varies according to the plant species. The structure of sporopollenin has not been fully characterised but different studies suggest the presence of conjugated phenols, which provide antioxidant properties to the microcapsule and UV (ultraviolet) protection to the material inside it. These microcapsule shells have many advantageous properties, such as homogeneity in size, resilience to both alkalis and acids, and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 250 °C. These hollow microcapsules have the ability to encapsulate and release actives in a controlled manner. Their mucoadhesion to intestinal tissues may contribute to the extended contact of the sporopollenin with the intestinal mucosa leading to an increased efficiency of delivery of nutraceuticals and drugs. The hollow microcapsules can be filled with a solution of the active or active in a liquid form by simply mixing both together, and in some cases operating a vacuum. The active payload can be released in the human body depending on pressure on the microcapsule, solubility and/or pH factors. Active release can be controlled by adding a coating on the shell, or co-encapsulation with the active inside the shell. PMID:24638098

  15. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  16. Vapor-Induced Solid-Liquid-Solid Process for Silicon-based Nanowire Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Donghai; Choi, Daiwon; Fifield, Leonard S.; Wang, Chong M.; Xia, Guanguang; Nie, Zimin; Yang, Zhenguo; Pederson, Larry R.; Graff, Gordon L.

    2010-03-10

    Silicon based nanowires have been grown from commercial silicon powders under conditions of differing oxygen and carbon activities. Nanowires grown in the presence of carbon sources consisted of a crystalline SiC core with an amorphous SiOx shell. The thickness of SiOx shell decreased as the oxygen concentration in the precursor gases was lowered. Nanowires grown in a carbon-free environment consisted of amorphous silicon oxide with a typical composition of SiO1.8. The growth rate of nanowires decreased with decreasing oxygen content in the precursor gases. SiO1.8 nanowires exhibited an initial discharge capacity of ~ 1,300 mAh/g and better stability than those of silicon powders. A Vapor Induced Solid-Liquid-Solid (VI-SLS) mechanism is proposed to explain the nanowire growth (including silicon and other metal based nanowires) from powder sources. In this approach, both a gas source and a solid powder source are required for nanowire growth. This mechanism is consistent with experimental observations and can also be used to guide the design and growth of other nanowires.

  17. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOEpatents

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  18. Structural Assessment of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stanford, Bret K.; Hrinda, Glenn A.; Wang, Zhuosong; Martin, Robert a.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are predicted using linear finite element analyses. These preliminary predictions compare well with the test results, with an average agreement of approximately 10 percent.

  19. Fluorescent core-shell silica nanoparticles: an alternative radiative materials platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, Erik; Burns, Andrew; Lee, Stephanie; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Bonner, Daniel; Ow, Hooisweng; Liddell, Chekesha; Baird, Barbara; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2006-02-01

    We report on monodisperse fluorescent core-shell silica nanoparticles (C dots) with enhanced brightness and photostability as compared to parent free dye in aqueous solution. Dots containing either tetramethylrhodamine or 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole dyes with diameters ranging from tens of nanometers to microns are discussed. The benefits of the core-shell architecture are described in terms of enhanced fluorescent yield of the fluorophores in the quasi-solid-state environment within the particle as compared with parent free dye in water. Several applications of these particles in the fields of photonics and the life sciences are discussed. Specifically, fluorescent core-shell silica nanoparticles are investigated as an active medium for photonic building blocks assembled on zinc sulfide-based seed particles. Initial assembly results for these composite raspberry structures are shown. Finally, applications in the life sciences are explored, including targeting of specific antibody receptors using these single-emission nanoparticles. We expand on single-emission core-shell architecture to incorporate environmentally-sensitive fluorophores to create quantitative ratiometric nanoscale sensors capable of interrogating chemical concentrations on the sub-cellular to molecular levels and demonstrate initial results of intracellular pH imaging. The concept of a single particle laboratory (SPL) is introduced as an active investigator of its environment.

  20. Effective medium theory expressions for the effective diffusion in chromatographic beds filled with porous, non-porous and porous-shell particles and cylinders. Part II: Numerical verification and quantitative effect of solid core on expected B-term band broadening.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2011-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation study of the diffusion and retention in fully porous spheres and cylinders are compared with some of the high order accuracy analytical solutions for the effective diffusion coefficient that have been derived from the effective medium theory (EMT) theory in part I of the present study. A variety of different ordered (spheres and cylinders) and disordered (cylinders) packings arrangements has been considered. The agreement between simulations and theory was always excellent, lying within the (very tight) accuracy limits of the simulations over the full range of retention factor and diffusion constant values that is practically relevant for most LC applications. Subsequently filling up the spheres and cylinders with a central solid core, while keeping the same packing geometry and the same mobile phase (same thermodynamic retention equilibrium), it was found that the core induces an additional obstruction which reduces the effective intra-particle diffusion coefficient exactly with a factor γ(part)=2/(2+ρ³) for spherical particles and γ(part)=1/(1+ρ²) for cylinders (ρ is the ratio of the core to the particle diameter, ρ=d(core)/d(part)). These expressions hold independently of the packing geometry, the value of the diffusion coefficients and the equilibrium constant or the size of the core. The expressions also imply that, if considering equal mobile phase conditions, the presence of the solid core will never reduce the particle contribution to the B-term band broadening with more than 33% (50% in case of cylindrical pillars). PMID:21122871

  1. Do freshwater mussel shells record road-salt pollution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, Dane D.; Gillikin, David P.

    2014-11-01

    Road-salt pollution in streams in the Northeastern United States has become a major concern, but historical data are scarce. Freshwater bivalve shells have the ability to record past environmental information, and may act as archives of road-salt pollution. We sampled Elliptio complanata shells from four streams, as well as specimens collected in 1877. Average [Na/Ca]shell was highest in modern shells from the stream with the highest sodium concentrations, and low in shells collected from this same stream in 1877 as well as in the shells from other streams, suggesting that [Na/Ca]shell serves as a proxy for road-salt pollution. We expected higher [Na/Ca]shell in winter and spring. However, high-resolution [Na/Ca]shell analyses along the growth axis of one shell did not reveal any clear subannual patterns, which could be the result of shell growth cessation in winter and/or during periods of high stream sodium concentrations. Therefore, bulk [Na/Ca]shell analysis from multiple shells can be used as a proxy of large changes in stream sodium concentrations, but high-resolution variations in stream sodium concentrations do not seem to be recorded in the shells.

  2. Do freshwater mussel shells record road-salt pollution?

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Dane D.; Gillikin, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Road-salt pollution in streams in the Northeastern United States has become a major concern, but historical data are scarce. Freshwater bivalve shells have the ability to record past environmental information, and may act as archives of road-salt pollution. We sampled Elliptio complanata shells from four streams, as well as specimens collected in 1877. Average [Na/Ca]shell was highest in modern shells from the stream with the highest sodium concentrations, and low in shells collected from this same stream in 1877 as well as in the shells from other streams, suggesting that [Na/Ca]shell serves as a proxy for road-salt pollution. We expected higher [Na/Ca]shell in winter and spring. However, high-resolution [Na/Ca]shell analyses along the growth axis of one shell did not reveal any clear subannual patterns, which could be the result of shell growth cessation in winter and/or during periods of high stream sodium concentrations. Therefore, bulk [Na/Ca]shell analysis from multiple shells can be used as a proxy of large changes in stream sodium concentrations, but high-resolution variations in stream sodium concentrations do not seem to be recorded in the shells. PMID:25418687

  3. Synthesis of fluorescent core-shell nanomaterials and strategies to generate white light

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Amandeep; Kaur, Ramanjot; Pandey, O. P.; Wei, Xueyong; Sharma, Manoj E-mail: manojsharma@bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-07-28

    In this work, cadmium free core-shell ZnS:X/ZnS (X = Mn, Cu) nanoparticles have been synthesized and used for white light generation. First, the doping concentration of Manganese (Mn) was varied from 1% to 4% to optimize the dopant related emission and its optimal value was found to be 1%. Then, ZnS shell was grown over ZnS:Mn(1%) core to passivate the surface defects. Similarly, the optimal concentration of Copper (Cu) was found to be 0.8% in the range varied from 0.6% to 1.2%. In order to obtain an emission in the whole visible spectrum, dual doping of Mn and Cu was done in the core and the shell, respectively. A solid-solid mixing in different ratios of separately doped quantum dots (QDs) emitting in the blue green and the orange region was performed. Results show that the optimum mixture of QDs excited at 300 nm gives Commission Internationale del'Éclairage color coordinates of (0.35, 0.36), high color rendering index of 88, and correlated color temperature of 4704 K with minimum self-absorption.

