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Sample records for 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient mutator phenotype

  1. Phenotypic clustering in MPZ mutations.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E; Jáni, Agnes; Krajewski, Karen; Grandis, Marina; Lewis, Richard A; Li, Jun; Shy, Rosemary R; Balsamo, Janne; Lilien, Jack; Garbern, James Y; Kamholz, John

    2004-02-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily with single extracellular, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Homotypic interactions between extracellular domains of MPZ adhere adjacent myelin wraps to each other. MPZ is also necessary for myelin compaction since mice which lack MPZ develop severe dysmyelinating neuropathies in which compaction is dramatically disrupted. MPZ mutations in humans cause the inherited demyelinating neuropathy CMT1B. Some mutations cause the severe neuropathies of infancy designated as Dejerine-Sottas disease, while others cause a 'classical' Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease Type 1B (CMT1B) phenotype with normal early milestones but development of disability during the first two decades of life. Still other mutations cause a neuropathy that presents in adults, with normal nerve conduction velocities, designated as a 'CMT2' form of CMT1B. To correlate the phenotype of patients with MPZ mutations with their genotype, we identified and evaluated 13 patients from 12 different families with eight different MPZ mutations. In addition, we re-analysed the clinical data from 64 cases of CMT1B from the literature. Contrary to our expectations, we found that most patients presented with either an early onset neuropathy with signs and symptoms prior to the onset of walking or a late onset neuropathy with signs and symptoms at around age 40 years. Only occasional patients presented with a 'classical' CMT phenotype. Correlation of specific MPZ mutations with their phenotypes demonstrated that addition of either a charged amino acid or altering a cysteine residue in the extracellular domain caused a severe early onset neuropathy. Severe neuropathy was also caused by truncation of the cytoplasmic domain or alteration of an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. Taken together, these data suggest that early onset neuropathy is caused by MPZ mutations that significantly disrupt the tertiary structure of MPZ and thus

  2. The Evolutionary Potential of Phenotypic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Hayato; Gispan, Ariel; Kadouri, Noam; Rozen, Shelly; Sharon, Michal; Barkai, Naama; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Errors in protein synthesis, so-called phenotypic mutations, are orders-of-magnitude more frequent than genetic mutations. Here, we provide direct evidence that alternative protein forms and phenotypic variability derived from translational errors paved the path to genetic, evolutionary adaptations via gene duplication. We explored the evolutionary origins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IDP3 - an NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase mediating fatty acids ß-oxidation in the peroxisome. Following the yeast whole genome duplication, IDP3 diverged from a cytosolic ancestral gene by acquisition of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal. We discovered that the pre-duplicated cytosolic IDPs are partially localized to the peroxisome owing to +1 translational frameshifts that bypass the stop codon and unveil cryptic peroxisomal targeting signals within the 3’-UTR. Exploring putative cryptic signals in all 3’-UTRs of yeast genomes, we found that other enzymes related to NADPH production such as pyruvate carboxylase 1 (PYC1) might be prone to peroxisomal localization via cryptic signals. Using laboratory evolution we found that these translational frameshifts are rapidly imprinted via genetic single base deletions occurring within the very same gene location. Further, as exemplified here, the sequences that promote translational frameshifts are also more prone to genetic deletions. Thus, genotypes conferring higher phenotypic variability not only meet immediate challenges by unveiling cryptic 3’-UTR sequences, but also boost the potential for future genetic adaptations. PMID:26244544

  3. The Evolutionary Potential of Phenotypic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Hayato; Gispan, Ariel; Kadouri, Noam; Rozen, Shelly; Sharon, Michal; Barkai, Naama; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Errors in protein synthesis, so-called phenotypic mutations, are orders-of-magnitude more frequent than genetic mutations. Here, we provide direct evidence that alternative protein forms and phenotypic variability derived from translational errors paved the path to genetic, evolutionary adaptations via gene duplication. We explored the evolutionary origins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IDP3 - an NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase mediating fatty acids ß-oxidation in the peroxisome. Following the yeast whole genome duplication, IDP3 diverged from a cytosolic ancestral gene by acquisition of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal. We discovered that the pre-duplicated cytosolic IDPs are partially localized to the peroxisome owing to +1 translational frameshifts that bypass the stop codon and unveil cryptic peroxisomal targeting signals within the 3'-UTR. Exploring putative cryptic signals in all 3'-UTRs of yeast genomes, we found that other enzymes related to NADPH production such as pyruvate carboxylase 1 (PYC1) might be prone to peroxisomal localization via cryptic signals. Using laboratory evolution we found that these translational frameshifts are rapidly imprinted via genetic single base deletions occurring within the very same gene location. Further, as exemplified here, the sequences that promote translational frameshifts are also more prone to genetic deletions. Thus, genotypes conferring higher phenotypic variability not only meet immediate challenges by unveiling cryptic 3'-UTR sequences, but also boost the potential for future genetic adaptations.

  4. Why Are Phenotypic Mutation Rates Much Higher Than Genotypic Mutation Rates?

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Reinhard; Willensdorfer, Martin; Nowak, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of genotypic mutation rates has been investigated in numerous theoretical and experimental studies. Mutations, however, occur not only when copying DNA, but also when building the phenotype, especially when translating and transcribing DNA to RNA and protein. Here we study the effect of such phenotypic mutations. We find a maximum phenotypic mutation rate, umax, that is compatible with maintaining a certain function of the organism. This may be called a phenotypic error threshold. In particular, we find a minimum phenotypic mutation rate, umin, with the property that there is (nearly) no selection pressure to reduce the rate of phenotypic mutations below this value. If there is a cost for lowering the phenotypic mutation rate, then umin is close to the optimum phenotypic mutation rate that maximizes the fitness of the organism. In our model, there is selective pressure to decrease the rate of genotypic mutations to zero, but to decrease the rate of phenotypic mutations only to a positive value. Despite its simplicity, our model can explain part of the huge difference between genotypic and phenotypic mutation rates that is observed in nature. The relevant data are summarized. PMID:16143614

  5. Human phenylalanine hydroxylase mutations and hyperphenylalaninemia phenotypes: a metanalysis of genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, E; Treacy, E; Waters, P J; Byck, S; Nowacki, P; Scriver, C R

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed correlations between mutant genotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase locus (gene symbol PAH) and the corresponding hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) phenotypes (notably, phenylketonuria [OMIM 261600]). We used reports, both published and in the PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium Database, on 365 patients harboring 73 different PAH mutations in 161 different genotypes. HPA phenotypes were classified as phenylketonuria (PKU), variant PKU, and non-PKU HPA. By analysis both of homoallelic mutant genotypes and of "functionally hemizygous" heteroallelic genotypes, we characterized the phenotypic effect of 48 of the 73 different, largely missense mutations. Among those with consistent in vivo expression, 24 caused PKU, 3 caused variant PKU, and 10 caused non-PKU HPA. However, 11 mutations were inconsistent in their effect: 9 appeared in two different phenotype classes, and 2 (I65T and Y414C) appeared in all three classes. Seven mutations were inconsistent in phenotypic effect when in vitro (unit-protein) expression was compared with the corresponding in vivo phenotype (an emergent property). We conclude that the majority of PAH mutations confer a consistent phenotype and that this is concordant with their effects, when known, predicted from in vitro expression analysis. However, significant inconsistencies, both between in vitro and in vivo phenotypes and between different individuals with similar PAH genotypes, reveal that the HPA-phenotype is more complex than that predicted by Mendelian inheritance of alleles at the PAH locus. PMID:9399896

  6. Volatility of Mutator Phenotypes at Single Cell Resolution.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott R; Schultz, Eric M; Chappell, Thomas M; Kohrn, Brendan; Knowels, Gary M; Herr, Alan J

    2015-04-01

    Mutator phenotypes accelerate the evolutionary process of neoplastic transformation. Historically, the measurement of mutation rates has relied on scoring the occurrence of rare mutations in target genes in large populations of cells. Averaging mutation rates over large cell populations assumes that new mutations arise at a constant rate during each cell division. If the mutation rate is not constant, an expanding mutator population may contain subclones with widely divergent rates of evolution. Here, we report mutation rate measurements of individual cell divisions of mutator yeast deficient in DNA polymerase ε proofreading and base-base mismatch repair. Our data are best fit by a model in which cells can assume one of two distinct mutator states, with mutation rates that differ by an order of magnitude. In error-prone cell divisions, mutations occurred on the same chromosome more frequently than expected by chance, often in DNA with similar predicted replication timing, consistent with a spatiotemporal dimension to the hypermutator state. Mapping of mutations onto predicted replicons revealed that mutations were enriched in the first half of the replicon as well as near termination zones. Taken together, our findings show that individual genome replication events exhibit an unexpected volatility that may deepen our understanding of the evolution of mutator-driven malignancies.

  7. Extended phenotypic spectrum of KIF5A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Laurá, Matilde; Hersheson, Joshua; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Pittman, Alan; Hughes, Deborah; Polke, James M.; Sweeney, Mary G.; Proukakis, Christos; Janssen, John C.; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Zuchner, Stephan; Shields, Kevin G.; Reilly, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish the phenotypic spectrum of KIF5A mutations and to investigate whether KIF5A mutations cause axonal neuropathy associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) or typical Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Methods: KIF5A sequencing of the motor-domain coding exons was performed in 186 patients with the clinical diagnosis of HSP and in 215 patients with typical CMT2. Another 66 patients with HSP or CMT2 with pyramidal signs were sequenced for all exons of KIF5A by targeted resequencing. One additional patient was genetically diagnosed by whole-exome sequencing. Results: Five KIF5A mutations were identified in 6 unrelated patients: R204W and D232N were novel mutations; R204Q, R280C, and R280H have been previously reported. Three patients had CMT2 as the predominant and presenting phenotype; 2 of them also had pyramidal signs. The other 3 patients presented with HSP but also had significant axonal neuropathy or other additional features. Conclusion: This is currently the largest study investigating KIF5A mutations. By combining next-generation sequencing and conventional sequencing, we confirm that KIF5A mutations can cause variable phenotypes ranging from HSP to CMT2. The identification of mutations in CMT2 broadens the phenotypic spectrum and underlines the importance of KIF5A mutations, which involve degeneration of both the central and peripheral nervous systems and should be tested in HSP and CMT2. PMID:25008398

  8. Phenotypic Involvement in Females with the FMR1 Gene Mutation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, J. E.; Cheema, A.; Sobesky, W. E.; Gardner, S. C.; Taylor, A. K.; Pennington, B. F.; Hagerman, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated phenotypic effects seen in 114 females with premutation and 41 females (ages 18-58) with full Fragile X mental retardation gene mutation. Those with the full mutation had a greater incidence of hand-flapping, eye contact problems, special education help for reading and math, and grade retention. (Author/CR)

  9. Cardiac Sodium Channel Mutations: Why so Many Phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Yang, K-C; Dudley, S C

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac Na(+) channel (Nav1.5) conducts a depolarizing inward Na(+) current that is responsible for the generation of the upstroke Phase 0 of the action potential. In heart tissue, changes in Na(+) currents can affect conduction velocity and impulse propagation. The cardiac Nav1.5 is also involved in determination of the action potential duration, since some channels may reopen during the plateau phase, generating a persistent or late inward current. Mutations of cardiac Nav1.5 can induce gain or loss of channel function because of an increased late current or a decrease of peak current, respectively. Gain-of-function mutations cause Long QT syndrome type 3 and possibly atrial fibrillation, while loss-of-function channel mutations are associated with a wider variety of phenotypes, such as Brugada syndrome, cardiac conduction disease, dilated cardiomyopathy, and sick sinus node syndrome. The penetrance and phenotypes resulting from Nav1.5 mutations also vary with age, gender, body temperature, circadian rhythm, and between regions of the heart. This phenotypic variability makes it difficult to correlate genotype-phenotype. We propose that mutations are only one contributor to the phenotype and additional modifications on Nav1.5 lead to the phenotypic variability. Possible modifiers include other genetic variations and alterations in the life cycle of Nav1.5 such as gene transcription, RNA processing, translation, posttranslational modifications, trafficking, complex assembly, and degradation. In this chapter, we summarize potential modifiers of cardiac Nav1.5 that could help explain the clinically observed phenotypic variability. Consideration of these modifiers could help improve genotype-phenotype correlations and lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27586294

  10. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve.

  11. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. PMID:24214728

  12. Mutations and phenotype in isolated glycerol kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. P.; Muscatelli, F.; Stafford, A. N.; Chelly, J.; Dahl, N.; Blomquist, H. K.; Delanghe, J.; Willems, P. J.; Steinmann, B.; Monaco, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that isolated glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency in three families results from mutation of the Xp21 GK gene. GK mutations were detected in four patients with widely differing phenotypes. Patient 1 had a splice-site mutation causing premature termination. His general health was good despite absent GK activity, indicating that isolated GK deficiency can be silent. Patient 2 had GK deficiency and a severe phenotype involving psychomotor retardation and growth delay, bone dysplasia, and seizures, similar to the severe phenotype of one of the first described cases of GK deficiency. His younger brother, patient 3, also had GK deficiency, but so far his development has been normal. GK exon 17 was deleted in both brothers, implicating additional factors in causation of the severe phenotype of patient 2. Patient 4 had both GK deficiency with mental retardation and a GK missense mutation (D440V). Possible explanations for the phenotypic variation of these four patients include ascertainment bias; metabolic or environmental stress as a precipitating factor in revealing GK-related changes, as has previously been described in juvenile GK deficiency; and interactions with functional polymorphisms in other genes that alter the effect of GK deficiency on normal development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8651297

  13. CMT4D (NDRG1 mutation): genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Emilie; Mathis, Stéphane; Magdelaine, Corinne; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Magy, Laurent; Funalot, Benoît; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2013-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous condition with a large number of clinical, electrophysiological and pathological phenotypes. More than 40 genes are involved. We report a child of gypsy origin with an autosomal recessive demyelinating phenotype. Clinical data, familial history, and electrophysiological studies were in favor of a CMT4 sub-type. The characteristic N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) mutation responsible for this CMT4D phenotype was confirmed: p.R148X. The exact molecular function of the NDRG1 protein has yet to be elucidated.

  14. Truncating mutations in APP cause a distinct neurological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Klein, Steven; Goldman, Alexander; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Bhakta, Viraj; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2016-09-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) gene have been implicated in early onset Alzheimer disease. These mutations alter protein structure to favor the pathologic production of Aβ. We report that homozygous nonsense mutations in APP are associated with decreased somatic growth, microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, thinning of the corpus callosum, and seizures. We compare the phenotype of this case to those reported in mouse models and demonstrate multiple similarities, strengthening the role of amyloid precursor protein in normal brain function and development. Ann Neurol 2016;80:456-460. PMID:27422356

  15. Fragile X mutation and FG syndrome-like phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Piussan, C.; Mathieu, M.; Berquin, P.

    1996-08-09

    We present data on 4 mentally retarded brothers, 2 of whom were dizygotic twins with congenital hypotonia, constipation, head size disproportionately large for length or height, and a combination of minor anomalies suggestive of FG syndrome. These brothers have a mentally retarded full sister with similar minor anomalies and an older half-brother with the Martin-Bell syndrome. The mother is mentally retarded; 4 of 7 individuals are positive for fragile X, but all have a CGG expansion ranging from 0.2-2 to 4 kb. Although the phenotype is not completely typical of the FG syndrome and the coincidence of the FMR1 mutation and segregation of the MCA/MR phenotype are highly unlikely, the FMR1 mutation may affect morphogenesis more extensively and differently than the Martin-Bell syndrome does to effect an FG syndrome-like phenotype in certain families. This phenotype does not appear to be a contiguous gene syndrome, but an effect of the FMR1 mutation on an adjacent gene must be considered. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Otopalatodigital spectrum disorders: refinement of the phenotypic and mutational spectrum.

    PubMed

    Moutton, Sébastien; Fergelot, Patricia; Naudion, Sophie; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Solé, Guilhem; Guerineau, Elodie; Hubert, Christophe; Rooryck, Caroline; Vuillaume, Marie-Laure; Houcinat, Nada; Deforges, Julie; Bouron, Julie; Devès, Sylvie; Le Merrer, Martine; David, Albert; Geneviève, David; Giuliano, Fabienne; Journel, Hubert; Megarbane, André; Faivre, Laurence; Chassaing, Nicolas; Francannet, Christine; Sarrazin, Elisabeth; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Leclair, Danielle; Abadie, Caroline; Sarda, Pierre; Baumann, Clarisse; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Arveiler, Benoit; Lacombe, Didier; Goizet, Cyril; Coupry, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Otopalatodigital spectrum disorders (OPDSD) constitute a group of dominant X-linked osteochondrodysplasias including four syndromes: otopalatodigital syndromes type 1 and type 2 (OPD1 and OPD2), frontometaphyseal dysplasia, and Melnick-Needles syndrome. These syndromes variably associate specific facial and extremities features, hearing loss, cleft palate, skeletal dysplasia and several malformations, and show important clinical overlap over the different entities. FLNA gain-of-function mutations were identified in these conditions. FLNA encodes filamin A, a scaffolding actin-binding protein. Here, we report phenotypic descriptions and molecular results of FLNA analysis in a large series of 27 probands hypothesized to be affected by OPDSD. We identified 11 different missense mutations in 15 unrelated probands (n=15/27, 56%), of which seven were novel, including one of unknown significance. Segregation analyses within families made possible investigating 20 additional relatives carrying a mutation. This series allows refining the phenotypic and mutational spectrum of FLNA mutations causing OPDSD, and providing suggestions to avoid the overdiagnosis of OPD1. PMID:27193221

  17. Otopalatodigital spectrum disorders: refinement of the phenotypic and mutational spectrum.

    PubMed

    Moutton, Sébastien; Fergelot, Patricia; Naudion, Sophie; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Solé, Guilhem; Guerineau, Elodie; Hubert, Christophe; Rooryck, Caroline; Vuillaume, Marie-Laure; Houcinat, Nada; Deforges, Julie; Bouron, Julie; Devès, Sylvie; Le Merrer, Martine; David, Albert; Geneviève, David; Giuliano, Fabienne; Journel, Hubert; Megarbane, André; Faivre, Laurence; Chassaing, Nicolas; Francannet, Christine; Sarrazin, Elisabeth; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Leclair, Danielle; Abadie, Caroline; Sarda, Pierre; Baumann, Clarisse; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Arveiler, Benoit; Lacombe, Didier; Goizet, Cyril; Coupry, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Otopalatodigital spectrum disorders (OPDSD) constitute a group of dominant X-linked osteochondrodysplasias including four syndromes: otopalatodigital syndromes type 1 and type 2 (OPD1 and OPD2), frontometaphyseal dysplasia, and Melnick-Needles syndrome. These syndromes variably associate specific facial and extremities features, hearing loss, cleft palate, skeletal dysplasia and several malformations, and show important clinical overlap over the different entities. FLNA gain-of-function mutations were identified in these conditions. FLNA encodes filamin A, a scaffolding actin-binding protein. Here, we report phenotypic descriptions and molecular results of FLNA analysis in a large series of 27 probands hypothesized to be affected by OPDSD. We identified 11 different missense mutations in 15 unrelated probands (n=15/27, 56%), of which seven were novel, including one of unknown significance. Segregation analyses within families made possible investigating 20 additional relatives carrying a mutation. This series allows refining the phenotypic and mutational spectrum of FLNA mutations causing OPDSD, and providing suggestions to avoid the overdiagnosis of OPD1.

  18. Phenotypic effect of mutations in evolving populations of RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The secondary structure of folded RNA sequences is a good model to map phenotype onto genotype, as represented by the RNA sequence. Computational studies of the evolution of ensembles of RNA molecules towards target secondary structures yield valuable clues to the mechanisms behind adaptation of complex populations. The relationship between the space of sequences and structures, the organization of RNA ensembles at mutation-selection equilibrium, the time of adaptation as a function of the population parameters, the presence of collective effects in quasispecies, or the optimal mutation rates to promote adaptation all are issues that can be explored within this framework. Results We investigate the effect of microscopic mutations on the phenotype of RNA molecules during their in silico evolution and adaptation. We calculate the distribution of the effects of mutations on fitness, the relative fractions of beneficial and deleterious mutations and the corresponding selection coefficients for populations evolving under different mutation rates. Three different situations are explored: the mutation-selection equilibrium (optimized population) in three different fitness landscapes, the dynamics during adaptation towards a goal structure (adapting population), and the behavior under periodic population bottlenecks (perturbed population). Conclusions The ratio between the number of beneficial and deleterious mutations experienced by a population of RNA sequences increases with the value of the mutation rate μ at which evolution proceeds. In contrast, the selective value of mutations remains almost constant, independent of μ, indicating that adaptation occurs through an increase in the amount of beneficial mutations, with little variations in the average effect they have on fitness. Statistical analyses of the distribution of fitness effects reveal that small effects, either beneficial or deleterious, are well described by a Pareto distribution. These results

  19. Human Cancers Express a Mutator Phenotype: Hypothesis, Origin, and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2016-01-01

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis was postulated more than 40 years ago. It was based on the multiple enzymatic steps required to precisely replicate the 6 billion bases in the human genome each time a normal cell divides. A reduction in this accuracy during tumor progression could be responsible for the striking heterogeneity of malignant cells within a tumor and for the rapidity by which cancers become resistant to therapy. PMID:27197248

  20. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations by Ethnicity and Mutation Location in BRCA Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Soley; Jackson, Michelle; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Liu, Diane; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Brandt, Amanda; Woodson, Ashley; Litton, Jennifer; Lu, Karen H; Valero, Vicente; Arun, Banu K

    2015-01-01

    The genotype-phenotype correlations of the specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in multi-ethnic populations in USA have not yet been fully investigated. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of ethnicity at specific mutation locations and breast/ovarian cancer phenotypes. Our cohort included 445 women with different ethnic backgrounds who underwent BRCA genetic testing between 1997 and 2010. Known clinical and pathologic characteristics were compared with Chi-Square Analysis or Fisher's Exact test as appropriate. The three most common mutation locations in BRCA1 (exons 2, 11, and 20) and BRCA2 (exons 10, 11, and 25) genes were chosen. Prevalence of BRCA1 exon 2 mutations were significantly higher in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women compared to Caucasians (41% versus 15%; p = 0.001). Similarly, AJ women with breast cancer were more likely to have BRCA1 exon 2 mutation (47% positivity in AJ women versus 0-12.5% positivity in other ethnicities; p = 0.004). Women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation had the highest probability of having combined breast and ovarian cancers compared to women carrying other exon mutations (p = 0.05). The median age at initial cancer diagnosis, phenotypic features of breast cancer tumors, and overall survival did not vary significantly by ethnicity or mutation location. Our data suggest that ethnicity does not affect age of onset, overall survival or confer different risks of breast and ovarian cancer development in BRCA carriers. These results also suggest that women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation may warrant mutation-specific counseling and be more aggressively managed for risk reduction.

  1. Point mutation instability (PIN) mutator phenotype as model for true back mutations seen in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 - a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Etresia; Pretorius, Pieter J

    2012-05-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolism pathway. The liver mosaicism observed in HT1 patients is due to the reversion to the wild type of one allele of the original point mutation in fah. It is generally accepted that these reversions are true back mutations; however, the mechanism is still unresolved. Previous reports excluded intragenic recombination, mitotic recombination, or homologous recombination with a pseudogene as possible mechanisms of mutation reversion in HT1. Sequence analysis did not reveal DNA motifs, tandem repeats or other sequence peculiarities that may be involved in mutation reversion. We propose the hypothesis that a point mutation instability mutator (PIN) phenotype brought about by the sustained stress environment created by the accumulating metabolites in the cell is the driver of the true back mutations in HT1. The metabolites accumulating in HT1 create a sustained stress environment by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT survival pathways, inducing aberrant mitosis and development of death resistant cells, depleting glutathione, and impairing DNA ligase IV and possibly DNA polymerases δ and ε. This continual production of proliferative and stress-related survival signals in the cellular environment coupled with the mutagenicity of FAA, may instigate a mutator phenotype and could end in tumorigenesis and/or mutation reversion. The establishment of a PIN-mutator phenotype therefore not only seems to be a possible mechanism underlying the true back mutations, but also contributes to explaining the clinical heterogeneity seen in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

  2. Cellular characterization of MPZ mutations presenting with diverse clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chung; Lin, Kon-Ping; Chang, Ming-Hong; Liao, Yi-Chu; Tsai, Ching-Piao; Liao, Kwong-Kum; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in MPZ, which encodes myelin protein zero (P(0)), may lead to different subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular manifestations of various MPZ mutations associated with CMT1, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) and CMT2, and to correlate their cellular and clinical phenotypes. Nine P(0) mutants associated with CMT1 (P(0)S63F, R98H, R277S, and S233fs), DSS (P(0) I30T and R98C), and CMT2 (P(0)S44F, D75V, and T124M), were investigated. Wild-type and mutant P(0) fused with fluorescent proteins were expressed in vitro to monitor their intracellular localization. An adhesiveness assay was used to evaluate the adhesiveness of the transfected cells. Protein localization and cell adhesiveness of each mutant protein were compared and correlated with their clinical phenotypes. Three different intracellular localization patterns of the mutant P(0) were observed. Wild-type P(0), P(0)I30T, S44F, S63F, D75V, T124M, and R227S were mostly localized on the cell membrane, P(0)R98H, and R98C were found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, and P(0)S233fs formed aggregates within the ER. Cells expressing mutant P(0), as compared with those expressing wild-type P(0), demonstrated variable degrees of reduction in the cell adhesiveness. The molecular patho-mechanisms of MPZ mutations are likely very complex and the clinical phenotype must be influenced by many genetic or environmental factors. This complexity may contribute to the highly variable clinical manifestations resulting from different MPZ mutations. PMID:20461396

  3. Spectrum of mutations and genotype-phenotype analysis in Noonan syndrome patients with RIT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Masako; Niihori, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Seiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Shion; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yokozawa, Masato; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Akihiko; Nakano, Yusuke; Hokosaki, Tatsunori; Ohmori, Ayumi; Sawada, Hirofumi; Migita, Ohsuke; Mima, Aya; Lapunzina, Pablo; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kawame, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Aoki, Yoko

    2016-02-01

    RASopathies are autosomal dominant disorders caused by mutations in more than 10 known genes that regulate the RAS/MAPK pathway. Noonan syndrome (NS) is a RASopathy characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital heart defects. We have recently identified mutations in RIT1 in patients with NS. To delineate the clinical manifestations in RIT1 mutation-positive patients, we further performed a RIT1 analysis in RASopathy patients and identified 7 RIT1 mutations, including two novel mutations, p.A77S and p.A77T, in 14 of 186 patients. Perinatal abnormalities, including nuchal translucency, fetal hydrops, pleural effusion, or chylothorax and congenital heart defects, are observed in all RIT1 mutation-positive patients. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the newly identified RIT1 mutants, including p.A77S and p.A77T, and the previously identified p.F82V, p.T83P, p.Y89H, and p.M90I, enhanced Elk1 transactivation. Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses of previously reported NS patients harboring RIT1, PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, and KRAS revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (56 %) was more frequent in patients harboring a RIT1 mutation than in patients harboring PTPN11 (9 %) and SOS1 mutations (10 %). The rates of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were similar between patients harboring RIT1 mutations and patients harboring RAF1 mutations (75 %). Short stature (52 %) was less prevalent in patients harboring RIT1 mutations than in patients harboring PTPN11 (71 %) and RAF1 (83 %) mutations. These results delineate the clinical manifestations of RIT1 mutation-positive NS patients: high frequencies of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrial septal defects, and pulmonary stenosis; and lower frequencies of ptosis and short stature. PMID:26714497

  4. Yeast mutator phenotype enforced by Arabidopsis PMS1 expression.

    PubMed

    Galles, Celina; Spampinato, Claudia P

    2013-03-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system is a major DNA repair pathway whose function is critical for the correction of DNA biosynthetic errors. MMR is initiated by the binding of MutS proteins to mismatches and unpaired nucleotides followed by the recruitment of MutL proteins. The major MutL activity in eukaryotes is performed by MutLα, the heterocomplex of MLH1-PMS1 in yeast and plants and MLH1-PMS2 in humans. We here report the effect the expression of Arabidopsis PMS1 protein exerts on Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic stability. A strain carrying specific microsatellite instability reporter systems was chosen for the study. The plant protein failed to complement the hypermutator phenotype of a pms1 deficient strain but increased approximately 14-fold and 2,000-fold the mutation rates of his7-2 and lys2::InsE-A 14 loci of MMR proficient strains when compared to wild-type strains, respectively. Overexpressing AtMLH1 in the AtPMS1-overproducing strain generated an increase in mutation rate comparable to that of AtPMS1 expression alone. Deletion of the C-terminal residues implicated in protein-protein interaction and including the putative endonuclease sequence of AtPMS1 completely eliminated the mutator phenotype. Taken together, these results indicate that the plant proteins affect yeast genomic stability, very possibly altering protein-protein interactions that are necessary to complete repair.

  5. Similar phenotypes caused by mutations in OTOG and OTOGL

    PubMed Central

    Oonk, Anne M.M.; Leijendeckers, Joop M.; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Schraders, Margit; del Campo, Miguel; del Castillo, Ignacio; Tekin, Mustafa; Feenstra, Ilse; Beynon, Andy J.; Kunst, Henricus P.M.; Snik, Ad F.M.; Kremer, Hannie; Admiraal, Ronald J.C.; Pennings, Ronald J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives recently, OTOG and OTOGL were identified as human deafness genes. Currently, only four families are known to have autosomal recessive hearing loss based on mutations in these genes. Since the two genes code for proteins (otogelin and otogelin-like) that are strikingly similar in structure and localization in the inner ear, this study is focused on characterizing and comparing the hearing loss caused by mutations in these genes. Design To evaluate this type of hearing, an extensive set of audiometric and vestibular examinations was performed in the 13 patients from four families. Results all families show a flat to downsloping configuration of the audiogram with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Speech recognition scores remain good (>90%). Hearing loss is not significantly different in the four families and the psychophysical test results also do not differ between the families. Vestibular examinations show evidence for vestibular hyporeflexia. Conclusion since otogelin and otogelin-like are localized in the tectorial membrane, one could expect a cochlear conductive hearing loss, as was previously shown in DFNA13 (COL11A2) and DFNA8/12 (TECTA) patients. Results of psychophysical examinations, however, do not support this. Furthermore, the authors can conclude that there are no phenotypic differences between hearing loss based on mutations in OTOG or OTOGL. This phenotype description will facilitate counseling of hearing loss caused by defects in either of these two genes. PMID:24378291

  6. Phenotypic characteristics of Alzheimer patients carrying an ABCA7 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, Tobi; Sleegers, Kristel; Cuyvers, Elise; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Sieben, Anne; De Roeck, Arne; Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Vermeulen, Steven; Van den Broeck, Marleen; Laureys, Annelies; Peeters, Karin; Mattheijssens, Maria; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter P.; Cras, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To generate a clinical and pathologic phenotype of patients carrying rare loss-of-function mutations in ABCA7, identified in a Belgian Alzheimer patient cohort and in an autosomal dominant family. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of available data records, medical records, results of CSF analyses and neuroimaging studies, and neuropathology data. Results: The mean onset age of the mutation carriers (n = 22) was 73.4 ± 8.4 years with a wide age range of 36 (54–90) years, which was independent of APOE genotype and cerebrovascular disease. The mean disease duration was 5.7 ± 3.0 years (range 2–12 years). A positive family history was recorded for 10 carriers (45.5%). All patient carriers except one presented with memory complaints. The 4 autopsied brains showed typical immunohistochemical changes of late-onset Alzheimer disease. Conclusions: All patients carrying a loss-of-function mutation in ABCA7 exhibited a classical Alzheimer disease phenotype, though with a striking wide onset age range, suggesting the influence of unknown modifying factors. PMID:27037232

  7. Whole chromosome aneuploidy: big mutations drive adaptation by phenotypic leap

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangbo; Rubinstein, Boris; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Despite its wide existence, the adaptive role of aneuploidy (the abnormal state of having unequal number of different chromosomes) has been a subject of debate. Cellular aneuploidy has been associated with enhanced resistance to stress, whereas on the organismal level it is detrimental to multi-cellular species. Certain aneuploid karyotypes are deleterious for specific environments, but karyotype diversity in a population potentiates adaptive evolution. To reconcile these paradoxical observations, this review distinguishes the role of aneuploidy in cellular versus organismal evolution. Further, it proposes a population genetics perspective to examine the behavior of aneuploidy on a populational versus individual level. By altering the copy number of a significant portion of the genome, aneuploidy introduces large phenotypic leap that enables small cell populations to explore a wide phenotypic landscape, from which adaptive traits can be selected. The production of chromosome number variation can be further increased by stress- or mutation-induced chromosomal instability, fueling rapid cellular adaptation. PMID:22926916

  8. Human Cancers Express a Mutator Phenotype: Hypothesis, Origin, and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Lawrence A

    2016-04-15

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis was postulated more than 40 years ago. It was based on the multiple enzymatic steps required to precisely replicate the 6 billion bases in the human genome each time a normal cell divides. A reduction in this accuracy during tumor progression could be responsible for the striking heterogeneity of malignant cells within a tumor and for the rapidity by which cancers become resistant to therapy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2057-9. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Loeb et al. Cancer Res. 1974;34:2311-21.

  9. Mutations in PIGY: expanding the phenotype of inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Ilkovski, Biljana; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; O'Grady, Gina L.; Kinoshita, Taroh; Howard, Malcolm F.; Lek, Monkol; Thomas, Brett; Turner, Anne; Christodoulou, John; Sillence, David; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Popitsch, Niko; Keays, David A.; Anzilotti, Consuelo; Goriely, Anne; Waddell, Leigh B.; Brilot, Fabienne; North, Kathryn N.; Kanzawa, Noriyuki; Macarthur, Daniel G.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Kini, Usha; Murakami, Yoshiko; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are ubiquitously expressed in the human body and are important for various functions at the cell surface. Mutations in many GPI biosynthesis genes have been described to date in patients with multi-system disease and together these constitute a subtype of congenital disorders of glycosylation. We used whole exome sequencing in two families to investigate the genetic basis of disease and used RNA and cellular studies to investigate the functional consequences of sequence variants in the PIGY gene. Two families with different phenotypes had homozygous recessive sequence variants in the GPI biosynthesis gene PIGY. Two sisters with c.137T>C (p.Leu46Pro) PIGY variants had multi-system disease including dysmorphism, seizures, severe developmental delay, cataracts and early death. There were significantly reduced levels of GPI-anchored proteins (CD55 and CD59) on the surface of patient-derived skin fibroblasts (∼20–50% compared with controls). In a second, consanguineous family, two siblings had moderate development delay and microcephaly. A homozygous PIGY promoter variant (c.-540G>A) was detected within a 7.7 Mb region of autozygosity. This variant was predicted to disrupt a SP1 consensus binding site and was shown to be associated with reduced gene expression. Mutations in PIGY can occur in coding and non-coding regions of the gene and cause variable phenotypes. This article contributes to understanding of the range of disease phenotypes and disease genes associated with deficiencies of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway and also serves to highlight the potential importance of analysing variants detected in 5′-UTR regions despite their typically low coverage in exome data. PMID:26293662

  10. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. PMID:20949630

  11. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II.

  12. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease–relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Results Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant’s colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Conclusions Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all

  13. Discordant phenotypes in monozygotic twins with identical de novo WT1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zihua; Yang, Yonghui; Feng, Dongning

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the WT1 gene, leading to Denys-Drash syndrome and Frasier syndrome, can also cause isolated steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (ISRNS). Previous studies have reported six pairs of monozygotic twins with WT1 mutations, including one presenting with discordant phenotypes with identical WT1 mutations being of paternal origin and five pairs of monozygotic twins presenting the same phenotype with identical WT1 mutations. In this study, we report on female monozygotic twins showing discordant phenotypes with an identical de novo WT1 mutation, R394W, and presenting incomplete Denys-Drash syndrome and ISRNS. PMID:26069768

  14. Hepatitis C virus induces a mutator phenotype: enhanced mutations of immunoglobulin and protooncogenes.

    PubMed

    Machida, Keigo; Cheng, Kevin T-N; Sung, Vicky M-H; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Lindsay, Karen L; Levine, Alexandra M; Lai, Ming-Yang; Lai, Michael M C

    2004-03-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a nonretroviral oncogenic RNA virus, which is frequently associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and B cell lymphoma. We demonstrated here that acute and chronic HCV infection caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in mutation frequency in Ig heavy chain, BCL-6, p53, and beta-catenin genes of in vitro HCV-infected B cell lines and HCV-associated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymphomas, and HCCs. The nucleotide-substitution pattern of p53 and beta-catenin was different from that of Ig heavy chain in HCV-infected cells, suggesting two different mechanisms of mutation. In addition, the mutated protooncogenes were amplified in HCV-associated lymphomas and HCCs, but not in lymphomas of nonviral origin or HBV-associated HCC. HCV induced error-prone DNA polymerase zeta, polymerase iota, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, which together, contributed to the enhancement of mutation frequency, as demonstrated by the RNA interference experiments. These results indicate that HCV induces a mutator phenotype and may transform cells by a hit-and-run mechanism. This finding provides a mechanism of oncogenesis for an RNA virus.

  15. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer.

  16. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer. PMID:20934514

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  18. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  19. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  20. Severe phenotypes in two Tunisian families with novel XPA mutations: evidence for a correlation between mutation location and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Messaoud, O; Rekaya, M Ben; Ouragini, H; Benfadhel, S; Azaiez, H; Kefi, R; Gouider-Khouja, N; Mokhtar, I; Amouri, A; Boubaker, M S; Zghal, M; Abdelhak, S

    2012-03-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare disorder characterized by a high skin sun-sensitivity predisposing to skin cancers at an early age. Among Tunisian XP patients with an intermediate skin phenotype, 92% presented neurological abnormalities related to XPA gene deficiency. Clinical variability of the XP-A phenotype is associated with a mutational heterogeneity. In the present study, two Tunisian families with severe dermatological and neurological XP phenotypes were investigated in order to determine clinical characteristics and genetic basis. Two Tunisian families with four XP affected children were examined in the Dermatology Department. Clinical features showed severe presentation of the disease. Coding regions of the XPA gene were analysed by direct sequencing. Results showed the presence of a novel mutation, p.E111X, in three patients belonging to the same family and presenting a very severe phenotype i.e. development of skin lesions and neurological signs before 1 year age. For the other patient, we identified a nonsense mutation, p.R207X, already identified in a Palestinian XP-A patient. Identification of novel causing mutations in Tunisian XP-A patients shows the genetic and mutational heterogeneity of the disease in Tunisia. Despite a relatively homogenous mutational spectrum, mutational heterogeneity for rare cases is observed because of the high rate of consanguinity.

  1. Predicted Mutation Strength of Nontruncating PKD1 Mutations Aids Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Christina M; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Chapman, Arlene B; Torres, Vicente E; Grantham, Jared J; Bae, Kyongtae T; Schrier, Robert W; Perrone, Ronald D; Braun, William E; Steinman, Theodore I; Mrug, Michal; Yu, Alan S L; Brosnahan, Godela; Hopp, Katharina; Irazabal, Maria V; Bennett, William M; Flessner, Michael F; Moore, Charity G; Landsittel, Douglas; Harris, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) often results in ESRD but with a highly variable course. Mutations to PKD1 or PKD2 cause ADPKD; both loci have high levels of allelic heterogeneity. We evaluated genotype-phenotype correlations in 1119 patients (945 families) from the HALT Progression of PKD Study and the Consortium of Radiologic Imaging Study of PKD Study. The population was defined as: 77.7% PKD1, 14.7% PKD2, and 7.6% with no mutation detected (NMD). Phenotypic end points were sex, eGFR, height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV), and liver cyst volume. Analysis of the eGFR and htTKV measures showed that the PKD1 group had more severe disease than the PKD2 group, whereas the NMD group had a PKD2-like phenotype. In both the PKD1 and PKD2 populations, men had more severe renal disease, but women had larger liver cyst volumes. Compared with nontruncating PKD1 mutations, truncating PKD1 mutations associated with lower eGFR, but the mutation groups were not differentiated by htTKV. PKD1 nontruncating mutations were evaluated for conservation and chemical change and subdivided into strong (mutation strength group 2 [MSG2]) and weak (MSG3) mutation groups. Analysis of eGFR and htTKV measures showed that patients with MSG3 but not MSG2 mutations had significantly milder disease than patients with truncating cases (MSG1), an association especially evident in extreme decile populations. Overall, we have quantified the contribution of genic and PKD1 allelic effects and sex to the ADPKD phenotype. Intrafamilial correlation analysis showed that other factors shared by families influence htTKV, with these additional genetic/environmental factors significantly affecting the ADPKD phenotype. PMID:26823553

  2. Novel MBTPS2 missense mutation causes a keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans phenotype: mutation update and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wang, Y; Cheng, R; Ni, C; Liang, J; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2016-10-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked condition characterized by keratotic follicular papules and progressive alopecia, which is caused by mutations in the MBTPS2 gene. We carried out a genetic study on a child who was suspected clinically to have KFSD. Sanger sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the entire coding region of MBTPS2. A novel missense mutation (c.599C>T) was identified in the patient, confirming a diagnosis of KFSD. We reviewed related cases with MBTPS2 mutations for evidence of genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27663151

  3. Phenotypic Conservation in Patients With X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by RPGR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Sarwar; Khan, Naheed; Branham, Kari; Othman, Mohammad; Karoukis, Athanasios J.; Sharma, Nisha; Moncrief, Ashley; Mahmood, Mahdi N.; Sieving, Paul A.; Swaroop, Anand; Heckenlively, John R.; Jayasundera, Thiran

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and clinicians alike, phenotypic variability can be challenging because it complicates counseling regarding patients’ likely visual prognosis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical findings from patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa with 13 distinct RPGR mutations and assess for phenotypic concordance or variability. DESIGN Retrospective medical record review of data collected from 1985 to 2011. SETTING Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan. PATIENTS A total of 42 patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa with mutations in RPGR. Age at first visit ranged from 4 to 53 years, with follow-up ranging from 1 to 11 visits (median follow-up time, 5.5 years; range, 1.4-32.7 years, for 23 patients with >1 visit). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinical data assessed for concordance included visual acuity (VA), Goldmann visual fields (GVFs), and full-field electroretinography (ERG). Electroretinography phenotype (cone-rod vs rod-cone dysfunction) was defined by the extent of photopic vs scotopic abnormality. Qualitative GVF phenotype was determined by the GVF pattern, where central or peripheral loss suggested cone or rod dysfunction, respectively. Goldmann visual fields were also quantified and compared among patients. RESULTS Each mutation was detected in 2 or more related or unrelated patients. Five mutations in 11 patients displayed strong concordance of VA, while 4 mutations in 16 patients revealed moderate concordance of VA. A definitive cone-rod or rod-cone ERG pattern consistent among patients was found in 6 of 13 mutations (46.2%); the remaining mutations were characterized by patients demonstrating both phenotypes or who had limited data or nonrecordable ERG values. Concordant GVF phenotypes (7 rod-cone pattern vs 4 cone-rod pattern) were seen in 11 of 13 mutations (84.6%). All 6 mutations displaying a constant ERG pattern within the mutation group revealed a GVF phenotype consistent with the ERG

  4. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  5. Autism Spectrum Phenotype in Males and Females with Fragile X Full Mutation and Premutation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Sally; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Bui, Quang M.; Huggins, Richard; Taylor, Annette K.; Loesch, Danuta Z.

    2007-01-01

    The behavioural phenotype of autism was assessed in individuals with full mutation and premutation fragile X syndrome (FXS) using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale-Generic (ADOS-G) and the Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI-R). The participants, aged 5-80 years, comprised 33 males and 31 females with full mutation, 7 males and 43 females with…

  6. Laminin 5 mutations in junctional epidermolysis bullosa: molecular basis of Herlitz vs. non-Herlitz phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Aoi; Chao, Sheau-Chiou; Pulkkinen, Leena; Murrell, Dedee; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Pfendner, Ellen; Uitto, Jouni

    2002-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a group of heritable blistering diseases in which tissue separation occurs within the lamina lucida of the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Clinically, two broad subcategories have been recognized: The Herlitz variant (H-JEB; OMIM 226700) is characterized by early demise of the affected individuals, usually within the first year of life, while non-Herlitz (nH-JEB; OMIM 226650) patients show a milder phenotype with life-long blistering, yet with normal lifespan. In this study, we have examined a cohort of 27 families, 15 with Herlitz and 12 with non-Herlitz JEB, for mutations in the candidate genes, LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, encoding the subunit polypeptides of laminin 5. The mutation detection strategy consisted of PCR amplification of all exons in these genes, followed by heteroduplex scanning and nucleotide sequencing. We were able to identify pathogenic mutations in both alleles of each proband, the majority of the mutations being in the LAMB3 gene. Examination of the mutation database revealed that most cases with Herlitz JEB harbored premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in both alleles. In non-Herlitz cases, the PTC mutation was frequently associated with a missense mutation or a putative splicing mutation in trans. In three cases with putative splicing mutations, RT-PCR analysis revealed a repertoire of splice variants in-frame, predicting the synthesis of either shortened or lengthened, yet partly functional, polypeptides. These observations would explain the relatively mild phenotype in cases with splicing mutations. Collectively, these findings, together with the global laminin 5 mutation database, contribute to our understanding of the genotype/phenotype correlations explaining the Herlitz vs non-Herlitz phenotypes. PMID:11810295

  7. Structure-phenotype correlations of human CYP21A2 mutations in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Haider, Shozeb; Islam, Barira; D'Atri, Valentina; Sgobba, Miriam; Poojari, Chetan; Sun, Li; Yuen, Tony; Zaidi, Mone; New, Maria I

    2013-02-12

    Mutations in the cytochrome p450 (CYP)21A2 gene, which encodes the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase, cause the majority of cases in congenital adrenal hyperplasia, an autosomal recessive disorder. To date, more than 100 CYP21A2 mutations have been reported. These mutations can be associated either with severe salt-wasting or simple virilizing phenotypes or with milder nonclassical phenotypes. Not all CYP21A2 mutations have, however, been characterized biochemically, and the clinical consequences of these mutations remain unknown. Using the crystal structure of its bovine homolog as a template, we have constructed a humanized model of CYP21A2 to provide comprehensive structural explanations for the clinical manifestations caused by each of the known disease-causing missense mutations in CYP21A2. Mutations that affect membrane anchoring, disrupt heme and/or substrate binding, or impair stability of CYP21A2 cause complete loss of function and salt-wasting disease. In contrast, mutations altering the transmembrane region or conserved hydrophobic patches cause up to a 98% reduction in enzyme activity and simple virilizing disease. Mild nonclassical disease can result from interference in oxidoreductase interactions, salt-bridge and hydrogen-bonding networks, and nonconserved hydrophobic clusters. A simple in silico evaluation of previously uncharacterized gene mutations could, thus, potentially help predict the often diverse phenotypes of a monogenic disorder.

  8. Strong mutator phenotype drives faster adaptation from growth on glucose to growth on acetate in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Hervé; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bousarghin, Latifa

    2014-10-01

    The metabolic adaptation of strong mutator strains was studied to better understand the link between the strong mutator phenotype and virulence. Analysis of the growth curves of isogenic strains of Salmonella, which were previously grown in M63 glucose media, revealed that the exponential phase of growth was reached earlier in an M63 acetate medium with strong mutator strains (mutated in mutS or in mutL) than with normomutator strains (P<0.05). Complemented strains confirmed the direct role of the strong mutator phenotype in this faster metabolic adaptation to the assimilation of acetate. In a mixed cell population, proliferation of strong mutators over normomutators was observed when the carbon source was switched from glucose to acetate. These results add to the sparse body of knowledge about strong mutators and highlight the selective advantage conferred by the strong mutator phenotype to adapt to a switch of carbon source in the environment. This work may provide clinically useful information given that there is a high prevalence of strong mutators among pathogenic strains of Salmonella and that acetate is the principal short chain fatty acid of the human terminal ileum and colon where Salmonella infection is localized.

  9. Evidence of a Mild Mutator Phenotype in Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew H; Fidock, David A

    2016-01-01

    Malaria control efforts have been continuously stymied by drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, which typically originate in Southeast Asia prior to spreading into high-transmission settings in Africa. One earlier proposed explanation for Southeast Asia being a hotbed of resistance has been the hypermutability or "Accelerated Resistance to Multiple Drugs" (ARMD) phenotype, whereby multidrug-resistant Southeast Asian parasites were reported to exhibit 1,000-fold higher rates of resistance to unrelated antimalarial agents when compared to drug-sensitive parasites. However, three recent studies do not recapitulate this hypermutability phenotype. Intriguingly, genome sequencing of recently derived multidrug-resistant Cambodian isolates has identified a high proportion of DNA repair gene mutations in multidrug-resistant parasites, suggesting their potential role in shaping local parasite evolution. By adapting fluctuation assays for use in P. falciparum, we have examined the in vitro mutation rates of five recent Cambodian isolates and three reference laboratory strains. For these studies we also generated a knockout parasite line lacking the DNA repair factor Exonuclease I. In these assays, parasites were typed for their ability to acquire resistance to KAE609, currently in advanced clinical trials, yielding 13 novel mutations in the Na+/H+-ATPase PfATP4, the primary resistance determinant. We observed no evidence of hypermutability. Instead, we found evidence of a mild mutator (up to a 3.4-fold increase in mutation rate) phenotype in two artemisinin-resistant Cambodian isolates, which carry DNA repair gene mutations. We observed that one such mutation in the Mismatch Repair protein Mlh1 contributes to the mild mutator phenotype when modeled in yeast (scmlh1-P157S). Compared to basal rates of mutation, a mild mutator phenotype may provide a greater overall benefit for parasites in Southeast Asia in terms of generating drug resistance without incurring

  10. Evidence of a Mild Mutator Phenotype in Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew H; Fidock, David A

    2016-01-01

    Malaria control efforts have been continuously stymied by drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, which typically originate in Southeast Asia prior to spreading into high-transmission settings in Africa. One earlier proposed explanation for Southeast Asia being a hotbed of resistance has been the hypermutability or "Accelerated Resistance to Multiple Drugs" (ARMD) phenotype, whereby multidrug-resistant Southeast Asian parasites were reported to exhibit 1,000-fold higher rates of resistance to unrelated antimalarial agents when compared to drug-sensitive parasites. However, three recent studies do not recapitulate this hypermutability phenotype. Intriguingly, genome sequencing of recently derived multidrug-resistant Cambodian isolates has identified a high proportion of DNA repair gene mutations in multidrug-resistant parasites, suggesting their potential role in shaping local parasite evolution. By adapting fluctuation assays for use in P. falciparum, we have examined the in vitro mutation rates of five recent Cambodian isolates and three reference laboratory strains. For these studies we also generated a knockout parasite line lacking the DNA repair factor Exonuclease I. In these assays, parasites were typed for their ability to acquire resistance to KAE609, currently in advanced clinical trials, yielding 13 novel mutations in the Na+/H+-ATPase PfATP4, the primary resistance determinant. We observed no evidence of hypermutability. Instead, we found evidence of a mild mutator (up to a 3.4-fold increase in mutation rate) phenotype in two artemisinin-resistant Cambodian isolates, which carry DNA repair gene mutations. We observed that one such mutation in the Mismatch Repair protein Mlh1 contributes to the mild mutator phenotype when modeled in yeast (scmlh1-P157S). Compared to basal rates of mutation, a mild mutator phenotype may provide a greater overall benefit for parasites in Southeast Asia in terms of generating drug resistance without incurring

  11. Evidence of a Mild Mutator Phenotype in Cambodian Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew H.; Fidock, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria control efforts have been continuously stymied by drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, which typically originate in Southeast Asia prior to spreading into high-transmission settings in Africa. One earlier proposed explanation for Southeast Asia being a hotbed of resistance has been the hypermutability or “Accelerated Resistance to Multiple Drugs” (ARMD) phenotype, whereby multidrug-resistant Southeast Asian parasites were reported to exhibit 1,000-fold higher rates of resistance to unrelated antimalarial agents when compared to drug-sensitive parasites. However, three recent studies do not recapitulate this hypermutability phenotype. Intriguingly, genome sequencing of recently derived multidrug-resistant Cambodian isolates has identified a high proportion of DNA repair gene mutations in multidrug-resistant parasites, suggesting their potential role in shaping local parasite evolution. By adapting fluctuation assays for use in P. falciparum, we have examined the in vitro mutation rates of five recent Cambodian isolates and three reference laboratory strains. For these studies we also generated a knockout parasite line lacking the DNA repair factor Exonuclease I. In these assays, parasites were typed for their ability to acquire resistance to KAE609, currently in advanced clinical trials, yielding 13 novel mutations in the Na+/H+-ATPase PfATP4, the primary resistance determinant. We observed no evidence of hypermutability. Instead, we found evidence of a mild mutator (up to a 3.4-fold increase in mutation rate) phenotype in two artemisinin-resistant Cambodian isolates, which carry DNA repair gene mutations. We observed that one such mutation in the Mismatch Repair protein Mlh1 contributes to the mild mutator phenotype when modeled in yeast (scmlh1-P157S). Compared to basal rates of mutation, a mild mutator phenotype may provide a greater overall benefit for parasites in Southeast Asia in terms of generating drug resistance without incurring

  12. [The floral meristem undetermination mutation in Papaver somniferum L.: spontaneous phenotypic variation in ontogeny].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, R G

    2008-01-01

    A new morphogenetic mutation of the shoot, floral meristem undetermination, was found in Papaver somniferum L. with monocarpic shoot. The expression of the DFM (determination of floral meristem) gene, which limits the proliferative activity of stem cells in the floral meristem, was affected. The mutation displayed spontaneous phenotypic instability in ontogeny, variation in the mutant character expression on different flowers of the same plant in the same genotypic environment. The mutation phenotype varied from no expression or formation of individual phyllomes in the center of the primary ovary to formation of a new flower and a new capsule with viable seeds.

  13. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene (SLC26A2): 22 novel mutations, mutation review, associated skeletal phenotypes, and diagnostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Superti-Furga, A

    2001-03-01

    Mutations in the DTDST gene can result in a family of skeletal dysplasia conditions which comprise two lethal disorders, achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG1B) and atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO2); and two non-lethal disorders, diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED). The gene product is a sulfate-chloride exchanger of the cell membrane. Inactivation of the sulfate exchanger leads to intracellular sulfate depletion and to the synthesis of undersulfated proteoglycans in susceptible cells such as chondrocytes and fibroblasts. Genotype-phenotype correlations are recognizable, with mutations predicting a truncated protein or a non-conservative amino acid substitution in a transmembrane domain giving the severe phenotypes, and non-transmembrane amino acid substitutions and splice site mutations giving the milder phenotypes. The clinical phenotype is modulated strictly by the degree of residual activity. Over 30 mutations have been observed, including 22 novel mutations reported here. The most frequent mutation, 862C>T (R279W), is a mild mutation giving the rMED phenotype when homozygous and mostly DTD when compounded; occurrence at a CpG dinucleotide and its panethnic distribution suggest independent recurrence. Mutation IVS1+2T>C is the second most common mutation, but is very frequent in Finland. It produces low levels of correctly spliced mRNA, and results in DTD when homozygous. Two other mutations, 1045-1047delGTT (V340del) and 558C>T (R178X), are associated with severe phenotypes and have been observed in multiple patients. Most other mutations are rare. Heterozygotes are clinically unaffected. When clinical samples are screened for radiologic and histologic features compatible with the ACG1B/AO2/DTD/rMED spectrum prior to analysis, the mutation detection rate is high (over 90% of alleles), and appropriate genetic counseling can be given. The sulfate uptake or sulfate incorporation assays in cultured fibroblasts have largely been

  14. A missense mutation in PAX9 in a family with distinct phenotype of oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Halonen, Katri; Pirinen, Sinikka; Thesleff, Irma; Arte, Sirpa; Nieminen, Pekka

    2003-11-01

    Mutations in PAX9 have been described for families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. In addition to permanent molars, some teeth were congenitally missing in the premolar, canine, and incisor regions. Measurements of tooth size revealed the reduced size of the proband's and his father's deciduous and permanent teeth. This phenotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 gene revealed a missense mutation in the beginning of the paired domain of the molecule, an arginine-to-tryptophan amino-acid change occurring in a position absolutely conserved in all sequenced paired box genes. A mutation of the homologous arginine of PAX6 has been shown to affect the target DNA specificity of PAX6. We suggest that a similar mechanism explains these distinct oligodontia phenotypes. PMID:14571272

  15. A missense mutation in PAX9 in a family with distinct phenotype of oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Halonen, Katri; Pirinen, Sinikka; Thesleff, Irma; Arte, Sirpa; Nieminen, Pekka

    2003-11-01

    Mutations in PAX9 have been described for families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. In addition to permanent molars, some teeth were congenitally missing in the premolar, canine, and incisor regions. Measurements of tooth size revealed the reduced size of the proband's and his father's deciduous and permanent teeth. This phenotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 gene revealed a missense mutation in the beginning of the paired domain of the molecule, an arginine-to-tryptophan amino-acid change occurring in a position absolutely conserved in all sequenced paired box genes. A mutation of the homologous arginine of PAX6 has been shown to affect the target DNA specificity of PAX6. We suggest that a similar mechanism explains these distinct oligodontia phenotypes.

  16. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle improves aging phenotypes in the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Williams, Siôn L; Hida, Aline; Peacock, Jacqueline D; Prolla, Tomas A; Lincoln, Joy; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-05-15

    Aging is an intricate process that increases susceptibility to sarcopenia and cardiovascular diseases. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is believed to contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, potentially shortening lifespan. The mtDNA mutator mouse, a mouse model with a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ, was shown to develop a premature aging phenotype, including sarcopenia, cardiomyopathy and decreased lifespan. This phenotype was associated with an accumulation of mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a crucial regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, in the muscle of mutator mice increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function and also improved the skeletal muscle and heart phenotypes of the mice. Deep sequencing analysis of their mtDNA showed that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis did not reduce the accumulation of mtDNA mutations but rather caused a small increase. These results indicate that increased muscle PGC-1α expression is able to improve some premature aging phenotypes in the mutator mice without reverting the accumulation of mtDNA mutations.

  17. System analysis of gene mutations and clinical phenotype in Chinese patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liao, Yujie; Li, Zuoxiang; Hu, Panpan; Qi, Yan; Yin, Zhiwei; Li, Qinggang; Fu, Ping; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder mainly caused by mutation in PKD1/PKD2. However, ethnic differences in mutations, the association between mutation genotype/clinical phenotype, and the clinical applicable value of mutation detection are poorly understood. We made systematically analysis of Chinese ADPKD patients based on a next-generation sequencing platform. Among 148 ADPKD patients enrolled, 108 mutations were detected in 127 patients (85.8%). Compared with mutations in Caucasian published previously, the PKD2 mutation detection rate was lower, and patients carrying the PKD2 mutation invariably carried the PKD1 mutation. The definite pathogenic mutation detection rate was lower, whereas the multiple mutations detection rate was higher in Chinese patients. Then, we correlated PKD1/PKD2 mutation data and clinical data: patients with mutation exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with >1 mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with pathogenic mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype. Thus, the PKD1/PKD2 mutation status differed by ethnicity, and the PKD1/PKD2 genotype may affect the clinical phenotype of ADPKD. Furthermore, it makes sense to detect PKD1/PKD2 mutation status for early diagnosis and prognosis, perhaps as early as the embryo/zygote stage, to facilitate early clinical intervention and family planning. PMID:27782177

  18. Domain-dependent clustering and genotype-phenotype analysis of LGI1 mutations in ADPEAF

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yuan-Yuan; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In families with autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF) with mutations in the LGI1 gene, we evaluated clustering of mutations within the gene and associations of penetrance and phenotypic features with mutation location and predicted effect (truncation or missense). Methods: We abstracted clinical and molecular information from the literature for all 36 previously published ADPEAF families with LGI1 mutations. We used a sliding window approach to analyze mutation clustering within the gene. Each mutation was mapped to one of the gene's 2 major functional domains, N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and C-terminal epitempin (EPTP) repeats, and classified according to predicted effect on the encoded protein (truncation vs missense). Analyses of phenotypic features (age at onset and occurrence of auditory symptoms) in relation to mutation site and predicted effect included 160 patients with idiopathic focal unprovoked seizures from the 36 families. Results: ADPEAF-causing mutations clustered significantly in the LRR domain (exons 3–5) of LGI1 (p = 0.026). Auditory symptoms were less frequent in individuals with truncation mutations in the EPTP domain than in those with other mutation type/domain combinations (58% vs 80%, p = 0.018). Conclusion: The LRR region of the LGI1 gene is likely to play a major role in pathogenesis of ADPEAF. PMID:22323750

  19. Novel TMEM67 Mutations and Genotype-phenotype Correlates in Meckelin-related Ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Iannicelli, Miriam; Brancati, Francesco; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Mazzotta, Annalisa; Thomas, Sophie; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Travaglini, Lorena; Gomes, Céline; Ardissino, Gian Luigi; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen; Castorina, Pierangela; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Fischetto, Rita; Leroy, Brigitte; Loget, Philippe; Bonnière, Maryse; Starck, Lena; Tantau, Julia; Gentilin, Barbara; Majore, Silvia; Swistun, Dominika; Flori, Elizabeth; Lalatta, Faustina; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Johannes.Penzien; Grammatico, Paola; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Valente, Enza Maria

    2010-01-01

    Human ciliopathies are hereditary conditions caused by defects of proteins expressed at the primary cilium. Among ciliopathies, Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD), Meckel syndrome (MKS) and nephronophthisis (NPH) present clinical and genetic overlap, being allelic at several loci. One of the most interesting gene is TMEM67, encoding the transmembrane protein meckelin. We performed mutation analysis of TMEM67 in 341 probands, including 265 JSRD representative of all clinical subgroups and 76 MKS fetuses. We identified 33 distinct mutations, of which 20 were novel, in 8/10 (80%) JS with liver involvement (COACH phenotype) and 12/76 (16%) MKS fetuses. No mutations were found in other JSRD subtypes, confirming the strong association between TMEM67 mutations and liver involvement. Literature review of all published TMEM67 mutated cases was performed to delineate genotype-phenotype correlates. In particular, comparison of the types of mutations and their distribution along the gene in lethal versus non lethal phenotypes showed in MKS patients a significant enrichment of missense mutations falling in TMEM67 exons 8 to 15, especially when in combination with a truncating mutation. These exons encode for a region of unknown function in the extracellular domain of meckelin. PMID:20232449

  20. Novel motor phenotypes in patients with VRK1 mutations without pontocerebellar hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Marion; Teoh, Hooiling; Lee, James; Reddel, Stephen; Zhu, Ying; Buckley, Michael; Sampaio, Hugo; Roscioli, Tony; Farrar, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenotypes in 2 families with vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) mutations including one novel VRK1 mutation. Methods: VRK1 mutations were found by whole exome sequencing in patients presenting with motor neuron disorders. Results: We identified pathogenic mutations in the VRK1 gene in the affected members of 2 families. In family 1, compound heterozygous mutations were identified in VRK1, c.356A>G; p.H119R, and c.1072C>T; p.R358*, in 2 siblings with adult onset distal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). In family 2, a novel VRK1 mutation, c.403G>A; p.G135R and c.583T>G; p.L195V, were identified in a child with motor neuron disease. Conclusions: VRK1 mutations can produce adult-onset SMA and motor neuron disease in children without pontocerebellar hypoplasia. PMID:27281532

  1. Additive effect of mutations in LDLR and PCSK9 genes on the phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Priore Oliva, Claudio; Cefalù, Angelo Baldassare; Noto, Davide; Bellocchio, Antonella; Fresa, Raffaele; Cantafora, Alfredo; Patel, Dilip; Averna, Maurizio; Tarugi, Patrizia; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2006-06-01

    Patients homozygous or compound heterozygous for LDLR mutations or double heterozygous for LDLR and apo B R3500Q mutation have higher LDL-C levels, more extensive xanthomatosis and more severe premature coronary disease (pCAD) than simple heterozygotes for mutations in either these genes or for missense mutations in PCSK9 gene. It is not known whether combined mutations in LDLR and PKCS9 are associated with such a severe phenotype. We sequenced Apo B and PCSK9 genes in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of homozygous FH who were heterozygous for LDLR gene mutations. Proband Z.P. (LDL-C 13.39 mmol/L and pCAD) was heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.E228K) inherited from her father (LDL-C 8.07 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.R496W) from her mother (LDL-C 5.58 mmol/L). Proband L.R. and her sister (LDL-C 11.51 and 10.47 mmol/L, xanthomatosis and carotid atherosclerosis) were heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.Y419X) inherited from their mother (LDL-C 6.54 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.N425S) probably from their deceased father. The LDL-C levels in double heterozygotes of these two families were 56 and 44% higher than those found in simple heterozygotes for the two LDLR mutations, respectively. The two PCSK9 mutations are novel and were not found in 110 controls and 80 patients with co-dominant hypercholesterolemia. These observations indicate that rare missense mutations of PCSK9 may worsen the clinical phenotype of patients carrying LDLR mutations. PMID:16183066

  2. Consanguinity and rare mutations outside of MCCC genes underlie nonspecific phenotypes of MCCD

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Peter J.; Barshop, Bruce A.; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Hansen, John-Bjarne; Jepsen, Kristen; Smith, Erin N.; Frazer, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (MCCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine catabolism that has a highly variable clinical phenotype, ranging from acute metabolic acidosis to nonspecific symptoms such as developmental delay, failure to thrive, hemiparesis, muscular hypotonia, and multiple sclerosis. Implementation of newborn screening for MCCD has resulted in broadening the range of phenotypic expression to include asymptomatic adults. The purpose of this study was to identify factors underlying the varying phenotypes of MCCD. Methods We performed exome sequencing on DNA from 33 cases and 108 healthy controls. We examined these data for associations between either MCC mutational status, genetic ancestry, or consanguinity and the absence or presence/specificity of clinical symptoms in MCCD cases. Results We determined that individuals with nonspecific clinical phenotypes are highly inbred compared with cases that are asymptomatic and healthy controls. For 5 of these 10 individuals, we discovered a homozygous damaging mutation in a disease gene that is likely to underlie their nonspecific clinical phenotypes previously attributed to MCCD. Conclusion Our study shows that nonspecific phenotypes attributed to MCCD are associated with consanguinity and are likely not due to mutations in the MCC enzyme but result from rare homozygous mutations in other disease genes. PMID:25356967

  3. Marked phenotypic variation in a family with a new myelin protein zero mutation.

    PubMed

    Szabo, A; Züchner, S; Siska, E; Mechler, F; Molnar, M J

    2005-11-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, which has a role in myelin compaction. MPZ gene mutations cause mostly demyelinating neuropathies of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B type (CMT1B), but axonal CMT have been described as well. There is a broad spectrum of phenotypic manifestation of neuropathies caused by MPZ mutations. Some mutations of MPZ cause severe early-onset neuropathies such as Dejerine-Sottas disease, while others cause the classical CMT phenotype with normal early milestones but development of disability during the first two decades of life. We describe a family in which five members of three consecutive generations had a heterozygous mutation in nucleotide position 143 with a T-C transition in exon 2 of the MPZ gene. The resulting substitution of Leu48 with proline has not been previously described. The age of onset of symptoms varied from 8 months to 41 years. The marked variation of the age of disease onset and clinical phenotype in this one family, related to the same MPZ mutation, suggests that in addition to the type and intragenic location of the mutation, other putative modifying gene(s) are regulating MPZ gene expression, mRNA stability and posttranslational protein modification and may have an important effect on the ultimate clinical phenotype. PMID:16198109

  4. Mutations in CEP120 cause Joubert syndrome as well as complex ciliopathy phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Marta; Isrie, Mala; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Micalizzi, Alessia; Musaev, Damir; Mazza, Tommaso; Al-gazali, Lihadh; Altunoglu, Umut; Boltshauser, Eugen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; De Keersmaecker, Bart; Kayserili, Hülya; Brandenberger, Sarah; Kraoua, Ichraf; Mark, Paul R; McKanna, Trudy; Van Keirsbilck, Joachim; Moerman, Philippe; Poretti, Andrea; Puri, Ratna; Van Esch, Hilde; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Ciliopathies are an extensive group of autosomal recessive or X-linked disorders with considerable genetic and clinical overlap, which collectively share multiple organ involvement and may result in lethal or viable phenotypes. In large numbers of cases the genetic defect remains yet to be determined. The aim of this study is to describe the mutational frequency and phenotypic spectrum of the CEP120 gene. Methods Exome sequencing was performed in 145 patients with Joubert syndrome (JS), including 15 children with oral-facial-digital syndrome type VI (OFDVI) and 21 Meckel syndrome (MKS) fetuses. Moreover, exome sequencing was performed in one fetus with tectocerebellar dysraphia with occipital encephalocele (TCDOE), molar tooth sign and additional skeletal abnormalities. As a parallel study, 346 probands with a phenotype consistent with JS or related ciliopathies underwent next-generation sequencing-based targeted sequencing of 120 previously described and candidate ciliopathy genes. Results We present six probands carrying nine distinct mutations (of which eight are novel) in the CEP120 gene, previously found mutated only in Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD). The CEP120-associated phenotype ranges from mild classical JS in four patients to more severe conditions in two fetuses, with overlapping features of distinct ciliopathies that include TCDOE, MKS, JATD and OFD syndromes. No obvious correlation is evident between the type or location of identified mutations and the ciliopathy phenotype. Conclusion Our findings broaden the spectrum of phenotypes caused by CEP120 mutations that account for nearly 1% of patients with JS as well as for more complex ciliopathy phenotypes. The lack of clear genotype–phenotype correlation highlights the relevance of comprehensive genetic analyses in the diagnostics of ciliopathies. PMID:27208211

  5. Single amino acid mutations in the capsid switch the neutralization phenotype of porcine circovirus 2.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipongkor; Lefebvre, David J; Ooms, Karen; Huang, Liping; Delputte, Peter L; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-07-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated diseases in pigs. Previously, it was demonstrated that mAbs 16G12, 38C1, 63H3 and 94H8 directed against the PCV2 capsid protein recognize PCV2 strains Stoon-1010 (PCV2a), 48285 (PCV2b), 1121 (PCV2a), 1147 (PCV2b) and II9F (PCV2b), but only neutralize Stoon-1010 and 48285. This points to the existence of two distinct PCV2 neutralization phenotypes: phenotype α (mAb recognition with neutralization; Stoon-1010 and 48285) and phenotype β (mAb recognition without neutralization; 1121, 1147 and II9F). In the present study, amino acids that are important in determining the neutralization phenotype were identified in the capsid. Mutation of T at position 190 to A in strain 48285 (phenotype α) resulted in a capsid resembling that of strain 1147 (phenotype β) and caused a loss of neutralization (switch from α to β). Mutations of P at position 151 to T and A at position 190 to T in strain II9F (phenotype β) resulted in a capsid resembling that of strain 48285 (phenotype α) and gave a gain of neutralization (switch from β to α). Mutations of T at position 131 to P and of E at position 191 to R in Stoon-1010 (phenotype α) changed the capsid into that of 1121 (phenotype β) and reduced neutralization (switch from α to β). This study demonstrated that single amino acid changes in the capsid result in a phenotypic switch from α to β or β to α.

