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Sample records for 8-quinolinol

  1. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of 2,2‧-methylenedi-8-quinolinol dihydrochloride dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinczuk, J.; Piro, O. E.; Castellano, E. E.; Baran, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, a promising ligand for chelatoterapies in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffractometry. The compound crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2/c with Z = 4. The dimeric 8-quinolinol molecule is sited on a crystallographic twofold axis passing through the CH 2 carbon atom that links the symmetry related molecular halves, giving rise to a two-bladed propeller-like conformation. The 1H and 13C NMR as well as the FT-IR and Raman spectra of the compound were also recorded and are briefly discussed. Some comparisons with spectra of related species are made.

  2. Synergistic extraction equilibrium of gallium(III) with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid and 8-quinolinol derivatives into supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akira; Kawashima, Natsumi; Sato, Kazuaki; Kim, Haeng-Boo

    2013-01-01

    The synergistic effect of five 8-quinolinol derivatives (HQs) on the extraction of gallium(III) with di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA or HA) from weak nitric acid into supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) was investigated. 8-Quinolinol (Hq), 5-ethoxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(2)q), 5-hexyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(6)q), 5-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxymethyl)-8-quinolinol (HFO(2)q), and 5-chloro-8-quinolinol (5-Cl-Hq) were used as synergists. Synergism was observed for all of the HQs. The synergistic effect increased in the following order: Hq < HO(2)q < HFO(2)q < 5-Cl-Hq ≍ HO(6)q. The extent of synergism can be related to both the distribution constant and the acid dissociation constant of the HQ. The synergistic extraction equilibrium of gallium(III) with D2EHPA and 5-Cl-Hq into SC-CO(2) was investigated; the results suggest that the composition of the extracted complex is as GaA(2)Q·HA. The synergistic extraction mechanism was the same for both SC-CO(2) and n-heptane. The synergistic extraction equilibrium constants in both cases were calculated based on the experimental results.

  3. A rapid extractive spectrophotometric method for the determination of tin in canned foods with 5,7-dichloro-8-quinolinol.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, A M; Perez-Conde, C; Rebollar, M P; Diez, L M

    1985-09-01

    A rapid method for the spectrophotometric determination of tin in canned foods, based on formation of the binary Sn(IV)-5,7-dichloro-8-quinolinol complex and extraction into chloroform has been developed. The absorption maximum at 390nm ( = 1.26 x 10(4) l.mole(-1).cm(-1)) is used for the determination. Beer's law is obeyed up to 6mug of tin per ml. Organic matter is destroyed by digestion with acid. Potential interferences have been studied. The detection limit for tin is 2.5mg kg .

  4. A rapid and simple 8-quinolinol-based fluorescent stain of phosphoproteins in polyacrylamide gel after electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Hwang, Sun-Young; Cong, Wei-Tao; Jin, Li-Tai; Choi, Jung-Kap

    2015-10-01

    In order to obtain an easy and rapid protocol to visualize phosphoproteins in SDS-PAGE, a fluorescent detection method named 8-Quinolinol (8-Q) stain is described. 8-Q can form ternary complexes in the gel matrix contributed by the affinity of aluminum ion (Al(3+) ) to the phosphate groups on the proteins and the metal chelating property of 8-Quinolinol, exhibiting strong fluorescence in ultraviolet light. It can visualize as little as 4∼8 ng of α-casein and β-casein, 16∼32 ng of ovalbumin and κ-casein which is more sensitive than Stains-All but less sensitive than Pro-Q Diamond. The protocol of 8-Q requires only 70 min in 0.75 mm mini-size or 1.0 mm large-size gels with five changes of solutions without destaining step; Pro-Q takes at least 250 min with 11 changes of solutions. In addition, the new method was confirmed by the study of dephosphorylation and LC-MS/MS, respectively. The approach to visualize phosphoprotein utilizing 8-Q could be an alternative to simplify the analytical operations for phosphoproteomics research.