  4. Evaporation of multi-component mixtures and shell formation in spray dried droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Pedro; Duarte, Íris; Porfirio, Tiago; Temtem, Márcio

    2015-11-01

    Drug particles where the active pharmaceutical ingredient (APIs) is dispersed in a polymer matrix forming an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) is a commonly used strategy to increase the solubility and dissolution rate of poorly water soluble APIs. However, the formation and stability of an amorphous solid dispersion depends on the polymer/API combination and process conditions to generate it. The focus of the present work is to further develop a numerical tool to predict the formation of ASDs by spray drying solutions of different polymer/API combinations. Specifically, the evaporation of a multi-component droplet is coupled with a diffusion law within the droplet that minimizes the Gibbs free energy of the polymer/API/solvents system, following the Flory-Huggins model. Prior to the shell formation, the evaporation of the solvents is modelled following the simplified approach proposed by Abramzon & Sirignano (1989) which accounts for the varying relative velocity between the droplet and the drying gas. After shell formation, the diffusion of the solvents across the porous shell starkly modifies the evaporative dynamics.

  5. FInal Report - Investment Casting Shell Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Von Richards

    2003-12-01

    This project made a significant contribution to the understanding of the investment casting shell cracking problem. The effects of wax properties on the occurrence of shell cracking were demonstrated and can be measured. The properties measured include coefficient of thermal expansion, heating rate and crystallinity of the structure. The important features of production molds and materials properties have been indicated by case study analysis and fractography of low strength test bars. It was found that stress risers in shell cavity design were important and that typical critical flaws were either oversize particles or large pores just behind the prime coat. It was also found that the true effect of fugitive polymer fibers was not permeability increase, but rather a toughening mechanism due to crack deflection.

  6. Damage Tolerance of Large Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of large shell structures is investigated. A computer model is used for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture resistance, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Critical locations of a stiffened conical shell segment are identified. Defective and defect-free computer models are simulated to evaluate structural damage/defect tolerance. Safe pressurization levels are assessed for the retention of structural integrity at the presence of damage/ defects. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Damage propagation and burst pressures for defective and defect-free shells are compared to evaluate damage tolerance. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of a large steel pressure vessel are examined.

  7. Modeling of microencapsulated polymer shell solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, T.; Cheung, L.; Nelson, D.; Soane, D.; Wilemski, G.; Cook, R.

    1995-03-08

    A finite element transport model has been developed and implemented to complement experimental efforts to improve the quality of ICF target shells produced via controlled-mass microencapsulation. The model provides an efficient means to explore the effect of processing variables on the dynamics of shell dimensions, concentricity, and phase behavior. Comparisons with experiments showed that the model successfully predicts the evolution of wall thinning and core/wall density differences. The model was used to efficiently explore and identify initial wall compositions and processing temperatures which resulted in concentricity improvements from 65 to 99%. The evolution of trace amounts of water entering into the shell wall was also tracked in the simulations. Comparisons with phase envelope estimations from modified UNIFAP calculations suggest that the water content trajectory approaches the two-phase region where vacuole formation via microphase separation may occur.

  8. COMPLETE SURFACE MAPPING OF ICF SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS,R.B; OLSON,D; HUANG,H; GIBSON,J.B

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Inertial confinement fusion shells have previously been evaluated on the basis of microscopic examination for local defects and limited surface profiling to represent their average fluctuation power. Since defects are local, and don't always have visible edges, this approach both misses some important fluctuations and doesn't properly represent the spatially dependent surface fluctuation power. they have taken the first step toward correcting this problem by demonstrating the capability to completely map the surface of a NIF shell with the resolution to account for all modes. This allows complete accounting of all the surface fluctuations. In the future this capability could be used for valuable shells to generate a complete r({theta},{psi}) surface map for accurate 3-D modeling of a shot.

  9. The microindentation behavior of several mollusk shells

    SciTech Connect

    Laraia, V.J.; Heuer, A.H. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the relationship between structure and mechanical behavior is reported for mollusk shells employing foliated, nacreous, and crossed-lamellar structures by microindentation in the Knoop and Vickers geometries. Indentation damage zones develop crack systems that reflect the micro-architecture. For the crosed-lamellar structure, the system of cracks about the indentation normally developed in a brittle material is suppressed. Previous reports that shells are harder than the corresponding minerals, calcite and aragonite, are confirmed, but it is found that this effect can be strongly dependent on orientation. This anomalous hardness is not an artifact of the indentation test technique, since scratch tests confirm the relative hardness of shell over the mineral. It is suggested that microstructural organization is of central importance in producing this hardness, as opposed to intrinsic properties of the mineral or matrix phases. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Spline Approximation of Thin Shell Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delRosario, R. C. H.; Smith, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    A spline-based method for approximating thin shell dynamics is presented here. While the method is developed in the context of the Donnell-Mushtari thin shell equations, it can be easily extended to the Byrne-Flugge-Lur'ye equations or other models for shells of revolution as warranted by applications. The primary requirements for the method include accuracy, flexibility and efficiency in smart material applications. To accomplish this, the method was designed to be flexible with regard to boundary conditions, material nonhomogeneities due to sensors and actuators, and inputs from smart material actuators such as piezoceramic patches. The accuracy of the method was also of primary concern, both to guarantee full resolution of structural dynamics and to facilitate the development of PDE-based controllers which ultimately require real-time implementation. Several numerical examples provide initial evidence demonstrating the efficacy of the method.

  11. Single-Molecule Solvation-Shell Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, E.; Höbenreich, H.; Higgins, S. J.; van Zalinge, H.; Haiss, W.; Nichols, R. J.; Finch, C. M.; Grace, I.; Lambert, C. J.; McGrath, R.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new route to single-molecule sensing via solvation shells surrounding a current-carrying backbone molecule. As an example, we show that the presence of a water solvation shell “gates” the conductance of a family of oligothiophene-containing molecular wires, and that the longer the oligothiophene, the larger is the effect. For the longest example studied, the molecular conductance is over 2 orders of magnitude larger in the presence of a shell comprising just 10 water molecules. A first principles theoretical investigation of electron transport through the molecules, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, shows that water molecules interact directly with the thiophene rings, significantly shifting transport resonances and greatly increasing the conductance. This reversible effect is confirmed experimentally through conductance measurements performed in the presence of moist air and dry argon.

  12. Locally adaptive method to define coordination shell.

    PubMed

    Higham, Jonathan; Henchman, Richard H

    2016-08-28

    An algorithm is presented to define a particle's coordination shell for any collection of particles. It requires only the particles' positions and no pre-existing knowledge or parameters beyond those already in the force field. A particle's shell is taken to be all particles that are not blocked by any other particle and not further away than a blocked particle. Because blocking is based on two distances and an angle for triplets of particles, it is called the relative angular distance (RAD) algorithm. RAD is applied to Lennard-Jones particles in molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline, liquid, and gaseous phases at various temperatures and densities. RAD coordination shells agree well with those from a cut-off in the radial distribution function for the crystals and liquids and are slightly higher for the gas. PMID:27586905

  13. Shell nebulae around luminous evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1989-01-01

    Shell nebulae around luminous Population I Wolf-Rayet, Of, and P-Cygni stars are astrophysically interesting since they are indicators of pre-supernova mass loss and how such massive stars prepare their surrounding interstellar medium prior to explosion. Some twenty-odd such nebulae are known, for which detailed study of their morphological and spectroscopic characteristics have only begun in this decade. In this paper, some of these characteristics are reviewed in general, and new observations are reported. Emphasis has been placed on several 'prototype 'objects (NGC 7635, NGC 2359, NGC 6888, and the Eta Carinae condensations) to illustrate the varied massive-star mass-loss, the physics of their winds and shell ejecta, and related nucleosynthesis effects in the compositions of the winds and shells.

