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Sample records for 80 foot wind

  1. Fan Blade Shake Test Results for the 40- by 80-/80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Graham, T.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the shake tests performed on the first set of hydulignum fan blades for the 40- by 80-/80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. The purpose of the shake test program is described. The test equipment and test procedures are reviewed. Results from each shake test are presented and the overall findings of the shake test program are discussed.

  2. The rationale and design features for the 40 by 80/80 by 120 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mort, K. W.; Kelly, M. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    A substantial increase in the test capability of full scale wind tunnels is considered. In order to determine the most cost effective means for providing this desired increase in test capability, a series of design studies were conducted of various new facilities as well as of major modifications to the existing 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The most effective trade between test capability and facility cost was provided by repowering the existing 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to increase the maximum speed from 200 knots to 300 knots and by the addition of a new 80- by 120-foot test section having a 110 knot maximum speed. The design of the facility is described with special emphasis on the unique features, such as the drive system which absorbs nearly four times the power without an increase in noise, and the large flow diversion devices required to interface the two test sections to a single drive.

  3. Turbulence Intensity at Inlet of 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel Caused by Upwind Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Denise; Yuricich, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In order to estimate the magnitude of turbulence in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel (80 x 120) caused by buildings located upwind from the 80 x 120 inlet, a 150th-scale study was performed that utilized a nominal two-dimensional blockage placed ahead of the inlet. The distance of the blockage ahead of the inlet was varied. This report describes velocity measurements made in the plane of the 80 x 120 model inlet for the case of zero ambient (atmospheric) wind.

  4. A Technique for Measuring Rotocraft Dynamic Stability in the 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Bohn, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    An on-line technique is described for the measurement of tilt rotor aircraft dynamic stability in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The technique is based on advanced system identification methodology and uses the instrumental variables approach. It is particulary applicable to real time estimation problems with limited amounts of noise-contaminated data. Several simulations are used to evaluate the algorithm. Estimated natural frequencies and damping ratios are compared with simulation values. The algorithm is also applied to wind tunnel data in an off-line mode. The results are used to develop preliminary guidelines for effective use of the algorithm.

  5. Simulated rotor test apparatus dynamic characteristics in the 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoque, M. S.; Peterson, R. L.; Graham, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    A shake test was conducted in the 80 by 120 foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, using a load frame and dummy weights to simulate the weight of the NASA Rotor Test Apparatus. The simulated hub was excited with broadband random excitation, and accelerometer responses were measured at various locations. The transfer functions (acceleration per unit excitation force as a function of frequency) for each of the accelerometer responses were computed, and the data were analyzed using modal analysis to estimate the model parameters.

  6. Simulation and control engineering studies of NASA-Ames 40 foot by 80 foot/80 foot by 120 foot wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, J. G.; Jones, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The development and use of a digital computer simulation of the proposed wind tunnel facility is described. The feasibility of automatic control of wind tunnel airspeed and other parameters was examined. Specifications and implementation recommendations for a computer based automatic control and monitoring system are presented.

  7. Airloads Correlation of the UH-60A Rotor Inside the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Norman, Thomas R.; Romander, Ethan A.

    2013-01-01

    The presented research validates the capability of a loosely-coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and comprehensive rotorcraft analysis (CRA) code to calculate the flowfield around a rotor and test stand mounted inside a wind tunnel. The CFD/CRA predictions for the full-scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor inside the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center are compared with the latest measured airloads and performance data. The studied conditions include a speed sweep at constant lift up to an advance ratio of 0.4 and a thrust sweep at constant speed up to and including stall. For the speed sweep, wind tunnel modeling becomes important at advance ratios greater than 0.37 and test stand modeling becomes increasingly important as the advance ratio increases. For the thrust sweep, both the wind tunnel and test stand modeling become important as the rotor approaches stall. Despite the beneficial effects of modeling the wind tunnel and test stand, the new models do not completely resolve the current airload discrepancies between prediction and experiment.

  8. Sources and levels of background noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    Background noise levels are measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel following installation of a sound-absorbent lining on the test-section walls. Results show that the fan-drive noise dominated the empty test-section background noise at airspeeds below 120 knots. Above 120 knots, the test-section broadband background noise was dominated by wind-induced dipole noise (except at lower harmonics of fan blade-passage tones) most likely generated at the microphone or microphone support strut. Third-octave band and narrow-band spectra are presented for several fan operating conditions and test-section airspeeds. The background noise levels can be reduced by making improvements to the microphone wind screen or support strut. Empirical equations are presented relating variations of fan noise with fan speed or blade-pitch angle. An empirical expression for typical fan noise spectra is also presented. Fan motor electric power consumption is related to the noise generation. Preliminary measurements of sound absorption by the test-section lining indicate that the 152 mm thick lining will adequately absorb test-section model noise at frequencies above 300 Hz.

  9. Air-Loads Prediction of a UH-60A Rotor inside the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I-Chung; Romander, Ethan A.; Potsdam, Mark; Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    2010-01-01

    The presented research extends the capability of a loose coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structure dynamics (CSD) code to calculate the flow-field around a rotor and test stand mounted inside a wind tunnel. Comparison of predicted air-load results for a full-scale UH-60A rotor recently tested inside the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center and in free-air flight are made for three challenging flight data points from the earlier conducted UH-60A Air-loads Program. Overall results show that the extension of the coupled CFD/CSD code to the wind-tunnel environment is generally successful.

  10. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  11. Flow direction measurement criteria and techniques planned for the 40- by 80-/80- x 120-foot wind tunnel integrated systems tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, P. T.; Hoffmann, J.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was performed in order to develop the criteria for the selection of flow direction indicators for use in the Integrated Systems Tests (ISTs) of the 40 by 80/80 by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel System. The problems, requirements, and limitations of flow direction measurement in the wind tunnel were investigated. The locations and types of flow direction measurements planned in the facility were discussed. A review of current methods of flow direction measurement was made and the most suitable technique for each location was chosen. A flow direction vane for each location was chosen. A flow direction vane that employs a Hall Effect Transducer was then developed and evaluated for application during the ISTs.

  12. Status and capabilities of the National Full Scale Facility 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mort, K. W.; Engelbert, D. F.; Dusterberry, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The background, requirements, and aerodynamic design of the modified NASA Ames 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel are reviewed, along with the systems integration and systems test results. Advancing vehicle sizes and airspeeds required a larger wind tunnel test section and a capability for 100 and 300 knots airspeed simulation. Acoustic mufflers at the inlet and exit of the nonreturn circuit provide noise suppression. The enlarged test section is intended to accomodate the complex flowfields of wings with high lift coefficients, and the drive system is designed with minimum residual swirl. Features of the fan blades are examined, along with characteristics of the test channels, control vanes and louvers, the exit, circuit losses, temperature rises during operation of the nonreturn circuit, and the facility acoustics. Specific construction problems and solutions for the conversion process are outlined, and it is noted that operational status is expected at the end of 1982.

  13. Large-scale V/STOL testing. [conducted in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. G.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.; Falarshi, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Several facets of large-scale testing of V/STOL aircraft configurations are discussed with particular emphasis on test experience in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Examples of powered-lift test programs are presented in order to illustrate tradeoffs confronting the planner of V/STOL test programs. Large-scale V/STOL wind-tunnel testing can sometimes compete with small-scale testing in the effort required (overall test time) and program costs because of the possibility of conducting a number of different tests with a single large-scale model where several small-scale models would be required. The benefits of both high- or full-scale Reynolds numbers, more detailed configuration simulation, and number and type of onboard measurements are studied.

  14. Wind-tunnel investigation of the thrust augmentor performance of a large-scale swept wing model. [in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. G.; Falarski, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were made in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to determine the forward speed effects on wing-mounted thrust augmentors. The large-scale model was powered by the compressor output of J-85 driven viper compressors. The flap settings used were 15 deg and 30 deg with 0 deg, 15 deg, and 30 deg aileron settings. The maximum duct pressure, and wind tunnel dynamic pressure were 66 cmHg (26 in Hg) and 1190 N/sq m (25 lb/sq ft), respectively. All tests were made at zero sideslip. Test results are presented without analysis.

  15. Current Background Noise Sources and Levels in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Jaeger, Stephen; Soderman, Paul; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Background noise measurements were made of the acoustic environment in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) at NASA Ames Research Center. The measurements were acquired subsequent to the 40x80 Aeroacoustic Modernization Project, which was undertaken to improve the anechoic characteristics of the 40x80's closed test section as well as reduce the levels of background noise in the facility. The resulting 40x80 anechoic environment was described by Soderman et. al., and the current paper describes the resulting 40x80 background noise, discusses the sources of the noise, and draws comparisons to previous 40x80 background noise levels measurements. At low wind speeds or low frequencies, the 40x80 background noise is dominated by the fan drive system. To obtain the lowest fan drive noise for a given tunnel condition, it is possible in the 40x80 to reduce the fans' rotational speed and adjust the fans' blade pitch, as described by Schmidtz et. al. This idea is not new, but has now been operationally implemented with modifications for increased power at low rotational speeds. At low to mid-frequencies and at higher wind speeds, the dominant noise mechanism was thought to be caused by the surface interface of the previous test section floor acoustic lining. In order to reduce this noise mechanism, the new test section floor lining was designed to resist the pumping of flow in and out of the space between the grating slats required to support heavy equipment. In addition, the lining/flow interface over the entire test section was designed to be smoother and quieter than the previous design. At high wind speeds or high frequencies, the dominant source of background noise in the 40x80 is believed to be caused by the response of the in-flow microphone probes (required by the nature of the closed test section) to the fluctuations in the freestream flow. The resulting background noise levels are also different for probes of various

  16. Modification of the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel for component acoustic testing for the second generation supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Allmen, J. R.; Soderman, P. T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of a large-scale anechoic test facility where large models of engine/airframe/high-lift systems can be tested for both improved noise reduction and minimum performance degradation is described. The facility development is part of the effort to investigate economically viable methods of reducing second generation high speed civil transport noise during takeoff and climb-out that is now under way in the United States. This new capability will be achieved through acoustic modifications of NASA's second largest subsonic wind tunnel: the 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. Three major items are addressed in the design of this large anechoic and quiet wind tunnel: a new deep (42 inch (107 cm)) test section liner, expansion of the wind tunnel drive operating envelope at low rpm to reduce background noise, and other promising methods of improving signal-to-noise levels of inflow microphones. Current testing plans supporting the U.S. high speed civil transport program are also outlined.

  17. Acoustic Quality of the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel Test Section After Installation of a Deep Acoustic Lining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Hayes, Julie A.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2002-01-01

    A recessed, 42-inch deep acoustic lining has been designed and installed in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) test section to greatly improve the acoustic quality of the facility. This report describes the test section acoustic performance as determined by a detailed static calibration-all data were acquired without wind. Global measurements of sound decay from steady noise sources showed that the facility is suitable for acoustic studies of jet noise or similar randomly generated sound. The wall sound absorption, size of the facility, and averaging effects of wide band random noise all tend to minimize interference effects from wall reflections. The decay of white noise with distance was close to free field above 250 Hz. However, tonal sound data from propellers and fans, for example, will have an error band to be described that is caused by the sensitivity of tones to even weak interference. That error band could be minimized by use of directional instruments such as phased microphone arrays. Above 10 kHz, air absorption began to dominate the sound field in the large test section, reflections became weaker, and the test section tended toward an anechoic environment as frequency increased.

  18. Aero-acoustic experimental verification of optimum configuration of variable-pitch fans for 40 x 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lown, H.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two drive fan configurations (low-speed and high-speed variable pitch design) for a 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel were monitored. A 1/7-scale model was utilized. The necessary aero-acoustic data reduction computer program logic was supplied. Test results were evaluated, and the optimum configuration to be employed in the 40 foot full scale fan was recommended.

  19. Full-scale S-76 rotor performance and loads at low speeds in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Vol. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinoda, Patrick M.

    1996-01-01

    A full-scale helicopter rotor test was conducted in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel with a four-bladed S-76 rotor system. Rotor performance and loads data were obtained over a wide range of rotor shaft angles-of-attack and thrust conditions at tunnel speeds ranging from 0 to 100 kt. The primary objectives of this test were (1) to acquire forward flight rotor performance and loads data for comparison with analytical results; (2) to acquire S-76 forward flight rotor performance data in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel to compare with existing full-scale 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test data that were acquired in 1977; (3) to evaluate the acoustic capability of the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel for acquiring blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise in the low speed range and compare BVI noise with in-flight test data; and (4) to evaluate the capability of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel test section as a hover facility. The secondary objectives were (1) to evaluate rotor inflow and wake effects (variations in tunnel speed, shaft angle, and thrust condition) on wind tunnel test section wall and floor pressures; (2) to establish the criteria for the definition of flow breakdown (condition where wall corrections are no longer valid) for this size rotor and wind tunnel cross-sectional area; and (3) to evaluate the wide-field shadowgraph technique for visualizing full-scale rotor wakes. This data base of rotor performance and loads can be used for analytical and experimental comparison studies for full-scale, four-bladed, fully articulated rotor systems. Rotor performance and structural loads data are presented in this report.

  20. Comparison of acoustic data from a 102 mm conic nozzle as measured in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Mckie, J.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative program between the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), England, and the NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to compare acoustic measurements made in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The acoustic measurements were made in both facilities using the same 102 mm conical nozzle supplied by the RAE. The nozzle was tested by each organization using its respective jet test rig. The mounting hardware and nozzle exit conditions were matched as closely as possible. The data from each wind tunnel were independently analyzed by the respective organization. The results from these tests show good agreement. In both facilities, interference with acoustic measurement is evident at angles in the forward quadrant.

  1. Analysis of F/A-18 Tail Buffet Data Acquired in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Kevin D.; Meyn, Larry A.; Schmitz, Fredric H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Tail buffet studies were conducted on a full-scale, production, F/A-18 fighter aircraft in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. Tail buffet data were acquired over an angle-of-attack range of +20 deg to +40 deg, a side-slip range of -16 deg to + 16 deg, and at wind speeds up to 100 knots. The maximum speed corresponds to a Reynolds number of l2.3 x l0(exp 6) based on mean aerodynamic chord and a Mach number of 0. 15. The port, vertical tail fin was instrumented with ninety-six surface-pressure transducers, arranged in six by eight arrays, on each side of the fin. ne aircraft was also equipped with a removable Leading-Edge Extension (LEX) fence whose purpose is to reduce tail-buffet loads. Current analysis methods for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures and loads are described. Only results for the zero side-slip condition are to be presented, both with and without the LEX fence. Results of the time-averaged, power-spectral analysis are presented for the tail fin bending moments which are derived from the integrated pressure field. Local wave velocities on the tail surfaces are calculated from pressure correlations. It was found that the LEX fence significantly reduces the magnitude of the root-mean-square pressures and bending moments. Scaling and repeatability issues are addressed by comparing the present full scale results for pressures at the 60%-span and 45%-chord location with previous full-scale F/A-18 tail-buffet test in the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel, and with several small-scale tests. The comparisons show that the tail buffet frequency scales very well with tail chord and free-stream velocity, and that there is good agreement with the previous full-scale test. Root-mean-square pressures and power spectra do not scale as well as the frequency results. Addition of a LEX fence caused tail-buffet loads to be reduced at all model scales.

  2. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Flack, Karen

    1989-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. A flow calibration test was conducted in May and June 1987. The goal of the flow calibration test was to determine detailed spatial variations in the 40- by 80-ft test section flow quality throughout the tunnel operational envelope. Data were collected for test section speeds up to 300 knots and for air exchange rates of 0, 5, and 10 percent. The tunnel performance was also calibrated during the detailed mapping of the test section flow field. Experimental results presented indicate that the flow quality in the test section, with the exception of temperature, is relatively insensitive to the level of dynamic pressure and the air exchange rate. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within + or - 0.5 deg at all test section velocities. Cross-stream temperature gradients in the test section caused by the air exchange system were documented, and a correction method was established. Streamwise static pressure variation on the centerline is about 1 percent of test section dynamic pressure over 30 ft of the test section length.

  3. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise. [NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise was refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy. This theory was then verified by carrying out extensive data/theory comparisons. The resulting model computer program was then employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line on rotor/turbulence noise for outdoor test stand. NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  4. Acoustics Reflections of Full-Scale Rotor Noise Measurements in NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha Lydia; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Sim, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of current research is to identify the extent of acoustic time history distortions due to wind tunnel wall reflections. Acoustic measurements from the recent full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor test (Fig. 2) will be used to illustrate the quality of noise measurement in the NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test section. Results will be compared to PSU-WOPWOP predictions obtained with and without adjustments due to sound reflections off wind tunnel walls. Present research assumes a rectangular enclosure as shown in Fig. 3a. The Method of Mirror Images7 is used to account for reflection sources and their acoustic paths by introducing mirror images of the rotor (i.e. acoustic source), at each and every wall surface, to enforce a no-flow boundary condition at the position of the physical walls (Fig. 3b). While conventional approach evaluates the "combined" noise from both the source and image rotor at a single microphone position, an alternative approach is used to simplify implementation of PSU-WOPWOP for this reflection analysis. Here, an "equivalent" microphone position is defined with respect to the source rotor for each mirror image that effectively renders the reflection analysis to be a one rotor, multiple microphones problem. This alternative approach has the advantage of allowing each individual "equivalent" microphone, representing the reflection pulse from the associated wall surface, to be adjusted by the panel absorption coefficient illustrated in Fig. 1a. Note that the presence of parallel wall surfaces requires an infinite number of mirror images (Fig. 3c) to satisfy the no-flow boundary conditions. In the present analysis, up to four mirror images (per wall surface) are accounted to achieve convergence in the predicted time histories

  5. Aeorodynamic characteristics of an air-exchanger system for the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Schmidt, G. I.; Meyn, L. A.; Ortner, K. R.; Holmes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A 1/50-scale model of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center was used to study various air-exchange configurations. System components were tested throughout a range of parameters, and approximate analytical relationships were derived to explain the observed characteristics. It is found that the efficiency of the air exchanger could be increased (1) by adding a shaped wall to smoothly turn the incoming air downstream, (2) by changing to a contoured door at the inlet to control the flow rate, and (3) by increasing the size of the exhaust opening. The static pressures inside the circuit then remain within the design limits at the higher tunnel speeds if the air-exchange rate is about 5% or more. Since the model is much smaller than the full-scale facility, it is not possible to completely duplicate the tunnel, and it will be necessary to measure such characteristics as flow rate and tunnel pressures during implementation of the remodeled facility. The aerodynamic loads estimated for the inlet door and for nearby walls are also presented.

  6. M2-F1 mounted in NASA Ames Research Center 40x80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    After the first attempted ground-tow tests of the M2-F1 in March 1963, the vehicle was taken to the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, for wind-tunnel testing. During these tests, Milt Thompson and others were in the M2-F1 to position the control surfaces for each test. The wingless, lifting body aircraft design was initially conceived as a means of landing an aircraft horizontally after atmospheric reentry. The absence of wings would make the extreme heat of re-entry less damaging to the vehicle. In 1962, Dryden management approved a program to build a lightweight, unpowered lifting body as a prototype to flight test the wingless concept. It would look like a 'flying bathtub,' and was designated the M2-F1, the 'M' referring to 'manned' and 'F' referring to 'flight' version. It featured a plywood shell placed over a tubular steel frame crafted at Dryden. Construction was completed in 1963. The first flight tests of the M2-F1 were over Rogers Dry Lake at the end of a tow rope attached to a hopped-up Pontiac convertible driven at speeds up to about 120 mph. This vehicle needed to be able to tow the M2-F1 on the Rogers Dry Lakebed adjacent to NASA's Flight Research Center (FRC) at a minimum speed of 100 miles per hour. To do that, it had to handle the 400-pound pull of the M2-F1. Walter 'Whitey' Whiteside, who was a retired Air Force maintenance officer working in the FRC's Flight Operations Division, was a dirt-bike rider and hot-rodder. Together with Boyden 'Bud' Bearce in the Procurement and Supply Branch of the FRC, Whitey acquired a Pontiac Catalina convertible with the largest engine available. He took the car to Bill Straup's renowned hot-rod shop near Long Beach for modification. With a special gearbox and racing slicks, the Pontiac could tow the 1,000-pound M2-F1 110 miles per hour in 30 seconds. It proved adequate for the roughly 400 car tows that got the M2-F1 airborne to prove it could fly safely and to train pilots before they were towed behind a C

  7. Wind-tunnel investigation of a large-scale VTOL aircraft model with wing root and wing thrust augmentors. [Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, K.; Aiken, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale V/STOL aircraft model with thrust augmentors. The model had a double-delta wing of aspect ratio 1.65 with augmentors located in the wing root and the wing trailing edge. The supply air for the augmentor primary nozzles was provided by the YJ-97 turbojet engine. The airflow was apportioned approximately 74 percent to the wing root augmentor and 24 percent to wing augmentor. Results were obtained at several trailing-edge flap deflections with the nozzle jet-momentum coefficients ranging from 0 to 7.9. Three-component longitudinal data are presented with the agumentor operating with and without the horizontal tail. A limited amount of six component data are also presented.

  8. Wind tunnel measurements on a full-scale F/A-18 with a tangentially blowing slot. [conducted in the Ames 80 by 120 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.

    1994-01-01

    A full-scale F/A-18 was tested in the 80 by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center to measure the effectiveness of a tangentially blowing slot in generating significant yawing moments while minimizing coupling in the pitch and roll axes. Various slot configurations were tested to determine the optimum configuration. The test was conducted for angles of attack from 25 to 50 deg, angles of sideslip from -15 to +15 deg, and freestream velocities from 67 ft/sec to 168 ft/sec. By altering the forebody vortex flow, yaw control was maintained for angles of attack up to 50 deg. Of particular interest was the result that blowing very close to the radome apex was not as effective as blowing slightly farther aft on the radome, that a 16-inch slot was more efficient, and that yawing moments were generated without inducing significant rolling or pitching moments.

  9. Time-averaged aerodynamic loads on the vane sets of the 40- by 80-foot and 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Olson, Lawrence E.; Peterson, Randall L.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Ross, James C.; Norman, Thomas R.

    1987-01-01

    Time-averaged aerodynamic loads are estimated for each of the vane sets in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC). The methods used to compute global and local loads are presented. Experimental inputs used to calculate these loads are based primarily on data obtained from tests conducted in the NFAC 1/10-Scale Vane-Set Test Facility and from tests conducted in the NFAC 1/50-Scale Facility. For those vane sets located directly downstream of either the 40- by 80-ft test section or the 80- by 120-ft test section, aerodynamic loads caused by the impingement of model-generated wake vortices and model-generated jet and propeller wakes are also estimated.

  10. Investigation of the Flying Mock-Up of the Consolidated Vultee XP-92 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Force and Moment Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Bradford, H.; Graham, David

    1948-01-01

    This report contains the results of the investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of the flying mock-up of the Consolidated Vultee XP-92 airplane as conducted in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel, Data are presented for test conditions which would give information as to the limits of stability and controllability, and also, the effect of Reynolds number. No analysis of the data has been made.

  11. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. The 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel was built to study spinning characteristics of aircraft. It was an open throat tunnel capable of a maximum speed of 80 mph. NACA engineer Charles H. Zimmerman designed the tunnel starting in 1928. Construction was completed in December 1929. It was one of two tunnels which replaced the original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (The other was the 7x10-Foot Wind Tunnel.). In NACA TR 387 (p. 499), Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris report that 'the tunnel passages are constructed of 1/8-inch sheet iron, stiffened with angle iron and bolted together at the corners. The over-all dimensions are: Height 31 feet 2 inches; length, 20 feet 3 inches; width, 10 feet 3 inches.' The tunnel was partially constructed in the Langley hanger as indicated by the aircraft in the background. Published in NACA TR 387, 'The Vertical Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Carl J. Wenzinger and Thomas A. Harris, 1931.

  12. 20-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1941-01-01

    The large structure on the left of the photograph is the Free-Spinning Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of modern airplanes are tested to determine their spinning characteristics and ability to recover from spins from movement of the control surfaces. From the information obtained in this manner, the spin recovery characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted. The large sphere on the right is 60 feet in diameter and houses the NACA 12-Foot Free-Flight Wind Tunnel in which dynamic scale models of airplanes are flown in actual controlled flight to provide information from which the stability characteristics of the full-scale airplane may be predicted.

  13. Simulation investigation of the effect of the NASA Ames 80-by 120-foot wind tunnel exhaust flow on light aircraft operating in the Moffett field trafffic pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streeter, Barry G.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary study of the exhaust flow from the Ames Research Center 80 by 120 Foot Wind Tunnel indicated that the flow might pose a hazard to low-flying light aircraft operating in the Moffett Field traffic pattern. A more extensive evaluation of the potential hazard was undertaken using a fixed-base, piloted simulation of a light, twin-engine, general-aviation aircraft. The simulated aircraft was flown through a model of the wind tunnel exhaust by pilots of varying experience levels to develop a data base of aircraft and pilot reactions. It is shown that a light aircraft would be subjected to a severe disturbance which, depending upon entry condition and pilot reaction, could result in a low-altitude stall or cause damage to the aircraft tail structure.

  14. Dynamic response of NASA Rotor Test Apparatus and Sikorsky S-76 hub mounted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Randall L.; Hoque, Muhammed S.

    1994-01-01

    A shake test was conducted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, using the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus (RTA) and the Sikorsky S-76 rotor hub. The primary objective of this shake test was to determine the modal properties of the RTA, the S-76 rotor hub, and the model support system installed in the wind tunnel. Random excitation was applied at the rotor hub, and vibration responses were measured using accelerometers mounted at various critical locations on the model and the model support system. Transfer functions were computed using the load cell data and the accelerometer responses. The transfer function data were used to compute the system modal parameters with the aid of modal analysis software.

  15. Dynamic response of NASA Rotor Test Apparatus and Sikorsky S-76 hub mounted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Randall L.; Hoque, Muhammed S.

    1994-09-01

    A shake test was conducted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, using the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus (RTA) and the Sikorsky S-76 rotor hub. The primary objective of this shake test was to determine the modal properties of the RTA, the S-76 rotor hub, and the model support system installed in the wind tunnel. Random excitation was applied at the rotor hub, and vibration responses were measured using accelerometers mounted at various critical locations on the model and the model support system. Transfer functions were computed using the load cell data and the accelerometer responses. The transfer function data were used to compute the system modal parameters with the aid of modal analysis software.

  16. Shake test of rotor test apparatus with balance dampers in the 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Biggers, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    A shake test was conducted to determine the dynamic characteristics of a rotor test apparatus on two strut systems with balance dampers in the Ames 40- by 80-ft wind tunnel. The rotor-off hub transfer function (acceleration per unit force as a function of frequency) was measured in the longitudinal and lateral directions, using a combination of broadband and discrete frequency excitation techniques. The dynamic data are summarized for the configurations tested, giving the following properties for each mode identified: the natural frequency, the hub response at resonance, the fixed system damping, the damping ratio, and the modal mass. The complete transfer functions are presented, and the detailed test results are included as an appendix.

  17. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  18. The effect of forward speed on J85 engine noise from suppressor nozzles as measured in the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effect of forward speed on the exhaust noise from a conical ejector nozzle and three suppressor nozzles mounted behind a J85 engine was performed in a 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The nozzles were tested at three engine power settings and at wind tunnel forward speeds up to 91 m/sec (300 ft/sec). In addition, outdoor static tests were conducted to determine (1) the differences between near field and far field measurements, (2) the effect of an airframe on the far field directivity of each nozzle, and (3) the relative suppression of each nozzle with respect to the baseline conical ejector nozzle. It was found that corrections to near field data are necessary to extrapolate to far field data and that the presence of the airframe changed the far field directivity as measured statically. The results show that the effect of forward speed was to reduce the noise from each nozzle more in the area of peak noise, but the change in forward quadrant noise was small or negligible. A comparison of wind tunnel data with available flight test data shows good agreement.

  19. Comparison of aircraft noise measured in flight test and in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Soderman, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A method to determine free-field aircraft noise spectra from wind-tunnel measurements has been developed. The crux of the method is the correction for reverberations. Calibrated loud speakers are used to simulate model sound sources in the wind tunnel. Corrections based on the difference between the direct and reverberant field levels are applied to wind-tunnel data for a wide range of aircraft noise sources. To establish the validity of the correction method, two research aircraft - one propeller-driven (YOV-10A) and one turbojet-powered (XV-5B) - were flown in free field and then tested in the wind tunnel. Corrected noise spectra from the two environments agree closely.

  20. Experimental investigation of inlet flow-control cascades for the NFAC 80- by 120-foot Indraft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Aken, Johannes M.; Scheller, Nina M.

    1988-01-01

    The present investigation of aerodynamic performance for various inlet cascade configurations of an indraft wind tunnel with a short inlet and a low contraction ratio has given attention to the effects of inlet wall shape, antiturbulence screens, and horizontal flow straighteners on test-section flow quality. It is found that an inlet cascade with a tailored vane-splay distribution, antiturbulence screen, and horizontal splitters, will both yield good test section flow quality and furnish isolation from atmospheric winds and turbulence.

  1. Design and Development of a Deep Acoustic Lining for the 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Schmitz, Fredric H.; Allen, Christopher S.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Sacco, Joe N.; Mosher, Marianne; Hayes, Julie A.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this report has made effective use of design teams to build a state-of-the-art anechoic wind-tunnel facility. Many potential design solutions were evaluated using engineering analysis, and computational tools. Design alternatives were then evaluated using specially developed testing techniques, Large-scale coupon testing was then performed to develop confidence that the preferred design would meet the acoustic, aerodynamic, and structural objectives of the project. Finally, designs were frozen and the final product was installed in the wind tunnel. The result of this technically ambitious project has been the creation of a unique acoustic wind tunnel. Its large test section (39 ft x 79 ft x SO ft), potentially near-anechoic environment, and medium subsonic speed capability (M = 0.45) will support a full range of aeroacoustic testing-from rotorcraft and other vertical takeoff and landing aircraft to the take-off/landing configurations of both subsonic and supersonic transports.

  2. The design of test-section inserts for higher speed aeroacoustic testing in the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal was to find test-section modifications that would allow improved aeroacoustic testing at airspeeds equal to and above the current 100 knots limit. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed drives the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis led to a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open-jet test section, and a 70 x 110 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoustic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 ft test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5-ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test-section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustics studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers.

  3. Real-time computer data system for the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel facility at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambra, J. M.; Tolari, G. P.

    1975-01-01

    The background material and operational concepts of a computer-based system for an operating wind tunnel are described. An on-line real-time computer system was installed in a wind tunnel facility to gather static and dynamic data. The computer system monitored aerodynamic forces and moments of periodic and quasi-periodic functions, and displayed and plotted computed results in real time. The total system is comprised of several off-the-shelf, interconnected subsystems that are linked to a large data processing center. The system includes a central processor unit with 32,000 24-bit words of core memory, a number of standard peripherals, and several special processors; namely, a dynamic analysis subsystem, a 256-channel PCM-data subsystem and ground station, a 60-channel high-speed data acquisition subsystem, a communication link, and static force and pressure subsystems. The role of the test engineer as a vital link in the system is also described.

  4. Application of a Two Camera Video Imaging System to Three-Dimensional Vortex Tracking in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Bennett, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    A description is presented of two enhancements for a two-camera, video imaging system that increase the accuracy and efficiency of the system when applied to the determination of three-dimensional locations of points along a continuous line. These enhancements increase the utility of the system when extracting quantitative data from surface and off-body flow visualizations. The first enhancement utilizes epipolar geometry to resolve the stereo "correspondence" problem. This is the problem of determining, unambiguously, corresponding points in the stereo images of objects that do not have visible reference points. The second enhancement, is a method to automatically identify and trace the core of a vortex in a digital image. This is accomplished by means of an adaptive template matching algorithm. The system was used to determine the trajectory of a vortex generated by the Leading-Edge eXtension (LEX) of a full-scale F/A-18 aircraft tested in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. The system accuracy for resolving the vortex trajectories is estimated to be +/-2 inches over distance of 60 feet. Stereo images of some of the vortex trajectories are presented. The system was also used to determine the point where the LEX vortex "bursts". The vortex burst point locations are compared with those measured in small-scale tests and in flight and found to be in good agreement.