  5. Cloud point extraction of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives and Triton X-100 and determination of 10(-7)moldm(-3) level iron(III) in riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akira; Ito, Hiromi; Kanai, Chikako; Imura, Hisanori; Ohashi, Kousaburo

    2005-01-30

    The cloud point extraction behavior of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives (HA) such as 8-quinolinol (HQ), 2-methyl-8-quinolinol (HMQ), 5-butyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(4)Q), 5-hexyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(6)Q), and 2-methyl-5-octyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HMO(8)Q) and Triton X-100 solution was investigated. Iron(III) was extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 1.70-5.44. Above pH 4.0, more than 95% of iron(III) was extracted with HQ, HMQ, and HMO(8)Q. Vanadium(V) was also extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 2.07-5.00, and the extractability increased in the following order of HMQ < HQ < HO(4)Q < HO(6)Q. The cloud point extraction was applied to the determination of iron(III) in the riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. When 1.25 x 10(-3)M HMQ and 1% (v/v) Triton X-100 were used, the found values showed a good agreement with the certified ones within the 2% of the R.S.D. Moreover, the effect of an alkyl group on the solubility of 5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol and 2-methyl-5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol in 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 at 25 degrees C was also investigated.

  6. Studies of the degradation mechanism of organic light-emitting diodes based on tris(8-quinolinolate)aluminum Alq and 2-tert-butyl-9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene TBADN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarikov, Viktor V.; Kondakov, Denis Y.

    2009-02-01

    Previously, radical cation of tris(8-quinolinolate)aluminum (Alq•+) has been associated with the instability of Alq films subjected to holes-only electrical current. Yet, the questions remain (i) whether Alq•+ is the primary source of the intrinsic degradation of bipolar organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on Alq, (ii) whether Alq•+ reactions result in deep charge traps in holes-only devices as found in bipolar counterparts, and (iii) whether radical cations can be a common source of degradation of OLEDs irrespective of materials. With regards to generality of hole-current-related degradation, it is interesting to examine the behavior of 9,10-diarylanthracenes (DAAs)—the practically important class of blue-fluorescing light-emitting-layer hosts. These questions prompted our comparative study of the effects of unipolar currents in Alq and 2-t-butyl-9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (TBADN), which was chosen as a representative material of the DAA class. First, we identified device structures allowing for rigorous and stable unipolar conduction. Interestingly, even in pristine holes-only devices, our voltammetric measurements indicated that Alq contains a substantial density of deep hole traps (far deeper than what can be explained by energetic disorder), which can be charged by passing holes-only current and seemingly discharged by exposure to white light. As for aged holes-only Alq devices, they exhibited symptoms qualitatively matching those of aged bipolar Alq devices, viz., photoluminescence (PL) loss, transition voltage (V0) rise, and drive voltage (Vd) rise. Notably, PL and V0 are linearly correlated in both holes-only and bipolar devices, which reinforces the supposed link between Alq•+ and the degradation in both types of devices. Yet, there are indications the Alq•+ instability may not be the only degradation pathway in bipolar devices. Even though our observations for holes-only Alq devices agree qualitatively with previously reported ones

  7. Opportunities for Low Cost Processing of Erbium 8-Quinolinolates for Active Integrated Photonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Penna, Stefano; Mattiello, Leonardo; Di Bartolo, Silvia; Pizzoleo, Angelo; Attanasio, Vincenzo; Beleffi, Giorgio Maria Tosi; Otomo, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Erbium-doped organic emitters are promising active materials for Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) due to their emission shown at 1550 nm combined to the potential low cost processing. In particular, Erbium Quinoline (ErQ) gained a strong interest in the last decade for the good emission efficiency. This contribution reports the results derived from the application of ErQ as active core material within a buried optical waveguide, following the development of a purposed optical process to control the refractive index of ErQ and then to define a patterned structure from a single thin film deposition step. The reported results show the potential of Er-doped organic materials for low cost processing and application to planar PICs.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of 8-Quinolinols, Salicylic Acids, Hydroxynaphthoic Acids, and Salts of Selected Quinolinols with Selected Hydroxy-Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Herman; Parmegiani, Raulo