  14. Spherical shell model description of rotational motion

    SciTech Connect

    Zuker, A.P.; Retamosa, J.; Poves, A.; Caurier, E.

    1995-10-01

    Exact diagonalizations with a realistic interaction show that configurations with four neutrons in a major shell and four protons in another---or the same---major shell, behave systematically as backbending rotors. The dominance of the {ital q}{center_dot}{ital q} component of the interaction is related to an approximate ``quasi-SU3`` symmetry. It is suggested that the onset of rotational motion in the rare earth nuclei is due to the promotion of the eight particle blocks to the major shells above the ones currently filling. Assuming a ``pseudo-SU3`` coupling for the particles in the lower orbits, it is possible to account remarkably well for the observed {ital B}({ital E}2) rates at the beginning of the region.

  15. Adaptive piezoelectric shell structures: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.; Zhong, J. P.

    1993-07-01

    Active "smart" space and mechanical structures with adaptive dynamic characteristics have long been interested in a variety of high-performance systems, e.g. flexible space structures, flexible robots, "smart" machines etc. In this paper, an active adaptive structure made of piezoelectric materials is proposed and evaluated. Electromechanical equations of motion and generalised boundary conditions of a generic piezoelectric shell subjected to mechanical and electrical excitations are derived using Hamilton's principle and the linear piezoelectric theory. The structural adaptivity is achieved by a voltage feedback (open or closed loops) utilising the converse piezoelectric effect. Applications of the theory is demonstrated in a bimorph beam case and a cylindrical shell case. Frequency manipulation of the bimorph beam is studied theoretically and experimentally. Damping control of the cylindrical shell via in-plane membrane forces is also investigated.

  16. Nova shell observation of V2275 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenoglu, Hasan H.; Balman, Solen; Saygac, A. Talat

    2016-07-01

    We present a recent search for nova shell of V2275 Cyg after its eruption of 9 years, using narrow bands of H-alpha, OIII and H-alpha-continuum images taken with RTT150 telescope at TUG. They were taken in November 2nd, 2010 with exposures of 600sec. There is uncertain in the literature whether the nova shell is visible in H-alpha. In this work the nova disappears on frame of OIII (wavelengt of 500.7nm with band width of 5nm) when it is faint apparent on the frames of both H-alpha and H-alpha continuum. We will calculate a new angular diameter of the nova shell by using the nebular expantion method if the data allow to measure seeing values of the nova and neighbor stars.

  17. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an important crude oil market center. Data are released twice each year near the end of May (data for March 31) and near the end of November (data for September 30).

  18. Inner shell radial pin geometry and mounting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Leach, David; Bergendahl, Peter Allen

    2002-01-01

    Circumferentially spaced arrays of support pins are disposed through access openings in an outer turbine shell and have projections received in recesses in forward and aft sections of an inner turbine shell supported from the outer shell. The projections have arcuate sides in a circumferential direction affording line contacts with the side walls of the recesses and are spaced from end faces of the recesses, enabling radial and axial expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. All loads are taken up in a tangential direction by the outer shell with the support pins taking no radial loadings.

  19. Triggered Snap-Through of Bistable Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yijie; Huang, Shicheng; Trase, Ian; Hu, Nan; Chen, Zi

    Elastic bistable shells are common structures in nature and engineering, such as the lobes of the Venus flytrap or the surface of a toy jumping poppers. Despite their ubiquity, the parameters that control the bistability of such structures are not well understood. In this study, we explore how the geometrical features of radially symmetric elastic shells affect the shape and potential energy of a shell's stable states, and how to tune certain parameters in order to generate a snap-through transition from a convex semi-stable state to concave stable state. We fabricated a series of elastic shells with varying geometric parameters out of silicone rubber and measured the resulting potential energy in the semi-stable state. Finite element simulations were also conducted in order to determine the deformation and stress in the shells during snap-through. It was found that the energy of the semi-stable state is controlled by only two geometric parameters and a dimensionless ratio. We also noted two distinct transitions during snap-through, one between monostability and semi-bistability (the state a popper toy is in before it snaps-through and jumps), and a second transition between semi-bistability and true bistability. This work shows that it is possible to use a set of simple parameters to tailor the energy landscape of an elastic shell in order to generate complex trigger motions for their potential use in smart applications. Z.C. acknowledge support from Society in Science-Branco Weiss Fellowship, administered by ETH Zurich.

  20. Tuning the synthesis of platinum-copper nanoparticles with a hollow core and porous shell for the selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuangshuang; Yang, Nating; Wang, Shibin; Sun, Yuhan; Zhu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol.Pt-Cu nanoparticles constructed with a hollow core and porous shell have been synthesized in which Pt-Cu cages with multiporous outermost shells are formed at the initial stage and then the Pt and Cu atoms in solution continuously fed these hollow-core of cages by passing through the porous tunnels of the outermost shells, finally leading to the formation of hollow structures with different sizes. Furthermore, these hollow-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles are more effective than the solid-core Pt-Cu nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural toward furfuryl alcohol. The former can achieve almost 100% conversion of furfural with 100% selectivity toward the alcohol. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03894h

  1. Static spherically symmetric thin shell wormhole colliding with a spherical thin shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaobao; Gao, Sijie

    2016-03-01

    We consider a static spherically symmetric thin shell wormhole that collides with another thin shell consisting of ordinary matter. By employing the geometrical constraint, which leads to the conservation of energy and momentum, we show that the state after the collision can be solved from the initial data. In the low speed approximation, the solutions are rather simple. The shell may either bounce back or pass through the wormhole. In either case, the wormhole shrinks right after the collision. In the "bouncing" case, a surprising result is that the radial speeds before and after the collision satisfy an addition law, which is independent of other parameters of the wormhole and the shell. Once the shell passes through the wormhole, we find that the shell always expands. However, the expansion rate is the same as its collapsing rate right before the collision. Finally, we find the solution for the shell moving together with the wormhole. This work sheds light on the interaction between wormholes and matter.

  2. What's in a Shell? - Interactions of Chemistry and Structure at Submicron Levels in Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Piazolo, S.; Trimby, P.

    2014-12-01

    The wide geographical distribution of bivalve shells makes them much favoured paleoclimate proxy archives. However, they are amongst the materials most affected by physiological effects, making the correct deciphering of these archives a challenging task. Shell building plans are usually hierarchic, thus optimizing mechanical properties. However, different structures common to certain bivalve families, such as the prism-nacre or the crossed-lamellar structures, are assembled from very different building blocks. These structural differences coincide with chemical and crystallographic differences suggesting critically different formation mechanisms within the bivalve class. Most importantly some bivalves form their shells from amorphous calcium carbonate that crystallizes in situ once assembled into the shell. We present new correlated multi-scale structural and compositional data for different shell bivalve shell structures such as nacre-prism, cross-lamellar intermediate structures. Data are obtained using EBSD, FIB-assisted TEM and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction combined with Nano-SIMS and Raman Microspectrometry and suggest that formation from amorphous phases is widespread and results in different calcium carbonate polymorphs to be present in the shell with distinct chemical compositions. The results highlight the complex nature of the biomaterials, which has consequences for the precision and accuracy of paleotemperature calculations.

  3. Simulation of the stress computation in shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M.; Utku, S.

    1978-01-01

    A self-teaching computer program is described, whereby the stresses in thin shells can be computed with good accuracy using the best fit approach. The program is designed for use in interactive game mode to allow the structural engineer to learn about (1) the major sources of difficulties and associated errors in the computation of stresses in thin shells, (2) possible ways to reduce the errors, and (3) trade-off between computational cost and accuracy. Included are derivation of the computational approach, program description, and several examples illustrating the program usage.