  5. Large-scale aeroacoustic research feasibility and conceptual design of test-section inserts for the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olsen, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80 by 120 foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The advantages and disadvantages of likely designs were analyzed. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed leads to the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis indicated a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open jet test section, and a 70 x 100 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining, respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoutic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5 ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustic studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. In all designs studied, the existing structure would have to be reinforced. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers. The larger size of the facility would make installation and removal of the insert components difficult. Consequently, scheduling of the existing 80 x 120 aerodynamic test section and scheduling of the open-jet test section would likely be made on an

  6. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40 x 80 foot Wind Tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a Conventional Takeoff/Landing (CTOL) hybrid inlet, a Short Takeoff/Landing (STOL) hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The CTOL hybrid inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 18 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a CF6 size engine while the STOL hybrid inlet suppressed the low tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a OCSEE size engine. The deflector inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB at 61 m (200 ft) overhead scaled to a CF6 size engine. No significant changes in fan noise suppression for the CTOL and STOL hybrid inlets occurred for forward velocity changes above 21 m/s (68 ft/s) or for angle of attack changes up to 15 deg. However, changes in both forward velocity and angle of attack changed the deflector inlet noise unpredictably due to the asymmetry of the inlet flow field into the fan.

  7. Aeroacoustic Study of a 26%-Scale Semispan Model of a Boeing 777 Wing in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.; Soderman, Paul T.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Reinero, Bryan R.; James, Kevin D.; Arledge, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    An acoustic and aerodynamic study was made of a 26%-scale unpowered Boeing 777 aircraft semispan model in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel for the purpose of identifying and attenuating airframe noise sources. Simulated approach and landing configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.12 and 0.24. Cruise configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.24 and 0.33. The research team used two Ames phased-microphone arrays, a large fixed array and a small traversing array, mounted under the wing to locate and compare various noise sources in the wing high-lift system and landing gear. Numerous model modifications and noise alleviation devices were evaluated. Simultaneous with acoustic measurements, aerodynamic forces were recorded to document aircraft conditions and any performance changes caused by the geometric modifications. Numerous airframe noise sources were identified that might be important factors in the approach and landing noise of the full-scale aircraft. Several noise-control devices were applied to each noise source. The devices were chosen to manipulate and control, if possible, the flow around the various tips and through the various gaps of the high-lift system so as to minimize the noise generation. Fences, fairings, tip extensions, cove fillers, vortex generators, hole coverings, and boundary-layer trips were tested. In many cases, the noise-control devices eliminated noise from some sources at specific frequencies. When scaled to full-scale third-octave bands, typical noise reductions ranged from 1 to 10 dB without significant aerodynamic performance loss.

  8. 20. 80 foot pony truss an upper chord pin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. 80 foot pony truss - an upper chord pin connection at a vertical post other than at the end post. Common to the five 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot truss, there are two pairs per 80 foot truss and one pair on the 64 foot truss for a total of 22. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  9. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Schematic drawing of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris describe the tunnel in NACA TR No. 387: 'The tunnel has an open jet, an open test chamber, and a closed return passage. ... The air passes through the test section in a downward direction then enters the exit cone and passes through the first set of guide vanes to a propeller. From here it passes, by way of the return passage, through the successive sets of guide vanes at the corners, then through the honeycomb, and finally through the entrance cone.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5%. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  10. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual

  11. 18. 80 foot pony truss detail of the lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. 80 foot pony truss - detail of the lower cord pin connection, typical of the 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot truss, where the vertical lace post joins the upper and lower chords. There are two pair of each 80 foot truss and a single pair on the 64 foot truss for a total of 22. The view also shows the chord eye bar and eye rod along with the diagonal bar and rod members. The rod hanging diagonally to the left is a broken lateral member. A four inch conduit is also in view. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  12. 19. 80 foot pony truss view of upper chord ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 80 foot pony truss - view of upper chord pin connection at the end post, typical of the five 80 foot trusses and similar to the 64 foot tress. There are two pair per pony truss for a total of 24. Shown are the vertical lace post, end post, top chord member, and a diagonal member. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  13. 17. 80 foot pony truss detail of the lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 80 foot pony truss - detail of the lower pin connection located where an end post joins the first and the last vertical post. There are two pair on each of the five 80 foot trusses for a total of 20. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  14. Initial Assessment of Acoustic Source Visibility with a 24-Element Microphone Array in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of background noise were recently obtained with a 24-element phased microphone array in the test section of the Arnold Engineering Development Center 80- by120-Foot Wind Tunnel at speeds of 50 to 100 knots (27.5 to 51.4 m/s). The array was mounted in an aerodynamic fairing positioned with array center 1.2m from the floor and 16 m from the tunnel centerline, The array plate was mounted flush with the fairing surface as well as recessed in. (1.27 cm) behind a porous Kevlar screen. Wind-off speaker measurements were also acquired every 15 on a 10 m semicircular arc to assess directional resolution of the array with various processing algorithms, and to estimate minimum detectable source strengths for future wind tunnel aeroacoustic studies. The dominant background noise of the facility is from the six drive fans downstream of the test section and first set of turning vanes. Directional array response and processing methods such as background-noise cross-spectral-matrix subtraction suggest that sources 10-15 dB weaker than the background can be detected.

  15. Aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale semispan model with a swept wing and an augmented jet flap with hypermixing nozzles. [Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.; Falarski, M. D.; Koenin, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the augmentor wing concept with hypermixing primary nozzles were investigated. A large-scale semispan model in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Static Test Facility was used. The trailing edge, augmentor flap system occupied 65% of the span and consisted of two fixed pivot flaps. The nozzle system consisted of hypermixing, lobe primary nozzles, and BLC slot nozzles at the forward inlet, both sides and ends of the throat, and at the aft flap. The entire wing leading edge was fitted with a 10% chord slat and a blowing slot. Outboard of the flap was a blown aileron. The model was tested statically and at forward speed. Primary parameters and their ranges included angle of attack from -12 to 32 degrees, flap angles of 20, 30, 45, 60 and 70 degrees, and deflection and diffuser area ratios from 1.16 to 2.22. Thrust coefficients ranged from 0 to 2.73, while nozzle pressure ratios varied from 1.0 to 2.34. Reynolds number per foot varied from 0 to 1.4 million. Analysis of the data indicated a maximum static, gross augmentation of 1.53 at a flap angle of 45 degrees. Analysis also indicated that the configuration was an efficient powered lift device and that the net thrust was comparable with augmentor wings of similar static performance. Performance at forward speed was best at a diffuser area ratio of 1.37.

  16. 12. 80 foot pony truss looking east from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 80 foot pony truss - looking east from the upstream side, view of a single pony truss showing its general arrangement on replacement piers, circa 1966. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  17. Flight effects on noise by the JT8D engine with inverted primary/fan flow as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strout, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    A JT8D-17R engine with inverted primary and fan flows was tested under static conditions as well as in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel to determine static and flight noise characteristics, and flow profile of a large scale engine. Test and analysis techniques developed by a previous model and JT8D engine test program were used to determine the in-flight noise. The engine with inverted flow was tested with a conical nozzle and with a plug nozzle, 20 lobe nozzle, and an acoustic shield. Wind tunnel results show that forward velocity causes significant reduction in peak PNL suppression relative to uninverted flow. The loss of EPNL suppression is relatively modest. The in-flight peak PNL suppression of the inverter with conical nozzle was 2.5 PNdb relative to a static value of 5.5 PNdb. The corresponding EPNL suppression was 4.0 EPNdb for flight and 5.0 EPNdb for static operation. The highest in-flight EPNL suppression was 7.5 EPNdb obtained by the inverter with 20 lobe nozzle and acoustic shield. When compared with the JT8D engine with internal mixer, the inverted flow configuration provides more EPNL suppression under both static and flight conditions.

  18. An Investigation of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XF-91 Airplane in the Ames 40- By 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Pressure Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; Dew, Joseph K.

    1949-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XF-91 airplane were conducted to determine the distribution of pressure over the external wing fuel tank installation and over the vee tail and ventral fin. The data were obtained for a range of angles of attack and sideslip and elerudder deflection angles; the presentation is in tabular form.

  19. Investigation of the Flying Mock-Up of Consolidated Vultee XP-92 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, David

    1948-01-01

    This report contains the results of the wind tunnel investigation of the pressure distribution on the flying mock-up of the Consolidated Vultee XP-92 airplane. Data are presented for the pressure distribution over the wing, vertical tail and the fuselage, and for the pressure loss and rate of flow through the ducted fuselage. Data are also presented for the calibration of two airspeed indicators, and for the calibration of angle-of-attack and sideslip-angle indicator vanes.

  20. Tests of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XF-91 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Force and Moment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, Lynn W.; Dew, Joseph K.

    1949-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XF-91 airplane having swept-back wings and a vee tail were conducted to determine both the stability and control characteristics of the model longitudinally, laterally, and directionally. Configurations of the model were investigated involving such variables as external fuel tanks, a landing gear, trailing-edge flaps, leading-edge slats, and a range of wing incidences and tail incidences.

  1. An Investigation of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Pressure-Distribution Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; James, Harry A.

    1948-01-01

    Pressure measurements were made during wind-tunnel tests of the McDonnell XP-85 parasite fighter. Static-pressure orifices were located over the fuselage nose, over the canopy, along the wing root, and along the upper and lower stabilizer roots. A total-pressure and static-pressure rake was located in the turbojet engine air-intake duct. It was installed at the station where the compressor face would be located. Pressure data were obtained for two airplane conditions, clean and with skyhook extended, through a range of angle of attack and a range of yaw.

  2. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel: Acoustic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1981-01-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in a wind tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a CTOL hybrid inlet, an STOL hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the baseline inlet noise and the effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The 1/3 octave band noise data from these tests are given along with selected plots of 1/3 octave band spectra and directivity and full scale PNL directivities. The test facilities and data reduction techniques used are also described.

  3. An Investigation of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel. Force and Moment Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; James Harry A.

    1948-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane were conducted to determine its longitudinal, lateral, and directional stability and the characteristics of the aileron, the ruddervator, the leading-edge droop nose flap, and the stall control vanes. The directional stability of the airplane with numerous skyhook modifications and with a ventral fin was also investigated. The results of the tests showed that the effectiveness of the droop nose flaps and the stall control vanes was negligible with regard to either the maximum lift or longitudinal stability of the airplane. Contrary to any previous small-scale results, extension of the skyhook caused a 75-percent reduction in the directional stability of the airplane for both low and high values of lift coefficient. The simplest solution to the problem short of a major redesign of the skyhook appears to be the adoption of a ventral fin.

  4. Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris wrote in NACA TR 387: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5 per cent. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  5. 7. 80 foot pony truss underside of bridge, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. 80 foot pony truss - underside of bridge, looking north, showing the original pier and the outrigger type extension to raise and level the present-day support for the pony trusses. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  6. 11. GIRDER PARTIAL ELEVATION AND SECTIONS, 80 FOOT THROUGH PLATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GIRDER PARTIAL ELEVATION AND SECTIONS, 80 FOOT THROUGH PLATE GIRDER SPAN. (Also includes a Marking Diagram and a schedule of parts.) American Bridge Company, Ambridge Plant No. 5, sheet no. 1, dated April 7, 1928, order no. F5073. For U.S. Steel Products Company, Pacific Coast Depot, order no. SF578. For Southern Pacific Company, order no. 8873-P-28746. Scale 1/4 inch to one foot. - Napa River Railroad Bridge, Spanning Napa River, east of Soscol Avenue, Napa, Napa County, CA

  7. 21. 80 foot pony truss view is from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. 80 foot pony truss - view is from the deck, looking down to the junction of the two pony trusses, showing the top of the lower chord pin connection on top of the replacement pier. Also shown is some deck surface and an electrical conduit. This is typical of the junction of all the pony trusses. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  8. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  9. A Unique RCM Application at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonagofski, James M.; Machala, Anthony C.; Smith, Anthony M.; Presley, Leroy L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is known internationally as a center of excellence for its capabilities and achievements in the field of developmental aerodynamics. The Center has a variety of aerodynamic test facilities including the largest wind tunnel in the world (with 40 x 80 deg and 80 x 120 deg atmospheric test sections) and the 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel which is the subject of this paper. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far-field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow base line and suppressor nozzles. Summary report. [conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to study the near- and far-field jet noise characteristics of six baseline and suppressor nozzles. Static and wind-on noise source locations were determined. A technique for extrapolating near field jet noise measurements into the far field was established. It was determined if flight effects measured in the near field are the same as those in the far field. The flight effects on the jet noise levels of the baseline and suppressor nozzles were determined. Test models included a 15.24-cm round convergent nozzle, an annular nozzle with and without ejector, a 20-lobe nozzle with and without ejector, and a 57-tube nozzle with lined ejector. The static free-field test in the anechoic chamber covered nozzle pressure ratios from 1.44 to 2.25 and jet velocities from 412 to 594 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K. The wind tunnel flight effects test repeated these nozzle test conditions with ambient velocities of 0 to 92 m/s.

  11. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Force Test set-up in 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels and were housed in the same building the first wind tunnel had been located in. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. There was a 6-component balance in this wind tunnel. The balance could support either static or rotation tests.

  12. 7 x 10 Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 7 x 10 Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels. While the 5 foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. The Warwick Machine Co. of Newport News, Virginia had the contract to fabricate and erection the 7x10 Foot tunnel for a total cost of $18,018.90. The balance was made by Fairbanks, Morse and Co., of Baltimore, Maryland for $2,544.00. The honeycomb was made by the Berkley Machine Works and Foundry Co., Inc. of Norfolk, Virginia for $1,580 and the control panel by Clark Controller Co. of Cleveland, OH for $1,153. Published in NACA TR No. 412, 'The 7 by 10 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Thomas A. Harris, 1932; Reference Notes on the 'Atmospheric Wind Tunnel' in the Langley Historical Archives (D. Baals notes on wind tunnels).

  13. Wind tunnel investigation of the Titan Forward Skirt compartment vent from a free-stream Mach number of 0.80 to 1.96. [conducted in the Lewis Research Center 8 by 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    A test was conducted to determine the flow characteristics of the Titan forward skirt compartment vent over a free stream Mach number range of 0.80 to 1.96. The vent was mounted in a flat plate and the plate was flush mounted to the tunnel side wall with coinciding center lines. Air was discharged from a duct, located on the tunnel side wall behind the plate, through a canted aft 30 deg honeycomb vent into the free stream. Data for the analysis of the Titan forward skirt compartment venting during ascent through the atmosphere are provided. Full scale simulated flight hardware, such as the honeycomb vent, duct corrugations and field joint ring were used. Boundary layer thicknesses were used to vary boundary height. The highest vent discharge coefficient for any given Mach number and vent pressure ratio generally occurred at the maximum displacement thickness. With no vent flow the static pressure in the vent region was generally less than the free stream static pressure. With vent flow, the static pressures upstream of the vent increased, and those downstream of the vent decreased.

  14. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Smoke generator for 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT) (left center); Force Test Set-Up in the center. In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931.

  15. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 8FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. SAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. SAME CAMERA POSITION AS VA-118-B-10 LOOKING IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  16. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Engineer is shown adjusting a test model of the Clark-Y airfoil #1 in 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels and were housed in the same building the first wind tunnel had been located in. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. The test model used to study the coefficients of lift, drag, cross-wind force, and pitching moment was a 'Clark Y airfoil with a 10-inch chord and a 60-inch span, and the model was set at 20 positive yaw.'

  17. Large-Scale Wind Turbine Testing in the NASA 24.4m (80) by 36.6m(120) Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Imprexia, Cliff (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center in California provides a unique capability to test large-scale wind turbines under controlled conditions. This special capability is now available for domestic and foreign entities wishing to test large-scale wind turbines. The presentation will focus on facility capabilities to perform wind turbine tests and typical research objectives for this type of testing.

  18. 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Drawing of 7 x 10-Foot Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT). In 1928, the NACA decided to replace its original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (AWT #1) with two tunnels--the 5-foot vertical tunnel and a 7 by 10 foot rectangular throat tunnel. Both were open-throat, closed-return-passage tunnels. While the 5-foot vertical tunnel was to be used mainly for spin tests, the 7x10 was an all-purpose tunnel although the main intent was to study stability and control problems. Construction was completed in the summer of 1930; calibration later that same year. The balance was installed and the tunnel went into operation in early 1931. The Warwick Machine Co. of Newport News, Virginia had the contract to fabricate and erection the 7x10-Foot tunnel for a total cost of $18,018.90. The balance was made by Fairbanks, Morse and Co., of Baltimore, Maryland for 2,544.00. The honeycomb was made by the Berkley Machine Works and Foundry Co., Inc. of Norfolk, Virginia for $1,580 and the control panel by Clark Controller Co. of Cleveland, OH for $1,153.

  19. An Investigation of the Low-speed Stability and Control Characteristics of Swept-forward and Swept-back Wing in the Ames 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Gerald M; Stevens, Victor I , Jr

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been made at large scale of the characteristics of highly swept wings. Data were obtained at several angles of sideslip on wings having angles of sweep of plus or minus 45 degrees, plus or minus 30 degrees, and 0 degrees. The airfoil sections of the wings varied from approximately NACA 0015 at the root to NACA 23009 at the tip. Each wing was investigated with flaps under flection, partial-span split flaps deflected 60 degrees, full-span split flaps defected 60 degrees and split-flap-type ailerons deflected plus or minus 15 degrees. Values of maximum lift were obtained at Reynolds numbers raging from 5.7 to 9.2 times 10 to the 6th power. In this report the summarized results are compared with the predictions made by use of the simplified theory for the effect of sweep and with existing small-scale data. The basic wind-tunnel results from which these summary data were taken are included in an appendix. The primary problems accompanying the use of weep as revealed by this investigation are the loss in maximum lift, the high effective dihedral, and the sharp reduction in lateral-control effectiveness. In general, simple theory enables good predictions to be made of the gross effects of sweep but further refinements are necessary to obtain the accuracy required for design purposes. In cases where comparisons can be made, the indications are that, as sweep increases, scale effects diminish and large-scale results approach small-scale results.

  20. The 80 megawatt wind power project at Kahuku Point, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laessig, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Windfarms Ltd. is developing the two largest wind energy projects in the world. Designed to produce 80 megawatts at Kahuku Point, Hawaii and 350 megawatts in Solano County, California, these projects will be the prototypes for future large-scale wind energy installations throughout the world.

  1. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  2. Overview of 6- X 6-foot wind tunnel aero-optics tests. [transonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buell, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The splitter-plate arrangement used in tests in the 6 x 6 foot wind tunnel and how it was configured to study boundary layers, both heated and unheated, shear layers over a cavity, separated flows behind spoilers, accelerated flows around a turret, and a turret wake are described. The flows are characterized by examples of the steady-state pressure and of velocity profiles through the various types of flow layers.

  3. HST Imaging of the Pulsar Wind Nebula CTB 80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, J.

    2000-12-01

    CTB80 is a remarkable pulsar wind nebula seen as the pulsar is passing through the shell of its own supernova remnant. HST images taken in the light of [O III], [S II], and Hα show the structure of a complex bow shock with a radiative central component and two Balmer-dominated lobes. Continuum images show the presence of a small diffuse knot of emission offset approximately 0.5'' from the location of the radio pulsar along a line bisecting the lobes. We interpret the knot as synchrotron emission, and note that its luminosity and offset from the pulsar make it remarkably like the knot seen 0.5'' to the south east of the Crab pulsar. We propose that the structure of the bow shock in CTB 80 is the result of an axisymmetric bipolar pulsar wind, much like that seen in the Crab Nebula, in which polar jets from the pulsar are responsible for forming the lobes. Shear flow from the relativistic jets may be responsible for stripping the cooling and recombination layer off of the back side of the shocks in the lobes. We predict that X-ray images of CTB 80 will show the presence of both a strong equatorial wind and synchrotron jets along the axis defined by the pulsar, the knot, and the lobes.

  4. Design improvements to the ESI-80 wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.; Kleeman, A.; Manwell, J.; McGowan, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes two investigations related to improvements to an ESI-80 wind turbine. One of them involved modeling the tip flaps during braking. The other was a study of the turbine behavior with various delta-3 angles. These topics are of interest since the turbine is a two-bladed, teetered, free-yaw machine with tip flaps and an adjustable delta-3 angle. Tip flaps are used for slowing the turbine during shutdown and as an emergency system to insure that the rotor does not go into an overspeed condition in the event of failure of other parts of the system. Upon deployment, the tip flaps are exposed to a number of varying forces including aerodynamic, damper, spring, centripetal, and gravitational forces and forces at the hinged connection to the blades. For maximum braking the angle of tip flap deployment needs to be as large as possible without striking the blades in overspeed conditions and when covered with ice. To investigate tip flap design tradeoffs, a dynamic model of the tip flaps on the modified ESI-80 turbine was developed. Results include a determination of the effect of the addition of weight to the flap, overspeed conditions, and changes in damping coefficient. Changes in the delta-3 angle can be used to couple pitching and flapping motions, affecting both teeter and yaw behavior. These effects have been investigated using a modified version of YawDyn. The effects of changes in the delta-3 angle on the teeter and yaw behavior of the modified ESI-80 wind turbine were investigated. Results show that increased teeter excursions in steady high winds can be reduced by increasing the delta-3 angle. Increasing the delta-3 angle may also increase yaw motion in low wind speeds. Results suggest that the optimum delta-3 angle for improved performance may be substantially greater than the presently used angle of zero degrees. 8 refs., 16 figs.

  5. A study of the noise radiation from four helicopter rotor blades. [tests in Ames 40 by 20 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A.; Mosher, M.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic measurements were taken of a modern helicopter rotor with four blade tip shapes in the NASA Ames 40-by-80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The four tip shapes are: rectangular, swept, trapezoidal, and swept tapered in platform. Acoustic effects due to tip shape changes were studied based on the dBA level, peak noise pressure, and subjective rating. The swept tapered blade was found to be the quietest above an advancing tip Mach number of about 0.9, and the swept blade was the quietest at low speed. The measured high speed impulsive noise was compared with theoretical predictions based on thickness effects; good agreement was found.

  6. Aerodynamic flow quality and acoustic characteristics of the 40- by 80-foot test section circuit of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Lawrence E.; Zell, Peter T.; Soderman, Paul T.; Falarski, Michael D.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Edenborough, H. Kipling

    1988-01-01

    The 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel circuit of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) has recently undergone major modifications and subsequently completed final acceptance testing. The initial testing and calibration of the wind tunnel are described and in many cases these results are compared with predictions derived from model tests and theoretical analyses. The wind tunnel meets or exceeds essentially all performance objectives. The facility runs smoothly and routinely at its maximum test-section velocity of 300 knots (Mach number = 0.45). An effective cooling air exchange system enables the wind tunnel to operate indefinitely at this maximum power condition. Throughout the operating envelope of the wind tunnel the test-section dynamic pressure is uniform to within + or - 0.5 deg, and the axial component of turbulence is generally less than 0.5 percent. Acoustic measurements indicate that, due to the low noise fans and acoustic treatment in the wind-tunnel circuit and test section, the background noise level in the test section is comparable to other large-scale acoustic wind tunnels in the United States and abroad.

  7. A Study of Lightning Current Distribution at a Wind Turbine Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ueda, Naoya; Ametani, Akihiro; Natsuno, Daisuke

    A Rogowski coil, used for measuring lightning current through a wind turbine generator system, is generally set up at the foot of a tower. In most wind turbines, there is an entrance at the foot of the tower, which leads to a flight of stairs or a ladder. When lightning strikes the wind turbine, the lightning current flows to the ground through the blades, nacelle, and tower. The current is shunted to the tower and the stairs/ladder at the foot of the tower, from where it may flow into the foundation and the earth. A Rogowski coil is usually set up at only the foot of a tower. The lightning current shunted to the stairs/ladder cannot be measured using the Rogowski. The installation position of the Rogowski coil depends on the construction of the stairs/ladder. In this study, the lightning current distribution at the foot of a tower is calculated using the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) method, which is one of methods used for numerical analyses of electromagnetic fields. We also studied the effect that the setup of the stairs/ladder and the resistivity of the ground have on the lightning current distribution. The results of the current distribution are very important for predicting the total current that flows through an existing wind turbine generator system.

  8. Preliminary Computational Study for Future Tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot' x 7 foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, Jason M.; Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; WInski, Courtney S.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Commercial Supersonics Technology Project seeks to advance tools and techniques to make over-land supersonic flight feasible. In this study, preliminary computational results are presented for future tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot x 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel to be conducted in early 2016. Shock-plume interactions and their effect on pressure signature are examined for six model geometries. Near- field pressure signatures are assessed using the CFD code USM3D to model the proposed test geometries in free-air. Additionally, results obtained using the commercial grid generation software Pointwise Reigistered Trademark are compared to results using VGRID, the NASA Langley Research Center in-house mesh generation program.

  9. The 7 by 10 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a description of the 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel and associated apparatus of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Included also are calibration test results and characteristic test data of both static force tests and autorotation tests made in the tunnel.

  10. High speed civil transport in 14x22 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA technician Michael E. Ramsey inspects a high speed civil transport model between wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Aerodynamic tests of the 19-foot (5.7 meters) model in the 14x22 foot subsonic tunnel simulate takeoff and landing of a 300 passenger supersonic commercial transport that would cruise at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/2,560kph). Designated Reference H, the concept was designed by Boeing and presently serves as a common configuration for government-industry technology studies.

  11. Wind-Tunnel Tests of 10-foot-diameter Autogiro Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheatley, John B; Bioletti, Carlton

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of a series of 10-foot-diameter autogiro rotor models tested in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel. Four of the models differed only in the airfoil sections of the blades, the sections used being the NACA 0012, 0018, 4412, and 4418. Three additional models employing the NACA 0012 section were tested, in which a varying portion of the blade near the hub was replaced by a streamline tube with a chord of about one-fourth the blade chord.

  12. Construction of the 30 x 60 Foot Wind Tunnel at Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    This photograph from 1930 shows the 30 x 60 Foot Tunnel during construction. Smith J. de France, a NACA engineer, was in charge of the design team for the new tunnel. Planning involved the construction of a 1/5 scale model of the tunnel. In 1929, the NACA received congresional approval and two year appropriation of $900,000 for construction. The tunnel was built by the J.A. Jones Construction Company. The framework is solid steel. Like many early wind tunnels, the 30 x 60 foot tunnel featured 'inside- out' construction, with structual supports on the outside. The circular frames indicate where the two 35 foot propellers are located today. Built to test full-scale models or actual aircraft, the 30 x 60 foot tunnel was an innovative concept in wind tunnel design. It proved especially valuable during World War II as a majority of the nation's bombers and fighters (as well as several foreign aircraft) were tested in this tunnel. Since the 1970s, one of the unique test techinques used in the 30 x 60 was free flight of dynamically scaled models in the test section. This technique allowed researchers to measure and assess flight characteristics as well as control options. The 30 x 60 is an example of a major facility adapted to serve a multitude of uses that its designers did not initially visualize. The 30 x 60 remained as one of NASA's largest wind tunnels until its closing in September 1995. In 1985 the 30 x 60 foot wind tunnel was designated a National Historic Landmark.

  13. Plume and Shock Interaction Effects on Sonic Boom in the 1-foot by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan; Winski, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    The desire to reduce or eliminate the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed by the aircraft. A study has been performed focused on reducing the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Testing was completed in the 1-foot by 1-foot supersonic wind tunnel to study the effects of an exhaust nozzle plume and shock wave interaction. The plume and shock interaction study was developed to collect data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation of a nozzle plume passing through the shock generated from the wing or tail of a supersonic vehicle. The wing or tail was simulated with a wedgeshaped shock generator. This test entry was the first of two phases to collect schlieren images and off-body static pressure profiles. Three wedge configurations were tested consisting of strut-mounted wedges of 2.5- degrees and 5-degrees. Three propulsion configurations were tested simulating the propulsion pod and aft deck from a low boom vehicle concept, which also provided a trailing edge shock and plume interaction. Findings include how the interaction of the jet plume caused a thickening of the shock generated by the wedge (or aft deck) and demonstrate how the shock location moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio.

  14. AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSOR IN THE 8X6 FOOT SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL - ELECTRIC MOTORS OF 87,000 HORSEPOWER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSOR IN THE 8X6 FOOT SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL - ELECTRIC MOTORS OF 87,000 HORSEPOWER DRIVE THIS HUGE COMPRESSOR TO PRODUCE 1300 MILE PER HOUR AIRSPEEDS - THE 2 HALVES OF THE 18 FOOT DIAMETER CASING ARE SHOWN OPENED TO EXPOSE THE 7 ROW

  15. 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel Acoustic Improvements Expanded Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2016-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT) at NASA Glenn Research Center was built in 1969 in the return leg of the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT). The 8x6 SWT was completed in 1949 and acoustically treated to mitigate community noise issues in 1950. This treatment included the addition of a large muffler downstream of the 8x6 SWT test section and diffuser. The 9x15 LSWT was designed for performance testing of V/STOL aircraft models, but with the addition of the current acoustic treatment in 1986 the tunnel been used principally for acoustic and performance testing of aircraft propulsion systems. The present document describes an anticipated acoustic upgrade to be completed in 2017.

  16. NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    The 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at Lewis Research Center is available for use by qualified researchers. This manual contains tunnel performance maps which show the range of total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, dynamic pressure, altitude, Reynolds number, and mass flow as a function of test section Mach number. These maps are applicable for both the aerodynamic and propulsion cycle. The 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is an atmospheric facility with a test section Mach number range from 0.36 to 2.0. General support systems (air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, infrared system, laser system, laser sheet system, and schlieren system are also described as are instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems. Pretest meeting formats are outlined. Tunnel user responsibility and personal safety requirements are also stated.

  17. Design, fabrication, test, and evaluation of a prototype 150-foot long composite wind turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gewehr, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of a prototype 150 foot long composite wind turbine blade is described. The design approach and material selection, compatible with low cost fabrication methods and objectives, are highlighted. The operating characteristics of the blade during rotating and nonrotating conditions are presented. The tensile, compression, and shear properties of the blade are reported. The blade fabrication, tooling, and quality assurance are discussed.

  18. The 12-foot pressure wind tunnel restoration project model support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Glen E.

    1992-01-01

    The 12 Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel is a variable density, low turbulence wind tunnel that operates at subsonic speeds, and up to six atmospheres total pressure. The restoration of this facility is of critical importance to the future of the U.S. aerospace industry. As part of this project, several state of the art model support systems are furnished to provide an optimal balance between aerodynamic and operational efficiency parameters. Two model support systems, the Rear Strut Model Support, and the High Angle of Attack Model Support are discussed. This paper covers design parameters, constraints, development, description, and component selection.

  19. Operating manual holographic interferometry system for 2 x 2 foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic interferometer system was installed in a 2X2 foot transonic wind tunnel. The system incorporates a modern, 10 pps, Nd:YAG pulsed laser which provides reliable operation and is easy to align. The spatial filtering requirements of the unstable resonator beam are described as well as the integration of the system into the existing Schieren system. A two plate holographic interferometer is used to reconstruct flow field data. For static wind tunnel models the single exposure holograms are recorded in the usual manner; however, for dynamic models such as oscillating airfoils, synchronous laser hologram recording is used.

  20. Results of tests using a 0.030-scale model (45-0) of space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA/ARC 12-foot pressure wind tunnel (OA159)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation (test OA159) was conducted in the NASA/ARC 12-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel from June 23 through July 8, 1975. The objective was to obtain detailed strut tare and interference effects of the support system used in the NASA/ARC 40 x 80-foot wind tunnel during 0.36-scale orbiter testing (OA100). Six-component force and moment data were obtained through an angle-of-attack range from -9 through +18 degrees with 0 deg angle of sideslip and a sideslip angle range from -9 through +18 degrees at 9 deg angle of attack results are presented.