  6. NPHS2 mutations in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: a mutation update and the associated phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bouchireb, Karim; Boyer, Olivia; Gribouval, Olivier; Nevo, Fabien; Huynh-Cong, Evelyne; Morinière, Vincent; Campait, Raphaëlle; Ars, Elisabet; Brackman, Damien; Dantal, Jacques; Eckart, Philippe; Gigante, Maddalena; Lipska, Beata S; Liutkus, Aurélia; Megarbane, André; Mohsin, Nabil; Ozaltin, Fatih; Saleem, Moin A; Schaefer, Franz; Soulami, Kenza; Torra, Roser; Garcelon, Nicolas; Mollet, Géraldine; Dahan, Karin; Antignac, Corinne

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in the NPHS2 gene encoding podocin are implicated in an autosomal-recessive form of nonsyndromic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in both pediatric and adult patients. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations commonly present with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome before the age of 6 years and rapidly progress to end-stage kidney disease with a very low prevalence of recurrence after renal transplantation. Here, we reviewed all the NPHS2 mutations published between October 1999 and September 2013, and also all novel mutations identified in our personal cohort and in international genetic laboratories. We identified 25 novel pathogenic mutations in addition to the 101 already described. The mutations are distributed along the entire coding region and lead to all kinds of alterations including 53 missense, 17 nonsense, 11 small insertions, 26 small deletions, 16 splicing, two indel mutations, and one mutation in the stop codon. In addition, 43 variants were classified as variants of unknown significance, as these missense changes were exclusively described in the heterozygous state and/or considered benign by prediction software. Genotype-phenotype analyses established correlations between specific variants and age at onset, ethnicity, or clinical evolution. We created a Web database using the Leiden Open Variation Database (www.lovd.nl/NPHS2) software that will allow the inclusion of future reports.

  7. Novel SOX2 mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation in anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya; Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Semina, Elena V

    2009-12-01

    SOX2 represents a High Mobility Group domain containing transcription factor that is essential for normal development in vertebrates. Mutations in SOX2 are known to result in a spectrum of severe ocular phenotypes in humans, also typically associated with other systemic defects. Ocular phenotypes include anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M), optic nerve hypoplasia, ocular coloboma and other eye anomalies. We screened 51 unrelated individuals with A/M and identified SOX2 mutations in the coding region of the gene in 10 individuals. Seven of the identified mutations are novel alterations, while the remaining three individuals carry the previously reported recurrent 20-nucleotide deletion in SOX2, c.70del20. Among the SOX2-positive cases, seven patients had bilateral A/M and mutations resulting in premature termination of the normal protein sequence (7/38; 18% of all bilateral cases), one patient had bilateral A/M associated with a single amino acid insertion (1/38; 3% of bilateral cases), and the final two patients demonstrated unilateral A/M associated with missense mutations (2/13; 15% of all unilateral cases). These findings and review of previously reported cases suggest a potential genotype/phenotype correlation for SOX2 mutations with missense changes generally leading to less severe ocular defects. In addition, we report a new familial case of affected siblings with maternal mosaicism for the identified SOX2 mutation, which further underscores the importance of parental testing to provide accurate genetic counseling to families.

  8. Germline BRAF mutations in Noonan, LEOPARD and cardiofaciocutaneous syndromes: molecular diversity and associated phenotypic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Sarkozy, Anna; Carta, Claudio; Moretti, Sonia; Zampino, Giuseppe; Digilio, Maria C.; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Scioletti, Anna Paola; Esposito, Giorgia; Cordeddu, Viviana; Lepri, Francesca; Petrangeli, Valentina; Dentici, Maria L.; Mancini, Grazia M.S.; Selicorni, Angelo; Rossi, Cesare; Mazzanti, Laura; Marino, Bruno; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Memo, Luigi; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Stuppia, Liborio; Puxeddu, Efisio; Gelb, Bruce D.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Tartaglia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Noonan, LEOPARD and cardiofaciocutaneous syndromes (NS, LS and CFCS) are developmental disorders with overlapping features including distinctive facial dysmorphia, reduced growth, cardiac defects, skeletal and ectodermal anomalies, and variable cognitive deficits. Dysregulated RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal traffic has been established to represent the molecular pathogenic cause underlying these conditions. To investigate the phenotypic spectrum and molecular diversity of germline mutations affecting BRAF, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase functioning as a RAS effector frequently mutated in CFCS, subjects with a diagnosis of NS (N= 270), LS (N= 6) and CFCS (N= 33), and no mutation in PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, RAF1, MEK1 or MEK2, were screened for the entire coding sequence of the gene. Besides the expected high prevalence of mutations observed among CFCS patients (52%), a de novo heterozygous missense change was identified in one subject with LS (17%) and 5 individuals with NS (1.9%). Mutations mapped to multiple protein domains and largely did not overlap with cancer-associated defects. NS-causing mutations had not been documented in CFCS, suggesting that the phenotypes arising from germline BRAF defects might be allele specific. Selected mutant BRAF proteins promoted variable gain of function of the kinase, but appeared less activating compared than the recurrent cancer-associated p.Val600Glu mutant. Our findings provide evidence for a wide phenotypic diversity associated with mutations affecting BRAF, and occurrence of a clinical continuum associated with these molecular lesions. PMID:19206169

  9. Novel SOX2 Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Anophthalmia and Microphthalmia

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya; Reis, Linda M.; Tyler, Rebecca C.; Semina, Elena V.

    2009-01-01

    SOX2 represents a High Mobility Group domain containing transcription factor that is essential for normal development in vertebrates. Mutations in SOX2 are known to result in a spectrum of severe ocular phenotypes in humans, also typically associated with other systemic defects. Ocular phenotypes include anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M), optic nerve hypoplasia, ocular coloboma and other eye anomalies. We screened 51 unrelated individuals with A/M and indentified SOX2 mutations in the coding region of the gene in 10 individuals. Seven of the identified mutations are novel alterations, while the remaining three individuals carry the previously reported recurrent 20-nucleotide deletion in SOX2, c.70del20. Among the SOX2-positive cases, seven patients had bilateral A/M and mutations resulting in premature termination of the normal protein sequence (7/38; 18% of all bilateral cases), one patient had bilateral A/M associated with a single amino acid insertion (1/38; 3% of bilateral cases), and the final two patients demonstrated unilateral A/M associated with missense mutations (2/13; 15% of all unilateral cases). These findings and review of previously reported cases suggest a potential genotype/phenotype correlation for SOX2 mutations with missense changes generally leading to less severe ocular defects. In addition, we report a new familial case of affected siblings with maternal mosaicism for the identified SOX2 mutation, which further underscores the importance of parental testing to provide accurate genetic counseling to families. PMID:19921648

  10. A strain of Yersinia pestis with a mutator phenotype from the Republic of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Rajanna, Chythanya; Ouellette, Gary; Rashid, Mohammed; Zemla, Adam; Karavis, Mark; Zhou, Carol; Revazishvili, Tamara; Redmond, Brady; McNew, Lauren; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Rivers, Bryan; Skowronski, Evan W; O'Connell, Kevin P; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Gibbons, Henry S

    2013-06-01

    We describe here a strain of Yersinia pestis, G1670A, which exhibits a baseline mutation rate elevated 250-fold over wild-type Y. pestis. The responsible mutation, a C to T substitution in the mutS gene, results in the transition of a highly conserved leucine at position 689 to arginine (mutS(L689R)). When the MutSL 689R protein of G1670A was expressed in a ΔmutS derivative of Y. pestis strain EV76, mutation rates observed were equivalent to those observed in G1670A, consistent with a causal association between the mutS mutation and the mutator phenotype. The observation of a mutator allele in Yersinia pestis has potential implications for the study of evolution of this and other especially dangerous pathogens.

  11. Mutations of ARX are associated with striking pleiotropy and consistent genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mitsuhiro; Das, Soma; Petras, Kristin; Kitamura, Kunio; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou; Abuelo, Diane N; Barr, Mason; Bonneau, Dominique; Brady, Angela F; Carpenter, Nancy J; Cipero, Karen L; Frisone, Francesco; Fukuda, Takayuki; Guerrini, Renzo; Iida, Eri; Itoh, Masayuki; Lewanda, Amy Feldman; Nanba, Yukiko; Oka, Akira; Proud, Virginia K; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Schelley, Susan L; Selicorni, Angelo; Shaner, Rachel; Silengo, Margherita; Stewart, Fiona; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Toyama, Jun; Toutain, Annick; Vargas, Ana Lía; Yanazawa, Masako; Zackai, Elaine H; Dobyns, William B

    2004-02-01

    We recently identified mutations of ARX in nine genotypic males with X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia (XLAG), and in several female relatives with isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). We now report 13 novel and two recurrent mutations of ARX, and one nucleotide change of uncertain significance in 20 genotypic males from 16 families. Most had XLAG, but two had hydranencephaly and abnormal genitalia, and three males from one family had Proud syndrome or ACC with abnormal genitalia. We obtained detailed clinical information on all 29 affected males, including the nine previously reported subjects. Premature termination mutations consisting of large deletions, frameshifts, nonsense mutations, and splice site mutations in exons 1 to 4 caused XLAG or hydranencephaly with abnormal genitalia. Nonconservative missense mutations within the homeobox caused less severe XLAG, while conservative substitution in the homeodomain caused Proud syndrome. A nonconservative missense mutation near the C-terminal aristaless domain caused unusually severe XLAG with microcephaly and mild cerebellar hypoplasia. In addition, several less severe phenotypes without malformations have been reported, including mental retardation with cryptogenic infantile spasms (West syndrome), other seizure types, dystonia or autism, and nonsyndromic mental retardation. The ARX mutations associated with these phenotypes have included polyalanine expansions or duplications, missense mutations, and one deletion of exon 5. Together, the group of phenotypes associated with ARX mutations demonstrates remarkable pleiotropy, but also comprises a nearly continuous series of developmental disorders that begins with hydranencephaly, lissencephaly, and agenesis of the corpus callosum, and ends with a series of overlapping syndromes with apparently normal brain structure.

  12. Somatic mosaicism and the phenotypic expression of COL2A1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, Sonali; Richards, Allan J; McNinch, Annie; Sandford, Richard N; Snead, Martin P

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in COL2A1, the gene for type II-collagen, can result in a wide variety of phenotypes depending upon the nature of the mutation. Dominant negative mutations tend to result in severe and often lethal skeletal dysplasias such as achondrogenesis type 2, Kniest dysplasia, and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. Stickler syndrome, a condition characterized by ophthalmological and orofacial features, deafness and arthritis, usually, but not exclusively, results from haploinsufficiency. Overlapping features of all these disorders can also be seen in the same family. Rare reports have demonstrated that phenotypic variability can be explained in some families by somatic mosaicism. Here, we describe five further examples of somatic mosaicism of COL2A1 mutations illustrating the importance of detailed clinical evaluation and molecular testing even in clinically normal parents of affected individuals. PMID:22496037

  13. De novo SHANK3 mutation causes Rett syndrome-like phenotype in a female patient.

    PubMed

    Hara, Munetsugu; Ohba, Chihiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly affecting females. Females with the MECP2 mutations exhibit a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from classical Rett syndrome to asymptomatic carriers. Mutations of genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) are also found in early onset RTT variants. Here, we present the first report of a female patient with RTT-like phenotype caused by SHANK3 (SH3 and multiple ankylin repeat domain 3) mutation, indicating that the clinical spectrum of SHANK3 mutations may extend to RTT-like phenotype in addition to (severe) developmental delay, absence of expressive speech, autistic behaviors and intellectual disability.

  14. Molecular analysis of connexin26 asparagine14 mutations associated with syndromic skin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    de Zwart-Storm, Eugene A; Rosa, Rafael F M; Martin, Patricia E; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Frank, Jorge; Bau, Ana E K; Zen, Paulo R G; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio A; Kamps, Miriam A; van Geel, Michel; van Steensel, Maurice A M

    2011-05-01

    Mutations in connexin26, a cutaneous gap junction protein, cause a wide variety of skin disorders including keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome (KID). We previously delineated a phenotype distinct from KID, hypotrichosis-deafness syndrome, caused by the mutation p.Asn14Lys in connexin26. However, a different mutation at the same location, p.Asn14Tyr, was reported to cause a disorder similar to KID. Distinct substitutions cause different conformational changes to the protein, each with unique consequences for its behaviour. This may explain the phenotypic differences. We found the previously described mutation p.Asn14Tyr in connexin26 in two patients from Brazil and Poland, and observe quite distinct phenotypes distinguishable from classical KID syndrome. We assessed functional consequences of p.Asn14Tyr and p.Asn14Lys, using fluorescently labelled proteins and parachute assay, comparing them with the classical KID mutation p.Asp50Asn. Our analyses show that p.Asn14Tyr, p.Asn14Lys and p.Asp50Asn have different consequences for protein localization and gap junction permeability. However, the differences between the phenotypes we observed cannot be readily explained from effects on protein trafficking or gap junction permeability. PMID:21410767

  15. X-linked VACTERL with hydrocephalus syndrome: further delineation of the phenotype caused by FANCB mutations.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Joanna; Masand, Navta; McGowan, Ruth; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Hunter, Alasdair; Michaud, Jacques L; Gibson, Kate; Robertson, Jeremy; Vaz, Fiona; Abbs, Stephen; Holden, Simon T

    2011-10-01

    X-linked VACTERL-hydrocephalus syndrome (X-linked VACTERL-H) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the gene FANCB which underlies Fanconi Anemia (FA) complementation group B. Cells from affected males have increased chromosome breakage on exposure to DNA cross-linking agents. Only five FANCB mutations found in six affected males, including an affected uncle and nephew, have been reported. We have identified FANCB mutations in a further four affected families. The VACTERL-H phenotype segregates as an X-linked recessive trait in three of these. Each mutation is predicted to truncate the FANCB open reading frame and results in highly skewed X-inactivation in unaffected carrier females. Phenotypic data were available on six affected males. Comparison of the clinical findings in our patients with published clinical data (total 12 patients) shows that ventriculomegaly, bilateral absent thumbs and radii, vertebral defects, renal agenesis, and growth retardation are the major phenotypic signs in affected males. Less frequent are brain, pituitary, ear and eye malformations, gastrointestinal atresias (esophageal, duodenal and anal), tracheoesophageal fistula, lung segmentation defects, and small genitalia. Three of six of our patients survived the perinatal period. One boy lived up to 2 years 10 months but developed aplastic anemia and died of renal failure. These data show that loss-of-function FANCB mutations result in a recognizable, multiple malformation phenotype in hemizygous males for which we propose clinical criteria to aid diagnosis. PMID:21910217

  16. X-linked VACTERL with hydrocephalus syndrome: further delineation of the phenotype caused by FANCB mutations.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Joanna; Masand, Navta; McGowan, Ruth; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Hunter, Alasdair; Michaud, Jacques L; Gibson, Kate; Robertson, Jeremy; Vaz, Fiona; Abbs, Stephen; Holden, Simon T

    2011-10-01

    X-linked VACTERL-hydrocephalus syndrome (X-linked VACTERL-H) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the gene FANCB which underlies Fanconi Anemia (FA) complementation group B. Cells from affected males have increased chromosome breakage on exposure to DNA cross-linking agents. Only five FANCB mutations found in six affected males, including an affected uncle and nephew, have been reported. We have identified FANCB mutations in a further four affected families. The VACTERL-H phenotype segregates as an X-linked recessive trait in three of these. Each mutation is predicted to truncate the FANCB open reading frame and results in highly skewed X-inactivation in unaffected carrier females. Phenotypic data were available on six affected males. Comparison of the clinical findings in our patients with published clinical data (total 12 patients) shows that ventriculomegaly, bilateral absent thumbs and radii, vertebral defects, renal agenesis, and growth retardation are the major phenotypic signs in affected males. Less frequent are brain, pituitary, ear and eye malformations, gastrointestinal atresias (esophageal, duodenal and anal), tracheoesophageal fistula, lung segmentation defects, and small genitalia. Three of six of our patients survived the perinatal period. One boy lived up to 2 years 10 months but developed aplastic anemia and died of renal failure. These data show that loss-of-function FANCB mutations result in a recognizable, multiple malformation phenotype in hemizygous males for which we propose clinical criteria to aid diagnosis.

  17. Phenotypic Suppression of Streptomycin Resistance by Mutations in Multiple Components of the Translation Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer F.; Lee, Hannah J.; Jaspers, Joshua B.; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Jogl, Gerwald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial ribosome and its associated translation factors are frequent targets of antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance mutations have been found in a number of these components. Such mutations can potentially interact with one another in unpredictable ways, including the phenotypic suppression of one mutation by another. These phenotypic interactions can provide evidence of long-range functional interactions throughout the ribosome and its functional complexes and potentially give insights into antibiotic resistance mechanisms. In this study, we used genetics and experimental evolution of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus to examine the ability of mutations in various components of the protein synthesis apparatus to suppress the streptomycin resistance phenotypes of mutations in ribosomal protein S12, specifically those located distant from the streptomycin binding site. With genetic selections and strain constructions, we identified suppressor mutations in EF-Tu or in ribosomal protein L11. Using experimental evolution, we identified amino acid substitutions in EF-Tu or in ribosomal proteins S4, S5, L14, or L19, some of which were found to also relieve streptomycin resistance. The wide dispersal of these mutations is consistent with long-range functional interactions among components of the translational machinery and indicates that streptomycin resistance can result from the modulation of long-range conformational signals. IMPORTANCE The thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus has become a model system for high-resolution structural studies of macromolecular complexes, such as the ribosome, while its natural competence for transformation facilitates genetic approaches. Genetic studies of T. thermophilus ribosomes can take advantage of existing high-resolution crystallographic information to allow a structural interpretation of phenotypic interactions among mutations. Using a combination of genetic selections, strain constructions

  18. Normosmic Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Due to TAC3/TACR3 Mutations: Characterization of Neuroendocrine Phenotypes and Novel Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Voican, Adela; Amazit, Larbi; Trabado, Séverine; Fagart, Jérôme; Meduri, Geri; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Chanson, Philippe; Lecomte, Pierre; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Context TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) (OMIM #146110). In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. Results From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%). We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants) found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn) probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001) higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. Conclusion The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations. PMID:22031817

  19. Spectrum of CHD7 Mutations in 110 Individuals with CHARGE Syndrome and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Safiullah, Arsalan M.; Fernbach, Susan D.; Harutyunyan, Karine G.; Thaller, Christina; Peterson, Leif E.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; White, Lisa D.; Hefner, Margaret; Davenport, Sandra L. H.; Graham, John M.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Glass, Nancy L.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Craigen, William J.; Neish, Steven R.; Lin, Angela E.; Belmont, John W.

    2006-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a well-established multiple-malformation syndrome with distinctive consensus diagnostic criteria. Characteristic associated anomalies include ocular coloboma, choanal atresia, cranial nerve defects, distinctive external and inner ear abnormalities, hearing loss, cardiovascular malformations, urogenital anomalies, and growth retardation. Recently, mutations of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein gene CHD7 were reported to be a major cause of CHARGE syndrome. We sequenced the CHD7 gene in 110 individuals who had received the clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, and we detected mutations in 64 (58%). Mutations were distributed throughout the coding exons and conserved splice sites of CHD7. Of the 64 mutations, 47 (73%) predicted premature truncation of the protein. These included nonsense and frameshift mutations, which most likely lead to haploinsufficiency. Phenotypically, the mutation-positive group was more likely to exhibit cardiovascular malformations (54 of 59 in the mutation-positive group vs. 30 of 42 in the mutation-negative group; P=.014), coloboma of the eye (55 of 62 in the mutation-positive group vs. 30 of 43 in the mutation-negative group; P=.022), and facial asymmetry, often caused by seventh cranial nerve abnormalities (36 of 56 in the mutation-positive group vs. 13 of 39 in the mutation-negative group; P=.004). Mouse embryo whole-mount and section in situ hybridization showed the expression of Chd7 in the outflow tract of the heart, optic vesicle, facio-acoustic preganglion complex, brain, olfactory pit, and mandibular component of the first branchial arch. Microarray gene-expression analysis showed a signature pattern of gene-expression differences that distinguished the individuals with CHARGE syndrome with CHD7 mutation from the controls. We conclude that cardiovascular malformations, coloboma, and facial asymmetry are common findings in CHARGE syndrome caused by CHD7 mutation. PMID:16400610

  20. Complex inheritance of ABCA4 disease: four mutations in a family with multiple macular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing; Zernant, Jana; Yuan, Bo; Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Tsang, Stephen H; Lupski, James R; Allikmets, Rando

    2016-01-01

    Over 800 mutations in the ABCA4 gene cause autosomal recessive Stargardt disease. Due to extensive genetic heterogeneity, observed variant-associated phenotypes can manifest tremendous variability of expression. Furthermore, the high carrier frequency of pathogenic ABCA4 alleles in the general population (~1:20) often results in pseudo-dominant inheritance patterns further complicating the diagnosis and characterization of affected individuals. This study describes a genotype/phenotype analysis of an unusual family with multiple macular disease phenotypes spanning across two generations and segregating four distinct ABCA4 mutant alleles. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 discovered two known missense mutations, p.C54Y and p.G1961E. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a large novel deletion combined with a small insertion, c.6148-698_c.6670del/insTGTGCACCTCCCTAG, and complete sequencing of the entire ABCA4 genomic locus uncovered a new deep intronic variant, c.302+68C>T. Patients with the p.G1961E mutation had the mildest, confined maculopathy phenotype with peripheral flecks while those with all other mutant allele combinations exhibited a more advanced stage of generalized retinal and choriocapillaris atrophy. This family epitomizes the clinical and genetic complexity of ABCA4-associated diseases. It contained variants from all classes of mutations, in the coding region, deep intronic, both single nucleotide variants and copy number variants that accounted for varying phenotypes segregating in an apparent dominant fashion. Unequivocally defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires a multifaceted approach that includes advanced mutation detection methods and a thorough analysis of clinical phenotypes.

  1. Mutations in COL6A3 Cause Severe and Mild Phenotypes of Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Ercan; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Allamand, Valérie; Ferreiro, Ana; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Topaloglu, Haluk; Echenne, Bernard; Merlini, Luciano; Guicheney, Pascale

    2002-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized muscular weakness, contractures of multiple joints, and distal hyperextensibility. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of COL6A2 on chromosome 21q22 have recently been shown to cause UCMD. We performed a genomewide screening with microsatellite markers in a consanguineous family with three sibs affected with UCMD. Linkage of the disease to chromosome 2q37 was found in this family and in two others. We analyzed COL6A3, which encodes the α3 chain of collagen VI, and identified one homozygous mutation per family. In family I, the three sibs carried an A→G transition in the splice-donor site of intron 29 (6930+5A→G), leading to the skipping of exon 29, a partial reduction of collagen VI in muscle biopsy, and an intermediate phenotype. In family II, the patient had an unusual mild phenotype, despite a nonsense mutation, R465X, in exon 5. Analysis of the patient’s COL6A3 transcripts showed the presence of various mRNA species—one of which lacked several exons, including the exon containing the nonsense mutation. The deleted splice variant encodes collagen molecules that have a shorter N-terminal domain but that may assemble with other chains and retain a functional role. This could explain the mild phenotype of the patient who was still ambulant at age 18 years and who showed an unusual combination of hyperlaxity and finger contractures. In family III, the patient had a nonsense mutation, R2342X, causing absence of collagen VI in muscle and fibroblasts, and a severe phenotype, as has been described in patients with UCMD. Mutations in COL6A3 are described in UCMD for the first time and illustrate the wide spectrum of phenotypes which can be caused by collagen VI deficiency. PMID:11992252

  2. Genotype–phenotype correlation of PAX6 gene mutations in aniridia

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Tadashi; Nishina, Sachiko; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genotype–phenotype correlation of the PAX6 gene in aniridia. We clinically examined 5 families and 16 sporadic patients with aniridia. We performed chromosomal analysis and PCR analysis of the PAX6 gene using patient genomic DNA. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated deletions at 11p13 in one allele in four sporadic patients. Seven nonsense mutations, two frameshifts (two insertions), four splice junction errors and two missense mutations were found, and all were heterozygous. The iris phenotype ranged from total to normal in each patient, and the characteristic phenotypes, including cataract, glaucoma or optic nerve hypoplasia, varied widely even among members of the same family. Foveal hypoplasia was detected in all patients except for one. No obvious genotype–phenotype correlation was identified; however, the aniridia phenotype between the two eyes in each patient was quite similar in all patients. Because PAX6 regulates numerous downstream genes and its expression is regulated by several factors during eye development, the aniridia phenotype may be complex even in family members. However, because PAX6 regulation, resulting from both paternal and maternal alleles associated with PAX6, is considered to be roughly similar in both eyes of each patient, the aniridia phenotype may be similar in both eyes of each patient. PMID:27081561

  3. MFN2 mutation distribution and genotype/phenotype correlation in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Kristien; Claeys, Kristl G; Züchner, Stephan; Schröder, J Michael; Weis, Joachim; Ceuterick, Chantal; Jordanova, Albena; Nelis, Eva; De Vriendt, Els; Van Hul, Matthias; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Saifi, Gulam Mustafa; Szigeti, Kinga; Mancias, Pedro; Butler, Ian J; Kochanski, Andrzej; Ryniewicz, Barbara; De Bleecker, Jan; Van den Bergh, Peter; Verellen, Christine; Van Coster, Rudy; Goemans, Nathalie; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Robberecht, Wim; Milic Rasic, Vedrana; Nevo, Yoram; Tournev, Ivajlo; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Roelens, Filip; Vieregge, Peter; Vinci, Paolo; Moreno, Maria Teresa; Christen, H-J; Shy, Michael E; Lupski, James R; Vance, Jeffery M; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2006-08-01

    Mutations in mitofusin 2 (MFN2) have been reported in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2) families. To study the distribution of mutations in MFN2 we screened 323 families and isolated patients with distinct CMT phenotypes. In 29 probands, we identified 22 distinct MFN2 mutations, and 14 of these mutations have not been reported before. All mutations were located in the cytoplasmic domains of the MFN2 protein. Patients presented with a classical but rather severe CMT phenotype, since 28% of them were wheelchair-dependent. Some had additional features as optic atrophy. Most patients had an early onset and severe disease status, whereas a smaller group experienced a later onset and milder disease course. Electrophysiological data showed in the majority of patients normal to slightly reduced nerve conduction velocities with often severely reduced amplitudes of the compound motor and sensory nerve action potentials. Examination of sural nerve specimens showed loss of large myelinated fibres and degenerative mitochondrial changes. In patients with a documented family history of CMT2 the frequency of MFN2 mutations was 33% indicating that MFN2 mutations are a major cause in this population.

  4. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Phenotypic heterogeneity in British patients with a founder mutation in the FHL1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Sarkozy, Anna; Windpassinger, Christian; Hudson, Judith; Dougan, Charlotte F; Lecky, Bryan; Hilton-Jones, David; Eagle, Michelle; Charlton, Richard; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) gene, which encodes a 280-amino-acid protein containing four LIM domains and a single zinc-finger domain in the N-terminal region, have been associated with a broad clinical spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases encompassing a variety of different phenotypes. Patients might present with a scapuloperoneal myopathy, a myopathy with postural muscle atrophy and generalized hypertrophy, an Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, or an early onset myopathy with reducing bodies. It has been proposed that the phenotypic variability is related to the position of the mutation within the FHL1 gene. Here, we report on three British families with a heterogeneous clinical presentation segregating a single FHL1 gene mutation and haplotype, suggesting that this represents a founder mutation. The underlying FHL1 gene mutation was detected by direct sequencing and the founder effect was verified by haplotype analysis of the FHL1 gene locus. A 3-bp insertion mutation (p.Phe127_Thr128insIle) within the second LIM domain of the FHL1 gene was identified in all available affected family members of the three families. Haplotype analysis of the FHL1 region on Xq26 revealed that the families shared a common haplotype. The p.Phe127_Thr128insIle mutation in the FHL1 gene therefore appears to be a British founder mutation and FHL1 gene screening, in particular of exon 6, should therefore be indicated in British patients with a broad phenotypic spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases. PMID:21629301

  6. A single-nucleotide substitution mutator phenotype revealed by exome sequencing of human colon adenomas.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergey I; Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Pateras, Ioannis S; Santoni, Federico; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Edgren, Henrik; Almusa, Henrikki; Robyr, Daniel; Guipponi, Michel; Saarela, Janna; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2012-12-01

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress is thought to drive genomic instability in cancer. In particular, replication stress can explain the high prevalence of focal genomic deletions mapping within very large genes in human tumors. However, the origin of single-nucleotide substitutions (SNS) in nonfamilial cancers is strongly debated. Some argue that cancers have a mutator phenotype, whereas others argue that the normal DNA replication error rates are sufficient to explain the number of observed SNSs. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 24, mostly precancerous, colon polyps. Analysis of the sequences revealed mutations in the APC, CTNNB1, and BRAF genes as the presumptive cancer-initiating events and many passenger SNSs. We used the number of SNSs in the various lesions to calculate mutation rates for normal colon and adenomas and found that colon adenomas exhibit a mutator phenotype. Interestingly, the SNSs in the adenomas mapped more often than expected within very large genes, where focal deletions in response to DNA replication stress also map. We propose that single-stranded DNA generated in response to oncogene-induced replication stress compromises the repair of deaminated cytosines and other damaged bases, leading to the observed SNS mutator phenotype.

  7. dNTP pool levels modulate mutator phenotypes of error-prone DNA polymerase ε variants

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lindsey N.; Marjavaara, Lisette; Knowels, Gary M.; Schultz, Eric M.; Fox, Edward J.; Chabes, Andrei; Herr, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutator phenotypes create genetic diversity that fuels tumor evolution. DNA polymerase (Pol) ε mediates leading strand DNA replication. Proofreading defects in this enzyme drive a number of human malignancies. Here, using budding yeast, we show that mutator variants of Pol ε depend on damage uninducible (Dun)1, an S-phase checkpoint kinase that maintains dNTP levels during a normal cell cycle and up-regulates dNTP synthesis upon checkpoint activation. Deletion of DUN1 (dun1Δ) suppresses the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 (encoding Pol ε proofreading deficiency) and is synthetically lethal with pol2-M644G (encoding altered Pol ε base selectivity). Although pol2-4 cells cycle normally, pol2-M644G cells progress slowly through S-phase. The pol2-M644G cells tolerate deletions of mediator of the replication checkpoint (MRC) 1 (mrc1Δ) and radiation sensitive (Rad) 9 (rad9Δ), which encode mediators of checkpoint responses to replication stress and DNA damage, respectively. The pol2-M644G mutator phenotype is partially suppressed by mrc1Δ but not rad9Δ; neither deletion suppresses the pol2-4 mutator phenotype. Thus, checkpoint activation augments the Dun1 effect on replication fidelity but is not required for it. Deletions of genes encoding key Dun1 targets that negatively regulate dNTP synthesis, suppress the dun1Δ pol2-M644G synthetic lethality and restore the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 in dun1Δ cells. DUN1 pol2-M644G cells have constitutively high dNTP levels, consistent with checkpoint activation. In contrast, pol2-4 and POL2 cells have similar dNTP levels, which decline in the absence of Dun1 and rise in the absence of the negative regulators of dNTP synthesis. Thus, dNTP pool levels correlate with Pol ε mutator severity, suggesting that treatments targeting dNTP pools could modulate mutator phenotypes for therapy. PMID:25827226

  8. dNTP pool levels modulate mutator phenotypes of error-prone DNA polymerase ε variants.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsey N; Marjavaara, Lisette; Knowels, Gary M; Schultz, Eric M; Fox, Edward J; Chabes, Andrei; Herr, Alan J

    2015-05-12

    Mutator phenotypes create genetic diversity that fuels tumor evolution. DNA polymerase (Pol) ε mediates leading strand DNA replication. Proofreading defects in this enzyme drive a number of human malignancies. Here, using budding yeast, we show that mutator variants of Pol ε depend on damage uninducible (Dun)1, an S-phase checkpoint kinase that maintains dNTP levels during a normal cell cycle and up-regulates dNTP synthesis upon checkpoint activation. Deletion of DUN1 (dun1Δ) suppresses the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 (encoding Pol ε proofreading deficiency) and is synthetically lethal with pol2-M644G (encoding altered Pol ε base selectivity). Although pol2-4 cells cycle normally, pol2-M644G cells progress slowly through S-phase. The pol2-M644G cells tolerate deletions of mediator of the replication checkpoint (MRC) 1 (mrc1Δ) and radiation sensitive (Rad) 9 (rad9Δ), which encode mediators of checkpoint responses to replication stress and DNA damage, respectively. The pol2-M644G mutator phenotype is partially suppressed by mrc1Δ but not rad9Δ; neither deletion suppresses the pol2-4 mutator phenotype. Thus, checkpoint activation augments the Dun1 effect on replication fidelity but is not required for it. Deletions of genes encoding key Dun1 targets that negatively regulate dNTP synthesis, suppress the dun1Δ pol2-M644G synthetic lethality and restore the mutator phenotype of pol2-4 in dun1Δ cells. DUN1 pol2-M644G cells have constitutively high dNTP levels, consistent with checkpoint activation. In contrast, pol2-4 and POL2 cells have similar dNTP levels, which decline in the absence of Dun1 and rise in the absence of the negative regulators of dNTP synthesis. Thus, dNTP pool levels correlate with Pol ε mutator severity, suggesting that treatments targeting dNTP pools could modulate mutator phenotypes for therapy.

  9. Mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlation of hearing loss patients caused by SLC26A4 mutations in the Japanese: a large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2014-05-01

    Mutations in SLC26A4 cause a broad phenotypic spectrum, from typical Pendred syndrome to nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct. Identification of these mutations is important for accurate diagnosis, proper medical management and appropriate genetic counseling and requires updated information regarding spectrum, clinical characteristics and genotype-phenotype correlations, based on a large cohort. In 100 patients with bilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct among 1511 Japanese hearing loss probands registered in our gene bank, goiter data were available for 79, of whom 15 had Pendred syndrome and 64 had nonsyndromic hearing loss. We clarified the mutation spectrum for the SLC26A4 mutations and also summarized hearing levels, progression, fluctuation and existence of genotype-phenotype correlation. SLC26A4 mutations were identified in 82 of the 100 patients (82.0%). Of the Pendred syndrome patients, 93% (14/15) were carriers, as were 77% (49/64) of the nonsyndromic hearing loss patients. Clinical characteristics of patients with SLC26A4 mutations were congenital, fluctuating and progressive hearing loss usually associated with vertigo and/or goiter. We found no genotype-phenotype correlations, indicating that, unlike in the case of GJB2 mutations, the phenotype cannot be predicted from the genotype. Our mutation analysis confirmed the importance of mutations in the SLC26A4 gene among hearing loss patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct and revealed the mutation spectrum, essential information when performing genetic testing.

  10. Impact of HIV type 1 drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance profile on virologic response to salvage therapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, L; Liao, Q; Gao, H; Pham, S; Tolson, J; Hertogs, K; Larder, B; Saag, M S

    2001-10-10

    This study examines the association between presence of drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance at baseline to virologic response to salvage therapy in a community setting. The study population consisted of 58 antiretroviral drug-experienced patients with HIV-1 infection who had recently switched therapy because of virologic failure. Drug resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase- and protease-coding regions and phenotypic susceptibility to 13 antiretroviral drugs were assessed at baseline. Plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were assessed at baseline and at subsequent clinic visits. Results showed that three variables were significant in predicting virologic response: HIV-1 levels at baseline, number of protease mutations, and phenotypic sensitivity score for the regimen at baseline. For four drugs there was a significant association between the presence of specific drug resistance mutations and >10-fold phenotypic resistance to that drug. With phenotypic resistance defined as >4-fold resistance, the association between specific drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance was significant for seven drugs. Overall, these data show that phenotypic susceptibility and absence of drug resistance mutations, particularly protease mutations, are significant predictors of virologic response. For several drugs, specific combinations of drug resistance mutations are associated with decreased phenotypic susceptibility and might provide useful clinical guidelines in selecting therapeutic options.

  11. Variability in dentofacial phenotypes in four families with WNT10A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vink, Christian P; Ockeloen, Charlotte W; ten Kate, Sietske; Koolen, David A; Ploos van Amstel, Johannes Kristian; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne-Marie; van Heumen, Celeste C; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Carels, Carine E L

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability in four families with WNT10A mutations. Clinical characteristics of the patients range from mild to severe isolated tooth agenesis, over mild symptoms of ectodermal dysplasia, to more severe syndromic forms like odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia (OODD) and Schöpf–Schulz–Passarge syndrome (SSPS). Recurrent WNT10A mutations were identified in all affected family members and the associated symptoms are presented with emphasis on the dentofacial phenotypes obtained with inter alia three-dimensional facial stereophotogrammetry. A comprehensive overview of the literature regarding WNT10A mutations, associated conditions and developmental defects is presented. We conclude that OODD and SSPS should be considered as variable expressions of the same WNT10A genotype. In all affected individuals, a dished-in facial appearance was observed which might be helpful in the clinical setting as a clue to the underlying genetic etiology. PMID:24398796

  12. Variability in phenotype induced by the podocin variant R229Q plus a single pathogenic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Paul J.; Hall, Gentzon; Wigfall, Delbert; Foreman, John; Nagaraj, Shashi; Malone, Andrew F.; Winn, Michelle P.; Howell, David N.; Gbadegesin, Rasheed

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in podocin (NPHS2) are the most common cause of childhood onset autosomal recessive steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). The disease is characterized by early-onset proteinuria, resistance to immunosuppressive therapy and rapid progression to end-stage renal disease. Compound heterozygous changes involving the podocin variant R229Q combined with another pathogenic mutation have been associated with a mild phenotype with disease onset often in adulthood. Methods We screened 19 families with early-onset SRNS for mutations in NPHS2 and WT1 and identified four disease-causing mutations (three in NPHS2 and one in WT1) prior to planned whole-exome sequencing. Results We describe two families with three individuals presenting in childhood who are compound heterozygous for R229Q and one other pathogenic NPHS2 mutation, either L327F or A297V. One child presented at age 4 years (A297V plus R229Q) and the other two at age 13 (L327F plus R229Q), one with steadily deteriorating renal function. Conclusions These cases highlight the phenotypic variability associated with the NPHS2 R229Q variant plus pathogenic mutation. Individuals may present with early aggressive disease. PMID:26413278

  13. BMP9 mutations cause a vascular-anomaly syndrome with phenotypic overlap with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney L; McDonald, Jamie; O'Fallon, Brendan; Upton, Paul D; Li, Wei; Roman, Beth L; Young, Sarah; Plant, Parker; Fülöp, Gyula T; Langa, Carmen; Morrell, Nicholas W; Botella, Luisa M; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Stevenson, David A; Runo, James R; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2013-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), the most common inherited vascular disorder, is caused by mutations in genes involved in the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway (ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4). Yet, approximately 15% of individuals with clinical features of HHT do not have mutations in these genes, suggesting that there are undiscovered mutations in other genes for HHT and possibly vascular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. The genetic etiology for 191 unrelated individuals clinically suspected to have HHT was investigated with the use of exome and Sanger sequencing; these individuals had no mutations in ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. Mutations in BMP9 (also known as GDF2) were identified in three unrelated probands. These three individuals had epistaxis and dermal lesions that were described as telangiectases but whose location and appearance resembled lesions described in some individuals with RASA1-related disorders (capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome). Analyses of the variant proteins suggested that mutations negatively affect protein processing and/or function, and a bmp9-deficient zebrafish model demonstrated that BMP9 is involved in angiogenesis. These data confirm a genetic cause of a vascular-anomaly syndrome that has phenotypic overlap with HHT.

  14. A nonsense mutation in zebrafish gata1 causes the bloodless phenotype in vlad tepes

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Susan E.; Lawson, Nathan D.; Lei, Lin; Bennett, Paul E.; Weinstein, Brant M.; Liu, P. Paul

    2002-01-01

    Vlad tepes (vltm651) is one of only five “bloodless” zebrafish mutants isolated through large-scale chemical mutagenesis screening. It is characterized by a severe reduction in blood cell progenitors and few or no blood cells at the onset of circulation. We now report characterization of the mutant phenotype and the identification of the gene mutated in vltm651. Embryos homozygous for the vltm651 mutation had normal expression of hematopoietic stem cell markers through 24 h postfertilization, as well as normal expression of myeloid and lymphoid markers. Analysis of erythroid development revealed variable expression of erythroid markers. Through positional and candidate gene cloning approaches we identified a nonsense mutation in the gata1 gene, 1015C → T (Arg-339 → Stop), in vltm651. The nonsense mutation was located C-terminal to the two zinc fingers and resulted in a truncated protein that was unable to bind DNA or mediate GATA-specific transactivation. A BAC clone containing the zebrafish gata1 gene was able to rescue the bloodless phenotype in vltm651. These results show that the vltm651 mutation is a previously uncharacterized gata1 allele in the zebrafish. The vltm651 mutation sheds new light on Gata1 structure and function in vivo, demonstrates that Gata1 plays an essential role in zebrafish hematopoiesis with significant conservation of function between mammals and zebrafish, and offers a powerful tool for future studies of the hematopoietic pathway. PMID:11960002

  15. Identification of novel KIF11 mutations in patients with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy and a phenotypic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia-Kai; Fei, Ping; Li, Yian; Huang, Qiu-Jing; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Xiang; Rao, Yu-Qing; Li, Jing; Zhao, Peiquan

    2016-01-01

    KIF11 gene mutations cause a rare autosomal dominant inheritable disease called microcephaly with or without chorioretinopathy, lymphedema, or mental retardation (MCLMR). Recently, such mutations were also found to be associated with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Here, we report 7 novel KIF11 mutations identified by targeted gene capture in a cohort of 142 probands with FEVR who were diagnosed in our clinic between March 2015 and November 2015. These mutations were: p.L171V, c.790-2A>C, p.Q525*, p.Q842*, p.S936*, p.L983fs and p.R1025G. Phenotypic analysis revealed that all of the affected probands had advanced FEVR (stage 4 or above). Three had microcephaly, and one had chorioretinopathy, which indicated a phenotypic overlap with MCLMR. Two mutations were also found in the families of the affected probands. One parent with a p.R1025G mutation had an avascular peripheral retina and abnormal looping vessels. However, one parent with p.L983fs had normal retina, which indicated incomplete penetration of the genotype. Our results further confirmed that KIF11 is causative of FEVR in an autosomal dominant manner. We also suggest the examination of MCLMR-like features, such as microcephaly, chorioretinopathy, for patients with FEVR and wide-field fundus photography for patients with MCLMR in future practice. PMID:27212378

  16. CASK mutations are frequent in males and cause X-linked nystagmus and variable XLMR phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Anna; Tarpey, Patrick S; Licata, Andrea; Cox, James; Whibley, Annabel; Boyle, Jackie; Rogers, Carolyn; Grigg, John; Partington, Michael; Stevenson, Roger E; Tolmie, John; Yates, John RW; Turner, Gillian; Wilson, Meredith; Futreal, Andrew P; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Gecz, Jozef; Raymond, F Lucy; Stratton, Michael R; Schwartz, Charles E; Abidi, Fatima E

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) gene have recently been associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with microcephaly, optic atrophy and brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, as well as with an X-linked syndrome having some FG-like features. Our group has recently identified four male probands from 358 probable XLMR families with missense mutations (p.Y268H, p.P396S, p.D710G and p.W919R) in the CASK gene. Congenital nystagmus, a rare and striking feature, was present in two of these families. We screened a further 45 probands with either nystagmus or microcephaly and mental retardation (MR), and identified two further mutations, a missense mutation (p.Y728C) and a splice mutation (c.2521-2A>T) in two small families with nystagmus and MR. Detailed clinical examinations of all six families, including an ophthalmological review in four families, were undertaken to further characterise the phenotype. We report on the clinical features of 24 individuals, mostly male, from six families with CASK mutations. The phenotype was variable, ranging from non-syndromic mild MR to severe MR associated with microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. Carrier females were variably affected. Congenital nystagmus was found in members of four of the families. Our findings reinforce the CASK gene as a relatively frequent cause of XLMR in females and males. We further define the phenotypic spectrum and demonstrate that affected males with missense mutations or in-frame deletions in CASK are frequently associated with congenital nystagmus and XLMR, a striking feature not previously reported. PMID:20029458

  17. CASK mutations are frequent in males and cause X-linked nystagmus and variable XLMR phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Anna; Tarpey, Patrick S; Licata, Andrea; Cox, James; Whibley, Annabel; Boyle, Jackie; Rogers, Carolyn; Grigg, John; Partington, Michael; Stevenson, Roger E; Tolmie, John; Yates, John Rw; Turner, Gillian; Wilson, Meredith; Futreal, Andrew P; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Gecz, Jozef; Raymond, F Lucy; Stratton, Michael R; Schwartz, Charles E; Abidi, Fatima E

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) gene have recently been associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with microcephaly, optic atrophy and brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, as well as with an X-linked syndrome having some FG-like features. Our group has recently identified four male probands from 358 probable XLMR families with missense mutations (p.Y268H, p.P396S, p.D710G and p.W919R) in the CASK gene. Congenital nystagmus, a rare and striking feature, was present in two of these families. We screened a further 45 probands with either nystagmus or microcephaly and mental retardation (MR), and identified two further mutations, a missense mutation (p.Y728C) and a splice mutation (c.2521-2A>T) in two small families with nystagmus and MR. Detailed clinical examinations of all six families, including an ophthalmological review in four families, were undertaken to further characterise the phenotype. We report on the clinical features of 24 individuals, mostly male, from six families with CASK mutations. The phenotype was variable, ranging from non-syndromic mild MR to severe MR associated with microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. Carrier females were variably affected. Congenital nystagmus was found in members of four of the families. Our findings reinforce the CASK gene as a relatively frequent cause of XLMR in females and males. We further define the phenotypic spectrum and demonstrate that affected males with missense mutations or in-frame deletions in CASK are frequently associated with congenital nystagmus and XLMR, a striking feature not previously reported.

  18. Multiple phenotypes resulting from a mutagenesis screen for pharynx muscle mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, Andrew; Charron, Alexandra; Sadozai, Yama; Switaj, Lynn; Szutenbach, Anneliese; Smith, Pliny A

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel screen to isolate pharyngeal cell morphology mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans using myo-2::GFP to rapidly identify abnormally shaped pharynxes in EMS (Ethyl Methanesulfonate) mutagenized worms. We observed over 83 C. elegans lines with distinctive pharyngeal phenotypes in worms surviving to the L1 larval stage, with phenotypes ranging from short pharynx, unattached pharynx, missing cells, asymmetric morphology, and non-adherent pharynx cells. Thirteen of these mutations have been chromosomally mapped using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and deficiency strain complementation. Our studies have focused on genetically mapping and functionally testing two phenotypes, the short pharynx and the loss of muscle cohesion phenotypes. We have also identified new alleles of sma-1, and our screen suggests many genes directing pharynx assembly and structure may be either pharynx specific or less critical in other tissues.

  19. Next-generation Sequencing Extends the Phenotypic Spectrum for LCA5 Mutations: Novel LCA5 Mutations in Cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Sun, Xiantao; Zhang, Yuxin; Jiang, Chao; Li, Huiping; Ding, Sijia; Liu, Yani; Liu, Wenzhou; Li, Zili; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aim to characterize the clinical features and genetic causes for two affected siblings from a Chinese family with cone dystrophy (CD). Two patients and four unaffected family members were recruited and received complete ophthalmic examinations. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood samples from all patients. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach followed by intrafamilal cosegregation and in silico analyses were employed to determine the genetic defects. Ophthalmic evaluations finalized the clinical diagnosis of CD for the two patients in this family, both of whom presented macular atrophy with no remarkable changes in the peripheral retina. Comprehensive genetic screening approach revealed biallelic missense mutations in the Leber congenital amaurosis 5 (LCA5) gene, p.[Ala212Pro];[Tyr441Cys], as disease causative for this family. Both mutations were novel. The first substitution was predicted to eliminate a hydrogen bond and alter the tertiary structure of lebercilin, protein encoded by LCA5. We for the first time report novel biallelic LCA5 mutations in causing CD. Our study extends the phenotypic and genotypic spectrums for LCA5-associated retinopathies and better illustrates its genotype-phenotype correlations, which would help with better genetic diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment for CD patients. PMID:27067258

  20. Individualized Iterative Phenotyping for Genome-wide Analysis of Loss-of-Function Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Lewis, Katie L.; Ng, David; Singh, Larry N.; Wynter, Jamila; Brewer, Carmen; Brooks, Brian P.; Brownell, Isaac; Candotti, Fabio; Gonsalves, Steven G.; Hart, Suzanne P.; Kong, Heidi H.; Rother, Kristina I.; Sokolic, Robert; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Zein, Wadih M.; Cooper, David N.; Stenson, Peter D.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing provides the opportunity to practice predictive medicine based on identified variants. Putative loss-of-function (pLOF) variants are common in genomes and understanding their contribution to disease is critical for predictive medicine. To this end, we characterized the consequences of pLOF variants in an exome cohort by iterative phenotyping. Exome data were generated on 951 participants from the ClinSeq cohort and filtered for pLOF variants in genes likely to cause a phenotype in heterozygotes. 103 of 951 exomes had such a pLOF variant and 79 participants were evaluated. Of those 79, 34 had findings or family histories that could be attributed to the variant (28 variants in 18 genes), 2 had indeterminate findings (2 variants in 2 genes), and 43 had no findings or a negative family history for the trait (34 variants in 28 genes). The presence of a phenotype was correlated with two mutation attributes: prior report of pathogenicity for the variant (p = 0.0001) and prior report of other mutations in the same exon (p = 0.0001). We conclude that 1/30 unselected individuals harbor a pLOF mutation associated with a phenotype either in themselves or their family. This is more common than has been assumed and has implications for the setting of prior probabilities of affection status for predictive medicine. PMID:26046366

  1. A novel mutation in the AGXT gene causing primary hyperoxaluria type I: genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    M'Dimegh, Saoussen; Aquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; Omezzine, Asma; M'Barek, Ibtihel; Souche, Geneviéve; Zellama, Dorsaf; Abidi, Kamel; Achour, Abdelattif; Gargah, Tahar; Abroug, Saoussen; Bouslama, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by inherited mutations in the AGXT gene encoding liver peroxisomal alanine : glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) which is deficient or mistargeted to mitochondria. PH1 shows considerable phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. The incidence and severity of PH1 varies in different geographic regions. DNA samples of the affected members from two unrelated Tunisian families were tested by amplifying and sequencing each of the AGXT exons and intron-exon junctions. We identified a novel frameshift mutation in the AGXT gene, the c.406_410dupACTGC resulting in a truncated protein (p.Gln137Hisfs*19). It is found in homozygous state in two nonconsanguineous unrelated families from Tunisia. These molecular findings provide genotype/phenotype correlations in the intrafamilial phenotypic and permit accurate carrier detection, and prenatal diagnosis. The novel p.Gln137Hisfs*19 mutation detected in our study extend the spectrum of known AGXT gene mutations in Tunisia. PMID:27659337

  2. Phenotype in parkinsonian and nonparkinsonian LRRK2 G2019S mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Schuele, B.; Munhoz, R.P.; Rogaeva, E.; Langston, J.W.; Kasten, M.; Meaney, C.; Klein, C.; Wadia, P.M.; Lim, S.-Y.; Chuang, R.S.-I.; Zadikof, C.; Steeves, T.; Prakash, K.M.; de Bie, R.M.A.; Adeli, G.; Thomsen, T.; Johansen, K.K.; Teive, H.A.; Asante, A.; Reginold, W.; Lang, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Using a family study design, we describe the motor and nonmotor phenotype in probands with LRRK2 G2019S mutations and family members and compare these individuals to patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease (iPD) and unrelated controls. Methods: Probands with G2019S mutations and their first-degree relatives, subjects with iPD, and unrelated control subjects were identified from 4 movement disorders centers. All underwent neurologic examinations and tests of olfaction, color vision, anxiety, and depression inventories. Results: Tremor was more often a presenting feature among 25 individuals with LRRK2-associated PD than among 84 individuals with iPD. Subjects with LRRK2-PD had better olfactory identification compared with subjects with iPD, higher Beck Depression Inventory scores, and higher error scores on Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test of color discrimination. Postural or action tremor was more common among 29 nonmanifesting mutation carriers compared with 53 noncarriers within the families. Nonparkinsonian family members had higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores, more constipation, and worse color discrimination than controls, regardless of mutation status. Conclusions: Although tremor is a more common presenting feature of LRRK2-PD than iPD and some nonmotor features differed in degree, the phenotype is largely overlapping. Postural or action tremor may represent an early sign. Longitudinal evaluation of a large sample of nonmanifesting carriers will be required to describe any premotor phenotype that may allow early diagnosis. PMID:21753163

  3. Targetable signaling pathway mutations are associated with malignant phenotype in IDH-mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shota; Curry, William T.; Loebel, Franziska; Zhao, Dan; Tateishi, Kensuke; Chen, Juxiang; Klofas, Lindsay K.; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ellisen, Leif W.; Borger, Darrell R.; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Iafrate, A. John; Cahill, Daniel P.; Chi, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutations occur in low-grade and high-grade gliomas. We sought to identify the genetic basis of malignant phenotype heterogeneity in IDH-mutant gliomas. METHODS We prospectively implanted tumor specimens from 20 consecutive IDH1-mutant glioma resections into mouse brains and genotyped all resection specimens using a CLIA-certified molecular panel. Gliomas with cancer driver mutations were tested for sensitivity to targeted inhibitors in vitro. Associations between genomic alterations and outcomes were analyzed in patients. RESULTS By 10 months, 8 of 20 IDH1-mutant gliomas developed intracerebral xenografts. All xenografts maintained mutant IDH1 and high levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate on serial transplantation. All xenograft-producing gliomas harbored “lineage-defining” mutations in CIC (oligodendroglioma) or TP53 (astrocytoma), and 6 of 8 additionally had activating mutations in PIK3CA or amplification of PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC. Only IDH1 and CIC/TP53 mutations were detected in non-xenograft-forming gliomas (P=.0007). Targeted inhibition of the additional alterations decreased proliferation in vitro. Moreover, we detected alterations in known cancer driver genes in 13.4% of IDH-mutant glioma patients, including PIK3CA, KRAS, AKT or PTEN mutation or PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC amplification. IDH/CIC mutant tumors were associated with PIK3CA/KRAS mutations while IDH/TP53 tumors correlated with PDGFRA/MET amplification. Presence of driver alterations at progression was associated with shorter subsequent progression-free survival (median 9.0 vs. 36.1 months, P=.0011). CONCLUSION A subset of IDH-mutant gliomas with mutations in driver oncogenes has a more malignant phenotype in patients. Identification of these alterations may provide an opportunity for use of targeted therapies in these patients. PMID:24714777

  4. Novel mutations in the MNX1 gene in two families with Currarino syndrome and variable phenotype.

    PubMed

    Markljung, Ellen; Adamovic, Tatjana; Cao, Jia; Naji, Hussein; Kaiser, Sylvie; Wester, Tomas; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2012-10-01

    The Currarino syndrome (CS) consists of a sacral defect, an anorectal malformation and a pre-sacral mass. It manifests as an autosomal dominant congenital malformation in familial settings, with varying penetrance. The disease-causing gene, Motor neuron and pancreas homeobox-1 (MNX1), is known to be mutated in almost all familial cases, but due to the lack of genotype-phenotype correlation, there is a need for better clinical and molecular genetic characterization of the CS. Here, we report two novel mutations in the MNX1 gene in two cases. Each case was found to be familial upon further investigation of the other members of each family. The first affected case (a one year old boy) exhibited a missense mutation, p.Phe289Ser, in exon 3 in the highly conserved third helix of the homeodomain, which is considered to affect the DNA binding property and transcription regulation of the protein. The mutation seemed to display full penetrance of the disease in this family, but with different time of on-set. The second affected case (a 5 months old boy) displayed a 13 basepair insertion in exon 1, creating a complex frameshift mutation which results in a premature truncation of the protein that lacks the third helix homeodomain. Other members of the boy's family, who harbored the same mutation, were found to be completely asymptomatic. In conclusion, we detected two novel mutations in the MNX1 gene in cases with CS, which supports mutational analysis in the diagnosis of CS, even though the variability in the genotype and phenotype correlation maintains. PMID:22820079

  5. Three new PAX6 mutations including one causing an unusual ophthalmic phenotype associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Dansault, Anouk; David, Gabriel; Schwartz, Claire; Jaliffa, Carolina; Vieira, Véronique; de la Houssaye, Guillaume; Bigot, Karine; Catin, Françise; Tattu, Laurent; Chopin, Catherine; Halimi, Philippe; Roche, Olivier; Van Regemorter, Nicole; Munier, Francis; Schorderet, Daniel; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Marsac, Cécile; Ricquier, Daniel; Menasche, Maurice; Penfornis, Alfred

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The PAX6 gene was first described as a candidate for human aniridia. However, PAX6 expression is not restricted to the eye and it appears to be crucial for brain development. We studied PAX6 mutations in a large spectrum of patients who presented with aniridia phenotypes, Peters' anomaly, and anterior segment malformations associated or not with neurological anomalies. Methods Patients and related families were ophthalmologically phenotyped, and in some cases neurologically and endocrinologically examined. We screened the PAX6 gene by direct sequencing in three groups of patients: those affected by aniridia; those with diverse ocular manifestations; and those with Peters' anomaly. Two mutations were investigated by generating crystallographic representations of the amino acid changes. Results Three novel heterozygous mutations affecting three unrelated families were identified: the g.572T>C nucleotide change, located in exon 5, and corresponding to the Leucine 46 Proline amino-acid mutation (L46P); the g.655A>G nucleotide change, located in exon 6, and corresponding to the Serine 74 Glycine amino-acid mutation (S74G); and the nucleotide deletion 579delG del, located in exon 6, which induces a frameshift mutation leading to a stop codon (V48fsX53). The L46P mutation was identified in affected patients presenting bilateral microphthalmia, cataracts, and nystagmus. The S74G mutation was found in a large family that had congenital ocular abnormalities, diverse neurological manifestations, and variable cognitive impairments. The 579delG deletion (V48fsX53) caused in the affected members of the same family bilateral aniridia associated with congenital cataract, foveal hypolasia, and nystagmus. We also detected a novel intronic nucleotide change, IVS2+9G>A (very likely a mutation) in an apparently isolated patient affected by a complex ocular phenotype, characterized primarily by a bilateral microphthalmia. Whether this nucleotide change is indeed pathogenic

  6. Complexity of the Class B Phenotype in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Rhodopsin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Samuel G.; McGuigan, David B.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Gruzensky, Michaela L.; Sheplock, Rebecca; Palma, Judy; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previously, patients with RHO mutations and a class A phenotype were found to have severe early-onset loss of rod function, whereas patients with a class B phenotype retained rod function at least in certain retinal regions. Here class B patients were studied at different disease stages to understand the topographic details of the phenotype in preparation for therapies of this regionalized retinopathy. Methods A cohort of patients with RHO mutations and class B phenotype (n = 28; ages 10–80 years) were studied with rod and cone perimetry and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results At least three components of the phenotype were identified in these cross-sectional studies. Patients could have hemifield dysfunction, pericentral loss of function, or a diffuse rod sensitivity loss across the visual field. Combinations of these different patterns were also found. Colocalized photoreceptor layer thicknesses were in agreement with the psychophysical results. Conclusions These disorders with regional retinal variation of severity require pre-evaluations before enrollment into clinical trials to seek answers to questions about where in the retina would be appropriate to deliver focal treatments, and, for retina-wide treatment strategies, where in the retina should be monitored for therapeutic efficacy (or safety). PMID:27654411

  7. Mutation in collagen II alpha 1 isoforms delineates Stickler and Wagner syndrome phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Soler, Vincent; Quiette, Valencia; Powell, Caldwell; Yanovitch, Tammy; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Luo, Xiaoyan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Nading, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy with phenotypic overlap with Wagner syndrome. The common Stickler syndrome type I is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with causal mutations in collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1). Wagner syndrome is associated with mutations in versican (VCAN), which encodes for a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. A three-generation Caucasian family variably diagnosed with either syndrome was screened for sequence variants in the COL2A1 and VCAN genes. Methods Genomic DNA samples derived from saliva were collected from all family members (six affected and four unaffected individuals). Complete sequencing of COL2A1 and VCAN was performed on two affected individuals. Direct sequencing of remaining family members was conducted if the discovered variants followed segregation. Results A base-pair substitution (c.258C>A) in exon 2 of COL2A1 cosegregated with familial disease status. This known mutation occurs in a highly conserved site that causes a premature stop codon (p.C86X). The mutation was not seen in 1,142 ethnically matched control DNA samples. Conclusions Premature stop codons in COL2A1 exon 2 lead to a Stickler syndrome type I ocular-only phenotype with few or no systemic manifestations. Mutation screening of COL2A1 exon 2 in families with autosomal dominant vitreoretinopathy is important for accurate clinical diagnosis. PMID:23592912

  8. Mutations in the TTDN1 gene are associated with a distinct trichothiodystrophy phenotype#

    PubMed Central

    Kuschal, Christiane; Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare multisystem disorder, characterized by sulfur deficient hair with alternating dark and light “tiger tail” banding on polarized light microscopy. TTD is caused by mutations in DNA repair/transcription genes XPD, XPB or TTDA, and in TTDN1, a gene of unknown function. While most TTD patients are photosensitive, patients with TTDN1 mutations were reported to be non-photosensitive. We followed a cohort of 36 TTD patients from 2001 to 2013. We describe 5 patients from 4 families with defects in the TTDN1 gene: 4 had no photosensitivity while 1 patient exhibited cutaneous burning. Deep phenotyping of our cohort revealed differences between the patients with and without TTDN1 mutations. Delayed bone age and seizure disorders were overrepresented in the TTDN1 group (p=0.009 and p=0.024, respectively), while some characteristic TTD clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings were absent. The 3 oldest TTDN1 patients displayed autistic behaviors in contrast to the characteristic friendly, socially interactive personality in the other patients. DNA sequencing revealed deletion mutations in TTDN1 ranging in size from a single base pair to over 120kb. These data identify a distinct phenotype relationship in TTD caused by TTDN1 mutations and suggest a different mechanism of disease. PMID:25290684

  9. Phenotypic variability in three families with valosin-containing protein mutation

    PubMed Central

    Spina, S.; Van Laar, A. D.; Murrell, J. R.; Hamilton, R. L.; Kofler, J. K.; Epperson, F.; Farlow, M. R.; Lopez, O. L.; Quinlan, J.; DeKosky, S. T.; Ghetti, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The phenotype of IBMPFD [inclusion body myopathy with Paget’s disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (FTD)] associated with valosin-containing protein(VCP) mutation is described in three families. Methods Probands were identified based on a pathological diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions type IV. VCP sequencing was carried out. Clinical data on affected family members were reviewed. Results Ohio family: four subjects presented muscle weakness and wasting. (One subject had both neuropathic and myopathic findings and another subject showed only evidence of myopathy. The etiology of weakness could not be ascertained in the remaining two subjects.) Two individuals also showed Parkinsonism (with associated FTD in one of the two). The proband’s brain displayed FTLD-TDP type IV and Braak stage five Parkinson’s disease (PD). A VCP R191Q mutation was found. Pennsylvania family: 11 subjects developed IBMPFD. Parkinsonism was noted in two mutation carriers, whilst another subject presented with primary progressive aphasia (PPA). A novel VCP T262A mutation was found. Indiana family: three subjects developed IBMPFD. FTD was diagnosed in two individuals and suspected in the third one who also displayed muscle weakness. A VCP R159C mutation was found. Conclusions We identified three families with IBMPFD associated with VCP mutations. Clinical and pathological PD was documented for the first time in members of two families. A novel T262A mutation was found. One individual had PPA: an uncommon presentation of IBMPFD. PMID:22900631

  10. Progressive skeletal myopathy, a phenotypic variant of desmin myopathy associated with desmin mutations.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Goudeau, Bertrand; Park, Kye-Yoon; Takeda, Kazuyo; Simon-Casteras, Monique; Vasconcelos, Olavo; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Shatunov, Alexey; Nagle, James W; Sivakumar, Kumaraswamy; Vicart, Patrick; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2003-03-01

    Desmin myopathy is a familial or sporadic disorder characterized by the presence of desmin mutations that cause skeletal muscle weakness associated with cardiac conduction block, arrhythmia and heart failure. Distinctive histopathologic features include intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin-reactive deposits and electron-dense granular aggregates in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. We describe two families with features of adult-onset slowly progressive skeletal myopathy without cardiomyopathy. N342D point mutation was present in the desmin helical rod domain in patients of family 1, and I451M mutation was found in the non-helical tail domain in patients of family 2. Of interest, the same I451M mutation has previously been reported in patients with cardiomyopathy and no signs of skeletal myopathy. Some carriers of the I451M mutation did not develop any disease, suggesting incomplete penetrance. Expression studies demonstrated inability of the N342D mutant desmin to form cellular filamentous network, confirming the pathogenic role of this mutation, but the network was not affected by the tail-domain I451M mutation. Progressive skeletal myopathy is a rare phenotypic variant of desmin myopathy allelic to the more frequent cardio-skeletal form.