    1962-01-01

    Seventy-seven compounds were screened by the disc-plate method against strains of five bacteria and five fungi. A new constant was proposed to describe the antimicrobial activity of a compound in a defined system of organisms. This constant includes not only the inhibitory level of activity of the material but also the number of organisms inhibited. This constant, the antimicrobial spectrum index, was compared with the antimicrobial index of Albert. PMID:13898066

  9. Tent Preservation Project - Demonstration/Validation for Replacement of Aqueous Copper 8 Quinolinolate Treatment of Cotton Webbing With RO-59-WP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    on military tents. This material is subject to degradation in both use and storage by exposure to bacteria and fungi in a moist environment . The...times due to environmental concerns. Tents coated with both the baseline coating (Copper 8 only) and two candidate coatings (RO-59-WP only and RO-59...WP applied over Copper 8) were exposed to three different outdoor environments in the continental United States and were subsequently destructively

  10. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    the BoNT/A protease activity were selected. Database search queries of the best candidate hit [7-((4-nitro- anilino)(phenyl) methyl )-8-quinolinol (NSC...therapeutic challenges. Trends Mol. Med. 9:291–299. 18. Gershon, H., and R. Parmegiani. 1963. Antimicrobial activity of 8-quinoli- nol, its salts with salicylic ...Parmegiani. 1962. Antimicrobial activity of 8-quinoli- nols, salicylic acids, hydroxynaphthoic acids, and salts of selected quinolinols with selected

  11. Selective Precipitation of Thorium lodate from a Tartaric Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Medium Application to Rapid Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Silicate Rocks and in Ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a selective iodate separation of thorium from nitric acid medium containing d-tartaric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is prevented by the use of 8quinolinol. A few micrograms of thorium are separated sufficiently clean from 30 mg. of such oxides as cerium, zirconium, titanium, niobium, tantalum, scandium, or iron with one iodate precipitation to allow an accurate determination of thorium with the thoronmesotartaric acid spectrophotometric method. The method is successful for the determination of 0.001% or more of thorium dioxide in silicate rocks and for 0.01% or more in black sand, monazite, thorite, thorianite, eschynite, euxenite, and zircon.

  12. A Preliminary Toxicological Evaluation of Eight Chemicals Used as Wood Preservatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    DEVELOPMENT LAB FORT..I UNCLASSIFIED J C DRCRE MAY 84 USAMBRDL-TR-8405 F/G 6/28 NL nommmmmmmmmmmm IIl- LpL tr Hil IIII "" I NATIONL BU~EA L STNA-93.2...Environmental effects Ammoniacal copper borate Environmental standards Copper 8-quinolinolate Mamalian toxicity Copper naphthenate Pentachlorophenol 2L... ammoniacal copper borate, and tri-n-butyltin oxide have been reviewed, and recommendations made for further toxicological studies. O I OR 103 EDITION OF I

  13. Structural dynamics of nitrosylruthenium isomeric complexes studied with steady-state and transient pump-probe infrared spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jianru; Yu, Pengyun; Pan, Huifen; Wang, Hongfei; Wang, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The characteristic nitrosyl stretching (NO) in the region of 1800-1900 cm- 1 was used to study the geometric and ligand effect on two nitrosylruthenium complexes, namely [Ru(OAc)(2QN)2NO] (QN = 2-chloro-8-quinolinol (H2cqn) or QN = 2-methyl-8-quinolinol (H2mqn)). The NO stretching frequency (νNO) was found in the following order: νcis-1 (2cqn) > νcis-2 (2cqn) > νcis-1 (2mqn) > νtrans (2mqn). The results exhibited a spectral sensitivity of the NO mode to both charge distribution and ligand arrangement, which was supported by ab initio computations and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses. Further, the vibrational population of the vibrationally excited NO stretching mode was found to relax on the order of 7-10 ps, showing less than 30% variation from one isomer to another, which were explained on the basis of NO local structures and solute-solvent interactions in these isomeric nitrosylruthenium complexes.