  1. Modernization and Activation of the NASA Ames 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmak, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    The Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Automation systems were installed in all three UPWT tunnel legs and the Auxiliaries facility. Major improvements were made to the four control rooms, model support systems, main drive motors, and main drive speed control. Pressure vessel repairs and refurbishment to the electrical distribution system were also completed. Significant changes were made to improve test section flow quality in the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg. After the completion of the construction phase of the project, acceptance and checkout testing was performed to demonstrate the capabilities of the modernized facility. A pneumatic test of the tunnel circuit was performed to verify the structural integrity of the pressure vessel before wind-on operations. Test section turbulence, flow angularity, and acoustic parameters were measured throughout the tunnel envelope to determine the effects of the tunnel flow quality improvements. The new control system processes were thoroughly checked during wind-off and wind-on operations. Manual subsystem modes and automated supervisory modes of tunnel operation were validated. The aerodynamic and structural performance of both the new composite compressor rotor blades and the old aluminum rotor blades was measured. The entire subsonic and supersonic envelope of the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg was defined up to the maximum total pressure.

  2. NASA Glenn 1-by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seablom, Kirk D.; Soeder, Ronald H.; Stark, David E.; Leone, John F. X.; Henry, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    This manual describes the NASA Glenn Research Center's 1 - by 1 -Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel and provides information for customers who wish to conduct experiments in this facility. Tunnel performance envelopes of total pressure, total temperature, and dynamic pressure as a function of test section Mach number are presented. For each Mach number, maps are presented of Reynolds number per foot as a function of the total air temperature at the test section inlet for constant total air pressure at the inlet. General support systems-such as the service air, combustion air, altitude exhaust system, auxiliary bleed system, model hydraulic system, schlieren system, model pressure-sensitive paint, and laser sheet system are discussed. In addition, instrumentation and data processing, acquisition systems are described, pretest meeting formats and schedules are outlined, and customer responsibilities and personnel safety are addressed.

  3. High Speed Civil Transport in 14x22 Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A NASA technician (Michael E. Ramsey) inspects a high-speed civil transport model between wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Aerodynamic tests of the 19-foot (5.7m) model in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel simulate takeoff and landing of a 300-passenger supersonic commercial transport that would cruise at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/2,560 kph). Designated 'Reference H,' the concept was designed by Boeing and presently serves as a common configuration for government-industry technology studies. Langley is NASA's lead center for the agency's High Speed Research program, aimed at developing technology to help U.S. industry compete in the rapidly expanding trans-oceanic transport market. A. U.S. high-speed civil transport is expected to fly in about the year 2010.

  4. Flow quality studies of the NASA Lewis Research Center 8- by 6-foot supersonic/9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. A.; Pickett, Mark T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to determine the existing flow quality in the NASA Lewis 8 by 6 Foot Supersonic/9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The information gathered from these studies was used to determine the types and designs of flow manipulators which can be installed to improve overall tunnel flow quality and efficiency. Such manipulators include honeycomb flow straighteners, turbulence reduction screens, corner turning vanes, and acoustic treatments. The types of measurements, instrumentation, and results obtained from experiments conducted at several locations throughout the tunnel loop are described.

  5. Flow quality studies of the NASA Lewis Research Center 8- by 6-foot supersonic/9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pickett, Mark T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to determine the existing flow quality in the NASA Lewis 8 by 6 Foot Supersonic/9 by 15 Foot Low speed Wind Tunnel. The information gathered from these studies was used to determine the types and designs of flow manipulators which can be installed to improve overall tunnel flow quality and efficiency. Such manipulators include honeycomb flow straighteners, turbulence reduction screens, corner turning vanes, and acoustic treatments. The types of measurements, instrumentation, and results obtained from experiments conducted at several locations throughout the tunnel loop are described.

  6. An experimental investigation of boundary layer and crossflow characteristics of the Ames 2 by 2 foot and 11 by 11 foot transonic wind-tunnel walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matyk, G.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The boundary layer and crossflow characteristics of 2- by 2-foot and 11- by 11-foot transonic wind-tunnel wall configurations have been studied for Mach numbers ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 and for various crossflow to free stream unit mass flow ratios. For the 2- by 2-ft and 11- by 11-ft wall configurations, these ratios ranged from 0 to 0.12 and from 0 to 0.07, respectively. Most notably, for both wall configurations, the pressure-drop coefficient across the wall was nonlinear with mass flow and invariant with Mach number.

  7. Propeller propulsion integration, phase 1. [conducted in langley 30 by 60 foot full scale wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, G.; Koenig, K.; Miley, S. J.; Mcwhorter, J.; Wells, G.

    1981-01-01

    A bibliography was compiled of all readily available sources of propeller analytical and experimental studies conducted during the 1930 through 1960 period. A propeller test stand was developed for the measurement of thrust and torque characteristics of full scale general aviation propellers and installed in the LaRC 30 x 60 foot full scale wind tunnel. A tunnel entry was made during the January through February 1980 period. Several propellers were tested, but unforseen difficulties with the shaft thrust torque balance severely degraded the data quality.

  8. NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    This manual describes the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Research Center and provides information for users who wish to conduct experiments in this atmospheric facility. Tunnel variables such as pressures, temperatures, available tests section area, and Mach number ranges (0.05 to 0.20) are discussed. In addition, general support systems such as air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, laser system, flow visualization system, and model support systems are described. Instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems are also discussed.

  9. The Acoustic Environment of the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel is an acoustic testing facility with a long history of aircraft propulsion noise research. Due to interest in renovating the facility to support future testing of advanced quiet engine designs, a study was conducted to document the background noise level in the facility and investigate the sources of contaminating noise. The anechoic quality of the facility was also investigated using an interrupted noise method. The present report discusses these aspects of the noise environment in this facility.

  10. Uncertainty Analysis of NASA Glenn's 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Julia E.; Hubbard, Erin P.; Walter, Joel A.; McElroy, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the measurement uncertainty of the Mach Number of the 8- by 6-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper details the analysis process used, including methods for handling limited data and complicated data correlations. Due to the complexity of the equations used, a Monte Carlo Method was utilized for this uncertainty analysis. A summary of the findings are presented as pertains to understanding what the uncertainties are, how they impact various research tests in the facility, and methods of reducing the uncertainties in the future.

  11. Phase 2 and 3 wind tunnel tests of the J-97 powered, external augmentor V/STOL model. [at Ames 40 by 80 wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, D. B.; Harris, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Static and forward speed tests were made in a 40 multiplied by 80 foot wind tunnel of a large-scale, ejector-powered V/STOL aircraft model. Modifications were made to the model following earlier tests primarily to improve longitudinal acceleration capability during transition from hovering to wingborne flight. A rearward deflection of the fuselage augmentor thrust vector was shown to be beneficial in this regard. Other augmentor modifications were tested, notably the removal of both endplates, which improved acceleration performance at the higher transition speeds. The model tests again demonstrated minimal interference of the fuselage augmentor on aerodynamic lift. A flapped canard surface also showed negligible influence on the performance of the wing and of the fuselage augmentor.

  12. Supersonic Retropropulsion Experimental Results from the NASA Ames 9- x 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic retropropulsion was experimentally examined in the Ames Research Center 9x7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 1.8 and 2.4. The experimental model, previously designed for and tested in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach 2.4, 3.5 and 4.6, was a 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody with a 9.55-in long cylindrical aftbody. The forebody was designed to accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, one on the model centerline and the other three on the half radius spaced 120-deg apart. Surface pressure and flow visualization were the primary measurements, including high-speed data to investigate the dynamics of the interactions between the bow and nozzle shocks. Three blowing configurations were tested with thrust coefficients up to 10 and angles of attack up to 20-deg. Preliminary results and observations from the test are provided

  13. A Summary of the Experimental Results for a Generic Tractor-Trailer in the Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot and 12-Foot Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce L.; Satran, Dale R.; Heineck, James T.; Walker, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental measurements of a generic tractor-trailer were obtained in two wind tunnels at Ames Research Center. After a preliminary study at atmospheric conditions in the 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel, additional testing was conducted at Reynolds numbers corresponding to full-scale highway speeds in the 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel. To facilitate computational modeling, the 1:8-scale geometry, designated the Generic Conventional Model, included a simplified underbody and omitted many small-scale details. The measurements included overall and component forces and moments, static and dynamic surface pressures, and three-component particle image velocimetry. This summary report highlights the effects of numerous drag reduction concepts and provides details of the model installation in both wind tunnels. To provide a basis for comparison, the wind-averaged drag coefficient was tabulated for all configurations tested. Relative to the baseline configuration representative of a modern class-8 tractor-trailer, the most effective concepts were the trailer base flaps and trailer belly box providing a drag-coefficient reduction of 0.0855 and 0.0494, respectively. Trailer side skirts were less effective yielding a drag reduction of 0.0260. The database of this experimental effort is publicly available for further analysis.

  14. Flow Quality Measurements in the NASA Ames Upgraded 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaya, Max A.; Murthy, Sreedhara V.; George, M. W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the many upgrades designed and implemented in the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel over the past few years, several directly affect flow quality in the test section: a turbulence reduction system with a honeycomb and two screens, a flow smoothing system in the back leg diffusers, an improved drive motor control system, and a full replacement set of composite blades for the compressor. Prior to the shut-down of the tunnel for construction activities, an 8-foot span rake populated with flow instrumentation was traversed in the test section to fully document the flow quality and establish a baseline against which the upgrades could be characterized. A similar set of measurements was performed during the recent integrated system test trials, but the scope was somewhat limited in accordance with the primary objective of such tests, namely to return the tunnel to a fully operational status. These measurements clearly revealed substantial improvements in flow angularity and significant reductions in turbulence level for both full-span and semi-span testing configurations, thus making the flow quality of the tunnel one of the best among existing transonic facilities.

  15. New Model Exhaust System Supports Testing in NASA Lewis' 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeder, James W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    In early 1996, the ability to run NASA Lewis Research Center's Abe Silverstein 10- by 10- Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10) at subsonic test section speeds was reestablished. Taking advantage of this new speed range, a subsonic research test program was scheduled for the 10x10 in the fall of 1996. However, many subsonic aircraft test models require an exhaust source to simulate main engine flow, engine bleed flows, and other phenomena. This was also true of the proposed test model, but at the time the 10x10 did not have a model exhaust capability. So, through an in-house effort over a period of only 5 months, a new model exhaust system was designed, installed, checked out, and made ready in time to support the scheduled test program.

  16. User manual for NASA Lewis 10 by 10 foot supersonic wind tunnel. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1995-01-01

    This manual describes the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center and provides information for users who wish to conduct experiments in this facility. Tunnel performance operating envelopes of altitude, dynamic pressure, Reynolds number, total pressure, and total temperature as a function of test section Mach number are presented. Operating envelopes are shown for both the aerodynamic (closed) cycle and the propulsion (open) cycle. The tunnel test section Mach number range is 2.0 to 3.5. General support systems, such as air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, fuel system, and Schlieren system, are described. Instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems are also described. Pretest meeting formats and schedules are outlined. Tunnel user responsibility and personnel safety are also discussed.

  17. Background Pressure Profiles for Sonic Boom Vehicle Testing in the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Shaw, Stephen; Adamson, Eric; Simerly, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify test facilities that offer sonic boom measurement capabilities, an exploratory test program was initiated using wind tunnels at NASA research centers. The subject of this report is the sonic boom pressure rail data collected in the Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose is to summarize the lessons learned based on the test activity, specifically relating to collecting sonic boom data which has a large amount of spatial pressure variation. The wind tunnel background pressure profiles are presented as well as data which demonstrated how both wind tunnel Mach number and model support-strut position affected the wind tunnel background pressure profile. Techniques were developed to mitigate these effects and are presented.

  18. Acoustical properties of materials and muffler configurations for the 80 by 120 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.; Sneddon, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques for measuring the impedance of the muffler configurations and of porous plates with grazing flow were investigated and changes in the configuration parameters to enhance acoustic performance are explored. The feasibility of a pulse reflection technique for measuring the impedance of built-up structures in situ was demonstrated. A second technique involving the use of an open-end impedance tube with grazing flow was used to obtain detailed design data for the perforated plate configuration. Acoustic benefits associated with configuration changes such as curving the baffles, spacing and staggering baffle partitions, and techniques for alleviating baffle self-generated noise are described.

  19. Calibration of the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1996 and 1997 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen

    2012-01-01

    There were several physical and operational changes made to the NASA Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel during the period of 1992 through 1996. Following each of these changes, a facility calibration was conducted to provide the required information to support the research test programs. Due to several factors (facility research test schedule, facility downtime and continued facility upgrades), a full test section calibration was not conducted until 1996. This calibration test incorporated all test section configurations and covered the existing operating range of the facility. However, near the end of that test entry, two of the vortex generators mounted on the compressor exit tailcone failed causing minor damage to the honeycomb flow straightener. The vortex generators were removed from the facility and calibration testing was terminated. A follow-up test entry was conducted in 1997 in order to fully calibrate the facility without the effects of the vortex generators and to provide a complete calibration of the newly expanded low speed operating range. During the 1997 tunnel entry, all planned test points required for a complete test section calibration were obtained. This data set included detailed in-plane and axial flow field distributions for use in quantifying the test section flow quality.

  20. Acoustical evaluation of the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The test section of the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel was acoustically treated to allow the measurement of acoustic sources located within the tunnel test section under simulated free field conditions. The treatment was designed for high sound absorption at frequencies above 250 Hz and to withstand tunnel airflow velocities up to 0.2 Mach. Evaluation tests with no tunnel airflow were conducted in the test section to assess the performance of the installed treatment. This performance would not be significantly affected by low speed airflow. Time delay spectrometry tests showed that interference ripples in the incident signal resulting from reflections occurring within the test section average from 1.7 dB to 3.2 dB wide over a 500 to 5150 Hz frequency range. Late reflections, from upstream and downstream of the test section, were found to be insignificant at the microphone measuring points. For acoustic sources with low directivity characteristics, decay with distance measurements in the test section showed that incident free field behavior can be measured on average with an accuracy of +/- 1.5 dB or better at source frequencies from 400 Hz to 10 kHz. The free field variations are typically much smaller with an omnidirectional source.

  1. New Test Section Installed in NASA Lewis' 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x1) is a critical facility that fulfills the needs of important national programs. This tunnel supports supersonic and hypersonic research test projects for NASA, for other Government agencies, and for industry, such as the High Speed Research (HSR) and Space Transportation Technologies (STT) programs. The 1x1, which is located in Lewis' Building 37, Cell 1NW, was built in 1954 and was upgraded to provide Mach 6.0 capability in 1989. Since 1954, only minor improvements had been made to the test section. To improve the 1x1's capabilities and meet the needs of these programs, Lewis recently redesigned and replaced the test section. The new test section has interchangeable window and wall inserts that allow easier and faster test configuration changes, thereby improving the adaptability and productivity of this highly utilized facility. In addition, both the wall and window areas are much larger. The larger walls provide more flexibility in how models are mounted and instrumented. The new window design vastly increases optical access to the research test hardware, which makes the use of advanced flow-visualization systems more effective.

  2. Check Calibration of the NASA Glenn 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (2014 Test Entry)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Aaron; Pastor-Barsi, Christine; Arrington, E. Allen

    2016-01-01

    A check calibration of the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) was conducted in May/June 2014 using an array of five supersonic wedge probes to verify the 1999 Calibration. This check calibration was necessary following a control systems upgrade and an integrated systems test (IST). This check calibration was required to verify the tunnel flow quality was unchanged by the control systems upgrade prior to the next test customer beginning their test entry. The previous check calibration of the tunnel occurred in 2007, prior to the Mars Science Laboratory test program. Secondary objectives of this test entry included the validation of the new Cobra data acquisition system (DAS) against the current Escort DAS and the creation of statistical process control (SPC) charts through the collection of series of repeated test points at certain predetermined tunnel parameters. The SPC charts secondary objective was not completed due to schedule constraints. It is hoped that this effort will be readdressed and completed in the near future.

  3. Softwall acoustical characteristics and measurement capabilities of the NASA Lewis 9x15 foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rentz, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustical characteristics and source directionality measurement capabilities of the wind tunnel in the softwall configuration were evaluated, using aerodynamically clean microphone supports. The radius of measurement was limited by the size of the test section, instead of the 3.0 foot (1 m) limitation of the hardwall test section. The wind-on noise level in the test section was reduced 10 dB. Reflections from the microphone support boom, after absorptive covering, induced measurement errors in the lower frequency bands. Reflections from the diffuser back wall were shown to be significant. Tunnel noise coming up the diffuser was postulated as being responsible, at least partially, for the wind-on noise in the test section and settling chamber. The near field characteristics of finite-sized sources and the theoretical response of a porous strip sensor in the presence of wind are presented.

  4. One-fiftieth scale model studies of 40-by 80-foot and 80-by 120-foot wind tunnel complex at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gene I.; Rossow, Vernon J.; Vanaken, Johannes M.; Parrish, Cynthia L.

    1987-01-01

    The features of a 1/50-scale model of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex are first described. An overview is then given of some results from the various tests conducted with the model to aid in the design of the full-scale facility. It was found that the model tunnel simulated accurately many of the operational characteristics of the full-scale circuits. Some characteristics predicted by the model were, however, noted to differ from previous full-scale results by about 10%.

  5. Parametric Inlet Tested in Glenn's 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Davis, David O.; Solano, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    The Parametric Inlet is an innovative concept for the inlet of a gas-turbine propulsion system for supersonic aircraft. The concept approaches the performance of past inlet concepts, but with less mechanical complexity, lower weight, and greater aerodynamic stability and safety. Potential applications include supersonic cruise aircraft and missiles. The Parametric Inlet uses tailored surfaces to turn the incoming supersonic flow inward toward an axis of symmetry. The terminal shock spans the opening of the subsonic diffuser leading to the engine. The external cowl area is smaller, which reduces cowl drag. The use of only external supersonic compression avoids inlet unstart--an unsafe shock instability present in previous inlet designs that use internal supersonic compression. This eliminates the need for complex mechanical systems to control unstart, which reduces weight. The conceptual design was conceived by TechLand Research, Inc. (North Olmsted, OH), which received funding through NASA s Small-Business Innovation Research program. The Boeing Company (Seattle, WA) also participated in the conceptual design. The NASA Glenn Research Center became involved starting with the preliminary design of a model for testing in Glenn s 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10 10 SWT). The inlet was sized for a speed of Mach 2.35 while matching requirements of an existing cold pipe used in previous inlet tests. The parametric aspects of the model included interchangeable components for different cowl lip, throat slot, and sidewall leading-edge shapes and different vortex generator configurations. Glenn researchers used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools for three-dimensional, turbulent flow analysis to further refine the aerodynamic design.

  6. Comparison of propeller cruise noise data taken in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel with other tunnel and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James

    1989-01-01

    The noise of advanced high speed propeller models measured in the NASA 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel has been compared with model propeller noise measured in another tunnel and with full-scale propeller noise measured in flight. Good agreement was obtained for the noise of a model counterrotation propeller tested in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel and in the acoustically treated test section of the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel. This good agreement indicates the relative validity of taking cruise noise data on a plate in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel compared with the free-field method in the Boeing tunnel. Good agreement was also obtained for both single rotation and counter-rotation model noise comparisons with full-scale propeller noise in flight. The good scale model to full-scale comparisons indicate both the validity of the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel data and the ability to scale to full size. Boundary layer refraction on the plate provides a limitation to the measurement of forward arc noise in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel at the higher harmonics of the blade passing tone. The sue of a validated boundary layer refraction model to adjust the data could remove this limitation.

  7. Comparison of propeller cruise noise data taken in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel with other tunnel and flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.

    1989-01-01

    The noise of advanced high speed propeller models measured in the NASA 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel has been compared with model propeller noise measured in another tunnel and with full-scale propeller noise measured in flight. Good agreement was obtained for the noise of a model counterrotation propeller tested in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel and in the acoustically treated test section of the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel. This good agreement indicates the relative validity of taking cruise noise data on a plate in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel compared with the free-field method in the Boeing tunnel. Good agreement was also obtained for both single rotation and counter-rotation model noise comparisons with full-scale propeller noise in flight. The good scale model to full-scale comparisons indicate both the validity of the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel data and the ability to scale to full size. Boundary layer refraction on the plate provides a limitation to the measurement of forward arc noise in the 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel at the higher harmonics of the blade passing tone. The use of a validated boundary layer refraction model to adjust the data could remove this limitation.

  8. Revalidation of the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel with a Commercial Airplane Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmak, Frank J.; Hudgins, M.; Hergert, D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 11-By 11-Foot Transonic leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve tunnel performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Wind tunnel tests to demonstrate the readiness of the tunnel for a return to production operations included an Integrated Systems Test (IST), calibration tests, and airplane validation tests. One of the two validation tests was a 0.037-scale Boeing 777 model that was previously tested in the 11-By 11-Foot tunnel in 1991. The objective of the validation tests was to compare pre-modernization and post-modernization results from the same airplane model in order to substantiate the operational readiness of the facility. Evaluation of within-test, test-to-test, and tunnel-to-tunnel data repeatability were made to study the effects of the tunnel modifications. Tunnel productivity was also evaluated to determine the readiness of the facility for production operations. The operation of the facility, including model installation, tunnel operations, and the performance of tunnel systems, was observed and facility deficiency findings generated. The data repeatability studies and tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons demonstrated outstanding data repeatability and a high overall level of data quality. Despite some operational and facility problems, the validation test was successful in demonstrating the readiness of the facility to perform production airplane wind tunnel%, tests.

  9. The Aerodynamic Drag of Flying-boat Hull Model as Measured in the NACA 20-foot Wind Tunnel I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P

    1935-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic drag were made in the 20-foot wind tunnel on a representative group of 11 flying-boat hull models. Four of the models were modified to investigate the effect of variations in over-all height, contours of deck, depth of step, angle of afterbody keel, and the addition of spray strips and windshields. The results of these tests, which cover a pitch-angle range from -5 to 10 degrees, are presented in a form suitable for use in performance calculations and for design purposes.

  10. Turbofan Noise Studied in Unique Model Research Program in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive aeroacoustic research program called the Source Diagnostic Test was recently concluded in NASA Glenn Research Center's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The testing involved representatives from Glenn, NASA Langley Research Center, GE Aircraft Engines, and the Boeing Company. The technical objectives of this research were to identify the different source mechanisms of noise in a modern, high-bypass turbofan aircraft engine through scale-model testing and to make detailed acoustic and aerodynamic measurements to more fully understand the physics of how turbofan noise is generated.

  11. XV-3 in Ames Reseach Center 40x80ft wind tunnel with K. Edenborough and B. Ramsey, engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    XV-3 in Ames Reseach Center 40x80ft wind tunnel with K. Edenborough and B. Ramsey, engineers Published in The History of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft (from Concept to Flight NASA SP-2000-4517)

  12. Improving Large-Scale Testing Capability by Modifying the 40- by 80-ft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mort, Kenneth W.; Soderman, Paul T.; Eckert, William T.

    1979-01-01

    Interagency studies conducted during the last several years have indicated the need to Improve full-scale testing capabilities. The studies showed that the most effective trade between test capability and facility cost was provided by re-powering the existing Ames Research Center 40- by 80-ft Wind Tunnel to Increase the maximum speed from about 100 m/s (200 knots) lo about 150 m/s (300 knots) and by adding a new 24- by 37-m (80- by 120-ft) test section powered for about a 50-m/s (100-knot) maximum speed. This paper reviews the design of the facility, a few or its capabilities, and some of its unique features.

  13. Adjoint Method and Predictive Control for 1-D Flow in NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ardema, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling method and a new optimal control approach to investigate a Mach number control problem for the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The flow in the wind tunnel is modeled by the 1-D unsteady Euler equations whose boundary conditions prescribe a controlling action by a compressor. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system whose dynamics are modeled by ordinary differential equations. The resulting Euler equations are thus coupled to the ordinary differential equations via the boundary conditions. Optimality conditions are established by an adjoint method and are used to develop a model predictive linear-quadratic optimal control for regulating the Mach number due to a test model disturbance during a continuous pitch

  14. Analytical Models for Rotor Test Module, Strut, and Balance Frame Dynamics in the 40 by 80 Ft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for the dynamics of a wind tunnel support system consisting of a balance frame, struts, and an aircraft or test module. Data are given for several rotor test modules in the Ames 40 by 80 ft wind tunnel. A model for ground resonance calculations is also described.

  15. Space Launch System Liftoff and Transition Aerodynamic Characterization in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Erickson, Gary E.; Paulson, John W.; Tomek, William G.; Bennett, David W.; Blevins, John A.

    2015-01-01

    A 1.75% scale force and moment model of the Space Launch System was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to quantify the aerodynamic forces that will be experienced by the launch vehicle during its liftoff and transition to ascent flight. The test consisted of two parts: the first was dedicated to measuring forces and moments for the entire range of angles of attack (0deg to 90deg) and roll angles (0 deg. to 360 deg.). The second was designed to measure the aerodynamic effects of the liftoff tower on the launch vehicle for ground winds from all azimuthal directions (0 deg. to 360 deg.), and vehicle liftoff height ratios from 0 to 0.94. This wind tunnel model also included a set of 154 surface static pressure ports. Details on the experimental setup, and results from both parts of testing are presented, along with a description of how the wind tunnel data was analyzed and post-processed in order to develop an aerodynamic database. Finally, lessons learned from experiencing significant dynamics in the mid-range angles of attack due to steady asymmetric vortex shedding are presented.

  16. Reflective Focused Schlieren System Improved for Use in 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Gary Scott

    2000-01-01

    The reflective focused schlieren system that was developed for use in the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field as part of the Unstart Test Program was improved this past year. In April 1999, the development and use of the system was presented at the Supersonic Tunnel Association International in Bedford, England. A focused schlieren system is similar to a standard schlieren system in that shock waves coming from an object in supersonic flow can be seen using a standard video camera. Unlike the standard schlieren system, which produces a two-dimensional schlieren image, a focused schlieren system can produce a threedimensional image. The preceding drawing shows the components of the reflective focused schlieren system being developed for use in the 10x10 SWT. Although the system worked well for the Unstart Test Program, it was not sensitive enough to be classified as a facility capability. Therefore, a program was implemented to improve the sensitivity of the reflective focused schlieren system so that it could be a facility capability for Glenn's 10x10 SWT. Several techniques were implemented to increase the sensitivity and to improve the overall operation of the system. These included refinement of the source grid, improvement in the cutoff grid production, improvement of the source grid and cutoff grid alignment, installation of an improved light source, and incorporation of an image-enhancing system. These changes are being implemented with the system set up in the laboratory. A checkout test of the system is planned in the 10x10 SWT in March 2000. Of these techniques, the most developed is the refinement of the source grid. The original system had a pattern of -in. by -in. squares on -in. centers (distance between the center points of adjacent squares). This gave a ratio of light to dark (reflective to nonreflective area) of 3:1. The recommended ratio is 1:1. In order to accomplish this, a pattern of

  17. Large-Scale Boundary-Layer Control Tests on Two Wings in the NACA 20-Foot Wind Tunnel, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Hugh B.

    1935-01-01

    Tests were made in the N.A.C.A. 20-foot wind tunnel on: (1) a wing, of 6.5-foot span, 5.5-foot chord, and 30 percent maximum thickness, fitted with large end plates and (2) a 16-foot span 2.67-foot chord wing of 15 percent maximum thickness to determine the increase in lift obtainable by removing the boundary layer and the power required for the blower. The results of the tests on the stub wing appeared more favorable than previous small-scale tests and indicated that: (1) the suction method was considerably superior to the pressure method, (2) single slots were more effective than multiple slots (where the same pressure was applied to all slots), the slot efficiency increased rapidly for increasing slot widths up to 2 percent of the wing chord and remained practically constant for all larger widths tested, (3) suction pressure and power requirements were quite low (a computation for a light airplane showed that a lift coefficient of 3.0 could be obtained with a suction as low as 2.3 times the dynamic pressure and a power expenditure less than 3 percent of the rated engine power), and (4) the volume of air required to be drawn off was quite high (approximately 0.5 cubic feet per second per unit wing area for an airplane landing at 40 miles per hour with a lift coefficient of 3,0), indicating that considerable duct area must be provided in order to prevent flow losses inside the wing and insure uniform distribution of suction along the span. The results from the tests of the large-span wing were less favorable than those on the stub wing. The reasons for this were, probably: (1) the uneven distribution of suction along the span, (2) the flow losses inside the wing, (3) the small radius of curvature of the leading edge of the wing section, and (4) the low Reynolds Number of these tests, which was about one half that of the stub wing. The results showed a large increase in the maximum lift coefficient with an increase in Reynolds Number in the range of the tests. The

  18. Wind tunnel performance of four energy efficient propellers designed for Mach 0.8 cruise. [Lewis 8x6 foot wind tunnel studies for noise reduction in high speed turboprop aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeracki, R. J.; Mikkelson, D. C.; Blaha, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    Several advanced aerodynamic and acoustic concepts were investigated in recent wind tunnel tests performed in the NASA-Lewis Research Center 8x6 foot wind tunnel. These concepts included aerodynamically integrated propeller/nacelles, area-ruling, blade sweep, reduced blade thickness, and power (disk) loadings several times higher than conventional designs. Four eight-bladed propeller models were tested to determine aerodynamic performance. Relative noise measurements were made on three of the models at cruise conditions. Three of the models were designed with swept blades and one with straight blades. At the design Mach number of 0.8, power coefficient of 1.7, and advance ratio of 3.06, the straight bladed model had the lowest net efficiency of 75.8 percent. Increasing the sweep to 30 deg improved the performance to near 77 percent. Installation of an area-ruled spinner on a 30 deg sweep model further improved the efficiency to about 78 percent. The model with the highest blade sweep (45 deg) and an area-ruled spinner had the highest net efficiency of 78.7 percent, and at lower power loadings the efficiency exceeded 80 percent. At lower Mach numbers the 30 deg swept model had the highest efficiency. Values near 81 percent were obtained for the design loading at speeds to Mach 0.7. Relative noise measurements indicated that the acoustically designed 45 deg sweep model reduced the near field cruise noise by between 5 and 6 dB.

  19. Pratt & Whitney Two Dimensional HSR Nozzle Test in the NASA Lewis 9- By 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel: Aerodynamic Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, John D.; Jones, Christopher W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a test that was conducted jointly by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines and NASA Lewis Research Center. The test was conducted in NASA's 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9x15 LSWT). The test setup, methods, and aerodynamic results of this test are discussed. Acoustical results are discussed in a separate paper by J. Bridges and J. Marino.

  20. Investigation in the 7-by-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators within an Airplane Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A; Recant, Isidore G

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord wing model with a duct to house a simulated radiator suitable for a liquid-cooled engine. The duct was expanded to reduce the radiator losses, and the installation of the duct and radiator was made entirely within the wing to reduce form and interference drag. The tests were made using a two-dimensional-flow setup with a full-span duct and radiator. Section aerodynamic characteristics of the basic airfoil are given and also curves showing the characteristics of the various duct-radiator combinations. An expression for efficiency, the primary criterion of merit of any duct, and the effect of the several design parameters of the duct-radiator arrangement are discussed. The problem of throttling is considered and a discussion of the power required for cooling is included.