  11. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    PubMed

    Juan-Mateu, Jonas; Gonzalez-Quereda, Lidia; Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Baena, Manel; Verdura, Edgard; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5%) were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1%) were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%). Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%), most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%). Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%). In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD), with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure.

  12. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Baena, Manel; Verdura, Edgard; Nascimento, Andres; Ortez, Carlos; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5%) were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1%) were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%). Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%), most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%). Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%). In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD), with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure. PMID:26284620

  13. Augmentation of phenotype in a transgenic Parkinson mouse heterozygous for a Gaucher mutation.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ianai; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Giasson, Benoit I; Nussbaum, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of the protein α-synuclein (SNCA) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is strongly supported by the facts that (i) missense and copy number mutations in the SNCA gene can cause inherited Parkinson's disease; and (ii) Lewy bodies in sporadic Parkinson's disease are largely composed of aggregated SNCA. Unaffected heterozygous carriers of Gaucher disease mutations have an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. As mutations in the GBA gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GBA) are known to interfere with lysosomal protein degradation, GBA heterozygotes may demonstrate reduced lysosomal SNCA degradation, leading to increased steady-state SNCA levels and promoting its aggregation. We have created mouse models to investigate the interaction between GBA mutations and synucleinopathies. We investigated the rate of SNCA degradation in cultured primary cortical neurons from mice expressing wild-type mouse SNCA, wild-type human SNCA, or mutant A53T SNCA, in a background of either wild-type Gba or heterozygosity for the L444P GBA mutation associated with Gaucher disease. We also tested the effect of this Gaucher mutation on motor and enteric nervous system function in these transgenic animals. We found that human SNCA is stable, with a half-life of 61 h, and that the A53T mutation did not significantly affect its half-life. Heterozygosity for a naturally occurring Gaucher mutation, L444P, reduced GBA activity by 40%, reduced SNCA degradation and triggered accumulation of the protein in culture. This mutation also resulted in the exacerbation of motor and gastrointestinal deficits found in the A53T mouse model of Parkinson's disease. This study demonstrates that heterozygosity for a Gaucher disease-associated mutation in Gba interferes with SNCA degradation and contributes to its accumulation, and exacerbates the phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25351739

  14. Expanded HSAN4 phenotype associated with two novel mutations in NTRK1.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Stefan; Bergström, Jonas; Sääf, Maria; Kötting, Judith; Iwarsson, Erik

    2008-08-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN4) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by childhood onset of sensory and autonomic dysfunction leading to hyperthermia, recurrent infections and physical impairment due to complications of osteoarthritis. Cognitive impairment and aggressive behaviour is common. HSAN4 is caused by mutations in the NTRK1 gene coding for the tyrosine kinase receptor A. We present detailed description of a rare, mild HSAN4 phenotype associated with two novel NTRK1 mutations. This Swedish patient presents with an adult onset of painful Charcot arthropathy, prolonged wound healing, discrete polyneuropathy, hypohidrosis without further autonomic dysfunction and no cognitive affection.

  15. New mutation of the MPZ gene in a family with the Dejerine-Sottas disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Floroskufi, Paraskewi; Panas, Marios; Karadima, Georgia; Vassilopoulos, Demetris

    2007-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B is associated with mutations in the myelin protein zero gene. In the present study a new myelin protein zero gene mutation (c.89T>C,Ile30Thr) was detected in a family with the Dejerine-Sottas disease phenotype. The results support the hypothesis that severe, early-onset neuropathy may be related to either an alteration of a conserved amino acid or a disruption of the tertiary structure of myelin protein zero. PMID:17143884

  16. A rare CYP21A2 mutation in a congenital adrenal hyperplasia kindred displaying genotype-phenotype nonconcordance.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Ahmed; Yuen, Tony; Al-Malki, Sultan; Yau, Mabel; Kazmi, Diya; Sun, Li; Harbison, Madeleine; Haider, Shozeb; Zaidi, Mone; New, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by the autosomal recessive inheritance of mutations in the gene CYP21A2. CYP21A2 mutations lead to variable impairment of the 21-hydroxylase enzyme, which, in turn, is associated with three clinical phenotypes, namely, salt wasting, simple virilizing, and nonclassical CAH. However, it is known that a given mutation can associate with different clinical phenotypes, resulting in a high rate of genotype-phenotype nonconcordance. We aimed to study the genotype-phenotype nonconcordance in a family with three siblings affected with nonclassical CAH. All had hormonal evidence of nonclassical CAH, but this phenotype could not be explained by the genotype obtained from commercial CYP21A2 genetic testing, which revealed heterozygosity for the maternal 30 kb deletion mutation. We performed Sanger sequencing of the entire CYP21A2 gene in this family to search for a rare mutation that was not covered by commercial testing and found in the three siblings a second, rare c.1097G>A (p.R366H) mutation in exon 8. Computational modeling confirmed that this was a mild mutation consistent with nonclassical CAH. We recommend that sequencing of entire genes for rare mutations should be carried out when genotype-phenotype nonconcordance is observed in patients with autosomal recessive monogenic disorders, including CAH.

  17. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: description of two novel homozygous missense mutations causing divergent clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guiu, Isabel; Antón, Ana I; García-Barberá, Nuria; Navarro-Fernández, José; Martínez, Constantino; Fuster, Jose L; Couselo, Jose M; Ortuño, Francisco J; Vicente, Vicente; Rivera, Jose; Lozano, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease resulting from mutations in the LYST/CHS1 gene, which encodes for a 429 kDa protein, CHS1/LYST, that regulates vesicle trafficking and determines the size of lysosomes and other organelles. To date, 60 different mutations have been characterized, and a reasonably straightforward phenotype-genotype correlation has been suggested. We describe two patients on opposite ends of the CHS clinical spectrum with novel missense mutations. We characterized these patients in terms of their mutations, protein localization and expression, mRNA stability, and electrostatic potential. Patient 1 is the first report of a severe early-onset CHS with a homozygous missense mutation (c.11362 G>A, p.G3725R) in the LYST/CHS1 gene. This molecular change results in a reduction at the CHS1 protein level, not due to an mRNA effect, but maybe a consequence of both, a change in the structure of the protein and most likely attributable to the remarkable serious perturbation in the electrostatic potential. Patient 2, who exhibited the adolescence form of the disease, was found to be homozygous for a novel missense mutation c.961 T>C, p.C258R, which seemed to have minor effect on the structure of the CHS1/LYST protein. Reexamining accepted premises of missense mutant alleles being reported among patients with clinically mild forms of the disorder should be carried out, and attempts to link genotype and clinical phenotype require identifying the actual molecular effect of the mutation. Early and accurate diagnosis of the severity of the disease is extremely important to early differentiate patients who would benefit from premature enrollment into a transplantation protocol.

  18. Experimental approaches to evaluate the contributions of candidate cis-regulatory mutations to phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Rebeiz, Mark; Williams, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular bases by which phenotypic traits have evolved provides a glimpse into the past, allowing the characterization of genetic changes that cumulatively contribute to evolutionary innovations. Historically, much of the experimental attention has been focused on changes in protein-coding regions that can readily be identified by the genetic code for translating gene coding sequences into proteins. Resultantly, the role of noncoding sequences in trait evolution has remained more mysterious. In recent years, several studies have reached an unprecedented level of detail in describing how noncoding mutations in gene cis-regulatory elements contribute to morphological evolution. Based on these and other studies, we describe an experimental framework and some of the genetic and molecular methods to connect a particular cis-regulatory mutation to the evolution of any phenotypic trait. PMID:22065449

  19. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: clinical course, genetic mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-08-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients.

  20. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Clinical Course, Genetic Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients. PMID:25337067

  1. A cohort study of MFN2 mutations and phenotypic spectrums in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2A patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, B-O; Nakhro, K; Park, H J; Hyun, Y S; Lee, J H; Kanwal, S; Jung, S-C; Chung, K W

    2015-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2A (CMT2A) is the most common axonal form of peripheral neuropathy caused by a defect in the mitofusin 2 (MFN2) gene, which encodes an outer mitochondrial membrane GTPase. MFN2 mutations result in a large range of phenotypes. This study analyzed the prevalence of MFN2 mutation in Korean families with their assorted phenotypes (607 CMT families and 160 CMT2 families). Direct sequencing of the MFN2 coding exons or whole-exome sequencing has been applied to identify causative mutations. A total of 21 mutations were found in 36 CMT2 families. Comparative genotype-phenotype correlations impacting severity, onset age, and specific symptoms were assessed. Most mutations were seen in the GTPase domain (∼86%). A deletion mutation found in the transmembrane helices is reported for the first time, as well as five novel mutations at other domains. MFN2 mutations made up 5.9% of total CMT families, whereas 22.9% in CMT2 families, of which 27.8% occurred de novo. Interestingly, patient phenotypes ranged from mild to severe even for the same mutation, suggesting other factors influenced phenotype and penetrance. This CMT2A cohort study will be useful for molecular diagnosis and treatment of axonal neuropathy.

  2. The tRNA-Tyr gene family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: agents of phenotypic variation and position effects on mutation frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Ito-Harashima, Sayoko; Hartzog, Phillip E; Sinha, Himanshu; McCusker, John H

    2002-01-01

    Extensive phenotypic diversity or variation exists in clonal populations of microorganisms and is thought to play a role in adaptation to novel environments. This phenotypic variation or instability, which occurs by multiple mechanisms, may be a form of cellular differentiation and a stochastic means for modulating gene expression. This work dissects a case of phenotypic variation in a clinically derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain involving a cox15 ochre mutation, which acts as a reporter. The ochre mutation reverts to sense at a low frequency while tRNA-Tyr ochre suppressors (SUP-o) arise at a very high frequency to produce this phenotypic variation. The SUP-o mutations are highly pleiotropic. In addition, although all SUP-o mutations within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family suppress the ochre mutation reporter, there are considerable phenotypic differences among the different SUP-o mutants. Finally, and of particular interest, there is a strong position effect on mutation frequency within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family, with one locus, SUP6, mutating at a much higher than average frequency and two other loci, SUP2 and SUP8, mutating at much lower than average frequencies. Mechanisms for the position effect on mutation frequency are evaluated. PMID:12196388

  3. MECP2 mutations in Czech patients with Rett syndrome and Rett-like phenotypes: novel mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations and validation of high-resolution melting analysis for mutation scanning.

    PubMed

    Zahorakova, Daniela; Lelkova, Petra; Gregor, Vladimir; Magner, Martin; Zeman, Jiri; Martasek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental regression with loss of motor, communication and social skills, onset of stereotypic hand movements and often seizures. RTT is primarily caused by de novo mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We established a high-resolution melting (HRM) technique for mutation scanning of the MECP2 gene and performed analyses in Czech patients with RTT, autism spectrum conditions and intellectual disability with Rett-like features. In the cases with confirmed MECP2 mutations, we determined X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), examined the relationships between genotype and clinical severity and evaluated the modifying influence of XCI. Our results demonstrate that HRM analysis is a reliable method for the detection of point mutations, small deletions and duplications in the MECP2 gene. We identified 29 pathogenic mutations in 75 girls, including four novel mutations: c.155_1189del1035;909_932inv;insC, c.573delC, c.857_858dupAA and c.1163_1200del38. Skewed XCI (ratio >75%) was found in 19.3% of the girls, but no gross divergence in clinical severity was observed. Our findings confirm a high mutation frequency in classic RTT (92%) and a correlation between the MECP2 mutation type and clinical severity. We also demonstrate limitations of XCI in explaining all of the phenotypic differences in RTT.

  4. Choline acetyltransferase mutations causing congenital myasthenic syndrome: molecular findings and genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Gospe, Sídney M.; Mazia, Claudio G.; Vaccarezza, Maria; Garcia-Erro, Marcela; Bowe, Constance; Chang, Celia; Mezei, Michelle; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase catalyzes the synthesis of acetylcholine at cholinergic nerves. Mutations in human CHAT cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to impaired synthesis of ACh; this severe variant of the disease is frequently associated with unexpected episodes of potentially fatal apnea. The severity of this condition varies remarkably, and the molecular factors determining this variability are poorly understood. Furthermore, genotype–phenotype correlations have been difficult to establish in patients with biallelic mutations. We analyzed the protein expression of seven ChAT mutations, p.Val136Met, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp, p.Val194Leu, p.Pro211Ala, p.Arg566Cys and p.Ser694Cys, in HEK-293 cells to phosphorylated ChAT, determined their enzyme kinetics and thermal instability, and examined their structural changes. Three mutations, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp and p.Arg566Cys, are novel, and p.Val136Met and p.Arg207His are homozygous in three families and associated with severe disease. The characterization of mutants showed a decrease in the overall catalytic efficiency of ChAT; in particular, those located near the active-site tunnel produced the most seriously disruptive phenotypic effects. On the other hand, p.Val136Met is located far from both active and substrate-binding sites produced the most drastic reduction of ChAT expression. Overall, CHAT mutations producing low enzyme expression and severe kinetic effects are associated with the most severe phenotypes. PMID:26080897

  5. The Phenotypic Spectrum of DYT24 Due to ANO3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Charlesworth, Gavin; Cordivari, Carla; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Batla, Amit; Houlden, Henry; Wood, Nicholas W; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Genes causing primary dystonia are rare. Recently, pathogenic mutations in the anoctamin 3 gene (ANO3) have been identified to cause autosomal dominant craniocervical dystonia and have been assigned to the dystonia locus dystonia-24 (DYT24). Here, we expand on the phenotypic spectrum of DYT24 and provide demonstrative videos. Moreover, tremor recordings were performed, and back-averaged electroencephalography, sensory evoked potentials, and C-reflex studies were carried out in two individuals who carried two different mutations in ANO3. Ten patients from three families are described. The age at onset ranged from early childhood to the forties. Cervical dystonia was the most common site of onset followed by laryngeal dystonia. The characteristic feature in all affected individuals was the presence of tremor, which contrasts DYT24 from the typical DYT6 phenotype. Tremor was the sole initial manifestation in some individuals with ANO3 mutations, leading to misdiagnosis as essential tremor. Electrophysiology in two patients with two different mutations showed co-contraction of antagonist muscles, confirming dystonia, and a 6-Hz arm tremor at rest, which increased in amplitude during action. In one of the studied patients, clinically superimposed myoclonus was observed. The duration of the myoclonus was in the range of 250 msec at about 3 Hz, which is more consistent with subcortical myoclonus. In summary, ANO3 causes a varied phenotype of young-onset or adult-onset craniocervical dystonia with tremor and/or myoclonic jerks. Patients with familial cervical dystonia who also have myoclonus-dystonia as well as patients with prominent tremor and mild dystonia should be tested for ANO3 mutations. © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:24442708

  6. Phenotypic variability of CLDN14 mutations causing DFNB29 hearing loss in the Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Zil-e-Huma; Latief, Noreen; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Iqbal, Farheena; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    Human hereditary deafness at the DFNB29 autosomal locus on chromosome 21q22.1 is caused by recessive mutations of CLDN14, encoding claudin 14. This tight junction protein is tetra-membrane spanning that localizes to the apical tight junctions of organ of Corti hair cells and in many other tissues. Typically, the DFNB29 phenotype is characterized by pre-lingual, bi-lateral, sensorineural hearing loss. The goal of this study was to define the identity and frequency of CLDN14 mutations and associated inner ear phenotypes in a cohort of 800 Pakistani families segregating deafness. Hearing loss in 15 multi-generational families was found to co-segregate with CLDN14-linked STR markers. The sequence of the six exons and regions flanking the introns of CLDN14 in these 15 families revealed five likely pathogenic alleles. Two are novel missense substitutions (p.Ser87Ile and p.Ala94Val) while p.Arg81His, p.Val85Asp and p.Met133ArgfsX23 have been reported previously. Haplotype analyses indicate that p.Val85Asp and p.Met133ArgfsX23 are founder mutations. The p.Val85Asp accounts for approximately 67% of the mutant alleles of CLDN14 in our cohort. Combined with previously reported data, CLDN14 mutations were identified in 18 of 800 Pakistani families (2.25%; 95% CI, 1.4-3.5%). Hearing loss in the affected individuals homozygous for CLDN14 mutations varied from moderate to profound. This phenotypic variability may be due to environmental factors (e.g. drug and noise exposure) and/or genetic modifiers. PMID:23235333

  7. Particular Mal de Meleda phenotypes in Tunisia and mutations founder effect in the Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Bchetnia, Mbarka; Laroussi, Nadia; Youssef, Monia; Charfeddine, Cherine; Ben Brick, Ahlem Sabrine; Boubaker, Mohamed Samir; Mokni, Mourad; Abdelhak, Sonia; Zili, Jameleddine; Benmously, Rym

    2013-01-01

    Mal de Meleda (MDM) is a rare, autosomal recessive form of palmoplantar keratoderma. It is characterized by erythema and hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles that progressively extend to the dorsal surface of the hands and feet. It is caused by mutations in SLURP-1 gene encoding for secreted mammalian Ly-6/uPAR-related protein 1 (SLURP-1). We performed mutational analysis by direct sequencing of SLURP-1 gene in order to identify the genetic defect in three unrelated families (families MDM-12, MDM-13, and MDM-14) variably affected with transgressive palmoplantar keratoderma. A spectrum of clinical presentations with variable features has been observed from the pronounced to the transparent hyperkeratosis. We identified the 82delT frame shift mutation in the SLURP-1 gene in both families MDM-12 and MDM-13 and the missense variation p.Cys99Tyr in family MDM-14. To date, the 82delT variation is the most frequent cause of MDM in the world which is in favour of a recurrent molecular defect. The p.Cys99Tyr variation is only described in Tunisian families making evidence of founder effect mutation of likely Tunisian origin. Our patients presented with very severe to relatively mild phenotypes, including multiple keratolytic pits observed for one patient in the hyperkeratotic area which was not previously reported. The phenotypic variability may reflect the influence of additional factors on disease characteristics. This report further expands the spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in SLURP1 in the Mediterranean population.

  8. Characterization of spectrum, de novo rate and genotype-phenotype correlation of dominant GJB2 mutations in Chinese hans.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiuhong; Chai, Yongchuan; Sun, Lianhua; Chen, Dongye; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Zhihua; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Dominant mutations in GJB2 may lead to various degrees of sensorineural hearing impairment and/or hyperproliferative epidermal disorders. So far studies of dominant GJB2 mutations were mostly limited to case reports of individual patients and families. In this study, we identified 7 families, 11 subjects with dominant GJB2 mutations by sequencing of GJB2 in 2168 Chinese Han probands with sensorineural hearing impairment and characterized the associated spectrum, de novo rate and genotype-phenotype correlation. We identified p.R75Q, p.R75W and p.R184Q as the most frequent dominant GJB2 mutations among Chinese Hans, which had a very high de novo rate (71% of probands). A majority (10/11) of subjects carrying dominant GJB2 mutations exhibited palmoplantar keratoderma in addition to hearing impairment. In two families segregated with additional c.235delC or p.V37I mutations of GJB2, family members with the compound heterozygous mutations exhibited more severe phenotype than those with single dominant GJB2 mutation. Our study suggested that the high de novo mutation rate gives rise to a significant portion of dominant GJB2 mutations. The severity of the hearing and epidermal phenotypes associated with dominant GJB2 mutations may be modified by additional recessive mutations of GJB2. PMID:24945352

  9. WDR35 Mutation in Siblings with Sensenbrenner Syndrome: A Ciliopathy With Variable Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bacino, Carlos A.; Dhar, Shweta U.; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Bonnen, Penelope E.

    2014-01-01

    Sensenbrenner syndrome and unclassified short rib-polydactyly conditions are ciliopathies with overlapping phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in WDR35 were identified recently in a sub-group of patients with Sensenbrenner syndrome and in a single family that presented with an unclassified form of short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome. We report on siblings with an unusual combination of phenotypes: narrow thorax, short stature, minor anomalies, developmental delay, and severe hepatic fibrosis leading to liver failure and early death in two of the children. Both parents were unaffected suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. The family and their affected children were followed over a decade. Exome sequencing was performed in one affected individual. It showed a homozygous missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the WDR35 gene. This family represents aWDR35-ciliopathy with a complex clinical presentation that includes significant overlap of the phenotypes described in Sensenbrenner syndrome and the unclassified SRPs. The accurate molecular diagnosis of this family exemplifies the power of exome sequencing in the diagnosis of Mendelian disorders and enabled us to broaden and refine our understanding of Sensenbrenner syndrome and SRP. Detailed genotype–phenotype information is provided as well as discussion of previously reported cases. PMID:22987818

  10. WDR35 mutation in siblings with Sensenbrenner syndrome: a ciliopathy with variable phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bacino, Carlos A; Dhar, Shweta U; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Bonnen, Penelope E

    2012-11-01

    Sensenbrenner syndrome and unclassified short rib-polydactyly conditions are ciliopathies with overlapping phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in WDR35 were identified recently in a sub-group of patients with Sensenbrenner syndrome and in a single family that presented with an unclassified form of short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome. We report on siblings with an unusual combination of phenotypes: narrow thorax, short stature, minor anomalies, developmental delay, and severe hepatic fibrosis leading to liver failure and early death in two of the children. Both parents were unaffected suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. The family and their affected children were followed over a decade. Exome sequencing was performed in one affected individual. It showed a homozygous missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the WDR35 gene. This family represents a WDR35-ciliopathy with a complex clinical presentation that includes significant overlap of the phenotypes described in Sensenbrenner syndrome and the unclassified SRPs. The accurate molecular diagnosis of this family exemplifies the power of exome sequencing in the diagnosis of Mendelian disorders and enabled us to broaden and refine our understanding of Sensenbrenner syndrome and SRP. Detailed genotype-phenotype information is provided as well as discussion of previously reported cases.

  11. PCR assay confirms diagnosis in syndrome with variably expressed phenotype: mutation detection in Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, N N; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Dixon, P; Zackai, E H; Tasman, W S

    1996-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease with ocular (severe myopia, vitreal degeneration, and retinal detachment) and other systemic manifestations (hearing loss, cleft palate, epiphyseal dysplasia, and premature osteoarthritis). As with other dominantly inherited conditions, the clinical phenotype of Stickler syndrome varies considerably. To date, all mutations have been located in the type II procollagen (COL2A1) gene. Analysis of a C-->T mutation we had identified previously, in COL2A1 gene in exon 40, in a three generation pedigree showed the loss of a cleavage site for the TaqI restriction enzyme. We designed a rapid PCR based restriction enzyme assay to detect this mutation and used it to establish the diagnosis in a neonate from the same pedigree, presenting with the first occurrence of the Pierre-Robin sequence in the family and minimal ocular findings. These results underline the potential diagnostic value of many as yet undetected DNA mutations in families affected with Stickler syndrome, since the variability of the phenotype can impede accurate diagnosis, appropriate genetic counselling, and effective intervention and prophylactic treatment for affected people. Images PMID:8863161

  12. A massively parallel pipeline to clone DNA variants and examine molecular phenotypes of human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaomu; Das, Jishnu; Fragoza, Robert; Liang, Jin; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Lee, Hao Ran; Wang, Xiujuan; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Lipkin, Steven M; Smolka, Marcus B; Yu, Haiyuan

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the functional relevance of DNA variants is essential for all exome and genome sequencing projects. However, current mutagenesis cloning protocols require Sanger sequencing, and thus are prohibitively costly and labor-intensive. We describe a massively-parallel site-directed mutagenesis approach, "Clone-seq", leveraging next-generation sequencing to rapidly and cost-effectively generate a large number of mutant alleles. Using Clone-seq, we further develop a comparative interactome-scanning pipeline integrating high-throughput GFP, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H), and mass spectrometry assays to systematically evaluate the functional impact of mutations on protein stability and interactions. We use this pipeline to show that disease mutations on protein-protein interaction interfaces are significantly more likely than those away from interfaces to disrupt corresponding interactions. We also find that mutation pairs with similar molecular phenotypes in terms of both protein stability and interactions are significantly more likely to cause the same disease than those with different molecular phenotypes, validating the in vivo biological relevance of our high-throughput GFP and Y2H assays, and indicating that both assays can be used to determine candidate disease mutations in the future. The general scheme of our experimental pipeline can be readily expanded to other types of interactome-mapping methods to comprehensively evaluate the functional relevance of all DNA variants, including those in non-coding regions.

  13. The Stability of G6PD Is Affected by Mutations with Different Clinical Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Terrón-Hernández, Jessica; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; García-Torres, Itzhel; Vanoye-Carlo, America; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency worldwide, causing a wide spectrum of conditions with severity classified from the mildest (Class IV) to the most severe (Class I). To correlate mutation sites in the G6PD with the resulting phenotypes, we studied four naturally occurring G6PD variants: Yucatan, Nashville, Valladolid and Mexico City. For this purpose, we developed a successful over-expression method that constitutes an easier and more precise method for obtaining and characterizing these enzymes. The kcat (catalytic constant) of all the studied variants was lower than in the wild-type. The structural rigidity might be the cause and the most evident consequence of the mutations is their impact on protein stability and folding, as can be observed from the protein yield, the T50 (temperature where 50% of its original activity is retained) values, and differences on hydrophobic regions. The mutations corresponding to more severe phenotypes are related to the structural NADP+ region. This was clearly observed for the Classes III and II variants, which became more thermostable with increasing NADP+, whereas the Class I variants remained thermolabile. The mutations produce repulsive electric charges that, in the case of the Yucatan variant, promote increased disorder of the C-terminus and consequently affect the binding of NADP+, leading to enzyme instability. PMID:25407525

  14. Single Synonymous Mutations in KRAS Cause Transformed Phenotypes in NIH3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Andrew M.; Bagni, Rachel; Portugal, Franklin; Hartley, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations in the KRAS gene are clustered at G12, G13, and G60 in human cancers. We constructed 9 stable NIH3T3 cell lines expressing KRAS, each with one of these synonymous mutations. Compared to the negative control cell line expressing the wild type human KRAS gene, all the synonymous mutant lines expressed more KRAS protein, grew more rapidly and to higher densities, and were more invasive in multiple assays. Three of the cell lines showed dramatic loss of contact inhibition, were more refractile under phase contrast, and their refractility was greatly reduced by treatment with trametinib. Codon usage at these glycines is highly conserved in KRAS compared to HRAS, indicating selective pressure. These transformed phenotypes suggest that synonymous mutations found in driver genes such as KRAS may play a role in human cancers. PMID:27684555

  15. CASE REPORT: Phenotypic presentation of the Ser63Del MPZ mutation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lindsey J.; Patzko, Agnes; Lewis, Richard A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in MPZ cause CMT1B, the second most frequent cause of CMT1. Elegant studies with Ser63del mice suggest that Ser63del MPZ is retained in the ER where it activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) that contributes to the neuropathy. Clinical information about patients with this mutation is limited. We present clinical and electrophysiological data on a large multigenerational family with CMT1B caused by Ser63del MPZ. The patients have a classical CMT1 phenotype that is much less severe than that of patients with Arg98Cys MPZ that also activates the UPR. These results suggest that clinical presentation along cannot predict which MPZ mutations will be retained in the ER and activate the UPR. PMID:22734905

  16. Four novel point mutations in the PMP22 gene with phenotypes of HNPP and Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Brožková, Dana; Mazanec, Radim; Rychlý, Zdeněk; Haberlová, Jana; Böhm, Jiří; Staněk, Jan; Plevová, Pavlína; Lisoňová, Jana; Sabová, Jana; Sakmaryová, Iva; Seeman, Pavel

    2011-11-01

    We report four novel point mutations in the PMP22 gene with two different phenotypes: mutation p.Ser79Thr arose de novo in a patient with the Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy (DSN) phenotype; and mutations c.78+5 G>A, c.320-1 G>C, and p.Trp140Stop segregated with HNPP in 5 families.Our findings show that point mutations in PMP22 may be more likely in HNPP patients than in CMT1 patients after exclusion of CMT1A/HNPP. PMID:22006697

  17. Analysis of phenotype and outcome in essential thrombocythemia with CALR or JAK2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Al Assaf, Carla; Van Obbergh, Florence; Billiet, Johan; Lierman, Els; Devos, Timothy; Graux, Carlos; Hervent, Anne-Sophie; Emmerechts, Jan; Tousseyn, Thomas; De Paepe, Pascale; Papadopoulos, Petros; Michaux, Lucienne; Vandenberghe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The JAK2 V617F mutation, the thrombopoietin receptor MPL W515K/L mutation and calreticulin (CALR) mutations are mutually exclusive in essential thrombocythemia and support a novel molecular categorization of essential thrombocythemia. CALR mutations account for approximately 30% of cases of essential thrombocythemia. In a retrospective study, we examined the frequency of MPL and CALR mutations in JAK2 V617F-negative cases of essential thrombocythemia (n=103). In addition, we compared the clinical phenotype and outcome of CALR mutant cases of essential thrombocythemia with a cohort of JAK2 V617F-positive essential thrombocythemia (n=57). CALR-positive cases represented 63.7% of double-negative cases of essential thrombocythemia, and most carried CALR type 1 or type 2 indels. However, we also identified one patient who was positive for both the JAK2 V617F and the CALR mutations. This study revealed that CALR mutant essential thrombocythemia is associated with younger age, higher platelet counts, lower erythrocyte counts, leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and increased risk of progression to myelofibrosis in comparison with JAK2 V617F-positive essential thrombocythemia. Analysis of the CALR mutant group according to indel type showed that CALR type 1 deletion is strongly associated with male gender. CALR mutant patients had a better overall survival than JAK2 V617F-positive patients, in particular patients of age 60 years or younger. In conclusion, this study in a Belgian cohort of patients supports and extends the growing body of evidence that CALR mutant cases of essential thrombocythemia are phenotypically distinct from JAK2 V617F-positive cases, with regards to clinical and hematologic presentation as well as overall survival. PMID:25934766

  18. Diverse clinical phenotypes associated with a nonsense mutation in FAM161A

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A M; Sergouniotis, P; Alfano, G; Muspratt-Tucker, N; Barton, S; Moore, A T; Black, G; Bhattacharya, S S; Webster, A R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Mutations in the FAM161A gene have been reported in association with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in several ethnic populations. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of FAM161A-related retinopathy in a British cohort and to characterise the phenotype associated with mutations in this gene. Methods: The FAM161A coding region and intron–exon boundaries were screened by Sanger sequencing in 120 retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients (with likely autosomal recessive inheritance) in whom mutations in other known major RP genes have been ruled out by commercially available testing. Homozygosity mapping was performed in one consanguineous family, and high-throughput sequencing of candidate genes was performed to identify disease-associated changes. Clinical assessment of affected individuals included perimetry testing, fundus autofluorescence imaging, and optical coherence tomography. Results: Two patients of British origin with a homozygous mutation in FAM161A (c.1309A>T, p.Arg437*) were identified by Sanger sequencing. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent high-throughput sequencing analysis identified a further family of Pakistani origin with the same genotype. Clinical examination of affected members of these families revealed that this mutation was associated with a diverse clinical phenotype, ranging from mild disease with preservation of central acuity to severe visual impairment. Conclusions: Homozygosity for the c.1309A>T, p.Arg437* variant in FAM161A is a relatively common cause of arRP. The mutation occurs in diverse ethnic populations, associated with typical retinitis pigmentosa with disease onset usually in the second or third decade of life. PMID:26113502

  19. Mutations in PSMB8 Cause CANDLE Syndrome with Evidence of Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Ramot, Yuval; Torrelo, Antonio; Paller, Amy S.; Si, Nuo; Babay, Sofia; Kim, Peter W.; Sheikh, Afzal; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Chen, Yongqing; Vera, Angel; Zhang, Xue; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Zlotogorski, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome is an autoinflammatory syndrome recently described in children. We investigated the clinical phenotype, genetic cause and the immune dysregulation in nine CANDLE patients. Methods Genomic DNA from all patients was screened for PSMB8 (Proteasome subunit beta type-8) mutations. Serum cytokine levels were measured from four patients. Skin biopsies were evaluated immunohistochemically and blood microarray profile (n=4) and stat-1 phosphorylation (n=3) were assessed. Results One patient was homozygous for a novel nonsense mutation in PSMB8 (c.405C>A) suggesting a protein truncation, four patients were homozygous and two were heterozygous for a previously reported missense mutation (c.224C>T), and one patient showed no mutation. None of these sequence changes was observed in chromosomes from 750 healthy controls. Of the four patients with the same mutation, only two share the same haplotype indicating a mutational hot spot. PSMB8 mutation-positive and -negative patients expressed high IP-10 (Interferon gamma-induced protein 10) levels. Levels of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1Ra were moderately elevated. Microarray profiles and monocyte stat-1 activation suggested a unique interferon (IFN) signaling signature, unlike in other autoinflammatory disorders. Conclusion CANDLE is caused by mutations in PSMB8, a gene recently reported to cause JMP syndrome (joint contractures, muscle atrophy and panniculitis induced lipodystrophy) in adults. We extend the clinical and pathogenic description of this novel autoinflammatory syndrome, thereby expanding the clinical and genetic disease spectrum of PSMB8-associated disorders. IFN may be a key mediator of the inflammatory response and may present a therapeutic target. PMID:21953331

  20. ABCA12 mutations and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis: a review of genotype/phenotype correlations and of pathogenetic concepts.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masashi

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in ABCA12 have been described in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCI) including harlequin ichthyosis (HI), congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE), and lamellar ichthyosis (LI). HI shows the most severe phenotype. CIE and LI are clinically characterized by fine, whitish scales on a background of erythematous skin, and large, thick, dark scales over the entire body without serious background erythroderma, respectively. To date, a total of 56 ABCA12 mutations have been reported in 66 ARCI families including 48 HI, 10 LI, and 8 CIE families of African, European, Pakistani/Indian, and Japanese origin (online database: http://www.derm-hokudai.jp/ABCA12/). A total of 62.5% of reported ABCA12 mutations are expected to lead to truncated proteins. Most mutations in HI are truncation mutations and homozygous or compound heterozygous truncation mutations always results in HI phenotype. In CIE families, at least one mutation on each allele is typically a missense mutation. Combinations of missense mutations in the first ATP-binding cassette of ABCA12 underlie the LI phenotype. ABCA12 is a keratinocyte lipid transporter associated with lipid transport in lamellar granules, and loss of ABCA12 function leads to a defective lipid barrier in the stratum corneum, resulting in an ichthyotic phenotype. Recent work using mouse models confirmed ABCA12 roles in skin barrier formation.

  1. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. PMID:27312022

  2. Ectodermal Defects and Anal Atresia in a Child with a TP63 Mutation--Expanding the Phenotypic Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ruml, Jelena; Cuturilo, Goran; Lukac, Marija; Peters, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias caused by mutations in the TP63 gene comprise a group of disorders characterized by a spectrum of ectodermal changes, orofacial clefting, and split hand or foot malformation. We report on a boy with a mutation located in the DNA-binding domain of the TP63 gene with atypical phenotype. These data provide additional evidence of the great variability seen in TP63-related disorders and further delineation of genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:25209878

  3. Thomsen or Becker myotonia? A novel autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene associated with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Senkevics, Adriano S; Zilbersztajn-Gotlieb, Dinorah; Yamamoto, Lydia U; Muniz, Viviane P; Pavanello, Rita C M; Oliveira, Acary B; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2012-02-01

    We describe a large Brazilian consanguineous kindred with 3 clinically affected patients with a Thomsen myotonia phenotype. They carry a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the CLCN1 gene (K248X). None of the 6 heterozygote carriers show any sign of myotonia on clinical evaluation or electromyography. These findings confirm the autosomal recessive inheritance of the novel mutation in this family, as well as the occurrence of phenotypic variability in the autosomal recessive forms of myotonia.

  4. Mutations in the human UBR1 gene and the associated phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sukalo, Maja; Fiedler, Ariane; Guzmán, Celina; Spranger, Stephanie; Addor, Marie-Claude; McHeik, Jiad N; Oltra Benavent, Manuel; Cobben, Jan M; Gillis, Lynette A; Shealy, Amy G; Deshpande, Charu; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Everman, David B; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Liebelt, Jan; Keller, Klaus-Michael; Bertola, Débora Romeo; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Bergmann, Carsten; Liu, Zhifeng; Düker, Gesche; Rezaei, Nima; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Oğur, Gönül; Alrajoudi, Abdullah; Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Verbeek, Nienke E; Richmond, Erick J; Kirbiyik, Ozgür; Ranganath, Prajnya; Singh, Ankur; Godbole, Koumudi; Ali, Fouad A M; Alves, Crésio; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Witt, Heiko; Zenker, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, typical facial features, dental anomalies, hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, scalp defects, urogenital and anorectal anomalies, short stature, and cognitive impairment of variable degree. This syndrome is caused by a defect of the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBR1, which is part of the proteolytic N-end rule pathway. Herein, we review previously reported (n = 29) and a total of 31 novel UBR1 mutations in relation to the associated phenotype in patients from 50 unrelated families. Mutation types include nonsense, frameshift, splice site, missense, and small in-frame deletions consistent with the hypothesis that loss of UBR1 protein function is the molecular basis of JBS. There is an association of missense mutations and small in-frame deletions with milder physical abnormalities and a normal intellectual capacity, thus suggesting that at least some of these may represent hypomorphic UBR1 alleles. The review of clinical data of a large number of molecularly confirmed JBS cases allows us to define minimal clinical criteria for the diagnosis of JBS. For all previously reported and novel UBR1 mutations together with their clinical data, a mutation database has been established at LOVD.

  5. Spondyloocular Syndrome: Novel Mutations in XYLT2 Gene and Expansion of the Phenotypic Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Taylan, Fulya; Costantini, Alice; Coles, Nicole; Pekkinen, Minna; Héon, Elise; Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih; Kämpe, Anders; Kıykım, Ertuğrul; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Mäkitie, Outi

    2016-08-01

    Spondyloocular syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder with spinal compression fractures, osteoporosis, and cataract. Mutations in XYLT2, encoding isoform of xylosyltransferase, were recently identified as the cause of the syndrome. We report on 4 patients, 2 unrelated patients and 2 siblings, with spondyloocular syndrome and novel mutations in XYLT2. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation, NM_022167.3(XYLT2): c.2188C>T, resulting in a premature stop codon (p.Arg730*) in a female patient. The patient presents visual impairment, generalized osteoporosis, short stature with short trunk, spinal compression fractures, and increased intervertebral disc space and hearing loss. We extended our XYLT2 analysis to a cohort of 22 patients with generalized osteoporosis, mostly from consanguineous families. In this cohort, we found by Sanger sequencing 2 siblings and 1 single patient who were homozygous for missense mutations in the XYLT2 gene (p.Arg563Gly and p.Leu605Pro). The patients had osteoporosis, compression fractures, cataracts, and hearing loss. Bisphosphonate treatment in 1 patient resulted in almost complete normalization of vertebral structures by adolescence, whereas treatment response in the others was variable. This report together with a previous study shows that mutations in the XYLT2 gene result in a variable phenotype dominated by spinal osteoporosis, cataract, and hearing loss. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Genotype-phenotype relationship in 12 patients carrying cystic fibrosis mutation R334W.

    PubMed Central

    Antiñolo, G; Borrego, S; Gili, M; Dapena, J; Alfageme, I; Reina, F

    1997-01-01

    We present a phenotype-genotype correlation analysis in 12 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) carrying the mutation R334W in the CFTR gene. The clinical data obtained for this group were compared with the clinical data of deltaF508/deltaF508 patients. Current age and age at diagnosis were significantly higher in the R334W mutation group (p=0.028 and p=0.0001). We found a lower rate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation in patients carrying the R334W mutation, although the difference was not found to be statistically significant. However, we found a statistically significant higher age of onset of Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation (p=0.0036) in the group of patients with the R334W mutation. Thirty three percent of R334W patients were pancreatic insufficient, significantly lower than the deltaF508/deltaF508 patients (p=0.004). We also found that the weight expressed as a percentage of ideal weight for height was significantly higher in patients with the R334W mutation (p=0.0028). PMID:9039981

  7. Mutations in genes involved in nonsense mediated decay ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber stop mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, Alisson M; Aubert, Sylvie; Roelens, Ingele; Lakowski, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Background Presenilin proteins are part of a complex of proteins that can cleave many type I transmembrane proteins, including Notch Receptors and the Amyloid Precursor Protein, in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Dominant mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 lead to Familial Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-12 presenilin gene cause a highly penetrant egg-laying defect due to reduction of signalling through the lin-12/Notch receptor. Mutations in six spr genes (for suppressor of presenilin) are known to strongly suppress sel-12. Mutations in most strong spr genes suppress sel-12 by de-repressing the transcription of the largely functionally equivalent hop-1 presenilin gene. However, how mutations in the spr-2 gene suppress sel-12 is unknown. Results We show that spr-2 mutations increase the levels of sel-12 transcripts with Premature translation Termination Codons (PTCs) in embryos and L1 larvae. mRNA transcripts from sel-12 alleles with PTCs undergo degradation by a process known as Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD). However, spr-2 mutations do not appear to affect NMD. Mutations in the smg genes, which are required for NMD, can restore sel-12(PTC) transcript levels and ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber PTCs. However, the phenotypic suppression of sel-12 by smg genes is nowhere near as strong as the effect of previously characterized spr mutations including spr-2. Consistent with this, we have identified only two mutations in smg genes among the more than 100 spr mutations recovered in genetic screens. Conclusion spr-2 mutations do not suppress sel-12 by affecting NMD of sel-12(PTC) transcripts and appear to have a novel mechanism of suppression. The fact that mutations in smg genes can ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 alleles with amber PTCs suggests that some read-through of sel-12(amber) alleles occurs in smg backgrounds. PMID:19302704

  8. Mutations in BALB Mitochondrial DNA Induce CCL20 Up-regulation Promoting Tumorigenic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sligh, James; Janda, Jaroslav; Jandova, Jana

    2014-01-01

    mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF-κB activation inhibited CCL20 expression in mtBALB cybrids and decreased their migratory capabilities. Thus, acquired mtDNA mutations may promote tumorigenic phenotypes through up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. PMID:25177208

  9. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E; Lapin, Morten; Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S S; Bang, Jeanne Mari V; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Carey, John C; Yu, Ping; Vaughn, Cecily; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A; Andresen, Brage S

    2016-05-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  10. Parkinson Disease Phenotype in Ashkenazi Jews with and without LRRK2 G2019S mutations

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, Roy N.; Mirelman, Anat; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Tang, Ming-X; Santana, Helen Mejia; Raymond, Deborah; Roos, Ernest; Orbe-Reilly, Martha; Gurevich, Tanya; Shira, Anat Bar; Weisz, Mali Gana; Yasinovsky, Kira; Zalis, Maayan; Thaler, Avner; Deik, Andres; Barrett, Matthew James; Cabassa, Jose; Groves, Mark; Hunt, Ann L.; Lubarr, Naomi; Luciano, Marta San; Miravite, Joan; Palmese, Christina; Sachdev, Rivka; Sarva, Harini; Severt, Lawrence; Shanker, Vicki; Swan, Matthew Carrington; Soto-Valencia, Jeannie; Johannes, Brooke; Ortega, Robert; Fahn, Stanley; Cote, Lucien; Waters, Cheryl; Mazzoni, Pietro; Ford, Blair; Louis, Elan; Levy, Oren; Rosado, Llency; Ruiz, Diana; Dorovski, Tsvyatko; Pauciulo, Michael; Nichols, William; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ozelius, Laurie; Clark, Lorraine; Giladi, Nir; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen S

    2013-01-01

    Background The phenotype of Parkinson disease (PD) patients with and without LRRK2 G2019S mutations is reported to be similar; however large uniformly evaluated series are lacking. Objective To characterize the clinical phenotype of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) PD carriers of the LRRK2 G2019S mutation. Methods We studied 553 AJ PD patients, including 65 patients who were previously reported, from three sites (two in New York and one in Tel-Aviv). GBA mutation carriers were excluded. Evaluations included the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the geriatric depression scale (GDS) and the non-motor symptoms (NMS) questionnaire. Regression models were constructed to test the association between clinical and demographic features and LRRK2 status (outcome) in 488 newly recruited participants. Results LRRK2 G2019S carriers (n=97) and non-carriers (n=391) were similar in age and age-at-onset of PD. Carriers had longer disease duration (8.6years versus 6.1years, p<0.001), were more likely to be women (51.5% versus 37.9%, p=0.015) and more often reported first symptoms in lower extremities (40.0% versus 19.2%, p<0.001). In logistic models adjusted for age, disease duration, gender, education, and site, carriers were more likely to have lower extremity onset (p<0.001), postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD, p=0.043) and persistent levodopa response for>5 years (p=0.042). Performance on UPDRS, MoCA, GDS and NMS did not differ by mutation status. Conclusion PD in AJ-LRRK2 G2019S mutation carriers is similar to idiopathic PD, but characterized by more frequent lower extremity involvement at onset and PIGD without the associated cognitive impairment. PMID:24243757

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta caused by PPIB mutation with severe phenotype and congenital hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Eric T.; Caldwell, Kathleen S.; Kreikemeier, Rose M.; Lutz, Richard E.; Esposito, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue typically caused by defects in either COL1A1 or COL1A2. A number of other genes causative of this disorder have been found, including PPIB, which forms one subunit of the prolyl 3-hydroxylase enzyme complex. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in this gene have OI with a trend toward lethal or severe phenotype. We present a Native American female with prenatal diagnosis of OI. Long bones were shortened with significant rhizomelia. At birth, fractures were present in ribs, humerii, and femurs. She had significant respiratory disease at birth, and required oxygen throughout her life. She also had recurrent pneumonias, one of which ultimately caused her death at age 16 mo. She also had significant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Molecular testing showed that the patient was homozygous for a single nucleotide substitution in PPIB (c. 136-2A>G). Patients with OI caused by PPIB mutations have had variable disease, but with majority of either with perinatal lethality or progressively deforming severe disease. Patients with OI due to PPIB mutation have shown some differences in phenotype. There appears to be a trend toward rhizomelic shortening and less severe bowing of the extremities, as compared to patients with comparably severe OI caused by COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Congenital hearing loss may be an inconsistent feature of this condition, or may have co-occurred in our patient for unrelated reasons. Still, patients with OI caused by PPIB mutation should have appropriate early and regular management of their hearing. PMID:27625864

  12. Osteogenesis imperfecta caused by PPIB mutation with severe phenotype and congenital hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Caldwell, Kathleen S; Kreikemeier, Rose M; Lutz, Richard E; Esposito, Paul W

    2014-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue typically caused by defects in either COL1A1 or COL1A2. A number of other genes causative of this disorder have been found, including PPIB, which forms one subunit of the prolyl 3-hydroxylase enzyme complex. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in this gene have OI with a trend toward lethal or severe phenotype. We present a Native American female with prenatal diagnosis of OI. Long bones were shortened with significant rhizomelia. At birth, fractures were present in ribs, humerii, and femurs. She had significant respiratory disease at birth, and required oxygen throughout her life. She also had recurrent pneumonias, one of which ultimately caused her death at age 16 mo. She also had significant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Molecular testing showed that the patient was homozygous for a single nucleotide substitution in PPIB (c. 136-2A>G). Patients with OI caused by PPIB mutations have had variable disease, but with majority of either with perinatal lethality or progressively deforming severe disease. Patients with OI due to PPIB mutation have shown some differences in phenotype. There appears to be a trend toward rhizomelic shortening and less severe bowing of the extremities, as compared to patients with comparably severe OI caused by COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Congenital hearing loss may be an inconsistent feature of this condition, or may have co-occurred in our patient for unrelated reasons. Still, patients with OI caused by PPIB mutation should have appropriate early and regular management of their hearing. PMID:27625864

  13. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S. S.; Bang, Jeanne Mari V.; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Carey, John C.; Yu, Ping; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R.; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A.; Andresen, Brage S.

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3’ splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  14. Mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor‐1β and their related phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Edghill, E L; Bingham, C; Ellard, S; Hattersley, A T

    2006-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte nuclear factor‐1 beta (HNF‐1β) is a widely distributed transcription factor which plays a critical role in embryonic development of the kidney, pancreas, liver, and Mullerian duct. Thirty HNF‐1β mutations have been reported in patients with renal cysts and other renal developmental disorders, young‐onset diabetes, pancreatic atrophy, abnormal liver function tests, and genital tract abnormalities. Methods We sequenced the HNF‐1β gene in 160 unrelated subjects with renal disease, 40% of whom had a personal/family history of diabetes. Results Twenty three different heterozygous HNF‐1β mutations were identified in 23/160 subjects (14%), including 10 novel mutations (V61G, V110G, S148L, K156E, Q176X, R276Q, S281fsinsC, R295P, H324fsdelCA, Q470X). Seven (30%) cases were proven to be due to de novo mutations. Renal cysts were found in 19/23 (83%) patients (four with glomerulocystic kidney disease, GCKD) and diabetes in 11/23 (48%, while three other families had a family history of diabetes. Only 26% of families met diagnostic criteria for maturity‐onset diabetes of the young (MODY) but 39% had renal cysts and diabetes (RCAD). We found no clear genotype/phenotype relationships. Conclusion We report the largest series to date of HNF‐1β mutations and confirm HNF‐1β mutations as an important cause of renal disease. Despite the original description of HNF‐1β as a MODY gene, a personal/family history of diabetes is often absent and the most common clinical manifestation is renal cysts. Molecular genetic testing for HNF‐1β mutations should be considered in patients with unexplained renal cysts (including GCKD), especially when associated with diabetes, early‐onset gout, or uterine abnormalities. PMID:15930087

  15. AB070. Mutations of SRD5A2 in Vietnamese patients: phenotype and genotype

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Vu Chi; Thao, Bui Phuong; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Fukami, Maki

    2015-01-01

    A rare form of the 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD), 5α-reductase deficiency was first described in patients with pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias, microphallus, and cryptorchid testes in 1974 by Imperato-McGinley et al. and Walsh et al. This undervirilization in the male is due to an alteration in the 5α-reductase type 2 gene (SRD5A2), which encodes for 5α-reductase activity. Our registry of 750 patients with DSD showed no definitive diagnosis in 80% of cases with 46,XY DSD. Our aim is to identify mutations in SRD5A2 gene and to describe phenotype of detected mutative cases. Mutation analysis was performed for genomic DNA extracted from WBC of 10 patients with 46,XY DSD using PCR and direct sequencing. We identified mutations of SRD5A2 gene in two cases. The first case presented with isolated micropenis at birth, two palpable testes in the normal scrotum. Pelvic ultrasound showed no ovaries and uterus, karyotype was 46,XY and SRY was positive. Serum FSH level was 2.4 UI/L; LH level was 0.9 UI/L and testosterone level was 0.4 nmol/L at 8 years of age. A homozygous missense mutation (p.R237G) was identified in the SRD5A2 gene. The second case presented with microphallus, penoscrotal hypospadias, and gonad bilateral in labioscrotal folds. No uterus and ovaries were found by pelvic ultrasound. Karyotype was 46,XY and SRY was positive. A novel homozygous missense mutation (c.659C>T; p.S220L) was identified in the SRD5A2 gene. Mutation analysis of SRD5A2 gene helps to make definitive diagnosis for patients with 46,XY DSD.

  16. Genotype-phenotype relationship in female carriers of the premutation and full mutation of FMR-1.

    PubMed

    Franke, P; Leboyer, M; Gänsicke, M; Weiffenbach, O; Biancalana, V; Cornillet-Lefebre, P; Croquette, M F; Froster, U; Schwab, S G; Poustka, F; Hautzinger, M; Maier, W

    1998-08-17

    The present French-German cooperative study focuses on the genotype-phenotype relationship of mutations of the FMR-1 gene and psychiatric conditions in mothers with a full mutation in the FMR-1 gene of fra-X children (n=13), mothers with a premutation in the FMR-1 gene of fra-X children (n=61), as well as premutated siblings of these mothers without affected children (n=17) and two non-mutated control groups: (1) siblings of these mothers with normal CGG repeat (n=18); and (2) mothers of non-fra-X autistic children (n=42). Mothers with a full mutation in the FMR-1 gene and mothers with a premutation in the FMR-1 gene did not differ in the frequency of any axis I disorder; however, both groups were diagnosed with social phobia more often than the control group of mothers of autistic children. Moreover, mothers with a premutation in the FMR-1 gene of fra-X children and their siblings with the premutation (without affected offspring) revealed a similar frequency of social phobia. Furthermore avoidant personality disorder was more common in groups of carriers of the full premutation than in siblings without mutation or than the control group of mothers with autistic children. On the basis of our data, we therefore suggest that social avoidance (expressed as social phobia or avoidant personality disorder) has been underestimated in previous studies of carriers with the FMR-1 full mutation or premutation. Comorbidity of axis I and axis II psychiatric diagnoses was mainly restricted to the group of carriers of the full mutation and carriers of the premutation of FMR-1. Correlations between size of CGG repeat and IQ as well as CGG and age of onset of axis I diagnosis were non-significant. IQ of subjects had no impact on presence or absence of axis I and/or axis II diagnoses.

  17. Mosaicism for dominant collagen VI mutations as a cause for intra-familial phenotypic variability

    PubMed Central

    Donkervoort, Sandra; Hu, Ying; Stojkovic, Tanya; Voermans, Nicol; Foley, A. Reghan; Leach, Meganne E; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Bolduc, Veronique; Cullup, Thomas; de Becdelièvre, Alix; Yang, Lin; Su, Hai; Meilleur, Katherine; Schindler, Alice B.; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Richard, Pascale; Butterfield, Russell; Winder, Thomas L.; Crawford, Thomas; Weiss, Robert B.; Muntoni, Francesco; Allamand, Valérie; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen VI-related dystrophies and myopathies (COL6-RD) are a group of disorders that form a wide phenotypic spectrum, ranging from severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), intermediate phenotypes, to the milder Bethlem myopathy (BM). Both inter- and intra-familial variable expressivity are commonly observed. We present clinical, immunohistochemical, and genetic data on four COL6-RD families with marked inter-generational phenotypic heterogeneity. This variable expression seemingly masquerades as anticipation is due to parental mosaicism for a dominant mutation, with subsequent full inheritance and penetrance of the mutation in the heterozygous offspring. We also present an additional 5th simplex patient identified as a mosaic carrier. Parental mosaicism was confirmed in the four families through quantitative analysis of the ratio of mutant versus wild-type allele (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3) in genomic DNA (gDNA) from various tissues; including blood, saliva, and dermal fibroblasts. Consistent with somatic mosaicism, parental samples had lower ratios of mutant versus wild-type allele compared to the fully heterozygote offspring. However, there was notable variability of the mutant allele levels between tissues tested, ranging from 16% (saliva) to 43% (fibroblasts) in one mosaic father. This is the first report demonstrating mosaicism as a cause of intra-familial/inter-generational variability of COL6-RD, and suggests that sporadic and parental mosaicism may be more common than previously suspected. PMID:25204870

  18. Characterization of broadly pleiotropic phenotypes caused by an hfq insertion mutation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Tsui, H C; Leung, H C; Winkler, M E

    1994-07-01

    The region immediately downstream from the miaA tRNA modification gene at 94.8 min contains the hfq gene and the hflA region, which are important in the bacteriophage Q beta and lambda life cycles. The roles of these genes in bacteria remain largely unknown. We report here the characterization of two chromosomal hfq insertion mutations. An omega (omega) cassette insertion near the end of hfq resulted in phenotypes only slightly different from the parent, although transcript mapping demonstrated that the insertion was completely polar on hflX expression. In contrast, an equally polar omega cassette insertion near the beginning of hfq caused pronounced pleiotropic phenotypes, including decreased growth rates and yields, decreased negative supercoiling of plasmids in stationary phase, increased cell size, osmosensitivity, increased oxidation of carbon sources, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light, and suppression of bgl activation by hns mutations. hfq::omega mutant phenotypes were distinct from those caused by omega insertions early in the miaA tRNA modification gene. On the other hand, both hfq insertions interfered with lambda phage plaque formation, probably by means of polarity at the hflA region. Together, these results show that hfq function plays a fundamental role in Escherichia coli physiology and that hfq and the hflA-region are in the amiB-mutL-miaA-hfq-hflX superoperon. PMID:7984093

  19. A laminopathic mutation disrupting lamin filament assembly causes disease-like phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bank, Erin M.; Ben-Harush, Kfir; Wiesel-Motiuk, Naama; Barkan, Rachel; Feinstein, Naomi; Lotan, Oren; Medalia, Ohad; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene underlie many laminopathic diseases, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD); however, a mechanistic link between the effect of mutations on lamin filament assembly and disease phenotypes has not been established. We studied the ΔK46 Caenorhabditis elegans lamin mutant, corresponding to EDMD-linked ΔK32 in human lamins A and C. Cryo-electron tomography of lamin ΔK46 filaments in vitro revealed alterations in the lateral assembly of dimeric head-to-tail polymers, which causes abnormal organization of tetrameric protofilaments. Green fluorescent protein (GFP):ΔK46 lamin expressed in C. elegans was found in nuclear aggregates in postembryonic stages along with LEM-2. GFP:ΔK46 also caused mislocalization of emerin away from the nuclear periphery, consistent with a decreased ability of purified emerin to associate with lamin ΔK46 filaments in vitro. GFP:ΔK46 animals had motility defects and muscle structure abnormalities. These results show that changes in lamin filament structure can translate into disease-like phenotypes via altering the localization of nuclear lamina proteins, and suggest a model for how the ΔK32 lamin mutation may cause EDMD in humans. PMID:21653823

  20. [Novel TSC1 mutation associated with variable phenotypes in tuberous sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kövesdi, Erzsébet; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Komlósi, Katalin; Kassay, Mária; Barsi, Péter; Melegh, Béla

    2013-06-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant disorder, caused by mutations of the TSC1 or TSC2 genes resulting in tumor predisposition. Clinical signs include non-malignant brain tumors, skin, eye, heart and kidney abnormalities. The authors report a Hungarian family with broad phenotypic variability. First, the 5-year-old boy, showing the most symptoms was examined, whose first seizure occurred at 15 months and a cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed numerous intracerebral calcareous foci. Except of hypopigmented skin spots, no other abnormality was found on physical examination. The mother was completely asymptomatic. Epilepsy of the maternal uncle started at the age of 3 years, of his sister at the age of 17 years and of the maternal grandmother at the age of 39 years. At the age of 52 years the grandmother developed renal cysts. Molecular genetic analysis of the family confirmed a de novo heterozygous point mutation (c.2524 C\\>T) [corrected] in exon 20 of the TSC1 gene. The mutation was detected in all examined family members. Despite increasing data on the pathomechanism of tuberous sclerosis, there is still little known about the genetic modifying factors influencing the broad intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability.