  4. Fast optimization of static axisymmetric shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Jeffrey

    An axisymmetric shell optimization procedure is developed which is a fast, user-friendly and practical tool for design use in disciplines including aerospace, mechanical and civil engineering. The shape and thickness of a shell can be optimized to minimize shell mass, mass/volume ratio or stress with constraints imposed on von Mises stress and local buckling. The procedure was created with the aid of the GENOPT optimization development system (Dr. D. Bushnell, Lockheed Missiles and Space Co) and uses the FAST1 shell analysis program (Prof. C. R. Steele, Stanford University) to perform the constraint analysis. The optimization method used is the modified method of feasible directions. The procedure is fast because exact analysis methods allow complex shells to be modelled with only a few large shell elements and still retain a sufficiently accurate solution. This is of particular advantage near shell boundaries and intersections which can have small regions of very detailed variation in the solution. Finite element methods would require many small elements to capture accurately this detail with a resulting increase in computation time and model complexity. Reducing the complexity of the model also reduces the size of the required input and contributes to the simplicity of the procedure. Optimization design variables are the radial and axial coordinates of nodes and the shape parameters and thicknesses of the elements. Thickness distribution within an element can be optimized by specifying the thickness at evenly spaced control points. Spline interpolation is used to provide a smooth thickness variation between the control points. An effective method is developed for reducing the number of required stress constraint equations. Various shells have been optimized and include models for comparison with published results. Shape, thickness and shape/thickness optimization has been performed on examples including a simple aerobrake, sphere-nozzle intersections, ring

  5. Computation of Thin-Walled Prismatic Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasov, V. Z.

    1949-01-01

    We consider a prismatic shell consisting of a finite number of narrow rectangular plates and having in the cross-section a finite number of closed contours (fig. 1(a)). We shall assume that the rectangular plates composing the shell are rigidly joined so that there is no motion of any kind of one plate relative to the others meeting at a given connecting line. The position of a point on the middle prismatic surface is considered to be defined by the coordinate z, the distance to a certain initial cross-section z = O, end the coordinate s determining its position on the contour of the cross-section.

  6. Shell model for buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Verma, Mahendra K

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a unified shell model for stably stratified and convective turbulence. Numerical simulation of this model for stably stratified flow shows Bolgiano-Obukhbov scaling in which the kinetic energy spectrum varies as k(-11/5). The shell model of convective turbulence yields Kolmogorov's spectrum. These results are consistent with the energy flux and energy feed due to buoyancy, and are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations of Kumar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 023016 (2014)]. PMID:25974587

  7. Distribution of neutrino fluxes from pulsar shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, M. M.; Silberberg, R.

    According to a model considered by Berezinsky and Prilutsky (1976), a young, dense supernova shell can be a powerful source of high-energy neutrinos. In this model, ultra-high energy protons and other nuclei are accelerated at the central pulsar. The protons interact in the supernova shell and generate cascades of mesons, which in turn yield neutrinos upon decay. The pulsar luminosity function based on all the observed Galactic pulsars is considered. It is found that the high-energy neutrinos from supernovae in the Milky Way Galaxy should be readily detectable. The corresponding pulsars would be relatively low-powered pulsars.

  8. Carbon nanotube core graphitic shell hybrid fibers.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Hart, Amelia H C; Song, Sung Moo; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Li, Bo; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Park, Chi-Dong; Zhao, Yao; Vajtai, Robert; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Endo, Morinobu; Barrera, Enrique; Jung, Yung Joon; Thomas, Edwin L; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-12-23

    A carbon nanotube yarn core graphitic shell hybrid fiber was fabricated via facile heat treatment of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8) on carbon nanotube yarn. The effective encapsulation of carbon nanotube yarn in carbon fiber and a glassy carbon outer shell determines their physical properties. The higher electrical conductivity (than carbon fiber) of the carbon nanotube yarn overcomes the drawbacks of carbon fiber/glassy carbon, and the better properties (than carbon nanotubes) of the carbon fiber/glassy carbon make up for the lower thermal and mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube yarn via synergistic hybridization without any chemical doping and additional processes. PMID:24224730

  9. Shell hoop prestress generated by welding

    SciTech Connect

    Meuser, R.B.

    1991-03-01

    For some magnet designs it is desirable to generate a prestress, approaching the yield strength, in the shell surrounding the yoke. If that prestress can be generated by weld shrinkage, then more expensive methods of prestressing can be avoided. Shell-to-yoke friction can reduce the prestress, so it is desirable to minimize it. A quick-and-dirty test was performed to address these matters. While the scatter of the data was large, it appears that weld shrinkage can indeed generate the required prestress. The scatter was too large to give any information about the friction, however. The experiment raised more questions than it answered. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Stability analysis of dynamic thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Crawford, Paulo

    2005-11-01

    We analyse the stability of generic spherically symmetric thin shells to linearized perturbations around static solutions. We include the momentum flux term in the conservation identity, deduced from the 'ADM' constraint and the Lanczos equations. Following the Ishak Lake analysis, we deduce a master equation which dictates the stable equilibrium configurations. Considering the transparency condition, we study the stability of thin shells around black holes, showing that our analysis is in agreement with previous results. Applying the analysis to traversable wormhole geometries, by considering specific choices for the form function, we deduce stability regions and find that the latter may be significantly increased by considering appropriate choices for the redshift function.

  11. Absorption spectra of CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots at high photon energies: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Amlan; Ghosh, Sandip

    2014-11-01

    Absorption spectra of CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dot (QD) ensembles, with average core diameters ranging from 2.6 nm to 7.2 nm have been obtained using both transmission and photoluminescence excitation measurements. In agreement with previous reports, the absorption coefficient at energies ≃1 eV above the effective bandgap increases monotonically as in bulk solids. A simple effective-mass spherical core-shell potential model cannot explain the relatively high absorption at higher energies. The calculated electron and hole radial envelope wavefunctions show asymmetry due to the core-shell structure. It leads to normally symmetry-disallowed transitions acquiring a weak oscillator strength, with their number and strength increasing with energy. A phenomenological model that invokes normally disallowed transitions in general is shown to reproduce the absorption spectrum at higher energies quite well. The oscillator strength scaling factor for such transitions increases with decrease in QD size, consistent with expectations.

  12. A platonic solid templating Archimedean solid: an unprecedented nanometre-sized Ag37 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Yu; Su, Hai-Feng; Yu, Kai; Tan, Yuan-Zhi; Wang, Xing-Po; Zhao, Ya-Qin; Sun, Di; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2015-04-01

    The spontaneous formation of discrete spherical nanosized molecules is prevalent in nature, but the authentic structural mimicry of such highly symmetric polyhedra from edge sharing of regular polygons has remained elusive. Here we present a novel ball-shaped {(HNEt3)[Ag37S4(SC6H4tBu)24(CF3COO)6(H2O)12]} cluster (1) that is assembled via a one-pot process from polymeric {(HNEt3)2[Ag10(SC6H4tBu)12]}n and CF3COOAg. Single crystal X-ray analysis confirmed that 1 is a Td symmetric spherical molecule with a [Ag36(SC6H4tBu)24] anion shell enwrapping a AgS4 tetrahedron. The shell topology of 1 belongs to one of 13 Archimedean solids, a truncated tetrahedron with four edge-shared hexagons and trigons, which are supported by a AgS4 Platonic solid in the core. Interestingly, the cluster emits green luminescence centered at 515 nm at room temperature. Our investigations have provided a promising synthetic protocol for a high-nuclearity silver cluster based on underlying geometrical principles.The spontaneous formation of discrete spherical nanosized molecules is prevalent in nature, but the authentic structural mimicry of such highly symmetric polyhedra from edge sharing of regular polygons has remained elusive. Here we present a novel ball-shaped {(HNEt3)[Ag37S4(SC6H4tBu)24(CF3COO)6(H2O)12]} cluster (1) that is assembled via a one-pot process from polymeric {(HNEt3)2[Ag10(SC6H4tBu)12]}n and CF3COOAg. Single crystal X-ray analysis confirmed that 1 is a Td symmetric spherical molecule with a [Ag36(SC6H4tBu)24] anion shell enwrapping a AgS4 tetrahedron. The shell topology of 1 belongs to one of 13 Archimedean solids, a truncated tetrahedron with four edge-shared hexagons and trigons, which are supported by a AgS4 Platonic solid in the core. Interestingly, the cluster emits green luminescence centered at 515 nm at room temperature. Our investigations have provided a promising synthetic protocol for a high-nuclearity silver cluster based on underlying geometrical principles

  13. Comparative study of shell swab and shell crush methods for the recovery of Salmonella from shell eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Egg associated Salmonella Enteritidis outbreaks have been a major cause of foodborne illness in Japan as well as in the United States and several European countries. Researchers have been attempting to develop a rapid and highly sensitive method for the recovery of microorganisms from shell eggs. ...