  14. Flame AAS determination of lead in water with flow-injection preconcentration and speciation using functionalized cellulose sorbent.

    PubMed

    Naghmush, A M; Pyrzyńska, K; Trojanowicz, M

    1995-06-01

    The on-line solid phase extraction of trace amount of lead in flow-injection system with flame AAS detection was investigated using cellulose sorbents with phosphonic acid and carboxymethyl groups, C(18) sorbent non-modified and modified with Pyrocatechol Violet or 8-quinolinol, commercial chelating sorbents Chelex 100 and Spheron Oxin 1000, non-polar sorbent Amberlite XAD-2 modified with Pyrocatechol Violet and several cation-exchange resins. The best dynamic characteristics of retention were observed for functionalized cellulose sorbents. For Cellex P assumed as optimum sorbent, elution with a separate fractions of nitric acid and ethanol allows the differentiation between tetraalkyllead and sum of inorganic lead and organolead species of smaller number of alkyl groups. The detection limit for the determination of inorganic Pb(II) was estimated as 0.17 microg/l. at preconcentration from 50 ml sample at a flow rate of 7 ml/min.

  15. Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes by electron transporting layer engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seok Jae; Koo, Ja Ryong; Lee, Dong Hyung; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Kwan

    2014-10-01

    The authors describe the fabrication of white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with dual electron transporting layers (D-ETL) using 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanhroline/ 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) and bis-(2-methyl-8-quinolinolate)-4-(phenylphenolato) aluminum/BPhen. Stepwise D-ETL easily transports electrons easily to the emitting layer and reduces the leakage of electrons. Therefore, WOLEDs with D-ETL show higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) when compared to a control WOLED with a single ETL device. The optimized WOLEDs showed a peak EQE of 13.0%, luminous efficiency of 27.4 cd/A, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.40, 0.39) at 1000 cd/m2.

  16. Concentration method for the spectrochemical determination of seventeen minor elements in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvey, W.D.; Brennan, R.

    1962-01-01

    A method for the quantitative spectrochemical determination of microgram amounts of 17 minor elements in water is given. The chelating reagents 8-quinolinol, tannic acid, and thionalide are utilized to concentrate traces (1 to 500 ??g.) of aluminum, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, gallium, germanium, manganese, nickel, titanium, vanadium, bismuth, lead, molybdenum, cadmium, zinc, and beryllium. Indium is added as a buffer, and palladium is used as an internal standard. The ashed oxides of these 17 metals are subsequently subjected to direct current arcing conditions during spectrum analysis. The method can be used to analyze waters with dissolved solids ranging from less than 100 to more than 100,000 p.p.m. There is no limiting concentration range for the determination of the heavy metals since any volume of sample can be used that will contain a heavy metal concentration within the analytical range of the method. Both the chemical and spectrographic procedures are described, and precision and accuracy data are given.

  17. Stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) for the passive, integrative sampling of labile metals in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, W.G.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Manahan, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    A stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) is described for potential use as an in situ, passive, integrative sampler for cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in natural waters. The SLMD (patent pending) consists of a 2.5-cm-wide by 15-cm-long strip of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) layflat tubing containing 1 mL of an equal mixture (v/v) of oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid) and EMO-8Q (7-[4-ethyl-1-methyloctyl]-8-quinolinol). The reagent mixture continuously diffuses to the exterior surface of the LDPE membrane, and provides for sequestration of several divalent metals for up to several weeks. Depending on sampler configuration, concentration factors of several thousand can be realized for these metal ions after just a few days. In addition to in situ deployment, the SLMD may be useful for laboratory determination of labile metal species in grab samples. Methods for minimizing the effects of water flow on the sampling rate are currently under investigation.