  1. Hardwall acoustical characteristics and measurement capabilities of the NASA Lewis 9 x 15 foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rentz, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental evaluations of the acoustical characteristics and source sound power and directionality measurement capabilities of the NASA Lewis 9 x 15 foot low speed wind tunnel in the untreated or hardwall configuration were performed. The results indicate that source sound power estimates can be made using only settling chamber sound pressure measurements. The accuracy of these estimates, expressed as one standard deviation, can be improved from + or - 4 db to + or - 1 db if sound pressure measurements in the preparation room and diffuser are also used and source directivity information is utilized. A simple procedure is presented. Acceptably accurate measurements of source direct field acoustic radiation were found to be limited by the test section reverberant characteristics to 3.0 feet for omni-directional and highly directional sources. Wind-on noise measurements in the test section, settling chamber and preparation room were found to depend on the sixth power of tunnel velocity. The levels were compared with various analytic models. Results are presented and discussed.

  2. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Feet » Foot Health Information Surgery When is Foot Surgery Necessary? Many foot problems do not respond ... restore the function of your foot. Types of Foot Surgery Fusions: Fusions are usually performed to treat ...

  3. Effect of wind and altitude on record performance in foot races, pole vault, and long jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1985-08-01

    Using only elementary physics, one can estimate the effect of wind and altitude on performance in several track and field events. Experiments have shown that the power lost to aerodynamic drag forces is about a tenth of the total power expended in running at sprint speeds. From this observation one can calculate the effect of wind or of air density changes on sprinting speed. In pole vaulting, the sprinter converts his kinetic energy into potential energy to clear the bar. In long jumping, he is a projectile, but he is prevented from reaching his optimum distance expected for his initial velocity by the height which he can attain during his jump. For each of these events, performance in moderate winds of 2.0 m/s or at altitudes comparable to Mexico City differ by several percent from performances at sea level or in still air. In longer running races and in bicycle races, aerodynamic forces play an important role in racing strategy. However, since the athletes perform in groups it is difficult to calculate the effect on individual performances.

  4. Experimental investigation of the subsonic high-altitude operation of the NASA Lewis 10- by 10-foot supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA Lewis 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel during subsonic tunnel operation in the aerodynamic cycle to determine the test section flow characteristics near the Advanced Turboprop Project propeller model plane of rotation. The investigation used an eight-probe pitot static flow survey rake to measure total and static pressures at two locations in the wind tunnel: the test section and the bellmouth section (upstream of the two-dimensional flexible-wall nozzle). A cone angularity probe was used to measure any flow angularity in the test section. The evaluation was conducted at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.35 and at three operating altitudes from 2,000 to 50,000 ft. which correspond to tunnel reference total pressures from 1960 to 245 psfa, respectively. The results of this experimental investigation indicate a total-pressure loss area in the center of the test section and a static-pressure gradient from the test section centerline to the wall. These total and static pressure differences were observed at all tunnel operating altitudes and diminished at lower tunnel velocities. The total-pressure loss area was also found in the bellmouth section, which indicates that the loss mechanism is not the tunnel flexible-wall nozzle. The flow in the test section is essentially axial since very small flow angles were measured. The results also indicate that a correction to the tunnel total and static pressures must be applied in order to determine accurate freestream conditions at the test section centerline.

  5. Enabling Advanced Wind-Tunnel Research Methods Using the NASA Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busan, Ronald C.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Croom, Mark A.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Grafton, Sue B.; O-Neal, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Design of Experiment (DOE) testing methods were used to gather wind tunnel data characterizing the aerodynamic and propulsion forces and moments acting on a complex vehicle configuration with 10 motor-driven propellers, 9 control surfaces, a tilt wing, and a tilt tail. This paper describes the potential benefits and practical implications of using DOE methods for wind tunnel testing - with an emphasis on describing how it can affect model hardware, facility hardware, and software for control and data acquisition. With up to 23 independent variables (19 model and 2 tunnel) for some vehicle configurations, this recent test also provides an excellent example of using DOE methods to assess critical coupling effects in a reasonable timeframe for complex vehicle configurations. Results for an exploratory test using conventional angle of attack sweeps to assess aerodynamic hysteresis is summarized, and DOE results are presented for an exploratory test used to set the data sampling time for the overall test. DOE results are also shown for one production test characterizing normal force in the Cruise mode for the vehicle.

  6. A three-dimensional orthogonal laser velocimeter for the NASA Ames 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Cooper, Donald L.

    1995-01-01

    A three-component dual-beam laser-velocimeter system has been designed, fabricated, and implemented in the 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The instrument utilizes optical access from both sides and the top of the test section, and is configured for uncoupled orthogonal measurements of the three Cartesian coordinates of velocity. Bragg cell optics are used to provide fringe velocity bias. Modular system design provides great flexibility in the location of sending and receiving optics to adapt to specific experimental requirements. Near-focus Schmidt-Cassegrain optic modules may be positioned for collection of forward or backward scattered light over a large solid angle, and may be clustered to further increase collection solid angle. Multimode fiber optics transmit collected light to the photomultiplier tubes for processing. Counters are used to process the photomultiplier signals and transfer the processed data digitally via buffered interface controller to the host MS-DOS computer. Considerable data reduction and graphical display programming permit on-line control of data acquisition and evaluation of the incoming data. This paper describes this system in detail and presents sample data illustrating the system's capability.

  7. Acoustic Data Processing and Transient Signal Analysis for the Hybrid Wing Body 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    An advanced vehicle concept, the HWB N2A-EXTE aircraft design, was tested in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study its acoustic characteristics for var- ious propulsion system installation and airframe con gurations. A signi cant upgrade to existing data processing systems was implemented, with a focus on portability and a re- duction in turnaround time. These requirements were met by updating codes originally written for a cluster environment and transferring them to a local workstation while en- abling GPU computing. Post-test, additional processing of the time series was required to remove transient hydrodynamic gusts from some of the microphone time series. A novel automated procedure was developed to analyze and reject contaminated blocks of data, under the assumption that the desired acoustic signal of interest was a band-limited sta- tionary random process, and of lower variance than the hydrodynamic contamination. The procedure is shown to successfully identify and remove contaminated blocks of data and retain the desired acoustic signal. Additional corrections to the data, mainly background subtraction, shear layer refraction calculations, atmospheric attenuation and microphone directivity corrections, were all necessary for initial analysis and noise assessments. These were implemented for the post-processing of spectral data, and are shown to behave as expected.

  8. Acoustic evaluation of the Helmholtz resonator treatment in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Gordon, Elliot B.

    1989-01-01

    The acoustic consequences of sealing the Helmholtz resonators of the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT) were experimentally evaluated. This resonator sealing was proposed in order to avoid entrapment of hydrogen during tests of advanced hydrogen-fueled engines. The resonators were designed to absorb energy in the 4- to 20-Hz range; thus, this investigation is primarily concerned with infrasound. Limited internal and external noise measurements were made at tunnel Mach numbers ranging from 0.5 to 2.0. Although the resonators were part of the acoustic treatment installed because of a community noise problem their sealing did not seem to indicate a reoccurrence of the problem would result. Two factors were key to this conclusion: (1) A large bulk treatment muffler downstream of the resonators was able to make up for much of the attenuation originally provided by the resonators, and (2) there was no noise source in the tunnel test section. The previous community noise problem occurred when a large ramjet was tested in an open-loop tunnel configuration. If a propulsion system producing high noise levels at frequencies of less than 10 Hz were tested, the conclusion on community noise would have to be reevaluated.

  9. V/STOL Tandem Fan transition section model test. [in the Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkin, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    An approximately 0.25 scale model of the transition section of a tandem fan variable cycle engine nacelle was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel. Two 12-inch, tip-turbine driven fans were used to simulate a tandem fan engine. Three testing modes simulated a V/STOL tandem fan airplane. Parallel mode has two separate propulsion streams for maximum low speed performance. A front inlet, fan, and downward vectorable nozzle forms one stream. An auxilliary top inlet provides air to the aft fan - supplying the core engine and aft vectorable nozzle. Front nozzle and top inlet closure, and removal of a blocker door separating the two streams configures the tandem fan for series mode operations as a typical aircraft propulsion system. Transition mode operation is formed by intermediate settings of the front nozzle, blocker door, and top inlet. Emphasis was on the total pressure recovery and flow distortion at the aft fan face. A range of fan flow rates were tested at tunnel airspeeds from 0 to 240 knots, and angles-of-attack from -10 to 40 deg for all three modes. In addition to the model variables for the three modes, model variants of the top inlet were tested in the parallel mode only. These lip variables were: aft lip boundary layer bleed holes, and Three position turning vane. Also a bellmouth extension of the top inlet side lips was tested in parallel mode.

  10. Background noise levels measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    The acoustic capability of the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel has been significantly improved by reducing the background noise levels measured by in-flow microphones. This was accomplished by incorporating streamlined microphone holders having a profile developed by researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center. These new holders were fabricated for fixed mounting on the tunnel wall and for an axially traversing microphone probe which was mounted to the tunnel floor. Measured in-flow noise levels in the tunnel test section were reduced by about 10 dB with the new microphone holders compared with those measured with the older, less refined microphone holders. Wake interference patterns between fixed wall microphones were measured and resulted in preferred placement patterns for these microphones to minimize these effects. Acoustic data from a model turbofan operating in the tunnel test section showed that results for the fixed and translating microphones were equivalent for common azimuthal angles, suggesting that the translating microphone probe, with its significantly greater angular resolution, is preferred for sideline noise measurements. Fixed microphones can provide a local check on the traversing microphone data quality, and record acoustic performance at other azimuthal angles.

  11. Direct Validation of the Wall Interference Correction System of the Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert; Boone, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Data from the test of a large semispan model was used to perform a direct validation of a wall interference correction system for a transonic slotted wall wind tunnel. At first, different sets of uncorrected aerodynamic coefficients were generated by physically changing the boundary condition of the test section walls. Then, wall interference corrections were computed and applied to all data points. Finally, an interpolation of the corrected aerodynamic coefficients was performed. This interpolation made sure that the corrected Mach number of a given run would be constant. Overall, the agreement between corresponding interpolated lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficient sets was very good. Buoyancy corrections were also investigated. These studies showed that the accuracy goal of one drag count may only be achieved if reliable estimates of the wall interference induced buoyancy correction are available during a test.

  12. Gone with the Wind? Integrity and Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Frances; Katz, Brit

    2011-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina slammed into 80 miles of Mississippi shoreline on August 29, 2005. It was the nation's worst natural disaster, a perfect storm. One hundred sixty miles-per-hour winds sent 55-foot-tall waves and a 30-foot wall of water across the shore and miles inland. It displaced 400,000 residents along the coast of the Mississippi, and…

  13. 80 and 100 Meter Wind Energy Resource Potential for the United States (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Flowers, L.; Brower, M.; Hale, E.; Phelps, B.

    2010-05-01

    Accurate information about the wind potential in each state is required for federal and state policy initiatives that will expand the use of wind energy in the United States. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and AWS Truewind have collaborated to produce the first comprehensive new state-level assessment of wind resource potential since 1993. The estimates are based on high-resolution maps of predicted mean annual wind speeds for the contiguous 48 states developed by AWS Truewind. These maps, at spatial resolution of 200 meters and heights of 60 to 100 meters, were created with a mesoscale-microscale modeling technique and adjusted to reduce errors through a bias-correction procedure involving data from more than 1,000 measurement masts. NREL used the capacity factor maps to estimate the wind energy potential capacity in megawatts for each state by capacity factor ranges. The purpose of this presentation is to (1) inform state and federal policy makers, regulators, developers, and other stakeholders on the availability of the new wind potential information that may influence development, (2) inform the audience of how the new information was derived, and (3) educate the audience on how the information should be interpreted in developing state and federal policy initiatives.

  14. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Athlete's Foot KidsHealth > For Kids > Athlete's Foot Print A A ... a public shower. Why Is It Called Athlete's Foot? Athlete's foot gets its name because athletes often ...

  15. Tests of Submerged Duct Installation on the Ryan FR-1 Airplane in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Norman J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of an NACA submerged intake installation on the Ryan FR-1 was conducted to determine the full-scale aerodynamic characteristics of this installation. In addition, tests were conducted on the submerged inlet with revised entrance lips and deflectors to determine the configuration which would result in the best dynamic pressure recovery measured at the inlet for this installation without a major rework of the entrance. Stalling of the air flow over the inner lip surface created excessive dynamic pressure losses with the original entrance. The revised entrance produced a 12-percent increase in dynamic pressure recovery at the design high-speed inlet-velocity ratio and resulted in an improvement of thte critical-speed characteristics of the entrance lip. A complete redesign of the entrance including a decrease in ramp angle and adjustment of lip camber is necessary to secure optimum results from this submerged duct installation.

  16. Investigation in the 7-By-10 Foot Wind Tunnel of Ducts for Cooling Radiators Within an Airplane Wing, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A.; Recant, Isidore G.

    1938-01-01

    An investigation was made in the NACA 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord wing model with a duct to house a simulated radiator suitable for a liquid-cooled engine. The duct was expanded to reduce the radiator losses, and the installation of the duct and radiator was made entirely within the wing to reduce form and interference drag. The tests were made using a two-dimensional flow set-up with a full-span duct and radiator. Section aerodynamic characteristics of the basic airfoil are given and also curves showing the characteristics of the various duct-radiator combinations. An expression for efficiency, the primary criterion of merit of any duct, and the effect of the several design parameters of the duct-radiator arrangement are discussed. The problem of throttling is considered and a discussion of the power required for cooling is included. It was found that radiators could be mounted in the wing and efficiently pass enough air for cooling with duct outlets located at any point from 0.25c to 0.70c from the wing leading edge on the upper surface. The duct-inlet position was found to be critical and, for maximum efficiency, had to be at the stagnation point of the airfoil and to change with flight attitude. The flow could be efficiently throttled only by a simultaneous variation of duct inlet and outlet sizes and of inlet position. It was desirable to round both inlet and outlet lips. With certain arrangements of duct, the power required for cooling at high speed was a very low percentage of the engine power.

  17. Heat-transfer test results for a .0275-scale space shuttle external tank with a 10 deg/40 deg double cone-ogive nose in the NASA/AMES 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (FH14), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    A .0275 scale forebody model of the new baseline configuration of the space shuttle external tank vent cap configuration was tested to determine the flow field due to the double cone configuration. The tests were conducted in a 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel at alpha = -5 deg, -4.59 deg, 0 deg, 5 deg, and 10 deg; beta = 0 deg, -3 deg, -5.51 deg, -6 deg, -9 deg, and +6 deg; nominal freestream Reynolds numbers per foot of 1.5 x 1 million, 3.0 x 1 million, and 5.0 x 1 million; and a nominal Mach number of 5. Separation and reattached flow from thermocouple data, shadowgraphs, and oil flows indicate that separation begins about 80% from the tip of the 10 deg cone, then reattaches on the vent cap and produces fully turbulent flow over most of the model forebody. The hardware disturbs the flow over a much larger area than present TPS application has assumed. A correction to the flow disturbance was experimentally suggested from the results of an additional test run.

  18. Boundary-Layer Transition on the N.A.C.A. 0012 and 23012 Airfoils in the 8-Foot High-Speed Wind Tunnel, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V.

    1940-01-01

    Determinations of boundary-layer transition on the NACA 0012 and 2301 airfoils were made in the 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel over a range of Reynolds Numbers from 1,600,000 to 16,800,000. The results are of particular significance as compared with flight tests and tests in wind tunnels of appreciable turbulence because of the extremely low turbulence in the high-speed tunnel. A comparison of the results obtained on NACA 0012 airfoils of 2-foot and 5-foot chord at the same Reynolds Number permitted an evaluation of the effect of compressibility on transition. The local skin friction along the surface of the NACA 0012 airfoil was measured at a Reynolds Number of 10,000,000. For all the lift coefficient at which tests were made, transition occurred in the region of estimated laminar separation at the low Reynolds Numbers and approach the point of minimum static pressure as a forward limit at the high Reynolds Numbers. The effect of compressibility on transition was slight. None of the usual parameters describing the local conditions in the boundary layer near the transition point served as an index for locating the transition point. As a consequence of the lower turbulence in the 8-foot high-speed tunnel, the transition points occurred consistently farther back along the chord than those measured in the NACA full-scale tunnel. An empirical relation for estimating the location of the transition point for conventional airfoils on the basis of static-pressure distribution and Reynolds Number is presented.

  19. A full-scale wind tunnel investigation of a helicopter bearingless main rotor. [Ames 40 by 80 Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Mccloud, J. L., II

    1981-01-01

    A helicopter bearingless main rotor was tested. Areas of investigation included aeroelastic stability, aerodynamic performance, and rotor loads as a function of collective pitch setting, RPM, airspeed and shaft angle. The rotor/support system was tested with the wind tunnel balance dampers installed and, subsequently, removed. Modifications to the rotor hub were tested. These included a reduction in the rotor control system stiffness and increased flexbeam structural damping. The primary objective of the test was to determine aeroelastic stability of the fundamental flexbeam/blade chordwise bending mode. The rotor was stable for all conditions. Damping of the rotor chordwise bending mode increases with increased collective pitch angle at constant operating conditions. No significant decrease in rotor damping occured due to frequency coalescence between the blade chordwise fundamental bending mode and the support system.

  20. Comparison between design and installed acoustic characteristics of NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The test section of the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel was acoustically treated to allow the measurement of sound under simulated free-field conditions. The treatment was designed for high sound absorption at frequencies above 250 Hz and for withstanding the environmental conditions in the test section. In order to achieve the design requirements, a fibrous, bulk-absorber material was packed into removable panel sections. Each section was divided into two equal-depth layers packed with material to different bulk densities. The lower density was next to the facing of the treatment. The facing consisted of a perforated plate and screening material layered together. Sample tests for normal-incidence acoustic absorption were also conducted in an impedance tube to provide data to aid in the treatment design. Tests with no airflow, involving the measurement of the absorptive properties of the treatment installed in the 9- by 15-foot wind tunnel test section, combined the use of time-delay spectrometry with a previously established free-field measurement method. This new application of time-delay spectrometry enabled these free-field measurements to be made in nonanechoic conditions. The results showed that the installed acoustic treatment had absorption coefficients greater than 0.95 over the frequency range 250 Hz to 4 kHz. The measurements in the wind tunnel were in good agreement with both the analytical prediction and the impedance tube test data.

  1. United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. Final report May 77-Sep 80

    SciTech Connect

    Kullgren, T.E.; Wiedemeier, D.W.

    1980-09-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, installation and testing of a small variable-speed vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). This VAWT is unique in its installation using hand tools only; unconventional and simple support system; and variable speed operation under microprocessor control. Initial testing confirmed that the turbine can be controlled by commanded alternator field modulation. Further studies will be directed toward determination of an optimum control algorithm.

  2. Dynamic Distortion in a Short S-Shaped Subsonic Diffuser with Flow Separation. [Lewis 8 by 6 foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stumpf, R.; Neumann, H. E.; Giamati, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time varying distortion at the diffuser exit of a subscale HiMAT forebody and inlet was conducted at Mach 0.9 in the Lewis 8 by 6 foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. A transitory separation was detected within the subsonic diffuser. Vortex generators were installed to eliminate the flow separation. Results from a study of the instantaneous pressure variations at the diffuser exit are presented. The time unsteady total pressures at the diffuser exit are computer interpolated and presented in the form of a movie showing the transitory separation. Limited data showing the instantaneous distortion levels is also presented.

  3. WTG Energy Systems' Rotor: Steel at 80 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The design, specifications, and performance of the 80 foot diameter fixed pitch rotor operating on the MP1-200 wind turbine generator installed as part of the Island of Cuttyhunk's electric power utility grid system are described. This synchronous generating system rated 200 kilowatts at 28 mph wind velocity, and produces constant 60 Hz, 480 VAC current at +/- 1 percent accuracy throughout the machine's operating range. Future R & D requirements and suggestions are included with cost data.

  4. Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing Capability Upgraded in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center supports short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) tests in its 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9 x 15 LSWT). As part of a facility capability upgrade, a dynamic actuation system (DAS) was fabricated to enhance the STOVL testing capabilities. The DAS serves as the mechanical interface between the 9 x 15 LSWT test section structure and the STOVL model to be tested. It provides vertical and horizontal translation of the model in the test section and maintains the model attitude (pitch, yaw, and roll) during translation. It also integrates a piping system to supply the model with exhaust and hot air to simulate the inlet suction and nozzle exhausts, respectively. Hot gas ingestion studies have been performed with the facility ground plane installed. The DAS provides vertical (ascent and descent) translation speeds of up to 48 in./s and horizontal translation speeds of up to 12 in./s. Model pitch variations of +/- 7, roll variations of +/- 5, and yaw variations of 0 to 180 deg can be accommodated and are maintained within 0.25 deg throughout the translation profile. The hot air supply, generated by the facility heaters and regulated by control valves, provides three separate temperature zones to the model for STOVL and hot gas ingestion testing. Channels along the supertube provide instrumentation paths from the model to the facility data system for data collection purposes. The DAS is supported by the 9 x 15 LSWT test section ceiling structure. A carriage that rides on two linear rails provides for horizontal translation of the system along the test section longitudinal axis. A vertical translation assembly, consisting of a cage and supertube, is secured to the carriage. The supertube traverses vertically through the cage on a set of linear rails. Both translation axes are hydraulically actuated and provide position and velocity profile control. The lower flange on the supertube serves as the model interface to the DAS. The

  5. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Athlete's Foot What is Athlete's Foot? Athlete's foot is a skin disease caused by a fungus, ... fungus growth. Not all fungus conditions are athlete's foot. Other conditions, such as disturbances of the sweat ...

  6. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat transfer data for the 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 3 are presented. Interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of orbiter alone, tank alone, second, and first stage configurations. The test program was conducted in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 5.3 for nominal free stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1.5, and 5.0 million.

  7. Results of the AFRSI rewaterproofing systems screening test in the NASA/Ames Research Center (ARC) 2 x 2-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Kingsland, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 2x2-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel to evaluate two AFRSI rewaterproofing systems and to investigate films as a means of reducing blanket joint distortion. The wind tunnel wall slot configuration influenced on the flow field over the test panel was investigated; primarily using oil flow data, and resulted in a closed slot configuration to provide a satisfactory screening environment flow field for the test. Sixteen AFRSI test panels, configured to represent the test system or film, were subjected to this screening environment (a flow field of separated and reattached flow at a freestream Mach numnber of 0.65 and q = 650 or 900 psf). Each condition was held until damage to the test article was observed or 55 minutes if no damage was incurred. All objectives related to AFRSI rewaterproofing and to the use of films to stiffen the blanket fibers were achieved.

  8. Athlete's foot

    MedlinePlus

    Tinea pedis; Fungal infection - feet; Tinea of the foot; Infection - fungal - feet; Ringworm - foot ... Athlete's foot is the most common type of tinea infection. The fungus or yeast thrives in warm, ...

  9. Foot Drop

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Foot Drop Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Foot Drop? Foot drop describes the inability to raise ...

  10. Foot Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... toenails straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall ... disease, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Good foot care and regular foot checks are an important ...

  11. Athlete's foot

    MedlinePlus

    Tinea pedis; Fungal infection - feet; Tinea of the foot; Infection - fungal - feet; Ringworm - foot ... Athlete's foot occurs when a certain fungus or yeast grows on the skin of your feet. The same fungus ...

  12. A concept study of a carbon spar cap design for a 80m wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosemeier, M.; Bätge, M.

    2014-06-01

    The buckling resistance is a key design driver for large wind turbine blades with a significant influence on the material costs. During the structural design process the choice was made for carbon spar caps and two shear webs, which were set relatively far apart in order to stabilize the panels. This design presented a major challenge for the stability of the spar caps. The topology of these spar caps has been modified with regard to stability, comparing a continuous spar cap with split spar cap concepts and considering both lay-ups with hybrid carbon glass spar caps or sandwich concepts. Within those concepts, parametric studies were conducted varying different geometrical parameters of the spar caps and its layups. In order to determine the buckling resistance of the spar cap, an analytical model considering a 2D cross section discretized blade model was utilized to select the basic concept, after which a 3D numerical finite element model taking the whole blade into account was used to evaluate the chosen design concepts. The stability limit state analysis was conducted according to the certification scheme of GL guideline 2012. The various concepts were evaluated based on the blade's mass, tip deflection and modal properties. The results of this design process of the spar caps and the evaluation of the used analysis tools are presented within the paper.

  13. 3D Blade Vibration Measurements on an 80 m Diameter Wind Turbine by Using Non-contact Remote Measurement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Non-contact optical measurement systems photogrammetry and laser interferometry are introduced as cost efficient alternatives to the conventional wind turbine/farm monitoring systems that are currently in use. The proposed techniques are proven to provide an accurate measurement of the dynamic behavior of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine. Several measurements are taken on the test turbine by using 4 CCD cameras and 1 laser vibrometer and the response of the turbine is monitored from a distance of 220 m. The results of the infield tests and the corresponding analyses show that photogrammetry (also can be called as videogrammetry or computer vision technique) enable the 3D deformations of the rotor to be measured at 33 different points simultaneously with an average accuracy of ±25 mm, while the turbine is rotating. Several important turbine modes can also be extracted from the recorded data. Similarly, laser interferometry (used for the parked turbine only) provides very valuable information on the dynamic properties of the turbine structure. Twelve different turbine modes can be identified from the obtained response data.

  14. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Constructing the forms for the foundation of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000. The first step was to pour the foundation for the tunnel and the housing which would encase the wind tunnel.

  15. Full scale wind tunnel investigation of a bearingless main helicopter rotor. [Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel test using the BO-105 helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A stability test program was conducted to determine the effects of airspeed, collective pitch, rotor speed and shaft angle on stability and loads at speeds beyond that attained in the BMR/BO-105 flight test program. Loads and performance data were gathered at forward speeds up to 165 knots. The effect of cyclic pitch perturbations on rotor response was investigated at simulated level flight conditions. Two configuration variations were tested for their effect on stability. One variable was the control system stiffness. An axially softer pitch link was installed in place of the standard BO-105 pitch link. The second variation was the addition of elastomeric damper strips to increase the structural damping. The BMR was stable at all conditions tested. At fixed collective pitch, shaft angle and rotor speed, damping generally increased between hover and 60 knots, remained relatively constant from 60 to 90 knots, then decreased above 90 knots. Analytical predictions are in good agreement with test data up to 90 knots, but the trend of decreasing damping above 90 knots is contrary to the theory.

  16. Phase 2 and 3 wind tunnel tests of the J-97 powered, external augmentor V/STOL model. [conducted in Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    Modifications were made to the model to improve longitudinal acceleration capability during transition from hovering to wing borne flight. A rearward deflection of the fuselage augmentor thrust vector is shown to be beneficial in this regard. Other agmentor modifications were tested, notably the removal of both endplates, which improved acceleration performance at the higher transition speeds. The model tests again demonstrated minimal interference of the fuselage augmentor on aerodynamic lift. A flapped canard surface also shows negligible influence on the performance of the wing and of the fuselage augmentor.

  17. Evaluation of the in-flight noise signature of a 32-chute suppressor nozzle: Acoustic data report. [outdoor static and 40 x 80 ft. wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. T.; Doyle, V. L.

    1977-01-01

    Outdoor static and 40 x 80 FT wind tunnel tests of the J79-15 engine/nacelle system with the conic nozzle and 32-chute exhaust suppressor were conducted to acquire the data necessary to evaluate the simulated in-flight signature of an engine-size 32-chute exhaust nozzle suppressor using the 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel and to study possible engine core noise contamination of the jet signature. The tests are described and and a sampling of the data acquired is presented. Included are aero performance summaries, as-measured and composite 1/3 OBSPL spectra for the 70 ft sideline high and low mics from the outdoor static tests, sideline traverse spectra and internal noise measurements from both the outdoor static and the 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel tests.

  18. 13. 64 foot truss oblique view of the 64 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. 64 foot truss - oblique view of the 64 foot pony truss showing its general configuration. The 80 foot pony trusses are similar. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  19. Results of pressure distribution tests of a 0.010-scale space shuttle orbiter model (61-0) in the NASA/ARC 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (test OH38), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, W. H.; Polek, T.

    1975-01-01

    Test results are presented of hypersonic pressure distributions at simulated atmospheric entry conditions. Pressure data were obtained at Mach numbers of 7.4 and 10.4 and Reynolds numbers of 3.0 and 6.5 million per foot. Data are presented in both plotted and tabulated data form. Photographs of wind tunnel apparatus and test configurations are provided.

  20. Hypersonic aeroheating test of space shuttle vehicle configuration 3 (model 22-OTS) in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH20), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of hypersonic wind tunnel testing of an 0.0175 scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration are presented. Temperature measurements were made on the launch configuration, orbiter plus tank, orbiter alone, tank alone, and solid rocket booster alone to provide heat transfer data. The test was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers of 5.3 and 7.3 and at free-stream Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million, 3.7 million, 5.0 million, and 7.0 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 deg to 20 deg and side slip angles of -5 deg and 0 deg.

  1. Canard-body-tail missile test at angles of attack to 50 deg in the Ames 11-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. Q.; Schwind, R. G.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1978-01-01

    Blunted ogive cylinder missile models with a length-to-diameter ratio of 10.4 were tested at transonic speeds and large angles of attack in an 11 foot transonic wind tunnel. The configurations are: body, body with tail panels, body with canards, and body with canards and tails. Forces and moments from the entire model and each of the eight fins were measured over the pitch range of 20 deg to 50 deg, and roll angles of 0 deg to 45 deg and canard deflection angles between 0 deg and 15 deg. The Reynolds number ranged from 3.9 x 10 to the 6th power per meter. Large side forces and yawing moments were observed for some of the test cases involving a symmetric geometry.

  2. Boundary layer separation on isolated boattail nozzles. M.S. Thesis; [conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, W. K.

    1977-01-01

    The phenomenon of separated flow on a series of circular-arc afterbodies was investigated using the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.95 at 0 deg angle of attack. Both high-pressure air and solid circular cylinders with a diameter equal to the nozzle exit diameter were used to simulate jet exhausts. A detailed data base of boundary layer separation locations was obtained using oil-flow techniques. The results indicate that boundary layer separation is most extensive on steep boattails at high Mach numbers.

  3. Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foot and take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve pain. See your doctor if ... foot. Use ice and an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicine. See your doctor if the pain doesn' ...

  4. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    Athlete's foot is a common infection caused by a fungus. It most often affects the space between the toes. ... skin between your toes. You can get athlete's foot from damp surfaces, such as showers, swimming pools, ...

  5. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of tinea, athlete's foot. The Basics on Tinea Infections Tinea (pronounced: TIH-nee-uh) is the medical name ... or scalp, including athlete's foot, jock itch , and ringworm (despite its name, ringworm is not a worm). ...

  6. Foot Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  7. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat-transfer data for the 0.0175-scale Space Shuttle Vehicle 3 are presented. Interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of Orbiter alone, tank alone, second, and first stage configurations. The test program was conducted in the NASA-Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 5.3 for nominal free-stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1.5 x 1,000,000 and 5.0 x 1,000,000.

  8. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e., top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  9. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot Transonic wind tunnel (IA613A), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e. top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  10. The Real-Time Wall Interference Correction System of the NASA Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert

    1998-01-01

    An improved version of the Wall Signature Method was developed to compute wall interference effects in three-dimensional subsonic wind tunnel testing of aircraft models in real-time. The method may be applied to a full-span or a semispan model. A simplified singularity representation of the aircraft model is used. Fuselage, support system, propulsion simulator, and separation wake volume blockage effects are represented by point sources and sinks. Lifting effects are represented by semi-infinite line doublets. The singularity representation of the test article is combined with the measurement of wind tunnel test reference conditions, wall pressure, lift force, thrust force, pitching moment, rolling moment, and pre-computed solutions of the subsonic potential equation to determine first order wall interference corrections. Second order wall interference corrections for pitching and rolling moment coefficient are also determined. A new procedure is presented that estimates a rolling moment coefficient correction for wings with non-symmetric lift distribution. Experimental data obtained during the calibration of the Ames Bipod model support system and during tests of two semispan models mounted on an image plane in the NASA Ames 12 ft. Pressure Wind Tunnel are used to demonstrate the application of the wall interference correction method.