  14. Synthesis of Ge/Si core/shell nanowires with suppression of branch formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Tomohiro; Simanullang, Marolop; Xu, Zhengyu; Usami, Koichi; Kodera, Tetsuo; Oda, Shunri

    2016-05-01

    Ge/Si core/shell nanowires (Ge/Si-NWs) are promising materials for applications such as transistors, sensors, and thermoelectric devices. A major problem in the synthesis of Ge/Si-NWs using Au catalysts in conjunction with vapor–liquid–solid chemical vapor deposition is the formation of branched Si nanowires on the surface of Ge nanowires because of the migration of Au nanoparticles that serve as seeds. Based on an analysis of the Au–Ge phase diagram, we propose a method to mitigate this issue. By introducing Ge-rich conditions during the temperature-increase step between the formation of the Ge core and the Si shell, we have successfully eliminated Au nanoparticles on Ge surfaces, and thus fabricated Ge/Si-NWs without Si nanowires.

  15. Characterizing inner-shell with spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mashiko, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Oguri, Katsuya; Suda, Akira; Gotoh, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In many atomic, molecular and solid systems, Lorentzian and Fano profiles are commonly observed in a broad research fields throughout a variety of spectroscopies. As the profile structure is related to the phase of the time-dependent dipole moment, it plays an important role in the study of quantum properties. Here we determine the dipole phase in the inner-shell transition using spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER) with isolated attosecond pulses (IAPs). In addition, we propose a scheme for pulse generation and compression by manipulating the inner-shell transition. The electromagnetic radiation generated by the transition is temporally compressed to a few femtoseconds in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) region. The proposed pulse-compression scheme may provide an alternative route to producing attosecond pulses of light. PMID:25510971

  16. Experimental evaluation of drying characteristics of sewage sludge and hazelnut shell mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehlivan, Hüseyin; Ateş, Asude; Özdemir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    In this study the drying behavior of organic and agricultural waste mixtures has been experimentally investigated. The usability of sewage sludge as an organic waste and hazelnut shell as an agricultural waste was assessed in different mixture range. The paper discusses the applicability of these mixtures as a recovery energy source. Moisture content of mixtures has been calculated in laboratory and plant conditions. Indoor and outdoor solar sludge drying plants were constructed in pilot scale for experimental purposes. Dry solids and climatic conditions were constantly measured. A total more than 140 samples including for drying has been carried out to build up results. Indoor and outdoor weather conditions are taken into consideration in winter and summer. The most effective drying capacity is obtained in mixture of 20 % hazelnut shell and 80 % sewage sludge.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J. Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  18. Epoxy-acrylic core-shell particles by seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hong, Liang; Lin, Jui-Ching; Meyers, Greg; Harris, Joseph; Radler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel method for synthesizing epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes. We first prepared an aqueous dispersion of high molecular weight solid epoxy prepolymers using a mechanical dispersion process at elevated temperatures, and we subsequently used the epoxy dispersion as a seed in the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers comprising methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Advanced analytical techniques, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PFT-AFM), have elucidated a unique core-shell morphology of the epoxy-acrylic hybrid particles. Moreover, the formation of the core-shell morphology in the seeded emulsion polymerization process is primarily attributed to kinetic trapping of the acrylic phase at the exterior of the epoxy particles. By this new method, we are able to design the epoxy and acrylic polymers in two separate steps, and we can potentially synthesize epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes with a broad range of compositions. PMID:27078740

  19. Low Dimensional Models of Shell Vibrations. Parametrically Excited Vibrations of Cylinder Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. A.; Thompson, J. M. T.; McRobie, F. A.

    1998-01-01

    Vibrations of cylindrical shells parametrically excited by axial forcing are considered. The governing system of two coupled non-linear partial differential equations is discretized by using Lagrange equations. The computation is simplified significantly by the application of computer algebra and as a result low dimensional models of shell vibrations are readily obtained. After applying numerical continuation techniques and ideas from dynamical systems theory, complete bifurcation diagrams are constructed. The principal aim is to investigate the interaction between different modes of shell vibration. Results for system models with two of the lowest modes are discussed.

  20. Fabrication and photocatalytic properties of SnO2 double-shelled and triple-shelled hollow spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shanshan; Wang, Yong; Lu, Shan; Wang, Dongxia; Wang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    SnO2 double-shelled and triple-shelled hollow spheres were tailored by adjusting concentration of tin (IV) chloride solution during the process of the tin (IV) ions infused carbonaceous spheres. The structures of these SnO2 multi-shelled hollow spheres were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their possible formation mechanism were also discussed. In virtue of triple-shelled hollow porous structure and higher specific surface area, SnO2 triple-shelled hollow spheres exhibited enhanced photocatalytic properties compared to SnO2 double-shelled hollow spheres.

  1. Cosmic Shell-Seekers Find a Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Two scientists have discovered a distinctive shell of hot gas around the site of a distant supernova explosion by combining 150 hours of archived data collected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery is a significant step forward in solving a decades-old puzzle as to why some stellar explosions display shells and others do not. "The likely answer is that the explosion of every massive star sends a sonic boom rumbling through interstellar space," said Samar Safi-Harb of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, who is a coauthor with Heather Matheson on a paper describing the research that appears in the journal Advances in Space Research. "It's just that, some of the shells are harder to find than others because of the environment where the explosion occurs." The shell marks a sonic boom, or shock wave, generated by the supernova. Gas is heated to millions of degrees by the shock wave and produces X-rays, but little visible light. By examining the properties of the shell with an X-ray telescope, astronomers can work back to deduce the age (a few thousand years), and energy of the explosion, as well as information about the state of the star a million years before it exploded. Animation of a Supernova Explosion Animation of a Supernova Explosion It is likely that the star that produced the supernova remnant and shell was about 10 times as massive as the Sun. The absence of a detectable shell around this and similar supernova remnants had led astronomers to speculate that another, weaker type of explosion had occurred there. Now this hypothesis seems unlikely. Although many supernovas leave behind bright shells, others do not. This supernova remnant, identified as G21.5-0.9 by radio astronomers 30 years ago, was considered to be one that had no shell. A diffuse cloud of X-rays around the source was detected about 5 years ago by another group of astronomers and independently by Safi-Harb and colleagues using Chandra, but it took the careful

  2. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in the elements between Tm( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, N.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Apaydın, G.

    2008-04-01

    The K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios have been measured in the elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) without having any mass attenuation coefficient at the upper and lower energy branch of the K absorption edge. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements have been determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the total atomic absorption cross-sections, the K α X-ray production cross-sections, the intensity ratio of the K β and K α X-rays and the K shell fluorescence yields. We have performed the measurements for the calculations of these values in attenuation and direct excitation experimental geometry. The K X-ray photons are excited in the target using 123.6 keV gamma-rays from a strong 57Co source, and detected with an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution 0.15 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values have been compared with theoretical and others' experimental values. The results have been plotted versus atomic number.