  18. Photocontrolled nitric oxide release from two nitrosylruthenium isomer complexes and their potential biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiao; Duan, Qingqing; Wang, Jianru; Song, Zhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hongfei

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has key regulatory roles in various biological and medical processes. The control of its local concentration, which is crucial for obtaining the desired effect, can be achieved with exogenous NO donors. Release of NO from metal-nitrosyl complexes upon exposure to light is a strategy that could allow for the site-specific delivery of the reactive species NO to physiological targets. The photodissociation of NO from two nitrosylruthenium(II) isomer complexes {cis- and trans-[Ru(OAc)2NO]} was demonstrated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry spectra, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra further prove the photoinduced NO release by spin trapping of NO free radicals upon photoirradiation. Real-time NO release was quantitatively measured by electrochemistry with an NO-specific electrode. The quantitative control of NO release from [Ru(OAc)2NO] in aqueous solutions was done by photoirradiation at different wavelengths. Both isomers show photoinduced damage on plasmid DNA, but the trans isomer has higher cytotoxicity and photocytotoxicity activity against the HeLa tumor cell line than that of the cis isomer. Nitrosylruthenium(II) complex, with 8-quinolinol derivatives as ligands, has a great potential as a photoactivated NO donor reagent for biomedical applications.

  19. Spectrophotometric catalytic determination of small amounts of rhenium in mineralized rocks and molybdenite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, F.O.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1962-01-01

    Rhenium is determined by spectrophotometry of the tellurium sol formed by the reduction of tellurate by stannous chloride under the catalytic influence of rhenium. A detailed investigation of the conditions for high sensitivity and stability at lowest concentration levels of rhenium is presented as well as the behavior of 26 ions. The method is applied to the determination of some tenths of 1 p.p.m. or more of rhenium in a 1-mg. aliquot of mineralized rocks, mixtures of molybdenite and rocks, and molybdenite concentrates. The practical quantity limit of detection is 2 ?? 10-10 gram of rhenium. Samples are decomposed with a mixture of CaO, CaCl2, and MgO. On leaching, most constituents of the sample are precipitated either as calcium salts or hydroxides, except for rhenium and a small amount of molybdenum which pass into the filtrate. Residual molybdenum is removed by extraction with 8-quinolinol in chloroform. Better than 95% recoveries are obtained with two fusions with flux.

  20. Structure-activity studies in E. coli strains on ochratoxin A (OTA) and its analogues implicate a genotoxic free radical and a cytotoxic thiol derivative as reactive metabolites.

    PubMed

    Malaveille, C; Brun, G; Bartsch, H

    1994-05-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), its major metabolite in rodents, ochratoxin alpha, and seven structurally related substances were assayed for SOS DNA repair inducing activity in Escherichia coli strain PQ37. At concentrations of 0.1-4 mM, OTA, chloroxine, 5-chloro-8-quinolinol, 4-chloro-meta-cresol and chloroxylenol induced SOS DNA repair in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system. Ochratoxin B, ochratoxin alpha, 5-chlorosalicylic acid and citrinin were inactive, but all except ochratoxin alpha were cytotoxic. Thus, the presence of chlorine at C-5 appears to be one determinant of genotoxicity in these substances. Amino oxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of the cysteine conjugate beta-lyase, decreased the cytotoxicity of OTA but did not alter its genotoxic activity, suggesting the formation of a cytotoxic thiol-containing derivative. The mechanisms by which OTA and some of its active analogues induce SOS DNA repair activity was further investigated in E. coli PQ37 and in three derived strains (PQ300, OG100 and OG400), containing deletions within the oxy R regulon. The response in strain PQ37 was measured in the absence and presence of Trolox C, a water-soluble form of vitamin E. Trolox C completely quenched the genotoxicity of OTA, and the effect was similar in the mutant and wild-type strains. These results implicate an OTA-derived free radical rather than reduced oxygen species as genotoxic intermediate(s) in bacteria.