  11. Investigations on an 0.030-scale space shuttle vehicle configuration 140A/B orbiter model in the Ames Research Center unitary plan 8 by 7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (0A53C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted of an 0.030 scale model of the space shuttle orbiter in a supersonic wind tunnel. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5. Reynolds numbers ranged from 0.75 million per foot to 4.00 million per foot. The objective of the test was to establish and verify longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics for the configuration 140 A/B SSV Orbiter. Six-component force and moment data, base and cavity pressures, body-flap, elevon, speedbrake, and rudder hinge moments, and vertical tail forces and moments were measured.

  12. Results of flutter test OS7 obtained using the 0.14-scale space shuttle orbiter fin/rudder model number 55-0 in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter vertical tail was tested in a 16-foot transonic dynamic wind tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and rudder buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between .5 and 1.11 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 55-0 was used for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  13. Results of flutter test OS6 obtained using the 0.14-scale wing/elevon model (54-0) in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter wing was tested in the Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Dynamics Wind Tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and elevon buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between 0.3 and 1.1 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 54-0 was utilized for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  14. Hot gas ingestion testing of an advanced STOVL concept in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel with flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Flood, Joseph D.; Strock, Thomas W.; Amuedo, Kurt C.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft capable of operating from remote sites, damaged runways, and small air capable ships are being pursued for deployment around the turn of the century. To achieve this goal, it is important that the technologies critical to this unique class of aircraft be developed. Recognizing this need, NASA Lewis Research Center, McDonnell Douglas Aircraft, and DARPA defined a cooperative program for testing in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) to establish a database for hot gas ingestion, one of the technologies critical to STOVL. Results from a test program are presented along with a discussion of the facility modifications allowing this type of testing at model scale. These modifications to the tunnel include a novel ground plane, an elaborate model support which included 4 degrees of freedom, heated high pressure air for nozzle flow, a suction system exhaust for inlet flow, and tunnel sidewall modifications. Several flow visualization techniques were employed including water mist in the nozzle flows and tufts on the ground plane. Headwind (free-stream) velocity was varied from 8 to 23 knots.

  15. Hot gas ingestion test results of a two-poster vectored thrust concept with flow visualization in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Neiner, George; Bencic, Timothy J.; Flood, Joseph D.; Amuedo, Kurt C.

    1990-01-01

    A 9.2 percent scale STOVL hot gas ingestion model was tested in the NASA Lewis 9 x 15-foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Flow visualization from the Phase 1 test program, which evaluated the hot ingestion phenomena and control techniques, is covered. The Phase 2 test program evaluated the hot gas ingestion phenomena at higher temperatures and used a laser sheet to investigate the flow field. Hot gas ingestion levels were measured for the several forward nozzle splay configurations and with flow control/life improvement devices (LIDs) which reduced the hot gas ingestion. The test was conducted at full scale nozzle pressure ratios and inlet Mach numbers. Results are presented over a range of nozzle pressure ratios at a 10 kn headwind velocity. The Phase 2 program was conducted at exhaust nozzle temperatures up to 1460 R and utilized a sheet laser system for flow visualization of the model flow field in and out of ground effects. The results reported are for nozzle exhaust temperatures up to 1160 R and contain the compressor face pressure and temperature distortions, the total pressure recovery, the inlet temperature rise, and the environmental effects of the hot gas. The environmental effects include the ground plane contours, the model airframe heating, and the location of the ground flow separation.

  16. A two-dimensional adaptive-wall test section with ventilated walls in the Ames 2- by 2-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Lee, George; Mcdevitt, T. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The first tests conducted in the adaptive-wall test section of the Ames Research Center's 2- by 2-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel are described. A procedure was demonstrated for reducing wall interference in transonic flow past a two-dimensional airfoil by actively controlling flow through the slotted walls of the test section. Flow through the walls was controlled by adjusting pressures in compartments of plenums above and below the test section. Wall interference was assessed by measuring (with a laser velocimeter) velocity distributions along a contour surrounding the model, and then checking those measurements for their compatibility with free-air far-field boundary conditions. Plenum pressures for minimum wall interference were determined from empirical influence coefficients. An NACA 0012 airfoil was tested at angles of attach of 0 and 2, and at Mach numbers between 0.70 and 0.85. In all cases the wall-setting procedure greatly reduced wall interference. Wall interference, however, was never completely eliminated, primarily because the effect of plenum pressure changes on the velocities along the contour could not be accurately predicted.

  17. Acoustic Performance of the GEAE UPS Research Fan in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel in 1994. The Universal Propulsion Simulator fan was designed and manufactured by General Electric Aircraft Engines, and included an active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The fan was tested with several rotors featuring unswept, forward-swept and aft-swept designs of both metal and composite construction. Sideline acoustic data were taken with both hard and acoustically treated walls in the flow passages. The fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20, which is representative of aircraft takeoff/approach conditions. All rotors showed similar aerodynamic performance. However, the composite rotors typically showed higher noise levels than did corresponding metal rotors. Aft and forward rotor sweep showed at most modest reductions of transonic multiple pure tone levels. However, rotor sweep often introduced increased rotor-stator interaction tone levels. Broadband noise was typically higher for the composite rotors and also for the aft-swept metal rotor. Transonic MPT generation was reduced with increasing fan axis angle of attack (AOA); however, higher downstream noise levels did increase with AOA resulting in higher overall Effective Perceived Noise Level.

  18. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  19. Hot gas ingestion testing of an advanced STOVL concept in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel with flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Flood, Joseph D.; Strock, Thomas W.; Amuedo, Kurt C.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft capable of operating from remote sites, damaged runways, and small air capable ships are being pursued for deployment around the turn of the century. To achieve this goal, it is important that the technologies critical to this unique class of aircraft be developed. Recognizing this need, NASA Lewis Research Center, McDonnell Douglas Aircraft, and DARPA defined a cooperative program for testing in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) to establish a database for hot gas ingestion, one of the technologies critical to STOVL. Results from a test program are presented along with a discussion of the facility modifications allowing this type of testing at modal scale. These modifications to the tunnel include a novel ground plane, an elaborate model support which included 4 degrees of freedom, heated high pressure air for nozzle flow, a suction system exhaust for inlet flow, and tunnel sidewall modifications. Several flow visualization techniques were employed including water mist in the nozzle flows and tufts on the ground plane. Headwind (free-stream) velocity was varied from 8 to 23 knots.

  20. Evaluation of the NASA Ames no. 1 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel as an acoustic test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Scharton, T. D.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made in the no. 1 7'x10' wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, with the objectives of defining the acoustic characteristics and recommending minimum cost treatments so that the tunnel can be converted into an acoustic research facility. The results indicate that the noise levels in the test section are due to (a) noise generation in the test section, associated with the presence of solid bodies such as the pitot tube, and (b) propagation of acoustic energy from the fan. A criterion for noise levels in the test section is recommended, based on low-noise microphone support systems. Noise control methods required to meet the criterion include removal of hardware items for the test section and diffuser, improved design of microphone supports, and installation of acoustic treatment in the settling chamber and diffuser.

  1. Diabetic Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection. You can help avoid foot problems. First, control your blood sugar levels. Good foot hygiene is also crucial: Check your feet every day Wash your feet every day Keep the skin soft and smooth Smooth corns and calluses gently If you can see, reach, ...

  2. Noise measurements from an ejector suppressor nozzle in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Cooper, Beth A.; Hall, David G.; Khavaran, Abbas

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic results are presented of a cooperative nozzle test program between NASA and Pratt and Whitney, conducted in the NASA-Lewis 9 x 15 ft Anechoic Wind Tunnel. The nozzle tested was the P and W Hypermix Nozzle concept, a 2-D lobed mixer nozzle followed by a short ejector section made to promote rapid mixing of the induced ejector nozzle flow. Acoustic and aerodynamic measurements were made to determine the amount of ejector pumping, degree of mixing, and noise reduction achieved. A series of tests were run to verify the acoustic quality of this tunnel. The results indicated that the tunnel test section is reasonably anechoic but that background noise can limit the amount of suppression observed from suppressor nozzles. Also, a possible internal noise was observed in the air supply system. The P and W ejector suppressor nozzle demonstrated the potential of this concept to significantly reduce jet noise. Significant reduction in low frequency noise was achieved by increasing the peak jet noise frequency. This was accomplished by breaking the jet into segments with smaller dimensions than those of the baseline nozzle. Variations in ejector parameters had little effect on the noise for the geometries and the range of temperatures and pressure ratios tested.

  3. 2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SETTLING CHAMBER OF 8FOOT HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SETTLING CHAMBER OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNEL. Jet Lowe, HAER Photographer, December 1995. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  4. Periodic variations in stratospheric meridional wind from 20-65 km, at 80 deg N to 8 deg S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Belmont, A. D.; Dartt, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    The variability of stratospheric meridional winds is examined in both space and time. Height-latitude sections for January along 70 deg E and 90 deg W show a divergence zone above 50 km near 60 deg N and an intense convergence zone 40 km near 50 deg N over North America. This latter structure, with southward winds in the Arctic and northward winds at mid-latitudes over North America, persists from October through April. Tidal winds dominate all other circulation features in summer at all latitudes, and throughout the year at low latitudes. To help understand the observed patterns of variability, long-term periodic features are analyzed. The quasi-biennial oscillation, annual wave, and four-month wave have amplitudes of about 10, 20, and 10 m/sec respectively in the Arctic near 45 km. The phase of the annual wave changes by nearly 180 deg in a narrow zone near 45 deg N. The semiannual wave has an amplitude of 10 m/sec. 50 deg N above 50 km equinoctial phase dates in the region of maximum amplitude. This polar semiannual wave corresponds closely to that previously found in the zonal wind.

  5. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.A.

    2001-04-30

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. As part of the WindPACT program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), was awarded contract number YAM-0-30203-01 to examine Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling, Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics, and Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Towers. This report documents the results of GEC's Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling. The primary objectives of the Blade-Scaling Study are to assess the scaling of current materials and manufacturing technologies for blades of 40 to 60 meters in length, and to develop scaling curves of estimated cost and mass for rotor blades in that size range.

  6. Investigations on an 0.030-scale space shuttle vehicle configuration 140A/B orbiter model in the Ames Research Center 9 by 7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (OA53B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an 0.030-scale space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B model was conducted in the Ames Research Center 9- by 7-foot supersonic wind tunnel. This part of test series OA53 was conducted at Mach numbers of 1.60 and 2.00 and at Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.0 million per foot to 4.0 million per foot. The objective was to establish and verify longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics for the configuration 140A/B SSV orbiter. Reynolds number studies were performed on certain nominal control-setting configurations, and examinations were made of the incremental effects of an alternate wing leading-edge configuration and of a sealed elevon-split construction. Six-component force and moment data, base and cavity pressures, bodyflap, elevon, speedbrake, and rudder hinge moments, and vertical tail forces and moments were measured for the orbiter.

  7. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search by GPS Please enter a city or last name. Use your current position? {{ps.position.alert.message}} ... digit zip code. Please enter a city or last name. Search Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram ...

  8. Charcot Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... help prevent recurrence of Charcot foot, development of ulcers, and possibly amputation. In cases with significant deformity, ... instructions for long-term treatment to prevent recurrences, ulcers, and amputation. and or or and or or, ...

  9. Laser velocimetry in the low-speed wind tunnels at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, K. L.; Snyder, P. K.; Reinath, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    The historical development of laser velocimetry and its application to low-speed (less than 100 m/sec) aerodynamic flows in the subsonic wind tunnels at Ames Research Center is reviewed. A fully three dimensional velocimeter for the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel is described, and its capabilities are presented through sample data from a recent experiment. Finally, a long-range (2.6 to 10 m) velocimeter that is designed to be installed within the test section of the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel is described and sample data are presented.

  10. Wind tunnel tests of the 0.010-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle (model 52-QT) in the NASA/Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IA18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.; Chee, E.; Stone, J.; Mellenthin, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel on an 0.010-scale model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle consisting of an orbiter and external tank. The basic hypersonic stability characteristics of the orbiter attached rigidly to the external tank and the basic hypersonic stability characteristics of external tank alone simulating RTLS abort conditions were evaluated. The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack from- 8 deg through +30 deg and angles of sideslip of- 8 deg through +8 deg at fixed angles of attack of -4 deg, 0 deg, and +4 deg. A maximum angle of attack range of +15 deg through +40 deg was obtained for this configuration, at Mach number 7.3, for one run only. External tank alone testing was conducted at angles of attack from +8 deg through -30 deg and angles of sideslip of -8 deg at fixed angles of attack of -4 deg, 0 deg and +4 deg. Six-component force data and static base pressures were recorded during the test.

  11. Turbulence and pressure loss characteristics of the inlet vanes for the 80- by 120-ft wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel investigations were conducted to determine the flow characteristics downstream of a set of wind tunnel inlet flow conditioning vanes. The purpose was to develop an understanding of the flow mechanisms that contributed to the pressure loss and turbulence generated by the vane set. The near-field characteristics and flow field development were investigated with a 1/3 scale two dimensional model of the vane set at near full-scale Reynolds numbers. In a second series of tests, the global flow field characteristics were investigated by means of a 1/15 scale model of the full vane set and the 5:1 contraction leading to the model's test section. Scale effects due to Reynolds number mismatch were identified and their significance noted and accounted for when possible. Scaling parameters were adopted that allowed predictions to be made of the expected turbulence and pressure distributions in the full-scale wind tunnel test section, based on the small-scale test results. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with actual measurements made in the full-scale facility.

  12. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  13. Advanced Canard in 12 Foot Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Advanced-concepts model plane with front canards, winglets and pusher propellers, in 12 Foot Low-Speed Tunnel. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, (page 12), by James Schultz.

  14. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the influence of inlet aeroacoustic design as measured in the NASA Ames 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, R. G.; Langenbrunner, L. E.; Mccann, E. O.

    1981-01-01

    The inlet radiated noise of a turbofan engine was studied. The principal research objectives were to characterize or suppress such noise with particular regard to its tonal characteristics. The major portion of this research was conducted by using ground-based static testing without simulation of aircraft forward speed or aircraft installation-related aeroacoustic effects.

  15. Velocity and rolling-moment measurements in the wake of a swept-wing model in the 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, V. J.; Corsiglia, V. R.; Schwind, R. G.; Frick, J. K. D.; Lemmer, O. J.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made in the wake of a swept wing model to study the structure of lift generated vortex wakes shed by conventional span loadings and by several span loadings designed to reduce wake velocities. Variations in the span loading on the swept wing generator were obtained by deflecting seven flap segments on each side by amounts determined by vortex lattice theory to approximate the desired span loadings. The resulting wakes were probed with a three component, hot wire probe to measure velocity, and with a wing to measure the rolling moment that would be induced on a following aircraft. The experimental techniques are described herein, and the measured velocity and rolling moments are presented, along with some comparisons with the applicable theories.

  16. Results of a FRSI material test under Space Shuttle ascent conditions in the Ames Research Center 9x7 foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS13). Space Shuttle aerothermodynamic data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, P. L.; Collette, J. G. R.

    1992-01-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/ARC 9 x 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel to verify the integrity of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) material in a panel flutter environment. A FRSI sample panel was subjected to the shocks, pressure gradients, and turbulence characteristics encountered at dynamic pressure 1.5 times the 3(sigma) dispersed trajectory flight conditions of the Space Shuttle. Static and fluctuating pressure data were obtained for Mach numbers ranging from 1.55 to 2.5 with dynamic pressures of 625 to 1250 psf. The FRSI panel suffered no appreciable damage as a result of the test.

  17. Hot gas ingestion test results of a two-poster vectored thrust concept with flow visualization in the NASA Lewis 9- x 15-foot low speed wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Neiner, George; Bencic, Timothy J.; Flood, Joseph D.; Amuedo, Kurt C.; Strock, Thomas W.

    1990-01-01

    A 9.2 percent scale Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) hot gas ingestion model was designed and built by McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MCAIR) and tested in the Lewis Research Center 9 x 15 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Hot gas ingestion, the entrainment of heated engine exhaust into the inlet flow field, is a key development issure for advanced short takeoff and vertical landing aircraft. Flow visualization from the Phase 1 test program, which evaluated the hot ingestion phenomena and control techniques, is covered. The Phase 2 test program evaluated the hot gas ingestion phenomena at higher temperatures and used a laser sheet to investigate the flow field. Hot gas ingestion levels were measured for the several forward nozzle splay configurations and with flow control/life improvement devices (LIDs) which reduced the hot gas ingestion. The model support system had four degrees of freedom - pitch, roll, yaw, and vertical height variation. The model support system also provided heated high-pressure air for nozzle flow and a suction system exhaust for inlet flow. The test was conducted at full scale nozzle pressure ratios and inlet Mach numbers. Test and data analysis results from Phase 2 and flow visualization from both Phase 1 and 2 are documented. A description of the model and facility modifications is also provided. Headwind velocity was varied from 10 to 23 kn. Results are presented over a range of nozzle pressure ratios at a 10 kn headwind velocity. The Phase 2 program was conducted at exhaust nozzle temperatures up to 1460 R and utilized a sheet laser system for flow visualization of the model flow field in and out of ground effects. The results reported are for nozzle exhaust temperatures up to 1160 R. These results will contain the compressor face pressure and temperature distortions, the total pressure recovery, the inlet temperature rise, and the environmental effects of the hot gas. The environmental effects include the ground plane contours

  18. Cavus Foot (High-Arched Foot)

    MedlinePlus

    ... also experience foot drop, a weakness of the muscles in the foot and ankle that results in ... and claw toes. The foot is tested for muscle strength, and the patient’s walking pattern and coordination ...

  19. Diabetic Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause you to lose feeling in your feet. You may not feel a cut, a blister or a sore. Foot injuries such as these can cause ulcers and ... the blood vessels can also mean that your feet do not get enough blood and oxygen. It ...

  20. Foot Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of physical activities like running, dancing, biking, or playing basketball, soccer, or tennis. Going too far, too fast or not warming up properly before physical activity can set you up for painful foot injuries. Play it safe. Exercise your feet to increase ...

  1. Static and control investigations of an 0.030-scale space shuttle orbiter configuration 140A/B model in the Ames Research Center 11 by 11-foot transonic wind tunnel (OA53A), Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an 0.030 scale model of the Rockwell International Configuration 140A/B Space Shuttle Vehicle Orbiter were conducted in the Ames Research Center 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. This part (part A) of test series 0A53 was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.8, 0.9, 1.05, and 1.20, and at Reynolds numbers from 1.8 x to 6.5 million per foot. The objective of this test was to establish and verify longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics for the Configuration 140A/B SSV Orbiter. Reynolds number studies were performed for certain nominal control-settings. An alternate leading-edge wing configuration and sealed elevon-split arrangement were tested. Bodyflap, elevon, speedbrake, and rudder hinge moments were measured in addition to standard six-component forces and moments and base pressure data. Furthermore, six-component force and moment data were measured for the vertical tail assembly.

  2. Wind-tunnel tests of the XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiberg, J. A.; Maisel, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The XV-15 aircraft was tested in the Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel for preliminary evaluation of aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics prior to flight. The tests were undertaken to investigate the aircraft performance, stability, control and structural loads for flight modes from helicopter through transition and airplane mode up to the tunnel capability of 170 knots. Results from these tests are presented.

  3. Radial and latitudinal dependencies of discontinuities in the solar wind between 0.3 and 19 AU and -80° and +10°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söding, A.; Neubauer, F. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Ness, N. F.; Lepping, R. P.

    2001-07-01

    Directional discontinuities (DD) from 5 missions at 7 different locations between 0.3 and 19 AU and - 80° and + 10° in the 3D heliosphere are investigated during minimum solar activity. The data are surveyed using the identification criteria of Burlaga (1969) (B) and Tsurutani and Smith (1979) (TS). The rate of occurrence depends linearly on the solar wind velocity caused by the geometric effect of investigating a larger plasma volume if the solar wind velocity vsw increases. The radial dependence is proportional to r - 0.78 (TS criterion) and r - 1.28 (B criterion), respectively. This dependence is not only due to an increasing miss rate with increasing distance. The DDs must be unstable or some other physical effect must exist. After normalization of the daily rates to 400 km/s and 1 AU, no dependence on heliographic latitude or on solar wind structures is observable. This means that the DDs are uniformly distributed on a spherical shell. Normalized 64 DD per day are identified with both criteria. But large variations of the daily rate still occur, indicating that other influences must exist. The ratio of the rates of rotational (RDs) and tangential discontinuities (TDs) depends on the solar wind structures. In high speed streams, relatively more RDs exist than in low speed streams. In the inner heliosphere (r < 10 AU), no radial or latitudinal dependence of the portions of the DD types occur. 55% clear RDs, 10% clear TDs and 33% EDs (either discontinuities) are observed, but the portions differ with regard to the criteria used. In the middle heliosphere (10 AU< r < 40 AU), the DD types are more uniformly distributed. The distribution of the directional change over the transition evolves to an increase of smaller with increasing distance from the sun. The evolution is yielded by the anisotropic RDs with small . The spatial thickness dkm in kilometers increases with distance. The thickness drg normalized to the proton gyro radius decreases

  4. Cavus Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toes All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Cavus Foot Surgery Page Content What is a cavus foot? A cavus or high-arched foot may have ... related problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The main goal of surgery is to ...

  5. Wind tunnel and flight test of the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, R. L.; Blackman, S.; Weiberg, J. A.; Schroers, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft Project involves design, fabrication, and flight testing of two aircraft. This program is currently in the test phase for concept evaluation and substantiation of design. As part of this evaluation, one of the aircraft was tested in the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The status of testing to date and some of the results of the wind tunnel and flight tests are presented.

  6. Ceramic and coating applications in the hostile environment of a high temperature hypersonic wind tunnel. [Langley 8-foot high temperature structures tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.; Karns, J. R.; Vasquez, P.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    A Mach 7, blowdown wind tunnel was used to investigate aerothermal structural phenomena on large to full scale high speed vehicle components. The high energy test medium, which provided a true temperature simulation of hypersonic flow at 24 to 40 km altitude, was generated by the combustion of methane with air at high pressures. Since the wind tunnel, as well as the models, must be protected from thermally induced damage, ceramics and coatings were used extensively. Coatings were used both to protect various wind tunnel components and to improve the quality of the test stream. Planned modifications for the wind tunnel included more extensive use of ceramics in order to minimize the number of active cooling systems and thus minimize the inherent operational unreliability and cost that accompanies such systems. Use of nonintrusive data acquisition techniques, such as infrared radiometry, allowed more widespread use of ceramics for models to be tested in high energy wind tunnels.

  7. 6. VIEW OF FIVEFOOT WIND TUNNEL WITH AIR STRAIGHTENER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF FIVE-FOOT WIND TUNNEL WITH AIR STRAIGHTENER AND OPERATOR STATION IN FOREGROUND (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 19, Five-Foot Wind Tunnel, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  8. Foot amputation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  9. Foot sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Mid-foot sprain ... There are many bones and ligaments in your foot. A ligament is a strong flexible tissue that holds bones together. When the foot lands awkwardly, some ligaments can stretch and tear. ...

  10. 6. FAN HOUSE OF 8FOOT HIGH SPEED TUNNEL. AIR INTAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FAN HOUSE OF 8-FOOT HIGH SPEED TUNNEL. AIR INTAKES AND FILTERS ARE ENCLOSED IN THE UPPER LEVEL STRUCTURE. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot High Speed Wind Tunnel, 641 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  11. Investigation of space shuttle vehicle 140C configuration orbiter (model 16-0) wheel well pressure loads in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11 foot wind tunnel (OA143)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a sting mounted .0405-scale representation of the 140C outer mold line space shuttle orbiter configuration in the Rockwell International 7.75 x 11.00 foot low speed wind tunnel. The primary test objectives were to define the orbiter wheel well pressure loading and its effects on landing gear thermal insulation and to investigate the pressure environment experienced by both the horizontal flight nose probe and air vent door probes. Steady state and dynamic pressure values were recorded in the orbiter nose gear well, left main landing gear well, horizontal flight nose probe, and both left and right air vent door probe. All steady state pressure levels were measured by Statham differential pressure transducers while dynamic pressure levels were recorded by Kulite high frequency response pressure sensors.

  12. Results of investigations on an 0.015 scale 140A/B configuration space shuttle vehicle orbiter model (49-0) in the LTV 4 by 4-foot high speed wind tunnel (0A84)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.; Embury, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Data obtained from a wind tunnel test of an 0.015-scale 140 A/B configuration space shuttle vehicle orbiter model (49-0) are presented. Runs were conducted at Mach numbers 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 and Reynolds numbers of 8.4, 9.0, 9.0, 10.9, and 13.6 million per foot respectively. Various control surface settings were investigated from angles of attack of minus 4 degrees to plus 30 degrees at fixed angles of sideslip of zero and minus 5 degrees and through angles of sideslip from minus 2 to plus 8 degrees at fixed angles of attack of zero, plus 10, plus 15, and plus 20 degrees. The purpose of the test was to define the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control characteristics for the updated SSV configuration.

  13. Effects of reaction control system jet simulation on the stability and control characteristics of a 0.015-scale space shuttle orbiter model in the Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziubala, T. J.; Marroquin, J.; Cleary, J. W.; Mellenthin, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the Ames Research Center 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel to obtain detailed effects which interactions between the RCS jet flow field and the local orbiter flow field have on orbiter hypersonic stability and control characteristics. Six-component force data were obtained through an angle-of-attack range of 15 to 35 deg with 0 deg angle of sideslip. The test was conducted with yaw, pitch and roll jet simulation at a free-stream Mach number of 10.3. These data simulate two SSV reentry flight conditions at Mach numbers of 28.3 and 10.3. Fuselage base pressures and pressures on the nonmetric RCS pods were obtained in addition to the basic force measurements. Model 42-0 was used for these tests.

  14. Results of test IA137 in the NASA/ARC 14 foot transonic wind tunnel of the 0.07 scale external tank forebody (model 68-T) to determine auxiliary aerodynamic data system feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a 14 foot transonic wind tunnel to examine the feasibility of the auxiliary aerodynamic data system (AADS) for determining angles of attack and sideslip during boost flight. The model used was a 0.07 scale replica of the external tank forebody consisting of the nose portion and a 60 inch (full scale) cylindrical section of the ogive cylinder tangency point. The model terminated in a blunt base with a 320.0 inch diameter at external tank (ET) station 1120.37. Pressure data were obtained from five pressure orifices (one total and four statics) on the nose probe, and sixteen surface static pressure orifices along the ET forebody.

  15. Hypersonic aeroheating test of space shuttle vehicle: Configuration 3 (model 22 OTS) in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH20), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    The model tested was an 0.0175-scale version of the vehicle 3 space shuttle configuration. Temperature measurements were made on the launch configuration, orbiter plus tank, orbiter alone, tank alone, and solid rocket booster (SRB) alone to provide heat transfer data. The test was conducted at free stream Mach numbers of 5.3 and 7.3 and at free stream Reynolds numbers of 1.5, 3.7, 5.0, and 7.0 million per foot. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 deg to 20 deg and side slip angles of -5 deg and 0 deg.

  16. Foot Disorders, Foot Posture, and Foot Function: The Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Thomas J.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Riskowski, Jody L.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Menz, Hylton B.; Casey, Virginia A.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Foot disorders are common among older adults and may lead to outcomes such as falls and functional limitation. However, the associations of foot posture and foot function to specific foot disorders at the population level remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between specific foot disorders, foot posture, and foot function. Methods Participants were from the population-based Framingham Foot Study. Quintiles of the modified arch index and center of pressure excursion index from plantar pressure scans were used to create foot posture and function subgroups. Adjusted odds ratios of having each specific disorder were calculated for foot posture and function subgroups relative to a referent 3 quintiles. Results Pes planus foot posture was associated with increased odds of hammer toes and overlapping toes. Cavus foot posture was not associated with the foot disorders evaluated. Odds of having hallux valgus and overlapping toes were significantly increased in those with pronated foot function, while odds of hallux valgus and hallux rigidus were significantly decreased in those with supinated function. Conclusions Foot posture and foot function were associated with the presence of specific foot disorders. PMID:24040231

  17. Radial and latitudinal dependencies of discontinuities in the solar wind between 0.3 and 19 AU and -80° and +10°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söding, A.; Neubauer, F. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Ness, N. F.; Lepping, R. P.

    Directional discontinuities (DD) from 5 missions at 7 different locations between 0.3 and 19 AU and -80° and +10° in the 3D heliosphere are investigated during minimum solar activity. The data are surveyed using the identification criteria of Burlaga (1969) (B) and Tsurutani and Smith (1979) (TS). The rate of occurrence depends linearly on the solar wind velocity caused by the geometric effect of investigating a larger plasma volume if the solar wind velocity νsw increases. The radial dependence is proportional to r 0.78 (TS criterion) and r 1.28 (B criterion), respectively. This dependence is not only due to an increasing miss rate with increasing distance. The DDs must be unstable or some other physical effect must exist. After normalization of the daily rates to 400 km/s and 1 AU, no dependence on heliographic latitude or on solar wind structures is observable. This means that the DDs are uniformly distributed on a spherical shell. Normalized 64 DD per day are identified with both criteria. But large variations of the daily rate still occur, indicating that other influences must exist. The ratio of the rates of rotational (RDs) and tangential discontinuities (TDs) depends on the solar wind structures. In high speed streams, relatively more RDs exist than in low speed streams. In the inner heliosphere (r < 10 AU), no radial or latitudinal dependence of the portions of the DD types occur. 55% clear RDs, 10% clear TDs and 33% EDs (either discontinuities) are observed, but the portions differ with regard to the criteria used. In the middle heliosphere (10 AU< r < 40 AU), the DD types are more uniformly distributed. The distribution of the directional change ω over the transition evolves to an increase of smaller ω with increasing distance from the sun. The evolution is yielded by the anisotropic RDs with small ω. The spatial thickness dkm in kilometers increases with distance. The thickness drg normalized to the proton gyro radius decreases by a factor of 50

  18. 20-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Construction of a typical model used in the 20-Foot Spin Tunnel. >From 'Characteristics of Nine Research Wind Tunnels of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory': 'Dynamic models are used for free-spinning tunnel tests. A dynamic model is one for which geometric similarity between model and airplane is extended to obtain geometric similarity of the paths of motion of corresponding points by maintaining constant, in addition to the scale ratio of linear dimensions, three other ratios, that of force, mass, and time. In model testing, however, complete similarity can generally not be duplicated and some compromise is necessary. For free-spinning-model tests in the NACA 20-foot tunnel, the ratio of inertia to frictional or viscous forces (Reynolds number) is not maintained constant, but the ratio of inertia to gravity forces (Froude number) is maintained constant.' 'Models used in the spin tunnel until recently [this report was written in 1957] were made primarily of balsa and reinforced with hardwood. Now, plastic models are being used almost entirely, because they are more durable and when properly constructed are no heavier than balsa models. The models are constructed accurately to scale by pressing plastic material and class cloth into a previously constructed mold. A typical mod is shown in [this picture]. The model is swung as a torsional pendulum and is ballasted to obtain dynamic similarity by placing lead weights in suitable locations within the model wings and fuselage. Corrections are made for the effect of ambient and entrapped air.'

  19. Wind sensitivity studies of a non-return wind tunnel with a 216- by 432-mm (8.5- by 17.0-inches) test section, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.; Mort, K. W.; Piazza, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The refinement of inlet and exit treatments were studied which would minimize the effect of external wind on the test-section flow quality of a nonreturn wind tunnel. The investigation was conducted in the Ames Research Center 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel which served as the wind source. Several inlets and two exits were tested at wind directions ranging from 0 to 180 degrees and at wind-to-test-section velocity ratios from zero to somewhat greater than one. For the best inlet configuration the flow quality was good, with a velocity deviation in each of the three component directions generally less. The loss in total pressure due to the inlet treatment was low: about 0.035 of the test-section dynamic pressure for the no-wind case.