  3. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  4. ROTARY BULK SOLIDS DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer JR., Richard P.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  5. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  6. A piezolaminated composite degenerated shell finite element for active control of structures with distributed piezosensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2008-06-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of a nine-noded piezolaminated degenerated shell finite element for modeling and analysis of multilayer composite general shell structures with bonded/embedded distributed piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The distributed PZT sensors and actuators used in the composite smart structures are relatively thin and could have arbitrary variation of curvatures and thicknesses. They cannot be modeled with shell elements based on curvilinear shell theories which would need the specification of constant shell curvatures and thicknesses. Modeling them with piezo finite elements available in popular commercial codes like ABAQUS, ANSYS, MARC, etc, would need relatively greater computational effort as they are based on solid element formulation. In view of these, the present proposed degenerated piezoelectric shell element would be a better choice giving good computational accuracy and efficiency. The main advantage of a degenerate shell element is that it is not based on any shell theories and is applicable over a wide range of curvatures and thicknesses. This element is developed by using the degenerate solid approach based on Reissner-Mindlin assumptions which allow the shear deformation and rotary inertia effect to be considered and the 3D field is reduced to a 2D field in terms of mid-surface nodal variables. Uniformly reduced integration is carried out to overcome membrane locking and shear locking and the numerical integration is carried out in all three directions to obtain accurate results. The present element has 45 elastic degrees of freedom and 10 electric degrees of freedom per piezoelectric layer in the element. The potential induced due to bending deformation is more accurately represented by assuming quadratic variation of the electric potential through the thickness of each piezoelectric layer. This is achieved by interpolating using nodal mid-plane electric potentials and one electric degree of freedom representing the

  7. TEM Study of the Growth Mechanism, Phase Transformation, and Core/shell Structure of Semiconductor Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tai Lun

    In this thesis, the fabrication and characterization of one-dimensional nanostructures have been studied systematically to understand the growth mechanism and structure transformation of one-dimensional nanostructures. The growth behavior of the ultrathin ZnSe nanowires with diameter less than 60 nm was found to be different from classical vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process. The growth rate increases when the diameter of nanowires decreases, in contrast to the classical VLS process in which the growth rate increases with the diameter. The nucleation, initial growth, growth rates, defects, interface structures and growth direction of the nanowires were investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We found the structure and growth direction of ultra-thin nanowires are highly sensitive to growth temperatures and diameters of nanowires. At a low growth temperature (380°C), the growth direction for most nanowires is along <111>. Planar defects were found throughout the nanowires. At a high growth temperature (530°C), uniform nanowires with diameters around 10nm were grown along <110> and <112> directions, and the nanowires with diameters larger than 20nm were mainly grown along <111> direction. The possible growth mechanism of ultrathin nanowires was proposed by combining the solid catalytic growth with the interface diffusion theory, in order to explain how the growth temperature and the size of the catalysts influent the morphology, growth direction and growth rate of ultrathin nanowires. Structural and phase transformation of a nickel coated Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures has been investigated by the in-situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The phase transformation is a single-site nucleation process and therefore a single crystalline NiSi2 core resulted in the core-shell nanowire heterostructures. The transformation of the Si nanowire to NiSi2/SiC core-shell nanowire heterostructures was extremely

  8. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.; Edwards, T.B.

    1997-12-19

    Tetraphenylborate solids provide a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene.

  9. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  10. Thermal dryers for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, C.H.

    1993-12-01

    This article describes an indirect thermal dryer added to dewater solids before incineration of sewage sludge at a Buffalo, New York waste water treatment plant. In the first three months of operation, the solids inventory was reduced from about 799 tons to 250 tons. The solids processed in the plant's multiple hearth incinerators varied from 12 to 14 tons per hour.

  11. Batteries: Getting solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Materials with high ionic conductivity are urgently needed for the development of solid-state lithium batteries. Now, an inorganic solid electrolyte is shown to have an exceptionally high ionic conductivity of 25 mS cm‑1, which allows a solid-state battery to deliver 70% of its maximum capacity in just one minute at room temperature.

  12. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  13. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  14. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of uniformly sized core-shell imprinted microspheres for the separation trans-resveratrol from giant knotweed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Liu, Li; Li, Hui; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2009-09-01

    A novel core-shell molecularly imprinting microspheres (MIMs) with trans-resveratrol as the template molecule; acrylamide (AA) as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker, was prepared based on SiO 2 microspheres with surface imprinting technique. These core-shell trans-resveratrol imprinted microspheres were characterized by infrared spectra (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that these core-shell imprinted microspheres, which take on perfect spherical shape with average shell thickness of 150 nm, exhibit especially selective recognition for trans-resveratrol. These imprinted microspheres were applied as solid-phase extraction materials for selective extraction of trans-resveratrol from giant knotweed extracting solution successfully.

  16. Vibrations of moderately thick shallow spherical shells at large amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, M.

    1994-04-01

    A shallow shell theory is presented for the geometrically nonlinear analysis of moderately thick isotropic spherical shells. Effects of transverse shear deformation and rotatory inertia are included in the governing equations of motion by means of tracing constants. When these effects are ignored, the governing equations readily reduce to those applicable for thin shallow spherical shells. Solutions to the system of thick shell equations are obtained by means of Galerkin's method and the numerical Runge-Kutta procedure. Numerical results are presented for certain cases of shallow spherical shells considering different geometric shell parameters. Transverse shear and rotatory inertia effects are found to be important in linear as well as nonlinear responses of shallow spherical shells. The nonlinear frequency-amplitude behavior is of the softening type for shallow spherical shells and of the hardening type for circular plates. Frequency ratios are lower at any given amplitude when the effects of transverse shear and rotatory inertia are included in the analysis.

  17. MOND implications for spectral line profiles of shell galaxies: shell formation history and mass-velocity scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bílek, M.; Jungwiert, B.; Ebrová, I.; Bartošková, K.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Many ellipticals are surrounded by round stellar shells probably stemming from minor mergers. A new method for constraining gravitational potential in elliptical galaxies has recently been suggested. It uses the spectral line profiles of these shells to measure the circular velocity at the edge of the shell and the expansion velocity of the shell itself. MOND is an alternative to the dark matter framework aiming to solve the missing mass problem. Aims: We study how the circular and expansion velocities behave in MOND for large shells. Methods: The asymptotic behavior for infinitely large shells is derived analytically. The applicability of the asymptotic results for finitely sized shells is studied numerically on a grid of galaxies modeled with Sérsic spheres. Results: Circular velocity settles asymptotically at a value determined by the baryonic mass of the galaxy forming the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation known for disk galaxies. Shell expansion velocity also becomes asymptotically constant. The expansion velocities of large shells form a multibranched analogy to the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, together with the galactic baryonic masses. For many - but not all - shell galaxies, the asymptotic values of these two types of velocities are reached under the effective radius. If MOND is assumed to work in ellipticals, then the shell spectra allow many details of the history to be revealed about the formation of the shell system, including its age. The results pertaining to circular velocities apply to all elliptical galaxies, not only those with shells.

  18. On Newton’s shell theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2014-03-01

    In the present letter, Newton’s theorem for the gravitational field outside a uniform spherical shell is considered. In particular, a purely geometric proof of proposition LXXI/theorem XXXI of Newton’s Principia, which is suitable for undergraduates and even skilled high-school students, is proposed. Minimal knowledge of elementary calculus and three-dimensional Euclidean geometry are required.

  19. Shell seeks modifications to Mosconi sale

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, E.

    1993-01-06

    Privatization of Argentina's Petroquimica General Mosconi (PGM; Buenos Aires) got under way at the end of last years with three companies submitting technical bids. The interested parties are Shell Compania Argentina de Petroleo SA, Diamond Shamrock, and Panam - a group of local companies including Perez Companc, Laboratorios Phoenix, and Quitral. The technical bids include terms of reference and plans for PGM. Shell has sent a letter to the minister in charge of privatization saying it would not present its economic bid, due January 28, unless changes are made in the sale concerning feedstock supply contracts with state oil group YPF. Shell is concerned about the impact of YPF, which supplies PGM most feedstocks. Tender conditions state YPF will retain 30% of PGM, which will be renamed Petroquimica Platense, and will be the exclusive supplier of feestocks and one of the main buyers of product. Government authorities say no decision has been taken relating to Shell's request to change the contract, but they are reviewing the situation. Other bidders made no objections about the proposed conditions. The government is selling 64% of PGM, YPF will retain 30%, and the remainder will go to the workforce.