  1. Three Routes to Suppression of the Neurodegenerative Phenotypes Caused by Kinesin Heavy Chain Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Djagaeva, Inna; Rose, Debra J.; Lim, Angeline; Venter, Chris E.; Brendza, Katherine M.; Moua, Pangkong; Saxton, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin-1 is a motor protein that moves stepwise along microtubules by employing dimerized kinesin heavy chain (Khc) subunits that alternate cycles of microtubule binding, conformational change, and ATP hydrolysis. Mutations in the Drosophila Khc gene are known to cause distal paralysis and lethality preceded by the occurrence of dystrophic axon terminals, reduced axonal transport, organelle-filled axonal swellings, and impaired action potential propagation. Mutations in the equivalent human gene, Kif5A, result in similar problems that cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 2 (CMT2) distal neuropathies. By comparing the phenotypes and the complementation behaviors of a large set of Khc missense alleles, including one that is identical to a human Kif5A HSP allele, we identified three routes to suppression of Khc phenotypes: nutrient restriction, genetic background manipulation, and a remarkable intramolecular complementation between mutations known or likely to cause reciprocal changes in the rate of microtubule-stimulated ADP release by kinesin-1. Our results reveal the value of large-scale complementation analysis for gaining insight into protein structure–function relationships in vivo and point to possible paths for suppressing symptoms of HSP and related distal neuropathies. PMID:22714410

  2. Distinct Clinical Phenotypes Associated with a Mutation in the Mitochondrial Translation Elongation Factor EFTs

    PubMed Central

    Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Elpeleg, Orly; Antonicka, Hana; Diepstra, Heleen; Saada, Ann; Smits, Paulien; Sasarman, Florin; Vriend, Gert; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Shaag, Avraham; Rechavi, Gideon; Welling, Brigitte; Horst, Jürgen; Rodenburg, Richard J.; van den Heuvel, Bert; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2006-01-01

    The 13 polypeptides encoded in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are synthesized in the mitochondrial matrix on a dedicated protein-translation apparatus that resembles that found in prokaryotes. Here, we have investigated the genetic basis for a mitochondrial protein-synthesis defect associated with a combined oxidative phosphorylation enzyme deficiency in two patients, one of whom presented with encephalomyopathy and the other with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Sequencing of candidate genes revealed the same homozygous mutation (C997T) in both patients in TSFM, a gene coding for the mitochondrial translation elongation factor EFTs. EFTs functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for EFTu, another translation elongation factor that brings aminoacylated transfer RNAs to the ribosomal A site as a ternary complex with guanosine triphosphate. The mutation predicts an Arg333Trp substitution at an evolutionarily conserved site in a subdomain of EFTs that interacts with EFTu. Molecular modeling showed that the substitution disrupts local subdomain structure and the dimerization interface. The steady-state levels of EFTs and EFTu in patient fibroblasts were reduced by 75% and 60%, respectively, and the amounts of assembled complexes I, IV, and V were reduced by 35%–91% compared with the amounts in controls. These phenotypes and the translation defect were rescued by retroviral expression of either EFTs or EFTu. These data clearly establish mutant EFTs as the cause of disease in these patients. The fact that the same mutation is associated with distinct clinical phenotypes suggests the presence of genetic modifiers of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. PMID:17033963

  3. Phenotypic and molecular insights into spinal muscular atrophy due to mutations in BICD2

    PubMed Central

    Rossor, Alexander M.; Oates, Emily C.; Salter, Hannah K.; Liu, Yang; Murphy, Sinead M.; Schule, Rebecca; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Scoto, Mariacristina; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline A.; Houlden, Henry; Jordanova, Albena; Tournev, Iyailo; Chamova, Teodora; Litvinenko, Ivan; Zuchner, Stephan; Herrmann, David N.; Blake, Julian; Sowden, Janet E.; Acsadi, Gyuda; Rodriguez, Michael L.; Menezes, Manoj P.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Auer Grumbach, Michaela; Bullock, Simon L.; Muntoni, Francesco; North, Kathryn N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a disorder of lower motor neurons, most commonly caused by recessive mutations in SMN1 on chromosome 5q. Cases without SMN1 mutations are subclassified according to phenotype. Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, is characterized by lower limb muscle weakness and wasting, associated with reduced numbers of lumbar motor neurons and is caused by mutations in DYNC1H1, which encodes a microtubule motor protein in the dynein-dynactin complex and one of its cargo adaptors, BICD2. We have now identified 32 patients with BICD2 mutations from nine different families, providing detailed insights into the clinical phenotype and natural history of BICD2 disease. BICD2 spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity predominant most commonly presents with delayed motor milestones and ankle contractures. Additional features at presentation include arthrogryposis and congenital dislocation of the hips. In all affected individuals, weakness and wasting is lower-limb predominant, and typically involves both proximal and distal muscle groups. There is no evidence of sensory nerve involvement. Upper motor neuron signs are a prominent feature in a subset of individuals, including one family with exclusively adult-onset upper motor neuron features, consistent with a diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. In all cohort members, lower motor neuron features were static or only slowly progressive, and the majority remained ambulant throughout life. Muscle MRI in six individuals showed a common pattern of muscle involvement with fat deposition in most thigh muscles, but sparing of the adductors and semitendinosus. Muscle pathology findings were highly variable and included pseudomyopathic features, neuropathic features, and minimal change. The six causative mutations, including one not previously reported, result in amino acid changes within all three coiled-coil domains of the BICD2 protein, and include a possible ‘hot spot’ mutation, p.Ser107

  4. Rapid emergence of resistance to linezolid and mutator phenotypes in Staphylococcus aureus isolates from an adult cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Asmaa; Chapron, Jeanne; Touak, Gerald; Longo, Magalie; Hubert, Dominique; Collobert, Gislène; Dusser, Daniel; Poyart, Claire; Morand, Philippe C

    2013-10-01

    Linezolid has emerged as an important therapeutic option for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with cystic fibrosis. We report the rapid emergence, upon treatment with linezolid, of linezolid-resistant S. aureus clinical isolates through the accumulation of resistance-associated 23S rRNA mutations, together with acquisition of an altered mutator phenotype.

  5. Mutation Update and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations of Novel and Previously Described Mutations in TPM2 and TPM3 Causing Congenital Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Marston, Steven; Nyman, Tuula A.; Barnerias, Christine; Beggs, Alan H.; Bertini, Enrico; Ceyhan-Birsoy, OÖzge; Cintas, Pascal; Gerard, Marion; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hogue, Jacob S.; Longman, Cheryl; Eymard, Bruno; Frydman, Moshe; Kang, Peter B.; Klinge, Lars; Kolski, Hanna; Lochmüller, Hans; Magy, Laurent; Manel, Véronique; Mayer, Michèle; Mercuri, Eugenio; North, Kathryn N.; Peudenier-Robert, Sylviane; Pihko, Helena; Probst, Frank J.; Reisin, Ricardo; Stewart, Willie; Taratuto, Ana Lia; de Visser, Marianne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Winer, John; Nowak, Kristen; Laing, Nigel G.; Winder, Tom L.; Monnier, Nicole; Clarke, Nigel F.; Pelin, Katarina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting skeletal muscle isoforms of the tropomyosin genes may cause nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, core-rod myopathy, congenital fiber-type disproportion, distal arthrogryposes, and Escobar syndrome. We correlate the clinical picture of these diseases with novel (19) and previously reported (31) mutations of the TPM2 and TPM3 genes. Included are altogether 93 families: 53 with TPM2 mutations and 40 with TPM3 mutations. Thirty distinct pathogenic variants of TPM2 and 20 of TPM3 have been published or listed in the Leiden Open Variant Database (http://www.dmd.nl/). Most are heterozygous changes associated with autosomal-dominant disease. Patients with TPM2 mutations tended to present with milder symptoms than those with TPM3 mutations, DA being present only in the TPM2 group. Previous studies have shown that five of the mutations in TPM2 and one in TPM3 cause increased Ca2+ sensitivity resulting in a hypercontractile molecular phenotype. Patients with hypercontractile phenotype more often had contractures of the limb joints (18/19) and jaw (6/19) than those with nonhypercontractile ones (2/22 and 1/22), whereas patients with the non-hypercontractile molecular phenotype more often (19/22) had axial contractures than the hypercontractile group (7/19). Our in silico predictions show that most mutations affect tropomyosin–actin association or tropomyosin head-to-tail binding. PMID:24692096

  6. Mutation update and genotype-phenotype correlations of novel and previously described mutations in TPM2 and TPM3 causing congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Marston, Steven; Nyman, Tuula A; Barnerias, Christine; Beggs, Alan H; Bertini, Enrico; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Cintas, Pascal; Gerard, Marion; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hogue, Jacob S; Longman, Cheryl; Eymard, Bruno; Frydman, Moshe; Kang, Peter B; Klinge, Lars; Kolski, Hanna; Lochmüller, Hans; Magy, Laurent; Manel, Véronique; Mayer, Michèle; Mercuri, Eugenio; North, Kathryn N; Peudenier-Robert, Sylviane; Pihko, Helena; Probst, Frank J; Reisin, Ricardo; Stewart, Willie; Taratuto, Ana Lia; de Visser, Marianne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Winer, John; Nowak, Kristen; Laing, Nigel G; Winder, Tom L; Monnier, Nicole; Clarke, Nigel F; Pelin, Katarina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-07-01

    Mutations affecting skeletal muscle isoforms of the tropomyosin genes may cause nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, core-rod myopathy, congenital fiber-type disproportion, distal arthrogryposes, and Escobar syndrome. We correlate the clinical picture of these diseases with novel (19) and previously reported (31) mutations of the TPM2 and TPM3 genes. Included are altogether 93 families: 53 with TPM2 mutations and 40 with TPM3 mutations. Thirty distinct pathogenic variants of TPM2 and 20 of TPM3 have been published or listed in the Leiden Open Variant Database (http://www.dmd.nl/). Most are heterozygous changes associated with autosomal-dominant disease. Patients with TPM2 mutations tended to present with milder symptoms than those with TPM3 mutations, DA being present only in the TPM2 group. Previous studies have shown that five of the mutations in TPM2 and one in TPM3 cause increased Ca(2+) sensitivity resulting in a hypercontractile molecular phenotype. Patients with hypercontractile phenotype more often had contractures of the limb joints (18/19) and jaw (6/19) than those with nonhypercontractile ones (2/22 and 1/22), whereas patients with the non-hypercontractile molecular phenotype more often (19/22) had axial contractures than the hypercontractile group (7/19). Our in silico predictions show that most mutations affect tropomyosin-actin association or tropomyosin head-to-tail binding. PMID:24692096

  7. HSAN1 mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase reveal a close structure-function-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bode, Heiko; Bourquin, Florence; Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Wei, Yu; Alecu, Irina; Othman, Alaa; Von Eckardstein, Arnold; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in the SPTLC1 and SPTLC2 subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). The mutations induce a permanent shift in the substrate preference from L-serine to L-alanine, which results in the pathological formation of atypical and neurotoxic 1-deoxy-sphingolipids (1-deoxySL). Here we compared the enzymatic properties of 11 SPTLC1 and six SPTLC2 mutants using a uniform isotope labelling approach. In total, eight SPT mutants (STPLC1p.C133W, p.C133Y, p.S331F, p.S331Y and SPTLC2p.A182P, p.G382V, p.S384F, p.I504F) were associated with increased 1-deoxySL synthesis. Despite earlier reports, canonical activity with l-serine was not reduced in any of the investigated SPT mutants. Three variants (SPTLC1p.S331F/Y and SPTLC2p.I505Y) showed an increased canonical activity and increased formation of C20 sphingoid bases. These three mutations are associated with an exceptionally severe HSAN1 phenotype, and increased C20 sphingosine levels were also confirmed in plasma of patients. A principal component analysis of the analysed sphingoid bases clustered the mutations into three separate entities. Each cluster was related to a distinct clinical outcome (no, mild and severe HSAN1 phenotype). A homology model based on the protein structure of the prokaryotic SPT recapitulated the same grouping on a structural level. Mutations associated with the mild form clustered around the active site, whereas mutations associated with the severe form were located on the surface of the protein. In conclusion, we showed that HSAN1 mutations in SPT have distinct biochemical properties, which allowed for the prediction of the clinical symptoms on the basis of the plasma sphingoid base profile. PMID:26681808

  8. Impact of homozygosity for an amyloidogenic transthyretin mutation on phenotype and long term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, G; Hellman, U; Lundgren, H; Sandgren, O; Suhr, O

    2005-01-01

    Although amyloidogenic transthyretin (ATTR) mutations are common in several populations, such as black Americans, the small number of diagnosed patients homozygous for TTR amyloid and the short follow up in most studies has until now prevented an analysis of their phenotype. In Sweden, nine homozygous patients from eight families carrying the ATTR mutation Val30Met, which gives rise to fatal neuropathic amyloidosis (FAP), have been identified and have now been followed for up to 15 years. This has enabled an analysis of the phenotype of homozygous patients. Genetic testing and detection of amyloid deposits in the vitreous body or in intestinal or skin biopsies confirmed the diagnosis in all patients. The patients' symptoms were obtained from medical records. For comparison, we used a group of 35 heterozygous non-transplanted patients with FAP (18 men and 17 women), who had been evaluated at the Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital before their deaths. Vitreous amyloidosis was the most prevalent symptom in the homozygous group, and in two patients it was the only manifestation of the disease during their lifetime. The age at onset was not different from that of heterozygous patients, and their survival tended not to be shorter but actually longer than for heterozygotes. Homozygosity for the mutation associated with FAP, ATTR Val30Met, does not implicate a more severe phenotype for Swedish patients. The most common symptom was vitreous opacity, which may be the only manifestation of the disease. These findings point to the possibilities of different pathways for amyloid formation, or the presence of hitherto unknown genes operating in amyloid formation. PMID:15930086

  9. Phenotype characterization and DSPP mutational analysis of three Brazilian dentinogenesis imperfecta type II families.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, A C; Santos, L J S; Paula, L M; Dong, J; MacDougall, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform phenotype analysis and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) mutational analysis on 3 Brazilian families diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) attending the Dental Anomalies Clinic in Brasilia, Brazil. Physical and oral examinations, as well as radiographic and histopathological analyses, were performed on 28 affected and unaffected individuals. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological analyses confirmed the diagnosis of DGI-II in 19 individuals. Pulp stones were observed in ground sections of several teeth in 2 families, suggesting that obliteration of pulp chambers and root canals results from the growth of these nodular structures. Mutational DSPP gene analysis of representative affected family members revealed 7 various non-disease-causing alterations in exons 1-4 within the dentin sialoprotein domain. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the progression of pulpal obliteration in the DGI-II patients studied as well as the molecular basis of their disease.

  10. Phenotypic population screen identifies a new mutation in bovine DGAT1 responsible for unsaturated milk fat.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Klaus; Ward, Hamish; Berry, Sarah D; Ankersmit-Udy, Alex; Burrett, Alayna; Beattie, Elizabeth M; Thomas, Natalie L; Harris, Bevin; Ford, Christine A; Browning, Sharon R; Rawson, Pisana; Verkerk, Gwyneth A; van der Does, Yvonne; Adams, Linda F; Davis, Stephen R; Jordan, T William; MacGibbon, Alastair K H; Spelman, Richard J; Snell, Russell G

    2015-02-26

    Selective breeding has strongly reduced the genetic diversity in livestock species, and contemporary breeding practices exclude potentially beneficial rare genetic variation from the future gene pool. Here we test whether important traits arising by new mutations can be identified and rescued in highly selected populations. We screened milks from 2.5 million cows to identify an exceptional individual which produced milk with reduced saturated fat content, and improved unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations. The milk traits were transmitted dominantly to her offspring, and genetic mapping and genome sequencing revealed a new mutation in a previously unknown splice enhancer of the DGAT1 gene. Homozygous carriers show features of human diarrheal disorders, and may be useful for the development of therapeutic strategies. Our study demonstrates that high-throughput phenotypic screening can uncover rich genetic diversity even in inbred populations, and introduces a novel strategy to develop novel milks with improved nutritional properties.

  11. Mutations Conferring a Noncytotoxic Phenotype on Chikungunya Virus Replicons Compromise Enzymatic Properties of Nonstructural Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Utt, Age; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Valeria; Lulla, Aleksei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (genus Alphavirus) has a positive-sense RNA genome. CHIKV nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) proteolytically processes the viral nonstructural polyprotein, possesses nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase), RNA triphosphatase, and RNA helicase activities, and induces cytopathic effects in vertebrate cells. Although alphaviral nsP2 mutations can result in a noncytotoxic phenotype, the effects of such mutations on nsP2 enzymatic activities are not well understood. In this study, we introduced a P718G (PG) mutation and selected for additional mutations in CHIKV nsP2 that resulted in a CHIKV replicon with a noncytotoxic phenotype in BHK-21 cells. Combinations of PG and either an E116K (EK) substitution or a GEEGS sequence insertion after residue T648 (5A) markedly reduced RNA synthesis; however, neither PG nor 5A prevented nsP2 nuclear translocation. Introducing PG into recombinant nsP2 inhibited proteolytic cleavage of nsP1/nsP2 and nsP3/nsP4 sites, reduced GTPase and RNA helicase activities, and abolished RNA stimulation of GTPase activity. 5A and EK modulated the effects of PG. However, only the RNA helicase activity of nsP2 was reduced by both of these mutations, suggesting that defects in this activity may be linked to a noncytotoxic phenotype. These results increase our understanding of the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity that accompanies alphaviral replication. Furthermore, adaptation of the CHIKV replicon containing both 5A and PG allowed the selection of a CHIKV replicon with adaptive mutations in nsP1 and nsP3 that enable persistence in human cell line. Such cell lines represent valuable experimental systems for discovering host factors and for screening inhibitors of CHIKV replication at lower biosafety levels. IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a medically important pathogen that causes febrile illness and can cause chronic arthritis. No approved vaccines or antivirals are available for CHIKV. The attenuation of CHIKV is critical to the

  12. Expansion of the TARP Syndrome Phenotype Associated with De Novo Mutations and Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Curry, Cynthia; Horton, Margaret; Leon, Eyby; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; Dobyns, William B.; Hudgins, Louanne; Zackai, Elaine; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    The TARP syndrome (Talipes equinovarus, Atrial septal defect, Robin sequence, and Persistent left superior vena cava) is an X-linked disorder that was determined to be caused by mutations in RBM10 in two families, and confirmed in a subsequent case report. The first two original families were quite similar in phenotype, with uniform early lethality although a confirmatory case report showed survival into childhood. Here we report on five affecteds from three newly recognized families, including patients with atypical manifestations. None of the five patients had talipes and others also lacked cardinal TARP features of Robin sequence and atrial septal defect. All three families demonstrated de novo mutations, and one of the families had two recurrences, with demonstrable maternal mosaicism. PMID:24259342

  13. Inheritance patterns and phenotypic features of myofibrillar myopathy associated with a BAG3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Odgerel, Zagaa; Sarkozy, Anna; Lee, Hee-Suk; McKenna, Caoimhe; Rankin, Julia; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Paola, Francalanci; D’Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2010-01-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by disintegration of myofibrils. The inheritance pattern in MFMs is commonly autosomal dominant, but there has been a striking absence of secondary cases noted in a BAG3-associated subtype. We studied three families with BAG3 p.Pro209Leu mutation showing a severe phenotype of myofibrillar myopathy and axonal neuropathy with giant axons. In one family, transmission to a pair of siblings has occurred from their asymptomatic father who showed somatic mosaicism. In two other families, neither of the parents was affected or showed detectable level of somatic mosaicism. These observations suggest that the BAG3 variant of MFM may result from a spontaneous mutation at an early point of embryonic development and that transmission from a mosaic parent may occur more than once. The study underlines the importance of parental evaluation as it may have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:20605452

  14. Phenotypic population screen identifies a new mutation in bovine DGAT1 responsible for unsaturated milk fat

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Klaus; Ward, Hamish; Berry, Sarah D.; Ankersmit-Udy, Alex; Burrett, Alayna; Beattie, Elizabeth M.; Thomas, Natalie L.; Harris, Bevin; Ford, Christine A.; Browning, Sharon R.; Rawson, Pisana; Verkerk, Gwyneth A.; van der Does, Yvonne; Adams, Linda F.; Davis, Stephen R.; Jordan, T. William; MacGibbon, Alastair K. H.; Spelman, Richard J.; Snell, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding has strongly reduced the genetic diversity in livestock species, and contemporary breeding practices exclude potentially beneficial rare genetic variation from the future gene pool. Here we test whether important traits arising by new mutations can be identified and rescued in highly selected populations. We screened milks from 2.5 million cows to identify an exceptional individual which produced milk with reduced saturated fat content, and improved unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations. The milk traits were transmitted dominantly to her offspring, and genetic mapping and genome sequencing revealed a new mutation in a previously unknown splice enhancer of the DGAT1 gene. Homozygous carriers show features of human diarrheal disorders, and may be useful for the development of therapeutic strategies. Our study demonstrates that high-throughput phenotypic screening can uncover rich genetic diversity even in inbred populations, and introduces a novel strategy to develop novel milks with improved nutritional properties. PMID:25719731

  15. Cystic fibrosis mice carrying the missense mutation G551D replicate human genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, S J; Alton, E W; Smith, S N; Lunn, D P; Farley, R; Lovelock, P K; Thomson, S A; Hume, D A; Lamb, D; Porteous, D J; Dorin, J R; Wainwright, B J

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a mouse carrying the human G551D mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) by a one-step gene targeting procedure. These mutant mice show cystic fibrosis pathology but have a reduced risk of fatal intestinal blockage compared with 'null' mutants, in keeping with the reduced incidence of meconium ileus in G551D patients. The G551D mutant mice show greatly reduced CFTR-related chloride transport, displaying activity intermediate between that of cftr(mlUNC) replacement ('null') and cftr(mlHGU) insertional (residual activity) mutants and equivalent to approximately 4% of wild-type CFTR activity. The long-term survival of these animals should provide an excellent model with which to study cystic fibrosis, and they illustrate the value of mouse models carrying relevant mutations for examining genotype-phenotype correlations. Images PMID:8605891

  16. Clinical phenotype and diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in pediatric patients carrying desmosomal gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bauce, Barbara; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Basso, Cristina; Mazzotti, Elisa; Rigato, Ilaria; Steriotis, Alexandros; Beffagna, Giorgia; Lorenzon, Alessandra; De Bortoli, Marzia; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Corbetti, Francesco; Daliento, Luciano; Iliceto, Sabino; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Nava, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is an inherited heart muscle disease carrying a risk of sudden death. Information about the clinical features during childhood and the age at disease onset is scanty. Objective The aim of the study was to describe the ARVC phenotype as its initial clinical manifestation in a pediatric population (<18 years) with desmosomal gene mutations. Methods Fifty-three ARVC desmosomal gene mutation carriers (mean age 12.3 ± 3.9 years) were investigated by electrocardiogram (ECG), signal-averaged ECG, 24-hour Holter, echocardiogram, and contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Results None of the children ≤10 years old fulfilled the 1994 criteria, as opposed to six (33%) aged 11–14 years and eight aged >14 years (42%). At the end of follow-up (9 ± 7 years), 21 (40%) fulfilled the 1994 diagnostic criteria (mean age 16 ± 4 years). By using the 2010 criteria in subjects aged ≤18 years, 53% were unaffected, versus 62% by using the traditional criteria. More than two-thirds of affected subjects had moderate-severe forms of the disease. Contrast-enhanced CMR was performed in 21 (40%); of 13 unaffected gene mutation carriers, six showed ARVC morphological and/or tissue abnormalities. Conclusion In pediatric ARVC mutation carriers, a diagnosis was achieved in 40% of cases, confirming that the disease usually develops during adolescence and young adulthood. The 2010 modified criteria seem to be more sensitive than the 1994 ones in identifying familial pediatric cases. Contrast-enhanced CMR can provide diagnostic information on gene mutation carriers not fulfilling either traditional or modified criteria. Management of asymptomatic gene mutation carriers remains the main clinical challenge. PMID:21723241

  17. A de-novo STXBP1 gene mutation in a patient showing the Rett syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, Romina; Saettini, Francesco; Panzeri, Elena; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bassi, Maria T; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-03-25

    This study reports on a 9-year-old girl who developed West syndrome and showed clinical features fulfilling the main revised diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome (hand washing, severe cognitive impairment with absence of language, ataxic gait, progressive scoliosis and autistic features). Mutation analyses for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5/STK9), ARX and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) genes were carried out, with negative results. A known de-novo c.1217G>A missense mutation in exon 14 leading to the substitution of a conserved residue, p.R406H in domain3b of the syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) gene, was detected. The STXBP1 gene encodes the syntaxin-binding protein 1, a neuron-specific protein involved in synaptic vesicle release at both glutaminergic and GABAergic synapses. This function is also affected by MECP2 gene mutations, which are known to lead to a decrease in glutamate and GABA receptors' density. It is possible to speculate that the impairment in synaptic plasticity represents the pathogenic link between MECP2 and STXBP1 gene mutations. On reviewing the clinical features of the reported patients with the same mutation in the STXBP1 gene, it has been observed that poor eye contact, tremour, dyskinesia, head/hand stereotypies and both cognitive and motor progressive deterioration are common symptoms, although never considered as indicative of a Rett syndrome phenotype. In conclusion, the case described here suggests a relationship between the Rett syndrome and the STXBP1 gene not described so far, making the search for STXBP1 gene mutations advisable in patients with Rett syndrome and early onset of epilepsy.

  18. Chi Mutation in a Transposon and the Orientation-Dependence of Chi Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Yagil, Ezra; Dower, Nancy A.; Chattoraj, Dhruba; Stahl, Mary; Pierson, Carey; Stahl, Franklin W.

    1980-01-01

    Chi, an element that stimulates recombination via the E. coli RecBC pathway, can arise by spontaneous mutation in the transposon Tn5. When in phage λ in one orientation, the mutant transposon confers Chi+ phenotype (large plaque and a high rate of exchange near the transposon). In the other orientation, however, the transposon does not confer Chi+ phenotype. The mobility of the transposon allows us to show that the Chi+ orientation of the mutant Tn5 is the same at different locations in λ. These include a site near gene J, one in gam at 69, one to the right of gam at 73 and several to the right of R between 95.7 and 99.5. To the right of R, the mutant transposon could be found in only one orientation, that which confers Chi+ phenotype. We speculate that the other orientation of Tn5 in that locale is lethal to λ. The orientation-dependence of Chi+ phenotype also revealed that Tn5 flip-flops in λ. PMID:6259016

  19. Genome editing with Cas9 in adult mice corrects a disease mutation and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hao; Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Bogorad, Roman L; Benedetti, Eric; Grompe, Markus; Koteliansky, Victor; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate CRISPR-Cas9–mediated correction of a Fah mutation in hepatocytes in a mouse model of the human disease hereditary tyrosinemia. Delivery of components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system by hydrodynamic injection resulted in initial expression of the wild-type Fah protein in ~1/250 liver cells. Expansion of Fah-positive hepatocytes rescued the body weight loss phenotype. Our study indicates that CRISPR-Cas9–mediated genome editing is possible in adult animals and has potential for correction of human genetic diseases. PMID:24681508

  20. Genome editing with Cas9 in adult mice corrects a disease mutation and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Bogorad, Roman L; Benedetti, Eric; Grompe, Markus; Koteliansky, Victor; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate CRISPR-Cas9-mediated correction of a Fah mutation in hepatocytes in a mouse model of the human disease hereditary tyrosinemia. Delivery of components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system by hydrodynamic injection resulted in initial expression of the wild-type Fah protein in ∼1/250 liver cells. Expansion of Fah-positive hepatocytes rescued the body weight loss phenotype. Our study indicates that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing is possible in adult animals and has potential for correction of human genetic diseases.

  1. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  2. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  3. Genotype–Phenotype Correlations in Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency: A Mutation Update

    PubMed Central

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Abdikarim, Iman; Narain, Sahas; Tuchman, Mendel; Morizono, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is an X-linked trait that accounts for nearly half of all inherited disorders of the urea cycle. OTC is one of the enzymes common to both the urea cycle and the bacterial arginine biosynthesis pathway; however, the role of OTC has changed over evolution. For animals with a urea cycle, defects in OTC can trigger hyperammonemic episodes that can lead to brain damage and death. This is the fifth mutation update for human OTC with previous updates reported in 1993, 1995, 2002, and 2006. In the 2006 update, 341 mutations were reported. This current update contains 417 disease-causing mutations, and also is the first report of this series to incorporate information about natural variation of the OTC gene in the general population through examination of publically available genomic data and examination of phenotype/genotype correlations from patients participating in the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium Longitudinal Study and the first to evaluate the suitability of systematic computational approaches to predict severity of disease associated with different types of OTC mutations. PMID:26059767

  4. Further defining the phenotypic spectrum of B4GALT7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Salter, Claire G; Davies, Justin H; Moon, Rebecca J; Fairhurst, Joanna; Bunyan, David; Foulds, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix with diverse biological functions. Defects in proteoglycan synthesis have been linked to several human diseases with common features of short stature, hypermobility, joint dislocations, and skeletal dysplasia. B4GALT7 encodes galactosyltransferase-I that catalyzes the addition of a galactose moiety to a xylosyl group in the tetrasaccharide linker of proteoglycans. Mutations in this gene have been associated with the rare progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome and in addition more recently found to underlie Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome. Nine individuals have been reported with a diagnosis of the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome, four of whom have had molecular characterization showing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7. We report two newly described patients with compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7, and show that the six individuals with confirmed mutations do not have the progeroid features described in the original five patients with a clinical diagnosis of the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome. We suggest that galactosyltransferase-I deficiency does not cause the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome, but instead results in a clinically recognizable syndrome comprising short stature, joint hypermobility, radioulnar synostosis, and severe hypermetropia. This group of syndromic patients are on a phenotypic spectrum with individuals who have Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome, although the key features of osteopenia, fractures and hypermetropia have not been reported in patients from Reunion Island. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Phenotypic variation of a novel nonsense mutation in the P0 intracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Senderek, J; Ramaekers, V T; Zerres, K; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Schröder, J M; Bergmann, C

    2001-11-15

    Mutations in the gene for the peripheral myelin protein zero (P0, MPZ) cause type 1B of Charcot-Marie-Tooth sensorimotor neuropathy (CMT1B). Here we report a German family with a novel heterozygous P0 nonsense mutation (G206X) that supposedly removes four-fifths of the amino acid residues constituting the P0 intracellular domain. The 12-year-old propositus had childhood-onset CMT1B associated with bilateral pes cavus, moderate lower limb weakness, and mildly reduced sensory qualities in the distal legs. The electrophysiology was consistent with a demyelinating neuropathy. He inherited the mutation from his mother who had no complaints but slight pes cavus deformity and slow nerve conduction velocities (NCV). Conclusively, truncating mutations within the P0 intracellular domain do not necessarily cause a severe phenotype such as Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) or congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy (CHN), but can result in mild or moderate CMT1B with intrafamilial clinical variability. PMID:11701152

  6. Different phenotypes in vivo are associated with ATPase motif mutations in Schizosaccharomyces pombe minichromosome maintenance proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Eliana B; Catlett, Michael G; Forsburg, Susan L

    2002-01-01

    The six conserved MCM proteins are essential for normal DNA replication. They share a central core of homology that contains sequences related to DNA-dependent and AAA(+) ATPases. It has been suggested that the MCMs form a replicative helicase because a hexameric subcomplex formed by MCM4, -6, and -7 proteins has in vitro DNA helicase activity. To test whether ATPase and helicase activities are required for MCM protein function in vivo, we mutated conserved residues in the Walker A and Walker B motifs of MCM4, -6, and -7 and determined that equivalent mutations in these three proteins have different in vivo effects in fission yeast. Some mutations reported to abolish the in vitro helicase activity of the mouse MCM4/6/7 subcomplex do not affect the in vivo function of fission yeast MCM complex. Mutations of consensus CDK sites in Mcm4p and Mcm7p also have no phenotypic consequences. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses and in situ chromatin-binding experiments were used to study the ability of the mutant Mcm4ps to associate with the other MCMs, localize to the nucleus, and bind to chromatin. We conclude that the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis is different for different MCM subunits. PMID:11973289

  7. Further defining the phenotypic spectrum of B4GALT7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Salter, Claire G; Davies, Justin H; Moon, Rebecca J; Fairhurst, Joanna; Bunyan, David; Foulds, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix with diverse biological functions. Defects in proteoglycan synthesis have been linked to several human diseases with common features of short stature, hypermobility, joint dislocations, and skeletal dysplasia. B4GALT7 encodes galactosyltransferase-I that catalyzes the addition of a galactose moiety to a xylosyl group in the tetrasaccharide linker of proteoglycans. Mutations in this gene have been associated with the rare progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome and in addition more recently found to underlie Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome. Nine individuals have been reported with a diagnosis of the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome, four of whom have had molecular characterization showing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7. We report two newly described patients with compound heterozygous mutations in B4GALT7, and show that the six individuals with confirmed mutations do not have the progeroid features described in the original five patients with a clinical diagnosis of the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome. We suggest that galactosyltransferase-I deficiency does not cause the progeroid form of Ehlers Danlos syndrome, but instead results in a clinically recognizable syndrome comprising short stature, joint hypermobility, radioulnar synostosis, and severe hypermetropia. This group of syndromic patients are on a phenotypic spectrum with individuals who have Larsen of Reunion Island syndrome, although the key features of osteopenia, fractures and hypermetropia have not been reported in patients from Reunion Island. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26940150

  8. Analysis of phenotype, enzyme activity and genotype of Chinese patients with POMT1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haipo; Manya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Jiao, Hui; Fu, Xiaona; Xiao, Jiangxi; Li, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jingmin; Jiang, Yuwu; Toda, Tatsushi; Endo, Tamao; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 (POMT1) is a glycosyltransferase involved in α-dystroglycan glycosylation. POMT1 mutations cause a wide spectrum of clinical conditions from Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), which involves muscle, eye and brain abnormalities, to mild forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy with mental retardation. We aimed to elucidate the impact of different POMT1 mutations on the clinical phenotype. We report five Chinese patients with POMT1 mutations: one had a typical clinical manifestation of WWS, and the other four were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy with mental retardation of varying severity. We analyzed the influence of the POMT1 mutations on POMT activity by assaying the patients' muscles and cultured skin fibroblasts. We demonstrated different levels of decreased POMT activity that correlated highly with decreased α-dystroglycan glycosylation. Our results suggest that POMT activity is inversely proportional to clinical severity, and demonstrate that skin fibroblasts can be used for differential diagnosis of patients with α-dystroglycanopathies. We have provided clinical, histological, enzymatic and genetic evidence of POMT1 involvement in five unrelated Chinese patients.

  9. Phenotypic expression of factor H mutations in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaziri-Sani, F; Holmberg, L; Sjöholm, A G; Kristoffersson, A-C; Manea, M; Frémeaux-Bacchi, V; Fehrman-Ekholm, I; Raafat, R; Karpman, D

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the phenotypic expression of factor H mutations in two patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Factor H in serum was assayed by rocket immunoelectrophoresis, immunoblotting, and double immunodiffusion and in tissue by immunohistochemistry. Functional activity was analyzed by hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes and binding to endothelial cells. A homozygous mutation in complement control protein (CCP) domain 10 of factor H was identified in an adult man who first developed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and later HUS. C3 levels were very low. The patient had undetectable factor H levels in serum and a weak factor H 150 kDa band. Double immunodiffusion showed partial antigenic identity with factor H in normal serum owing to the presence of factor H-like protein 1. Strong specific labeling for factor H was detected in glomerular endothelium, mesangium and in glomerular and tubular epithelium as well as in bone marrow cells. A heterozygous mutation in CCP 20 of factor H was found in a girl with HUS. C3 levels were moderately decreased at onset. Factor H levels were normal and a normal 150 kDa band was present. Double immunodiffusion showed antigenic identity with normal factor H. Factor H labeling was minimal in the renal cortex. Factor H dysfunction was demonstrated by increased sheep erythrocyte hemolysis and decreased binding to endothelial cells. In summary, two different factor H mutations associated with HUS were examined: in one, factor H accumulated in cells, and in the other, membrane binding was reduced.

  10. Novel Somatic Mutations in Primary Hyperaldosteronism are related to the Clinical, Radiological and Pathological Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Ute I.; Healy, James M.; Thiel, Anne; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Brown, Taylor C.; Kunstman, John W.; Horne, Matthew J.; Dietrich, Dimo; Riemer, Jasmin; Kücükköylü, Seher; Reimer, Esther N.; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Goh, Gerald; Kristiansen, Glen; Mahajan, Amit; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.; Prasad, Manju L.; Carling, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia are important causes of secondary hypertension. Somatic mutations in KCNJ5, CACNA1D, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CTNNB1 have been described in APAs. Objective To characterize clinical-pathological features in APAs and unilateral adrenal hyperplasia, and correlate them with genotypes. Design Retrospective study. Subjects and Measurements Clinical and pathological characteristics of 90 APAs and 7 diffusely or focally hyperplastic adrenal glands were reviewed, and samples were examined for mutations in known disease genes by Sanger or exome sequencing. Results Mutation frequencies were: KCNJ5, 37.1%; CACNA1D, 10.3%; ATP1A1, 8.2%; ATP2B3, 3.1%; CTNNB1, 2.1%. Previously unidentified mutations included I157K, F154C and 2 insertions (I150_G151insM and I144_E145insAI) in KCNJ5, all close to the selectivity filter, V426G_V427Q_A428_L433del in ATP2B3, and A39Efs*3 in CTNNB1. Mutations in KCNJ5 were associated with female, and other mutations with male gender (p=0.007). On computed tomography, KCNJ5-mutant tumors displayed significantly greater diameter (p=0.023), calculated area (p=0.002) and lower pre-contrast Hounsfield Units (p=0.0002) vs. tumors with mutations in other genes. Accordingly, KCNJ5-mutant tumors were predominantly comprised of lipid-rich fasciculata-like clear cells, whereas other tumors were heterogeneous (p=5×10−6 vs. non-KCNJ5 mutant and p=0.0003 vs. wild type tumors, respectively). CACNA1D mutations were present in two samples with hyperplasia without adenoma. Conclusions KCNJ5 mutant tumors appear to be associated with fasciculata-like clear cell predominant histology and tend to be larger with a characteristic imaging phenotype. Novel somatic KCNJ5 variants likely cause adenomas by loss of potassium selectivity, similar to previously described mutations. PMID:26252618

  11. MFN2 mutations cause severe phenotypes in most patients with CMT2A

    PubMed Central

    Feely, S.M.E.; Laura, M.; Siskind, C.E.; Sottile, S.; Davis, M.; Gibbons, V.S.; Reilly, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A), the most common form of CMT2, is caused by mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2), a nuclear encoded gene essential for mitochondrial fusion and tethering the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria. Published CMT2A phenotypes have differed widely in severity. Methods: To determine the prevalence and phenotypes of CMT2A within our clinics we performed genetic testing on 99 patients with CMT2 evaluated at Wayne State University in Detroit and on 27 patients with CMT2 evaluated in the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London. We then preformed a cross-sectional analysis on our patients with CMT2A. Results: Twenty-one percent of patients had MFN2 mutations. Most of 27 patients evaluated with CMT2A had an earlier onset and more severe impairment than patients without CMT2A. CMT2A accounted for 91% of all our severely impaired patients with CMT2 but only 11% of mildly or moderately impaired patients. Twenty-three of 27 patients with CMT2A were nonambulatory prior to age 20 whereas just one of 78 non-CMT2A patients was nonambulatory after this age. Eleven patients with CMT2A had a pure motor neuropathy while another 5 also had profound proprioception loss. MFN2 mutations were in the GTPase domain, the coiled-coil domains, or the highly conserved R3 domain of the protein. Conclusions: We find MFN2 mutations particularly likely to cause severe neuropathy that may be primarily motor or motor accompanied by prominent proprioception loss. Disruption of functional domains of the protein was particularly likely to cause neuropathy. PMID:21508331

  12. Novel phenotype associated with a mutation in the KCNA1(Kv1.1) gene

    PubMed Central

    D'Adamo, Maria C.; Gallenmüller, Constanze; Servettini, Ilenio; Hartl, Elisabeth; Tucker, Stephen J.; Arning, Larissa; Biskup, Saskia; Grottesi, Alessandro; Guglielmi, Luca; Imbrici, Paola; Bernasconi, Pia; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Franciolini, Fabio; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Pessia, Mauro; Klopstock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is an autosomal dominant K+ channelopathy which manifests with short attacks of cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria, and may also show interictal myokymia. Episodes can be triggered by emotional or physical stress, startle response, sudden postural change or fever. Here we describe a 31-year-old man displaying markedly atypical symptoms, including long-lasting attacks of jerking muscle contractions associated with hyperthermia, severe migraine, and a relatively short-sleep phenotype. A single nucleotide change in KCNA1 (c.555C>G) was identified that changes a highly conserved residue (p.C185W) in the first transmembrane segment of the voltage-gated K+ channel Kv1.1. The patient is heterozygous and the mutation was inherited from his asymptomatic mother. Next generation sequencing revealed no variations in the CACNA1A, CACNB4, KCNC3, KCNJ10, PRRT2 or SCN8A genes of either the patient or mother, except for a benign variant in SLC1A3. Functional analysis of the p.C185W mutation in KCNA1 demonstrated a deleterious dominant-negative phenotype where the remaining current displayed slower activation kinetics, subtle changes in voltage-dependence and faster recovery from slow inactivation. Structural modeling also predicts the C185W mutation to be functionally deleterious. This description of novel clinical features, associated with a Kv1.1 mutation highlights a possibly unrecognized relationship between K+ channel dysfunction, hyperthermia and migraine in EA1, and suggests that thorough assessments for these symptoms should be carefully considered for all patients affected by EA1. PMID:25642194

  13. Phenotypic spectrum of disorders associated with glycyl-tRNA synthetase mutations.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Kumaraswamy; Kyriakides, Theodoros; Puls, Imke; Nicholson, Garth A; Funalot, Benoît; Antonellis, Anthony; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Christodoulou, Kyproula; Beggs, John L; Zamba-Papanicolaou, Eleni; Ionasescu, Victor; Dalakas, Marinos C; Green, Eric D; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2005-10-01

    We describe clinical, electrophysiological, histopathological and molecular features of a unique disease caused by mutations in the glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene. Sixty patients from five multigenerational families have been evaluated. The disease is characterized by adolescent onset of weakness, and atrophy of thenar and first dorsal interosseus muscles progressing to involve foot and peroneal muscles in most but not all cases. Mild to moderate sensory deficits develop in a minority of patients. Neurophysiologically confirmed chronic denervation in distal muscles with reduced compound motor action potentials were features consistent with both motor neuronal and axonal pathology. Sural nerve biopsy showed mild to moderate selective loss of small- and medium-sized myelinated and small unmyelinated axons, although sensory nerve action potentials were not significantly decreased. Based on the presence or absence of sensory changes, the disease phenotype was initially defined as distal spinal muscular atrophy type V (dSMA-V) in three families, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D (CMT2D) in a single family, and as either dSMA-V or CMT2D in patients of another large family. Linkage to chromosome 7p15 and the presence of disease-associated heterozygous GARS mutations have been identified in patients from each of the five studied families. We conclude that patients with GARS mutations present a clinical continuum of predominantly motor distal neuronopathy/axonopathy with mild to moderate sensory involvement that varies between the families and between members of the same family. Awareness of these overlapping clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in GARS will facilitate identification of this disorder in additional families and direct future research toward better understanding of its pathogenesis.

  14. A novel mutation in FHL1 in a family with X-linked scapuloperoneal myopathy: phenotypic spectrum and structural study of FHL1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Hui; Raskind, Wendy H.; Parson, William W.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Vu, Tiffany; Zheng, YunLin; Matsushita, Mark; Wolff, John; Lipe, Hillary; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    An X-linked myopathy was recently associated with mutations in the four-and-a-half-LIM domains 1 (FHL1) gene. We identified a family with late onset, slowly progressive weakness of scapuloperoneal muscles in three brothers and their mother. A novel missense mutation in the LIM2 domain of FHL1 (W122C) co-segregated with disease in the family. The phenotype was less severe than that in other reported families. Muscle biopsy revealed myopathic changes with FHL1 inclusions that were ubiquitin- and desmin-positive. This mutation provides additional evidence for X-linked myopathy caused by a narrow spectrum of mutations in FHL1, mostly in the LIM2 domain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the newly identified mutation and five previously published missense mutations in the LIM2 domain revealed no major distortions of the protein structure or disruption of zinc binding. There were, however, increases in the nonpolar, solvent-accessible surface area in one or both of two clusters of residues, suggesting that the mutant proteins have a variably increased propensity to aggregate. Review of the literature shows a wide range of phenotypes associated with mutations in FHL1. However, recognizing the typical scapuloperoneal phenotype and X-linked inheritance pattern will help clinicians arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:20633900

  15. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a questionnaire based study to delineate the different phenotypes caused by endoglin and ALK1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Berg, J; Porteous, M; Reinhardt, D; Gallione, C; Holloway, S; Umasunthar, T; Lux, A; McKinnon, W; Marchuk, D; Guttmacher, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant vascular dysplasia characterised by mucocutaneous telangiectasis, epistaxis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and arteriovenous malformations in the lung and brain. Causative mutations for HHT have been identified in two genes, endoglin and ALK1, which encode proteins involved in serine-threonine kinase signalling in the endothelial cell. Methods: A number of people affected with HHT had completed a postal questionnaire as part of an international study to delineate the HHT phenotype. We identified questionnaires completed by subjects in whom we had identified a mutation in endoglin or ALK1. Further questionnaires were sent to families with known mutations. Data were only included from questionnaires returned by people known to carry disease causing mutations. Results: Questionnaires were completed by 83 subjects with known mutations. Of these, 49 had endoglin mutations (HHT1) and 34 had ALK1 mutations (HHT2). Subjects with HHT1 reported an earlier onset of epistaxis (p=0.01) and telangiectasis (p=0.0001) than those with HHT2. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations were only reported in the endoglin mutation group in our study (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our questionnaire based study provides evidence that the HHT phenotype caused by mutations in endoglin (HHT1) is distinct from, and more severe than, HHT caused by mutations in ALK1 (HHT2). This has significant implications for diagnosis, screening, and treatment in the two different forms of HHT, as well as for understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:12920067

  16. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination – including the optic disc – might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  17. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination - including the optic disc - might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  18. Retinitis pigmentosa: impact of different Pde6a point mutations on the disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Jiao, Kangwei; Buena-Atienza, Elena; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Trifunović, Dragana; Balendran, Sukirthini; Koepfli, Tanja; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Heckmann, Angelique; Beck, Susanne C; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wissinger, Bernd; Seeliger, Mathias W; Paquet-Durand, François

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the PDE6A gene can cause rod photoreceptors degeneration and the blinding disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP). While a number of pathogenic PDE6A mutations have been described, little is known about their impact on compound heterozygous situations and potential interactions of different disease-causing alleles. Here, we used a novel mouse model for the Pde6a R562W mutation in combination with an existing line carrying the V685M mutation to generate compound heterozygous Pde6a V685M/R562W animals, exactly homologous to a case of human RP. We compared the progression of photoreceptor degeneration in these compound heterozygous mice with the homozygous V685M and R562W mutants, and additionally with the D670G line that is known for a relatively mild phenotype. We investigated PDE6A expression, cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate accumulation, calpain and caspase activity, in vivo retinal function and morphology, as well as photoreceptor cell death and survival. This analysis confirms the severity of different Pde6a mutations and indicates that compound heterozygous mutants behave like intermediates of the respective homozygous situations. Specifically, the severity of the four different Pde6a situations may be categorized by the pace of photoreceptor degeneration: V685M (fastest) > V685M/R562W > R562W > D670G (slowest). While calpain activity was strongly increased in all four mutants, caspase activity was not. This points to the execution of non-apoptotic cell death and may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic interventions. For individual RP patients, our study may help to predict time-courses for Pde6a-related retinal degeneration and thereby facilitate the definition of a window-of-opportunity for clinical interventions. PMID:26188004

  19. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene: correlation between sulfate transport activity and chondrodysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Karniski, L P

    2001-07-01

    The diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene encodes a transmembrane protein that transports sulfate into chondrocytes to maintain adequate sulfation of proteoglycans. Mutations in this gene are responsible for four recessively inherited chondrodysplasias that include diastrophic dysplasia, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type 2 and achondrogenesis 1B (ACG-1B). To determine whether the DTDST mutations found in individuals with these chondrodysplasias differ functionally from each other, we compared the sulfate transport activity of 11 reported DTDST mutations. Five mutations, G255E, Delta a1751, L483P, R178X and N425D, had minimal sulfate transport function following expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Two mutations, Delta V340 and R279W, transported sulfate at rates of 17 and 32%, respectively, of wild-type DTDST. Four mutations, A715V, C653S, Q454P and G678V, had rates of sulfate transport nearly equal to that of wild-type DTDST. Transport kinetics were not different among the four mutations with near-normal sulfate transport function and wild-type DTDST. When the sulfate transport function of the different DTDST mutations are grouped according to the general phenotypes, individuals with the most severe form, ACG-1B, tend to be homozygous for null mutations, individuals with the moderately severe atelosteogenesis type 2 have at least one allele with a loss-of-function mutation, and individuals with the mildest forms are typically homozygous for mutations with residual sulfate transport function. However, in the X.laevis oocyte expression system, the correlation between residual transport function and the severity of phenotype was not absolute, suggesting that factors in addition to the intrinsic sulfate transport properties of the DTDST protein may influence the phenotype in individuals with DTDST mutations. PMID:11448940

  20. A de novo dominant mutation in ACTA1 causing congenital nemaline myopathy associated with a milder phenotype: expanding the spectrum of dominant ACTA1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Levesque, L; Del Bigio, M R; Krawitz, S; Mhanni, A A

    2013-03-01

    We describe the presentation and six-year follow up of a child with nemaline myopathy due to a de novo mutation in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) characterized by dramatic improvement during the early childhood years. The presentation in this female patient was infantile-onset weakness in the facial, bulbar, respiratory and neck flexor muscles. A six-year follow-up revealed continued progressive improvement in her muscle strength. Based upon the histopathologic and ultrastructural features of nemaline rod disease, ACTA1 was sequenced. This revealed a mutation in exon 4 of ACTA1 (c.557A>G). Our report further expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with ACTA1 mutations. Although it is difficult to infer any genotype-phenotype correlation, this report stimulates the discussion regarding the pathophysiologic mechanism of the clinical improvement seen in some patients with ACTA1 mutations. PMID:23305948

  1. Phenotypes of Recessive Pediatric Cataract in a Cohort of Children with Identified Homozygous Gene Mutations (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif O.; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess for phenotype-genotype correlations in families with recessive pediatric cataract and identified gene mutations. Methods: Retrospective review (2004 through 2013) of 26 Saudi Arabian apparently nonsyndromic pediatric cataract families referred to one of the authors (A.O.K.) and for which recessive gene mutations were identified. Results: Fifteen different homozygous recessive gene mutations were identified in the 26 consanguineous families; two genes and five families are novel to this study. Ten families had a founder CRYBB1 deletion (all with bilateral central pulverulent cataract), two had the same missense mutation in CRYAB (both with bilateral juvenile cataract with marked variable expressivity), and two had different mutations in FYCO1 (both with bilateral posterior capsular abnormality). The remaining 12 families each had mutations in 12 different genes (CRYAA, CRYBA1, AKR1E2, AGK, BFSP2, CYP27A1, CYP51A1, EPHA2, GCNT2, LONP1, RNLS, WDR87) with unique phenotypes noted for CYP27A1 (bilateral juvenile fleck with anterior and/or posterior capsular cataract and later cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis), EPHA2 (bilateral anterior persistent fetal vasculature), and BFSP2 (bilateral flecklike with cloudy cortex). Potential carrier signs were documented for several families. Conclusions: In this recessive pediatric cataract case series most identified genes are noncrystallin. Recessive pediatric cataract phenotypes are generally nonspecific, but some notable phenotypes are distinct and associated with specific gene mutations. Marked variable expressivity can occur from a recessive missense CRYAB mutation. Genetic analysis of apparently isolated pediatric cataract can sometimes uncover mutations in a syndromic gene. Some gene mutations seem to be associated with apparent heterozygous carrier signs. PMID:26622071

  2. Embryonic left-right separation mechanism allows confinement of mutation-induced phenotypes to one lateral body half of bilaterians.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental question in developmental biology is how a chimeric animal such as a bilateral gynandromorphic animal can have different phenotypes confined to different lateral body halves, and how mutation-induced phenotypes, such as genetic diseases, can be confined to one lateral body half in patients. Here, I propose that embryos of many, if not all, bilaterian animals are divided into left and right halves at a very early stage (which may vary among different types of animals), after which the descendants of the left-sided and right-sided cells will almost exclusively remain on their original sides, respectively, throughout the remaining development. This embryonic left-right separation mechanism allows (1) mutations and the mutation-induced phenotypes to be strictly confined to one lateral body half in animals and humans; (2) mothers with bilateral hereditary primary breast cancer to transmit their disease to their offspring at twofold of the rate compared to mothers with unilateral hereditary breast cancer; and (3) a mosaic embryo carrying genetic or epigenetic mutations to develop into either an individual with the mutation-induced phenotype confined unilaterally, or a pair of twins displaying complete, partial, or mirror-image discordance for the phenotype. Further, this left-right separation mechanism predicts that the two lateral halves of a patient carrying a unilateral genetic disease can each serve as a case and an internal control, respectively, for genetic and epigenetic comparative studies to identify the disease causations.

  3. Specific point mutations in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 cause a phenotype switch from Lac- to Lac+.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Kuo; Chen, Hung-Wen; Lo, Ta-Chun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2009-03-01

    Lactose metabolism is a changeable phenotype in strains of Lactobacillus casei. In this study, we found that L. casei ATCC 27139 was unable to utilize lactose. However, when exposed to lactose as the sole carbon source, spontaneous Lac(+) clones could be obtained. A gene cluster (lacTEGF-galKETRM) involved in the metabolism of lactose and galactose in L. casei ATCC 27139 (Lac(-)) and its Lac(+) revertant (designated strain R1) was sequenced and characterized. We found that only one nucleotide, located in the lacTEGF promoter (lacTp), of the two lac-gal gene clusters was different. The protein sequence identity between the lac-gal gene cluster and those reported previously for some L. casei (Lac(+)) strains was high; namely, 96-100 % identity was found and no premature stop codon was identified. A single point mutation located within the lacTp promoter region was also detected for each of the 41 other independently isolated Lac(+) revertants of L. casei ATCC 27139. The revertants could be divided into six classes based on the positions of the point mutations detected. Primer extension experiments conducted on transcription from lacTp revealed that the lacTp promoter of these six classes of Lac(+) revertants was functional, while that of L. casei ATCC 27139 was not. Northern blotting experiments further confirmed that the lacTEGF operon of strain R1 was induced by lactose but suppressed by glucose, whereas no blotting signal was ever detected for L. casei ATCC 27139. These results suggest that a single point mutation in the lacTp promoter was able to restore the transcription of a fully functional lacTEGF operon and cause a phenotype switch from Lac(-) to Lac(+) for L. casei ATCC 27139. PMID:19246746

  4. Predicting extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypes with genetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, Timothy C; Valafar, Faramarz; Douglas, James; Qian, Lishi; Garfein, Richard S; Chawla, Ashu; Torres, Jessica; Zadorozhny, Victoria; Kim, Min Soo; Hoshide, Matt; Catanzaro, Donald; Jackson, Lynn; Lin, Grace; Desmond, Edward; Rodrigues, Camilla; Eisenach, Kathy; Victor, Thomas C; Ismail, Nazir; Crudu, Valeru; Gler, Maria Tarcela; Catanzaro, Antonino

    2014-03-01

    Molecular diagnostic methods based on the detection of mutations conferring drug resistance are promising technologies for rapidly detecting multidrug-/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR TB), but large studies of mutations as markers of resistance are rare. The Global Consortium for Drug-Resistant TB Diagnostics analyzed 417 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from multinational sites with a high prevalence of drug resistance to determine the sensitivities and specificities of mutations associated with M/XDR TB to inform the development of rapid diagnostic methods. We collected M/XDR TB isolates from regions of high TB burden in India, Moldova, the Philippines, and South Africa. The isolates underwent standardized phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) to isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), moxifloxacin (MOX), ofloxacin (OFX), amikacin (AMK), kanamycin (KAN), and capreomycin (CAP) using MGIT 960 and WHO-recommended critical concentrations. Eight genes (katG, inhA, rpoB, gyrA, gyrB, rrs, eis, and tlyA) were sequenced using Sanger sequencing. Three hundred seventy isolates were INHr, 356 were RIFr, 292 were MOXr/OFXr, 230 were AMKr, 219 were CAPr, and 286 were KANr. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in katG/inhA had a combined sensitivity of 96% and specificities of 97 to 100% for the detection of INHr. Eleven SNPs in rpoB had a combined sensitivity of 98% for RIFr. Eight SNPs in gyrA codons 88 to 94 had sensitivities of 90% for MOXr/OFXr. The rrs 1401/1484 SNPs had 89 to 90% sensitivity for detecting AMKr/CAPr but 71% sensitivity for KANr. Adding eis promoter SNPs increased the sensitivity to 93% for detecting AMKr and to 91% for detecting KANr. Approximately 30 SNPs in six genes predicted clinically relevant XDR-TB phenotypes with 90 to 98% sensitivity and almost 100% specificity.

  5. Biochemical and structural analysis of missense mutations in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase causing mucopolysaccharidosis IVA phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sukegawa, K; Nakamura, H; Kato, Z; Tomatsu, S; Montaño, A M; Fukao, T; Toietta, G; Tortora, P; Orii, T; Kondo, N

    2000-05-22

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; OMIM#253000), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of N -acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), has variable clinical phenotypes. To date we have identified 65 missense mutations in the GALNS gene from MPS IVA patients, but the correlation between genotype and phenotype has remained unclear. We studied 17 missense mutations using biochemical approaches and 32 missense mutations, using structural analyses. Fifteen missense mutations and two newly engineered active site mutations (C79S, C79T) were characterized by transient expression analysis. Mutant proteins, except for C79S and C79T, were destabilized and detected as insoluble precursor forms while the C79S and C79T mutants were of a soluble mature size. Mutants found in the severe phenotype had no activity. Mutants found in the mild phenotype had a considerable residual activity (1.3-13.3% of wild-type GALNS activity). Sulfatases, including GALNS, are members of a highly conserved gene family sharing an extensive sequence homology. Thus, a tertiary structural model of human GALNS was constructed from the X-ray crystal structure of N -acetylgalacto-samine-4-sulfatase and arylsulfatase A, using homology modeling, and 32 missense mutations were investigated. Consequently, we propose that there are at least three different reasons for the severe phenotype: (i) destruction of the hydrophobic core or modification of the packing; (ii) removal of a salt bridge to destabilize the entire conformation; (iii) modification of the active site. In contrast, mild mutations were mostly located on the surface of the GALNS protein. These studies shed further light on the genotype-phenotype correlation of MPS IVA and structure-function relationship in the sulfatase family. PMID:10814710

  6. [Formation of para-Bombay phenotype caused by homozygous or heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zheng, Yan; Sun, Dong-Ni

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms for para-Bombay phenotype formation. The H antigen of these individuals were identified by serological techniques. The full coding region of alpha (1, 2) fucosyltransferase (FUT1) gene of these individuals was amplified by high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR product was identified by TOPO cloning sequencing. Analysis and comparison were used to explore the mechanisms of para-bombay phenotype formation in individuals. The results indicated that the full coding region of FUT1 DNA was successfully amplified by PCR and gel electrophoresis. DNA sequencing and analysis found that h1 (547-552delAG) existed in one chromosome and h4 (35C > T) existed in the other chromosome of NO.1 individual. Meantime, h1 (547-552delAG) was found in two chromosomes of NO.2 and NO.3 individual. It also means that FUT1 gene of NO.1 individual was h1h4 heterozygote, FUT1 gene of NO.2 and NO.3 individuals were h1h1 homozygote. It is concluded that homozygous and heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene can lead to the formation of para-Bombay phenotype.

  7. Haplotype and phenotype analysis of six recurrent BRCA1 mutations in 61 families: Results of an international study

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhausen, S.L.; Skolnick, M.H.; Goldgar, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    Several BRCA1 mutations have now been found to occur in geographically diverse breast and ovarian cancer families. To investigate mutation origin and mutation-specific phenotypes due to BRCA1, we constructed a haplotype of nine polymorphic markers within or immediately flanking the BRCA1 locus in a set of 61 breast/ovarian cancer families selected for having one of six recurrent BRCA1 mutations. Tests of both mutations and family-specific differences in age at diagnosis were not significant. A comparison of the six mutations in the relative proportions of cases of breast and ovarian cancer was suggestive of an effect (P = .069), with 57% of women presumed affected because of the 1294 del 40 BRCA1 mutation having ovarian cancer, compared with 14% of affected women with the splice-site mutation in intron 5 of BRCA1. For the BRCA1 mutations studied here, the individual mutations are estimated to have arisen 9-170 generations ago. In general, a high degree of haplotype conservation across the region was observed, with haplotype differences most often due to mutations in the short-tandem-repeat markers, although some likely instances of recombination also were observed. For several of the instances, there was evidence for multiple, independent, BRCA1 mutational events. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tab.

  8. Novel mutation in Sjogren-Larsson syndrome is associated with divergent neurologic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathleen; Holden, Kenton R; S'Aulis, Dana; Amador, Claudia; Matheus, M Gisele; Rizzo, William B

    2013-10-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is an inherited disorder of lipid metabolism caused by mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene that codes for fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes and alcohols and is characterized by ichthyosis, intellectual disability, and spastic diplegia/quadriplegia. The authors describe 2 unrelated Honduran patients who carried the same novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1309A>T, p.K437X) and ALDH3A2 DNA haplotype, but widely differed in disease severity. One patient exhibited spastic quadriplegia with unusual neuroregression, whereas the other patient had the usual static form of spastic diplegia with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Biochemical analyses showed a similar profound deficiency of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and impaired fatty alcohol metabolism in both patients' cultured fibroblasts. These results indicate that variation in the neurologic phenotype of Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is not strictly determined by the ALDH3A2 mutation or the biochemical defect as expressed in cultured fibroblasts, but by unidentified epigenetic/environmental factors, gene modifiers, or other mechanisms.

  9. Phenotypic Switching in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Hemadsorption Is Governed by a High-Frequency, Reversible Point Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Florian; Markovà, Ivana; Much, Peter; Lugmair, Albin; Siebert-Gulle, Karin; Vogl, Gunther; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a flask-shaped organism that commonly induces chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. Phenotypic switching in M. gallisepticum hemadsorption (HA) was found to correlate with phase variation of the GapA cytadhesin concurrently with that of the CrmA protein, which exhibits cytadhesin-related features and is encoded by a gene located downstream of the gapA gene as part of the same transcription unit. In clones derived from strain Rlow, detailed genetic analyses further revealed that on-off switching in GapA expression is governed by a reversible base substitution occurring at the beginning of the gapA structural gene. In HA− variants, this event generates a stop codon that results in the premature termination of GapA translation and consequently affects the expression of CrmA. Sequences flanking the mutation spot do not feature any repeated motifs that could account for error-prone mutation via DNA slippage and the exact mechanism underlying this high-frequency mutational event remains to be elucidated. An HA− mutant deficient in producing CrmA, mHAD3, was obtained by disrupting the crmA gene by using transposition mutagenesis. Despite a fully functional gapA gene, the amount of GapA detected in this mutant was considerably lower than in HA+ clonal variants, suggesting that, in absence of CrmA, GapA might be subjected to a higher turnover. PMID:12595441

  10. Null mutations at the p66 and bradykinin 2 receptor loci induce divergent phenotypes in the diabetic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Vashistha, Himanshu; Singhal, Pravin C.; Malhotra, Ashwani; Husain, Mohammad; Mathieson, Peter; Saleem, Moin A.; Kuriakose, Cyril; Seshan, Surya; Wilk, Anna; DelValle, Luis; Peruzzi, Francesca; Giorgio, Marco; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Smithies, Oliver; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Kakoki, Masao; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Candidate genes have been identified that confer increased risk for diabetic glomerulosclerosis (DG). Mice heterozygous for the Akita (Ins2+/C96Y) diabetogenic mutation with a second mutation introduced at the bradykinin 2 receptor (B2R−/−) locus express a disease phenotype that approximates human DG. Src homology 2 domain transforming protein 1 (p66) controls mitochondrial metabolism and cellular responses to oxidative stress, aging, and apoptosis. We generated p66-null Akita mice to test whether inactivating mutations at the p66 locus will rescue kidneys of Akita mice from disease-causing mutations at the Ins2 and B2R loci. Here we show null mutations at the p66 and B2R loci interact with the Akita (Ins2+/C96Y) mutation, independently and in combination, inducing divergent phenotypes in the kidney. The B2R−/− mutation induces detrimental phenotypes, as judged by increased systemic and renal levels of oxidative stress, histology, and urine albumin excretion, whereas the p66-null mutation confers a powerful protection phenotype. To elucidate the mechanism(s) of the protection phenotype, we turned to our in vitro system. Experiments with cultured podocytes revealed previously unrecognized cross talk between p66 and the redox-sensitive transcription factor p53 that controls hyperglycemia-induced ROS metabolism, transcription of p53 target genes (angiotensinogen, angiotensin II type-1 receptor, and bax), angiotensin II generation, and apoptosis. RNA-interference targeting p66 inhibits all of the above. Finally, protein levels of p53 target genes were upregulated in kidneys of Akita mice but unchanged in p66-null Akita mice. Taken together, p66 is a potential molecular target for therapeutic intervention in DG. PMID:23019230

  11. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    PubMed

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  12. Genotype-phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene.