  1. A Novel Method Applied in Determination and Assessment of Trace Amount of Lead and Cadmium in Rice from Four Provinces, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Wang, Mei; Yang, Bingyi; Zhong, Yizhou; Feng, Le

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soils or water can lead to excessive lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) levels in rice. As cumulative poisons, consumption of Pb and Cd in contaminated rice may cause many toxic effects in humans. In the present study, Pb and Cd levels in rice samples from Hubei, Jiangxi, Heilongjiang, and Guangdong provinces in China were analyzed by cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The heavy metals in the rice samples were reacted with 8-quinolinol to form a complex at pH 9.0 and 40°C. Analytes were quantitatively extracted to a surfactant-rich phase (Triton X-45) after centrifugation and analyzed by GFAAS. The effects of experimental conditions, including pH, concentration of reagents, and equilibration time and temperature, on cloud point extraction were optimized efficiently using Plackett–Burman and Box–Behnken experimental designs. Under the optimum conditions, good linearity was observed in the concentration ranges of 0.5–5 µg/L for Pb and 0.05–0.50 µg/L for Cd. The limits of detection were 0.043 µg/L for Pb with a concentration factor of 24.2 in a 10 mL sample and 0.018 µg/L for Cd with a concentration factor of 18.4 in a 10 mL sample. Twenty rice samples from four provinces were analyzed successfully, and the mean levels of Pb and Cd in the rice were all below their maximum allowable concentrations in China. Comparing the tolerable daily intakes given by FAO/WHO with the mean estimated daily intakes; Pb and Cd mean daily intake through rice consumption were 0.84 µg/kg bw/day and 0.40 µg/kg bw/day, which were lower than the tolerable daily intakes. PMID:25251454

  2. Highly efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes using quantum well-like multiple emissive layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ju-An; Kim, You-Hyun; Kim, Nam Ho; Yoo, Seung Il; Lee, Sang Youn; Zhu, Fu Rong; Kim, Woo Young

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the properties of blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), employing quantum well-like structure (QWS) that includes four different blue emissive materials of 4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylyinyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (DPVBi), 9,10-di(naphth-2-yl)anthracene (ADN), 2-( N, N-diphenyl-amino)-6-[4-( N, N-diphenyl amine)styryl]naphthalene (DPASN), and bis(2-methyl-8-quinolinolate)-4-(phenyl phenolato) aluminum (BAlq), were investigated. Conventional QWS blue OLEDs composed of multiple emissive layers and charge blocking layer with lower highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level, and devices with triple emissive layers for more significant hole-electron recombination and a wider region for exciton generation were designed. The properties of triple emissive layered blue OLEDs with the structure of indium tin oxide (ITO) / N, N'-diphenyl- N, N'-bis(1-naphthyl-phenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB) (700 Ǻ)/X (100 Ǻ)/BAlq (100 Ǻ)/X (100 Ǻ)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) (300 Ǻ)/lithium quinolate (Liq) (20 Ǻ)/aluminum (Al) (1,200 Ǻ) (X = DPVBi, ADN, DPASN) were examined. HOMO-LUMO energy levels of DPVBi, ADN, DPASN, and BAlq are 2.8 to 5.9, 2.6 to 5.6, 2.3 to 5.2, and 2.9 to 5.9 eV, respectively. The OLEDs with DPASN/BAlq/DPASN QWS with maximum luminous efficiency of 5.32 cd/A was achieved at 3.5 V.