  20. Sanitation in the Shell Egg Processing Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hazard analysis and critical control programs (HACCP) will eventually be required for commercial shell egg processing plants. Sanitation is an essential prerequisite program for HACCP and is based upon current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) as listed in the Code of Federal Regulations. Good ...

  1. On the Theory of Thin Shallow Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarov, A. A.

    1956-01-01

    This report is concerned with the theory of thin shallow shells. It does not employ the lines of curvature as the coordinate system, but employs "almost cartesian coordinates" or the coordinates obtained by cutting the surface into two mutually orthogonal systems of parallel planes.

  2. Torrefaction of pomaces and nut shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical: Apple, grape, olive, and tomato pomaces as well as almond and walnut shells were torrefied at different temperatures and times in a muffle furnace. The fiber content and thermal stability of the raw byproducts were examined using fiber analysis and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respec...

  3. The 'shell effect': music from environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodati, Paolo

    2005-02-01

    The 'shell effect' can be used to play music with a pleasant and characteristic timbre. If you place a sensitive microphone at the rim of pipes of suitable length and diameter to obtain resonance frequencies, ambient noise will produce musical notes. The corresponding optical effect, i.e. extracting visible light from ambient radiation considered dark by the human eye, is also discussed.

  4. Orthotropic rotation-free thin shell elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munglani, Gautam; Vetter, Roman; Wittel, Falk K.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2015-11-01

    A method to simulate orthotropic behaviour in thin shell finite elements is proposed. The approach is based on the transformation of shape function derivatives, resulting in a new orthogonal basis aligned to a specified preferred direction for all elements. This transformation is carried out solely in the undeformed state leaving minimal additional impact on the computational effort expended to simulate orthotropic materials compared to isotropic, resulting in a straightforward and highly efficient implementation. This method is implemented for rotation-free triangular shells using the finite element framework built on the Kirchhoff-Love theory employing subdivision surfaces. The accuracy of this approach is demonstrated using the deformation of a pinched hemispherical shell (with a 18° hole) standard benchmark. To showcase the efficiency of this implementation, the wrinkling of orthotropic sheets under shear displacement is analyzed. It is found that orthotropic subdivision shells are able to capture the wrinkling behavior of sheets accurately for coarse meshes without the use of an additional wrinkling model.

  5. Dynamical Disorder in the DNA Hydration Shell.

    PubMed

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Fogarty, Aoife C; Hynes, James T; Laage, Damien

    2016-06-22

    The reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics of water molecules within the hydration shell of a B-DNA dodecamer, which are of interest for many of its biochemical functions, are investigated via molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump model, which provide valuable new molecular level insights into these dynamics. Different sources of heterogeneity in the hydration shell dynamics are determined. First, a pronounced spatial heterogeneity is found at the DNA interface and explained via the jump model by the diversity in local DNA interfacial topographies and DNA-water H-bond interactions. While most of the hydration shell is moderately retarded with respect to the bulk, some water molecules confined in the narrow minor groove exhibit very slow dynamics. An additional source of heterogeneity is found to be caused by the DNA conformational fluctuations, which modulate the water dynamics. The groove widening aids the approach of, and the jump to, a new water H-bond partner. This temporal heterogeneity is especially strong in the minor groove, where groove width fluctuations occur on the same time scale as the water H-bond rearrangements, leading to a strong dynamical disorder. The usual simplifying assumption that hydration shell dynamics is much faster than DNA dynamics is thus not valid; our results show that biomolecular conformational fluctuations are essential to facilitate the water motions and accelerate the hydration dynamics in confined groove sites. PMID:27240107

  6. Polarimetry of nacre in iridescent shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R. A.; Burgess, C.; Regan, B.; Spano, S.; Galvez, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the light transmitted or reflected from nacre (mother of pearl) taken from the iridescent shell of the bivalve Pinctad a fucata. These nacre surfaces have a rich structure, composed of aragonite crystals arranged as tablets or bricks, 5 μm wide and 400-500 nm thick, surrounded by 30nm thick organic mortar. The light reflected from these shell surfaces, or transmitted through thin polished layers, is rich in its polarization content, exhibiting a space dependent variation in the state of polarization with a high density of polarization singularities. Our goal is to use the polarization information to infer the structure of the biominerals and the role of the organic layer in determining the orientation of the crystals. In the experiments we send the light from a laser with a uniform state of polarization onto the shell, and analyze the light that is either transmitted or reflected, depending on the type of experiment, imaging it after its passage through polarization filters. We use the images from distinct filters to obtain the Stokes parameters, and hence the state of polarization, of each image point. We also construct the Mueller matrix for each imaged point, via 36 measurements. We do this for distinct physical and chemical treatments of the shell sample. Preliminary data shows that the organic layer may be responsible for organizing a multi-crystalline arrangement of aragonite tablets.

  7. BOWOOSS: bionic optimized wood shells with sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Göran

    2011-04-01

    In architecture, shell construction is used for the most efficient, large spatial structures. Until now the use of wood rather played a marginal role, implementing those examples of architecture, although this material offers manifold advantages, especially against the background of accelerating shortage of resources and increasing requirements concerning the energy balance. Regarding the implementation of shells, nature offers a wide range of suggestions. The focus of the examinations is on the shells of marine plankton, especially of diatoms, whose richness in species promises the discovery of entirely new construction principles. The project is targeting at transferring advantageous features of these organisms on industrial produced, modular wood shell structures. Currently a transfer of these structures in CAD - models is taking place, helping to perform stress analysis by computational methods. Micro as well as macro structures are the subject of diverse consideration, allowing to draw the necessary conclusions for an architectural design. The insights of these tests are the basis for the development of physical models on different scales, which are used to verify the different approaches. Another important aim which is promoted in the project is to enhance the competitiveness of timber construction. Downsizing of the prefabricated structural elements leads to considerable lower transportation costs as abnormal loads can be avoided as far as possible and means of transportation can be loaded with higher efficiency so that an important contribution to the sustainability in the field of architecture can also be made.

  8. Helium-Shell Nucleosynthesis and Extinct Radioactivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; El Eid, M. F.

    2004-03-01

    We present details of explosive nucleosynthesis in the helium-burning shell of a 25 solar mass star. We describe the production of short-lived radioactivities in this environment. We finally describe how to access the details of our calculations over the world-wide web.

  9. PEANUT SHELL FUEL FOR THE GAMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project will develop a household-scale human-powered briquette maker that will convert peanut shells into an efficient cooking fuel. The briquette maker will be designed such that it can be manufactured and used in The Gambia.

  10. Shell corrections, magic numbers, and mean field

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. Yu.

    2007-02-15

    It is shown that the positions of deep local minima of shell corrections associated with magic numbers in the region of superheavy nuclei depend on the parameters of the central and spin-orbit mean-field potentials. The accuracy of nuclear-mass predictions made within various models for superheavy nuclei is analyzed.

  11. On-Shell Methods in Perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Kosower, David A.

    2007-04-25

    We review on-shell methods for computing multi-parton scattering amplitudes in perturbative QCD, utilizing their unitarity and factorization properties. We focus on aspects which are useful for the construction of one-loop amplitudes needed for phenomenological studies at the Large Hadron Collider.

  12. Continuous representation for shell models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailybaev, Alexei A.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we construct and analyze continuous hydrodynamic models in one space dimension, which are induced by shell models of turbulence. After Fourier transformation, such continuous models split into an infinite number of uncoupled subsystems, which are all identical to the same shell model. The two shell models, which allow such a construction, are considered: the dyadic (Desnyansky-Novikov) model with the intershell ratio λ = 23/2 and the Sabra model of turbulence with λ = \\sqrt{2+\\sqrt{5}} ≈ 2.058 . The continuous models allow for understanding of various properties of shell model solutions and provide their interpretation in physical space. We show that the asymptotic solutions of the dyadic model with Kolmogorov scaling correspond to the shocks (discontinuities) for the induced continuous solutions in physical space, and the finite-time blowup together with its viscous regularization follow the scenario similar to the Burgers equation. For the Sabra model, we provide the physical space representation for blowup solutions and intermittent turbulent dynamics.