    PubMed

    Sanmaneechai, Oranee; Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S; Herrmann, David N; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E; Day, John W; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S; Yum, Sabrina W; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M; Shy, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3-84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required ambulation aids or wheelchairs for

  13. Mutation-Specific Phenotypes in hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Carrying Either Myosin-Binding Protein C Or α-Tropomyosin Mutation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Chandra; Pölönen, Risto-Pekka; Rajala, Kristiina; Pekkanen-Mattila, Mari; Rasku, Jyrki; Larsson, Kim; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease, which affects the structure of heart muscle tissue. The clinical symptoms include arrhythmias, progressive heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death but the mutation carrier can also be totally asymptomatic. To date, over 1400 mutations have been linked to HCM, mostly in genes encoding for sarcomeric proteins. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease are still largely unknown. Two founder mutations for HCM in Finland are located in myosin-binding protein C (MYBPC3-Gln1061X) and α-tropomyosin (TPM1-Asp175Asn) genes. We studied the properties of HCM cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) carrying either MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn mutation. Both types of HCM-CMs displayed pathological phenotype of HCM but, more importantly, we found differences between CMs carrying either MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn gene mutation in their cellular size, Ca2+ handling, and electrophysiological properties, as well as their gene expression profiles. These findings suggest that even though the clinical phenotypes of the patients carrying either MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn gene mutation are similar, the genetic background as well as the functional properties on the cellular level might be different, indicating that the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the two mutations would be divergent as well. PMID:27057166

  14. Variable phenotypes in a family with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy harboring a 3291T > C mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sunami, Yoko; Sugaya, Keizo; Chihara, Norio; Goto, Yu-ichi; Matsubara, Shiro

    2011-10-01

    We present a Japanese family suffering from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy associated with a T-to-C transition at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide position 3291. Clinical manifestations of the patients include cerebellar ataxia with myopathy, recurrent headache, and myoclonus and epilepsy. The phenotypic variation among the affected members of a single family and the mutational analysis showing maternal inheritance in a heteroplasmic fashion are consistent with well-recognized phenomena associated with many pathogenic point mutations of mtDNA tRNA genes. The 3291 mutation is a rare mtDNA mutation whose clinical presentation had only been reported in three sporadic cases. This is the first report of a family segregating the 3291 mutation with multigenerational matrilinear recurrence of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the pathogenicity of the 3291T > C mutation in mtDNA and its characteristic clinical heterogeneity.

  15. A three generation X-linked family with Kabuki syndrome phenotype and a frameshift mutation in KDM6A.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Damien; Shears, Debbie; Benoit, Valérie; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Maystadt, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare malformation syndrome characterized by a typical facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, cardiac malformation, and mild to moderate intellectual disability. In 55-80% of patients with Kabuki syndrome, a mutation in MLL2 is identified. Recently, eight patients with Kabuki syndrome and a mutation in KDM6A were described. In this report, we describe two brothers with a mutation in KDM6A inherited from their mother and maternal grandmother. The two boys have Kabuki-like phenotypes whereas the mother and grandmother present with attenuated phenotypes. This family represents the first instance of hereditary X-linked Kabuki syndrome. We present a short literature review of the patients described with a mutation in KDM6A.

  16. Systems-level response to point mutations in a core metabolic enzyme modulates genotype-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, Shimon; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Budnik, Bogdan; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2015-04-28

    Linking the molecular effects of mutations to fitness is central to understanding evolutionary dynamics. Here, we establish a quantitative relation between the global effect of mutations on the E. coli proteome and bacterial fitness. We created E. coli strains with specific destabilizing mutations in the chromosomal folA gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and quantified the ensuing changes in the abundances of 2,000+ E. coli proteins in mutant strains using tandem mass tags with subsequent LC-MS/MS. mRNA abundances in the same E. coli strains were also quantified. The proteomic effects of mutations in DHFR are quantitatively linked to phenotype: the SDs of the distributions of logarithms of relative (to WT) protein abundances anticorrelate with bacterial growth rates. Proteomes hierarchically cluster first by media conditions, and within each condition, by the severity of the perturbation to DHFR function. These results highlight the importance of a systems-level layer in the genotype-phenotype relationship.

  17. Delineation of the Marfan phenotype associated with mutations in exons 23-32 of the FBN1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, E.A.; Cho, M.; Milewicz, D.M.

    1996-03-29

    Marfan syndrome is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder with a wide range of phenotypic severity. The condition is the result of mutations in FBN1, a large gene composed of 65 exons encoding the fibrillin-1 protein. While mutations causing classic manifestations of Marfan syndrome have been identified throughout the FBN1 gene, the six previously characterized mutations resulting in the severe, perinatal lethal form of Marfan syndrome have clustered in exons 24-32 of the gene. We screened 8 patients with either neonatal Marfan syndrome or severe cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome for mutations in this region of the gene. Using intron-based exon-specific primers, we amplified exons 23-32 from genomic DNAs, screened these fragments by single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis, and sequenced indicated exons. This analysis documented mutations in exons 25-27 of the FBN1 mutations in 6 of these patients. These results, taken together with previously published FBN1 mutations in this region, further define the phenotype associated with mutations in exons 24-32 of the FBN1 gene, information important for the development of possible diagnostic tests and genetic counseling. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Truncating mutations of MAGEL2 cause Prader-Willi phenotypes and autism.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Christian P; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Xia, Fan; Potocki, Lorraine; Gripp, Karen W; Zhang, Baili; Peters, Brock A; McElwain, Mark A; Drmanac, Radoje; Beaudet, Arthur L; Caskey, C Thomas; Yang, Yaping

    2013-11-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by the absence of paternally expressed, maternally silenced genes at 15q11-q13. We report four individuals with truncating mutations on the paternal allele of MAGEL2, a gene within the PWS domain. The first subject was ascertained by whole-genome sequencing analysis for PWS features. Three additional subjects were identified by reviewing the results of exome sequencing of 1,248 cases in a clinical laboratory. All four subjects had autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disability and a varying degree of clinical and behavioral features of PWS. These findings suggest that MAGEL2 is a new gene causing complex ASD and that MAGEL2 loss of function can contribute to several aspects of the PWS phenotype.

  19. Molecular and phenotypic characteristics of seven novel mutations causing branched-chain organic acidurias.

    PubMed

    Stojiljkovic, M; Klaassen, K; Djordjevic, M; Sarajlija, A; Brasil, S; Kecman, B; Grkovic, S; Kostic, J; Rodriguez-Pombo, P; Desviat, L R; Pavlovic, S; Perez, B

    2016-09-01

    Specific mitochondrial enzymatic deficiencies in the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids cause methylmalonic aciduria (MMA), propionic acidemia (PA) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). Disease-causing mutations were identified in nine unrelated branched-chain organic acidurias (BCOA) patients. We detected eight previously described mutations: p.Asn219Tyr, p.Arg369His p.Val553Glyfs*17 in MUT, p.Thr198Serfs*6 in MMAA, p.Ile144_Leu181del in PCCB, p.Gly288Valfs*11, p.Tyr438Asn in BCKDHA and p.Ala137Val in BCKDHB gene. Interestingly, we identified seven novel genetic variants: p.Leu549Pro, p.Glu564*, p.Leu641Pro in MUT, p.Tyr206Cys in PCCB, p.His194Arg, p.Val298Met in BCKDHA and p.Glu286_Met290del in BCKDHB gene. In silico and/or eukaryotic expression studies confirmed pathogenic effect of all novel genetic variants. Aberrant enzymes p.Leu549Pro MUT, p.Leu641Pro MUT and p.Tyr206Cys PCCB did not show residual activity in activity assays. In addition, activity of MUT enzymes was not rescued in the presence of vitamin B12 precursor in vitro which was in accordance with non-responsiveness or partial responsiveness of patients to vitamin B12 therapy. Our study brings the first molecular genetic data and detailed phenotypic characteristics for MMA, PA and MSUD patients for Serbia and the whole South-Eastern European region. Therefore, our study contributes to the better understanding of molecular landscape of BCOA in Europe and to general knowledge on genotype-phenotype correlation for these rare diseases. PMID:26830710

  20. Hypo- and Hypermorphic FOXC1 Mutations in Dominant Glaucoma: Transactivation and Phenotypic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Trillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Aroca-Aguilar, José-Daniel; Ferre-Fernández, Jesús-José; Morales, Laura; Méndez-Hernández, Carmen-Dora; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; García-Feijoo, Julián; Escribano, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dominant glaucoma, a heterogeneous, infrequent and irreversible optic neuropathy, is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure and early-onset. The role of FOXC1 in this type of glaucoma was investigated in twelve Spanish probands via nucleotide variation screening of its proximal promoter and unique exon. Functional evaluations of the identified variants included analyses of the transcriptional activity, protein stability, DNA binding ability and subcellular localization. Four different mutations that were identified in four probands (33.3%) were associated with remarkable phenotypic variability and were functionally classified as either hypermorphic (p.Y47X, p.Q106X and p.G447_G448insDG) or hypomorphic (p.I126S) alleles. To the best of our knowledge, three of the variants are novel (p.Y47X, p.I126S and p.G447_G448insDG) and, in addition, hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations are reported herein for the first time. The presence of an intact N-terminal activation domain in the truncated proteins p.Y47X and p.Q106X may underlie their associated transactivation hyperactivity by a gain-of-function mechanism involving dysregulated protein-protein interactions. Similarly, altered molecular interactions may also lead to increased p.G447_G448insDG activity. In contrast, the partial loss-of-function associated with p.I126S was due to impaired protein stability, DNA binding, protein phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. These results support that moderate and variable FOXC1 transactivation changes are associated with moderate goniodysgenesis, dominant glaucoma and remarkable phenotypic variability. PMID:25786029

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups Do Not Play a Role in the Variable Phenotypic Presentation of the A3243G Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, Antonio; Campos, Yolanda; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; Achilli, Alessandro; Magri, Chiara; Semino, Ornella; García, Alberto; Jara, Pilar; Arenas, Joaquín; Scozzari, Rosaria

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-five mitochondrial (mt) DNAs from Spain that harbor the mutation A3243G in association with either MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) syndrome or a wide array of disease phenotypes (ranging from diabetes and deafness to a mixture of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegic symptoms and strokelike episodes) were studied by use of high-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and control-region sequencing. A total of 34 different haplotypes were found, indicating that all instances of the A3243G mutation are probably due to independent mutational events. Haplotypes were distributed into 13 haplogroups whose frequencies were close to those of the general Spanish population. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference in haplogroup distribution between patients with MELAS and those with disease phenotypes other than MELAS. Overall, these data indicate that the A3243G mutation harbors all the evolutionary features expected from a severely deleterious mtDNA mutation under strong negative selection, and they reveal that European mtDNA backgrounds do not play a substantial role in modulating the mutation's phenotypic expression. PMID:12612863

  2. Oncometabolic mutation IDH1 R132H confers a metformin-hypersensitive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; De Llorens, Rafael; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility might be particularly constrained in tumors bearing mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxygluratate (2HG). To test the hypothesis that IDH1 mutations could generate metabolic vulnerabilities for therapeutic intervention, we utilized an MCF10A cell line engineered with an arginine-to-histidine conversion at position 132 (R132H) in the catalytic site of IDH1, which equips the enzyme with a neomorphic α-ketoglutarate to 2HG reducing activity in an otherwise isogenic background. IDH1 R132H/+ and isogenic IDH1 +/+ parental cells were screened for their ability to generate energy-rich NADH when cultured in a standardized high-throughput Phenotype MicroArrayplatform comprising >300 nutrients. A radical remodeling of the metabotype occurred in cells carrying the R132H mutation since they presented a markedly altered ability to utilize numerous carbon catabolic fuels. A mitochondria toxicity-screening modality confirmed a severe inability of IDH1-mutated cells to use various carbon substrates that are fed into the electron transport chain at different points. The mitochondrial biguanide poisons, metformin and phenformin, further impaired the intrinsic weakness of IDH1-mutant cells to use certain carbon-energy sources. Additionally, metabolic reprogramming of IDH1-mutant cells increased their sensitivity to metformin in assays of cell proliferation, clonogenic potential, and mammosphere formation. Targeted metabolomics studies revealed that the ability of metformin to interfere with the anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the tricarboxylic acid cycle could explain the hypersensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to biguanides. Moreover, synergistic interactions occurred when metformin treatment was combined with the selective R132H-IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198. Together, these results suggest that therapy involving the simultaneous targeting of metabolic vulnerabilities with metformin, and 2HG

  3. Identification of mutations, genotype-phenotype correlation and prenatal diagnosis of maple syrup urine disease in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepti; Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Saxena, Renu; Kohli, Sudha; Dua-Puri, Ratna; Verma, Jyotsna; Thomas, E; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Deb, Roumi; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is caused by mutations in genes BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT encoding E1α, E1β, and E2 subunits of enzyme complex, branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH). BCKDH participates in catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) - leucine, isoleucine and valine in the energy production pathway. Deficiency or defect in the enzyme complex causes accumulation of BCAAs and keto-acids leading to toxicity. Twenty-four patients with MSUD were enrolled in the study for molecular characterization and genotype-phenotype correlation. Molecular studies were carried out by sequencing of the 3 genes by Sanger method. Bioinformatics tools were employed to classify novel variations into pathogenic or benign. The predicted effects of novel changes on protein structure were elucidated by 3D modeling. Mutations were detected in 22 of 24 patients (11, 7 and 4 in BCKDHB, BCKDHA and DBT genes, respectively). Twenty mutations including 11 novel mutations were identified. Protein modeling in novel mutations showed alteration of structure and function of these subunits. Mutations, c.1065 delT (BCKDHB gene) and c.939G > C (DBT gene) were noted to be recurrent, identified in 6 of 22 alleles and 5 of 8 alleles, respectively. Two-third patients were of neonatal classical phenotype (16 of 24). BCKDHB gene mutations were present in 10 of these 16 patients. Prenatal diagnoses were performed in 4 families. Consanguinity was noted in 37.5% families. Although no obvious genotype-phenotype correlation could be found in our study, most cases with mutation in BCKDHB gene presented in neonatal period. Large number of novel mutations underlines the heterogeneity and distinctness of gene pool from India. PMID:26257134

  4. HIV1-viral protein R (Vpr) mutations: associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rui; Rocha, Graça; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 30 years, research into HIV has advanced the knowledge of virus genetics and the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is a specialized and multifunctional protein that plays important roles at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. This protein interacts with a number of cellular and viral proteins and with multiple activities including nuclear transport of the pre-integration complex (PIC) to the nucleus, transcriptional activation, cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition phase and induction of cell death via apoptosis. Specifically, Vpr has been shown to control many host cell functions through a variety of biological processes and by interaction with several cellular pathways. The different functions of Vpr may enhance viral replication and impair the immune system in HIV-1 infected patients. Importantly, functional defects induced by mutations in the Vpr protein correlate with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is also associated with other concomitant pathologies developed by these patients, which may lead it to be considered as a potential novel therapeutic target. This review will focus on HIV-1 Vpr, mainly on the importance of its structural mutations on the progression of HIV infection, associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. HIV1-viral protein R (Vpr) mutations: associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rui; Rocha, Graça; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 30 years, research into HIV has advanced the knowledge of virus genetics and the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is a specialized and multifunctional protein that plays important roles at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. This protein interacts with a number of cellular and viral proteins and with multiple activities including nuclear transport of the pre-integration complex (PIC) to the nucleus, transcriptional activation, cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition phase and induction of cell death via apoptosis. Specifically, Vpr has been shown to control many host cell functions through a variety of biological processes and by interaction with several cellular pathways. The different functions of Vpr may enhance viral replication and impair the immune system in HIV-1 infected patients. Importantly, functional defects induced by mutations in the Vpr protein correlate with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is also associated with other concomitant pathologies developed by these patients, which may lead it to be considered as a potential novel therapeutic target. This review will focus on HIV-1 Vpr, mainly on the importance of its structural mutations on the progression of HIV infection, associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27264019

  6. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 39 Final Diagnosis: Fabry disease Symptoms: Acropareshesia • fatique Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Gene analysis Specialty: Metabolic Disorders and Diabetics Objective: Rare disease Background: Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. Case Report: We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband’s mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. Conclusions: Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  7. A novel Caspr mutation causes the shambling mouse phenotype by disrupting axoglial interactions of myelinated nerves.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Okabe, Erina; Chishima, Yûko; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Murase, Shiori; Mizumura, Kazue; Inaba, Mie; Komatsu, Yukio; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Peles, Elior; Oda, Sen-ichi; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2009-11-01

    The neurological mouse mutation shambling (shm) exhibits ataxia and hindlimb paresis. Positional cloning of shm showed that it encodes contactin-associated protein (Caspr), which is required for formation of the paranodal junction in myelinated nerves. The shm mutation is a TT insertion in the Caspr gene that results in a frame shift and a premature stop codon at the COOH-terminus. The truncated Caspr protein that is generated lacks the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Here, we found that the nodal/paranodal axoplasm of shm mice lack paranodal junctions and contain large mitochondria and abnormal accumulations of cytoplasmic organelles that indicate altered axonal transport. Immunohistochemical analysis of mutant mice showed reduced expression of Caspr, contactin, and neurofascin 155, which are thought to form a protein complex in the paranodal region; protein 4.1B, however, was normally distributed. The mutant mice had aberrant localization of voltage-gated ion channels on the axolemma of nodal/paranodal regions. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that the velocity of saltatory conduction was reduced in sciatic nerves and that the visual response was attenuated in the primary visual cortex. These abnormalities likely contribute to the neurological phenotype of the mutant mice. PMID:19816196

  8. Dominant lethal phenotype of a mutation in the -35 recognition region of Escherichia coli sigma 70.

    PubMed Central

    Keener, J; Nomura, M

    1993-01-01

    A dominant lethal mutation in the Escherichia coli rpoD gene, which encodes sigma 70, the promoter recognition subunit of RNA polymerase, was isolated after random mutagenesis. The lethal gene was maintained under control of the lac repressor on a low copy plasmid. An amount of lethal sigma 70 that was nearly equimolar with the chromosomally encoded sigma 70 was sufficient to cause cessation of growth. RNA synthesis per unit cell mass was unaffected, but protein synthesis was inhibited by the mutant sigma 70. The amino acid change (Glu-585 to Gln) was in a region of sigma 70 thought to bind the -35 hexamer of the promoter, and the mutant sigma 70 caused increased expression from promoters with nonconsensus bases in the third position of the -35 hexamer. A null mutation of the fis gene could partially suppress the mutant phenotype. These properties are consistent with those expected of a sigma 70 insensitive to growth rate control of rRNA and tRNA promoters. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7680477

  9. The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G; Gahl, William A; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS.

  10. The phenotype of the musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to CHST14 mutations.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Li, Ben; Boehm, Manfred; Krabichler, Birgit; Rohrbach, Marianne; Müller, Thomas; Fuchs, Irene; Golas, Gretchen; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Ziegler, Shira G; Gahl, William A; Wilnai, Yael; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Geller, Herbert M; Giunta, Cecilia; Slavotinek, Anne; Steinmann, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The musculocontractural type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MC-EDS) has been recently recognized as a clinical entity. MC-EDS represents a differential diagnosis within the congenital neuromuscular and connective tissue disorders spectrum. Thirty-one and three patients have been reported with MC-EDS so far with bi-allelic mutations identified in CHST14 and DSE, respectively, encoding two enzymes necessary for dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthesis. We report seven additional patients with MC-EDS from four unrelated families, including the follow-up of a sib-pair originally reported with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS in 1975. Brachycephaly, a characteristic facial appearance, an asthenic build, hyperextensible and bruisable skin, tapering fingers, instability of large joints, and recurrent formation of large subcutaneous hematomas are always present. Three of seven patients had mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. The oldest patient was blind due to retinal detachment at 45 years and died at 59 years from intracranial bleeding; her affected brother died at 28 years from fulminant endocarditis. All patients in this series harbored homozygous, predicted loss-of-function CHST14 mutations. Indeed, DS was not detectable in fibroblasts from two unrelated patients with homozygous mutations. Patient fibroblasts produced higher amounts of chondroitin sulfate, showed intracellular retention of collagen types I and III, and lacked decorin and thrombospondin fibrils compared with control. A great proportion of collagen fibrils were not integrated into fibers, and fiber bundles were dispersed into the ground substance in one patient, all of which is likely to contribute to the clinical phenotype. This report should increase awareness for MC-EDS. PMID:26373698

  11. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) mutations and their allelic linkage in unrelated caucasian individuals: Correlation with phenotypic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cascorbi, I.; Drakoulis, N.; Brockmoeller, J.

    1995-09-01

    The polymorphic arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2; EC2.3.1.5) is supposed to be a susceptibility factor for several drug side effects and certain malignancies. A group of 844 unrelated German subjects was genotyped for their acetylation type, and 563 of them were also phenotyped. Seven mutations of the NAT2 gene were evaluated by allele-specific PCR (mutation 341C to T) and PCR-RFLP for mutations at nt positions 191, 282, 481, 590, 803, and 857. From the mutation pattern eight different alleles, including the wild type coding for rapid acetylation and seven alleles coding for slow phenotype, were determined. Four hundred ninety-seven subjects had a genotype of slow acetylation (58.9%; 95% confidence limits 55.5%-62.2%). Phenotypic acetylation capacity was expressed as the ratio of 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil and 1-methylxanthine in urine after caffeine intake. Some 6.7% of the cases deviated in genotype and phenotype, but sequencing DNA of these probands revealed no new mutations. Furthermore, linkage pattern of the mutations was always confirmed, as tested in 533 subjects. In vivo acetylation capacity of homozygous wild-type subjects (NAT2{sup *}4/{sup *}4) was significantly higher than in heterozygous genotypes (P = .001). All mutant alleles showed low in vivo acetylation capacities, including the previously not-yet-defined alleles {sup *}5A, {sup *}5C, and {sup *}13. Moreover, distinct slow genotypes differed significantly among each other, as reflected in lower acetylation capacity of {sup *}6A, {sup *}7B, and {sup *}13 alleles than the group of {sup *}5 alleles. The study demonstrated differential phenotypic activity of various NAT2 genes and gives a solid basis for clinical and molecular-epidemiological investigations. 34 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Identification of a frameshift mutation responsible for the silent phenotype of human serum cholinesterase, Gly 117 (GGT----GGAG).

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, C P; McGuire, M C; Graeser, C; Bartels, C F; Arpagaus, M; Van der Spek, A F; Lightstone, H; Lockridge, O; La Du, B N

    1990-01-01

    A frameshift mutation that causes a silent phenotype for human serum cholinesterase was identified in the DNA of seven individuals of two unrelated families. The mutation, identified using the polymerase chain reaction, causes a shift in the reading frame from Gly 117, where GGT (Gly)----GGAG (Gly+ 1 base) to a new stop codon created at position 129. This alteration is upstream of the active site (Ser 198), and, if any protein were made, it would represent only 22% of the mature enzyme found in normal serum. Results of analysis of the enzymatic activities in serum agreed with the genotypes inferred from the nucleotide sequence. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis using alpha-naphthyl acetate to detect enzymatic activity showed an absence of cross-reactive material, as expected. One additional individual with a silent phenotype did not show the same frameshift mutation. This was not unexpected, since there must be considerable molecular heterogeneity involved in causes for the silent cholinesterase phenotype. This is the first report of a molecular mechanism underlying the silent phenotype for serum cholinesterase. The analytical approach used was similar to the one we recently employed to identify the mutation that causes the atypical cholinesterase variant. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2339692

  13. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J. R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T. B.; Kimberling, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP–like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia. PMID:12075507

  14. Splicing mutation in the ATR-X gene can lead to a dysmorphic mental retardation phenotype without {alpha}-thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Villard, L.; Lossi, A.M.; Fontes, M.

    1996-03-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a gene from Xq13 that codes for a putative regulator of transcription (XNP) and has now been shown to be the gene involved in the X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia with mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome. The widespread expression and numerous domains present in the putative protein suggest that this gene could be involved in other phenotypes. The predominant expression of the gene in the developing brain, as well as its association with neuron differentiation, indicates that mutations of this gene might result in a mental retardation (MR) phenotype. In this paper we present a family with a splice junction mutation in XNP that results in the skipping of an exon and in the introduction of a stop codon in the middle of the XNP-coding sequence. Only the abnormal transcript is expressed in two first cousins presenting the classic ATR-X phenotype (with {alpha}-thalassemia and HbH inclusions). In a distant cousin presenting a similar dysmorphic MR phenotype but not having thalassemia, {approximately}30% of the XNP transcripts are normal. These data demonstrate that the mode of action of the XNP gene product on globin expression is distinct from its mode of action in brain development and facial morphogenesis and suggest that other dysmorphic mental retardation phenotypes, such as Juberg-Marsidi or some sporadic cases of Coffin-Lowry, could be due to mutations in XNP. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A compound heterozygote of novel and recurrent DTDST mutations results in a novel intermediate phenotype of Desbuquois dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, and recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Atsushi; Nishimura, Gen; Futami, Toru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) is required for synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans in cartilage, and its loss-of-function mutations result in recessively inherited chondrodysplasias. The 40 or so DTDST mutations reported to date cause a group of disorders termed the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) group. The group ranges from the mildest recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (r-MED) through the most common DTD to perinatally lethal atelosteogenesis type II and achondrogenesis 1B. Furthermore, the relationship between DTDST mutations, their sulfate transport function, and disease phenotypes has been described. Here we report a girl with DTDST mutations: a compound heterozygote of a novel p.T266I mutation and a recurrent p.DeltaV340 mutation commonly found in severe phenotypes of the DTD group. In infancy, the girl presented with skeletal manifestations reminiscent of Desbuquois dysplasia, another recessively inherited chondrodysplasia, the mutations of which have never been identified. Her phenotype evolved with age into an intermediate phenotype between r-MED and DTD. Considering her clinical phenotypes and known phenotypes of p.DeltaV340, p.T266I was predicted to be responsible for mild phenotypes of the DTD group. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum of DTDST mutations, adding Desbuquois dysplasia to the list of differential diagnosis of the DTD group. PMID:18553123

  16. A chondrodysplasia family produced by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene: Genotype/phenotype correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Superti-Furga, A.; Steinmann, B.; Gitzelmann, R.; Rossi, A.

    1996-05-03

    Achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG-1B), atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO-2), and diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) are recessively inherited chondrodysplasia of decreasing severity caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene on chromosome 5. In these conditions, sulfate transport across the cell membrane is impaired which results in insufficient sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans and thus in an abnormally low sulfate content of cartilage. The severity of the phenotype correlates well with the predicted effect of the underlying DTDST mutations: homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for stop codons or transmembrane domain substitutions mostly result in achondrogenesis type 1B, while other structural or regulatory mutations usually result in one of the less severe phenotypes. The chondrodysplasia arising at the DTDST locus constitute a bone dysplasia family with recessive inheritance. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. A chondrodysplasia family produced by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene: genotype/phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Superti-Furga, A; Rossi, A; Steinmann, B; Gitzelmann, R

    1996-05-01

    Achondrogenesis type 1B (ACG-1B), atelosteogenesis type 2 (AO-2), and diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) are recessively inherited chondrodysplasias of decreasing severity caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene on chromosome 5. In these conditions, sulfate transport across the cell membrane is impaired which results in insufficient sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans and thus in an abnormally low sulfate content of cartilage. The severity of the phenotype correlates well with the predicted effect of the underlying DTDST mutations: homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for stop codons or transmembrane domain substitutions mostly result in achondrogenesis type 1B, while other structural or regulatory mutations usually result in one of the less severe phenotypes. The chondrodysplasias arising at the DTDST locus constitute a bone dysplasia family with recessive inheritance. PMID:8723100

  18. Clinical Relevance and Molecular Phenotypes in Gastric Cancer, of TP53 Mutations and Gene Expressions, in Combination With Other Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjin; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Jaheun; Shin, Jung-Woog; Nam, Seungyoon

    2016-01-01

    While altered TP53 is the most frequent mutation in gastric cancer (GC), its association with molecular or clinical phenotypes (e.g., overall survival, disease-free survival) remains little known. To that end, we can use genome-wide approaches to identify altered genes significantly related to mutated TP53. Here, we identified significant differences in clinical outcomes, as well as in molecular phenotypes, across specific GC tumor subpopulations, when combining TP53 with other signaling networks, including WNT and its related genes NRXN1, CTNNB1, SLITRK5, NCOR2, RYR1, GPR112, MLL3, MTUS2, and MYH6. Moreover, specific GC subpopulations indicated by dual mutation of NRXN1 and TP53 suggest different drug responses, according to the Connectivity Map, a pharmacological drug-gene association tool. Overall, TP53 mutation status in GC is significantly relevant to clinical or molecular categories. Thus, our approach can potentially provide a patient stratification strategy by dissecting previously unknown multiple TP53-mutated patient groups. PMID:27708434

  19. Expanding the phenotype of mutations in DICER1: mosaic missense mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 cause GLOW syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Steven; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Kempert, Pamela; Ischander, Mariam; Teitell, Michael A; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2015-01-01

    Background Constitutional DICER1 mutations have been associated with pleuropulmonary blastoma, cystic nephroma, Sertoli-Leydig tumours and multinodular goitres, while somatic DICER1 mutations have been reported in additional tumour types. Here we report a novel syndrome termed GLOW, an acronym for its core phenotypic findings, which include Global developmental delay, Lung cysts, Overgrowth and Wilms tumour caused by mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1. Methods and results We performed whole exome sequencing on peripheral mononuclear blood cells of an affected proband and identified a de novo missense mutation in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1. We confirmed an additional de novo missense mutation in the same domain of an unrelated case by Sanger sequencing. These missense mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 are suspected to affect one of four metal binding sites located within this domain. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the relative abundance of mutant alleles in various tissue types. The relative mutation abundance is highest in Wilms tumour and unaffected kidney samples when compared with blood, confirming that the mutation is mosaic. Finally, we performed bioinformatic analysis of microRNAs expressed in murine cells carrying specific Dicer1 RNase IIIb domain metal binding site-associated mutations. We have identified a subset of 3p microRNAs that are overexpressed whose target genes are over-represented in mTOR, MAPK and TGF-β signalling pathways. Conclusions We propose that mutations affecting the metal binding sites of the DICER1 RNase IIIb domain alter the balance of 3p and 5p microRNAs leading to deregulation of these growth signalling pathways, causing a novel human overgrowth syndrome. PMID:24676357

  20. A novel nonsense mutation in CEP290 induces exon skipping and leads to a relatively mild retinal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Littink, Karin W; Pott, Jan-Willem R; Collin, Rob W J; Kroes, Hester Y; Verheij, Joke B G M; Blokland, Ellen A W; de Castro Miró, Marta; Hoyng, Carel B; Klaver, Caroline C W; Koenekoop, Robert K; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Cremers, Frans P M; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; den Hollander, Anneke I

    2010-07-01

    PURPOSE. To identify the genetic defect in a family with variable retinal phenotypes. The proband had a diagnosis of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), whereas her two cousins had an early-onset severe retinal dystrophy (EOSRD) with useful vision. A distant family member had retinitis pigmentosa (RP). METHODS. DNA samples of the affected family members were genotyped with 250 K genome-wide SNP microarrays. Genetic defects were localized by linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping, and candidate genes were analyzed by sequencing. Patients underwent a full ophthalmic examination. RESULTS. Compound heterozygous mutations in CEP290 were identified in the proband and her two cousins: the frequent c.2991+1655A>G founder mutation and a novel nonsense mutation in exon 7 (c.451C>T, p.Arg151X). The proband had nystagmus, hyperopia, a flat electroretinogram (ERG), and decreased visual acuity (20/250) from birth. The two cousins had minimal scotopic ERG responses at the age of 2. In one of these patients, visual acuity had reached a level of 20/32 at age 5, which is high for patients with CEP290 mutations. Analysis of the CEP290 mRNA in affected individuals revealed altered splice forms in which either exon 7 or exons 7 and 8 were skipped. In both mutant cDNA products, the open reading frame was not disrupted. Furthermore, homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis in the distant family member affected by RP revealed a homozygous mutation in MERTK, but no CEP290 mutations. This MERTK mutation was heterozygously present in the most severely affected (LCA) patient, but was absent in the two more mildly affected cousins. CONCLUSIONS. A novel nonsense mutation in CEP290 results in nonsense-associated altered splicing. That the remaining open reading frame is intact may explain the less severe phenotype observed in the two affected cousins. The additional heterozygous mutation in MERTK may clarify the more severe phenotype in the proband. This study extends the phenotypic spectrum

  1. Identification of novel mutations in the ryanodine-receptor gene (RYR1) in malignant hyperthermia: genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, B M; Quane, K A; Ording, H; Urwyler, A; Tegazzin, V; Lehane, M; O'Halloran, J; Hartung, E; Giblin, L M; Lynch, P J; Vaughan, P; Censier, K; Bendixen, D; Comi, G; Heytens, L; Monsieurs, K; Fagerlund, T; Wolz, W; Heffron, J J; Muller, C R; McCarthy, T V

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle that is triggered in genetically predisposed individuals by common anesthetics and muscle relaxants. The ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is mutated in a number of MH pedigrees, some members of which also have central core disease (CCD), an inherited myopathy closely associated with MH. Mutation screening of 6 kb of the RYR1 gene has identified four adjacent novel mutations, C6487T, G6488A, G6502A, and C6617T, which result in the amino acid alterations Arg2163Cys, Arg2163His, Val2168Met, and Thr2206Met, respectively. Collectively, these mutations account for 11% of MH cases and identify the gene segment 6400-6700 as a mutation hot spot. Correlation analysis of the in vitro contracture-test data available for pedigrees bearing these and other RYR1 mutations showed an exceptionally good correlation between caffeine threshold and tension values, whereas no correlation was observed between halothane threshold and tension values. This finding has important ramifications for assignment of the MH-susceptible phenotype, in genotyping studies, and indicates that assessment of recombinant individuals on the basis of caffeine response is justified, whereas assessment on the basis of halothane response may be problematic. Interestingly, the data suggest a link between the caffeine threshold and tension values and the MH/CCD phenotype. PMID:9497245

  2. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I.

    PubMed

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N; Schoeb, Trenton R; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Bedwell, David M; Zinn, Kurt R; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H; Korf, Bruce R; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1(Arg681*) and missense NF1(Gly848Arg) mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1(Gly848Arg) mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1(Arg681*) mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1(Arg681*) allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf1(4F/Arg681*); DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  3. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N.; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Messiaen, Ludwine M.; Bedwell, David M.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H.; Korf, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1Arg681* and missense NF1Gly848Arg mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1Gly848Arg mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1Arg681* mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1Arg681* allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf14F/Arg681*; DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  4. Premature Termination Mutations in FBN1: Distinct Effects on Differential Allelic Expression and on Protein and Clinical Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Schrijver, Iris; Liu, Wanguo; Odom, Raanan; Brenn, Thomas; Oefner, Peter; Furthmayr, Heinz; Francke, Uta

    2002-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) and other type 1 fibrillinopathies result from mutations in the FBN1 gene, which encodes the connective-tissue microfibrillar protein fibrillin 1. Attempts at correlating genotype with phenotype have suggested considerable heterogeneity. To define the subtype of fibrillinopathy caused by premature termination codon (PTC) mutations, we integrate genotype information and mRNA expression levels with clinical and biochemical phenotypes. By screening the entire FBN1 gene for mutations, we identified 34 probands with PTC mutations. With the exception of two recurrent mutations, these nonsense and frameshift mutations are unique and span the entire FBN1 gene, from IVS2 to IVS63. Allele-specific reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed differential allelic expression in all studied samples, with variable reduction of the mutant transcript. Fibrillin protein synthesis and deposition into the extracellular matrix were studied by pulse-chase analysis of cultured fibroblasts. In the majority of PTC samples, synthesis of normal-sized fibrillin protein was ∼50% of control levels, but matrix deposition was disproportionately decreased. Probands and mutation-positive relatives were clinically evaluated by means of a standardized protocol. Only 71% (22/31) of probands and 58% (14/24) of the mutation-positive family members met current clinical diagnostic criteria for MFS. When compared with our previously reported study group of 44 individuals with FBN1 cysteine substitutions, the PTC group showed statistically significant differences in the frequency of individual signs, especially in the ocular manifestations. Whereas large-joint hypermobility was more common, lens dislocation and retinal detachment were distinctly less common in the PTC group. We conclude that PTC mutations have a major impact on the pathogenesis of type 1 fibrillinopathies and convey a distinct biochemical, clinical, and prognostic profile. PMID:12068374

  5. Phenotype-Genotype Correlations in Mouse Models of Amelogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Amelx and Enam Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Coxon, Thomas Liam; Brook, Alan Henry; Barron, Martin John; Smith, Richard Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in human and in mouse orthologous genes Amelx and Enam result in a diverse range of enamel defects. In this study we aimed to investigate the phenotype-genotype correlation between the mutants and the wild-type controls in mouse models of amelogenesis imperfecta using novel measurement approaches. Ten hemi-mandibles and incisors were dissected from each group of AmelxWT, AmelxX/Y64H, AmelxY/Y64H, AmelxY64H/Y64H, and EnamWT, EnamRgsc395 heterozygous and EnamRgsc395 homozygous mice. Their macro-morphology, colour and micro-topography were assessed using bespoke 2D and 3D image analysis systems and customized colour and whiteness algorithms. The novel methods identified significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between the Amelx groups for mandible and incisor size and enamel colour and between the Enam groups for incisor size and enamel colour. The AmelxWT mice had the largest mandibles and incisors, followed in descending order of size by the AmelxX/Y64H, AmelxY/Y64H and AmelxY64H/Y64H mice. Within the Enam groups the EnamWT incisors were largest and the EnamRgsc395 heterozygous mice were smallest. The effect on tooth morphology was also reflected by the severity of the enamel defects in the colour and whiteness assessment. Amelogenin affected mandible morphology and incisor enamel formation, while enamelin only affected incisors, supporting the multifunctional role of amelogenin. The enamelin mutation was associated with earlier forming enamel defects. The study supported the critical involvement of amelogenin and enamelin in enamel mineralization. PMID:22759786

  6. Research Resource: Correlating Human Cytochrome P450 21A2 Crystal Structure and Phenotypes of Mutations in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Lei, Li; Wang, Chunxue; Waterman, Michael R.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 21A2 is a key player in steroid 21-hydroxylation and converts progesterone to 11-deoxycorticosterone and 17α-hydroxy progesterone to 11-deoxycortisol. More than 100 mutations in P450 21A2 have been established in patients thus far; these account for the vast majority of occurrences of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), which is among the most common heritable metabolic diseases in humans. CAH phenotypes range from the most severe, salt-wasting (SW), to the simple virilizing (SV), and nonclassical (NC) CAH forms. We recently determined the crystal structure of human P450 21A2 in complex with progesterone. To gain more insight into the structural and stability changes underlying the phenotypes of individual mutations, we analyzed 24 SW, SV, and NC mutants in the context of the crystal structure of the human enzyme. Our analysis reveals clear differences in the localization of SW, SV, and NC mutations, with many of the first type mapping to the active site and near the heme and/or substrate and mostly resulting in complete loss of enzyme activity. Conversely, NC mutations are often found near the periphery and close to the surface of the protein, and mutant enzymes retain partial activity. The main conclusion from the mutation-structure-activity study is that the severity of the CAH clinical manifestations can be directly correlated with the degree of mutation-induced damage in terms of protein fold stability and active site changes in the structural model. Thus, the NC phenotype is typically associated with mutations that have a compensatory effect, ie, H-bonding replacing hydrophobic interactions and vice versa. PMID:26172259

  7. Impaired mechanical response of an EDMD mutation leads to motility phenotypes that are repaired by loss of prenylation.

    PubMed

    Zuela, Noam; Zwerger, Monika; Levin, Tal; Medalia, Ohad; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-05-01

    There are roughly 14 distinct heritable autosomal dominant diseases associated with mutations in lamins A/C, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). The mechanical model proposes that the lamin mutations change the mechanical properties of muscle nuclei, leading to cell death and tissue deterioration. Here, we developed an experimental protocol that analyzes the effect of disease-linked lamin mutations on the response of nuclei to mechanical strain in living Caenorhabditis elegans We found that the EDMD mutation L535P disrupts the nuclear mechanical response specifically in muscle nuclei. Inhibiting lamin prenylation rescued the mechanical response of the EDMD nuclei, reversed the muscle phenotypes and led to normal motility. The LINC complex and emerin were also required to regulate the mechanical response of C. elegans nuclei. This study provides evidence to support the mechanical model and offers a potential future therapeutic approach towards curing EDMD.

  8. Impaired mechanical response of an EDMD mutation leads to motility phenotypes that are repaired by loss of prenylation.

    PubMed

    Zuela, Noam; Zwerger, Monika; Levin, Tal; Medalia, Ohad; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-05-01

    There are roughly 14 distinct heritable autosomal dominant diseases associated with mutations in lamins A/C, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). The mechanical model proposes that the lamin mutations change the mechanical properties of muscle nuclei, leading to cell death and tissue deterioration. Here, we developed an experimental protocol that analyzes the effect of disease-linked lamin mutations on the response of nuclei to mechanical strain in living Caenorhabditis elegans We found that the EDMD mutation L535P disrupts the nuclear mechanical response specifically in muscle nuclei. Inhibiting lamin prenylation rescued the mechanical response of the EDMD nuclei, reversed the muscle phenotypes and led to normal motility. The LINC complex and emerin were also required to regulate the mechanical response of C. elegans nuclei. This study provides evidence to support the mechanical model and offers a potential future therapeutic approach towards curing EDMD. PMID:27034135

  9. MELAS phenotype associated with m.3302A>G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masahide; Komaki, Hirofumi; Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Nishino, Ichizo; Goto, Yu-Ichi

    2014-02-01

    The m.3302A>G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene has been identified in only 12 patients from 6 families, all manifesting adult-onset slowly progressive myopathy with minor central nervous system involvement. An 11-year-old boy presented with progressive proximal-dominant muscle weakness from age 7years. At age 10, he developed recurrent stroke-like episodes. Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, plus stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was diagnosed by clinical symptoms and muscle biopsy findings. Mitochondrial gene analysis revealed a heteroplasmic m.3302A>G mutation. Histological examination showed strongly SDH reactive blood vessels (SSVs), not present in previous cases with myopathies due to the m.3302A>G mutation. These findings broaden the phenotypic spectrum of this mutation.

  10. Novel mutations in the PRX and the MTMR2 genes are responsible for unusual Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Nouioua, Sonia; Hamadouche, Tarik; Funalot, Benoit; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Bellatache, Nora; Bouderba, Radia; Grid, Djamel; Assami, Salima; Benhassine, Traki; Levy, Nicolas; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Meriem

    2011-08-01

    Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, relatively common in Algeria due to high prevalence of consanguineous marriages, are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. We report on two consanguineous families with demyelinating autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4) associated with novel homozygous mutations in the MTMR2 gene, c.331dupA (p.Arg111LysfsX24) and PRX gene, c.1090C>T (p.Arg364X) respectively, and peculiar clinical phenotypes. The three patients with MTMR2 mutations (CMT4B1 family) had a typical phenotype of severe early onset motor and sensory neuropathy with typical focally folded myelin on nerve biopsy. Associated clinical features included vocal cord paresis, prominent chest deformities and claw hands. Contrasting with the classical presentation of CMT4F (early-onset Dejerine-Sottas phenotype), the four patients with PRX mutations (CMT4F family) had essentially a late age of onset and a protracted and relatively benign evolution, although they presented marked spine deformities. These observations broaden the spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with these two CMT4 forms. PMID:21741241

  11. Expanding the phenotype associated with FOXG1 mutations and in vivo FoxG1 chromatin-binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, R; Pancrazi, L; Bjørgo, K; Rosseto, A; Kleefstra, T; Grillo, E; Panighini, A; Cardarelli, F; Meloni, I; Ariani, F; Mencarelli, M A; Hayek, J; Renieri, A; Costa, M; Mari, F

    2012-10-01

    Mutations in the Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) gene, a brain specific transcriptional factor, are responsible for the congenital variant of Rett syndrome. Until now FOXG1 point mutations have been reported in 12 Rett patients. Recently seven additional patients have been reported with a quite homogeneous severe phenotype designated as the FOXG1 syndrome. Here we describe two unrelated patients with a de novo FOXG1 point mutation, p.Gln46X and p.Tyr400X, respectively, having a milder phenotype and sharing a distinctive facial appearance. Although FoxG1 action depends critically on its binding to chromatin, very little is known about the dynamics of this process. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we showed that most of the GFP-FoxG1 fusion protein associates reversibly to chromatin whereas the remaining fraction is bound irreversibly. Furthermore, we showed that the two pathologic derivatives of FoxG1 described in this paper present a dramatic alteration in chromatin affinity and irreversibly bound fraction in comparison with Ser323fsX325 mutant (associated with a severe phenotype) and wild type Foxg1 protein. Our observations suggest that alterations in the kinetics of FoxG1 binding to chromatin might contribute to the pathological effects of FOXG1 mutations.

  12. A new family with an SLC9A6 mutation expanding the phenotypic spectrum of Christianson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Piton, Amélie; Chancenotte, Sophie; Redin, Claire; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Henrenger, Yvan; Minot, Delphine; Creppy, Audrey; Ruffier-Bourdet, Marie; Thevenon, Julien; Kuentz, Paul; Lehalle, Daphné; Curie, Aurore; Blanchard, Gaelle; Ghosn, Ezzat; Bonnet, Marlene; Archimbaud-Devilliers, Mélanie; Huet, Frédéric; Perret, Odile; Philip, Nicole; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    Using targeted next generation sequencing, we have identified a splicing mutation (c.526-9_526-5del) in the SLC9A6 gene in a 9-year-old boy with mild intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly, and social interaction disabilities. This intronic microdeletion leads to the skipping of exon 3 and to an in-frame deletion of 26 amino acids in the TM4 domain. It segregates with cognitive impairment or learning difficulties in other members of the family. Mutations in SLC9A6 have been reported in X-linked Christianson syndrome associating severe to profound intellectual deficiency and an Angelman-like phenotype with microcephaly, absent speech, ataxia with progressive cerebellar atrophy, ophthalmoplegia, epilepsy, and neurological regression. The proband and his maternal uncle both have an attenuated phenotype with mild ID, attention deficit disorder, speech difficulties, and mild asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy. The proband also have microcephaly. The mutation cosegregated with learning disabilities and speech difficulties in the female carriers (mother and three sisters of the proband). Detailed neuropsychological, speech, and occupational therapy investigations in the female carriers revealed impaired oral and written language acquisition, with dissociation between verbal and performance IQ. An abnormal phenotype, ranging from learning disability with predominant speech difficulties to mild intellectual deficiency, has been described previously in a large proportion of female carriers. Besides broadening the clinical spectrum of SLC9A6 gene mutations, we present an example of a monogenic origin of mild learning disability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27256868

  13. The Compact Mutation of Myostatin Causes a Glycolytic Shift in the Phenotype of Fast Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Baán, Júlia Aliz; Kocsis, Tamás; Keller-Pintér, Anikó; Müller, Géza; Zádor, Ernö; Dux, László

    2013-01-01

    Myostatin is an important negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. The hypermuscular Compact (Cmpt) mice carry a 12-bp natural mutation in the myostatin propeptide, with additional modifier genes being responsible for the phenotype. Muscle cellularity of the fast-type tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) as well as the mixed-type soleus (SOL) muscles of Cmpt and wild-type mice was examined by immunohistochemical staining of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) proteins. In addition, transcript levels of MHC isoforms were quantified by qPCR. Based on our results, all investigated muscles of Cmpt mice were significantly larger compared with that of wild-type mice, as characterized by fiber hyperplasia of different grades. Fiber hypertrophy was not present in TA; however, EDL muscles showed specific IIB fiber hypertrophy while the (I and IIA) fibers of SOL muscles were generally hypertrophied. Both the fast TA and EDL muscles of Cmpt mice contained significantly more glycolytic IIB fibers accompanied by a decreased number of IIX and IIA fibers; however, this was not the case for SOL muscles. In summary, despite the variances found in muscle cellularity between the different myostatin mutant mice, similar glycolytic shifts were observed in Cmpt fast muscles as in muscles from myostatin knockout mice. PMID:23979839

  14. Mutations in collagen 18A1 and their relevance to the human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Suzuki, Oscar T; Armelin-Correa, Lucia M; Sertié, Andréa L; Errera, Flavia I V; Bagatini, Kelly; Kok, Fernando; Leite, Katia R M

    2006-03-01

    Collagen XVIII, a proteoglycan, is a component of basement membranes (BMs). There are three distinct isoforms that differ only by their N-terminal, but with a specific pattern of tissue and developmental expression. Cleavage of its C-terminal produces endostatin, an inhibitor of angiogenesis. In its N-terminal, there is a frizzled motif which seems to be involved in Wnt signaling. Mutations in this gene cause Knobloch syndrome KS), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by vitreoretinal and macular degeneration and occipital encephalocele. This review discusses the effect of both rare and polymorphic alleles in the human phenotype, showing that deficiency of one of the collagen XVIII isoforms is sufficient to cause KS and that null alleles causing deficiency of all collagen XVIII isoforms are associated with a more severe ocular defect. This review besides illustrating the functional importance of collagen XVIII in eye development and its structure maintenance throughout life, it also shows its role in other tissues and organs, such as nervous system and kidney.

  15. Mutation screen reveals novel variants and expands the phenotypes associated with DYNC1H1

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Alleene V.; Schabhüttl, Maria; Offenbacher, Hans; Synofzik, Matthis; Hauser, Natalie S.; Brunner-Krainz, Michaela; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Moore, Steven A.; Windhager, Reinhard; Bender, Benjamin; Harms, Matthew; Klebe, Stephan; Young, Peter; Kennerson, Marina; Garcia, Avencia Sanchez Mejias; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Züchner, Stephan; Schule, Rebecca; Shy, Michael E.; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Dynein, cytoplasmic 1, heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) encodes a necessary subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, which traffics cargo along microtubules. Dominant DYNC1H1 mutations are implicated in neural diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity dominance (SMA-LED), intellectual disability with neuronal migration defects, malformations of cortical development (MCD), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2O (CMT2O). We hypothesized that additional variants could be found in these and novel motoneuron and related diseases. Therefore we analysed our database of 1,024 whole exome sequencing samples of motoneuron and related diseases for novel single nucleotide variations. We filtered these results for significant variants, which were further screened using segregation analysis in available family members. Analysis revealed six novel, rare, and highly conserved variants. Three of these are likely pathogenic and encompass a broad phenotypic spectrum with distinct disease clusters. Our findings suggest that DYNC1H1 variants can cause not only lower, but also upper motor neuron disease. It thus adds DYNC1H1 to the growing list of spastic paraplegia related genes in microtubule-dependent motor protein pathways. PMID:26100331

  16. A Unique Mutation in a MYB Gene Cosegregates with the Nectarine Phenotype in Peach

    PubMed Central

    Dondini, Luca; Pacheco, Igor; Dettori, Maria Teresa; Gazza, Laura; Scalabrin, Simone; Strozzi, Francesco; Tartarini, Stefano; Bassi, Daniele; Verde, Ignazio; Rossini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Nectarines play a key role in peach industry; the fuzzless skin has implications for consumer acceptance. The peach/nectarine (G/g) trait was described as monogenic and previously mapped on chromosome 5. Here, the position of the G locus was delimited within a 1.1 cM interval (635 kb) based on linkage analysis of an F2 progeny from the cross ‘Contender’ (C, peach) x ‘Ambra’ (A, nectarine). Careful inspection of the genes annotated in the corresponding genomic sequence (Peach v1.0), coupled with variant discovery, led to the identification of MYB gene PpeMYB25 as a candidate for trichome formation on fruit skin. Analysis of genomic re-sequencing data from five peach/nectarine accessions pointed to the insertion of a LTR retroelement in exon 3 of the PpeMYB25 gene as the cause of the recessive glabrous phenotype. A functional marker (indelG) developed on the LTR insertion cosegregated with the trait in the CxA F2 progeny and was validated on a broad panel of genotypes, including all known putative donors of the nectarine trait. This marker was shown to efficiently discriminate between peach and nectarine plants, indicating that a unique mutational event gave rise to the nectarine trait and providing a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programs. PMID:24595269

  17. Acquired somatic ATRX mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome associated with alpha thalassemia (ATMDS) convey a more severe hematologic phenotype than germline ATRX mutations.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P; Higgs, Douglas R; Fisher, Chris A; Gibbons, Richard J

    2004-03-15

    Acquired somatic mutations in ATRX, an X-linked gene encoding a chromatin-associated protein, were recently identified in 4 patients with the rare subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with thalassemia (ATMDS). Here we describe a series of novel point mutations in ATRX detected in archival DNA samples from marrow and/or blood of patients with ATMDS by use of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), a technique sensitive to low-level mosaicism. Two of the new mutations result in changes in amino acids altered in previously described pedigrees with germ line ATRX mutations (ATR-X syndrome), but the hematologic abnormalities were much more severe in the patients with ATMDS than in the corresponding constitutional cases. In one ATMDS case where DNA samples from several time points were available, the proportion of ATRX-mutant subclones correlated with changes in the amount of hemoglobin H. This study strengthens the link between acquired, somatic ATRX mutations and ATMDS, illustrates how molecular defects associated with MDS and other hematologic malignancies masked by somatic mosaicism may be detected by DHPLC, and shows that additional factors increase the severity of the hematologic phenotype of ATRX mutations in ATMDS.

  18. Expanding the SHOC2 Mutation Associated Phenotype of Noonan Syndrome with Loose Anagen Hair: Structural Brain Anomalies and Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Zand, Dina J.; Demmer, Laurie; Anderson, Carol E.; Dobyns, William B.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Denenberg, Elizabeth; Jenny, Kim; Stabley, Deborah L.; Sol-Church, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a heterogenous rasopathy typically presenting with short stature, characteristic facial features, cardiac abnormalities including pulmonic valve stenosis, ASD and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cryptorchidism, ectodermal abnormalities and learning differences. The phenotype is variable, and limited genotype phenotype correlation exists with SOS1 mutations often associated with normal cognition and stature, RAF1 mutations entailing a high HCM risk, and certain PTPN11 mutations predisposing to juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The recently identified SHOC2 mutation (p.Ser2Gly) causes Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair. We report five patients with this mutation. All had skin hyperpigmentation, sparse light colored hair, increased fine wrinkles, ligamentous laxity, developmental delay and 4/4 had a structural cardiac anomaly. Hypotonia and macrocephaly occurred in 4/5 (80%); 3/5 (60%) had polyhydramnios, increased birth weight or required use of a feeding tube. Distinctive brain abnormalities included relative megalencephaly and enlarged subarachnoid spaces suggestive of benign external hydrocephalus, and a relatively small posterior fossa as indicated by a vertical tentorium. The combination of a large brain with a small posterior fossa likely resulted in the high rate of cerebellar tonsillar ectopia (3/4) (75%). Periventricular nodular heterotopia was seen in one patient with a thick and dysplastic corpus callosum. We report on the first hematologic neoplasm, myelofibrosis, in a 2-year-old patient with SHOC2 mutation. Myelofibrosis is exceedingly rare in children and young adults. The absence of a somatic JAK2 mutation, seen in the majority of patients with myelofibrosis, is noteworthy as it suggests that germline or somatic SHOC2 mutations are causally involved in myelofibrosis. PMID:23918763

  19. Inherited erythromelalgia due to mutations in SCN9A: natural history, clinical phenotype and somatosensory profile.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Schulman, Betsy; Ali, Zahid; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Brock, Fiona; Cobain, Sonia; Mainka, Tina; Vollert, Jan; Tarabar, Sanela; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia, the first human pain syndrome linked to voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely regarded as a genetic model of human pain. Because inherited erythromelalgia was linked to gain-of-function changes of sodium channel Na(v)1.7 only a decade ago, the literature has mainly consisted of reports of genetic and/or clinical characterization of individual patients. This paper describes the pattern of pain, natural history, somatosensory profile, psychosocial status and olfactory testing of 13 subjects with primary inherited erythromelalgia with mutations of SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(v)1.7. Subjects were clinically profiled using questionnaires, quantitative sensory testing and olfaction testing during the in-clinic phase of the study. In addition, a detailed pain phenotype for each subject was obtained over a 3-month period at home using diaries, enabling subjects to self-report pain attacks, potential triggers, duration and severity of pain. All subjects reported pain and heat in the extremities (usually feet and/or hands), with pain attacks triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by non-pharmacological manoeuvres such as cooling. A large proportion of pain attacks (355/1099; 32%) did not involve a specific trigger. There was considerable variability in the number, duration and severity of pain attacks between subjects, even those carrying the same mutation within a family, and within individuals over the 12-13 week observation period. Most subjects (11/13) had pain between attacks. For these subjects, mean pain severity between pain attacks was usually lower than that during an attack. Olfaction testing using the Sniffin'T test did not demonstrate hyperosmia. One subject had evidence of orthostatic hypotension. Overall, there was a statistically significant correlation between total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (P= 0.005) and pain between attacks and for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Depression scores and pain

  20. X-exome sequencing in Finnish families with Intellectual Disability - four novel mutations and two novel syndromic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by substantial impairment in cognitive abilities, social and behavioral adaptive skills. Next generation sequencing technologies have become a powerful approach for identifying molecular gene mutations relevant for diagnosis. Methods & objectives Enrichment of X-chromosome specific exons and massively parallel sequencing was performed for identifying the causative mutations in 14 Finnish families, each of them having several males affected with intellectual disability of unknown cause. Results We found four novel mutations in known XLID genes. Two mutations; one previously reported missense mutation (c.1111C > T), and one novel frameshift mutation (c. 990_991insGCTGC) were identified in SLC16A2, a gene that has been linked to Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS). One novel missense mutation (c.1888G > C) was found in GRIA3 and two novel splice donor site mutations (c.357 + 1G > C and c.985 + 1G > C) were identified in the DLG3 gene. One missense mutation (c.1321C > T) was identified in the candidate gene ZMYM3 in three affected males with a previously unrecognized syndrome characterized by unique facial features, aortic stenosis and hypospadia was detected. All of the identified mutations segregated in the corresponding families and were absent in > 100 Finnish controls and in the publicly available databases. In addition, a previously reported benign variant (c.877G > A) in SYP was identified in a large family with nine affected males in three generations, who have a syndromic phenotype. Conclusions All of the mutations found in this study are being reported for the first time in Finnish families with several affected male patients whose etiological diagnoses have remained unknown to us, in some families, for more than 30 years. This study illustrates the impact of X-exome sequencing to identify rare gene mutations

  1. Novel lip pit phenotypes and mutations of IRF6 in Van der Woude syndrome patients from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Malik, S; Wilcox, E R; Naz, S

    2014-05-01

    The role of interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene mutations in causing Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) and poplyteal pterygium syndrome has been described in different populations worldwide. The former is one of the major syndromes of cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P) with the distinct phenotype of presence of pits with or without sinuses on the lower lip. We identified seven probands with VWS from Punjab province of Pakistan and recognized two previously unreported lip pit phenotypes. The mutational analysis of IRF6 in this cohort revealed four novel and two previously reported mutations. The newly identified mutations include three frameshifts (c.635delG; c.21_33del13; c.627delC) and one transition mutation (c.2T>C) affecting the first codon of IRF6. Together with a past epidemiological study on VWS in Pakistan, the frequency of this syndrome among CL/P individuals from Punjab was calculated to be 1.17%. PMID:23713753

  2. Whole exome analysis identifies dominant COL4A1 mutations in patients with complex ocular phenotypes involving microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Deml, B; Reis, L M; Maheshwari, M; Griffis, C; Bick, D; Semina, E V

    2014-11-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) is a developmental ocular malformation defined as complete absence or reduction in size of the eye. A/M is a heterogenous disorder with numerous causative genes identified; however, about half the cases lack a molecular diagnosis. We undertook whole exome sequencing in an A/M family with two affected siblings, two unaffected siblings, and unaffected parents; the ocular phenotype was isolated with only mild developmental delay/learning difficulties reported and a normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the proband at 16 months. No pathogenic mutations were identified in 71 known A/M genes. Further analysis identified a shared heterozygous mutation in COL4A1, c.2317G>A, p.(Gly773Arg) that was not seen in the unaffected parents and siblings. Analysis of 24 unrelated A/M exomes identified a novel c.2122G>A, p.(Gly708Arg) mutation in an additional patient with unilateral microphthalmia, bilateral microcornea and Peters anomaly; the mutation was absent in the unaffected mother and the unaffected father was not available. Mutations in COL4A1 have been linked to a spectrum of human disorders; the most consistent feature is cerebrovascular disease with variable ocular anomalies, kidney and muscle defects. This study expands the spectrum of COL4A1 phenotypes and indicates screening in patients with A/M regardless of MRI findings or presumed inheritance pattern.

  3. Non dominant-negative KCNJ2 gene mutations leading to Andersen-Tawil syndrome with an isolated cardiac phenotype.

    PubMed

    Limberg, Maren M; Zumhagen, Sven; Netter, Michael F; Coffey, Alison J; Grace, Andrew; Rogers, Jane; Böckelmann, Doris; Rinné, Susanne; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Decher, Niels; Schulze-Bahr, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by dysmorphic features, periodic paralyses and abnormal ventricular repolarization. After genotyping a large set of patients with congenital long-QT syndrome, we identified two novel, heterozygous KCNJ2 mutations (p.N318S, p.W322C) located in the C-terminus of the Kir2.1 subunit. These mutations have a different localization than classical ATS mutations which are mostly located at a potential interaction face with the slide helix or at the interface between the C-termini. Mutation carriers were without the key features of ATS, causing an isolated cardiac phenotype. While the N318S mutants regularly reached the plasma membrane, W322C mutants primarily resided in late endosomes. Co-expression of N318S or W322C with wild-type Kir2.1 reduced current amplitudes only by 20-25 %. This mild loss-of-function for the heteromeric channels resulted from defective channel trafficking (W322C) or gating (N318S). Strikingly, and in contrast to the majority of ATS mutations, neither mutant caused a dominant-negative suppression of wild-type Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 currents. Thus, a mild reduction of native Kir2.x currents by non dominant-negative mutants may cause ATS with an isolated cardiac phenotype.

  4. SOS1 Mutations in Noonan Syndrome: Molecular Spectrum, Structural Insights on Pathogenic Effects, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Stella, Lorenzo; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Cordeddu, Viviana; Williams, Bradley J; Dentici, Maria L; Caputo, Viviana; Venanzi, Serenella; Bonaguro, Michela; Kavamura, Ines; Faienza, Maria F; Pilotta, Alba; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gabrielli, Orazio; Marino, Bruno; Neri, Giovanni; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Torrrente, Isabella; Selicorni, Angelo; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common nonchromosomal disorders affecting development and growth. NS is caused by aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling and is genetically heterogeneous, which explains, in part, the marked clinical variability documented for this Mendelian trait. Recently, we and others identified SOS1 as a major gene underlying NS. Here, we explored further the spectrum of SOS1 mutations and their associated phenotypic features. Mutation scanning of the entire SOS1 coding sequence allowed the identification of 33 different variants deemed to be of pathological significance, including 16 novel missense changes and in-frame indels. Various mutation clusters destabilizing or altering orientation of regions of the protein predicted to contribute structurally to the maintenance of autoinhibition were identified. Two previously unappreciated clusters predicted to enhance SOS1's recruitment to the plasma membrane, thus promoting a spatial reorientation of domains contributing to inhibition, were also recognized. Genotype–phenotype analysis confirmed our previous observations, establishing a high frequency of ectodermal anomalies and a low prevalence of cognitive impairment and reduced growth. Finally, mutation analysis performed on cohorts of individuals with nonsyndromic pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects excluded a major contribution of germline SOS1 lesions to the isolated occurrence of these cardiac anomalies. Hum Mutat 32:760–772, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21387466

  5. Long-term bezafibrate treatment improves skin and spleen phenotypes of the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Hida, Aline; Garcia, Sofia; Prolla, Tomas A; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological agents, such as bezafibrate, that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and PPAR γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathways have been shown to improve mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mouse is a mouse model of aging that harbors a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ. These mice develop many features of premature aging including hair loss, anemia, osteoporosis, sarcopenia and decreased lifespan. They also have increased mtDNA mutations and marked mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that mutator mice treated with bezafibrate for 8-months had delayed hair loss and improved skin and spleen aging-like phenotypes. Although we observed an increase in markers of fatty acid oxidation in these tissues, we did not detect a generalized increase in mitochondrial markers. On the other hand, there were no improvements in muscle function or lifespan of the mutator mouse, which we attributed to the rodent-specific hepatomegaly associated with fibrate treatment. These results showed that despite its secondary effects in rodent's liver, bezafibrate was able to improve some of the aging phenotypes in the mutator mouse. Because the associated hepatomegaly is not observed in primates, long-term bezafibrate treatment in humans could have beneficial effects on tissues undergoing chronic bioenergetic-related degeneration.