  3. Genotoxicity of ochratoxin A and structurally related compounds in Escherichia coli strains: studies on their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Malaveille, C; Brun, G; Bartsch, H

    1991-01-01

    Ochratoxin A, ochratoxin alpha (its major metabolite in rodents) and seven structurally related substances were assayed for SOS DNA repair inducing activity in Escherichia coli PQ37 strain. At a concentration range of 0.1-4 mM, ochratoxin A, chloroxine, 5-chloro-8-quinolinol, 4-chloro-meta-cresol and chloroxylenol were found to induce SOS-DNA repair in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system. Ochratoxin B, ochratoxin alpha, 5-chlorosalicylic acid and citrinin were inactive, but all except ochratoxin alpha were cytotoxic. Thus, the presence of a chlorine at C-5 in ochratoxin A and in other analogues appears to be one determinant of their genotoxicity. In order to ascertain whether this reactivity involves a bacterial glutathione conjugation reaction, we investigated the modifying effect on the genotoxicity of ochratoxin A of amino oxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of cysteine conjugate beta-lyase. Amino oxyacetic acid decreased the cytotoxicity of ochratoxin A but did not alter its genotoxic activity, suggesting the formation of a cytotoxic thiol-containing derivative. The way in which ochratoxin A and some of its active analogues induce SOS DNA repair activity was further investigated in E. coli PQ37 and in three derived strains (PQ300, OG100 and OG400, containing deletions within the oxy R regulon). The response in PQ37 strain was measured in the absence and presence of Trolox C, a hydrosoluble form of vitamin E. Trolox C completely quenched the genotoxicity of ochratoxin A, which was no greater in mutated than in wild type strains. These results implicate an ochratoxin A-derived free radical rather than reduced oxygen species as genotoxic intermediate(s) in bacteria.

  4. Small-molecule quinolinol inhibitor identified provides protection against BoNT/A in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Padma; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Chaudhary, Dilip; Chauhan, Vinita; Bharadwaj, Pranay; Pandey, Apurva; Upadhyay, Nisha; Dhaked, Ram Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylamino)methyl)-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096) to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC) on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC(50) values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A).

  5. Small-Molecule Quinolinol Inhibitor Identified Provides Protection against BoNT/A in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Padma; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Chaudhary, Dilip; Chauhan, Vinita; Bharadwaj, Pranay; Pandey, Apurva; Upadhyay, Nisha; Dhaked, Ram Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylamino)methyl)-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096) to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC) on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC50 values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). PMID:23071727

  6. The Organic LED Surface:. a Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Tun-Wen; Yu, T. C.

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinolato) aluminum (Alq3), a prototypical molecule for organic light-emitting devices, has been studied via synchrotron radiation photoemission to investigate (1) the surface electronic structure of the molecules at room temperature and at elevated temperatures, (2) adsorption onto the inorganic Si(001)-2×1 surface, and (3) doping with the alkaline metal Mg. For case (1), three chemical environments of carbon are resolved. Moreover, the shake-up satellite structures are detected in all the N 1s, C 1s, O 1s, and Al 2p core-level spectra, but with different magnitudes. Annealing allows for a charge redistribution within Alq3 itself. As to case (2), the organic molecules not only passivate the dangling bonds, but also rupture the dimer bonds. The wave function of the surface dangling bonds and of the pyridyl side of an 8-quinolinol ligand overlaps greatly so that charge is polarized towards, the organic adlayer. However, the polarization diminishes at greater coverage. With regard to case (3), the N 1s core-level spectra appear as an Mg-induced charge-transfer component with a binding energy lower than the original component. This new component grows gradually in intensity with increasing concentration of the dopant. Moreover, Mg also affects the O 1s core, as manifested by a component lying at a +1.09 eV higher binding energy than the original component. The Mg 2p core-level spectra, although rather broad, exhibit a shift toward a lower binding energy with increasing Mg vapor. Upon examining all these experimental results, we propose that Mg in the surface Alq3 molecules forms clusters. Each cluster attaches to a pyridyl ring, affecting not only the nitrogen atom at that ring, but also the oxygen atom in the adjacent phenoxide ring. The depleted charge in the affected oxygen then flows about its adherent ligand and resides on the pyridyl ring at that ligand, resulting in a high Alq3 anion state.