  20. Results of a M = 5.3 heat transfer test of the integrated vehicle using phase-change paint techniques on the 0.0175-scale model 56-OTS in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel to obtain supersonic heat-distribution data in areas between the orbiter and external tank using phase-change paint techniques. The tests used Novamide SSV Model 56-OTS in the first and second-stage ascent configurations. Data were obtained at a nominal Mach number of 5.3 and a Reynolds number per foot of 5 x 10 to the 6th power with angles of attack of 0 deg, +/- 5 deg, and sideslip angles of 0 deg and +/- 5 deg.

  1. Wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of symmetrically deflected ailerons of the F-8C airplane. [conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gera, J.

    1977-01-01

    A .042-scale model of the F-8C airplane was investigated in a transonic wind tunnel at high subsonic Mach numbers and a range of angles of attack between-3 and 20 degrees. The effect of symmetrically deflected ailerons on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics was measured. Some data were also obtained on the lateral control effectiveness of asymmetrically deflected horizontal tail surfaces.

  2. 40 CFR 80.126 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements § 80.126 Definitions. The following definitions shall apply... the CPA or CIA performing the agreed-upon procedures engagement under this subpart. (i) Foot...

  3. 40 CFR 80.126 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements § 80.126 Definitions. The following definitions shall apply... the CPA or CIA performing the agreed-upon procedures engagement under this subpart. (i) Foot...

  4. 40 CFR 80.126 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements § 80.126 Definitions. The following definitions shall apply... the CPA or CIA performing the agreed-upon procedures engagement under this subpart. (i) Foot...

  5. Low speed testing of the inlets designed for a tamden-fan V/STOL nacelle. [conducted in the Lewis 10 by 10 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. C.; Ybarra, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    An approximately 0.25 scale model of a tandem fan nacelle, designed for a subsonic V/STOL aircraft, was tested in a Lewis wind tunnel. Model variables included long and short aft inlet cowls and the addition of exterior strakes to the short inlet cowl. Inlet pressure recoveries and distortion were measured at pitch angles to 40 deg and at combinations of pitch and yaw to 30 deg. Airspeeds covered a range to 135 knots (69 m/sec). The short aft inlet with added strakes had the best aerodynamic performance and is considered suitable for the intended V/STOL application.

  6. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist. PMID:26291149

  7. Athlete's Foot (Tinea Pedis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common locations for athlete's foot include: Spaces (webs) between the toes, especially between the 4th ... no worm involved.) Between the toes (the interdigital spaces), athlete's foot may appear as inflamed, scaly, and ...

  8. Investigation of airborne foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission during low-wind conditions in the early phase of the UK 2001 epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Alexandersen, S.; Astrup, P.; Champion, H. J.; Donaldson, A. I.; Dunkerley, F. N.; Gloster, J.; Sørensen, J. H.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    2003-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed domesticated and wild animals. The highly contagious nature of FMD is a reflection of the wide range of host species, the enormous quantities of virus liberated by infected animals, the range of excretions and secretions which can be infectious, the stability of the virus in the environment, the multiplicity of routes of infection and the very small doses of the virus that can initiate infection. One of the mechanisms of spread is the carriage of droplets and droplet nuclei exhaled in the breath of infected animals. Such spread can be rapid and extensive, and it is known in certain circumstances to have transmitted disease over a distance of several hundred kilometres. During the 2001 FMD epidemic in the United Kingdom (UK), atmospheric dispersion models were applied in real time in order to assess the potential for atmospheric dispersion of the disease. The operational value of such modelling is primarily to identify premises which may have been exposed so that the human resources for surveillance and disease control purposes are employed most effectively.

    The paper describes the combined modelling techniques and presents the results obtained of detailed analyses performed during the early stages of the UK 2001 epidemic. This paper investigates the potential for disease spread in relation to two outbreaks (Burnside Farm, Heddon-on-the-Wall and Prestwick Hall Farm, Ponteland, Northumberland). A separate paper (Gloster et al., 2002) provides a more detailed analysis of the airborne disease transmission in the vicinity of Burnside Farm.

    The combined results are consistent with airborne transmission of disease to livestock in the Heddon-on-the-Wall area. Local topography may have played a significant role in influencing the pattern of disease spread.

  9. Investigation of airborne foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission during low-wind conditions in the early phase of the UK 2001 epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Alexandersen, S.; Astrup, P.; Champion, H. J.; Donaldson, A. I.; Dunkerley, F. N.; Gloster, J.; Sørensen, J. H.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    2003-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed domesticated and wild animals. The highly contagious nature of FMD is a reflection of the wide range of host species, the enormous quantities of virus liberated by infected animals, the range of excretions and secretions which can be infectious, the stability of the virus in the environment, the multiplicity of routes of infection and the very small doses of the virus that can initiate infection. One of the mechanisms of spread is the carriage of droplets and droplet nuclei exhaled in the breath of infected animals. Such spread can be rapid and extensive, and it is known in certain circumstances to have transmitted disease over a distance of several hundred kilometres. During the 2001 FMD epidemic in the United Kingdom (UK), atmospheric dispersion models were applied in real time in order to assess the potential for atmospheric dispersion of the disease. The operational value of such modelling is primarily to identify premises which may have been exposed so that the human resources for surveillance and disease control purposes are employed most effectively. The paper describes the combined modelling techniques and presents the results obtained of detailed analyses performed during the early stages of the UK 2001 epidemic. This paper investigates the potential for disease spread in relation to two outbreaks (Burnside Farm, Heddon-on-the-Wall and Prestwick Hall Farm, Ponteland, Northumberland). A separate paper (Gloster et al., 2002) provides a more detailed analysis of the airborne disease transmission in the vicinity of Burnside Farm. The combined results are consistent with airborne transmission of disease to livestock in the Heddon-on-the Wall area. Local topography may have played a significant role in influencing the pattern of disease spread.

  10. Results of a jet plume effects test on Rockwell International integrated space shuttle vehicle using a vehicle 5 configuration 0.02-scale model (88-OTS) in the 11 by 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (IA19), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of jet plume effects test IA19 using a vehicle 5 configuration integrated space shuttle vehicle 0.02-scale model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 x 11-foot leg of the unitary plan wind tunnel. The jet plume power effects on the integrated vehicle static pressure distribution were determined along with elevon, main propulsion system nozzle, and solid rocket booster nozzle effectiveness and elevon hinge moments.

  11. Associations of Foot Posture and Function to Lower Extremity Pain: The Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Riskowski, JL; Dufour, AB; Hagedorn, TJ; Hillstrom, Howard; Casey, VA; Hannan, MT

    2014-01-01

    Objective Studies have implicated foot posture and foot function as risk factors for lower extremity pain. Empirical population-based evidence for this assertion is lacking; therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional associations of foot posture and foot function to lower extremity joint pain in a population-based study of adults. Methods Participants were members of the Framingham Foot Study. lower extremity joint pain was determined by the response to the NHANES-type question, “On most days do you have pain, aching or stiffness in your [hips, knees, ankles, or feet]?” Modified Arch Index (MAI) classified participants as having planus, rectus (referent) or cavus foot posture. Center of Pressure Excursion Index (CPEI) classified participants as having over-pronated, normal (referent) or over-supinated foot function. Crude and adjusted (age, gender, BMI) logistic regression determined associations of foot posture and function to lower extremity pain. Results Participants with planus structure had higher odds of knee (1.57, 95% CI: 1.24– 1.99) or ankle (1.47, 95% CI: 1.05–2.06) pain, whereas those with a cavus foot structure had increased odds of ankle pain only (7.56, 95% CI: 1.99–28.8) and pain at one lower extremity site (1.37, 95% CI: 1.04–1.80). Associations between foot function and lower extremity joint pain were not statistically significant, except for a reduced risk of hip pain in those with an over-supinated foot function (0.69, 95% CI: 0.51–0.93). Conclusions These findings offer a link between foot posture and lower extremity pain, highlighting the need for longitudinal or intervention studies. PMID:24591410

  12. Space Shuttle AFRSI OMS pod environment test using model 81-0 test fixture in the Ames Research Center 9x7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS-314A/B/C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 9x7-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to help resolve an anomaly that developed during the STS-6 orbiter flight wherein sections of the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) covering the OMS pods suffered some damage. A one-third scale two-dimensional shell structure model of an OMS pod cross-section was employed to support the test articles. These consisted of 15 AFRSI blanket panels form-fitted over the shell structures for exposure to simulated flight conditions. Of six baseline blankets, two were treated with special surface coatings. Two other panels were configured with AFRSI sections removed from the OV099 orbiter vehicle after the STS-6 flight. Seven additional specimens incorporated alternative designs and repairs. Following a series of surface pressure calibration runs, the specimens were exposed to simulated ascent and entry dynamic pressure profiles. Entry conditions included the use of a vortex generator to evaluate the effect of shed vortices on the AFRSI located in the area of concern.

  13. Wind tunnel investigation of an all flush orifice air data system for a large subsonic aircraft. [conducted in a Langley 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.; Flechner, S. G.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1980-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel investigation on an all flush orifice air data system for use on a KC-135A aircraft are presented. The investigation was performed to determine the applicability of fixed all flush orifice air data systems that use only aircraft surfaces for orifices on the nose of the model (in a configuration similar to that of the shuttle entry air data system) provided the measurements required for the determination of stagnation pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. For the measurement of static pressure, additional flush orifices in positions on the sides of the fuselage corresponding to those in a standard pitot-static system were required. An acceptable but less accurate system, consisting of orifices only on the nose of the model, is defined and discussed.

  14. 14. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  15. 13. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. EXTERIOR VIEW OF OLD TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  16. Horizontal wind and temperature in the lower thermosphere (80-140 km) measured by a Na Lidar at Andes Lidar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Vargas, F.; Guo, Yafang; Swenson, Gary

    2016-07-01

    We report the first measurement of nighttime atmospheric temperature and horizontal wind profiles in the lower thermosphere up to 140 km with the Na lidar at Andes Lidar Observatory in Cerro Pachón, Chile (30.3S, 70.7W), when enhanced thermospheric Na was observed. Temperature and horizontal wind were derived up to 140 km using various resolutions, with the lowest resolution of about 2.7 hr and 15 km above 130 km. Thus the measurements span 60 km in vertical, more than double the traditional 25 km. On the night of 17 April 2015, the horizontal wind magnitude in the thermosphere exceeds 150 m/s, consistent with past rocket measurements. The meridional wind shows a clear transition from the diurnal-tide-dominant mesopause to the semidiurnal-tide-dominant lower thermosphere. A lidar with a 100 times the power-aperture product will be able to measure wind and temperature above 160 km and cover longer time span, providing key measurements for the study of atmosphere-space interactions in this region.

  17. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Semi-automatic readout equipment installed in the 1950s used for data recording and reduction in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST). A 1957 NACA report on wind tunnel facilities at Langley included these comments on the data recording and reduction equipment for the 8-foot HST: 'The data recording and reduction equipment used for handling steady force and pressure information at the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is similar to that described for the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. Very little dynamic data recording equipment, however, is available.' The description of the 16-foot transonic tunnel equipment is as follows: 'A semiautomatic force data readout system provides tabulated raw data and punch card storage of raw data concurrent with the operation of the wind tunnel. Provision is made for 12 automatic channels of strain gage-data output, and eight channels of four-digit manually operated inputs are available for tabulating and punching constants, configuration codes, and other information necessary for data reduction and identification. The data are then processed on electronic computing machines to obtain the desired coefficients. These coefficients and their proper identification are then machine tabulated to provide a printed record of the results. The punched cards may also be fed into an automatic plotting device for the preparation of plots necessary for data analysis.'

  18. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  19. Laser velocimeter optical traverse scheme: An investigation of a proposed optical scanning technique for Arnold Engineering and Development Center's four-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajci, G. S.

    1983-12-01

    This investigation analyzed a nonstandard laser velocimeter setup proposed for use in AEDC Wind Tunnel 4T. The setup uses a gimballed mirror to move the probe volume from point to point, and the translation of a lens to control the distance in the tunnel the probe volume reaches. Results show that for equal indices of refraction inside and outside the tunnel, the laser beams of a converging pair do not totally converge with its associated beam except under certain conditions, and the probe volumes created by each pair of overlapping laser beams do not always coincide. This work then provides the conditions necessary for total convergence of a pair of laser beams for this setup. A solution is then proposed to insure convergence of each laser beam pair and overlap of the two probe volumes. More than a solution to the above problems, a method is given to determine the azimuth and elevation angles for a mirror such that the reflected beam off the mirror passes through a given point in the tunnel after traversing a window. To carry out these investigations, a computer code was written to simulate the nonstandard laser velocimeter setup, and a second code was written to determine the azimuth and elevation angles for a mirror such that the reflected beam off the mirror passes through a given point in the tunnel after traversing a window. Both codes were written in FORTRAN 77, implemented on a CDC 6000-CYBER 74.

  20. Investigation of space shuttle launch vehicle external tank nose configuration effects (model 67-OTS) in the Rockwell International 7 by 7 foot trisonic wind tunnel (IA69)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R.; Rogge, R.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel aerodynamic investigations were conducted on an 0.015-scale representation of the space shuttle launch configuration. The primary test objectives were to investigate shock wave formation and record the aerodynamic stability and control effects generated by a new external tank nose configuration (MCR 467) at a Mach number of 1.2. Schlieren photographs were taken at angles of attack of -4 deg, 0 deg, and 4 deg, beta = 0 deg with force and pressure data recorded over the alpha range of -4 deg equal to or less than alpha equal to or less than 4 deg at beta = + or - 4 deg. The launch configuration model, consisting of the VL70-00014OA/B Orbiter, the VL78-000041B ET, and the VL77-000036A SRBs, was sting mounted on a 2.5-inch Task type internal balance entering through the ET base region. Wing, body, and base pressure lines for all orifices were routed internally through the model to the sting support system. Parametric variation consisted only of altering the ET nose configuration.

  1. SKITTER foot design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Gene; Jones, David L.; Morris, James; Parham, Martin; Stephens, Jim; Yancey, Gregg

    1987-01-01

    A mechanical design team was formed to design a foot for the lunar utility vehicle SKITTER. The primary design was constrained to be a ski pole design compatible with the existing femur-tibia design legs. The lunar environment had several important effects on the foot design. Three materials were investigated for the SKITTER foot: aluminum alloys, cold worked stainless steel alloys, and titanium alloys. Thin film coatings were investigated as a method of wear reduction for the foot. The performance of the foot is dependent on the action of the legs. The range of motion for the legs was determined to be vertical to 15 degrees above horizontal. An impact analysis was performed for the foot movement, but the results were determined to be inconclusive due to unknown soil parameters. The initial foot design configuration consisted of an annulus attached to the pointed pole. The annulus was designed to prevent excess sinkage. Later designs call for a conical shaped foot with a disk at the point of the tibia attachment. The conical design was analyzed for strength and deflection by two different approaches. A deformable body analysis was performed for the foot under crane load in crane position, and also under actuator load in the vertical position. In both cases, the deflection of the foot was insignificant and the stresses well below the strength of the titanium alloy.

  2. An Investigation of the Wing and the Wing-Fuselage Combination of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XP-91 Airplane in the Ames 40-by 80-Foot Wing Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; Dew, Joseph K.

    1948-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XP-91 airplane were conducted to determine the longitudinal and lateral characteristics of the wing alone and the wing-fuselage combination, the characteristics of the aileron, and the damping in roll af the wing alone. Various high-lift devices were investigated including trailing-edge split flaps and partial- and full-span leading-edge slats and Krueger-type nose flaps. Results of this investigation showed that a very significant gain in maximum lift could be achieved through use of the proper leading-edge device, The maximum lift coefficient of the model with split flaps and the original partial-span straight slats was only 1.2; whereas a value of approximately 1.8 was obtained by drooping the slat and extending it full span, Improvement in maximum lift of approximately the same amount resulted when a full-span nose flap was substituted for the original partial-span slat.

  3. Heat transfer test of an 0.006-scale thin-skin thermocouple space shuttle model (50-0, 41-T) in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 5.3 (IH28), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, J. W.; Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained from a heat transfer test conducted on an 0.006-scale space shuttle orbiter and external tank in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel are presented. The purpose of this test was to obtain data under simulated return-to-launch-site abort conditions. Configurations tested were integrated orbiter and external tank, orbiter alone, and external tank alone at angles of attack of 0, + or - 30, + or - 60, + or - 90, and + or - 120 degrees. Runs were conducted at Mach numbers of 5.2 and 5.3 for Reynolds numbers of 1.0 and 4.0 million per foot, respectively. Heat transfer data were obtained from 75 orbiter and 75 external tank iron-constantan thermocouples.

  4. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    MedlinePlus

    ... pounding their feet endure from... Foot Injuries in Olympic Athletes and Beyond Foot and ankle surgeons offer ... for athletes of all levels. The 2012 Summer Olympics have arrived, and according to foot and ankle ...

  5. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript in your browser. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  6. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 33. Kim PJ, Steinberg JS. Complications of the diabetic foot. Endocrinol Metab Clin N Am. 2013;42:833-847. PMID: 24286952 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24286952 . Read More Diabetes Diabetes and nerve damage Leg or foot amputation Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Diabetes and ...

  7. Comparison of wind tunnel and flyover noise measurements of the YOV-10A STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Soderman, P. T.

    1972-01-01

    The YOV-10A Research Aircraft was flown to obtain flyover noise data that could be compared to noise data measured in the 40- by 80- foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The flyover noise measurements were made during the early morning hours on runway 32L at Moffett Field, California. A number of passes were made at 50 ft altitude in level flight with an airplane configuration closely matching that tested in the wind tunnel. Two passes were selected as prime and were designated for full data reduction. The YOV-10A was flown over a microphone field geometrically similar to the microphone array set up in the wind tunnel. An acoustic center was chosen as a matching point for the data. Data from the wind tunnel and flyover were reduced and appropiate corrections were applied to compare the data. Results show that wind tunnel and flight test acoustic data agreed closely.

  8. A directional microphone array for acoustic studies of wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Noble, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    An end-fire microphone array that utilizes a digital time delay system has been designed and evaluated for measuring noise in wind tunnels. The directional response of both a four- and eight-element linear array of microphones has enabled substantial rejection of background noise and reverberations in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. In addition, it is estimated that four- and eight-element arrays reject 6 and 9 dB, respectively, of microphone wind noise, as compared with a conventional omnidirectional microphone with nose cone. Array response to two types of jet engine models in the wind tunnel is presented. Comparisons of array response to loudspeakers in the wind tunnel and in free field are made.

  9. Evaluating the Cavus Foot.

    PubMed

    Eleswarapu, Ananth S; Yamini, Bakhtiar; Bielski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    The cavus foot is a deformity characterized by abnormal elevation of the medial arch of the foot. Unique among foot deformities, cavus typically occurs secondary to a spinal cord or neuromuscular pathology, with two-thirds of patients having an underlying neurologic diagnosis. Thus, recognition of cavus foot and appropriate evaluation are essential in the primary care setting. Patients may present with unstable gait, frequent ankle sprains, or pain along the metatarsal heads or the lateral border of the foot. The diagnosis can be confirmed with a lateral weight-bearing radiograph, with several key measurements defining a pes cavus alignment. A thorough history and physical examination should be performed to look for possible secondary causes. The first step in the treatment of cavus deformity is to address the underlying cause. After that, a variety of treatment options are available to alleviate the pain and dysfunction caused by this deformity. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e218-e222.]. PMID:27294497

  10. Construction of Foundation for 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Completed foundation for the outer housing for the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman was given the assignment to design and build a larger spin tunnel that would supplant the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Authorization to build the tunnel using funds from the Federal Public Works Administration (PWA) came in June 1933. Construction started in late winter 1934 and the tunnel was operational in April 1935. The initial construction costs were $64,000.

  11. Airloads investigation of an 0.030-scale model of the space shuttle vehicle 140A/B launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the arc 11-foot unitary plan wind tunnel for Mach range 0.6 to 1.4 (IA14A), Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Results of tests conducted on an 0.030-scale launch configuration model of the space shuttle vehicle 140A/B in the NASA/ARC 11-foot unitary plan wind tunnel are presented. Aerodynamic loads data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Surface pressure distributions were obtained simultaneously with six-component stability and control force data on the complete launch configuration. The configuration consisted of the orbiter, an external tank, two solid rocket boosters, and associated intercomponent attach hardware. Angles of attack and sideslip from -10 degrees to +10 degrees were investigated.

  12. A four-element end-fire microphone array for acoustic measurements in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Noble, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    A prototype four-element end-fire microphone array was designed and built for evaluation as a directional acoustic receiver for use in large wind tunnels. The microphone signals were digitized, time delayed, summed, and reconverted to analog form in such a way as to create a directional response with the main lobe along the array axis. The measured array directivity agrees with theoretical predictions confirming the circuit design of the electronic control module. The array with 0.15 m (0.5 ft) microphone spacing rejected reverberations and background noise in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel by 5 to 12 db for frequencies above 400 Hz.

  13. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  14. Biomechanics of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Prost, William J.

    1979-01-01

    The foot goes through a complex series of biomechanical movements in a normal gait cycle, which result in smooth and coordinated propulsion. Various biomechanical faults may result in abnormal motion of the foot, the most important of which is abnormal pronation, causing the foot to be unstable in propulsion, leading to hypermobility of the joints, and eventual subluxation with static deformities. This abnormal motion must be treated, usually be biomechanical orthotic devices, sometimes combined with surgery. Emphasis is laid on the early recognition and correction of biomechanical faults to prevent deformities.

  15. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcer has healed. These devices will take the pressure off of the ulcer area. This will help speed healing. Be sure to wear shoes that do not put a lot of pressure on only one part of your foot. Wear ...

  16. Foot pain causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 58. LeCursi N. Sports shoes and orthoses. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... Ligamentous Injuries of the Foot and Ankle. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  17. Leg or foot amputation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your high blood pressure Diabetes - foot ulcers Dietary fats explained Fast food ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic ...

  18. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems How can diabetes affect my feet? Too much glucose, also called ... you have any of these signs. How can diabetes change the shape of my feet? Nerve damage ...

  19. [The infected diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Voide, C; Trampuz, A; Orasch, C

    2012-10-31

    Disorders of local immunity associated with diabetes, neuropathy, vascular disease and pressure lesions all contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic foot lesions. Diabetic foot infections are frequently encountered, comprising multifactorial pathology and high morbidity and mortality rates. Microbiological sampling is indicated only when infection is suspected clinically, that is, when a lesion presents a minimum of two of the following six signs: erythema, heat, pain, tumefaction, induration or purulent discharge. PMID:23117963

  20. Prehensile Foot Restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willits, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed prehensile foot restraint enables such workers as astronauts and divers to maintain fixed positions in zero gravity or in buoyancy with minimal effort. With foot restraint worker devotes attention fully to task at hand, with little concern about holding on to supporting structure. Claw near toe of shoe grips rail. Wearer uses flexible shaft, first to lock claw tightly on bar; then, when work is done, to open claw. Underwater or in space, device boosts productivity.

  1. Diabetic foot risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, M Gail

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is a serious chronic disease that results in foot complications for many people world-wide. In 2014, the World Health Organization estimated the global prevalence of diabetes in adults to be 9%. To ascertain the risk that an individual patient might develop a diabetic foot ulcer that could lead to an amputation, clinicians are strongly encouraged to perform a risk assessment. Monteiro-Soares and Dinis-Ribeiro have presented a new DIAbetic FOot Risk Assessment with the acronym DIAFORA. It is different from other risk assessments in that it predicts the risk of developing both diabetic foot ulcers and amputation specifically. The risk variables were derived by regression analysis based on a data set of 293 patients from a high-risk setting, a Hospital Diabetic Foot Clinic, who had diabetes and a diabetic foot ulcers. Clear descriptions of the risk variables are provided as well as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the risk categories. As an added benefit, likelihood ratios are provided that will help clinicians determine the risk of amputation for individual patients. Having a risk assessment form is important for clinician use and examples exist. A question is raised about the effectiveness of risk assessment and how effectiveness might be determined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26825436

  2. Bi-directional streaming of solar wind electrons greater than 80 eV - ISEE evidence for a closed-field structure within the driver gas of an interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    In near time coincidence with the arrival of helium enriched plasma driving the shock wave disturbance of November 12-13, 1978, strong bi-directional streaming of solar wind electrons greater than about 80 eV was observed with Los Alamos instrumentation on ISEE 3. The streaming persisted for many hours simultaneously parallel and anti-parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field which was directed roughly perpendicular to the sun-satellite line. This example of bidirectional streaming cannot be explained by field line connection to the earth's bow shock or the outward propagating interplanetary shock which passed ISEE 3 approximately 16 hours earlier. The event is explained if the local interplanetary field was a part of a magnetic bottle rooted at the sun or a disconnected loop propagating outward.

  3. 6. CLOSEUP VIEW OF TENFOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF TEN-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  4. High-Speed Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Model of the Lockheed YP-80A Airplane Including Correlation with Flight Tests and Tests of Dive-Recovery Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleary, Joseph W.; Gray, Lyle J.

    1947-01-01

    This report contains the results of tests of a 1/3-scale model of the Lockheed YP-90A "Shooting Star" airplane and a comparison of drag, maximum lift coefficient, and elevator angle required for level flight as measured in the wind tunnel and in flight. Included in the report are the general aerodynamic characteristics of the model and of two types of dive-recovery flaps, one at several positions along the chord on the lower surface of the wing and the other on the lower surface of the fuselage. The results show good agreement between the flight and wind-tunnel measurements at all Mach numbers. The results indicate that the YP-80A is controllable in pitch by the elevators to a Mach number of at least 0.85. The fuselage dive-recovery flaps are effective for producing a climbing moment and increasing the drag at Mach numbers up to at least 0.8. The wing dive-recovery flaps are most effective for producing a climbing moment at 0.75 Mach number. At 0.85 Mach number, their effectiveness is approximately 50 percent of the maximum. The optimum position for the wing dive-recovery flaps to produce a climbing moment is at approximately 35 percent of the chord.

  5. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Interior view of the slotted throat test section installed in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST) in 1950. The slotted region is about 160 inches in length. In this photograph, the sting-type model support is seen straight on. In a NASA report, the test section is described as follows: 'The test section of the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is dodecagonal in cross section and has a cross-sectional area of about 43 square feet. Longitudinal slots are located between each of the 12 wall panels to allow continuous operation through the transonic speed range. The slots contain about 11 percent of the total periphery of the test section. Six of the twelve panels have windows in them to allow for schlieren observations. The entire test section is enclosed in a hemispherical shaped chamber.' John Becker noted that the tunnel's 'final achievement was the development and use in routine operations of the first transonic slotted throat. The investigations of wing-body shapes in this tunnel led to Whitcomb's discovery of the transonic area rule.' James Hansen described the origins of the the slotted throat as follows: 'In 1946 Langley physicist Ray H. Wright conceived a way to do transonic research effectively in a wind tunnel by placing slots in the throat of the test section. The concept for what became known as the slotted-throat or slotted-wall tunnel came to Wright not as a solution to the chronic transonic problem, but as a way to get rid of wall interference (i.e., the mutual effect of two or more meeting waves or vibrations of any kind caused by solid boundaries) at subsonic speeds. For most of the year before Wright came up with this idea, he had been trying to develop a theoretical understanding of wall interference in the 8-Foot HST, which was then being repowered for Mach 1 capability.' When Wright presented these ideas to John Stack, the response was enthusiastic but neither Wright nor Stack thought of slotted-throats as a solution to the transonic problem, only

  6. 16. Pony trusses pier between the 64 foot truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Pony trusses - pier between the 64 foot truss and the first 80 foot truss. View of the lower chord pin connection at the juncture of the two pony trusses as they sit on the replacement pier added, circa 1966. Shows the floor beam, chord eye bars. There are 10 of these similar connections for the six pony trusses. A 1 1/2 conduit is also shown. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  7. Post-test data report for the space shuttle full-scale AFRSI sequence of environments test (OS-305-1 to -5) in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) test article was wind tunnel tested. The AFRSI was exposed to a simulated ascent airloads environment and data was obtained which could be used to support the AFRSI certification program. The AFRSI sequence of environments also included radiant heating (1500 degrees Fahrenheit) and wind/rain environments. The test article was wind/rain conditioned before each wind tunnel entry and was thermally conditioned after each wind tunnel entry. The AFRSI failed and the test was aborted before reaching the ascent environment. The AFRSI test article sequentially exposed to 50 wind/rain and 49 simulated entry thermal missions, as well as four wind tunnel entries equivalent to 40 ascent missions.

  8. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat-transfer data for the 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 3 are presented, and interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of the orbiter. The test program was conducted at Mach 5.3 for nominal free-stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1,500,000 and 5,000,000.

  9. Insights into Airframe Aerodynamics and Rotor-on-Wing Interactions from a 0.25-Scale Tiltrotor Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. A.; Lillie, D.; McCluer, M.; Yamauchi, G. K.; Derby, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation into tiltrotor aerodynamics and acoustics has resulted in the acquisition of a set of data related to tiltrotor airframe aerodynamics and rotor and wing interactional aerodynamics. This work was conducted in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex's (NFAC) 40-by-80 Foot Wind Tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, on the Full-Span Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM). The full-span TRAM wind tunnel test stand is nominally based on a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 aircraft. The data acquired will enable the refinement of analytical tools for the prediction of tiltrotor aeromechanics and aeroacoustics.

  10. Charcot foot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoate, W J

    2015-06-01

    Charcot foot syndrome is an uncommon complication of diabetes but is potentially devastating in its consequences. Outcome is made worse by widespread professional ignorance leading to delayed diagnosis, but it is also hampered by lack of understanding of its causes and lack of treatments with proven effectiveness, other than offloading. There remains a desperate need for studies into its causes as well as comparative audit and trials designed to determine the best treatment for this difficult condition. Such work can probably only be effectively carried out through the establishment of multicentre networks. Nevertheless, improved understanding in recent years of the likely role of inflammatory pathways has raised awareness of the multiple ways in which the effects of neuropathy may be manifest in the development of the Charcot foot. This awareness is also leading to the realization that similar processes may conceivably contribute to the refractoriness of other foot diseases in diabetes, including both chronic unhealing ulcers and osteomyelitis. PMID:25818542

  11. 40 CFR 80.80 - Penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Penalties. 80.80 Section 80.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.80 Penalties. (a) Any person that violates...

  12. 4. PACK TRAIN WAITING TO BE UNLOADED AT FOOT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PACK TRAIN WAITING TO BE UNLOADED AT FOOT OF YAKI TRAIL. APPROXIMATELY TWO-AND-ONE-HALF TONS OF STEEL ON ANIMALS SHOWN. NOTE COIL OF 1-1/2' WIND CABLE IN FOREGROUND. - Kaibab Trail Suspension Bridge, Spanning Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  13. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  14. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    MedlinePlus

    Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most often begins in the throat. ... Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) is most commonly caused by a virus called coxsackievirus A16. Children under age 10 are most ...

  15. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that most ...

  16. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and Ankle Surgeons Warn Against Taking Part in Growing Surgery ... members of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, who specialize in foot surgery, are taking ...