  13. 7 CFR 983.29 - Shelled pistachios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled pistachios. 983.29 Section 983.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  14. Oyster shell calcium induced parotid swelling

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Muthiah; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; Srinivasamurthy, Sureshkumar; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2014-01-01

    A 59 year old female consumer was started on therapy with oyster shell calcium in combination with vitamin D3 and she presented with swelling below the ear, after two doses. She stopped the drug by herself and the swelling disappeared in one day. She started the drug one day after recovery and again she developed the swelling. She was advised to stop the drug with a suggestion to take lemon to enhance parotid secretion and the swelling subsided. Calcium plays major role in salivary secretion and studies have shown reduced parotid secretion in rats, deficient of vitamin D. But in humans involvement of calcium and vitamin D3 in parotid secretion is unknown. However, the patient had no history of reaction though she had previously taken vitamin D3 with calcium carbonate which was not from oyster shell. Hence, we ruled out vitamin D3 in this reaction and suspecting oyster shell calcium as a culprit. This adverse drug reaction (ADR) was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) causality assessment, Naranjo's and Hartwig severity scales. As per WHO causality assessment scale, the ADR was classified as “certain”. This reaction was analyzed as per Naranjo's algorithm and was classified as probable. According to Hartwig's severity scale the reaction was rated as mild. Our case is an example of a mild but rare adverse effect of oyster shell calcium carbonate which is widely used. PMID:25422569

  15. Quality and Composition of Retail Shell Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumers are becoming more aware of their food choices. As part of this movement, sourcing and production information is often desired for agricultural products. Furthermore, products associated with added health benefits are also becoming more common in the marketplace. The US shell egg industr...

  16. Morphology-controlled synthesis of Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide with superior photocatalytic activity under visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shixiong; Yang, Xiangjun; Wang, Yapeng; Liu, Lixiang; Guo, Yuanyuan; Guo, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates are fabricated through an environmental template-free route and the reduction reaction at low temperature subsequently. After the Ti{sup 3+} doping, the reduced TiO{sub 2} sample exhibits a wide visible-light absorption ranged from 400 nm to 800 nm. The intrinsic hollow core–shell microstructure can make multiple reflections of light within the chamber, and thus results in more efficient use of the light source compared with solid structure. Besides, the large surface area can render the sample with a high activity. Therefore, Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. This strategy is simple, cheap and mass-productive, which may shed light on a new avenue for large scale production of self-doped yolk–shell structural nano functional materials for catalyst, sensors, energy storage and other new applications. - Graphical abstract: A facile generic strategy is employed to prepare Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. - Highlights: • Yolk–shell TiO{sub 2} mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. • Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide is obtained at low temperature. • It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity.

  17. High performance of SDC and GDC core shell type composite electrolytes using methane as a fuel for low temperature SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Muneeb; Siraj, Khurram; Raza, Rizwan; Javed, Fayyaz; Ahsan, Muhammad; Shakir, Imran; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid

    2016-02-01

    Nanocomposites Samarium doped Ceria (SDC), Gadolinium doped Ceria (GDC), core shell SDC amorphous Na2CO3 (SDCC) and GDC amorphous Na2CO3 (GDCC) were synthesized using co-precipitation method and then compared to obtain better solid oxide electrolytes materials for low temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFCs). The comparison is done in terms of structure, crystallanity, thermal stability, conductivity and cell performance. In present work, XRD analysis confirmed proper doping of Sm and Gd in both single phase (SDC, GDC) and dual phase core shell (SDCC, GDCC) electrolyte materials. EDX analysis validated the presence of Sm and Gd in both single and dual phase electrolyte materials; also confirming the presence of amorphous Na2CO3 in SDCC and GDCC. From TGA analysis a steep weight loss is observed in case of SDCC and GDCC when temperature rises above 725 °C while SDC and GDC do not show any loss. The ionic conductivity and cell performance of single phase SDC and GDC nanocomposite were compared with core shell GDC/amorphous Na2CO3 and SDC/ amorphous Na2CO3 nanocomposites using methane fuel. It is observed that dual phase core shell electrolytes materials (SDCC, GDCC) show better performance in low temperature range than their corresponding single phase electrolyte materials (SDC, GDC) with methane fuel.

  18. Polymer-encapsulated carbon capture liquids that tolerate precipitation of solids for increased capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, Roger D; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2015-02-03

    A system for carbon dioxide capture from flue gas and other industrial gas sources utilizes microcapsules with very thin polymer shells. The contents of the microcapsules can be liquids or mixtures of liquids and solids. The microcapsules are exposed to the flue gas and other industrial gas and take up carbon dioxide from the flue gas and other industrial gas and eventual precipitate solids in the capsule.

  19. Background and basis for a knowledge elicitation shell for lifetime predictions from stress corrosion cracking data

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    An ideal expert system should closely reproduce the functions normally performed by the original source expert(s). But the complex transformations of a lifetime of industrial expertise into conveniently accessible software requires the willing and active participation of domain experts whose knowledge is rarely organized for such a transformation. The matching of logical and meticulous knowledge elicitation with memory-based judgments and expertise has often proved to be a difficult task. This paper describes an approach to construct a knowledge elicitation shell specifically adapted to the field of corrosion-related problems and expertise. The knowledge elicitation shell was structured along the lines of what has recently become the framework for the transfer of corrosion information to management and design engineers. The recent work published by Professor R.W. Staehle on the general topic of lifetime prediction and the impact of stress corrosion cracking on materials was used for this task. One obvious advantage of using an established formalism is the availability of supporting documentation and background material. The advantage of using Professor Staehle`s work in particular is the clarity of his points of view that reflect a solid career in materials science and engineering. In this paper, the environment-induced cracking of high-strength aluminum alloys is used as an example to illustrate how the elicitation shell could be activated. It is believed that, by using the elicitation shell, human experts will have to rationalize some aspects of their expertise and subsequently become able to establish new links between facts and corrosion data. The process of building tables of certainty factors during the shell operation and interaction with users is also discussed.

  20. Estimation of the CSA-ODF using Bayesian Compressed Sensing of Multi-shell HARDI

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Carvajalino, Julio M.; Lenglet, Christophe; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Moeller, Steen; Carin, Lawrence; Sapiro, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion MRI provides important information about the brain white matter structures and has opened new avenues for neuroscience and translational research. However, acquisition time needed for advanced applications can still be a challenge in clinical settings. There is consequently a need to accelerate diffusion MRI acquisitions. Methods A multi-task Bayesian compressive sensing (MT-BCS) framework is proposed to directly estimate the constant solid angle orientation distribution function (CSA-ODF) from under-sampled (i.e., accelerated image acquisition) multi-shell high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) datasets, and accurately recover HARDI data at higher resolution in q-space. The proposed MT-BCS approach exploits the spatial redundancy of the data by modeling the statistical relationships within groups (clusters) of diffusion signal. This framework also provides uncertainty estimates of the computed CSA-ODF and diffusion signal, directly computed from the compressive measurements. Experiments validating the proposed framework are performed using realistic multi-shell synthetic images and in-vivo multi-shell high angular resolution HARDI datasets. Results Results indicate a practical reduction in the number of required diffusion volumes (q-space samples) by at least a factor of four to estimate the CSA-ODF from multi-shell data. Conclusion This work presents, for the first time, a multi-task Bayesian compressive sensing approach to simultaneously estimate the full posterior of the CSA-ODF and diffusion-weighted volumes from multi-shell HARDI acquisitions. It demonstrates improvement of the quality of acquired datasets via CS de-noising, and accurate estimation of the CSA-ODF, as well as enables a reduction in the acquisition time by a factor of two to four, especially when “staggered” q-space sampling schemes are used. The proposed MT-BCS framework can naturally be combined with parallel MR imaging to further accelerate HARDI acquisitions