  6. Broadening of cohesinopathies: exome sequencing identifies mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with Cornelia de Lange-overlapping phenotype.

    PubMed

    Parenti, I; Gervasini, C; Pozojevic, J; Graul-Neumann, L; Azzollini, J; Braunholz, D; Watrin, E; Wendt, K S; Cereda, A; Cittaro, D; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Lazarevic, D; Mariani, M; Russo, S; Werner, R; Krawitz, P; Larizza, L; Selicorni, A; Kaiser, F J

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and KBG syndrome are two distinct developmental pathologies sharing common features such as intellectual disability, psychomotor delay, and some craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Mutations in one of the five genes NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 or RAD21, were identified in at least 70% of the patients with CdLS. Consequently, additional causative genes, either unknown or responsible of partially merging entities, possibly account for the remaining 30% of the patients. In contrast, KBG has only been associated with mutations in ANKRD11. By exome sequencing we could identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of CdLS. Both patients show features reminiscent of CdLS such as characteristic facies as well as a small head circumference which is not described for KBG syndrome. Patient A, who carries the mutation in a mosaic state, is a 4-year-old girl with features reminiscent of CdLS. Patient B, a 15-year-old boy, shows a complex phenotype which resembled CdLS during infancy, but has developed to a more KBG overlapping phenotype during childhood. These findings point out the importance of screening ANKRD11 in young CdLS patients who were found to be negative for mutations in the five known CdLS genes. PMID:25652421

  7. Compound heterozygous desmoplakin mutations result in a phenotype with a combination of myocardial, skin, hair, and enamel abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, My G; Sadowski, Sara; Brennan, Donna; Pikander, Pekka; Saukko, Pekka; Wahl, James; Aho, Heikki; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Fertala, Andrzej; Peltonen, Juha; Uitto, Jouni; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2010-04-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) anchors the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the desmosomal cadherins and thereby confers structural stability to tissues. In this study, we present a patient with extensive mucocutaneous blisters, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, enamel dysplasia, and sparse woolly hair. The patient died at the age of 14 years from undiagnosed cardiomyopathy. The skin showed hyperplasia and acantholysis in the mid- and lower epidermal layers, whereas the heart showed extensive fibrosis and fibrofatty replacement in both ventricles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a reduction in the C-terminal domain of DP in the skin and oral mucosa. Sequencing of the DP gene showed undescribed mutations in the maternal and paternal alleles. Both mutations affected exon 24 encoding the C-terminal domain. The paternal mutation, c.6310delA, leads to a premature stop codon. The maternal mutation, c.7964 C to A, results in a substitution of an aspartic acid for a conserved alanine residue at amino acid 2655 (A2655D). Structural modeling indicated that this mutation changes the electrostatic potential of the mutated region of DP, possibly altering functions that depend on intermolecular interactions. To conclude, we describe a combination of DP mutation phenotypes affecting the skin, heart, hair, and teeth. This patient case emphasizes the importance of heart examination of patients with desmosomal genodermatoses.

  8. Compound Heterozygous Desmoplakin Mutations Result in a Phenotype with a Combination of Myocardial, Skin, Hair, and Enamel Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Mỹ G.; Sadowski, Sara; Brennan, Donna; Pikander, Pekka; Saukko, Pekka; Wahl, James; Aho, Heikki; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Fertala, Andrzej; Peltonen, Juha; Uitto, Jouni; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2014-01-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) anchors the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the desmosomal cadherins and thereby confers structural stability to tissues. In this study, we present a patient with extensive mucocutaneous blisters, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, enamel dysplasia, and sparse woolly hair. The patient died at the age of 14 years from undiagnosed cardiomyopathy. The skin showed hyperplasia and acantholysis in the mid- and lower epidermal layers, whereas the heart showed extensive fibrosis and fibrofatty replacement in both ventricles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a reduction in the C-terminal domain of DP in the skin and oral mucosa. Sequencing of the DP gene showed undescribed mutations in the maternal and paternal alleles. Both mutations affected exon 24 encoding the C-terminal domain. The paternal mutation, c.6310delA, leads to a premature stop codon. The maternal mutation, c.7964 C to A, results in a substitution of an aspartic acid for a conserved alanine residue at amino acid 2655 (A2655D). Structural modeling indicated that this mutation changes the electrostatic potential of the mutated region of DP, possibly altering functions that depend on intermolecular interactions. To conclude, we describe a combination of DP mutation phenotypes affecting the skin, heart, hair, and teeth. This patient case emphasizes the importance of heart examination of patients with desmosomal genodermatoses. PMID:19924139

  9. A Phenotype-Driven Approach to Generate Mouse Models with Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations Causing Mitochondrial Disease.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Johanna H K; Baines, Holly L; Bratic, Ana; Simard, Marie-Lune; Freyer, Christoph; Mourier, Arnaud; Stamp, Craig; Filograna, Roberta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Greaves, Laura C; Stewart, James B

    2016-09-13

    Mutations of mtDNA are an important cause of human disease, but few animal models exist. Because mammalian mitochondria cannot be transfected, the development of mice with pathogenic mtDNA mutations has been challenging, and the main strategy has therefore been to introduce mutations found in cell lines into mouse embryos. Here, we describe a phenotype-driven strategy that is based on detecting clonal expansion of pathogenic mtDNA mutations in colonic crypts of founder mice derived from heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice. As proof of concept, we report the generation of a mouse line transmitting a heteroplasmic pathogenic mutation in the alanine tRNA gene of mtDNA displaying typical characteristics of classic mitochondrial disease. In summary, we describe a straightforward and technically simple strategy based on mouse breeding and histology to generate animal models of mtDNA-mutation disease, which will be of great importance for studies of disease pathophysiology and preclinical treatment trials. PMID:27626666

  10. Seven novel mutations in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene and genotype/phenotype correlations in severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, P.; Frosst, P.; Rosenblatt, D.S.; Rozen. R.

    1995-05-01

    5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, the major form of folate in plasma, is a carbon donor for the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. This form of folate is generated from 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate through the action of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a cytosolic flavoprotein. Patients with an autosomal recessive severe deficiency of MTHFR have homocystinuria and a wide range of neurological and vascular disturbances. We have recently described the isolation of a cDNA for MTHFR and the identification of two mutations in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. We report here the characterization of seven novel mutations in this gene: six missense mutations and a 5{prime} splice-site defect that activates a cryptic splice in the coding sequence. We also present a preliminary analysis of the relationship between genotype and phenotype for all nine mutations identified thus far in this gene. A nonsense mutation and two missense mutations (proline to leucine and threonine to methionine) in the homozygous state are associated with extremely low activity (0%-3%) and onset of symptoms within the 1st year of age. Other missense mutations (arginine to cysteine and arginine to glutamine) are associated with higher enzyme activity and later onset of symptoms. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype–phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal; Rosenberg, Thomas; Beemer, Frits A; Leroy, Jules G; Bendix, Laila; Björck, Erik; Bonduelle, Maryse; Boute, Odile; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; De Die-Smulders, Christine; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Dollfus, Hélène; Elting, Mariet; Green, Andrew; Guerci, Veronica I; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hilhorts-Hofstee, Yvonne; Holder, Muriel; Hoyng, Carel; Jones, Kristi J; Josifova, Dragana; Kaitila, Ilkka; Kjaergaard, Suzanne; Kroes, Yolande H; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Lees, Melissa; LeMerrer, Martine; Magnani, Cinzia; Marcelis, Carlo; Martorell, Loreto; Mathieu, Michèle; McEntagart, Meriel; Mendicino, Angela; Morton, Jenny; Orazio, Gabrielli; Paquis, Véronique; Reish, Orit; Simola, Kalle O J; Smithson, Sarah F; Temple, Karen I; Van Aken, Elisabeth; Van Bever, Yolande; van den Ende, Jenneke; Van Hagen, Johanna M; Zelante, Leopoldo; Zordania, Riina; De Paepe, Anne; Leroy, Bart P; De Buyzere, Marc; Coucke, Paul J; Mortier, Geert R

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effect of splice site alterations was investigated by analyzing mRNA. Multiplex ligation-dependent amplification analysis was used for the detection of intragenic deletions. We identified 77 different COL2A1 mutations in 100 affected individuals. Analysis of the splice site mutations showed unusual RNA isoforms, most of which contained a premature stop codon. Vitreous anomalies and retinal detachments were found more frequently in patients with a COL2A1 mutation compared with the mutation-negative group (P<0.01). Overall, 20 of 23 sporadic patients with a COL2A1 mutation had either a cleft palate or retinal detachment with vitreous anomalies. The presence of vitreous anomalies, retinal tears or detachments, cleft palate and a positive family history were shown to be good indicators for a COL2A1 defect. In conclusion, we confirm that Stickler syndrome type 1 is predominantly caused by loss-of-function mutations in the COL2A1 gene as >90% of the mutations were predicted to result in nonsense-mediated decay. On the basis of binary regression analysis, we developed a scoring system that may be useful when evaluating patients with Stickler syndrome. PMID:20179744

  12. Behavioral phenotypic properties of a natural occurring rat model of congenital stationary night blindness with Cacna1f mutation.

    PubMed

    An, Jing; Wang, Li; Guo, Qun; Li, Li; Xia, Feng; Zhang, Zuoming

    2012-09-01

    Cacna1f gene mutation could lead to incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (iCSNB) disease. The CSNB-like phenotype rat is a spontaneous rat model caused by Cacna1f gene mutation. The present study explored the phenotypic properties of behavior performance in CSNB rats further. The vision-related behaviors of CSNB rats were assessed with a Morris water maze (MWM), passive avoidance tests, and open-field test. Motor ability was evaluated with a rotarod test and a wire hang test, and mechanical pain and thermalgia were used to evaluate sensory system function. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded to evaluate the function of the retina. The vision-related results showed that longer latencies of escape and reduced probe trial in MWM for CSNB rats. There were more errors in avoidance test; CSNB rats were more active in the open field and presented a different pattern of exploration. The locomotor-related behaviors showed shorter falling latencies in the rotarod test and shorter gripping time in CSNB rats. And mechanical thresholds of pain increased in CSNB rats. The ERGs indicated that both the amplitude and latency of rod and cone systems were impaired in the CSNB rats. In summary, Cacna1f gene mutation changed the performance of various behaviors in the CSNB rat aside from vision-related phenotype. Cacna1f gene might play a role in a wide range of responses in the organism. These results confirm the importance of a comprehensive profile for understanding the behavior phenotype of Cacna1f gene mutation in CSNB rat. PMID:22800190

  13. A novel RPE65 hypomorph expands the clinical phenotype of RPE65 mutations. A comprehensive clinical and biochemical functional study

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Birgit; Poliakov, Eugenia; Schambeck, Maria; Friedburg, Christoph; Preising, Markus N.; Redmond, T. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Later onset and progression of retinal dystrophy occur with some RPE65 missense mutations. We correlate the functional consequences of the novel P25L RPE65 mutation with its early childhood phenotype and compare it with other pathogenic missense mutations. Methods In addition to typical clinical tests, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and 2-color-threshold perimetry (2CTP) were measured. RPE65 mutations were screened by SSCP and direct sequencing. Isomerase activity of mutant RPE65 was assayed in 293F cells and quantified by HPLC analysis of retinoids. Results A very mild phenotype was detected in a now 7-y old boy homozygous for the P25L mutation in RPE65. Though abnormal dark adaptation was noticed early, best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 at age 5-y and 20/30 at age 7-y. Nystagmus was absent. Cone electroretinogram (ERG) was measurable, rod ERG severely reduced, and FAF very low. 2CTP detected mainly cone-mediated answers under scotopic conditions, light-adapted cone answers were about 1.5 log units below normal. High resolution spectral domain OCT revealed morphological changes. Isomerase activity in 293F cells transfected with RPE65/P25L was reduced to 7.7% of wildtype RPE65-transfected cells, while RPE65/L22P-transfected cells had 13.5%. Conclusions The mild clinical phenotype observed is consistent with the residual activity of a severely hypomorphic mutant RPE65. Reduction to < 10% of wildtype RPE65 activity by homozygous P25L correlates with almost complete rod function loss and cone amplitude reduction. We conclude that functional survival of cones is possible in patients with residual RPE65 isomerase activity. This patient should profit most from gene therapy. PMID:18599565

  14. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined. PMID:27374774

  15. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined.

  16. Targeted mutations in myostatin by zinc-finger nucleases result in double-muscled phenotype in Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Tang, Maoxue; Yang, Jinzeng; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Jiang, Shengwang; Li, Hegang; Jiang, Ke; Gao, Pengfei; Ma, Dezun; Chen, Yaoxing; An, Xiaorong; Li, Kui; Cui, Wentao

    2015-09-24

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a dominant inhibitor of skeletal muscle development and growth. Mutations in MSTN gene can lead to muscle hypertrophy or double-muscled (DM) phenotype in cattle, sheep, dog and human. However, there has not been reported significant muscle phenotypes in pigs in association with MSTN mutations. Pigs are an important source of meat production, as well as serve as a preferred animal model for the studies of human disease. To study the impacts of MSTN mutations on skeletal muscle growth in pigs, we generated MSTN-mutant Meishan pigs with no marker gene via zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) technology. The MSTN-mutant pigs developed and grew normally, had increased muscle mass with decreased fat accumulation compared with wild type pigs, and homozygote MSTN mutant (MSTN(-/-)) pigs had apparent DM phenotype, and individual muscle mass increased by 100% over their wild-type controls (MSTN(+/+)) at eight months of age as a result of myofiber hyperplasia. Interestingly, 20% MSTN-mutant pigs had one extra thoracic vertebra. The MSTN-mutant pigs will not only offer a way of fast genetic improvement of lean meat for local fat-type indigenous pig breeds, but also serve as an important large animal model for biomedical studies of musculoskeletal formation, development and diseases.

  17. An ABCD1 Mutation (c.253dupC) Caused Diverse Phenotypes of Adrenoleukodystrophy in an Iranian Consanguineous Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Gohari, Faeze; Dizaji, Majid Zaki; Ahani, Ali; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Behnam, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current study was the first to report a consanguineous Iranian pedigree with ABCD1 mutation. Methods Targeted molecular analysis was initially performed in three affected individuals in one family suspected to have X-ALD due to chronic progressive spasticity. Upon confirmation of genetic diagnosis, further neurologic and genetic evaluation of all family members was done. Results A mutation in ABCD1 was identified in 35 affected individuals (out 96 pedigree members). The c. 253dup, in exon 1, leads to a frame shift and a premature stop codon at amino acid position 194 (p.Arg85Profs*110). Surprisingly, affected individuals in our cohort show some variability in phenotype, including childhood cerebral ALD, adrenomyeloneuropathy, and addison-only disease phenotypes, expanding the phenotype of X-ALD with p.Arg85Profs*110. Conclusion This report characterizes the clinical spectrum of an expanded Iranian pedigree with X-ALD due to an ABCD1 mutation. Given a high frequency of carriers in this region, we expect the prevalence of X-ALD to be higher, underscoring the importance of genetic counseling through reliable identification of heterozygous as well as homozygote females in consanguineous communities. PMID:27489563

  18. The expanding phenotypic spectrum of female SLC9A6 mutation carriers: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sinajon, Pierre; Verbaan, Deborah; So, Joyce

    2016-08-01

    Christianson syndrome (OMIM 300243), caused by mutations in the X-linked SLC9A6 gene, is characterized by severe global developmental delay and intellectual disability, developmental regression, epilepsy, microcephaly and impaired ocular movements. It shares many common features with Angelman syndrome. Carrier females have been described as having learning difficulties with mild to moderate intellectual disability, behavioural issues and psychiatric illnesses. There is little literature on the carrier female phenotype of Christianson syndrome. We describe a large extended family with three affected males, four carrier females, one presumed carrier female and one obligate carrier female with a c.190G>T, p.E64X mutation known to cause a premature stop codon in SLC9A6. We characterize and expand the clinical phenotype of female SLC9A6 mutation carriers by comparing our described family with female carriers previously discussed in the literature. In particular, we highlight the neurodevelopmental and psychiatric phenotypes observed in our family and previous reports. PMID:27142213

  19. Targeted mutations in myostatin by zinc-finger nucleases result in double-muscled phenotype in Meishan pigs

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Lili; Tang, Maoxue; Yang, Jinzeng; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Jiang, Shengwang; Li, Hegang; Jiang, Ke; Gao, Pengfei; Ma, Dezun; Chen, Yaoxing; An, Xiaorong; Li, Kui; Cui, Wentao

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a dominant inhibitor of skeletal muscle development and growth. Mutations in MSTN gene can lead to muscle hypertrophy or double-muscled (DM) phenotype in cattle, sheep, dog and human. However, there has not been reported significant muscle phenotypes in pigs in association with MSTN mutations. Pigs are an important source of meat production, as well as serve as a preferred animal model for the studies of human disease. To study the impacts of MSTN mutations on skeletal muscle growth in pigs, we generated MSTN-mutant Meishan pigs with no marker gene via zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) technology. The MSTN-mutant pigs developed and grew normally, had increased muscle mass with decreased fat accumulation compared with wild type pigs, and homozygote MSTN mutant (MSTN−/−) pigs had apparent DM phenotype, and individual muscle mass increased by 100% over their wild-type controls (MSTN+/+) at eight months of age as a result of myofiber hyperplasia. Interestingly, 20% MSTN-mutant pigs had one extra thoracic vertebra. The MSTN-mutant pigs will not only offer a way of fast genetic improvement of lean meat for local fat-type indigenous pig breeds, but also serve as an important large animal model for biomedical studies of musculoskeletal formation, development and diseases. PMID:26400270

  20. Phenotypic profile of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease caused by presenilin-1 E280A mutation.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Glatzel, Markus; Lopera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations are the most common cause of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD). They show a common phenotypic profile characterized by early age of onset, severe dementia and distinct neurodegeneration. The largest population of EOFAD carries the E280A mutation in PS1 and resides in Antioquia, Colombia, currently comprising around 5,000 individuals. Carriers start showing memory impairment in the third decade of life, followed by progressive impairment of language and other cognitive processes. They reach mild cognitive impairment around 45 and dementia around 50 years of age. There is some phenotypic variability among the carriers of this single PS1 mutation. Some patients present with epilepsy, verbal impairment, and cerebellar ataxia. Neuropathologically, PS1 E280A cases show pronounced brain atrophy, severe amyloid-β pathology, distinct hyperphosphorylated tau-related pathology, and cerebellar damage. The earliest event identified by functional magnetic imaging resonance is hyperactivation within the right anterior hippocampus around 33 years of age. This well-studied population with a clear pre-clinical profile and wide phenotypic variability in age of onset and clinical presentation is ideally suited for clinical trials and to study molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22766738

  1. Preservation of cell-survival mechanisms by the presenilin-1 K239N mutation may cause its milder clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sarroca, Sara; Molina-Martínez, Patricia; Aresté, Cristina; Etzrodt, Martin; García de Frutos, Pablo; Gasa, Rosa; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, José Luís; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Saura, Carlos A; Lladó, Albert; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-10-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of monogenic Alzheimer's disease. We studied the functional effects of the mutation K239N, which shows incomplete penetrance at the age of 65 years and compared it with the more aggressive mutation E120G. We engineered stable cell lines expressing human PSEN1 wild type or with K239N or E120G mutations. Both mutations induced dysfunction of γ-secretase in the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor, leading to an increase in the amyloid β42/amyloid β40 ratio. Analysis of homeostatic mechanisms showed that K239N induced lower basal and hydrogen peroxide induced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species than E120G. Similarly, K239N induced lower vulnerability to apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide injury than E120G. Accordingly, the proapoptotic signaling pathways c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase maintained PSEN1-mediated negative regulation in K239N but not in E120G-bearing cells. Furthermore, the activation of the prosurvival signaling pathways mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt was lower in E120G-bearing cells. Therefore, preservation of mechanisms regulating cell responses independent of amyloid-β protein precursor processing may account for the milder phenotype induced by the PSEN1 K239N mutation.

  2. A mutation in the {beta}-myosin rod associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has an unexpected molecular phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Armel, Thomas Z.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common, autosomal dominant disorder primarily characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in youth. HCM is caused by mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, with mutations in MYH7, encoding {beta}-MyHC, being the most common. While many mutations in the globular head region of the protein have been reported and studied, analysis of HCM-causing mutations in the {beta}-MyHC rod domain has not yet been reported. To address this question, we performed an array of biochemical and biophysical assays to determine how the HCM-causing E1356K mutation affects the structure, stability, and function of the {beta}-MyHC rod. Surprisingly, the E1356K mutation appears to thermodynamically destabilize the protein, rather than alter the charge profile know to be essential for muscle filament assembly. This thermodynamic instability appears to be responsible for the decreased ability of the protein to form filaments and may be responsible for the HCM phenotype seen in patients.

  3. Exon skipping causes atypical phenotypes associated with a loss-of-function mutation in FLNA by restoring its protein function.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hirotsugu; Sato, Tatsuhiro; Kunishima, Shinji; Nakagawa, Kenji; Izawa, Kazushi; Hiejima, Eitaro; Kawai, Tomoki; Yasumi, Takahiro; Doi, Hiraku; Katamura, Kenji; Numabe, Hironao; Okamoto, Shinya; Nakase, Hiroshi; Hijikata, Atsushi; Ohara, Osamu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Morisaki, Hiroko; Morisaki, Takayuki; Nunoi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Seisuke; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in filamin A (FLNA) cause an X-linked dominant disorder with multiple organ involvement. Affected females present with periventricular nodular heterotopia (PVNH), cardiovascular complications, thrombocytopenia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These mutations are typically lethal to males, and rare male survivors suffer from failure to thrive, PVNH, and severe cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications. Here we report two surviving male siblings with a loss-of-function mutation in FLNA. They presented with multiple complications, including valvulopathy, intestinal malrotation and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO). However, these siblings had atypical clinical courses, such as a lack of PVNH and a spontaneous improvement of CIPO. Trio-based whole-exome sequencing revealed a 4-bp deletion in exon 40 that was predicted to cause a lethal premature protein truncation. However, molecular investigations revealed that the mutation induced in-frame skipping of the mutated exon, which led to the translation of a mutant FLNA missing an internal region of 41 amino acids. Functional analyses of the mutant protein suggested that its binding affinity to integrin, as well as its capacity to induce focal adhesions, were comparable to those of the wild-type protein. These results suggested that exon skipping of FLNA partially restored its protein function, which could contribute to amelioration of the siblings' clinical courses. This study expands the diversity of the phenotypes associated with loss-of-function mutations in FLNA. PMID:26059841

  4. Preservation of cell-survival mechanisms by the presenilin-1 K239N mutation may cause its milder clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sarroca, Sara; Molina-Martínez, Patricia; Aresté, Cristina; Etzrodt, Martin; García de Frutos, Pablo; Gasa, Rosa; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, José Luís; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Saura, Carlos A; Lladó, Albert; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-10-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of monogenic Alzheimer's disease. We studied the functional effects of the mutation K239N, which shows incomplete penetrance at the age of 65 years and compared it with the more aggressive mutation E120G. We engineered stable cell lines expressing human PSEN1 wild type or with K239N or E120G mutations. Both mutations induced dysfunction of γ-secretase in the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor, leading to an increase in the amyloid β42/amyloid β40 ratio. Analysis of homeostatic mechanisms showed that K239N induced lower basal and hydrogen peroxide induced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species than E120G. Similarly, K239N induced lower vulnerability to apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide injury than E120G. Accordingly, the proapoptotic signaling pathways c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase maintained PSEN1-mediated negative regulation in K239N but not in E120G-bearing cells. Furthermore, the activation of the prosurvival signaling pathways mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt was lower in E120G-bearing cells. Therefore, preservation of mechanisms regulating cell responses independent of amyloid-β protein precursor processing may account for the milder phenotype induced by the PSEN1 K239N mutation. PMID:27498054

  5. Mutational Spectrum in the Δ7-Sterol Reductase Gene and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in 84 Patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Witsch-Baumgartner, M.; Fitzky, B. U.; Ogorelkova, M.; Kraft, H. G.; Moebius, F. F.; Glossmann, H.; Seedorf, U.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Hoffmann, G. F.; Clayton, P.; Kelley, R. I.; Utermann, G.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), an autosomal recessive malformation syndrome, ranges in clinical severity from mild dysmorphism and moderate mental retardation to severe congenital malformation and intrauterine lethality. Mutations in the gene for Δ7-sterol reductase (DHCR7), which catalyzes the final step in cholesterol biosynthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cause SLOS. We have determined, in 84 patients with clinically and biochemically characterized SLOS (detection rate 96%), the mutational spectrum in the DHCR7 gene. Forty different SLOS mutations, some frequent, were identified. On the basis of mutation type and expression studies in the HEK293-derived cell line tsA-201, we grouped mutations into four classes: nonsense and splice-site mutations resulting in putative null alleles, missense mutations in the transmembrane domains (TM), mutations in the 4th cytoplasmic loop (4L), and mutations in the C-terminal ER domain (CT). All but one of the tested missense mutations reduced protein stability. Concentrations of the cholesterol precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol and clinical severity scores correlated with mutation classes. The mildest clinical phenotypes were associated with TM and CT mutations, and the most severe types were associated with 0 and 4L mutations. Most homozygotes for null alleles had severe SLOS; one patient had a moderate phenotype. Homozygosity for 0 mutations in DHCR7 appears compatible with life, suggesting that cholesterol may be synthesized in the absence of this enzyme or that exogenous sources of cholesterol can be used. PMID:10677299

  6. Mutational spectrum in the Delta7-sterol reductase gene and genotype-phenotype correlation in 84 patients with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Witsch-Baumgartner, M; Fitzky, B U; Ogorelkova, M; Kraft, H G; Moebius, F F; Glossmann, H; Seedorf, U; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Hoffmann, G F; Clayton, P; Kelley, R I; Utermann, G

    2000-02-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), an autosomal recessive malformation syndrome, ranges in clinical severity from mild dysmorphism and moderate mental retardation to severe congenital malformation and intrauterine lethality. Mutations in the gene for Delta7-sterol reductase (DHCR7), which catalyzes the final step in cholesterol biosynthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cause SLOS. We have determined, in 84 patients with clinically and biochemically characterized SLOS (detection rate 96%), the mutational spectrum in the DHCR7 gene. Forty different SLOS mutations, some frequent, were identified. On the basis of mutation type and expression studies in the HEK293-derived cell line tsA-201, we grouped mutations into four classes: nonsense and splice-site mutations resulting in putative null alleles, missense mutations in the transmembrane domains (TM), mutations in the 4th cytoplasmic loop (4L), and mutations in the C-terminal ER domain (CT). All but one of the tested missense mutations reduced protein stability. Concentrations of the cholesterol precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol and clinical severity scores correlated with mutation classes. The mildest clinical phenotypes were associated with TM and CT mutations, and the most severe types were associated with 0 and 4L mutations. Most homozygotes for null alleles had severe SLOS; one patient had a moderate phenotype. Homozygosity for 0 mutations in DHCR7 appears compatible with life, suggesting that cholesterol may be synthesized in the absence of this enzyme or that exogenous sources of cholesterol can be used. PMID:10677299

  7. p.Pro4Arg mutation in LMNA gene: a new atypical progeria phenotype without metabolism abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Na; Hao, Fei; Bai, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a typical presenile disorder, with mutation in the LMNA gene. Besides HGPS, mutations in LMNA gene have also been reported in atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). The objective of the study was to investigate the phenotype and molecular basis of APS in a Chinese family. LMNA gene mutations were also reviewed to identify the phenotypic and pathogenic differences among APS. Two siblings in a non-consanguineous Chinese family with atypical progeria were reported. The clinical features were observed, including presenile manifestations such as bird-like facial appearance, generalized lipodystrophy involving the extremities and mottled hyperpigmentation on the trunk and extremities. A heterozygous mutation c.11C>G (p.Pro4Arg) of the LMNA gene was detected in the two patients. 28 different variants of the LMNA gene have been reported in APS families, spreading over almost all the 12 exons of the LMNA gene with some hot-spot regions. This is the first detailed description of an APS family without metabolism abnormalities. APS patients share most of the clinical features, but there may be some distinct features in different ethnic groups.

  8. Novel frameshift mutation in the CACNA1A gene causing a mixed phenotype of episodic ataxia and familiar hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Kinder, S; Ossig, C; Wienecke, M; Beyer, A; von der Hagen, M; Storch, A; Smitka, M

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, MIM#108500) is the most common form of EA and an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of ataxia. The disease causative gene CACNA1A encodes for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel. We report on a family with a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene. The clinical symptoms within the family varied from the typical clinical presentation of EA2 with dysarthria, gait ataxia and oculomotor symptoms to migraine and dystonia. A novel nonsense mutation of the CACNA1A gene was identified in all affected family members and is most likely the disease causing molecular defect. The pharmacological treatment with acetazolamide (AAA) was successful in three family members so far. Treatment with AAA led to a reduction of migraine attacks and an improvement of the dystonia. This relationship confirmed the hypothesis that this novel mutation results in a heterogeneous phenotype and confutes the coincidence with common migraine. Dystonia is potentially included as a further part of the phenotype spectrum of CACNA1A gene mutations.

  9. The SAM domain of ANKS6 has different interacting partners and mutations can induce different cystic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bakey, Zeineb; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Piedagnel, Rémi; Delestré, Laure; Arnould, Catherine; de Villiers, Alexandre d'Hotman; Devuyst, Olivier; Hoffmann, Sigrid; Ronco, Pierre; Gauguier, Dominique; Lelongt, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    The ankyrin repeat and sterile α motif (SAM) domain-containing six gene (Anks6) is a candidate for polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Originally identified in the PKD/Mhm(cy/+) rat model of PKD, the disease is caused by a mutation (R823W) in the SAM domain of the encoded protein. Recent studies support the etiological role of the ANKS6 SAM domain in human cystic diseases, but its function in kidney remains unknown. To investigate the role of ANKS6 in cyst formation, we screened an archive of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-treated mice and derived a strain carrying a missense mutation (I747N) within the SAM domain of ANKS6. This mutation is only six amino acids away from the PKD-causing mutation (R823W) in cy/+ rats. Evidence of renal cysts in these mice confirmed the crucial role of the SAM domain of ANKS6 in kidney function. Comparative phenotype analysis in cy/+ rats and our Anks6(I747N) mice further showed that the two models display noticeably different PKD phenotypes and that there is a defective interaction between ANKS6 with ANKS3 in the rat and between ANKS6 and BICC1 (bicaudal C homolog 1) in the mouse. Thus, our data demonstrate the importance of ANKS6 for kidney structure integrity and the essential mediating role of its SAM domain in the formation of protein complexes.

  10. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family's phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  11. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  12. Systems-level response to point mutations in a core metabolic enzyme modulates genotype-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, Shimon; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Budnik, Bogdan; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2015-04-28

    Linking the molecular effects of mutations to fitness is central to understanding evolutionary dynamics. Here, we establish a quantitative relation between the global effect of mutations on the E. coli proteome and bacterial fitness. We created E. coli strains with specific destabilizing mutations in the chromosomal folA gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and quantified the ensuing changes in the abundances of 2,000+ E. coli proteins in mutant strains using tandem mass tags with subsequent LC-MS/MS. mRNA abundances in the same E. coli strains were also quantified. The proteomic effects of mutations in DHFR are quantitatively linked to phenotype: the SDs of the distributions of logarithms of relative (to WT) protein abundances anticorrelate with bacterial growth rates. Proteomes hierarchically cluster first by media conditions, and within each condition, by the severity of the perturbation to DHFR function. These results highlight the importance of a systems-level layer in the genotype-phenotype relationship. PMID:25892240

  13. Recurrent mutation in CDMP1 in a family with Grebe chondrodysplasia: broadening the phenotypic manifestation of syndrome in Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Sara; Riaz, Hafiza Fizzah; Touseef, Mohammad; Basit, Sulman; Faiyaz Ul Haque, Muhammad; Malik, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Grebe syndrome (OMIM-200700) is a very rare type of acromesomelic dysplasia with autosomal recessive inheritance. We studied a Pakistani family with two affected individuals having typical features of Grebe chondrodysplasia. Patients were observed with short and deformed limbs having a proximo-distal gradient of severity. Hind-limbs were more severely affected than fore-limbs. Digits on autopods were very short and nonfunctional. Index subject also had nearsightedness. However, symptoms in the craniofacial and axial skeleton were minimal. Genetic analysis revealed four base pair insertion mutation (c.1114insGAGT) in gene coding cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1 (CDMP1). This mutation was predicted to cause premature stop codon. The clinical presentation in this study broadens the range of phenotypes associated with CDMP1 mutation in Pakistani population. PMID:26870132

  14. Recurrent mutation in CDMP1 in a family with Grebe chondrodysplasia: broadening the phenotypic manifestation of syndrome in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sara; Riaz, Hafiza Fizzah; Touseef, Mohammad; Basit, Sulman; Haque, Muhammad Faiyaz Ul; Malik, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Grebe syndrome (OMIM-200700) is a very rare type of acromesomelic dysplasia with autosomal recessive inheritance. We studied a Pakistani family with two affected individuals having typical features of Grebe chondrodysplasia. Patients were observed with short and deformed limbs having a proximo-distal gradient of severity. Hind-limbs were more severely affected than fore-limbs. Digits on autopods were very short and nonfunctional. Index subject also had nearsightedness. However, symptoms in the craniofacial and axial skeleton were minimal. Genetic analysis revealed four base pair insertion mutation (c.1114insGAGT) in gene coding cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1 (CDMP1). This mutation was predicted to cause premature stop codon. The clinical presentation in this study broadens the range of phenotypes associated with CDMP1 mutation in Pakistani population. PMID:26870132

  15. Modeling the effect of p53 on tumor heterogeneity and the mutator phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Melissa; Berryman, Matthew J.; Abbott, Derek

    2005-02-01

    p53 is an important gene, involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death), DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. We explore the selective advantages and disadvantages of mutations in the p53 gene on tumor cells, and the heterogeneity of tumor cell populations. Based on an evolutionary computational approach, our model considers changes in mutation rate caused by lack of DNA repair processes, and the lack of apoptosis caused by mutations in p53. We find that the degree of robustness of p53 to mutations has a significant effect on the tumor heterogeneity and "fitness", with clinical consequences for people who inherit p53 mutations.

  16. HFE gene mutation (C282Y) and phenotypic expression among a hospitalised population in a high prevalence area of haemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Distante, S; Berg, J; Lande, K; Haug, E; Bell, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Previous studies have shown that up to 0.5% of the Caucasian population is homozygous for the HFE gene C282Y mutation. High prevalence values have been reported in Northern Europe. To what extent the presence of this mutation is associated with overt clinical haemochromatosis is unclear.
AIM—To determine the prevalence of the C282Y allele in a hospitalised population of an acute medical department, and study the phenotypic expression in the homozygotes.
METHODS—Blood samples were obtained from 2027 hospitalised patients; 1900 Caucasians and 127 non-Caucasians. Serum iron, transferrin, and ferritin were measured at admission. The presence of the HFE gene mutation was determined by polymerase chain reaction based analysis. Follow up fasting blood samples were obtained from patients homozygous for the mutation.
RESULTS—Fourteen of the 1900 Caucasian subjects (0.74%) were homozygous and 224 (11.8%) were heterozygous for the C282Y mutation, including 32 subjects (1.7%) who were compound heterozygous for the C282Y and H63D mutations. Ten of 14 (71%) homozygous patients displayed mild to moderate biochemical expression of haemochromatosis with a serum ferritin level <550 µg/l, two (14%) patients were "non expressing", and two of five in whom liver biopsies were carried out had cirrhosis, including one with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.
CONCLUSIONS—The prevalence of C282Y homozygosity in a hospitalised population was 0.74%. However, the majority of homozygous patients displayed mild to moderate biochemical expression. C282Y mutation screening may detect individuals that do not develop haemochromatosis. Transferrin saturation and ferritin, which are used as first line screening in haemochromatosis, may be highly unreliable in the presence of an inflammatory process.


Keywords: haemochromatosis; HFE gene mutation; inherited disorders; screening; ferritin; transferrin saturation PMID:10986220

  17. Distinct phenotype of a Wilson disease mutation reveals a novel trafficking determinant in the copper transporter ATP7B

    PubMed Central

    Braiterman, Lelita T.; Murthy, Amrutha; Jayakanthan, Samuel; Nyasae, Lydia; Tzeng, Eric; Gromadzka, Grazyna; Woolf, Thomas B.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Hubbard, Ann L.

    2014-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a monogenic autosomal-recessive disorder of copper accumulation that leads to liver failure and/or neurological deficits. WD is caused by mutations in ATP7B, a transporter that loads Cu(I) onto newly synthesized cupro-enzymes in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and exports excess copper out of cells by trafficking from the TGN to the plasma membrane. To date, most WD mutations have been shown to disrupt ATP7B activity and/or stability. Using a multidisciplinary approach, including clinical analysis of patients, cell-based assays, and computational studies, we characterized a patient mutation, ATP7BS653Y, which is stable, does not disrupt Cu(I) transport, yet renders the protein unable to exit the TGN. Bulky or charged substitutions at position 653 mimic the phenotype of the patient mutation. Molecular modeling and dynamic simulation suggest that the S653Y mutation induces local distortions within the transmembrane (TM) domain 1 and alter TM1 interaction with TM2. S653Y abolishes the trafficking-stimulating effects of a secondary mutation in the N-terminal apical targeting domain. This result indicates a role for TM1/TM2 in regulating conformations of cytosolic domains involved in ATP7B trafficking. Taken together, our experiments revealed an unexpected role for TM1/TM2 in copper-regulated trafficking of ATP7B and defined a unique class of WD mutants that are transport-competent but trafficking-defective. Understanding the precise consequences of WD-causing mutations will facilitate the development of advanced mutation-specific therapies. PMID:24706876

  18. Adaptive mutations in Salmonella typhimurium phenotypic of purR super-repression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwei; Lu, Zhong; Wang, Aoquan

    2006-03-20

    Under non-lethal selective conditions, a non-dividing or very slowly dividing microbial population gives rise to mutations that relieve selective pressures. This process is described as adaptive mutation. Salmonella typhimurium strain 5-28 has been used as a system for studying adaptive mutations in the chromosomal regulatory gene purR and its target, the purD operator. When this strain is plated on a minimal lactose medium, no apparent growth of parent lawn is observed, yet the revertant colonies accumulate over a period of time. Analysis of the purR mutational spectra showed that the frequencies of transitions and transversions were not significantly different among the growth-dependent and adaptive mutations. But the frequencies for five kinds of -1 frameshifts were significantly different between the growth-dependent and adaptive types. Among the growth-dependent mutations, most one-base deletions occurred in non-iterated bases and were distributed randomly. Among adaptive mutations, the frequency of one-base deletions in small mononucleotide repeats was higher and mutations were concentrated at three hotspots. One-base deletion in small mononucleotide repeats are generally believed to result from DNA polymerase slippage errors, which are not corrected by DNA repair machinery. We further investigated the role of DNA repair on adaptive mutation. Our results showed that the mismatch repair (MMR) might function less efficiently during adaptive mutation. However, DNA oxidative damage repair seemed no less effective in correcting errors under selective pressures than during non-selective growth.

  19. Targeting the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null phenotype in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with pro-oxidants

    PubMed Central

    Agathanggelou, Angelo; Weston, Victoria J.; Perry, Tracey; Davies, Nicholas J.; Skowronska, Anna; Payne, Daniel T.; Fossey, John S.; Oldreive, Ceri E.; Wei, Wenbin; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Oscier, David; Coles, Steve J.; Hole, Paul S.; Darley, Richard L.; McMahon, Michael; Hayes, John D.; Moss, Paul; Stewart, Grant S.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia results in resistance to p53-dependent apoptosis and inferior responses to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Hence, p53-independent strategies are required to target Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-deficient chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated has been implicated in redox homeostasis, we investigated the effect of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia genotype on cellular responses to oxidative stress with a view to therapeutic targeting. We found that in comparison to Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-wild type chronic lymphocytic leukemia, pro-oxidant treatment of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null cells led to reduced binding of NF-E2 p45-related factor-2 to antioxidant response elements and thus decreased expression of target genes. Furthermore, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells contained lower levels of antioxidants and elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Consequently, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not tumors with 11q deletion or TP53 mutations, exhibited differentially increased sensitivity to pro-oxidants both in vitro and in vivo. We found that cell death was mediated by a p53- and caspase-independent mechanism associated with apoptosis inducing factor activity. Together, these data suggest that defective redox-homeostasis represents an attractive therapeutic target for Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:25840602

  20. Severe congenital lipodystrophy and a progeroid appearance: Mutation in the penultimate exon of FBN1 causing a recognizable phenotype.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Hida, Mariko; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-12-01

    Recently, three marfanoid patients with congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance were reported. Although their phenotype was distinct from that of classic Marfan syndrome, they all had a truncating mutation in the penultimate exon, i.e., exon 64, of FBN1, the causative gene for Marfan syndrome. These patients might represent a new entity, but the exact phenotypic and genotypic spectrum remains unknown. Here, we report on a girl born prematurely who exhibited severe congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance. The patient exhibited a characteristic growth pattern consisting of an accelerated growth in height with a discrepant poor weight gain. She had a characteristic facial appearance with craniosynostosis. A mutation analysis identified c.8175_8182del8bp, p.Arg2726Glufs*9 in exon 64 of the FBN1 gene. A review of similar, recently reported patients revealed that the cardinal features of these patients include (1) congenital lipodystrophy, (2) premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to the weight gain, and (3) a progeroid appearance with distinct facial features. Lines of molecular evidence suggested that this new progeroid syndrome represents a neomorphic phenotype caused by truncated transcripts with an extremely charged protein motif that escapes from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, altering FBN1-TGF beta signaling, rather than representing the severe end of the hypomorphic phenotype of the FBN1-TGF beta disorder spectrum. We propose that this marfanoid entity comprised of congenital lipodystrophy, a neonatal progeroid appearance, and a peculiar growth profile and caused by rare mutations in the penultimate exon of FBN1, be newly referred to as marfanoid-progeroid syndrome.

  1. A phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis screen for the identification of dominant mutations involved in alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Cornelius R; Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Soewarto, Dian; Wagner, Sibylle; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Spanagel, Rainer

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was the application of a phenotype-driven N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen in mice for the identification of dominant mutations involved in the regulation and modulation of alcohol-drinking behavior. The chemical mutagen ENU was utilized in the generation of 131 male ENU-mutant C57BL/6J mice (G0). These ENU-treated mice were paired with wild-type C57BL/6J mice to generate G1 and subsequent generations. In total, 3327 mice were generated. Starting with G1, mice were screened for voluntary oral self-administration of 10% (v/v) alcohol vs. water in a two-bottle paradigm. From these mice, after a total period of 5 weeks of drinking, 43 mutants fulfilled the criteria of an "alcohol phenotype," that is, high or low ethanol intake. They were then selected for breeding and tested in a "confirmation cross" (G2-G4) for inheritance. Although we did not establish stable high or low drinking lines, several results were obtained in the context of alcohol consumption. First, female mice drank more alcohol than their male counterparts. Second, the former demonstrated greater infertility. Third, all animals displayed relatively stable alcohol intake, although significantly different in two different laboratories. Finally, seasonal and monthly variability was observed, with the highest alcohol consumption occurring in spring and the lowest in autumn. In conclusion, it seems difficult to identify dominant mutations involved in the modulation or regulation of voluntary alcohol consumption via a phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis screen. In accordance with the findings from knockout studies, we suggest that mainly recessive mutations contribute to an alcohol-drinking or alcohol-avoiding phenotype.

  2. Severe congenital lipodystrophy and a progeroid appearance: Mutation in the penultimate exon of FBN1 causing a recognizable phenotype.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Hida, Mariko; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-12-01

    Recently, three marfanoid patients with congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance were reported. Although their phenotype was distinct from that of classic Marfan syndrome, they all had a truncating mutation in the penultimate exon, i.e., exon 64, of FBN1, the causative gene for Marfan syndrome. These patients might represent a new entity, but the exact phenotypic and genotypic spectrum remains unknown. Here, we report on a girl born prematurely who exhibited severe congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance. The patient exhibited a characteristic growth pattern consisting of an accelerated growth in height with a discrepant poor weight gain. She had a characteristic facial appearance with craniosynostosis. A mutation analysis identified c.8175_8182del8bp, p.Arg2726Glufs*9 in exon 64 of the FBN1 gene. A review of similar, recently reported patients revealed that the cardinal features of these patients include (1) congenital lipodystrophy, (2) premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to the weight gain, and (3) a progeroid appearance with distinct facial features. Lines of molecular evidence suggested that this new progeroid syndrome represents a neomorphic phenotype caused by truncated transcripts with an extremely charged protein motif that escapes from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, altering FBN1-TGF beta signaling, rather than representing the severe end of the hypomorphic phenotype of the FBN1-TGF beta disorder spectrum. We propose that this marfanoid entity comprised of congenital lipodystrophy, a neonatal progeroid appearance, and a peculiar growth profile and caused by rare mutations in the penultimate exon of FBN1, be newly referred to as marfanoid-progeroid syndrome. PMID:24039054

  3. Expanded phenotypic spectrum of the m.8344A>G "MERRF" mutation: data from the German mitoNET registry.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Judith; Büchner, Boriana; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Schäfer, Jochen; Jackson, Sandra; Lehmann, Diana; Deschauer, Marcus; Kopajtich, Robert; Lautenschläger, Ronald; Kuhn, Klaus A; Karle, Kathrin; Schöls, Ludger; Schulz, Jörg B; Weis, Joachim; Prokisch, Holger; Kornblum, Cornelia; Claeys, Kristl G; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The m.8344A>G mutation in the MTTK gene, which encodes the mitochondrial transfer RNA for lysine, is traditionally associated with myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibres (MERRF), a multisystemic mitochondrial disease that is characterised by myoclonus, seizures, cerebellar ataxia, and mitochondrial myopathy with ragged-red fibres. We studied the clinical and paraclinical phenotype of 34 patients with the m.8344A>G mutation, mainly derived from the nationwide mitoREGISTER, the multicentric registry of the German network for mitochondrial disorders (mitoNET). Mean age at symptom onset was 24.5 years ±10.9 (6-48 years) with adult onset in 75 % of the patients. In our cohort, the canonical features seizures, myoclonus, cerebellar ataxia and ragged-red fibres that are traditionally associated with MERRF, occurred in only 61, 59, 70, and 63 % of the patients, respectively. In contrast, other features such as hearing impairment were even more frequently present (72 %). Other common features in our cohort were migraine (52 %), psychiatric disorders (54 %), respiratory dysfunction (45 %), gastrointestinal symptoms (38 %), dysarthria (36 %), and dysphagia (35 %). Brain MRI revealed cerebral and/or cerebellar atrophy in 43 % of our patients. There was no correlation between the heteroplasmy level in blood and age at onset or clinical phenotype. Our findings further broaden the clinical spectrum of the m.8344A>G mutation, document the large clinical variability between carriers of the same mutation, even within families and indicate an overlap of the phenotype with other mitochondrial DNA-associated syndromes. PMID:26995359

  4. New Findings in a Global Approach to Dissect the Whole Phenotype of PLA2G6 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Mundwiller, Emeline; Khan, Arif O.; AlDrees, Abdulmajeed; Elmalik, Salah A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkhalidi, Hisham M. S.; Katona, Istvan; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Chrast, Roman; Kentab, Amal Y.; Alzaidan, Hamad; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Bosley, Thomas M.; Weis, Joachim; Koenig, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PLA2G6 gene have variable phenotypic outcome including infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, atypical neuroaxonal dystrophy, idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation and Karak syndrome. The cause of this phenotypic variation is so far unknown which impairs both genetic diagnosis and appropriate family counseling. We report detailed clinical, electrophysiological, neuroimaging, histologic, biochemical and genetic characterization of 11 patients, from 6 consanguineous families, who were followed for a period of up to 17 years. Cerebellar atrophy was constant and the earliest feature of the disease preceding brain iron accumulation, leading to the provisional diagnosis of a recessive progressive ataxia in these patients. Ultrastructural characterization of patients’ muscle biopsies revealed focal accumulation of granular and membranous material possibly resulting from defective membrane homeostasis caused by disrupted PLA2G6 function. Enzyme studies in one of these muscle biopsies provided evidence for a relatively low mitochondrial content, which is compatible with the structural mitochondrial alterations seen by electron microscopy. Genetic characterization of 11 patients led to the identification of six underlying PLA2G6 gene mutations, five of which are novel. Importantly, by combining clinical and genetic data we have observed that while the phenotype of neurodegeneration associated with PLA2G6 mutations is variable in this cohort of patients belonging to the same ethnic background, it is partially influenced by the genotype, considering the age at onset and the functional disability criteria. Molecular testing for PLA2G6 mutations is, therefore, indicated in childhood-onset ataxia syndromes, if neuroimaging shows cerebellar atrophy with or without evidence of iron accumulation. PMID:24130795

  5. Mutations in MITF and PAX3 Cause “Splashed White” and Other White Spotting Phenotypes in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Marlis; Brooks, Samantha A.; Burger, Dominik; Drögemüller, Cord; Gerber, Vincent; Henke, Diana; Janda, Jozef; Jude, Rony; Magdesian, K. Gary; Matthews, Jacqueline M.; Poncet, Pierre-André; Svansson, Vilhjálmur; Tozaki, Teruaki; Wilkinson-White, Lorna; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso

    2012-01-01

    During fetal development neural-crest-derived melanoblasts migrate across the entire body surface and differentiate into melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells. Alterations in this precisely regulated process can lead to white spotting patterns. White spotting patterns in horses are a complex trait with a large phenotypic variance ranging from minimal white markings up to completely white horses. The “splashed white” pattern is primarily characterized by an extremely large blaze, often accompanied by extended white markings at the distal limbs and blue eyes. Some, but not all, splashed white horses are deaf. We analyzed a Quarter Horse family segregating for the splashed white coat color. Genome-wide linkage analysis in 31 horses gave a positive LOD score of 1.6 in a region on chromosome 6 containing the PAX3 gene. However, the linkage data were not in agreement with a monogenic inheritance of a single fully penetrant mutation. We sequenced the PAX3 gene and identified a missense mutation in some, but not all, splashed white Quarter Horses. Genome-wide association analysis indicated a potential second signal near MITF. We therefore sequenced the MITF gene and found a 10 bp insertion in the melanocyte-specific promoter. The MITF promoter variant was present in some splashed white Quarter Horses from the studied family, but also in splashed white horses from other horse breeds. Finally, we identified two additional non-synonymous mutations in the MITF gene in unrelated horses with white spotting phenotypes. Thus, several independent mutations in MITF and PAX3 together with known variants in the EDNRB and KIT genes explain a large proportion of horses with the more extreme white spotting phenotypes. PMID:22511888

  6. A common cancer-associated DNA polymerase ε mutation causes an exceptionally strong mutator phenotype, indicating fidelity defects distinct from loss of proofreading.

    PubMed

    Kane, Daniel P; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2014-04-01

    Exonucleolytic proofreading and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) act in series to maintain high-fidelity DNA replication and to avoid mutagenesis. MMR defects elevate the overall mutation rate and are associated with increased cancer incidence. Hypermutable colorectal and endometrial tumors with functional MMR were recently reported to carry amino acid substitutions in the exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase ε (Polε). This created a notion that loss of the proofreading activity of Polε is an initiating cause of some sporadic human cancers. In this study, we identified a somatic P286R substitution in the conserved ExoI motif of Polε in a collection of 52 sporadic colorectal tumor specimens. This change has been repeatedly observed in colorectal and endometrial tumors in previous studies despite many possible ways to inactivate Polε proofreading. To understand the reasons for the recurrent appearance of the P286R variant, we characterized its functional consequences using the yeast model system. An analogous substitution in the yeast Polε produced an unusually strong mutator phenotype exceeding that of proofreading-deficient mutants by two orders of magnitude. This argues that the P286R mutation acts at some level other than loss of exonuclease to elevate cancer risk. Heterozygosity for the variant allele caused a strong mutator effect comparable with that of complete MMR deficiency, providing an explanation for why loss of heterozygosity is not required for the development of Polε-mutant human tumors.

  7. The phenotypes of temperature-sensitive mini-RK2 replicons carrying mutations in the replication control gene trfA are suppressed nonspecifically by intragenic cop mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Haugan, K; Karunakaran, P; Blatny, J M; Valla, S

    1992-01-01

    The minimal replicon of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 consists of the origin of vegetative replication (oriV) and a gene (trfA) encoding an essential replication protein that binds to short repeats in oriV. We report here the results of a DNA sequence analysis of seven unique mutants that are temperature sensitive for replication in Escherichia coli. The mutations (designated rts) were distributed throughout 40% of the downstream part of the trfA gene. Spontaneous revertants of the rts mutants were isolated, and further analysis of four such revertants demonstrated that the new phenotypes resulted from intragenic second-site copy up (cop) mutations. Subcloning experiments showed that all tested intragenic combinations of rts and cop mutations resulted in elimination or strong reduction of the temperature sensitivity of replication. This suppression was also observed under conditions where the mutant TrfA protein was provided in trans with respect to oriV, indicating that the reduction in temperature sensitivity could not be a TrfA protein dosage effect. The phenotypes of two of the cop mutants in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were analyzed; the results demonstrated that the mutants were either not functional or poorly functional in this host. The rts mutant plasmids were also reduced in their ability to replicate in P. aeruginosa, and the intragenic cop mutations did not improve the functionality of these mutants. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to current models of the mechanism of action of the TrfA protein. PMID:1400252

  8. Clinical phenotype and mutation spectrum of the CYP21A2 gene in patients with steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-H; Jin, H-Y; Lee, B H; Ko, J M; Lee, J-J; Kim, G-H; Jung, C-W; Lee, J; Yoo, H-W

    2012-01-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by inactivating mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. This paper reports on the mutation spectrum and the genotype-phenotype correlation of 21-hydroxylase deficiency. 72 unrelated patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were included. Molecular analysis of CYP21A2 was performed, via the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis and sequence-specific differenzial PCR amplification of the CYP21A2 and CYP21A1P genes, using 4 pair-wise sequence-specific primers, followed by sequencing of the entire CYP21A2 gene. Large gene deletions were identified in 45 (31.3%) of the 144 unrelated CAH alleles, whereas the most frequent point mutations were intron 2 splice mutations (c.293-13A>G) (41/144, 28.5%). The MLPA analysis successfully identified 23 of 72 patients (31.9%) with single copy deletion in CYP21A2. This paper describes a rapid and accurate method for the molecular diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, which relies on the identification of point mutations and structural rearrangements within the CYP21A2 gene.

  9. A compound heterozygote harboring novel and recurrent DTDST mutations with intermediate phenotype between atelosteogenesis type II and diastrophic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Koichi; Miyamoto, Yoshinari; Sawai, Hideaki; Karniski, Lawrence P; Nakashima, Eiji; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2006-06-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) is a sulfate transporter required for the synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans in the cartilage. Over 30 mutations have been described in the DTDST gene, which result in a continuous clinical spectrum of recessively inherited chondrodysplasias, including, in order of increasing severity, a recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED), diastrophic dysplasia (DTD), atelosteogenesis type II (AO-II) and achondrogenesis 1B (ACG-1B). Correlation between disease severity and residual sulfate transport activity has been reported. Here we report a patient with DTDST mutations, whose manifestations fell in a range between AO-II and DTD. The patient was a compound heterozygote for the recurrent c.835C>T (p.R279W) and novel c.1987G>A (p.G663R) mutations. Immunocytochemical analysis in HEK293 cells showed that the p.G663R mutation was localized within the cytoplasm, and not to the cell membrane, suggesting p.G663R is a loss-of-function mutation. Our case supports the previously described correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the putative level of residual transport function. PMID:16642506

  10. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saleha, Shamim; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jamil, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    AIM To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. RESULTS By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A) of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. CONCLUSION The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment. PMID:27275418

  11. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mutations.

    PubMed

    Dogruluk, Turgut; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Espitia, Maribel; Chen, Fengju; Chen, Tenghui; Chong, Zechen; Appadurai, Vivek; Dogruluk, Armel; Eterovic, Agna Karina; Bonnen, Penelope E; Creighton, Chad J; Chen, Ken; Mills, Gordon B; Scott, Kenneth L

    2015-12-15

    Large-scale sequencing efforts are uncovering the complexity of cancer genomes, which are composed of causal "driver" mutations that promote tumor progression along with many more pathologically neutral "passenger" events. The majority of mutations, both in known cancer drivers and uncharacterized genes, are generally of low occurrence, highlighting the need to functionally annotate the long tail of infrequent mutations present in heterogeneous cancers. Here we describe a mutation assessment pipeline enabled by high-throughput engineering of molecularly barcoded gene variant expression clones identified by tumor sequencing. We first used this platform to functionally assess tail mutations observed in PIK3CA, which encodes the catalytic subunit alpha of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) frequently mutated in cancer. Orthogonal screening for PIK3CA variant activity using in vitro and in vivo cell growth and transformation assays differentiated driver from passenger mutations, revealing that PIK3CA variant activity correlates imperfectly with its mutation frequency across breast cancer populations. Although PIK3CA mutations with frequencies above 5% were significantly more oncogenic than wild-type in all assays, mutations occurring at 0.07% to 5.0% included those with and without oncogenic activities that ranged from weak to strong in at least one assay. Proteomic profiling coupled with therapeutic sensitivity assays on PIK3CA variant-expressing cell models revealed variant-specific activation of PI3K signaling as well as other pathways that include the MEK1/2 module of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Our data indicate that cancer treatments will need to increasingly consider the functional relevance of specific mutations in driver genes rather than considering all mutations in drivers as equivalent. PMID:26627007

  12. Mutation Analysis of 16 Mucolipidosis II and III Alpha/Beta Chinese Children Revealed Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Weimin; Shi, Huiping; Yao, Fengxia; Wei, Min; Qiu, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II and III alpha/beta are autosomal recessive diseases caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene which encodes the α and β subunits of the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. Clinically, mucolipidosis II (MLII) is characterized by severe developmental delay, coarse facial features, skeletal deformities, and other systemic involvement. In contrast, MLIII alpha/beta is a much milder disorder, the symptoms of which include progressive joint stiffness, short stature, and scoliosis. To study the relationship between the genotypes and phenotypes of the MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients, we analyzed the GNPTAB gene in 16 Chinese MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients. We collected and analyzed the patients’ available clinical data and all showed clinical features typical of MLII or MLIII alpha/beta. Moreover, the activity of several lysosomal enzymes was measured in the plasma and finally the GNPTAB gene was sequenced. We detected 30 mutant alleles out of 32 alleles in our patients. These include 10 new mutations (c.99delC, c.118-1G>A, c.523_524delAAinsG, c.1212C>G, c.2213C>A, c.2345C>T, c.2356C>T, c.2455G>T, c.2821dupA, and c.3136-2A>G) and 5 previously reported mutations (c.1071G>A, c.1090C>T, c.2715+1G>A, c.2550_2554delGAAA, and c.3613C>T). The most frequent mutation was the splicing mutation c.2715+1G>A, which accounted for 28% of the mutations. The majority of the mutations reported in the Chinese patients (57%) were located on exon 13 or in its intronic flanking regions. PMID:27662472

  13. Female receptivity phenotype of icebox mutants caused by a mutation in the L1-type cell adhesion molecule neuroglian.

    PubMed

    Carhan, A; Allen, F; Armstrong, J D; Hortsch, M; Goodwin, S F; O'Dell, K M C

    2005-11-01

    Relatively little is known about the genes and brain structures that enable virgin female Drosophila to make the decision to mate or not. Classical genetic approaches have identified several mutant females that have a reluctance-to-mate phenotype, but most of these have additional behavioral defects. However, the icebox (ibx) mutation was previously reported to lower the sexual receptivity of females, without apparently affecting any other aspect of female behavior. We have shown that the ibx mutation maps to the 7F region of the Drosophila X chromosome to form a complex complementation group with both lethal and viable alleles of neuroglian (nrg). The L1-type cell adhesion molecule encoded by nrg consists of six immunoglobulin-like domains, five fibronectin-like domains, one transmembrane domain and one alternatively spliced intracellular domain. The ibx strain has a missense mutation causing a glycine-to-arginine change at amino acid 92 in the first immunoglobulin domain of nrg. Defects in the central brain of ibx mutants are similar to those observed in another nrg mutant, central brain deranged(1) (ceb(1)). However, both ceb(1) homozygous and ceb(1)/ibx heterozygous females are receptive. The expression of a transgene containing the non-neural isoform of nrg rescues both the receptivity and the brain structure phenotypes of ibx females.

  14. A relatively mild skeletal ciliopathy phenotype consistent with cranioectodermal dysplasia is associated with a homozygous nonsynonymous mutation in WDR35.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher; Lamont, Ryan E; Wade, Andrew; Bernier, Francois P; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil

    2016-03-01

    Ciliopathies are a class of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by deficits of the primary cilium, an important organelle for cellular signaling and development. Here we report on a patient from a consanguineous family presenting with renal cysts, short stature, distinctive facial features, missing teeth, brachydactyly, narrow chest, and abnormal ribs. His phenotype resembled a skeletal ciliopathy and the initial clinical differential diagnosis included Jeune thoracic dystrophy and cranioectodermal dysplasia. Due to the presence of parental consanguinity, a homozygous recessive mutation was the suspected cause and homozygosity mapping was used to direct candidate gene sequencing. WDR35, an intraflagellar transport protein previously associated with cranioectodermal dysplasia, the more severe short rib polydactyly syndrome type V and recently Ellis van Creveld syndrome, is present within a region of homozygosity and sequencing of all coding exons identified a novel homozygous nonsynonymous variant, p.Trp1153Cys. This variant affects a highly conserved tryptophan residue, is predicted to be deleterious, and is the most distal mutation yet reported in WDR35. This case expands the spectrum of phenotypes caused by WDR35 mutations, which we review herein. PMID:26691894

  15. Genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients compound heterozygous for the A455E mutation.

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, M; Allard, C; Leblanc, J P; Simard, F; Aubin, G

    1997-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a high incidence in the French-Canadian population of Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (Quebec). The A455E mutation accounts for 8.3% of the CF chromosomes. This mutation was shown to be associated with a milder lung disease in the Dutch population. Twenty two CF patients distributed in 17 families and compound heterozygotes for the A455E mutation have been followed at the Clinique de Fibrose Kystique de Chicoutimi. Fourteen patients also carried the delta F508 mutation while the remaining eight patients had the 621 + 1G-->T mutation. Each patient was matched by sex and age to a patient homozygous for the delta F508 mutation. The pairs were analyzed for several clinical and laboratory variables. The A455E compound heterozygotes were diagnosed at a later age (P = 0.003) and had chloride concentrations at the sweat test lower than those homozygous for the delta F508 mutation (P = 0.007). More patients were pancreatic sufficient (P = 0.004). They had a higher Shwachman score (P = 0.001) and better pulmonary function tests (P < 0.02). CF patients compound heterozygous for the A455E mutation have a milder pancreatic and lung disease than the delta F508 homozygotes. Therefore, the A455E should be associated with a better prognosis.

  16. REEP1 Mutation Spectrum and Genotype/Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beetz, Christian; Schule, Rebecca; Deconinck, Tine; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Zhu, Hui; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. G.; Byrne, Paula; Otto, Susanne; Nygren, Anders O. H.; Baets, Jonathan; Smets, Katrien; Ceulemans, Berten; Dan, Bernard; Nagan, Narasimhan; Kassubek, Jan; Klimpe, Sven; Klopstock, Thomas; Stolze, Henning; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T. R. M.; Hutchinson, Michael; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Braastad, Corey; Deufel, Thomas; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Schols, Ludger; de Jonghe, Peter; Zuchner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1) have recently been reported to cause autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) type SPG31. In a large collaborative effort, we screened a sample of 535 unrelated HSP patients for "REEP1" mutations and copy number variations. We identified 13 novel and 2 known "REEP1"…

  17. Spectrum of MKS1 and MKS3 mutations in Meckel syndrome: a genotype-phenotype correlation. Mutation in brief #960. Online.