  17. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical specialists of the podiatric ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  18. Effectiveness of foot care education among people with type 2 diabetes in rural Puducherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Saurabh, Suman; Sarkar, Sonali; Selvaraj, Kalaiselvi; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Roy, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Background: The burden of diabetes and its foot complications is increasing in India. Prevention of these complications through foot care education should be explored. The objective of our study was to assess the risk factors of poor diabetic foot care and to find the effectiveness of health education in improving foot care practice among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to the outpatients of a rural health center with type 2 diabetes. Awareness regarding diabetes, care of diabetes and foot care practice ware assessed and scored. Individual and group health education focusing on foot care was performed. Foot care practice was reassessed after 2 weeks of education. Results: Only 54% were aware that diabetes could lead to reduced foot sensation and foot ulcers. Nearly 53% and 41% of the patients had good diabetes awareness and good diabetes care respectively. Only 22% of the patients had their feet examined by a health worker or doctor. The patients with poor, satisfactory and good practice scores were 44.7%, 35.9% and 19.4% respectively. Low education status, old age and low awareness regarding diabetes were the risk factors for poor practice of foot care. Average score for practice of foot care improved from 5.90 ± 1.82 to 8.0 ± 1.30 after 2 weeks of health education. Practice related to toe space examination, foot inspection and foot wear inspection improved maximally. Conclusion: Foot care education for diabetics in a primary care setting improves their foot care practice and is likely to be effective in reducing the burden of diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:24701439

  19. Richard H. Foote

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Richard H. Foote, a world renowned specialist on the taxonomy of fruit flies and a widely respected former leader of the Systematic Entomology Laboratory, ARS, USDA, ARS, USDA, died on February 9, 2002. A summary of his career and his most important contributions to entomological research and the fi...

  20. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  1. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations. PMID:27294922

  2. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations. PMID:27294922

  3. The NASA Langley 8-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Reagon, Patricia G.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel is a continuous-flow, variable-pressure wind tunnel with control capability to independently vary Mach number, stagnation pressure, stagnation temperature, and humidity. The top and bottom walls of the test section are axially slotted to permit continuous variation of the test section Mach number from 0.2 to 1.2, the slot-width contour provides a gradient-free test section 50 in. long for Mach numbers equal to or greater than 1.0 and 100 in. long for Mach numbers less than 1.0. The stagnation pressure may be varied from 0.25 to 2.0 atm. The tunnel test section has been recalibrated to determine the relationship between the free-stream Mach number and the test chamber reference Mach number. The hardware was the same as that of an earlier calibration in 1972 but the pressure measurement instrumentation available for the recalibration was about an order of magnitude more precise. The principal result of the recalibration was a slightly different schedule of reentry flap settings for Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.05 than that determined during the 1972 calibration. Detailed tunnel contraction geometry, test section geometry, and limited test section wall boundary layer data are presented.

  4. Terminal area energy management regime investigations utilizing an 0.030-scale model (47-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B/C/R in the Ames Research Center 11 x 11 foot transonic wind tunnel (OH/48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained in a wind tunnel test were examined to: (1) obtain pressure distributions, forces and moments over the vehicle 5 Orbiter in the terminal area energy management (TAEM) and approach phases of flight; (2) obtain elevon and rudder hinge moments in the TAEM and approach phases of flight; (3) obtain body flap and elevon loads for verification of loads balancing with integrated pressure distributions; and (4) obtain pressure distributions near the short OMS pods in the high subsonic, transonic and low supersonic Mach number regimes. Testing was conducted over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.4 with Reynolds number variations from 7.57 x 1 million to 2.74 x 1 million per foot. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 to 16 degrees and angles of sideslip ranged from -8 to 8 degrees.

  5. Results of an aerodynamic investigation of a space shuttle orbiter/747 carrier flight test configuration to determine separation characteristics utilizing 0.0125-scale models (48-0/AX1318I-1) in the LTV 4 x 4 foot high speed wind tunnel (CA26), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Results of tests conducted on a 0.0125-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and a 0.0125-scale model of the 747 CAM configuration in a 4 x 4-foot High Speed Wind Tunnel were presented. Force and moment data were obtained for each vehicle separately at a Mach number of 0.6 and for each vehicle in proximity to the other at Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7. The proximity effects of each vehicle on the other at separation distances (from the mated configuration) ranging from 1.5 feet to 75 feet were presented; 747 Carrier angles of attack from 0 deg to 6 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg and -5 deg were tested. Model variables included orbiter elevon, aileron and body flap deflections, orbiter tailcone on and off, and 747 stabilizer and rudder deflections.

  6. Terminal area energy management regime investigations utilizing an 0.030-scale model (47-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B/C/R in the Ames Research Center 11 x 11 foot transonic wind tunnel (0A148), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained in wind tunnel tests are presented. The objectives of the tests were to: (1) obtain pressure distributions, forces and moments over the vehicle 5 Orbiter in the terminal area energy management (TAEM) and approach phases of flight; (2) obtain elevon and rudder hinge moments in the TAEM and approach phases of flight; (3) obtain body flap and elevon loads for verification of loads balancing with integrated pressure distributions; and (4) obtain pressure distributions near the short OMS pods in the high subsonic, transonic and low supersonic Mach number regimes. Testing was conducted over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.4 with Reynolds number variations from 4.57 million to 2.74 million per foot. Model angle-of-attack was varied from -4 to 16 degrees and angles of side slip ranged from -8 to 8 degrees.

  7. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  8. The foot of Homo naledi

    PubMed Central

    Harcourt-Smith, W. E. H.; Throckmorton, Z.; Congdon, K. A.; Zipfel, B.; Deane, A. S.; Drapeau, M. S. M.; Churchill, S. E.; Berger, L. R.; DeSilva, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo. PMID:26439101

  9. The foot of Homo naledi.

    PubMed

    Harcourt-Smith, W E H; Throckmorton, Z; Congdon, K A; Zipfel, B; Deane, A S; Drapeau, M S M; Churchill, S E; Berger, L R; DeSilva, J M

    2015-01-01

    Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints. In combination, these features indicate a foot well adapted for striding bipedalism. However, the H. naledi foot differs from modern humans in having more curved proximal pedal phalanges, and features suggestive of a reduced medial longitudinal arch. Within the context of primitive features found elsewhere in the skeleton, these findings suggest a unique locomotor repertoire for H. naledi, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo. PMID:26439101

  10. [Diabetic foot infections].

    PubMed

    Ryšková, Lenka

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are serious problems in persons with diabetes, about 10 to 25 % of patients with dia-betes develop a foot ulcer and 60 % of them are infected. DFIs cause morbidity, limit mobility, worsen patients quality of life. Infections are classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Most DFIs are polymicrobial, with Gram-positive cocci (especially staphylococci), Gram-negative bacilli and obligate anaerobes. Successful therapy of DFI requires proper topical care and often includes surgical interventions but appropriate antibiotic treatment plays a key role. Initial antimicrobial therapy of these infections is usually empirical, the antibiotic regimen should be based on the severity of the infection. Definitive therapy should then be tailored according to the results of culture and susceptibility tests from a reliably obtained specimen. PMID:26258977

  11. Aerodynamic results of an abort separation effects test (IA8) conducted in the NASA/ARC 14-foot transonic wind tunnel on a model (6-OTS) of the Rockwell International launch configuration integrated vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on a 6-OTS 0.015-scale model. The Ames dual sting support separation rig was used to obtain grid-type data for tank-booster abort from orbiter (SSV). Freestream data were obtained for the orbiter to provide a baseline for evaluation of proximity effects. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.32 to 1.1, and Reynolds number per foot varying from 2.1 million to 3.9 million. Data are not presented. Because of balance failure, a very substantial portion of the test was run with a dummy balance in the tank boosters configuration.

  12. The neuropathic diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Rathur, Haris M; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, and result in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are likely to be of neuropathic origin and, therefore, are eminently preventable. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet: education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb-threatening, or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identification of causative pathogens. Tissue specimens are strongly preferred to wound swabs for wound cultures. Antimicrobial therapy should be guided by culture results, and although such therapy may cure the infection, it does not heal the wound. Alleviation of the mechanical load on ulcers (offloading) should always be a part of treatment. Plantar neuropathic ulcers typically heal in 6 weeks with nonremovable casts, because pressure at the ulcer site is mitigated and compliance is enforced. The success of other approaches to offloading similarly depends on the patient's adherence to the strategy used for pressure relief. PMID:17179926

  13. Gait characteristics following Achilles tendon elongation: the foot rocker perspective.

    PubMed

    Bober, Tadeusz; Dziuba, Alicja; Kobel-Buys, Krystyna; Kulig, Kornelia

    2008-01-01

    The action of three functional rockers, namely the heel, ankle and forefoot rocker, assist the progression of the leg over the supporting foot. The purpose of this case series was to analyze the occurrence of foot rockers during gait in three children with cerebral palsy (CP) who had undergone the tendo-Achilles lengthening (TAL), procedure followed by a clinic- or home-based intervention and in one child with CP without history of surgery. Self-selected gait was video-recorded in a laboratory during six testing sessions at half-year intervals rendering a 3 year period of observation. One child had pre- and post-surgical gait data and the other two had post surgical data only. Sagittal plane knee angular velocity, as well as foot to ground positions, and foot rocker occurrence were analyzed. In a child with history of CP, and without history of surgery, mean angular velocities of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd foot rocker were 3.7, 0.57 and 6.67 rad/s, respectively, and the step length and cadence were normal. In children who underwent TAL the 1st and 2nd rocker was absent, as the initial contact of the foot with the ground was either with foot-flat or forefoot. The mean velocity of the 3rd rocker in children who underwent TAL was lower by approximately 50-80% than that of the nonsurgical case. Furthermore, the characteristic pattern of the knee joint to foot-floor position during gait was not observed in these cases. Foot rocker analysis identified children with abnormal gait characteristics. Following surgery these gait characteristics remained abnormal. PMID:18634352

  14. Wind Technology Advancements and Impacts on Western Wind Resources (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-09-01

    Robi Robichaud made this presentation at the Bureau of Land Management West-wide Wind Opportunities and Constraints Mapping (WWOCM) Project public meeting in Denver, Colorado in September 2014. This presentation outlines recent wind technology advancements, evolving turbine technologies, and industry challenges. The presentation includes maps of mean wind speeds at 50-m, 80-m, and 100-m hub heights on BLM lands. Robichaud also presented on the difference in mean wind speeds from 80m to 100m in Wyoming.

  15. 9. BUILDING NO. 620B, FRICTION PENDULUM BUILDING. 29FOOT DROP TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BUILDING NO. 620-B, FRICTION PENDULUM BUILDING. 29-FOOT DROP TOWER SITS BEHIND BLAST SHIELD IN FRONT OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  16. 93. View showing erection traveler erecting 190 foot span over ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    93. View showing erection traveler erecting 190 foot span over Southern Pacific Company's main line track. This is the last span of the steel approach to the main bridge spans. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  17. [Neuropathy and diabetic foot ulcers].

    PubMed

    Lobmann, R

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature. Polyneuropathy plays an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the high rates of major amputations. PMID:25903093

  18. The Jaipur limb and foot.

    PubMed

    Sharp, M

    1994-01-01

    In the 12 years which have elapsed since the United Nations declared 1981 to be the Year of the Disabled, the number of amputees world-wide has risen alarmingly, continuing the pattern of the past 40 years, which have seen innumerable conflicts, large and small, with ever-increasing and indiscriminate use of 'improved' antipersonnel mines which have been sown in enormous numbers in rural areas. Even after fighting has ceased--as in Vietnam, which currently has some 200,000 amputees--fresh injuries are caused daily, often to children, by the long-delayed detonation of these weapons. Much of the research and development in prosthetics since World War II has concentrated on producing artificial limbs suitable for an affluent and industrialized society. These, being made from the most modern materials and incorporating the latest technology, are of necessity expensive even for affluent Americans or Europeans and quite out of reach for the 80 per cent of the world's amputees who live in the developing world and for the vast majority of whom these splendid prostheses may be entirely inappropriate. This article describes a foot and leg specifically designed to fit in with the customs and practices of just such people. PMID:7935168

  19. Imaging of diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Robert; Bar-David, Tzvi; Kamen, Stewart; Staron, Ronald B; Leung, David K; Rasiej, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Complications from diabetic foot infections are a leading cause of nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations. Nearly 85% of these amputations result from an infected foot ulcer. Osteomyelitis is present in approximately 20% of diabetic foot infections. It is imperative that clinicians make quick and successful diagnoses of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) because a delay in treatment may lead to worsening outcomes. Imaging studies, such as plain films, bone scans, musculoskeletal ultrasound, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scans, aid in the diagnosis. However, there are several mimickers of DFO, which present problems to making a correct diagnosis. PMID:24296017

  20. Enchondroma of the Foot.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Stephanie, Stephanie; Choi, Jun Young; Nam, Ji Ho; Suh, Jin Soo

    2015-01-01

    The present study is a review of 20 patients with enchondroma of the foot treated from January 2005 to March 2012. All patients were examined clinically, followed by an evaluation of their enchondroma of the foot radiographically and an assessment of the outcome of their surgical intervention. The patients' sex and age, enchondroma location, findings from imaging studies such as plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, clinical findings, operative findings, and treatment outcomes were recorded. The average postoperative follow-up period was 24 months. Eighty percent of the tumors were located in the proximal phalanx and 14 (70%) patients presented with pathologic fracture. The plain radiographs and computed tomography findings revealed 13 (65%) cases of internal calcification and 11 (55%) with endosteal scalloping. A periosteal reaction was seen only in 4 (20%) cases. Magnetic resonance imaging of 11 (55%) patients showed low T1-weighted and high T2-weighted signal intensity in all cases. Internal septa and nodules with low T2-weighted signal intensity were observed in 9 (82%) out of 11 cases, and adjacent soft tissue edema was noted in 9 (82%). All patients underwent curettage of the tumor and bone grafting as their surgical treatment. No recurrence or postoperative complications were observed during the 24-month follow-up period. Enchondroma of the foot most frequently involves the proximal phalangeal bone and is often associated with pathologic fracture. The unique clinical signs and characteristic radiographic images are easily recognized, making this a relatively easy diagnosis. With appropriate treatment, a good surgical outcome can be expected. PMID:26024560

  1. Melanoma of the Foot.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Ivan; Bower, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is a rare form of skin cancer that is responsible for most skin cancer deaths globally. Tumors arising on the foot continue to be a particular challenge. Patients present later and lesions are frequently misdiagnosed, leading to more advanced disease with an overall poorer prognosis then melanoma elsewhere. In order to improve early recognition, this article reviews the clinical features of the disease along with published algorithms. Emerging assessment techniques such as dermoscopy are also discussed as tools to improve clinical decision making. Contemporary drug therapies in the treatment of advanced disease are also discussed. PMID:27215160

  2. Results of transonic wind tunnel tests on an 0.010-scale space shuttle mated vehicle model 72-OTS in the LaRC 8-foot TPT (IA43)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in NASA/Langley 8-Foot transonic pressure tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of 104A/B configuration of the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle. Component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over an angle of attack range of -10 deg to +10 deg at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.8, 0.9, 0.98, 1.13, and 1.2. Selected configurations were tested at sideslip angles from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbit, wing bending and torsion were measured on the right wing. Inboard elevon setting of 0 deg, +4 deg and +8 deg and outboard settings of 0 deg, +4 deg and +8 deg were tested.

  3. Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter (model 49-O) in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (OA36)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Gillins, R. L.; Cleary, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of the 140A/B configuration components are reported for the fuselage, canopy, elevons, bodyflaps, pods, engine nozzles, rudder, vertical tail, and wing. The test facility, and data reduction procedures are described. Test results for each component are graphed, and tabulated source data are included.

  4. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Search the Foot and Ankle Foot conditions in this region: Bunions (Hallux Valgus) » ... Injuries » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) » Tarsal Coalition » Ankle Fractures » Ankle Sprain » Chronic Ankle Instability » Equinus » Gout » ...

  5. The diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charles A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2007-10-01

    Lower extremity complications are common in patients with diabetes and include neuropathy, ulceration, infection, and peripheral arterial disease. Foot infections represent the single most common cause of hospitalization and lower extremity amputation in persons with diabetes. Foot ulceration as a result of diabetic peripheral sensory neuropathy, rigid osseous deformities and soft-tissue contractures, repetitive trauma from unprotected ambulation, and peripheral vascular disease can all lead to a limb- or life-threatening infection. Antibiotic therapy for diabetic soft-tissue and osseous infections is usually inadequate as an isolated form of therapy. The mainstay of treatment involves well-planned surgical procedures, including extensive and properly placed incisions to perform adequate drainage of abscesses and débridement of necrotic soft-tissue and osseous structures from which deep cultures are obtained for specific antibiotic coverage. Initial antibiotic therapy should provide broad-spectrum coverage, and when final culture results are available the regimen should be revised to organism-specific coverage. Detailed and timely evaluation of the vascularity of the limb is paramount, followed by timely vascular reconstruction involving various endovascular and open surgical procedures to restore pulsatile flow to the full extent of the limb. PMID:17936480

  6. An experimental 100 kilowatt wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Puthoff, R. L.; Savino, J. M.; Johnson, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental generator consists of two blades mounted on 100 foot tower, driving transmission train and electric generator mounted on top of tower. Machine generates 100 kW of electricity at wind speeds from 18 to 60 miles per hour. Yaw control mechanism automatically orients machine into wind.

  7. Relationship between foot type, foot deformity, and ulcer occurrence in the high-risk diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, William R; Shofer, Jane B; Smith, Douglas G; Sullivan, Katrina; Hayes, Shane G; Assal, Mathieu; Reiber, Gayle E

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized an association between foot type, foot deformity, and foot ulceration and conducted an analysis of a well-characterized, high-risk diabetic population of 398 subjects. The average age was 62 years of age and 74% of the study population were males. Foot-type distributions were 19.5% pes cavus (high arch), 51.5% neutrally aligned (normal arch), and 29.0% pes planus (low arch). We quantified the presence of hallux valgus (23.9%), hammer/claw toes (46.7%), and hallux limitus (24.4%). A significant association was found between foot type and hallux valgus (p = 0.003); pes planus feet had the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (odds ratio [OR] = 2.43, p = 0.0006). Foot type was also significantly associated with fixed hammer/claw toes (p = 0.01); pes cavus feet had the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (OR = 3.89, p = 0.001). Foot type was also significantly associated with hallux limitus (p = 0.006) with pes planus feet having the highest prevalence as compared with neutrally aligned feet (OR = 2.19, p = 0.003). However, foot type was not significantly related to any ulcer outcome (p = 0.7). Fixed hammer/claw toes (OR = 3.91, p = 0.003) and hallux limitus (OR = 3.02, p = 0.006) were associated with increased risk of any ulcer occurrence. This study affirms that foot type and foot deformity are related and that foot deformities are associated with ulcer occurrence. PMID:16586192

  8. Tests of a Triangular Wing of Aspect Ratio 2 in the Ames 12-foot Pressure Wind Tunnel III : the Effectiveness and Hinge Moments of a Skewed Wing-tip Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbe, Carl D; Tinling, Bruce E

    1948-01-01

    Results of wind-tunnel tests of a semispan model of a triangular wing of aspect ratio 2 with a skewed wing-tip flap are presented. Lift, drag, pitching-moment, and hinge-moment data are included for subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.95. The flap showed extremely high hinge moments and low effectiveness as a longitudinal control. Although less affected by compressibility, this flap is indicated to be inferior to a constant-chord flap when applied to this triangular wing.

  9. A Study of Acoustic Reflections in Full-Scale Rotor Low Frequency Noise Measurements Acquired in Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha L.; Sim, Ben W.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Goulding, Pat, II

    2010-01-01

    Difficulties in obtaining full-scale rotor low frequency noise measurements in wind tunnels are addressed via residual sound reflections due to non-ideal anechoic wall treatments. Examples illustrated with the Boeing-SMART rotor test in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel facility demonstrated that these reflections introduced distortions in the measured acoustic time histories that are not representative of free-field rotor noise radiation. A simplified reflection analysis, based on the method of images, is used to examine the sound measurement quality in such "less-than-anechoic" environment. Predictions of reflection-adjusted acoustic time histories are qualitatively shown to account for some of the spurious fluctuations observed in wind tunnel noise measurements

  10. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  11. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  12. 3. VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST (1991). WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL, LOOKING NORTHWEST (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  13. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). WrightPatterson Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  14. Testing a Parachute for Mars in World's Largest Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The team developing the landing system for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory tested the deployment of an early parachute design in mid-October 2007 inside the world's largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California.

    In this image, two engineers are dwarfed by the parachute, which holds more air than a 280-square-meter (3,000-square-foot) house and is designed to survive loads in excess of 36,000 kilograms (80,000 pounds).

    The parachute, built by Pioneer Aerospace, South Windsor, Connecticut, has 80 suspension lines, measures more than 50 meters (165 feet) in length, and opens to a diameter of nearly 17 meters (55 feet). It is the largest disk-gap-band parachute ever built and is shown here inflated in the test section with only about 3.8 meters (12.5 feet) of clearance to both the floor and ceiling.

    The wind tunnel, which is 24 meters (80 feet) tall and 37 meters (120 feet) wide and big enough to house a Boeing 737, is part of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, operated by the U.S. Air Force, Arnold Engineering Development Center.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is building and testing the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft for launch in 2009. The mission will land a roving analytical laboratory on the surface of Mars in 2010. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  15. Search the Foot and Ankle: Interactive Foot Diagram

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search by GPS Please enter a city or last name. Use your current position? {{ps.position.alert.message}} ... digit zip code. Please enter a city or last name. Search Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram ...

  16. Complications of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Steinberg, John S

    2013-12-01

    The diabetic foot is at high risk for complications because of its role in ambulation. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can lead to chronic foot ulcers, which are at high risk for infection, in part attributable to areas of high pressure caused by lack of tolerance of the soft tissue and bone and joint deformity. If left untreated, infection and ischemia lead to tissue death, culminating in amputation. Treatment strategies include antibiosis, topical therapies, offloading, debridement, and surgery. A multidisciplinary team approach is necessary in the prevention and treatment of complications of the diabetic foot. PMID:24286952

  17. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  18. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristic of semispan commercial transport model with wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller operating in reverse thrust. [conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Gile, Brenda E.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1994-01-01

    A test was conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of the reverse-thrust flow field of a wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan subsonic high-lift transport model. The advanced ducted propeller (ADP) model was mounted separately in position alongside the wing so that only the aerodynamic interference of the propeller and nacelle affected the aerodynamic performance of the transport model. Mach numbers ranged from 0.14 to 0.26; corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 2.2 to 3.9 x 10(exp 6). The reverse-thrust flow field of the ADP shielded a portion of the wing from the free-stream airflow and reduced both lift and drag. The reduction in lift and drag was a function of ADP rotational speed and free-stream velocity. Test results included ground effects data for the transport model and ADP configuration. The ground plane caused a beneficial increase in drag and an undesirable slight increase in lift. The ADP and transport model performance in ground effect was similar to performance trends observed for out of ground effect. The test results form a comprehensive data set that supports the application of the ADP engine and airplane concept on the next generation of advanced subsonic transports. Before this investigation, the engine application was predicted to have detrimental ground effect characteristics. Ground effect test measurements indicated no critical problems and were the first step in proving the viability of this engine and airplane configuration.

  19. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  20. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  1. 7 CFR 1217.4 - Board foot.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Board foot. 1217.4 Section 1217.4 Agriculture..., and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.4 Board foot. Board foot or BF means a unit of... cubic equivalent. A board foot calculation for softwood lumber 1 inch or more in thickness is based...

  2. Freeing the foot: integrating the foot core system into rehabilitation for lower extremity injuries.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Fourchet, François

    2015-04-01

    The intrinsic muscles of the foot play a critical role in the regulation of absorption and propulsion during dynamic activities. Dysfunction of these may lead to an increased demand on the remaining components within the foot core system to maintain dynamic foot control, leading to a more rapid breakdown of these contributors and those proximal to the foot. Training the intrinsic foot muscles through a systematic progression of isolation via the short foot exercise offers the opportunity to reincorporate their contribution into the foot core system. This article discusses the function of the intrinsic foot muscles, their contributions to dynamic foot control, and a progressive training paradigm. PMID:25818718

  3. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... the big toe “pushes off” during walking and running. The sesamoids also serve as a weight-bearing ... on the ball of the foot when walking, running, and jumping. Sesamoid injuries can involve the bones, ...

  4. Living with Diabetes: Foot Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... area and to prevent the ulcer from returning. Poor Circulation Poor circulation (blood flow) can make your foot less ... can control some of the things that cause poor blood flow. Don't smoke; smoking makes arteries ...

  5. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  6. Foot Push-Up Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search by GPS Please enter a city or last name. Use your current position? {{ps.position.alert.message}} ... digit zip code. Please enter a city or last name. Search Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram ...

  7. Prevention and management of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Turns, Martin

    2015-03-01

    As part of an annual foot review, trained and competent personnel should examine patients' feet to detect risk factors for ulceration. Foot examination with shoes and stockings removed should include: palpation of foot pulses; testing foot sensations using 10g monofilament or vibration; inspection for significant callus or deformed nails; inspection for any structural deformity; asking about any previous ulceration; checking for signs of ulceration; asking about any pain; and inspecting footwear. Following assessment, a foot risk classification score should be given. The person with diabetes should then be informed of their risk score, with education offered regarding future foot-care management. Diabetic foot complications include ulceration, Charcot foot, painful neuropathy, gangrene and amputation. Risk factors for ulceration include non-palpable pulses, insensate foot, significant callus, deformed nails, history of previous ulcer or amputation, tissue damage or signs of ulceration, foot pain and unsuitable footwear. PMID:25757381

  8. Chronic foot pain in older people.

    PubMed

    Menz, Hylton B

    2016-09-01

    Foot pain is a common accompaniment of advancing age, affecting at least one in four older people. However, management of foot pain is a largely undervalued aspect of geriatric health care, resulting in many older people needlessly enduring chronic foot pain and related disability. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of (i) the prevalence and risk factors for foot pain, (ii) the impact of foot pain on mobility and quality of life, and (iii) the conservative management of foot pain. The available evidence indicates that although foot pain is common and disabling in older people, conservative interventions such as routine foot care, footwear advice and foot orthoses are effective at reducing foot pain and may also assist in maintaining mobility and independence in this age group. PMID:27451329

  9. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Additional information is given in tabular form.

  10. Results of an experimental investigation to determine separation characteristics for the Orbiter/747 using a 0.0125-scale model (48-0 AX1318I-1 747) in the Ames Research Center 14-foot wind tunnel (CA23B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic separation data obtained from a wind tunnel test of an 0.0125-scale SSV Orbiter model of a VC70-000002 Configuration and a 0.0125-scale 747 model was presented. Separation data was obtained at a Mach number of 0.6 and three incidence angles of 4, 6, and 8 degrees. The orbiter angle of attack was varied from 0 to 14 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and normal separation increments were obtained for fixed 747 angles of attack of 0, 2, and 4 degrees while varying the orbiter angle of attack. Control surface settings on the 747 carrier included rudder deflections of 0 and 10 degrees and horizontal stabilizer deflections of -1 and +5 degrees.

  11. Results of transonic wind tunnel tests on an 0.015-scale space shuttle mated vehicle model (67-ots) in the LaRC 8 foot TPT (IA41)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, R.; Burrows, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to obtain aerodynamic force data for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20. Data were obtained for an alpha range of -10 deg to +10 deg (beta = 0 deg beta = 5 deg) and beta range of -10 deg to +10 deg (alpha = 0 deg). Longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control data were obtained for tank alone, tank plus SRB's, tank plus Orbiter, and mated configuration of tank + Orbiter + SRB's. Also, single-component rudder hinge moment data were obtained at rudder deflections of 0 and -20 deg for each Mach number tested. Plots of aerodynamic coefficients vs. Mach number are presented, using data from both test IA41 and tests LRC-UPWT-1056, 1073 (IA42A/B) for Mach numbers of 1.60 to 4.63. The model tested in IA42A/B was the same model as tested in IA41.

  12. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Data is given in graphical and tabular form.

  13. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics of two V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft configurations at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.0. [Ames 9 by 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P.; Durston, D. A.; Lummus, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Ames 9 by 7 ft supersonic wind tunnel to measure the aerodynamic characteristics of two horizontal attitude takeoff and landing V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft concepts. One concept featured a jet diffuser ejector for its vertical lift system and the other employed a remote augmentation lift system (RALS). Test results for Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.0 are reported. Effects of varying the angle of attack (-4 deg to +17 deg), angle of sideslip (-4 deg to +8 deg) Mach number, and configuration building were investigated. The effects of wing trailing edge flap deflections, canard incidence, and vertical tail deflections were also explored as well as the effects of varying the canard longitudinal location and shapes of the inboard nacelle body strakes.

  14. Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foust, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

  15. Synovial sarcoma of the foot.

    PubMed

    Bekarev, Mikhail; Elsinger, Elisabeth C; Villanueva-Siles, Esperanza; Borzykowski, Ross M; Geller, David S

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old male who underwent lung lobectomy for presumed lung cancer. Thereafter, he presented with a painful mass between the third and fourth metatarsal heads in the foot that was assumed to be Morton's neuroma. After extensive oncologic evaluation, the foot mass was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma. In retrospect, his lung lesion was understood to be metastatic disease. PMID:23632071

  16. Nine toes; Mirror Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Vlahovic, Aleksandar M; Pistignjat, Boris S; Vlahovic, Natasa S

    2015-01-01

    Mirror foot is a very rare congenital anomaly, with only a few papers presenting definitive treatment for this entity. There are limited management recommendations. Most cases are treated before walking age. In our case, there were no associated developmental defects of the leg. The child underwent complex rays resection with medial foot reconstruction. After 7.5 years of followup, definitive surgical treatment was performed with satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:26229172

  17. [Gap junction and diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-rong; Tao, Jian; Wang, Yun-kai

    2015-11-01

    Gap junctions play a critical role in electrical synchronization and exchange of small molecules between neighboring cells; connexins are a family of structurally related transmembrane proteins that assemble to form vertebrate gap junctions. Hyperglycemia changes the structure gap junction proteins and their expression, resulting in obstruction of neural regeneration, vascular function and wound healing, and also promoting vascular atherosclerosis. These pathogenic factors would cause diabetic foot ulcers. This article reviews the involvement of connexins in pathogenesis of diabetic foot. PMID:26822053

  18. Homosexual foot fetishism.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, M S; Williams, C J; Calhan, C

    1994-12-01

    262 respondents from an organization for homosexual foot fetishists provide information from a broader sample than clinical cases and allow examination of the effects of sexual preference on fetishism. Data show a wide range of feet/footwear objects to be arousing. Such interests were often associated with particular types of men, yet interests were subject to change over time. Fetishistic arousal rested on both sensual and symbolic aspects of the fetish. Symbolically, it was the theme of "masculinity" that made male feet/footwear arousing, showing parallels to "femininity" evoked by female feet/footwear for male heterosexual fetishists. For many of the respondents, fetishism did not seem to be a substitute for living persons. Respondents had intimate relationships and were able to incorporate their fetish interests into stable relationships and less intimate ones. Considerable involvement in sadomasochistic practices was also found as was involvement in the gay world. Finally, nothing about a fetishistic interest seemed to preclude the development of subcultural forms around the practice. PMID:7872858

  19. Mouth in Foot Disease.

    PubMed

    Melton, Katie S; DeRosa, Daniel C; Agee, Willie A; Pires, Valerie L; Yim, Duke G; Ngauy, Viseth

    2015-09-01

    Toothpicks are commonly used household items that rarely cause serious injury or infection. Toothpick-related injuries often occur due to ingestion with subsequent trauma/infection at distal sites within the gastrointestinal tract; however, cardiovascular, pleural, and soft tissue infections have been reported. Eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus found in oral flora associated with bite wound infections. A few case reports describe E. corrodens osteomyelitis from toothpick puncture wounds. We report a case of foot cellulitis and abscess in an elderly diabetic after toothpick puncture injury that was unresponsive to empiric antibiotics. Wound cultures grew E. corrodens and rare Peptostreptococcus species. E. corrodens is resistant to first-generation cephalosporins, macrolides, aminoglycosides, clindamycin, and metronidazole. This case highlights the insidious nature of E. corrodens infections and the need to tailor empiric antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections based on the mechanism of injury. In addition, this case stresses the importance of protective footwear in diabetics and serves as a cautionary tale regarding the use of seemingly innocuous toothpicks. PMID:26793413

  20. Mouth in Foot Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, Daniel C; Agee, Willie A; Pires, Valerie L; Yim, Duke G; Ngauy, Viseth

    2015-01-01

    Toothpicks are commonly used household items that rarely cause serious injury or infection. Toothpick-related injuries often occur due to ingestion with subsequent trauma/infection at distal sites within the gastrointestinal tract; however, cardiovascular, pleural, and soft tissue infections have been reported. Eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus found in oral flora associated with bite wound infections. A few case reports describe E. corrodens osteomyelitis from toothpick puncture wounds. We report a case of foot cellulitis and abscess in an elderly diabetic after toothpick puncture injury that was unresponsive to empiric antibiotics. Wound cultures grew E. corrodens and rare Peptostreptococcus species. E. corrodens is resistant to first-generation cephalosporins, macrolides, aminoglycosides, clindamycin, and metronidazole. This case highlights the insidious nature of E. corrodens infections and the need to tailor empiric antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections based on the mechanism of injury. In addition, this case stresses the importance of protective footwear in diabetics and serves as a cautionary tale regarding the use of seemingly innocuous toothpicks. PMID:26793413

  1. [Update on diabetic foot infections].