    PubMed

    Khaddour, Rana; Smith, Ursula; Baala, Lekbir; Martinovic, Jéléna; Clavering, Davina; Shaffiq, Rizwana; Ozilou, Catherine; Cullinane, Andrew; Kyttälä, Mira; Shalev, Stavit; Audollent, Sophie; d'Humières, Camille; Kadhom, Noman; Esculpavit, Chantal; Viot, Géraldine; Boone, Claire; Oien, Christine; Encha-Razavi, Férechté; Batman, Philip A; Bennett, Christopher P; Woods, C Geoffrey; Roume, Joelle; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Génin, Emmanuelle; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Cox, Phillip; Macdonald, Fiona; Vekemans, Michel; Johnson, Colin A; Attié-Bitach, Tania

    2007-05-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a rare autosomal recessive lethal condition characterized by central nervous system malformations (typically occipital meningoencephalocele), postaxial polydactyly, multicystic kidney dysplasia, and ductal proliferation in the portal area of the liver. MKS is genetically heterogeneous and three loci have been mapped respectively on 17q23 (MKS1), 11q13 (MKS2), and 8q24 (MKS3). Very recently, two genes have been identified: MKS1/FLJ20345 on 17q in Finnish kindreds, carrying the same intronic deletion, c.1408-35_c.1408-7del29, and MKS3/TMEM67 on 8q in families from Pakistan and Oman. Here we report the genotyping of the MKS1 and MKS3 genes in a large, multiethnic cohort of 120 independent cases of MKS. Our first results indicate that the MKS1 and MKS3 genes are each responsible for about 7% of MKS cases with various mutations in different populations. A strong phenotype-genotype correlation, depending on the mutated gene, was observed regarding the type of central nervous system malformation, the frequency of polydactyly, bone dysplasia, and situs inversus. The MKS1 c.1408-35_1408-7del29 intronic mutation was identified in three cases from French or English origin and dated back to 162 generations (approx. 4050 years) ago. We also identified a common MKS3 splice-site mutation, c.1575+1G>A, in five Pakistani sibships of three unrelated families of Mirpuri origin, with an estimated age-of-mutation of 5 generations (125 years).

  18. Presence of rd8 mutation does not alter the ocular phenotype of late-onset retinal degeneration mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Alapati, Akhila; Suk, John; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M.; Ayyagari, Radha

    2015-01-01

    -type and Ctrp5+/− mice with the rd8 mutation (Wtrd8/rd8 and Ctrp5+/−;rd8/rd8, respectively) revealed an integrated retinal architecture with well-defined outer segments/inner segments (OS/IS), outer nuclear layer (ONL), outer plexiform layer (OPL), and inner nuclear layer (INL). The presence of pseudorosette structures reported in the rd8 mice between the ONL and the INL in the ventral quadrant of the retina was not observed in all genotypes studied. Further, the external limiting membrane was continuous in the Ctrp5+/−;rd8/rd8 and Wtrd8/rd8 mice. Evaluation of the retinal phenotype revealed that the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt mice developed characteristic L-ORD pathology including age-dependent accumulation of AF spots, development of sub-retinal, sub-RPE, and basal laminar deposits, and Bruch’s membrane abnormalities at older age, while these changes were not observed in the age-matched littermate WTwt/wt mice. Conclusions The Wtrd8/rd8 and Ctrp5+/−;rd8/rd8 mice raised on C57BL/6J did not develop early onset retinal changes that are characteristic of the rd8 phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that manifestation of rd8-associated pathology depends on the genetic background. The retinal pathology observed in mice with the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt genotype is consistent with the L-ORD phenotype observed in patients and with the phenotype we described previously. The lack of rd8-associated retinal pathology in the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt mouse model raised on the C57BL/6J background and the development of the L-ORD phenotype in these mice in the presence and absence of the rd8 mutation suggests that the pathology observed in the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt mice is primarily associated with the S163R mutation in the Ctrp5 gene. PMID:25814825

  19. Somatic deleterious mutation rate in a woody plant: estimation from phenotypic data

    PubMed Central

    Bobiwash, K; Schultz, S T; Schoen, D J

    2013-01-01

    We conducted controlled crosses in populations of the long-lived clonal shrub, Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry) to estimate inbreeding depression and mutation parameters associated with somatic deleterious mutation. Inbreeding depression level was high, with many plants failing to set fruit after self-pollination. We also compared fruit set from autogamous pollinations (pollen collected from within the same inflorescence) with fruit set from geitonogamous pollinations (pollen collected from the same plant but from inflorescences separated by several meters of branch growth). The difference between geitonogamous versus autogamous fitness within single plants is referred to as ‘autogamy depression' (AD). AD can be caused by somatic deleterious mutation. AD was significantly different from zero for fruit set. We developed a maximum-likelihood procedure to estimate somatic mutation parameters from AD, and applied it to geitonogamous and autogamous fruit set data from this experiment. We infer that, on average, approximately three sublethal, partially dominant somatic mutations exist within the crowns of the plants studied. We conclude that somatic mutation in this woody plant results in an overall genomic deleterious mutation rate that exceeds the rate measured to date for annual plants. Some implications of this result for evolutionary biology and agriculture are discussed. PMID:23778990

  20. Molecular and phenotypic spectrum of ASPM-related primary microcephaly: Identification of eight novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Ismail, Manal F; Darwish, Hebatallh A; Effat, Laila K; Zaki, Maha S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H

    2016-08-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is an abnormal proliferation of neurons during brain development that leads to a small brain size but architecturally normal in most instances. Mutations in the ASPM gene have been identified to be the most prevalent. Thirty-seven patients from 30 unrelated families with a clinical diagnosis of MCPH were enrolled in this study. Screening of ASPM gene mutations was performed by targeted linkage analysis followed by direct sequencing. Thirteen protein truncating mutations of the ASPM were identified in 15 families (50%), eight of which were novel mutations. The mutations detected were eight nonsense, four frameshift, and one splice site. Two of these mutations (p.R1327* and p.R3181*) were recurrent and shared similar haplotypes suggesting founder effect. Patients with ASPM mutations had mild to severe intellectual disability and variable degrees of simplified gyral pattern and small frontal lobe. In addition, hypoplasia of corpus callosum (18 patients), mildly small cerebellar vermis (10 patients), and relatively small pons (13 patients) were found in 85.7%, 47.6%, and 61.9%, respectively. Furthermore, one patient had porencephaly and another had a small midline cyst. Epilepsy was documented in two patients (9.5%). Non-neurologic abnormalities consisted of growth retardation (four patients), and co-incidental association of oculo-cutaneous albinism (one patient). Our study expands the mutation spectrum of ASPM. Moreover, the simplified gyral pattern and small frontal lobe together with hypoplastic corpus callosum, small cerebellum and pons enable ASPM mutated patients to be distinguished. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27250695

  1. Novel TTC37 Mutations in a Patient with Immunodeficiency without Diarrhea: Extending the Phenotype of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Nicholas L.; Boisson, Bertrand; Jyonouchi, Soma; Hanson, Eric P.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Orange, Jordan S.

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased genetic diagnosis has increasingly associated seemingly unrelated somatic and immunological phenotypes. We report a male infant who presented within the first year of life with physical growth impairment, feeding difficulties, hyperemesis without diarrhea, and abnormal hair findings suggestive of trichorrhexis nodosa. With advancing age, moderate global developmental delay, susceptibility to frequent viral illnesses, otitis media, and purulent conjunctivitis were identified. Because of the repeated infections, an immunological evaluation was pursued and identified impaired antibody memory responses following pneumococcal vaccine administration. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy and nutritional support were employed as mainstays of therapy. The child is now aged 12 years and still without diarrhea. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the TTC37 gene, a known cause of the trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES). This case extends the known phenotype of THES and defines a potential subset for inclusion as an immune overlap syndrome. PMID:25688341

  2. Novel TTC37 Mutations in a Patient with Immunodeficiency without Diarrhea: Extending the Phenotype of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rider, Nicholas L; Boisson, Bertrand; Jyonouchi, Soma; Hanson, Eric P; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Cassanova, Jean-Laurent; Orange, Jordan S

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased genetic diagnosis has increasingly associated seemingly unrelated somatic and immunological phenotypes. We report a male infant who presented within the first year of life with physical growth impairment, feeding difficulties, hyperemesis without diarrhea, and abnormal hair findings suggestive of trichorrhexis nodosa. With advancing age, moderate global developmental delay, susceptibility to frequent viral illnesses, otitis media, and purulent conjunctivitis were identified. Because of the repeated infections, an immunological evaluation was pursued and identified impaired antibody memory responses following pneumococcal vaccine administration. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy and nutritional support were employed as mainstays of therapy. The child is now aged 12 years and still without diarrhea. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the TTC37 gene, a known cause of the trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES). This case extends the known phenotype of THES and defines a potential subset for inclusion as an immune overlap syndrome. PMID:25688341

  3. Gibberellin deficiency and response mutations suppress the stem elongation phenotype of phytochrome-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, J; Harberd, N P

    1997-01-01

    Plant growth and development are regulated by numerous internal and external factors. Among these, gibberellin (GA) (an endogenous plant growth regulator) and phytochrome (a photoreceptor) often influence the same processes. For example, in plants grown in the light Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyl elongation is reduced by GA deficiency and increased by phytochrome deficiency. Here we describe experiments in which the phenotypes of Arabidopsis plants doubly homozygous for GA-related and phytochrome-related mutations were examined. The double mutants were studied at various stages in the plant life cycle, including the seed germination, young seedling, adult, and reproductive phases of development. The results of these experiments are complex, but indicate that a fully functional GA system is necessary for full expression of the elongated phenotypes conferred by phytochrome deficiency. PMID:9112768

  4. Spectrum and distribution of MECP2 mutations in 64 Italian Rett syndrome girls: tentative genotype/phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Giunti, L; Pelagatti, S; Lazzerini, V; Guarducci, S; Lapi, E; Coviello, S; Cecconi, A; Ombroni, L; Andreucci, E; Sani, I; Brusaferri, A; Lasagni, A; Ricotti, G; Giometto, B; Nicolao, P; Gasparini, P; Granatiero, M; Uzielli, M L

    2001-12-01

    We report a direct DNA sequencing analysis of the MECP2 gene undertaken on a further 64 Italian patients with Rett syndrome by using a LICOR 4200 Automated Sequencer. All of the girls entering the study had a consistent clinical diagnosis for this disorder. All coding regions and the flanking intronic splice site sequences were amplified as three non-overlapping fragments by using both forward and reverse primers. The results were then compared to the MECP2 reference sequences published in GenBank. Mutations of the MECP2 gene were identified in 64 of 75 (85.33%) unrelated sporadic Rett syndrome girls. Genotype/phenotype correlation studies, in particular in groups of patients with the same mutation, did not offer definitive and interesting data. PMID:11738883

  5. Mutations in KIAA0586 Cause Lethal Ciliopathies Ranging from a Hydrolethalus Phenotype to Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alby, Caroline; Piquand, Kevin; Huber, Céline; Megarbané, André; Ichkou, Amale; Legendre, Marine; Pelluard, Fanny; Encha-Ravazi, Ferechté; Abi-Tayeh, Georges; Bessières, Bettina; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Laurent, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Sztriha, László; Zombor, Melinda; Szabó, Hajnalka; Failler, Marion; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Bole, Christine; Nitschké, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Thomas, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    KIAA0586, the human ortholog of chicken TALPID3, is a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary ciliogenesis. Its disruption in animal models causes defects attributed to abnormal hedgehog signaling; these defects include polydactyly and abnormal dorsoventral patterning of the neural tube. Here, we report homozygous mutations of KIAA0586 in four families affected by lethal ciliopathies ranging from a hydrolethalus phenotype to short-rib polydactyly. We show defective ciliogenesis, as well as abnormal response to SHH-signaling activation in cells derived from affected individuals, consistent with a role of KIAA0586 in primary cilia biogenesis. Whereas centriolar maturation seemed unaffected in mutant cells, we observed an abnormal extended pattern of CEP290, a centriolar satellite protein previously associated with ciliopathies. Our data show the crucial role of KIAA0586 in human primary ciliogenesis and subsequent abnormal hedgehog signaling through abnormal GLI3 processing. Our results thus establish that KIAA0586 mutations cause lethal ciliopathies. PMID:26166481

  6. A novel mutation of CLCNKB in a Japanese patient of Gitelman-like phenotype with diuretic insensitivity to thiazide administration

    PubMed Central

    Ohkubo, Kumiko; Matsuzaki, Tomoe; Yuki, Makiko; Yoshida, Ryoko; Terawaki, Yuichi; Maeyama, Akira; Kawashima, Hironobu; Ono, Junko; Yanase, Toshihiko; Matsunaga, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The clinical phenotypes of patients with Bartter syndrome type III sometimes closely resemble those of Gitelman syndrome. We report a patient with mild, adult-onset symptoms, such as muscular weakness and fatigue, who showed hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, elevated renin–aldosterone levels with normal blood pressure, hypocalciuria and hypomagnesemia. She was also suffering from chondrocalcinosis. A diuretic test with furosemide and thiazide showed a good response to furosemide, but little response to thiazide. Although the clinical findings and diuretic tests predicted that the patient had Gitelman syndrome, genetic analysis found no mutation in SLC12A3. However, a novel missense mutation, p.L647F in CLCNKB, which is located in the CBS domain at the C-terminus of ClC-Kb, was discovered. Therefore, gene analyses of CLCNKB and SLC12A3 might be necessary to elucidate the precise etiology of the salt-losing tubulopathies regardless of the results of diuretic tests. PMID:25606418

  7. A novel inherited SCN1A mutation associated with different neuropsychological phenotypes: is there a common core deficit?

    PubMed

    Passamonti, Claudia; Petrelli, Cristina; Mei, Davide; Foschi, Nicoletta; Guerrini, Renzo; Provinciali, Leandro; Zamponi, Nelia

    2015-02-01

    We report a three-generation, clinically heterogeneous family in which we identify a novel inherited splicing mutation of the SCN1A gene. Thirteen subjects were submitted to genetic analysis, clinical and instrumental examination, and neuropsychological assessment. In eight subjects, a heterozygous c.2946+5G>A donor splice site alteration in the SCN1A gene was found. Half of them had never had a seizure and showed normal EEG and cognitive profile, whereas the other half had a history of seizures and variable neuropsychological impairments ranging from moderate cognitive disabilities to mild visual-motor impairments. Different clinical phenotypes were identified, including generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+), Dravet syndrome, and partial epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (PEFS+). Remarkable clinical heterogeneity can be found among family members carrying the same SCN1A gene mutation. Variable involvement of visual-motor abilities might represent a neuropsychological feature which needs to be further explored in other familial cases.

  8. Mutations in KIAA0586 Cause Lethal Ciliopathies Ranging from a Hydrolethalus Phenotype to Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alby, Caroline; Piquand, Kevin; Huber, Céline; Megarbané, André; Ichkou, Amale; Legendre, Marine; Pelluard, Fanny; Encha-Ravazi, Ferechté; Abi-Tayeh, Georges; Bessières, Bettina; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Laurent, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Sztriha, László; Zombor, Melinda; Szabó, Hajnalka; Failler, Marion; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Bole, Christine; Nitschké, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Thomas, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    KIAA0586, the human ortholog of chicken TALPID3, is a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary ciliogenesis. Its disruption in animal models causes defects attributed to abnormal hedgehog signaling; these defects include polydactyly and abnormal dorsoventral patterning of the neural tube. Here, we report homozygous mutations of KIAA0586 in four families affected by lethal ciliopathies ranging from a hydrolethalus phenotype to short-rib polydactyly. We show defective ciliogenesis, as well as abnormal response to SHH-signaling activation in cells derived from affected individuals, consistent with a role of KIAA0586 in primary cilia biogenesis. Whereas centriolar maturation seemed unaffected in mutant cells, we observed an abnormal extended pattern of CEP290, a centriolar satellite protein previously associated with ciliopathies. Our data show the crucial role of KIAA0586 in human primary ciliogenesis and subsequent abnormal hedgehog signaling through abnormal GLI3 processing. Our results thus establish that KIAA0586 mutations cause lethal ciliopathies. PMID:26166481

  9. An Individual with Blepharophimosis-Ptosis-Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES) and Additional Features Expands the Phenotype Associated with Mutations in KAT6B

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Chun; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Medne, Livija; Zackai, Elaine H.; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2015-01-01

    Blepharophimosis-Ptosis-Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in FOXL2. We identified an individual with BPES and additional phenotypic features who did not have a FOXL2 mutation. We used whole exome sequencing to identify a de novo mutation in KAT6B (lysine acetyltransferase 6B) in this individual. The mutation was a 2 bp insertion leading to a frameshift which resulted in a premature stop codon. The resulting truncated protein does not have the C-terminal serine/methionine transcription activation domain necessary for interaction with other transcriptional and epigenetic regulators. This mutation likely has a dominant-negative or gain-of-function effect, similar to those observed in other genetic disorders resulting from KAT6B mutations, including Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson (SBBYSS) and Genitopatellar syndrome (GTPTS). Thus, our subject’s phenotype broadens the spectrum of clinical findings associated with mutations in KAT6B. Furthermore, our results suggest that individuals with BPES without a FOXL2 mutation should be tested for KAT6B mutations. The transcriptional and epigenetic regulation mediated by KAT6B appears crucial to early developmental processes, which when perturbed can lead to a wide spectrum of phenotypic outcomes. PMID:24458743

  10. Painful small fiber neuropathy with gastroparesis: A new phenotype with a novel mutation in the SCN10A gene.

    PubMed

    Dabby, Ron; Sadeh, Menachem; Broitman, Yelena; Yosovich, Keren; Dickman, Ram; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2016-04-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the SCN10A gene (encoding the Nav1.8 voltage gated sodium channel) have been reported in a small number of patients. All presented with predominantly painful sensory neuropathy, congruent with the expression of Nav1.8 in nociceptive sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion. Only a few had mild autonomic symptoms, including dry eyes and mouth, orthostatic dizziness, palpitations, diarrhea and constipation. The underlying mechanism of the autonomic symptoms in these patients is unclear. We describe a 37-year-old woman with severe progressive gastroparesis and diffuse painful small fiber sensory neuropathy that started at age 32. Due to the severe dysphagia she could not ingest solid food, and lost eight kilograms. The gastroparesis was documented by esophageal manometry and gastric scintigraphy. The neuropathic pain started distally and then intensified and spread to most body areas. The patient harbored a novel heterozygous mutation: c.G4915A:p.D1639N in the SCN10A gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of such a phenotype due to a Nav1.8 mutation. Thus, our study expands the clinical spectrum of Nav1.8 associated disorders, and suggests that mutations in this sodium channel should be considered in patients with gastrointestinal motility dysfunction and painful neuropathy. PMID:26711856

  11. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  12. Conditional Loss of Arx From the Developing Dorsal Telencephalon Results in Behavioral Phenotypes Resembling Mild Human ARX Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Simonet, Jacqueline C.; Sunnen, C. Nicole; Wu, Jue; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Marsh, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Aristaless-Related Homeobox (ARX) gene cause structural anomalies of the brain, epilepsy, and neurocognitive deficits in children. During forebrain development, Arx is expressed in both pallial and subpallial progenitor cells. We previously demonstrated that elimination of Arx from subpallial-derived cortical interneurons generates an epilepsy phenotype with features overlapping those seen in patients with ARX mutations. In this report, we have selectively removed Arx from pallial progenitor cells that give rise to the cerebral cortical projection neurons. While no discernable seizure activity was recorded, these mice exhibited a peculiar constellation of behaviors. They are less anxious, less social, and more active when compared with their wild-type littermates. The overall cortical thickness was reduced, and the corpus callosum and anterior commissure were hypoplastic, consistent with a perturbation in cortical connectivity. Taken together, these data suggest that some of the structural and behavioral anomalies, common in patients with ARX mutations, are specifically due to alterations in pallial progenitor function. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that some of the neurobehavioral features found in patients with ARX mutations may not be due to on-going seizures, as is often postulated, given that epilepsy was eliminated as a confounding variable in these behavior analyses. PMID:24794919

  13. Conditional Loss of Arx From the Developing Dorsal Telencephalon Results in Behavioral Phenotypes Resembling Mild Human ARX Mutations.

    PubMed

    Simonet, Jacqueline C; Sunnen, C Nicole; Wu, Jue; Golden, Jeffrey A; Marsh, Eric D

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the Aristaless-Related Homeobox (ARX) gene cause structural anomalies of the brain, epilepsy, and neurocognitive deficits in children. During forebrain development, Arx is expressed in both pallial and subpallial progenitor cells. We previously demonstrated that elimination of Arx from subpallial-derived cortical interneurons generates an epilepsy phenotype with features overlapping those seen in patients with ARX mutations. In this report, we have selectively removed Arx from pallial progenitor cells that give rise to the cerebral cortical projection neurons. While no discernable seizure activity was recorded, these mice exhibited a peculiar constellation of behaviors. They are less anxious, less social, and more active when compared with their wild-type littermates. The overall cortical thickness was reduced, and the corpus callosum and anterior commissure were hypoplastic, consistent with a perturbation in cortical connectivity. Taken together, these data suggest that some of the structural and behavioral anomalies, common in patients with ARX mutations, are specifically due to alterations in pallial progenitor function. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that some of the neurobehavioral features found in patients with ARX mutations may not be due to on-going seizures, as is often postulated, given that epilepsy was eliminated as a confounding variable in these behavior analyses.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome: delineation of the phenotype of the first patients carrying mutations in EP300

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdi, Deborah; Roelfsema, Jeroen H; Papadia, Francesco; Breuning, Martijn H; Niedrist, Dunja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Schinzel, Albert; Peters, Dorien J M

    2007-01-01

    Background Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a congenital disorder characterised by growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms, skeletal abnormalities and mental retardation. Broad thumbs and halluces are the hallmarks of the syndrome. RSTS is associated with chromosomal rearrangements and mutations in the CREB‐binding protein gene (CREBBP), also termed CBP, encoding the CREB‐binding protein. Recently, it was shown that mutations in EP300, coding for the p300 protein, also cause RSTS. CBP and EP300 are highly homologous genes, which play important roles as global transcriptional coactivators. Objective To report the phenotype of the presently known patients with RSTS (n = 4) carrying germline mutations of EP300. Results The patients with EP300 mutations displayed the typical facial gestalt and malformation pattern compatible with the diagnosis of RSTS. However, three patients exhibited much milder skeletal findings on the hands and feet than typically observed in patients with RSTS. Conclusions Part of the clinical variability in RSTS is explained by genetic heterogeneity. The diagnosis of RSTS must be expanded to include patients without broad thumbs or halluces. PMID:17220215

  15. Mild Lesch-Nyhan Disease in a Boy with a Null Mutation in HPRT1: An Exception to the Known Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Allan; Christensen, Mette; Wibrand, Flemming; Duno, Morten; Lund, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency results in a continuous spectrum of clinical phenotypes though all include overproduction of uric acid with hyperuricaemia, urate nephrolithiasis and gout. HPRT1 mutations that result in very low or no HPRT enzyme activities are generally associated with the classic Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) phenotype with intellectual disability, motor handicap and self-injurious behaviour. Mutations that permit a higher residual HPRT activity are seen in some patients with the milder LND variant phenotypes with varying degrees of cognitive, motor handicap and maladaptive behaviour without recurrent self-injury. We present a boy with a LND variant phenotype due to a deletion of exon 5 of HPRT1 predicted to fully abolish HPRT activity. Metabolic analysis confirms lack of significant residual enzyme activity. The boy, currently age 10, presented with hyperuricaemia, hypotonia, developmental delay and extrapyramidal and pyramidal involvement. He has never shown any signs of self-injurious or maladaptive behaviour. This boy is one of the rare cases with a suspected null mutation in HPRT1 that associates with a milder than expected phenotype with lack of self-injurious behaviour. Key Clinical Message HPRT1 mutations that result in very low or no hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activities are generally associated with the classic Lesch-Nyhan disease. This report presents one of the rare cases with a null mutation in the HPRT1 gene that associates with a milder than expected phenotype with lack of self-injurious behaviour.

  16. Mutations of the KIT (Mast/Stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene account for a continuous range of phenotypes in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Holmes, S.A. ); Ramesar, R.; Greenberg, J.; Beighton, P.; Curtis, D.

    1992-11-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of pigmentation, characterized by congenital patches of white skin and hair from which melanocytes are absent. The authors have previously shown that piebaldism can result from missense and frameshift mutations of the KIT proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular receptor tyrosine kinase for the mast/stem cell growth factor. Here, the authors report two novel KIT mutations associated with human piebaldism. A proximal frameshift is associated with a mild piebald phenotype, and a splice-junction mutation is associated with a highly variable piebald phenotype. They discuss the apparent relationship between the predicted impact of specific KIT mutations on total KIT-dependent signal transduction and the severity of the resultant piebald phenotypes. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  17. The Polg Mutator Phenotype Does Not Cause Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in DJ-1-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Hauser, David N; Primiani, Christopher T; Langston, Rebekah G; Kumaran, Ravindran; Cookson, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the DJ-1 gene cause autosomal recessive parkinsonism in humans. Several mouse models of DJ-1 deficiency have been developed, but they do not have dopaminergic neuron cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage occurs frequently in the aged human SNpc but not in the mouse SNpc. We hypothesized that the reason DJ-1-deficient mice do not have dopaminergic cell death is due to an absence of mtDNA damage. We tested this hypothesis by crossing DJ-1-deficient mice with mice that have similar amounts of mtDNA damage in their SNpc as aged humans (Polg mutator mice). At 1 year of age, we counted the amount of SNpc dopaminergic neurons in the mouse brains using both colorimetric and fluorescent staining followed by unbiased stereology. No evidence of dopaminergic cell death was observed in DJ-1-deficient mice with the Polg mutator mutation. Furthermore, we did not observe any difference in dopaminergic terminal immunostaining in the striatum of these mice. Finally, we did not observe any changes in the amount of GFAP-positive astrocytes in the SNpc of these mice, indicative of a lack of astrogliosis. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the DJ-1-deficient mice, Polg mutator mice, and DJ-1-deficient Polg mutator mice have intact nigrastriatal pathways. Thus, the lack of mtDNA damage in the mouse SNpc does not underlie the absence of dopaminergic cell death in DJ-1-deficient mice.

  18. Genome-wide association studies identify two novel BMP15 mutations responsible for an atypical hyperprolificacy phenotype in sheep.

    PubMed

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-04-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E(-05) and 1E(-07). The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecX(Gr) and FecX(O) were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (p FecX (Gr) = 5.98E(-06) and p FecX(O) = 2.55E(-08)). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecX(Gr)/FecX(Gr), LS = 2.50 ± 0.65 versus FecX(+)/FecX(Gr), LS = 1.93 ± 0.42, p<1E(-03) and FecX(O)/FecX(O), OR = 3.28 ± 0.85 versus FecX(+)/FecX(O), OR = 2.02 ± 0.47, p<1E(-03)). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecX(Gr)/FecX(Gr) Grivette and homozygous FecX(O)/FecX(O) Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function

  19. Phenotypic Variability and Newly Identified Mutations of the IVD Gene in Japanese Patients with Isovaleric Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Osamu; Arai-Ichinoi, Natsuko; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Haruna, Hidenori; Maruyama, Hidehiko; Sugawara, Hidenori; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia (IVA) is an autosomal recessive inborn error affecting leucine metabolism. It is caused by a deficiency in isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD), a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of isovaleryl-CoA to 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. IVD is a FAD-containing enzyme, consisting of four identical subunits. Clinical features of IVA include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, developmental delay, metabolic acidosis, and a characteristic "sweaty foot" odor. IVA is one of the target disorders for newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The human IVD gene is located on chromosome 15q. To date, over 50 disease-causing mutations have been reported worldwide. In this study, we searched for IVD mutations in five Japanese patients with IVA (neonatal type, two patients; chronic intermittent type, two patients; and mild biochemical type, one patient). The diagnosis of IVA was confirmed by urinary organic acid analysis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. All coding exons and the flanking introns in the IVD gene were amplified by PCR and were directly sequenced. We thus identified six hitherto unknown mutations (p.G94D, p.E116K, p.M167T, p.L243P, p.L246P, and c.696+1G>T) and four previously reported (p.R53P, p.R395C, p.Y403C, and p.E411K) pathogenic mutations. All patients were compound heterozygotes, and each mutation was identified in a single patient. Pathogenicity of newly identified mutations was validated using computational programs. Among them, the p.M167T is believed to influence FAD binding, as the position 167 is present in one of the FAD-binding sites. Our results have illustrated the heterogeneous mutation spectrum and clinical presentation of IVA in the Japanese patients.

  20. Local amino acid sequence patterns dominate the heterogeneous phenotype for the collagen connective tissue disease Osteogenesis Imperfecta resulting from Gly mutations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Yang, Zhangfu; Sun, Xiuxia; Addabbo, Rayna; Baum, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a hereditary connective tissue disease in collagen that arises from a single Gly->X mutation in the collagen chain, varies widely in phenotype from perinatal lethal to mild. It is unclear why there is such a large variation in the severity of the disease considering the repeating (Gly-X-Y)n sequence and the uniform rod-like structure of collagen. We systematically evaluate the effect of local (Gly-X-Y)n sequence around the mutation site on OI phenotype using integrated bio-statistical approaches, including odds ratio analysis and decision tree modeling. We show that different Gly->X mutations have different local sequence patterns that are correlated with lethal and nonlethal phenotypes providing a mechanism for understanding the sensitivity of local context in defining lethal and non-lethal OI. A number of important trends about which factors are related to OI phenotypes are revealed by the bio-statistical analyses; most striking is the complementary relationship between the placement of Pro residues and small residues and their correlation to OI phenotype. When Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent nearby a mutation site, the OI case tends to be lethal; when Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent further away from the mutation site, the OI case tends to be nonlethal. The analysis also reveals the dominant role of local sequence around mutation sites in the Major Ligand Binding Regions that are primarily responsible for collagen binding to its receptors and shows that non-lethal mutations are highly predicted by local sequence considerations alone whereas lethal mutations are not as easily predicted and may be a result of more complex interactions. Understanding the sequence determinants of OI mutations will enhance genetic counseling and help establish which steps in the collagen hierarchy to target for drug therapy. PMID:25980613

  1. ClC-1 mutations in myotonia congenita patients: insights into molecular gating mechanisms and genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Imbrici, P; Maggi, L; Mangiatordi, G F; Dinardo, M M; Altamura, C; Brugnoni, R; Alberga, D; Pinter, G Lauria; Ricci, G; Siciliano, G; Micheli, R; Annicchiarico, G; Lattanzi, G; Nicolotti, O; Morandi, L; Bernasconi, P; Desaphy, J-F; Mantegazza, R; Camerino, D Conte

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myotonia congenita is an inherited disease caused by loss-of-function mutations of the skeletal muscle ClC-1 chloride channel, characterized by impaired muscle relaxation after contraction and stiffness. In the present study, we provided an in-depth characterization of F484L, a mutation previously identified in dominant myotonia, in order to define the genotype–phenotype correlation, and to elucidate the contribution of this pore residue to the mechanisms of ClC-1 gating. Patch-clamp recordings showed that F484L reduced chloride currents at every tested potential and dramatically right-shifted the voltage dependence of slow gating, thus contributing to the mild clinical phenotype of affected heterozygote carriers. Unlike dominant mutations located at the dimer interface, no dominant-negative effect was observed when F484L mutant subunits were co-expressed with wild type. Molecular dynamics simulations further revealed that F484L affected the slow gate by increasing the frequency and stability of the H-bond formation between the pore residue E232 and the R helix residue Y578. In addition, using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we characterized three other myotonic ClC-1 mutations. We proved that the dominant L198P mutation in the channel pore also right-shifted the voltage dependence of slow gating, recapitulating mild myotonia. The recessive V640G mutant drastically reduced channel function, which probably accounts for myotonia. In contrast, the recessive L628P mutant produced currents very similar to wild type, suggesting that the occurrence of the compound truncating mutation (Q812X) or other muscle-specific mechanisms accounted for the severe symptoms observed in this family. Our results provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying normal and altered ClC-1 function. Key points Loss-of-function mutations of the skeletal muscle ClC-1 channel cause myotonia congenita with variable phenotypes. Using patch clamp we show that F484L, located

  2. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E.; Koerkkoe, J.; Ala-Kokko, L.

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature with varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Unusual phenotype of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with a novel mutation of the CYP21A2 gene.

    PubMed

    Raisingani, Manish; Contreras, Maria F; Prasad, Kris; Pappas, John G; Kluge, Michelle L; Shah, Bina; David, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Gonadotropin independent sexual precocity (SP) may be due to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), and its timing usually depends on the type of mutation in the CYP21A2 gene. Compound heterozygotes are common and express phenotypes of varying severity. The objective of this case report was to investigate the hormonal pattern and unusual genetic profile in a 7-year-old boy who presented with pubic hair, acne, an enlarged phallus, slightly increased testicular volume and advanced bone age. Clinical, hormonal and genetic studies were undertaken in the patient as well as his parents. We found elevated serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione that were suppressed with dexamethasone, and elevated testosterone that actually rose after giving dexamethasone, indicating activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. An initial search for common mutations was negative, but a more detailed genetic analysis of the CYP21A2 gene revealed two mutations including R341W, a non-classical mutation inherited from his mother, and g.823G>A, a novel not previously reported consensus donor splice site mutation inherited from his father, which is predicted to be salt wasting. However, the child had a normal plasma renin activity. He was effectively treated with low-dose dexamethasone and a GnRH agonist. His father was an unaffected carrier, but his mother had evidence of mild non-classical CAH. In a male child presenting with gonadotropin independent SP it is important to investigate adrenal function with respect to the androgen profile, and to carry out appropriate genetic studies.

  4. Unusual phenotype of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with a novel mutation of the CYP21A2 gene.

    PubMed

    Raisingani, Manish; Contreras, Maria F; Prasad, Kris; Pappas, John G; Kluge, Michelle L; Shah, Bina; David, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Gonadotropin independent sexual precocity (SP) may be due to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), and its timing usually depends on the type of mutation in the CYP21A2 gene. Compound heterozygotes are common and express phenotypes of varying severity. The objective of this case report was to investigate the hormonal pattern and unusual genetic profile in a 7-year-old boy who presented with pubic hair, acne, an enlarged phallus, slightly increased testicular volume and advanced bone age. Clinical, hormonal and genetic studies were undertaken in the patient as well as his parents. We found elevated serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione that were suppressed with dexamethasone, and elevated testosterone that actually rose after giving dexamethasone, indicating activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. An initial search for common mutations was negative, but a more detailed genetic analysis of the CYP21A2 gene revealed two mutations including R341W, a non-classical mutation inherited from his mother, and g.823G>A, a novel not previously reported consensus donor splice site mutation inherited from his father, which is predicted to be salt wasting. However, the child had a normal plasma renin activity. He was effectively treated with low-dose dexamethasone and a GnRH agonist. His father was an unaffected carrier, but his mother had evidence of mild non-classical CAH. In a male child presenting with gonadotropin independent SP it is important to investigate adrenal function with respect to the androgen profile, and to carry out appropriate genetic studies. PMID:27180336

  5. DNMT1 mutation hot spot causes varied phenotypes of HSAN1 with dementia and hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Tom; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Lincoln, Sarah; Hjorth, Robert; Wu, Yanhong; Kwok, John; Mer, Georges; Dyck, Peter J.; Nicholson, Garth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mutations in DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) have been identified in 2 autosomal dominant syndromes: 1) hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1E); and 2) cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy. Both syndromes have mutations in targeting sequence (TS) domain (exons 20–21), which is important in mediating DNA substrate binding to the DNMT1 catalytic domain. Frontal lobe hypometabolism has been documented in an HSAN1E family, but memory loss has been the primary cognitive complaint. The chromosomal location of the DNMT1 gene at 19p13.2 has been linked to familial late-onset Alzheimer disease. Methods: We sequenced 41 exons of DNMT1 and their flanking regions in 1) 2 kindreds with HSAN1E; 2) 48 patients with HSAN1 alone without dementia and hearing loss; and 3) 5 probands of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) kindreds. We also sequenced exon 20 and 21 in 364 autopsy-confirmed late-onset Alzheimer disease cases. Results: Mutations in DNMT1 were specific to 2 HSAN1E kindreds with dementia and hearing loss (no narcolepsy). One family carried previously identified mutation Tyr495Cys; the other carried a novel Tyr495His, both in the TS domain. The symptoms of these patients include prominent personality, psychiatric manifestations, and seizures in one and the onset time is later than the previously reported cases. Conclusion: Clinicians should consider DNMT1 mutations in patients presenting with FTD or primary memory decline who also have sensory neuropathy and hearing loss. Amino acid Tyr495 is a hot spot for HSAN1E, distinct from exon 21 mutations associated with narcolepsy. PMID:23365052

  6. Phenotypic severity of homozygous GCK mutations causing neonatal or childhood-onset diabetes is primarily mediated through effects on protein stability.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Anne; Chakera, Ali J; Thomsen, Soren K; Colclough, Kevin; Barrett, Amy; De Franco, Elisa; Chatelas, Alisson; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Akcay, Teoman; Alawneh, Hussein; Flanagan, Sarah E; Van De Bunt, Martijn; Hattersley, Andrew T; Gloyn, Anna L; Ellard, Sian

    2014-12-15

    Mutations in glucokinase (GCK) cause a spectrum of glycemic disorders. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause mild fasting hyperglycemia irrespective of mutation severity due to compensation from the unaffected allele. Conversely, homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause permanent neonatal diabetes requiring lifelong insulin treatment. This study aimed to determine the relationship between in vitro mutation severity and clinical phenotype in a large international case series of patients with homozygous GCK mutations. Clinical characteristics for 30 patients with diabetes due to homozygous GCK mutations (19 unique mutations, including 16 missense) were compiled and assigned a clinical severity grade (CSG) based on birth weight and age at diagnosis. The majority (28 of 30) of subjects were diagnosed before 9 months, with the remaining two at 9 and 15 years. These are the first two cases of a homozygous GCK mutation diagnosed outside infancy. Recombinant mutant GCK proteins were analyzed for kinetic and thermostability characteristics and assigned a relative activity index (RAI) or relative stability index (RSI) value. Six of 16 missense mutations exhibited severe kinetic defects (RAI ≤ 0.01). There was no correlation between CSG and RAI (r(2) = 0.05, P = 0.39), indicating that kinetics alone did not explain the phenotype. Eighty percent of the remaining mutations showed reduced thermostability, the exceptions being the two later-onset mutations which exhibited increased thermostability. Comparison of CSG with RSI detected a highly significant correlation (r(2) = 0.74, P = 0.002). We report the largest case series of homozygous GCK mutations to date and demonstrate that they can cause childhood-onset diabetes, with protein instability being the major determinant of mutation severity. PMID:25015100

  7. Phenotypic severity of homozygous GCK mutations causing neonatal or childhood-onset diabetes is primarily mediated through effects on protein stability.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Anne; Chakera, Ali J; Thomsen, Soren K; Colclough, Kevin; Barrett, Amy; De Franco, Elisa; Chatelas, Alisson; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Akcay, Teoman; Alawneh, Hussein; Flanagan, Sarah E; Van De Bunt, Martijn; Hattersley, Andrew T; Gloyn, Anna L; Ellard, Sian

    2014-12-15

    Mutations in glucokinase (GCK) cause a spectrum of glycemic disorders. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause mild fasting hyperglycemia irrespective of mutation severity due to compensation from the unaffected allele. Conversely, homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause permanent neonatal diabetes requiring lifelong insulin treatment. This study aimed to determine the relationship between in vitro mutation severity and clinical phenotype in a large international case series of patients with homozygous GCK mutations. Clinical characteristics for 30 patients with diabetes due to homozygous GCK mutations (19 unique mutations, including 16 missense) were compiled and assigned a clinical severity grade (CSG) based on birth weight and age at diagnosis. The majority (28 of 30) of subjects were diagnosed before 9 months, with the remaining two at 9 and 15 years. These are the first two cases of a homozygous GCK mutation diagnosed outside infancy. Recombinant mutant GCK proteins were analyzed for kinetic and thermostability characteristics and assigned a relative activity index (RAI) or relative stability index (RSI) value. Six of 16 missense mutations exhibited severe kinetic defects (RAI ≤ 0.01). There was no correlation between CSG and RAI (r(2) = 0.05, P = 0.39), indicating that kinetics alone did not explain the phenotype. Eighty percent of the remaining mutations showed reduced thermostability, the exceptions being the two later-onset mutations which exhibited increased thermostability. Comparison of CSG with RSI detected a highly significant correlation (r(2) = 0.74, P = 0.002). We report the largest case series of homozygous GCK mutations to date and demonstrate that they can cause childhood-onset diabetes, with protein instability being the major determinant of mutation severity.

  8. Phenotypic severity of homozygous GCK mutations causing neonatal or childhood-onset diabetes is primarily mediated through effects on protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Anne; Chakera, Ali J.; Thomsen, Soren K.; Colclough, Kevin; Barrett, Amy; De Franco, Elisa; Chatelas, Alisson; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Akcay, Teoman; Alawneh, Hussein; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Van De Bunt, Martijn; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Gloyn, Anna L.; Ellard, Sian; Abduljabbar, Mohammad A.; Al-Zyoud, Mahmoud; Aman, Syed; Bath, Louise; De, Parijat; Deshpande, Neeta; Durmaz, Erdem; Eickmeier, Frank; Elbarbary, Nancy Samir; Fillion, Marc; Jagadeesh, Sujatha M.; Kershaw, Melanie; Khan, Waqas I.; Mlynarski, Wojciech; Noyes, Kathryn; Peters, Catherine J.; Shaw, Nick; Tiron, Irina; Turkkahraman, Doga; Turner, Lesley; Eltonbary, Khadiga Y.; Yuksel, Bilgin

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in glucokinase (GCK) cause a spectrum of glycemic disorders. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause mild fasting hyperglycemia irrespective of mutation severity due to compensation from the unaffected allele. Conversely, homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause permanent neonatal diabetes requiring lifelong insulin treatment. This study aimed to determine the relationship between in vitro mutation severity and clinical phenotype in a large international case series of patients with homozygous GCK mutations. Clinical characteristics for 30 patients with diabetes due to homozygous GCK mutations (19 unique mutations, including 16 missense) were compiled and assigned a clinical severity grade (CSG) based on birth weight and age at diagnosis. The majority (28 of 30) of subjects were diagnosed before 9 months, with the remaining two at 9 and 15 years. These are the first two cases of a homozygous GCK mutation diagnosed outside infancy. Recombinant mutant GCK proteins were analyzed for kinetic and thermostability characteristics and assigned a relative activity index (RAI) or relative stability index (RSI) value. Six of 16 missense mutations exhibited severe kinetic defects (RAI ≤ 0.01). There was no correlation between CSG and RAI (r2 = 0.05, P = 0.39), indicating that kinetics alone did not explain the phenotype. Eighty percent of the remaining mutations showed reduced thermostability, the exceptions being the two later-onset mutations which exhibited increased thermostability. Comparison of CSG with RSI detected a highly significant correlation (r2 = 0.74, P = 0.002). We report the largest case series of homozygous GCK mutations to date and demonstrate that they can cause childhood-onset diabetes, with protein instability being the major determinant of mutation severity. PMID:25015100

  9. Phage-Like Streptococcus pyogenes Chromosomal Islands (SpyCI) and Mutator Phenotypes: Control by Growth State and Rescue by a SpyCI-Encoded Promoter.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julie; Nguyen, Scott V; King, Catherine J; Hendrickson, Christina; McShan, W Michael

    2012-01-01

    We recently showed that a prophage-like Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal island (SpyCI) controls DNA mismatch repair and other repair functions in M1 genome strain SF370 by dynamic excision and reintegration into the 5' end of mutL in response to growth, causing the cell to alternate between a wild type and mutator phenotype. Nine of the 16 completed S. pyogenes genomes contain related SpyCI integrated into the identical attachment site in mutL, and in this study we examined a number of these strains to determine whether they also had a mutator phenotype as in SF370. With the exception of M5 genome strain Manfredo, all demonstrated a mutator phenotype as compared to SpyCI-free strain NZ131. The integrase gene (int) in the SpyCIM5 contains a deletion that rendered it inactive, and this deletion predicts that Manfredo would have a pronounced mutator phenotype. Remarkably, this was found not to be the case, but rather a cryptic promoter within the int ORF was identified that ensured constitutive expression of mutL and the downstream genes encoded on the same mRNA, providing a striking example of rescue of gene function following decay of a mobile genetic element. The frequent occurrence of SpyCI in the group A streptococci may facilitate bacterial survival by conferring an inducible mutator phenotype that promotes adaptation in the face of environmental challenges or host immunity.

  10. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Makoto T.; Kojo, Kei H.; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D.

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids. PMID:26500667

  11. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Makoto T; Kojo, Kei H; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids. PMID:26500667

  12. Linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing exclude extra mutations responsible for the parkinsonian phenotype of spinocerebellar ataxia-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaodong; Xu, Yanming; Feng, Xiuli; Ma, Jinghong; Xie, Shu; Zhang, Yanli; Tang, Bei-Sha; Chan, Piu

    2015-01-01

    CAG expansion within the exon 1 of ataxin-2 (ATXN2) gene responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia-2 (SCA2) has been reported to cause pure parkinsonism and other neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains unclear whether CAG expansion is the only cause for SCA2 and its clinical alternatives, and whether extra mutations exist to modify the phenotypic diversity. To address this, we have conducted fine genetic mapping and exome sequencing for a large Chinese SCA2 pedigree predominantly manifesting parkinsonism (called SCA2-P). In addition, we compared the CAG expansions between the SCA2-P and 16 SCA2 families presenting as pure ataxia (SCA2-A). As a result, CAG repeat expansions, ranging from 37 to 40 copies, were detected among 10 affected and 8 nonsymptomatic members of the SCA2-P family. The CAG repeats in the diseased alleles were interrupted by CAA in the 3'-end. In contrast, CAG expansion ranging from 36 to 54 without CAA interruption was detected in all probands of the SCA2-A families. Genetic mapping located the SCA2-P pedigree on 12q24.21, which spans the ATXN2 gene. Exome sequencing for 3 patients and 1 normal member revealed no extra mutations in this family. In addition, by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms around SCA2 locus, we have excluded the existence of haplotypes predisposing different patterns of CAG expansion. These results demonstrate that the ATXN2 CAG expansion is the sole causative mutation responsible for SCA2-P, and that genetic modifiers may not be the major cause of the phenotypic diversity of SCA2.

  13. Neurons generated by direct conversion of fibroblasts reproduce synaptic phenotype caused by autism-associated neuroligin-3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Soham; Marro, Samuele; Wernig, Marius; Südhof, Thomas C

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that induced neuronal (iN) cells that are directly transdifferentiated from nonneuronal cells provide a powerful opportunity to examine neuropsychiatric diseases. However, the validity of using this approach to examine disease-specific changes has not been demonstrated. Here, we analyze the phenotypes of iN cells that were derived from murine embryonic fibroblasts cultured from littermate wild-type and mutant mice carrying the autism-associated R704C substitution in neuroligin-3. We show that neuroligin-3 R704C-mutant iN cells exhibit a large and selective decrease in AMPA-type glutamate receptor-mediated synaptic transmission without changes in NMDA-type glutamate receptor- or in GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Thus, the synaptic phenotype observed in R704C-mutant iN cells replicates the previously observed phenotype of R704C-mutant neurons. Our data show that the effect of the R704C mutation is applicable even to neurons transdifferentiated from fibroblasts and constitute a proof-of-concept demonstration that iN cells can be used for cellular disease modeling.

  14. First implication of STRA6 mutations in isolated anophthalmia, microphthalmia, and coloboma: a new dimension to the STRA6 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian; Kawaguchi, Riki; Morrissey, Maria; Sun, Hui; McGettigan, Paul; Nielsen, Jens E; Conroy, Judith; Regan, Regina; Kenny, Elaine; Cormican, Paul; Morris, Derek W; Tormey, Peter; Chróinín, Muireann Ní; Kennedy, Breandan N; Lynch, SallyAnn; Green, Andrew; Ennis, Sean

    2011-12-01

    Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) are structural congenital eye malformations that cause a significant proportion of childhood visual impairments. Several disease genes have been identified but do not account for all MAC cases, suggesting that additional risk loci exist. We used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping (HM) and targeted next-generation sequencing to identify the causative mutation for autosomal recessive isolated colobomatous microanophthalmia (MCOPCB) in a consanguineous Irish Traveller family. We identified a double-nucleotide polymorphism (g.1157G>A and g.1156G>A; p.G304K) in STRA6 that was homozygous in all of the MCOPCB patients. The STRA6 p.G304K mutation was subsequently detected in additional MCOPCB patients, including one individual with Matthew-Wood syndrome (MWS; MCOPS9). STRA6 encodes a transmembrane receptor involved in vitamin A uptake, a process essential to eye development and growth. We have shown that the G304K mutant STRA6 protein is mislocalized and has severely reduced vitamin A uptake activity. Furthermore, we reproduced the MCOPCB phenotype in a zebrafish disease model by inhibiting retinoic acid (RA) synthesis, suggesting that diminished RA levels account for the eye malformations in STRA6 p.G304K patients. The current study demonstrates that STRA6 mutations can cause isolated eye malformations in addition to the congenital anomalies observed in MWS.

  15. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of Als1 and Als2 mutations conferring tolerance to acetolactate synthase herbicides in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Kay L; Strachan, Stephen D; Ferry, Nancy M; Albert, Henrik H; Castle, Linda A; Sebastian, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sulfonylurea (SU) herbicides are effective because they inhibit acetolactate synthase (ALS), a key enzyme in branched-chain amino acid synthesis required for plant growth. A soybean line known as W4-4 was developed through rounds of seed mutagenesis and was demonstrated to have a high degree of ALS-based resistance to both post-emergence and pre-emergence applications of a variety of SU herbicides. This report describes the molecular and phenotypic characterization of the Als1 and Als2 mutations that confer herbicide resistance to SUs and other ALS inhibitors. RESULTS The mutations are shown to occur in two different ALS genes that reside on different chromosomes: Als1 (P178S) on chromosome 4 and Als2 (W560L) on chromosome 6 (P197S and W574L in Arabidopsis thaliana). CONCLUSION Although the Als1 and Als2 genes are unlinked, the combination of these two mutations is synergistic for improved tolerance of soybeans to ALS-inhibiting herbicides. © 2014 DuPont Pioneer. Pest Management Science published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:24425499

  16. Mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlations in a large French cohort of MYH9-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Saposnik, Béatrice; Binard, Sylvie; Fenneteau, Odile; Nurden, Alan; Nurden, Paquita; Hurtaud-Roux, Marie-Françoise; Schlegel, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    MYH9-Related Disorders are a group of rare autosomal dominant platelet disorders presenting as nonsyndromic forms characterized by macrothrombocytopenia with giant platelets and leukocyte inclusion bodies or as syndromic forms combining these hematological features with deafness and/or nephropathy and/or cataracts. They are caused by mutations in the MYH9 gene encoding the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain II-A (NMMHC-IIA). Until now, at least 49 MYH9 mutations have been reported in isolated cases or small series but only rarely in large series. We report the results of an 8-year study of a large cohort of 109 patients from 37 sporadic cases and 39 unrelated families. We have identified 43 genetic variants, 21 of which are novel to our patients. A majority, 33 (76.7%), were missense mutations and six exons were preferentially targeted, as previously published. The other alterations were three deletions of one nucleotide, one larger deletion of 21 nucleotides, and one duplication. For the first time, a substitution T>A was found in the donor splice site of intron 40 (c.5765+2T>A). Seven patients, four from the same family, had two genetic variants. The analysis of the genotype-phenotype relationships enabled us to improve the knowledge of this heterogeneous but important rare disease. PMID:25077172

  17. An ultra-dense library resource for rapid deconvolution of mutations that cause phenotypes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nehring, Ralf B.; Gu, Franklin; Lin, Hsin-Yu; Gibson, Janet L.; Blythe, Martin J.; Wilson, Ray; Bravo Núñez, María Angélica; Hastings, P. J.; Louis, Edward J.; Frisch, Ryan L.; Hu, James C.; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    With the wide availability of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), genetic mapping has become the rate-limiting step, inhibiting unbiased forward genetics in even the most tractable model organisms. We introduce a rapid deconvolution resource and method for untagged causative mutations after mutagenesis, screens, and WGS in Escherichia coli. We created Deconvoluter—ordered libraries with selectable insertions every 50 kb in the E. coli genome. The Deconvoluter method uses these for replacement of untagged mutations in the genome using a phage-P1-based gene-replacement strategy. We validate the Deconvoluter resource by deconvolution of 17 of 17 phenotype-altering mutations from a screen of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutants. The Deconvoluter resource permits rapid unbiased screens and gene/function identification and will enable exploration of functions of essential genes and undiscovered genes/sites/alleles not represented in existing deletion collections. This resource for unbiased forward-genetic screens with mapping-by-sequencing (‘forward genomics’) demonstrates a strategy that could similarly enable rapid screens in many other microbes. PMID:26578563

  18. Phenotypic spectrum of STRA6 mutations: from Matthew-Wood syndrome to non-lethal anophthalmia.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Nicolas; Golzio, Christelle; Odent, Sylvie; Lequeux, Léopoldine; Vigouroux, Adeline; Martinovic-Bouriel, Jelena; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Masini, Lucia; Piro, Francesca; Maragliano, Giovanna; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Etchevers, Heather C; Calvas, Patrick

    2009-05-01

    Matthew-Wood, Spear, PDAC or MCOPS9 syndrome are alternative names used to refer to combinations of microphthalmia/anophthalmia, malformative cardiac defects, pulmonary dysgenesis, and diaphragmatic hernia. Recently, mutations in STRA6, encoding a membrane receptor for vitamin A-bearing plasma retinol binding protein, have been identified in such patients. We performed STRA6 molecular analysis in three fetuses and one child diagnosed with Matthew-Wood syndrome and in three siblings where two adult living brothers are affected with combinations of clinical anophthalmia, tetralogy of Fallot, and mental retardation. Among these patients, six novel mutations were identified, bringing the current total of known STRA6 mutations to seventeen. We extensively reviewed clinical data pertaining to all twenty-one reported patients with STRA6 mutations (the seven of this report and fourteen described elsewhere) and discuss additional features that may be part of the syndrome. The clinical spectrum associated with STRA6 deficiency is even more variable than initially described.

  19. Neuropathological Phenotype of a Distinct Form of Lissencephaly Associated with Mutations in "TUBA1A"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallet-Bianco, Catherine; Loeuillet, Laurence; Poirier, Karine; Loget, Philippe; Chapon, Francoise; Pasquier, Laurent; Saillour, Yoann; Beldjord, Cherif; Chelly, Jamel; Francis, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Lissencephalies are congenital malformations responsible for epilepsy and mental retardation in children. A number of distinct lissencephaly syndromes have been characterized, according to the aspect and the topography of the cortical malformation, the involvement of other cerebral structures and the identified genetic defect. A mutation in…

  20. Phenotypical Characteristics of Idiopathic Infantile Nystagmus with and without Mutations in "FRMD7"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Shery; Proudlock, Frank A.; Sarvananthan, Nagini; Roberts, Eryl O.; Awan, Musarat; McLean, Rebecca; Surendran, Mylvaganam; Kumar, A. S. Anil; Farooq, Shegufta J.; Degg, Chris; Gale, Richard P.; Reinecke, Robert D.; Woodruff, Geoffrey; Langmann, Andrea; Lindner, Susanne; Jain, Sunila; Tarpey, Patrick; Raymond, F. Lucy; Gottlob, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) consists of involuntary oscillations of the eyes. The familial form is most commonly X-linked. We recently found mutations in a novel gene "FRMD7" (Xq26.2), which provided an opportunity to investigate a genetically defined and homogeneous group of patients with nystagmus. We compared clinical features and eye…

  1. Respiratory phenotypes are distinctly affected in mice with common Rett syndrome mutations MeCP2 T158A and R168X.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, J M; Schaevitz, L R; Knopp, S J; Zhou, Z

    2014-05-16

    Respiratory disturbances are a primary phenotype of the neurological disorder, Rett syndrome (RTT), caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mouse models generated with null mutations in Mecp2 mimic respiratory abnormalities in RTT girls. Large deletions, however, are seen in only ∼10% of affected human individuals. Here we characterized respiration in heterozygous females from two mouse models that genetically mimic common RTT point mutations, a missense mutation T158A (Mecp2(T158A/)(+)) or a nonsense mutation R168X (Mecp2(R168X/+)). MeCP2 T158A shows decreased binding to methylated DNA, while MeCP2 R168X retains the capacity to bind methylated DNA but lacks the ability to recruit complexes required for transcriptional repression. We found that both Mecp2(T158A/+) and Mecp2(R168X/+) heterozygotes display augmented hypoxic ventilatory responses and depressed hypercapnic responses, compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, the incidence of apnea was much greater in Mecp2(R168X/+) heterozygotes, 189 per hour, than Mecp2(T158A/+) heterozygotes, 41 per hour. These results demonstrate that different RTT mutations lead to distinct respiratory phenotypes, suggesting that characterization of the respiratory phenotype may reveal functional differences between MeCP2 mutations and provide insights into the pathophysiology of RTT.

  2. Paternally Inherited Gsα Mutation Impairs Adipogenesis and Potentiates a Lean Phenotype In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jan-jan; Russell, Elizabeth; Zhang, Deyu; Kaplan, Frederick S.; Pignolo, Robert J.; Shore, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Paternally inherited inactivating mutations of the GNAS gene have been associated with a rare and disabling genetic disorder, progressive osseous heteroplasia, in which heterotopic ossification occurs within extraskeletal soft tissues, such as skin, subcutaneous fat, and skeletal muscle. This ectopic bone formation is hypothesized to be caused by dysregulated mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation that affects a bipotential osteogenic-adipogenic lineage cell fate switch. Interestingly, patients with paternally inherited inactivating mutations of GNAS are uniformly lean. Using a mouse model of Gsα-specific exon 1 disruption, we examined whether heterozygous inactivation of Gnas affects adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal precursor cells from subcutaneous adipose tissues (fat pad). We found that paternally inherited Gsα inactivation (Gsα+/p−) impairs adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs). The Gsα+/p− mutation in ASCs also decreased expression of the adipogenic factors CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)β, C/EBPα, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and adipocyte protein 2. Impaired adipocyte differentiation was rescued by an adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, and provided evidence that Gsα-cAMP signals are necessary in early stages of this process. Supporting a role for Gnas in adipogenesis in vivo, fat tissue weight and expression of adipogenic genes from multiple types of adipose tissues from Gsα+/p− mice were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the inhibition of adipogenesis by paternally inherited Gsα mutation also enhances expression of the osteogenic factors, msh homeobox 2, runt-related transcription factor 2, and osteocalcin. These data support the hypothesis that Gsα plays a critical role in regulating the balance between fat and bone determination in soft tissues, a finding that has important implications for a wide variety of disorders of osteogenesis and adipogenesis. PMID

  3. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity.

  4. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S.; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity. PMID:26384561

  5. Arrhythmogenic Biophysical Phenotype for SCN5A Mutation S1787N Depends upon Splice Variant Background and Intracellular Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rou-Mu; Tan, Bi-Hua; Tester, David J.; Song, Chunhua; He, Yang; Dovat, Sinisa; Peterson, Blaise Z.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Makielski, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background SCN5A is a susceptibility gene for type 3 long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and sudden infant death syndrome. INa dysfunction from mutated SCN5A can depend upon the splice variant background in which it is expressed and also upon environmental factors such as acidosis. S1787N was reported previously as a LQT3-associated mutation and has also been observed in 1 of 295 healthy white controls. Here, we determined the in vitro biophysical phenotype of SCN5A-S1787N in an effort to further assess its possible pathogenicity. Methods and Results We engineered S1787N in the two most common alternatively spliced SCN5A isoforms, the major isoform lacking a glutamine at position 1077 (Q1077del) and the minor isoform containing Q1077, and expressed these two engineered constructs in HEK293 cells for electrophysiological study. Macroscopic voltage-gated INa was measured 24 hours after transfection with standard whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We applied intracellular solutions with pH7.4 or pH6.7. S1787N in the Q1077 background had WT-like INa including peak INa density, activation and inactivation parameters, and late INa amplitude in both pH 7.4 and pH 6.7. However, with S1787N in the Q1077del background, the percentages of INa late/peak were increased by 2.1 fold in pH 7.4 and by 2.9 fold in pH 6.7 when compared to WT. Conclusion The LQT3-like biophysical phenotype for S1787N depends on both the SCN5A splice variant and on the intracellular pH. These findings provide further evidence that the splice variant and environmental factors affect the molecular phenotype of cardiac SCN5A-encoded sodium channel (Nav1.5), has implications for the clinical phenotype, and may provide insight into acidosis-induced arrhythmia mechanisms. PMID:25923670

  6. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of P Element-Induced Mutations Reveals That the Drosophila Ovarian Tumor Gene Has Maternal Activity and a Variable Null Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, P. K.; Patton, J. S.; Rodesch, C.; Nagoshi, R. N.

    1993-01-01

    The mutations in the ovarian tumor (otu) gene arrest oogenesis at several stages in development. A series of deletion mutations in the otu region were characterized, each of which causes the absence or reduction of the otu transcript. These alleles range from the most severe class, which results in ovaries lacking egg cysts, to relatively mild mutations that allow the development of late stage oocytes. Heteroallelic combinations of these mutations demonstrate that the phenotypic complexity of otu mutant ovaries is due to a dosage dependent requirement for otu activity. Reciprocal cross and developmental Northern blot studies suggest a maternal requirement for otu in the development of the female germline. In addition we demonstrate that the otu zygotic null phenotype is variable, ranging from the absence of cysts in the most extreme cases, to the presence of tumorous egg chambers. PMID:8436275

  7. Role of a short tandem leucine/arginine repeat in strong mutator phenotype acquisition in a clinical isolate of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Hervé; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective study, a strong mutator strain of Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from a collection of 130 human clinical strains of Salmonella. Sequence analysis of the mutS, mutL, and mutH genes, which encode three proteins that are essential for initiation of methyl-directed DNA mismatch repair, revealed insertion of a short tandem repeat (STR) of leucine/alanine in the histidine kinase-like ATPase domain of MutL. The role of this STR in the acquisition of the strong mutator phenotype was confirmed by the construction of an isogenic mutant (6bpinsmutL) from a normomutator strain of Salmonella Heidelberg. This result adds to the sparse body of knowledge about strong mutators and highlights the role of this STR as a hotspot for the acquisition of a strong mutator phenotype in Salmonella.

  8. Atelosteogenesis type II is caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate-transporter gene (DTDST): evidence for a phenotypic series involving three chondrodysplasias.

    PubMed

    Hästbacka, J; Superti-Furga, A; Wilcox, W R; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Lander, E S

    1996-02-01

    Atelosteogenesis type II (AO II) is a neonatally lethal chondrodysplasia whose clinical and histological characteristics resemble those of another chondrodysplasia, the much less severe diastrophic dysplasia (DTD). The similarity suggests a shared pathogenesis involving lesions in the same biochemical pathway and perhaps the same gene. DTD is caused by mutations in the recently identified diastrophic dysplasia sulfate-transporter gene (DTDST). Here, we report that AOII patients also have DTDST mutations, which lead to defective uptake of inorganic sulfate and insufficient sulfation of macromolecules by patient mesenchymal cells in vitro. Together with our recent observation that a third even more severe chondrodysplasia, achondrogenesis type IB, is also caused by mutations in DTDST, these results demonstrate a phenotypic series of three chondrodysplasias of increasing severity caused by lesions in a single sulfate-transporter gene. The severity of the phenotype appears to be correlated with the predicted effect of the mutations on the residual activity of the DTDST protein. PMID:8571951

  9. SETD5 loss-of-function mutation as a likely cause of a familial syndromic intellectual disability with variable phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Brzezinska, Monika; Kot, Justyna; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Walczak, Anna; Stawiński, Piotr; Werner, Bożena; Płoski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Loss-of-function de novo mutations in the SETD5 gene, encoding a putative methyltransferase, are an important cause of moderate/severe intellectual disability as evidenced by the results of sequencing large patient cohorts. We present the first familial case of a SETD5 mutation contributing to a phenotype of congenital heart defects and dysmorphic features, with variable expression, in two siblings and their father. Interestingly, the father demonstrated only mild intellectual impairment. Family based exome sequencing combined to careful parental phenotyping may reveal a more complex clinical picture in newly recognized syndromes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27375234

  10. Striking intrafamilial phenotypic variability in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with the recurrent Asian founder mutation in RNASEH2C.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Julie; Agrawal, Shakti; Ibrahim, Zala; Southwood, Taunton R; Philip, Sunny; Macpherson, Lesley; Bhole, Malini V; Crow, Yanick J; Oley, Christine

    2013-02-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an encephalopathy of early childhood which is most commonly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The disorder demonstrates significant genetic heterogeneity with causative mutations in five genes identified to date. Although most patients with AGS experience a severe neonatal or infantile presentation, poor neurodevelopmental outcome and reduced survival, clinical variability in the onset and severity of the condition is being increasingly recognized. A later presentation with a more variable effect on development, morbidity and mortality has been particularly observed in association with mutations in SAMHD1 and RNASEH2B. In contrast, the recurrent c.205C > T (p.R69W) RNASEH2C Asian founder mutation has previously only been identified in children with a severe AGS phenotype. Here, to our knowledge, we present the first report of marked phenotypic variability in siblings both harboring this founder mutation in the homozygous state. In this family, one female child had a severe AGS phenotype with an onset in infancy and profound developmental delay, whilst an older sister was of completely normal intellect with a normal head circumference and was only diagnosed because of the presence of chilblains and a mild hemiplegia. An appreciation of intrafamilial phenotypic expression is important in the counseling of families considering prenatal diagnosis, and may also be relevant to the assessment of efficacy in future clinical trials. In addition, marked phenotypic variation raises the possibility that more mildly affected patients are not currently identified. PMID:23322642

  11. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  12. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype–Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary‐Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic‐Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P.; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W.; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben‐Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G.; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L.; Destree, Anne; Duat‐Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M.; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W.; Hernández‐Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano‐Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K.; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin‐Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Powell, Cynthia M.; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P.; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C.; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype–phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café‐au‐lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan‐like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1‐patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi‐exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss‐of‐function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype–phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  13. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  14. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients.

  15. Exploring the complete mutational space of the LDL receptor LA5 domain using molecular dynamics: linking SNPs with disease phenotypes in familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Orozco, Modesto; Sancho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disorder with a prevalence of 0.2%, represents a high-risk factor to develop cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The majority and most severe FH cases are associated to mutations in the receptor for low-density lipoproteins receptor (LDL-r), but the molecular basis explaining the connection between mutation and phenotype is often unknown, which hinders early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. We have used atomistic simulations to explore the complete SNP mutational space (227 mutants) of the LA5 repeat, the key domain for interacting with LDL that is coded in the exon concentrating the highest number of mutations. Four clusters of mutants of different stability have been identified. The majority of the 50 FH known mutations (33) appear distributed in the unstable clusters, i.e. loss of conformational stability explains two-third of FH phenotypes. However, one-third of FH phenotypes (17 mutations) do not destabilize the LR5 repeat. Combining our simulations with available structural data from different laboratories, we have defined a consensus-binding site for the interaction of the LA5 repeat with LDL-r partner proteins and have found that most (16) of the 17 stable FH mutations occur at binding site residues. Thus, LA5-associated FH arises from mutations that cause either the loss of stability or a decrease in domain's-binding affinity. Based on this finding, we propose the likely phenotype of each possible SNP in the LA5 repeat and outline a procedure to make a full computational diagnosis for FH. PMID:26755827

  16. Exploring the complete mutational space of the LDL receptor LA5 domain using molecular dynamics: linking SNPs with disease phenotypes in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Orozco, Modesto; Sancho, Javier

    2016-03-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a genetic disorder with a prevalence of 0.2%, represents a high-risk factor to develop cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The majority and most severe FH cases are associated to mutations in the receptor for low-density lipoproteins receptor (LDL-r), but the molecular basis explaining the connection between mutation and phenotype is often unknown, which hinders early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. We have used atomistic simulations to explore the complete SNP mutational space (227 mutants) of the LA5 repeat, the key domain for interacting with LDL that is coded in the exon concentrating the highest number of mutations. Four clusters of mutants of different stability have been identified. The majority of the 50 FH known mutations (33) appear distributed in the unstable clusters, i.e. loss of conformational stability explains two-third of FH phenotypes. However, one-third of FH phenotypes (17 mutations) do not destabilize the LR5 repeat. Combining our simulations with available structural data from different laboratories, we have defined a consensus-binding site for the interaction of the LA5 repeat with LDL-r partner proteins and have found that most (16) of the 17 stable FH mutations occur at binding site residues. Thus, LA5-associated FH arises from mutations that cause either the loss of stability or a decrease in domain's-binding affinity. Based on this finding, we propose the likely phenotype of each possible SNP in the LA5 repeat and outline a procedure to make a full computational diagnosis for FH.

  17. Genotype/phenotype correlations of NPHS1 and NPHS2 mutations in nephrotic syndrome advocate a functional inter-relationship in glomerular filtration.

    PubMed

    Koziell, Ania; Grech, Victor; Hussain, Sagair; Lee, Gary; Lenkkeri, Ulla; Tryggvason, Karl; Scambler, Peter

    2002-02-15

    Mutations of the novel renal glomerular genes NPHS1 and NPHS2 encoding nephrin and podocin cause two types of severe nephrotic syndrome presenting in early life, Finnish type congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNF) and a form of autosomal recessive familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (SRN1), respectively. To investigate the mechanisms by which mutations might cause glomerular protein leak, we analysed NPHS1/NPHS2 genotype/phenotype relationships in 41 non-Finnish CNF patients, four patients with congenital (onset 0 to 3 months) focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and five patients with possible SRN1 (onset 6 months to 2 years). We clarify the range of NPHS1 mutations in CNF, detecting mutation 'hot-spots' within the NPHS1 coding sequence. In addition, we describe a novel discordant CNF phenotype characterized by variable clinical severity, apparently influenced by gender. Moreover, we provide evidence that CNF may be genetically heterogeneous by detection of NPHS2 mutations in some CNF patients in whom NPHS1 mutations were not found. We confirm an overlap in the NPHS1/NPHS2 mutation spectrum with the characterization of a unique di-genic inheritance of NPHS1 and NPHS2 mutations, which results in a 'tri-allelic' hit and appears to modify the phenotype from CNF to one of congenital focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). This may result from an epistatic gene interaction, and provides a rare example of multiple allelic hits being able to modify an autosomal recessive disease phenotype in humans. Our findings provide the first evidence for a functional inter-relationship between NPHS1 and NPHS2 in human nephrotic disease, thus underscoring their critical role in the regulation of glomerular filtration. PMID:11854170

  18. Spectrum of pontocerebellar hypoplasia in 13 girls and boys with CASK mutations: confirmation of a recognizable phenotype and first description of a male mosaic patient

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by lack of development and/or early neurodegeneration of cerebellum and brainstem. According to clinical features, seven subtypes of PCH have been described, PCH type 2 related to TSEN54 mutations being the most frequent. PCH is most often autosomal recessive though de novo anomalies in the X-linked gene CASK have recently been identified in patients, mostly females, presenting with intellectual disability, microcephaly and PCH (MICPCH). Methods Fourteen patients (12 females and two males; aged 16 months-14 years) presenting with PCH at neuroimaging and with clinical characteristics unsuggestive of PCH1 or PCH2 were included. The CASK gene screening was performed using Array-CGH and sequencing. Clinical and neuroradiological features were collected. Results We observed a high frequency of patients with a CASK mutation (13/14). Ten patients (8 girls and 2 boys) had intragenic mutations and three female patients had a Xp11.4 submicroscopic deletion including the CASK gene. All were de novo mutations. Phenotype was variable in severity but highly similar among the 11 girls and was characterized by psychomotor retardation, severe intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, dystonia, mild dysmorphism, and scoliosis. Other signs were frequently associated, such as growth retardation, ophthalmologic anomalies (glaucoma, megalocornea and optic atrophy), deafness and epilepsy. As expected in an X-linked disease manifesting mainly in females, the boy hemizygous for a splice mutation had a very severe phenotype with nearly no development and refractory epilepsy. We described a mild phenotype in a boy with a mosaic truncating mutation. We found some degree of correlation between severity of the vermis hypoplasia and clinical phenotype. Conclusion This study describes a new series of PCH female patients with CASK inactivating mutations and confirms that these patients have a

  19. The retinal phenotype of Grk1−/− is compromised by a Crb1rd8 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Joseph S.; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Well-established laboratory mouse lines are important in creating genetically engineered knockout mouse models; however, these routinely used inbred strains are prone to spontaneous and deleterious mutations. One of these strains, the commonly used C57BL/6N (B6N), was discovered to carry a point mutation in the Crumbs homolog 1 (Crb1rd8) gene, which codes for a developmental protein involved in tight junction formation at the outer limiting membrane (OLM). This mutation disrupts photoreceptor polarity and leads to retinal degeneration. It was hypothesized that the G-protein receptor kinase 1 knockouts (Grk1−/−), which were based on the B6N strain, would exhibit abnormal morphological phenotypes in their offspring not related to GRK1’s major phosphorylation function. The hypothesis was tested by examining Grk1−/− with or without the Crb1rd8 mutation. Methods The mice strains tested were C57BL/6J (B6J), B6N, and Grk1−/− on either a B6J (Grk1−/−;B6J) or B6N background (Grk1−/−;B6N) and were verified with PCR genotype analysis for Grk1−/− and Crb rd8. The mice were bred and raised in complete darkness until 1 or 3 months of age and then exposed to 1,000 lux light for 24 h, followed by processing for immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis on the retinal structure to investigate the morphological effects of light exposure. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) was performed to detect photoreceptor apoptosis. Results The microanatomy of the retinal sections revealed disorganization of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) in the B6N and Grk1−/−;B6N mice and a significant decrease in the thickness of the ONL in the 3-month-old Grk1−/−;B6N mice. The adherens-junction-associated protein, Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1), formed a continuous line at the OLM in the 1- and 3-month-old control B6J and Grk1−/−;B6J mice. In contrast, the B6N and Grk1−/−;B6N retinas showed discontinuous and fragmented staining

  20. Severe infantile epileptic encephalopathy due to mutations in PLCB1: expansion of the genotypic and phenotypic disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Ngoh, Adeline; McTague, Amy; Wentzensen, Ingrid M; Meyer, Esther; Applegate, Carolyn; Kossoff, Eric H; Batista, Denise A; Wang, Tao; Kurian, Manju A

    2014-01-01

    Homozygous deletions of chromosome 20p12.3, disrupting the promoter region and first three coding exons of the phospholipase C β1 gene (PLCB1), have previously been described in two reports of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE). Both children were born to consanguineous parents, one presented with infantile spasms, the other with migrating partial seizures of infancy. We describe an infant presenting with severe intractable epilepsy (without a specific EIEE electroclinical syndrome diagnosis) and neurodevelopmental delay associated with compound heterozygous mutations in PLCB1. A case note review and molecular genetic investigations were performed for a child, approximately 10 months of age, admitted to Johns Hopkins University Hospital for developmental delay and new-onset seizures. The patient presented at 6 months of age with developmental delay, followed by the onset of intractable, focal, and generalized seizures associated with developmental regression from 10 months of age. Presently, at 2 years of age, the child has severe motor and cognitive delays. Diagnostic microarray revealed a heterozygous 476kb deletion of 20p12.3 (encompassing PLCB1), which was also detected in the mother. The genomic breakpoints for the heterozygous deletion were determined. In order to investigate the presence of a second PLCB1 mutation, direct Sanger sequencing of the coding region and flanking intronic regions was undertaken, revealing a novel heterozygous intron 1 splice site variant (c.99+1G>A) in both the index individual and the father. Advances in molecular genetic testing have greatly improved diagnostic rates in EIEE, and this report further confirms the important role of microarray investigation in this group of disorders. PLCB1-EIEE is now reported in a number of different EIEE phenotypes and our report provides further evidence for phenotypic pleiotropy encountered in early infantile epilepsy syndromes. PMID:24684524

  1. CRB2 Mutations Produce a Phenotype Resembling Congenital Nephrosis, Finnish Type, with Cerebral Ventriculomegaly and Raised Alpha-Fetoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, Anne; Kaylor, Julie; Pierce, Heather; Cahr, Michelle; DeWard, Stephanie J.; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Alsadah, Adnan; Salem, Fadi; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Mehta, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    We report five fetuses and a child from three families who shared a phenotype comprising cerebral ventriculomegaly and echogenic kidneys with histopathological findings of congenital nephrosis. The presenting features were greatly elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) or amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein (AFAFP) levels or abnormalities visualized on ultrasound scan during the second trimester of pregnancy. Exome sequencing revealed deleterious sequence variants in Crumbs, Drosophila, Homolog of, 2 (CRB2) consistent with autosomal-recessive inheritance. Two fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly and renal microcysts were compound heterozygotes for p.Asn800Lys and p.Trp759Ter, one fetus with renal microcysts was a compound heterozygote for p.Glu643Ala and p.Asn800Lys, and one child with cerebral ventriculomegaly, periventricular heterotopias, echogenic kidneys, and renal failure was homozygous for p.Arg633Trp in CRB2. Examination of the kidneys in one fetus showed tubular cysts at the corticomedullary junction and diffuse effacement of the epithelial foot processes and microvillous transformation of the renal podocytes, findings that were similar to those reported in congenital nephrotic syndrome, Finnish type, that is caused by mutations in nephrin (NPHS1). Loss of function for crb2b and nphs1 in Danio rerio were previously shown to result in loss of the slit diaphragms of the podocytes, leading to the hypothesis that nephrosis develops from an inability to develop a functional glomerular barrier. We conclude that the phenotype associated with CRB2 mutations is pleiotropic and that the condition is an important consideration in the evaluation of high MSAFP/AFAFP where a renal cause is suspected. PMID:25557780

  2. CRB2 mutations produce a phenotype resembling congenital nephrosis, Finnish type, with cerebral ventriculomegaly and raised alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne; Kaylor, Julie; Pierce, Heather; Cahr, Michelle; DeWard, Stephanie J; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Alsadah, Adnan; Salem, Fadi; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Mehta, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    We report five fetuses and a child from three families who shared a phenotype comprising cerebral ventriculomegaly and echogenic kidneys with histopathological findings of congenital nephrosis. The presenting features were greatly elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) or amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein (AFAFP) levels or abnormalities visualized on ultrasound scan during the second trimester of pregnancy. Exome sequencing revealed deleterious sequence variants in Crumbs, Drosophila, Homolog of, 2 (CRB2) consistent with autosomal-recessive inheritance. Two fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly and renal microcysts were compound heterozygotes for p.Asn800Lys and p.Trp759Ter, one fetus with renal microcysts was a compound heterozygote for p.Glu643Ala and p.Asn800Lys, and one child with cerebral ventriculomegaly, periventricular heterotopias, echogenic kidneys, and renal failure was homozygous for p.Arg633Trp in CRB2. Examination of the kidneys in one fetus showed tubular cysts at the corticomedullary junction and diffuse effacement of the epithelial foot processes and microvillous transformation of the renal podocytes, findings that were similar to those reported in congenital nephrotic syndrome, Finnish type, that is caused by mutations in nephrin (NPHS1). Loss of function for crb2b and nphs1 in Danio rerio were previously shown to result in loss of the slit diaphragms of the podocytes, leading to the hypothesis that nephrosis develops from an inability to develop a functional glomerular barrier. We conclude that the phenotype associated with CRB2 mutations is pleiotropic and that the condition is an important consideration in the evaluation of high MSAFP/AFAFP where a renal cause is suspected.

  3. Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis and ZSWIM6 mutation: phenotypic spectrum and mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Ousager, L.B.; Miller, K.A.; Zhou, Y.; Elalaoui, S.C.; Sefiani, A.; Bak, G.S; Hove, H.; Hansen, L.K.; Fagerberg, C.R.; Tajir, M.; Wilkie, A.O.M.

    2016-01-01

    Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis (AFND) is a distinctive and rare frontonasal malformation that presents in combination with brain and limb abnormalities. A single recurrent heterozygous missense substitution in ZSWIM6, encoding a protein of unknown function, was previously shown to underlie this disorder in four unrelated cases. Here we describe four additional individuals from three families, comprising two sporadic subjects (one of whom had no limb malformation) and a mildly affected female with a severely affected son. In the latter family we demonstrate parental mosaicism through deep sequencing of DNA isolated from a variety of tissues, which each contain different levels of mutation. This has important implications for genetic counselling. PMID:26706854

  4. Waxy Phenotype Evolution in the Allotetraploid Cereal Broomcorn Millet: Mutations at the GBSSI Locus in Their Functional and Phylogenetic Context

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Harriet V.; Moots, Hannah M.; Graybosch, Robert A.; Jones, Huw; Parker, Mary; Romanova, Olga; Jones, Martin K.; Howe, Christopher J.; Trafford, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Waxy mutants, in which endosperm starch contains ∼100% amylopectin rather than the wild-type composition of ∼70% amylopectin and ∼30% amylose, occur in many domesticated cereals. The cultivation of waxy varieties is concentrated in east Asia, where there is a culinary preference for glutinous-textured foods that may have developed from ancient food processing traditions. The waxy phenotype results from mutations in the GBSSI gene, which catalyzes amylose synthesis. Broomcorn or proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) is one of the world’s oldest cultivated cereals, which spread across Eurasia early in prehistory. Recent phylogeographic analysis has shown strong genetic structuring that likely reflects ancient expansion patterns. Broomcorn millet is highly unusual in being an allotetraploid cereal with fully waxy varieties. Previous work characterized two homeologous GBSSI loci, with multiple alleles at each, but could not determine whether both loci contributed to GBSSI function. We first tested the relative contribution of the two GBSSI loci to amylose synthesis and second tested the association between GBSSI alleles and phylogeographic structure inferred from simple sequence repeats (SSRs). We evaluated the phenotype of all known GBSSI genotypes in broomcorn millet by assaying starch composition and protein function. The results showed that the GBSSI-S locus is the major locus controlling endosperm amylose content, and the GBSSI-L locus has strongly reduced synthesis capacity. We genotyped 178 individuals from landraces from across Eurasia for the 2 GBSSI and 16 SSR loci and analyzed phylogeographic structuring and the geographic and phylogenetic distribution of GBSSI alleles. We found that GBSSI alleles have distinct spatial distributions and strong associations with particular genetic clusters defined by SSRs. The combination of alleles that results in a partially waxy phenotype does not exist in landrace populations. Our data suggest that broomcorn millet

  5. An emerging, recognizable facial phenotype in association with mutations in GLI-similar 3 (GLIS3).

    PubMed

    Dimitri, Paul; De Franco, Elisa; Habeb, Abdelhadi M; Gurbuz, Fatih; Moussa, Khairya; Taha, Doris; Wales, Jerry K H; Hogue, Jacob; Slavotinek, Anne; Shetty, Ambika; Balasubramanian, Meena

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal diabetes and hypothyroidism (NDH) syndrome was first described in 2003 in a consanguineous Saudi Arabian family where two out of four siblings were reported to have presented with proportionate IUGR, neonatal non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, severe congenital hypothyroidism, cholestasis, congenital glaucoma, and polycystic kidneys. Liver disease progressed to hepatic fibrosis. The renal disease was characterized by enlarged kidneys and multiple small cysts with deficient cortico-medullary junction differentiation and normal kidney function. There was minor facial dysmorphism (depressed nasal bridge, large anterior fontanelle, long philtrum) reported but no facial photographs were published. Mutations in the transcription factor GLI-similar 3 (GLIS3) gene in the original family and two other families were subsequently reported in 2006. All affected individuals had neonatal diabetes, congenital hypothyroidism but glaucoma and liver and kidney involvement were less consistent features. Detailed descriptions of the facial dysmorphism have not been reported previously. In this report, we describe the common facial dysmorphism consisting of bilateral low-set ears, depressed nasal bridge with overhanging columella, elongated, upslanted palpebral fissures, persistent long philtrum with a thin vermilion border of the upper lip in a cohort of seven patients with GLIS3 mutations and report the emergence of a distinct, probably recognizable facial gestalt in this group which evolves with age. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27148679

  6. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2.

  7. Multiple phenotypic alterations caused by a c-type cytochrome maturation ccmC gene mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Baert, Barbara; Baysse, Christine; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In some Proteobacteria biogenesis of c-type cytochromes depends on the products of the ccmABCDEFG(H) genes, which encode inner-membrane proteins. Inactivation of some ccm genes, in particular ccmC, has an impact on other processes as well, including siderophore production and utilization. Non-polar insertions were generated in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ccmA, ccmC, ccmE, ccmF and ccmH genes, and their impacts on different phenotypes were compared. Only in the case of the ccmC mutant was cytochrome c production totally abrogated. The ccmC mutant, and to a lesser extent the ccmF mutant, showed a range of other phenotypic changes. The production of the siderophore pyoverdine was very low and growth under the condition of iron limitation was severely restricted, but production of the second siderophore, pyochelin, was increased. Interestingly, other traits were also strongly affected by the ccmC mutation, including the production of pyocyanin, swarming and twitching motility, and rhamnolipid production. The production of N-acyl homoserine lactones or the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) was, however, not affected in the ccmC and ccmF mutants. The ccmC mutant was also found to accumulate porphyrins, and catalase production was undetectable, consistent with the increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Finally, reduction in the content of [Fe-S] clusters was evidenced in both ccmC and ccmF mutants. Wild-type phenotypes were restored by complementation with a ccmC gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that CcmC is a key determinant for cytochrome c biogenesis, pyoverdine maturation, and expression of some quorum sensing-regulated traits. PMID:18174132

  8. A novel mutation (a886g) in exon 5 of FGFR2 in members of a family with Crouzon phenotype and plagiocephaly.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger, D; Collmann, H; Schmalenberger, B; Müller, U

    1997-01-01

    We identified a novel mutation in members of a family with signs of Crouzon syndrome and plagiocephaly. In affected members of the family an A-->G transition was found at position 886 in exon 5 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. The base change results in the replacement of a lysine by glutamic acid in Ig-like loop III of FGFR2. The unusual finding of plagiocephaly in these Crouzon patients may either be the result of the type of mutation or because of genetic and environmental factors that affect the phenotype in addition to the mutated FGF receptor. Images PMID:9152842

  9. Adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit mutations causing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3) demonstrate genotype-phenotype correlations, codon bias and dominant-negative effects.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Howles, Sarah A; Rogers, Angela; Cranston, Treena; Gorvin, Caroline M; Babinsky, Valerie N; Reed, Anita A; Thakker, Clare E; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Brown, Rosalind S; Connell, John M; Cook, Jacqueline; Darzy, Ken; Ehtisham, Sarah; Graham, Una; Hulse, Tony; Hunter, Steven J; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Dhavendra; McKenna, Malachi J; McKnight, John A; Morrison, Patrick J; Mughal, M Zulf; O'Halloran, Domhnall; Pearce, Simon H; Porteous, Mary E; Rahman, Mushtaqur; Richardson, Tristan; Robinson, Robert; Scheers, Isabelle; Siddique, Haroon; Van't Hoff, William G; Wang, Timothy; Whyte, Michael P; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-09-15

    The adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit (AP2σ2) is pivotal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of plasma membrane constituents such as the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Mutations of the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue result in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3), a disorder of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+) o) homeostasis. To elucidate the role of AP2σ2 in Ca(2+) o regulation, we investigated 65 FHH probands, without other FHH-associated mutations, for AP2σ2 mutations, characterized their functional consequences and investigated the genetic mechanisms leading to FHH3. AP2σ2 mutations were identified in 17 probands, comprising 5 Arg15Cys, 4 Arg15His and 8 Arg15Leu mutations. A genotype-phenotype correlation was observed with the Arg15Leu mutation leading to marked hypercalcaemia. FHH3 probands harboured additional phenotypes such as cognitive dysfunction. All three FHH3-causing AP2σ2 mutations impaired CaSR signal transduction in a dominant-negative manner. Mutational bias was observed at the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue as other predicted missense substitutions (Arg15Gly, Arg15Pro and Arg15Ser), which also caused CaSR loss-of-function, were not detected in FHH probands, and these mutations were found to reduce the numbers of CaSR-expressing cells. FHH3 probands had significantly greater serum calcium (sCa) and magnesium (sMg) concentrations with reduced urinary calcium to creatinine clearance ratios (CCCR) in comparison with FHH1 probands with CaSR mutations, and a calculated index of sCa × sMg/100 × CCCR, which was ≥ 5.0, had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 83 and 86%, respectively, for FHH3. Thus, our studies demonstrate AP2σ2 mutations to result in a more severe FHH phenotype with genotype-phenotype correlations, and a dominant-negative mechanism of action with mutational bias at the Arg15 residue. PMID:26082470

  10. Adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit mutations causing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3) demonstrate genotype-phenotype correlations, codon bias and dominant-negative effects.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Howles, Sarah A; Rogers, Angela; Cranston, Treena; Gorvin, Caroline M; Babinsky, Valerie N; Reed, Anita A; Thakker, Clare E; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Brown, Rosalind S; Connell, John M; Cook, Jacqueline; Darzy, Ken; Ehtisham, Sarah; Graham, Una; Hulse, Tony; Hunter, Steven J; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Dhavendra; McKenna, Malachi J; McKnight, John A; Morrison, Patrick J; Mughal, M Zulf; O'Halloran, Domhnall; Pearce, Simon H; Porteous, Mary E; Rahman, Mushtaqur; Richardson, Tristan; Robinson, Robert; Scheers, Isabelle; Siddique, Haroon; Van't Hoff, William G; Wang, Timothy; Whyte, Michael P; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-09-15

    The adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit (AP2σ2) is pivotal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of plasma membrane constituents such as the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Mutations of the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue result in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3), a disorder of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+) o) homeostasis. To elucidate the role of AP2σ2 in Ca(2+) o regulation, we investigated 65 FHH probands, without other FHH-associated mutations, for AP2σ2 mutations, characterized their functional consequences and investigated the genetic mechanisms leading to FHH3. AP2σ2 mutations were identified in 17 probands, comprising 5 Arg15Cys, 4 Arg15His and 8 Arg15Leu mutations. A genotype-phenotype correlation was observed with the Arg15Leu mutation leading to marked hypercalcaemia. FHH3 probands harboured additional phenotypes such as cognitive dysfunction. All three FHH3-causing AP2σ2 mutations impaired CaSR signal transduction in a dominant-negative manner. Mutational bias was observed at the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue as other predicted missense substitutions (Arg15Gly, Arg15Pro and Arg15Ser), which also caused CaSR loss-of-function, were not detected in FHH probands, and these mutations were found to reduce the numbers of CaSR-expressing cells. FHH3 probands had significantly greater serum calcium (sCa) and magnesium (sMg) concentrations with reduced urinary calcium to creatinine clearance ratios (CCCR) in comparison with FHH1 probands with CaSR mutations, and a calculated index of sCa × sMg/100 × CCCR, which was ≥ 5.0, had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 83 and 86%, respectively, for FHH3. Thus, our studies demonstrate AP2σ2 mutations to result in a more severe FHH phenotype with genotype-phenotype correlations, and a dominant-negative mechanism of action with mutational bias at the Arg15 residue.

  11. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Novel USH2A Mutations Associated with Diverse Disease Phenotypes: Implications for Clinical and Molecular Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiping; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Ha, Shaoping; Liu, Wenzhou; Kang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    USH2A mutations have been implicated in the disease etiology of several inherited diseases, including Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2), nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and nonsyndromic deafness. The complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects make it difficult to manage patients with such mutations. In the present study, we aim to determine the genetic etiology and to characterize the correlated clinical phenotypes for three Chinese pedigrees with nonsyndromic RP, one with RP sine pigmento (RPSP), and one with USH2. Family histories and clinical details for all included patients were reviewed. Ophthalmic examinations included best corrected visual acuities, visual field measurements, funduscopy, and electroretinography. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied using two sequence capture arrays to reveal the disease causative mutations for each family. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also annotated. Seven USH2A mutations, including four missense substitutions (p.P2762A, p.G3320C, p.R3719H, and p.G4763R), two splice site variants (c.8223+1G>A and c.8559-2T>C), and a nonsense mutation (p.Y3745*), were identified as disease causative in the five investigated families, of which three reported to have consanguineous marriage. Among all seven mutations, six were novel, and one was recurrent. Two homozygous missense mutations (p.P2762A and p.G3320C) were found in one individual family suggesting a potential double hit effect. Significant phenotypic divergences were revealed among the five families. Three families of the five families were affected with early, moderated, or late onset RP, one with RPSP, and the other one with USH2. Our study expands the genotypic and phenotypic variability relevant to USH2A mutations, which would help with a clear insight into the complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects, and is complementary for a better management of patients with such mutations. We have also

  12. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptors: Phenotypic consequences during eukaryotic development

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.J.; Bellus, G.A.; Jabs, E.W.

    1995-10-01

    Recently, a tremendous amount of excitement and interest has been generated by the rapid succession of discoveries in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) field. In less than a year, mutations in three FGFRs (FGFR1-FGFR3) have been associated with three skeletal dysplasias and four craniosynostotic syndromes. FGFRs are members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that bind fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). The FGF family consists of structurally related polypeptides that play a key role in numerous aspects of embryogenesis, growth, and homeostasis. FGFs have a potent growth stimulatory and/or differentiation-inducing effect on cells such as those derived from the early-embryonic mesoderm or ectoderm. In addition to mitogenesis and differentiation, FGFs also stimulate chemotaxis, cell survival, and angiogenesis. FGFs mediate cellular responses on binding to and activation of FGFRs. 45 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. [A case of autosomal recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy without GJA12 mutation presenting a novel phenotype].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomoko; Sato, Kimiko; Shimazaki, Rie; Goto, Katsumasa; Matsuda, Takao; Ishiura, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman, who had consanguineous parents, developed gait disturbance at age 3, and revealed nystagmus, cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, and spastic tetraparesis. She admitted to our hospital at age 14, and the symptoms progressed very slowly. MRI of this case at age 45 showed a remarkable, diffuse hypomyelination of the cerebrum. Her older sister who already deceased at age 16 showed neurological symptoms similar to this case. The patient was found to have no proteolipid protein-1 gene duplications and deletions and base substitution. Her symptoms were considered to be different from those of typical HLD2, 3, 4 and 5. She carried no GJA12 mutations. These facts suggested that this disease is a novel, autosomal recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy. PMID:20120347

  14. Novel sporadic and recurrent mutations in KRT5 and KRT14 genes in Polish epidermolysis bullosa simplex patients: further insights into epidemiology and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Wertheim-Tysarowska, K; Ołdak, M; Giza, A; Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, A; Sota, J; Przybylska, D; Woźniak, K; Śniegórska, D; Niepokój, K; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, A; Rygiel, A M; Płoski, R; Bal, J; Kowalewski, C

    2016-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is a hereditary genodermatosis characterised by trauma-induced intraepidermal blistering of the skin. EBS is mostly caused by mutations in the KRT5 and KRT14 genes. Disease severity partially depends on the affected keratin type and may be modulated by mutation type and location. The aim of our study was to identify the molecular defects in KRT5 and KRT14 in a cohort of 46 Polish and one Belarusian probands with clinical suspicion of EBS and to determine the genotype-phenotype correlation. The group of 47 patients with clinical recognition of EBS was enrolled in the study. We analysed all coding exons of KRT5 and KRT14 using Sanger sequencing. The pathogenic status of novel variants was evaluated using bioinformatical tools, control group analysis (DNA from 100 healthy population-matched subjects) and probands' parents testing. We identified mutations in 80 % of patients and found 29 different mutations, 11 of which were novel and six were found in more than one family. All novel mutations were ascertained as pathogenic. In the majority of cases, the most severe genotype was associated with mutations in highly conserved regions. In some cases, different inheritance mode and clinical significance, than previously reported by others, was observed. We report 11 novel variants and show novel genotype-phenotype correlations. Our data give further insight into the natural history of EBS molecular pathology, epidemiology and mutation origin. PMID:26432462

  15. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-06-23

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A-producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  16. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D.; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D.; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A–producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  17. FGFR2 mutation in a patient without typical features of Pfeiffer syndrome--The emerging role of combined NGS and phenotype based strategies.

    PubMed

    Flöttmann, Ricarda; Knaus, Alexej; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise; Spielmann, Malte

    2015-08-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (MIM: #101600) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder classically characterized by limb and craniofacial anomalies. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptors types 1 and 2 (FGFR1 and FGFR2). We applied a next generation sequencing (NGS) panel approach comprising all 2877 genes currently known to be causative for one or more Mendelian diseases combined with the phenotype based computational tool PhenIX (Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes). We report on a patient presenting with multiple anomalies of hands and feet including brachydactyly and symphalangism. No clinical diagnosis could be established based on the clinical findings and testing of several genes associated with brachydactyly and symphalangism failed to identify mutations. Via next generation sequencing (NGS) panel approach we then identified a novel de novo missense FGFR2 mutation affecting an amino acid reported to be mutated in Pfeiffer syndrome. Since our patient shows typical radiological findings of Pfeiffer syndrome in hands and feet but at the same time lacks several characteristic features such as clinical signs of craniosynostosis and prominent eyes we suggest introducing the term "FGFR2 associated phenotypes" for similar cases. Our results highlight the emerging role of combined NGS and phenotype based bioinformatics strategies to establish clinical diagnoses.

  18. Mitochondrial ND6 T14502C variant may modulate the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated G11778A mutation in four Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhou, Jian; Li, Chengwu; Zhao, Fuxin; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yanzi; Wang, Jiying; Yuan, Meixia; Cai, Wanshi; Tong, Yi; Sun, Yan-Hong; Yang, Li; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2010-09-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular evaluations of four Han Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Thirty-one (20 males/11 females) of 83 matrilineal relatives in these families exhibited the variable severity and age-at-onset in visual impairment. The average age-of-onset of vision loss was 22years old. Strikingly, these penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families were higher than those in other 11 Chinese pedigrees carrying the only ND4 G11778A mutation. Molecular analysis identified the known G11778A mutation and distinct sets of variants belonging to the Asian haplogroups M10a and M7c2. Of these, the T14502C mutation caused the substitution of a highly conserved isoleucine for valine at position 58 in ND6. This mutation has been associated with LHON in other Chinese families with very low penetrance of LHON. Thus, the deficient activities of complex I, caused by G11778A mutation, would be worsened by the T14502C mutation in these four Chinese families. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunctions would lead to the high penetrance and expressivity of visual loss in these Chinese families carrying both G11778A and T14502C mutations than other 11 Chinese families carrying only G11778A mutation. These data suggested that the T14502C variant may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the G11778A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  19. 21-hydroxylase deficiency-induced congenital adrenal hyperplasia in 230 Chinese patients: Genotype-phenotype correlation and identification of nine novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruifang; Yu, Yongguo; Ye, Jun; Han, Lianshu; Qiu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Huiwen; Liang, Lili; Gong, Zhuwen; Wang, Lili; Gu, Xuefan

    2016-04-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) caused by the CYP21A2 gene mutations accounts for more than 90% of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) cases. In this study, molecular defects of 230 patients with 21-OHD were investigated. Point mutations of CYP21A2 gene were analyzed by Sanger sequencing, and large gene deletions were detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Nine micro-conversions and 18 spontaneous mutations accounted for 74.6% of alleles, while large gene deletions and large gene conversions accounted for 25.4% of alleles. The most frequent micro-conversion was c.292-13A/C>G (I2G) (35%), followed by p.I173N (14.3%), p.R357W (5.9%) and p.Q319* (4.6%). Nine novel mutations were identified in these patients, which were predicted to hamper the 21-hydroxylase protein function in varying degrees. Genotype and phenotype correlated well in 89.6% of our patients, but disparity in phenotypic appearance also appeared in a small portion of the patients. 16.1% of the patients carried homozygous genotypes while 83.9% of patients carried compound heterozygous mutations. We concluded that the frequency of CYP21A2 mutations in our study was slightly different from those reported for other ethnic groups. Micro-conversions were the main category of the mutation spectrum, while large deletions and large gene conversions could also cause 21-OHD. A large portion of different types of the compound heterozygous genotypes may partially contribute to the discordance in genotype-phenotype comparison. This study expanded the CYP21A2 mutation spectrum of Chinese patients and could be helpful in prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for 21-OHD patients.

  20. Mutation survey and genotype-phenotype analysis of COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes in 16 Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xun; Jia, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Xueshan; Li, Shiqiang; Li, Jie; Li, Yadi; Wei, Yantao; Liang, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes and to examine the genotype-phenotype correlation in a cohort of Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome. Methods A total of 16 Chinese probands with Stickler syndrome were recruited, including nine with a family history of an autosomal dominant pattern and seven sporadic cases. All patients underwent full ocular and systemic examinations. Sanger sequencing was used to analyze all coding and adjacent regions of the COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the gross indels of COL2A1 and COL11A1. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to evaluate the pathogenicity of the variants. Results Five mutations in COL2A1 were identified in six of 16 probands, including three novel (c.85C>T, c.3356delG, c.3401delG) mutations and two known mutations (c.1693C>T, c.2710C>T). Of the five mutations, three were truncated mutations, and the other two were missense mutations. Putative pathogenic mutations of the COL11A1 gene were absent in this cohort of patients. Gross indels were not found in COL2A1 or COL11A1 in any of the probands. High myopia was the most frequent initial ocular phenotype of Stickler syndrome. In this study, 12 Chinese probands lacked obvious systemic phenotypes. Conclusions In this study, three novel and two known mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified in six of 16 Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome. This is the first study in a cohort of Chinese patients with Stickler syndrome, and the results expand the mutation spectrum of the COL2A1 gene. Analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation showed that the early onset of high myopia with vitreous abnormalities may serve as a key indicator of Stickler syndrome, while the existence of mandibular protrusion in pediatric patients may be an efficient indicator for the absence of mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1. PMID:27390512

  1. Limited phenotypic variation of hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta in a Danish five-generation family with a novel FAM83H nonsense mutation.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Gjørup, Hans; Jensen, Lillian G; Juncker, Inger; Nyegaard, Mette; Børglum, Anders D; Poulsen, Sven; Hertz, Jens M

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND.  Autosomal dominant hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta (ADHCAI) is a disease with severe dental manifestations. OBJECTIVES.  The aims were by means of a genome-wide linkage scan to search for the gene underlying the ADHCAI phenotype in a Danish five-generation family and to study the phenotypic variation of the enamel in affected family members. RESULTS.  Significant linkage was found to a locus at chromosome 8q24.3 comprising the gene FAM83H identified to be responsible for ADHCAI in other families. Subsequent sequencing of FAM83H in affected family members revealed a novel nonsense mutation, p.Y302X. Limited phenotypic variation was found among affected family members with loss of translucency and discoloration of the enamel. Extensive posteruptive loss of enamel was found in all teeth of affected subjects. The tip of the cusps on the premolars and molars and a zone along the gingival margin seemed resistant to posteruptive loss of enamel. We have screened FAM83H in another five unrelated Danish patients with a phenotype of ADHCAI similar to that in the five-generation family, and identified a de novo FAM83H nonsense mutation, p.Q452X in one of these patients. CONCLUSION.  We have identified a FAM83H mutation in two of six unrelated families with ADHCAI and found limited phenotypic variation of the enamel in these patients.

  2. The rem Mutations in the ATP-Binding Groove of the Rad3/XPD Helicase Lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome-Like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Montelone, Beth A.; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes). We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS), we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease. PMID:25500814

  3. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 in a patient with severe short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toshio; Nagaya, Ken; Kawata, Yumi; Asai, Hiroko; Tsuchida, Etsushi; Nohara, Fumikatsu; Okajima, Kazuki; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive lethal skeletal ciliopathy, which is phenotypically similar to nonlethal asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy. Mutations in DYNC2H1 have been identified in both of these disorders, indicating that they are variants of a single disorder. However, short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is the more severe variant. Here, we report novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 (p.E1894fsX10 and p.R3004C) in a patient with typical short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype. R3004 is located within the microtubule-binding domain of DYNC2H1, and its substitution is predicted to disrupt the interaction with microtubules. Considering the severe phenotype of our patient, our findings suggest that R3004 may be a key residue for the microtubule-binding affinity of dynein.

  4. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene.

    PubMed

    Keilland, E; Rupar, C A; Prasad, Asuri N; Tay, K Y; Downie, A; Prasad, C

    2016-03-01

    m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (> 7 years) and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T > C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T > C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome), MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy), KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome) and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia).

  5. The expanding phenotype of MELAS caused by the m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Keilland, E.; Rupar, C.A.; Prasad, Asuri N.; Tay, K.Y.; Downie, A.; Prasad, C.

    2016-01-01

    m.3291T > C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene has been infrequently encountered in association with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), however remains poorly characterized from a clinical perspective. In the following report we describe in detail the phenotypic features, long term follow up (> 7 years) and management in a Caucasian family with MELAS due to the m.3291T > C mutation and review the literature on m.3291T > C mutation. The clinical phenotype in the proposita included overlapping features of MELAS, MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber syndrome), MNGIE (Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy), KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome) and CPEO (Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia). PMID:27014580

  6. Modeling the human MTM1 p.R69C mutation in murine Mtm1 results in exon 4 skipping and a less severe myotubular myopathy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Christopher R.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Durban, Ashley N.; Marshall, Morgan L.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Snyder, Andrew D.; Naiyer, Nada; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Dowling, James J.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM) is a severe neuromuscular disease of infancy caused by mutations of MTM1, which encodes the phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. The Mtm1 knockout (KO) mouse has a severe phenotype and its short lifespan (8 weeks) makes it a challenge to use as a model in the testing of certain preclinical therapeutics. Many MTM patients succumb early in life, but some have a more favorable prognosis. We used human genotype–phenotype correlation data to develop a myotubularin-deficient mouse model with a less severe phenotype than is seen in Mtm1 KO mice. We modeled the human c.205C>T point mutation in Mtm1 exon 4, which is predicted to introduce the p.R69C missense change in myotubularin. Hemizygous male Mtm1 p.R69C mice develop early muscle atrophy prior to the onset of weakness at 2 months. The median survival period is 66 weeks. Histopathology shows small myofibers with centrally placed nuclei. Myotubularin protein is undetectably low because the introduced c.205C>T base change induced exon 4 skipping in most mRNAs, leading to premature termination of myotubularin translation. Some full-length Mtm1 mRNA bearing the mutation is present, which provides enough myotubularin activity to account for the relatively mild phenotype, as Mtm1 KO and Mtm1 p.R69C mice have similar muscle phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels. These data explain the basis for phenotypic variability among human patients with MTM1 p.R69C mutations and establish the Mtm1 p.R69C mouse as a valuable model for the disease, as its less severe phenotype will expand the scope of testable preclinical therapies. PMID:22068590

  7. Bi-allelic Mutations in KLHL7 Cause a Crisponi/CISS1-like Phenotype Associated with Early-Onset Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Angius, Andrea; Uva, Paolo; Buers, Insa; Oppo, Manuela; Puddu, Alessandro; Onano, Stefano; Persico, Ivana; Loi, Angela; Marcia, Loredana; Höhne, Wolfgang; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Fotia, Giorgio; Deiana, Manila; Marongiu, Mara; Atalay, Hatice Tuba; Inan, Sibel; El Assy, Osama; Smit, Leo M E; Okur, Ilyas; Boduroglu, Koray; Utine, Gülen Eda; Kılıç, Esra; Zampino, Giuseppe; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Crisponi, Laura; Rutsch, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Crisponi syndrome (CS)/cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a complex phenotype with high neonatal lethality, associated with the following main clinical features: hyperthermia and feeding difficulties in the neonatal period, scoliosis, and paradoxical sweating induced by cold since early childhood. CS/CISS1 can be caused by mutations in cytokine receptor-like factor 1 (CRLF1). However, the physiopathological role of CRLF1 is still poorly understood. A subset of CS/CISS1 cases remain yet genetically unexplained after CRLF1 sequencing. In five of them, exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing identified four homozygous disease-causing mutations in kelch-like family member 7 (KLHL7), affecting the Kelch domains of the protein. KLHL7 encodes a BTB-Kelch-related protein involved in the ubiquitination of target proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation. Mono-allelic substitutions in other domains of KLHL7 have been reported in three families affected by a late-onset form of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Retinitis pigmentosa was also present in two surviving children reported here carrying bi-allelic KLHL7 mutations. KLHL7 mutations are thus associated with a more severe phenotype in recessive than in dominant cases. Although these data further support the pathogenic role of KLHL7 mutations in a CS/CISS1-like phenotype, they do not explain all their clinical manifestations and highlight the high phenotypic heterogeneity associated with mutations in KLHL7. PMID:27392078

  8. Tracing the pathway between mutation and phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta: Isolation of mineralization-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Culbert, A.A.; Wallis, G.A.; Kadler, K.E.

    1996-05-03

    The brittleness of bone in people with lethal (type II) osteogenesis imperfecta, a heritable disorder caused by mutations in the type I collagen genes, arises from the deposition of abnormal collagen in the bone matrix. The inability of the abnormal collagen to participate in mineralization may be caused by its failure to interact with other bone proteins. Here, we have designed a strategy to isolate the genes important for mineralization of collagen during bone formation. Cells isolated from 16-day embryonic chick calvaria and seeded post-confluence in culture deposited a mineralized matrix over a period of 2 weeks. Chick skin fibroblasts seeded and cultured under the same conditions did not mineralize. Using RT-PCR, we prepared short cDNAs ({approximately}300 bp) corresponding to the 3{prime} ends of mRNA from fibroblasts and separately from the mineralizing calvarial cells. Subtractive cDNA hybridization generated a pool of cDNAs that were specific to mineralizing calvarial cells but not to fibroblasts. Screening of 100,000 plaques of a chick bone ZAP Express cDNA library with this pool of mineralizing-specific cDNAs identified ten clones which comprised full-length cDNAs for the bone proteins osteopontin (eight of the ten positives), bone sialoprotein II (one of the ten positives), and cystatin (one of the ten positives). cDNAs for type I collagen, fibronectin, alkaline phosphatase, house-keeping genes, and other genes expressed in fibroblasts were not identified in this preliminary screen. The pool of short cDNAs is likely to comprise cDNAs for further bone-specific genes and will be used to screen the entire bone cDNA library of 4.2 million clones. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Uniparental disomy as a cause of spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy: phenotypic homogeneity due to the homozygous c.125C>T mutation in ASAH1.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Beatriz G; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Ortega-Moreno, Laura; Verdú, Alfonso; Carrascosa-Romero, M Carmen; García-Campos, Óscar; García-Muñozguren, Susana; Pardal-Fernández, José Manuel; Serratosa, José M

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMAPME, OMIM#159950) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of progressive myoclonic epilepsy and muscular weakness due to lower motor neuron disease. Mutations in ASAH1, previously associated only to Farber disease, have been recently described in seven patients with SMAPME. A homozygous c.125C>T mutation was initially found in six patients with a clinical homogeneous phenotype. A heterozygous compound mutation found in an additional patient has broadened the clinical and genetic spectrum of clinical SMAPME. We report a new case of a 13-year-old girl with SMAPME with the homozygous ASAH1 c.125C>T mutation, unique in that it is due to paternal uniparental disomy. She experienced muscle weakness from the age of three due to lower motor neuron involvement that lead to severe handicap and onset in late childhood of a progressive myoclonic epilepsy. This clinical picture fully overlaps with that of previously reported patients with this mutation and supports our view that the clinical phenotype associated with the homozygous c.125C>T mutation constitutes a clinically homogenous and recognizable disease. PMID:25578555

  10. Genotypic and phenotypic variation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals signatures of secondary infection and mutator activity in certain cystic fibrosis patients with chronic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ashley E; Boulianne-Larsen, Carla M; Chandler, Christine B; Chiotti, Kami; Kroll, Evgueny; Miller, Scott R; Taddei, Francois; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Ferroni, Agnes; McInnerney, Kathleen; Franklin, Michael J; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Evolutionary adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis lung is limited by genetic variation, which depends on rates of horizontal gene transfer and mutation supply. Because each may increase following secondary infection or mutator emergence, we sought to ascertain the incidence of secondary infection and genetic variability in populations containing or lacking mutators. Forty-nine strains collected over 3 years from 16 patients were phenotyped for antibiotic resistance and mutator status and were genotyped by repetitive-sequence PCR (rep-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Though phenotypic and genetic polymorphisms were widespread and clustered more strongly within than between longitudinal series, their distribution revealed instances of secondary infection. Sequence data, however, indicated that interlineage recombination predated initial strain isolation. Mutator series were more likely to be multiply antibiotic resistant, but not necessarily more variable in their nucleotide sequences, than nonmutators. One mutator and one nonmutator series were sequenced at mismatch repair loci and analyzed for gene content using DNA microarrays. Both were wild type with respect to mutL, but mutators carried an 8-bp mutS deletion causing a frameshift mutation. Both series lacked 126 genes encoding pilins, siderophores, and virulence factors whose inactivation has been linked to adaptation during chronic infection. Mutators exhibited loss of severalfold more genes having functions related to mobile elements, motility, and attachment. A 105-kb, 86-gene deletion was observed in one nonmutator that resulted in loss of virulence factors related to pyoverdine synthesis and elements of the multidrug efflux regulon. Diminished DNA repair activity may facilitate but not be absolutely required for rapid evolutionary change.

  11. Mutations in UDP-Glucose:sterol glucosyltransferase in Arabidopsis cause transparent testa phenotype and suberization defect in seeds.

    PubMed

    DeBolt, Seth; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Schrick, Kathrin; Auer, Manfred; Beisson, Fred; Bischoff, Volker; Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Carroll, Andrew; Hematy, Kian; Li, Yonghua; Milne, Jennifer; Nair, Meera; Schaller, Hubert; Zemla, Marcin; Somerville, Chris

    2009-09-01

    In higher plants, the most abundant sterol derivatives are steryl glycosides (SGs) and acyl SGs. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes, UGT80A2 and UGT80B1, that encode UDP-Glc:sterol glycosyltransferases, enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of SGs. Lines having mutations in UGT80A2, UGT80B1, or both UGT80A2 and UGT8B1 were identified and characterized. The ugt80A2 lines were viable and exhibited relatively minor effects on plant growth. Conversely, ugt80B1 mutants displayed an array of phenotypes that were pronounced in the embryo and seed. Most notable was the finding that ugt80B1 was allelic to transparent testa15 and displayed a transparent testa phenotype and a reduction in seed size. In addition to the role of UGT80B1 in the deposition of flavanoids, a loss of suberization of the seed was apparent in ugt80B1 by the lack of autofluorescence at the hilum region. Moreover, in ugt80B1, scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the outer integument of the seed coat lost the electron-dense cuticle layer at its surface and displayed altered cell morphology. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of lipid polyester monomers confirmed a drastic decrease in aliphatic suberin and cutin-like polymers that was associated with an inability to limit tetrazolium salt uptake. The findings suggest a membrane function for SGs and acyl SGs in trafficking of lipid polyester precursors. An ancillary observation was that cellulose biosynthesis was unaffected in the double mutant, inconsistent with a predicted role for SGs in priming cellulose synthesis.

  12. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J.; Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Ebschner, U.; Amano, S.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC{yields}G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly heating erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  13. A mutation in the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor-suppressor gene, giving rise to widely different clinical phenotypes in two unrelated individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Bourn, D.; Carter, S.A.; Goodship, J.; Strachan, T. ); Evans, G.R.; Coakham, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have sought mutations in the recently identified neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene in a large panel of NF2 patients, using PCR-based SSCP and heteroduplex analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of appropriate PCR products. Two unrelated NF2 patients were found to have identical nonsense mutations caused by a C-to-T transition in a CpG dinucleotide that is a potential mutational hot spot in the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene. Unexpectedly, the two individuals had widely different clinical phenotypes, representing the severe Wishart and mild Gardner clinical subtypes. Analysis of DNA samples from different tissues of the mildly affected patient suggests that he is a somatic mosaic for the mutation. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Marfan phenotype variability in a family segregating a missense mutation in the epidermal growth factor-like motif of the fibrillin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, H C; Pyeritz, R E; Puffenberger, E G; Kendzior, R J; Corson, G M; Maslen, C L; Sakai, L Y; Francomano, C A; Cutting, G R

    1992-01-01

    To examine the associations among fibrillin gene mutations, protein function, and Marfan syndrome phenotype, we screened for alterations in the fibrillin coding sequence in patients with a range of manifestations and clinical severity. A cysteine to serine substitution at codon 1409 (C1409S) was identified in an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like motif from one fibrillin allele which segregates with the disease phenotype through three generations of a family affected with the Marfan syndrome. This alteration was not observed in 60 probands from other families or in 88 unrelated normal individuals. The altered cysteine is completely conserved in all EGF-like motifs identified in fibrillin, and in all proteins that contain this motif. These observations strongly indicate that C1409S is the disease-producing mutation in this family. The phenotype of individuals carrying C1409S varied widely with respect to onset of disease, organ-system involvement, and clinical severity; certain affected adults were unaware of their status before being diagnosed through this investigation. We conclude that fibrillin gene defects cause familial Marfan syndrome, that mutations in the EGF-like motif of the fibrillin gene are not uniformly associated with severe disease, and that fibrillin genotype is not the sole determinant of Marfan phenotype. Images PMID:1569206

  15. Mutation of FdC2 gene encoding a ferredoxin-like protein with C-terminal extension causes yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Hu, Yan; Huang, Rui; Ma, Xiaozhi; Wang, Yang; Liao, Tingting; Zhong, Ping; Xiao, Fuliang; Sun, Changhui; Xu, Zhengjun; Deng, Xiaojian; Wang, Pingrong

    2015-09-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are small iron-sulfur proteins that mediate electron transfer in a wide range of metabolic reactions. Besides Fds, there is a type of Fd-like proteins designated as FdC, which have conserved elements of Fds, but contain a significant C-terminal extension. So far, only two FdC genes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified in higher plants and thus the functions of FdC proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we isolated a yellow-green leaf mutant, 501ys, in rice (Oryza sativa). The mutant exhibited yellow-green leaf phenotype and reduced chlorophyll level. The phenotype of 501ys was caused by mutation of a gene on rice chromosome 3. Map-based cloning of this mutant resulted in identification of OsFdC2 gene (LOC_Os03g48040) showing high identity with Arabidopsis FdC2 gene (AT1G32550). OsFdC2 was expressed most abundantly in leaves and its encoded protein was targeted to the chloroplast. In 501ys mutant, a missense mutation was detected in DNA sequence of the gene, resulting in an amino acid change in the encoded protein. The mutant phenotype was rescued by introduction of the wild-type gene. Therefore, we successfully identified FdC2 gene via map-based cloning approach, and demonstrated that mutation of this gene caused yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

  16. Mutation of FdC2 gene encoding a ferredoxin-like protein with C-terminal extension causes yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Hu, Yan; Huang, Rui; Ma, Xiaozhi; Wang, Yang; Liao, Tingting; Zhong, Ping; Xiao, Fuliang; Sun, Changhui; Xu, Zhengjun; Deng, Xiaojian; Wang, Pingrong

    2015-09-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are small iron-sulfur proteins that mediate electron transfer in a wide range of metabolic reactions. Besides Fds, there is a type of Fd-like proteins designated as FdC, which have conserved elements of Fds, but contain a significant C-terminal extension. So far, only two FdC genes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified in higher plants and thus the functions of FdC proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we isolated a yellow-green leaf mutant, 501ys, in rice (Oryza sativa). The mutant exhibited yellow-green leaf phenotype and reduced chlorophyll level. The phenotype of 501ys was caused by mutation of a gene on rice chromosome 3. Map-based cloning of this mutant resulted in identification of OsFdC2 gene (LOC_Os03g48040) showing high identity with Arabidopsis FdC2 gene (AT1G32550). OsFdC2 was expressed most abundantly in leaves and its encoded protein was targeted to the chloroplast. In 501ys mutant, a missense mutation was detected in DNA sequence of the gene, resulting in an amino acid change in the encoded protein. The mutant phenotype was rescued by introduction of the wild-type gene. Therefore, we successfully identified FdC2 gene via map-based cloning approach, and demonstrated that mutation of this gene caused yellow-green leaf phenotype in rice. PMID:26259181

  17. Primary hematopoietic cells from DBA patients with mutations in RPL11 and RPS19 genes exhibit distinct erythroid phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moniz, H; Gastou, M; Leblanc, T; Hurtaud, C; Crétien, A; Lécluse, Y; Raslova, H; Larghero, J; Croisille, L; Faubladier, M; Bluteau, O; Lordier, L; Tchernia, G; Vainchenker, W; Mohandas, N; Da Costa, L

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is caused by aberrant ribosomal biogenesis due to ribosomal protein (RP) gene mutations. To develop mechanistic understanding of DBA pathogenesis, we studied CD34⁺ cells from peripheral blood of DBA patients carrying RPL11 and RPS19 ribosomal gene mutations and determined their ability to undergo erythroid differentiation in vitro. RPS19 mutations induced a decrease in proliferation of progenitor cells, but the terminal erythroid differentiation was normal with little or no apoptosis. This phenotype was related to a G₀/G₁ cell cycle arrest associated with activation of the p53 pathway. In marked contrast, RPL11 mutations led to a dramatic decrease in progenitor cell proliferation and a delayed erythroid differentiation with a marked increase in apoptosis and G₀/G₁ cell cycle arrest with activation of p53. Infection of cord blood CD34⁺ cells with specific short hairpin (sh) RNAs against RPS19 or RPL11 recapitulated the two distinct phenotypes in concordance with findings from primary cells. In both cases, the phenotype has been reverted by shRNA p53 knockdown. These results show that p53 pathway activation has an important role in pathogenesis of DBA and can be independent of the RPL11 pathway. These findings shed new insights into the pathogenesis of DBA. PMID:22833095

  18. CamKII inhibitors reduce mitotic instability, connexon anomalies and progression of the in vivo behavioral phenotype in transgenic animals expressing a mutated Gjb1 gene.

    PubMed

    Mones, Saleh; Bordignon, Benoit; Peiretti, Franck; Landrier, Jean F; Gess, Burkhardt; Bourguignon, Jean J; Bihel, Frédéric; Fontés, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Mutation in the Gjb1 gene, coding for a connexin (Cx32), is associated with an inherited peripheral neuropathic disorder (X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth, CMTX). Our previous work reported that transgenic animals expressing a human Gjb1 transgene present polyploidy and abnormal over-duplication of the centrosome, suggesting a role for Gjb1 in mitotic stability. In this article, we propose mechanisms by which mutations in Gjb1 induce mitotic instability and discuss its potential relation with the CMTX phenotype. We showed that transgenic cells exhibit CamKII over-stimulation, a phenomenon that has been linked to mitotic instability (polyploidy, nuclear volume and centrosome over-duplication), that is reversed by CamKII inhibitors. We also demonstrate that connexon activity is partially restored in transgenic cells with CamKII inhibitors. Our model supports the role for Pim1, a kinase that has been associated with genomic instability in cancers, in genomic instability in Cx32 mutations. Regarding in vivo phenotype, we showed that degradation on the rotarod test in our transgenic mice is significantly lowered by treatment with a CamKII inhibitor (KN93). This effect was seen in two lines with different point mutations in GJB1, and stopping the treatment led to degradation of the phenotype. PMID:24982612

  19. Structural and Dynamic Characterization of the C313Y Mutation in Myostatin Dimeric Protein, Responsible for the “Double Muscle” Phenotype in Piedmontese Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bongiorni, Silvia; Valentini, Alessio; Chillemi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the molecular effects of the C313Y mutation, responsible for the “double muscle” phenotype in Piedmontese cattle, can help understanding the actual mechanism of phenotype determination and paves the route for a better modulation of the positive effects of this economic important phenotype in the beef industry, while minimizing the negative side effects, now inevitably intersected. The structure and dynamic behavior of the active dimeric form of Myostatin in cattle was analyzed by means of three state-of-the-art Molecular Dynamics simulations, 200-ns long, of wild-type and C313Y mutants. Our results highlight a role for the conserved Arg333 in establishing a network of short and long range interactions between the two monomers in the wild-type protein that is destroyed upon the C313Y mutation even in a single monomer. Furthermore, the native protein shows an asymmetry in residue fluctuation that is absent in the double monomer mutant. Time window analysis on further 200-ns of simulation demonstrates that this is a characteristic behavior of the protein, likely dependent on long range communications between monomers. The same behavior, in fact, has already been observed in other mutated dimers. Finally, the mutation does not produce alterations in the secondary structure elements that compose the characteristic TGF-β cystine-knot motif. PMID:26904102

  20. Two novel heterozygous mutations of EVC2 cause a mild phenotype of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenjing; Han, Dong; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Hailan

    2011-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, chondroectodermal dysplasia; OMIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with associated multisystem involvement. The syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, and abnormal teeth. Congenital heart defects occur in 50-60% of cases. In this study, we report EvC in a 6-year-old Chinese girl with hypodontia and polydactyly, mild short stature, and abnormalities of the knee joints. No signs of short ribs, narrow thorax, or congenital heart defects were found in this patient. The EvC phenotype shares some similarity with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyer; OMIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dysplastic teeth. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 are associated with both EvC syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis, but the two conditions differ in the severity of the phenotype and their pattern of inheritance. In this study, two novel heterozygous EVC2 mutations, IVS5-2A > G and c.2653C > T (Arg885X), were identified in the patient. The IVS5-2A > G mutation was inherited from the patient's mother and the c.2653C > T from her father. Her parents have no phenotypic symptoms similar to those of the patient. These findings extend the mutation spectrum of this malformation syndrome and provide the possibility of prenatal diagnosis for future offspring in this family.

  1. Identification of a premature stop codon mutation in the PHGDH gene in severe Neu-Laxova syndrome-evidence for phenotypic variability.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Eduardo P; Silva, André Anjos da; Magalhães, José Antônio A; Leite, Júlio César L; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Gus-Kessler, Rejane; Perez, Juliano Adams; Vedolin, Leonardo M; Torreblanca-Zanca, Albertina; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa V

    2015-06-01

    In some cases Neu-Laxova syndrome (NLS) is linked to serine deficiency due to mutations in the phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) gene. We describe the prenatal and postnatal findings in a fetus with one of the most severe NLS phenotypes described so far, caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation of PHGDH. Serial ultrasound (US) and pre- and postnatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluations were performed. Prenatally, serial US evaluations suggested symmetric growth restriction, microcephaly, hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, micrognathia, hydrops, shortened limbs, arthrogryposis, and talipes equinovarus. The prenatal MRI confirmed these findings prompting a diagnosis of NLS. After birth, radiological imaging did not detect any gross bone abnormalities. DNA was extracted from fetal and parental peripheral blood, all coding exons of PHGDH were PCR-amplified and subjected to Sanger sequencing. Sequencing of PHGDH identified a homozygous premature stop codon mutation (c.1297C>T; p.Gln433*) in fetal DNA, both parents (first-cousins) being heterozygotes. Based on previous associations of mutations in this gene with a milder NLS phenotype, as well as cases of serine deficiency, these observations lend further support to a genotype-phenotype correlation between the degree of PHGDH inactivation and disease severity. PMID:25913727

  2. Primary hematopoietic cells from DBA patients with mutations in RPL11 and RPS19 genes exhibit distinct erythroid phenotype in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, H; Gastou, M; Leblanc, T; Hurtaud, C; Crétien, A; Lécluse, Y; Raslova, H; Larghero, J; Croisille, L; Faubladier, M; Bluteau, O; Lordier, L; Tchernia, G; Vainchenker, W; Mohandas, N; Da Costa, L

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is caused by aberrant ribosomal biogenesis due to ribosomal protein (RP) gene mutations. To develop mechanistic understanding of DBA pathogenesis, we studied CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of DBA patients carrying RPL11 and RPS19 ribosomal gene mutations and determined their ability to undergo erythroid differentiation in vitro. RPS19 mutations induced a decrease in proliferation of progenitor cells, but the terminal erythroid differentiation was normal with little or no apoptosis. This phenotype was related to a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest associated with activation of the p53 pathway. In marked contrast, RPL11 mutations led to a dramatic decrease in progenitor cell proliferation and a delayed erythroid differentiation with a marked increase in apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest with activation of p53. Infection of cord blood CD34+ cells with specific short hairpin (sh) RNAs against RPS19 or RPL11 recapitulated the two distinct phenotypes in concordance with findings from primary cells. In both cases, the phenotype has been reverted by shRNA p53 knockdown. These results show that p53 pathway activation has an important role in pathogenesis of DBA and can be independent of the RPL11 pathway. These findings shed new insights into the pathogenesis of DBA. PMID:22833095

  3. N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency: Novel mutation associated with neonatal presentation and literature review of molecular and phenotypic spectra.

    PubMed

    Al Kaabi, Eiman H; El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2016-09-01

    The urea cycle is the main pathway for the disposal of excess nitrogen. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of urea cycle, is activated by N-acetylglutamate (NAG), and thus N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) is an essential part of the urea cycle. Although NAGS deficiency is the rarest urea cycle disorder, it is the only one that can be specifically and effectively treated by a drug, N-carbamylglutamate, a stable structural analogous of NAG that activates CPS1. Here we report an infant with NAGS deficiency who presented with neonatal hyperammonemia. She was found to have a novel homozygous splice-site mutation, c.1097-2A>T, in the NAGS gene.