    PubMed

    Pascale, Renato; Vitale, Mario; Esposito, Silvano; Noviello, Silvana

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common non-transmitted disease and currently 346 million people are affected in the world. According to the World Health Organization about 15% of diabetic patients develop a foot ulcer in need of medical care. Infection is a serious complication and in the western world it is the major responsible cause of lower limb amputation. In the 84% of cases amputation is the final step in the treatment of a non-healing foot ulcer. So, it's clear that, in order to reduce amputation rate, it's important to prevent foot ulcer formation and improve the treatment of lesion. In this review we report the most recent international literature as regards epidemiology, etiology, classification, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of infected diabetic foot ulcers. The purpose of our work is to remark the multifactorial features of this pathology and the role of infectious disease specialist in a multidisciplinary team for the treatment of infected diabetic foot ulcers. The knowledge of microbiology on one hand, and the need of a complex and long term antibiotic therapy on the other, point out the importance of infectious disease specialist to facilitate, if possible, the healing of a infected diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22992555

  2. 75 FR 60102 - South Dakota PrairieWinds Project (DOE/EIS-0418)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... capacity wind- powered energy generation facility that would feature 101 wind turbine generators... feature 101 wind turbine generators; 6,000 square-foot operations and maintenance building and fence... of the Proposed Project and Wind Partners' proposed development on birds and bats and to use...

  3. Full-scale wind tunnel investigation of a helicopter individual blade control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Leyland, Jane A.; Blaas, Achim

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the preparations and plans to test an individual rotor blade pitch control system in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. The test will be performed on a full-scale BO-105 rotor system using a control system made by Henschel Flugzeug-Werke, GmbH, Germany. The Individual Blade Control (IBC) actuators have been designed to replace the pitchlinks of the rotor system. The paper presents a brief historical perspective on the development of the individual blade control system and then describes the present IBC actuators and the wind tunnel test hardware. A discussion of the intended test matrix, expected potential benefits of IBC, and simulation results are included.

  4. Experience with scale effects in non-airplane wind tunnel testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. C.; Olson, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamics results of two tests performed in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center are discussed with particular emphasis on the effects of model scale. The tests are unusual for this facility in that they were performed on non-airplane configurations: a full-scale tractor/trailer and large ramair inflated wings. For the truck drag measurements, comparisons with 1/8th-scale drag data taken at the Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M indicate that small scale measurements can provide adequate accuracy if care is taken to test at high enough Reynolds numbers and if large regions of separated flow and reattachment are avoided. Some of the important aerodynamic and structural aspects of parafoil testing are also discussed. These include the effects of Reynolds number and aeroelastic effects such as fabric and support line stretch.

  5. Results of the Low Speed Aeroelastic Buffet Test with a 0.046-scale Model (747-ax1322-d-3/orbiter 8-0) of the 747 Cam/orbiter in the University of Washington Wind Tunnel (CS 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillins, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel studies designed to assess the potential buffet problems resulting from orbiter wake characteristics with its tailcone removed are presented to provide design loads and acceleration environments, and to develop data on buffet sensitivity to various aerodynamic configurations and flight parameters. Data are intended to support subsequent analyses of structural fatigue life, crew efficiency, and equipment vibrations.

  6. SMART Rotor Development and Wind-Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Benton H.; Straub, Friedrich; Anand, V. R.; Birchette, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Boeing and a team from Air Force, NASA, Army, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Los Angeles, and University of Maryland have successfully completed a wind-tunnel test of the smart material actuated rotor technology (SMART) rotor in the 40- by 80-foot wind-tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center, figure 1. The SMART rotor is a full-scale, five-bladed bearingless MD 900 helicopter rotor modified with a piezoelectric-actuated trailing-edge flap on each blade. The development effort included design, fabrication, and component testing of the rotor blades, the trailing-edge flaps, the piezoelectric actuators, the switching power amplifiers, the actuator control system, and the data/power system. Development of the smart rotor culminated in a whirl-tower hover test which demonstrated the functionality, robustness, and required authority of the active flap system. The eleven-week wind tunnel test program evaluated the forward flight characteristics of the active-flap rotor, gathered data to validate state-of-the-art codes for rotor noise analysis, and quantified the effects of open- and closed-loop active-flap control on rotor loads, noise, and performance. The test demonstrated on-blade smart material control of flaps on a full-scale rotor for the first time in a wind tunnel. The effectiveness and the reliability of the flap actuation system were successfully demonstrated in more than 60 hours of wind-tunnel testing. The data acquired and lessons learned will be instrumental in maturing this technology and transitioning it into production. The development effort, test hardware, wind-tunnel test program, and test results will be presented in the full paper.

  7. The Guyana Diabetes and Foot Care Project: Improved Diabetic Foot Evaluation Reduces Amputation Rates by Two-Thirds in a Lower Middle Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Sibbald, R. Gary; Martin, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes is the fourth leading cause of death in Guyana, South America. A complex, interprofessional, quality improvement intervention to improve foot and diabetes care was rolled out in two phases. Methods & Findings. Phase 1: Establishment of an Interprofessional Diabetic Foot Center (DFC) of Excellence to improve foot care and reduce diabetes-related amputations at the national referral hospital. Phase 2: Regionalization to cover 90% of the Guyanese population and expansion to include improved management of diabetes and hypertension. Fourteen key opinion leaders were educated and 340 health care professionals from 97 facilities trained. Eight centers for the evaluation and treatment of foot ulcers were established and 7567 people with diabetes evaluated. 3452 participants had foot screening and 48% were deemed high risk; 10% of these had undocumented foot ulcers. There was a 68% reduction in rate of major amputations (P < 0.0001); below knee amputations were decreased by 80%, while above knee amputations were unchanged. An increased association of diabetes with women (F/M = 2.09) and increased risk of major amputation in men [odds ratio 2.16 (95% CI 1.83, 2.56)] were documented. Conclusions. This intervention improved foot care with reduction in major amputations sustained over 5 years. PMID:26089901

  8. Wind speed forecasting for wind energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong

    With more wind energy being integrated into our grid systems, forecasting wind energy has become a necessity for all market participants. Recognizing the market demands, a physical approach to site-specific hub-height wind speed forecasting system has been developed. This system is driven by the outputs from the Canadian Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model. A simple interpolation approach benchmarks the forecasting accuracy inherited from GEM. Local, site specific winds are affected on a local scale by a variety of factors including representation of the land surface and local boundary-layer process over heterogeneous terrain which have been a continuing challenge in NWP models like GEM with typical horizontal resolution of order 15-km. In order to resolve these small scale effects, a wind energy industry standard model, WAsP, is coupled with GEM to improve the forecast. Coupling the WAsP model with GEM improves the overall forecasts, but remains unsatisfactory for forecasting winds with abrupt surface condition changes. Subsequently in this study, a new coupler that uses a 2-D RANS model of boundary-layer flow over surface condition changes with improved physics has been developed to further improve the forecasts when winds coming from a water surface to land experience abrupt changes in surface conditions. It has been demonstrated that using vertically averaged wind speeds to represent geostrophic winds for input into the micro-scale models could reduce forecast errors. The hub-height wind speed forecasts could be further improved using a linear MOS approach. The forecasting system has been evaluated, using a wind energy standard evaluation matrix, against data from an 80-m mast located near the north shore of Lake Erie. Coupling with GEM-LAM and a power conversion model using a theoretical power curve have also been investigated. For hub-height wind speeds GEM appears to perform better with a 15-Ian grid than the high resolution GEM-2.5Ian version at the

  9. Management of ischemic diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Caravaggi, C; Ferraresi, R; Bassetti, M; Sganzaroli, A B; Galenda, P; Fattori, S; De Prisco, R; Simonetti, D; Bona, F

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot pathology represent the more disabling complication of diabetes. More the 1 million of diabetes patients undergo a lower limb amputation per year; 85% of these amputation are preceded by un ulcer that can be avoided by a prevention program. Critical limb ischemia (CLI), the only independent cause of major amputation in diabetic population, can be correctly treated when an early diagnosis is made. Both endoluminal and surgical revascularization procedures can be applied in diabetes with high rate of success when performed by skilled operator. Infection of diabetic foot, in particular in patients suffering from peripheral artery disease (PVD), may rapidly evolves in severe local or systemic infection putting the patient at high risk of major amputation or death. Together with an early diagnosis of infection and ischemia it is mandatory to apply a correct medical and surgical treatment protocol with the aim to control infection and to improve blood perfusion to the foot. In case of infection surgical procedure should be applied first while revascularization procedure will follow soonest. Antibiotic therapy should be chosen considering different local biological pattern and different type of infection. Reconstructive surgery, the last step in treatment of any diabetic foot lesion, must obtain a functional residual foot or a stump that will allow the patient to go back walking soonest with residual good walking capacity. PMID:24126511

  10. 2010 Wind Program Peer Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, Randy; Clark, Charlton; Beaudry-Losique, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the technical, scientific, and business results of over 80 projects of the Wind Program, as well as the productivity and management effectiveness of the Wind Program itself.

  11. [Adjuvant treatment of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Lo Pardo, Dante; Pezzuti, Gabriela; Selleri, Carmine; Pepe, Stefano; Esposito, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    A diabetic infected foot with erythema and fluctuation can suspect that the infection has passed the fascial compartmental, a condition that requires surgical drainage. Elective amputation may be considered for patients who have recurrent ulcers, irreversible loss of function or injuries that require long-term treatment in the hospital. If the diabetic infected foot appears ischemic it requires a treatment of revascularization. The outcome of revascularization is related with the extension of the damaged artery. The debridement removes the bacterial colonies, promotes granulation tissue and its reepithelialization, also facilitates the collection of samples for microbiological analyses. This procedure can be performed with the classic sharp instruments or with advanced autolytic dressings, maggots or ultrasonic equipment. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of infected diabetic foot is controversial because studies in this area are few and methodologically questionable. The same conclusion was reached also for the use of growth factors and skin substitutes. PMID:22982696

  12. Foot Comfort for the Fashionable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Modellista Footwear's new shoe line uses Tempur(TM) material, which conforms to each wearer's unique foot shape to absorb shock and cushion the foot. The foam's properties allow the shoe to change with the wearer's foot as it shrinks and swells throughout the day. Scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center originally developed temper foam in the early 1970s to relieve the intense pressure of G-forces experienced by astronauts during rocket launches. Tempur-Pedic, Inc., further developed the foam and granted Modellista a license to use it in footwear. The Modellista collection is the first shoe design and construction to be certified by the Space Awareness Alliance. The shoes, with designs ranging from traditional clog shapes to sling backs and open-toe sandals, are currently available nationwide at select specialty shoe stores and through catalogs. Tempur(TM) is a registered trademark of Tempur-Pedic, Inc.

  13. Design, fabrication, and test of a composite material wind turbine rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffee, D. G., Jr.; Gustafson, R. E.; More, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic design, structural design, fabrication, and structural testing is described for a 60 foot long filament wound, fiberglass/epoxy resin matrix wind turbine rotor blade for a 125 foot diameter, 100 kW wind energy conversion system. One blade was fabricated which met all aerodynamic shape requirements and was structurally capable of operating under all specified design conditions. The feasibility of filament winding large rotor blades was demonstrated.

  14. Wind Tunnel Test of the SMART Active Flap Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Anand, Vaidyanthan R.; Birchette, Terrence S.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Boeing and a team from Air Force, NASA, Army, DARPA, MIT, UCLA, and U. of Maryland have successfully completed a wind-tunnel test of the smart material actuated rotor technology (SMART) rotor in the 40- by 80-foot wind-tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. The Boeing SMART rotor is a full-scale, five-bladed bearingless MD 900 helicopter rotor modified with a piezoelectric-actuated trailing edge flap on each blade. The eleven-week test program evaluated the forward flight characteristics of the active-flap rotor at speeds up to 155 knots, gathered data to validate state-of-the-art codes for rotor aero-acoustic analysis, and quantified the effects of open and closed loop active flap control on rotor loads, noise, and performance. The test demonstrated on-blade smart material control of flaps on a full-scale rotor for the first time in a wind tunnel. The effectiveness of the active flap control on noise and vibration was conclusively demonstrated. Results showed significant reductions up to 6dB in blade-vortex-interaction and in-plane noise, as well as reductions in vibratory hub loads up to 80%. Trailing-edge flap deflections were controlled within 0.1 degrees of the commanded value. The impact of the active flap on control power, rotor smoothing, and performance was also demonstrated. Finally, the reliability of the flap actuation system was successfully proven in more than 60 hours of wind-tunnel testing.

  15. Transonic stability and control characteristics of a 0.015-scale (remotely controlled elevon) model 44-0 of the space shuttle orbiter tested in the NASA/LaRC 8 foot TPT (LA62). [wind tunnel stability tests in transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, J. D.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.; Parrell, H.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the test was to generate a detailed aerodynamic data base which can be used to substantiate the aerodynamic design data book for the current shuttle orbiter configuration. Special attention was directed to definition of nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics by taking data at small increments in Mach number, angle of attack, and elevon position. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment and elevon position data were recorded over an angle-of-attack range from -4 deg to 20 deg, at angles of sideslip of 0 deg and 2 deg. The test Mach numbers were from 0.35 to 1.20. The Reynolds number for most of the test was held at a constant 3.5 million per foot.

  16. Aspects of investigating STOL noise using large-scale wind-tunnel models.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falarski, M. D.; Soderman, P. T.; Koenig, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The applicability of the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel for acoustic research on STOL concepts has been investigated. The acoustic characteristics of the wind-tunnel test section have been studied with calibrated acoustic sources. Acoustic characteristics of several large-scale STOL models have been studied in both the free-field and wind-tunnel acoustic environments. The results of these studies indicate that the acoustic characteristics of large-scale STOL models can be measured in the wind tunnel if the test section acoustic environment and model acoustic similitude are taken into consideration. The reverberant field of the test section must be determined with an acoustically similar noise source. A directional microphone, a phased array of microphones, and extrapolation of near-field data to far-field are some of the techniques being explored as possible solutions to the directivity loss in a reverberant field. The model sound pressure levels must be of sufficient magnitude to be distinguishible from the wind-tunnel background noise.

  17. Wind turbine testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is investigating concepts for removing heat from nuclear material storage units. One method which has been suggested is the use of wind turbine ventilators on the roofs of the units. An advantage of these devices is that it would require no power to operate them, and in this sense the system would be fail safe. The internal heat in the storage units would naturally cause air to rise through the ventilators and the usually prevailing winds which average about 5 mph would combine with the buoyancy to exhaust the air from the units. However, it was not known whether these type of ventilators can deliver a sufficient air flow through the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters which must be an integral part of the ventilation system in a nuclear storage facility. Therefore, this study was undertaken to answer that question. In this report we will discuss the experiments which were run on two wind turbine ventilators, one with a one foot diameter inlet duct and one with a two foot diameter inlet duct. The wind turbines were supplied by LANL and tested in the New Mexico State University/LANL wind binnel housed in the Mechanical Engineering Department on the Las Cruces Campus of NMSU. The experiments were run at a nominal wind speed of 5 mph, with and without heating below the ventilator inlet and with and without resistance elements at the ventilator inlet.

  18. Calibration of the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, B. W., Jr.; Runckel, J. F.; Igoe, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal (plenum suction) was calibrated to a Mach number of 1.3. The results of the calibration, including the effects of slot shape modifications, test section wall divergence, and water vapor condensation, are presented. A complete description of the wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment is included.

  19. The Foot's Arch and the Energetics of Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Stearne, Sarah M; McDonald, Kirsty A; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Oxnard, Charles E; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The energy-sparing spring theory of the foot's arch has become central to interpretations of the foot's mechanical function and evolution. Using a novel insole technique that restricted compression of the foot's longitudinal arch, this study provides the first direct evidence that arch compression/recoil during locomotion contributes to lowering energy cost. Restricting arch compression near maximally (~80%) during moderate-speed (2.7 ms(-1)) level running increased metabolic cost by + 6.0% (p < 0.001, d = 0.67; unaffected by foot strike technique). A simple model shows that the metabolic energy saved by the arch is largely explained by the passive-elastic work it supplies that would otherwise be done by active muscle. Both experimental and model data confirm that it is the end-range of arch compression that dictates the energy-saving role of the arch. Restricting arch compression had no effect on the cost of walking or incline running (3°), commensurate with the smaller role of passive-elastic mechanics in these gaits. These findings substantiate the elastic energy-saving role of the longitudinal arch during running, and suggest that arch supports used in some footwear and orthotics may increase the cost of running. PMID:26783259

  20. Leg or foot amputation - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000018.htm Leg or foot amputation - dressing change To use the sharing features ... chap 16. Read More Compartment syndrome Leg or foot amputation Peripheral artery disease - legs Type 1 diabetes ...

  1. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Field Hockey Football Injuries Golf Injuries Lacrosse Rugby Running Soccer Softball Tennis Volleyball Find an ACFAS Physician ... Foot and Ankle Although golf does not involve running or jumping, injuries can occur to the foot ...

  2. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  3. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can sometimes occur in adults. Symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease include fever, mouth sores, and a skin rash. More About Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD) Describes causes of the disease, its symptoms, ...

  4. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find an Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon Page Content The Orthopaedic Distinction Who are Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeons? Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons are ...

  5. Large-scale wind tunnel tests of a sting-supported V/STOL fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, F.; Minter, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A new sting model support has been developed for the NASA/Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. This addition to the facility permits testing of relatively large models to large angles of attack or angles of yaw depending on model orientation. An initial test on the sting is described. This test used a 0.4-scale powered V/STOL model designed for testing at angles of attack to 90 deg and greater. A method for correcting wake blockage was developed and applied to the force and moment data. Samples of this data and results of surface-pressure measurements are presented.

  6. FloWind`s advanced EHD series wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B.

    1995-09-01

    The EHD series is a class of advanced, utility-grade vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) designed to maximize the profit derivable from any given wind site. The EHD (extended height-to-diameter) rotor geometry is varied to optimize energy capture depending on the characteristics of the wind site and the turbine`s location in the power plant array. By varying rotor height (42--63 meters (138--207 feet)) and diameter (17--21 meters (56--69 feet)) an optimal balance between swept area, aerodynamic efficiency, and wake loss is achieved with minimal modification to the turbine`s major components. In the fall of 19963, FloWind pultruded three blades for the first EHD wind turbine. These 48.8 meter (160 foot) long blades represented the largest structural protrusions ever fabricated. In January, 1994 the first EHD wind turbine was installed at FloWind`s wind power plant in Tehachapi, California and a full modal survey was carried out be researchers from the Sandia National Laboratories. Preliminary testing of the machine is underway and results from these tests have been compared directly to structural loads calculated by FloWind`s ANSYS dynamic model of the turbine. Results of the modal survey, predicted loads, and measured turbine operating data will be presented.

  7. OAKLAND 50-FOOT DEEPENING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web site posting major public documents for the "Oakland Harbor Navigation Improvement (-50 Foot) Project." Site includes the following project documents: Notice of Availability; Final Environmental Impact Statement/Report; Revisions to the Final EIS/R; and Final Feasibility Stud...

  8. Foot-and-mouth disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. An outbreak of FMD can have a significant economic impact because of the restrictions on international trade of susceptible animals and their products with FMD-free countries. In this chapter we discuss vario...

  9. Billet planting, 8-foot rows, residue updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultural practices are continually tested and upgraded to maximize sugarcane yield in Louisiana. Over the past 3 years extensive research went in to comparing the industry standard 6-foot row spacing to a wider, 8 foot row. Each 8 foot row was double drilled with seed canes that were 2-3 feet apart....

  10. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  11. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  12. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  13. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  16. Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? Print A A A Text Size ... while you might have lost feeling in your foot, it might have felt heavy, or you might ...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  18. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  19. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  1. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  2. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  3. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  7. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1910.136 Section 1910.136 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General... areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  11. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foot protection. 1918.104 Section 1918.104 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot... in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects or...

  12. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foot protection. 142.33 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foot protection. 1915.156 Section 1915.156 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.156 Foot protection. (a) Use. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foot protection. 1917.94 Section 1917.94 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.94 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot...

  15. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in Hong Kong: A Time-Series Analysis on Its Relationship with Weather

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin; Goggins, William B.; Chan, Emily Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is an emerging enterovirus-induced infectious disease for which the environmental risk factors promoting disease circulation remain inconclusive. This study aims to quantify the association of daily weather variation with hospitalizations for HFMD in Hong Kong, a subtropical city in China. Methods A time series of daily counts of HFMD public hospital admissions from 2008 through 2011 in Hong Kong was regressed on daily mean temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation and total rainfall, using a combination of negative binomial generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models, adjusting for trend, season, and day of week. Results There was a positive association between temperature and HFMD, with increasing trends from 8 to 20°C and above 25°C with a plateau in between. A hockey-stick relationship of relative humidity with HFMD was found, with markedly increasing risks over 80%. Moderate rainfall and stronger wind and solar radiation were also found to be associated with more admissions. Conclusions The present study provides quantitative evidence that short-term meteorological variations could be used as early indicators for potential HFMD outbreaks. Climate change is likely to lead to a substantial increase in severe HFMD cases in this subtropical city in the absence of further interventions. PMID:27532865

  16. Wind resource in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonasson, K.; Bjornsson, H.; Birgisson, T.; Blondal, J.

    2010-12-01

    Iceland has considerable renewable energy resources. While hydropower and geothermal power have been exploited on a significant scale, less attention has been paid to wind power. In preparation for the Nordic IceWind project, this study aims to build up a quality controlled data base of wind observations, and make a preliminary map of the wind resource. The data used come from 130 automatic weather stations distributed around Iceland, and consists of wind measurements every ten minutes in the period 1999 - 2010. The operational period for the stations varies from 5 to 10 years, and in total there were 55 million observations to quality check (QC). In 80 stations more than 99% of the data passed QC. Most problems occurred during winter, especially in harsh climate mountain stations. These problems involved anemometer freezing and faults and electrostatic spikes. The wind speeds were transferred to 90 m agl using a standard power law profile. The resulting data was then averaged for extended winter (Sep-Apr) and summer (May - Aug) seasons. Furthermore, a generic production curve for wind turbines was used to estimate the annual energy production (AEP) per installed megawatt for each season at each station. These results have been interpolated to intra-station locations, thus producing a preliminary wind atlas of for Iceland, which will aid in the selection of sites for potential wind farms. Although the data base has been completed, the analysis of of the data and the production of the wind atlas is ongoing. The inclusion of topographic effects, wind profile measurements and more detailed power production modeling will be further studied within the IceWind project, as well as incorporation of wind from a reanalysis downscaled with a numerical weather prediction model (NWP).

  17. A laser-sheet flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinath, M. S.; Ross, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    A flow visualization technique for the large wind tunnels of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) is described. The technique uses a laser sheet generated by the NFAC Long Range Laser Velocimeter (LRLV) to illuminate a smoke-like tracer in the flow. The LRLV optical system is modified slightly, and a scanned mirror is added to generate the sheet. These modifications are described, in addition to the results of an initial performance test conducted in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. During this test, flow visualization was performed in the wake region behind a truck as part of a vehicle drag reduction study. The problems encountered during the test are discussed, in addition to the recommended improvements needed to enhance the performance of the technique for future applications.

  18. Strength of Footing with Punching Shear Preventers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Sup; Moon, Jiho; Park, Keum-Sung; Bae, Kyu-Woong

    2014-01-01

    The punching shear failure often governs the strength of the footing-to-column connection. The punching shear failure is an undesirable failure mode, since it results in a brittle failure of the footing. In this study, a new method to increase the strength and ductility of the footing was proposed by inserting the punching shear preventers (PSPs) into the footing. The validation and effectiveness of PSP were verified through a series of experimental studies. The nonlinear finite element analysis was then performed to demonstrate the failure mechanism of the footing with PSPs in depth and to investigate the key parameters that affect the behavior of the footing with PSPs. Finally, the design recommendations for the footing with PSPs were suggested. PMID:25401141

  19. Comparison of Full-Scale XV-15 Wind Tunnel and In-Flight Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaplioglu, Cahit; McCluer, M.; Acree, C. W., Jr.; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    An isolated full-scale XV-15 rotor was tested in helicopter mode in the NASA Ames 80 by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Extensive acoustic data were obtained to define the rotor operating condition for maximum blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Additional data were obtained at operating conditions simulating flight up to 80 knots. An XV-15 aircraft was also tested under operating conditions corresponding to landing approaches for which BVI is expected to be a maximum. In-flight acoustic data were obtained using the YO-3A acoustic research aircraft. An attempt was made to closely match wind tunnel and flight test operating conditions. Details of the two tests are described and some representative acoustic results are presented. Comparisons are shown between the wind tunnel data and corresponding flight test data. Preliminary results indicate very good correlation of the BVI-related features. However, some differences between flight test and wind tunnel results exist away from the BVI event, thought to arise from differences in the two flow environments.

  20. A user's guide to the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel complex. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The operational characteristics and equipment associated with the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel complex which is located in buildings 1146 and 1234 at the Langley Research Center are described in detail. This complex consists of the 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, the static test facility, and the 16- by 24-inch water tunnel research facilities. The 16-foot transonic tunnel is a single-return atmospheric wind tunnel with a 15.5 foot diameter test section and a Mach number capability from 0.20 to 1.30. The emphasis for research conducted in this research complex is on the integration of the propulsion system into advanced aircraft concepts. In the past, the primary focus has been on the integration of nozzles and empennage into the afterbody of fighter aircraft. During the last several years this experimental research has been expanded to include developing the fundamental data base necessary to verify new theoretical concepts, inlet integration into fighter aircraft, nozzle integration for supersonic and hypersonic transports, nacelle/pylon/wing integration for subsonic transport configurations, and the study of vortical flows (in the 16- by 24-inch water tunnel). The purpose here is to provide a comprehensive description of the operational characteristics of the research facilities of the 16-foot transonic tunnel complex and their associated systems and equipments.

  1. Obese older adults suffer foot pain and foot-related functional limitation.

    PubMed

    Mickle, Karen J; Steele, Julie R

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest being overweight or obese places adults at greater risk of developing foot complications such as osteoarthritis, tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. However, no research has comprehensively examined the effects of overweight or obesity on the feet of individuals older than 60 years of age. Therefore we investigated whether foot pain, foot structure, and/or foot function is affected by obesity in older adults. Three hundred and twelve Australian men and women, aged over 60 years, completed validated questionnaires to establish the presence of foot pain and health related quality of life. Foot structure (anthropometrics and soft tissue thickness) and foot function (ankle dorsiflexion strength and flexibility, toe flexor strength, plantar pressures and spatiotemporal gait parameters) were also measured. Obese participants (BMI >30) were compared to those who were overweight (BMI=25-30) and not overweight (BMI <25). Obese participants were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of foot pain and scored significantly lower on the SF-36. Obesity was also associated with foot-related functional limitation whereby ankle dorsiflexion strength, hallux and lesser toe strength, stride/step length and walking speed were significantly reduced in obese participants compared to their leaner counterparts. Therefore, disabling foot pain and altered foot structure and foot function are consequences of obesity for older adults, and impact upon their quality of life. Interventions designed to reduce excess fat mass may relieve loading of the foot structures and, in turn, improve foot pain and quality of life for older obese individuals. PMID:26260010

  2. The foot core system: a new paradigm for understanding intrinsic foot muscle function.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Hertel, Jay; Bramble, Dennis; Davis, Irene

    2015-03-01

    The foot is a complex structure with many articulations and multiple degrees of freedom that play an important role in static posture and dynamic activities. The evolutionary development of the arch of the foot was coincident with the greater demands placed on the foot as humans began to run. The movement and stability of the arch is controlled by intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. However, the intrinsic muscles are largely ignored by clinicians and researchers. As such, these muscles are seldom addressed in rehabilitation programmes. Interventions for foot-related problems are more often directed at externally supporting the foot rather than training these muscles to function as they are designed. In this paper, we propose a novel paradigm for understanding the function of the foot. We begin with an overview of the evolution of the human foot with a focus on the development of the arch. This is followed by a description of the foot intrinsic muscles and their relationship to the extrinsic muscles. We draw the parallels between the small muscles of the trunk region that make up the lumbopelvic core and the intrinsic foot muscles, introducing the concept of the foot core. We then integrate the concept of the foot core into the assessment and treatment of the foot. Finally, we call for an increased awareness of the importance of the foot core stability to normal foot and lower extremity function. PMID:24659509

  3. Space Shuttle Model In The 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    What may appear at first glance to be a swimming shark is a wind tunnel model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, being tested at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton,VA. The Orbiter model is 5.5 feet long (1/20th of the real Orbiter's length) and has remotely operated control surfaces. Inside Langley's 16 foot Transonic Wind Tunnel, the model simulated Orbiter re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, when it must fly through the transonic speed range (the range that crosses the sound barrier). Information on Orbiter stability and control, collected and analyzed during the tests, were integrated with other data to become part of computerized flight simulation programs.

  4. Weigh-in-motion scale with foot alignment features

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert Knox; Richardson, Gregory David; Scudiere, Matthew Bligh

    2013-03-05

    A pad is disclosed for use in a weighing system for weighing a load. The pad includes a weighing platform, load cells, and foot members. Improvements to the pad reduce or substantially eliminate rotation of one or more of the corner foot members. A flexible foot strap disposed between the corner foot members reduces rotation of the respective foot members about vertical axes through the corner foot members and couples the corner foot members such that rotation of one corner foot member results in substantially the same amount of rotation of the other corner foot member. In a strapless variant one or more fasteners prevents substantially all rotation of a foot member. In a diagonal variant, a foot strap extends between a corner foot member and the weighing platform to reduce rotation of the foot member about a vertical axis through the corner foot member.

  5. [Diabetic foot infections: microbiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Noviello, Silvana; Esposito, Isabella; Pascale, Renato; Esposito, Silvano; Zeppa, Pio

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of wound infection is based on clinical signs and local and/or systemic inflammation. Therefore, the examination has a major role in the diagnosis of infected lesions of the foot. Once the clinical diagnosis of infection is made, the next step is to determine the etiology with the aim to undertake a rational and appropriate treatment. The most reliable method for assessing microbiological etiology is the specimen of material from infected lesion to perform a bacterioscopic examination and culture. The microorganisms involved in the etiology of diabetic foot depends on the type of injury and on specific patient features (antibiotic therapy, previous hospitalization). The most frequently detected pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus. Mild infections are mostly caused by Gram positive cocci, with a prevalence of S. aureus. Moderate infections are mostly supported by pyogenic Gram positive cocci, but also Gram-negative bacteria can be involved. In severe infections the etiology is polymicrobial. As regards the involvement of fungi in diabetic foot infections data are few and mostly conflicting. PMID:22982694

  6. [Infected lesions of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Vitale, Mario; Zeppa, Pio; Esposito, Isabella; Esposito, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    The diabetic foot lesions are the result of a complex set of factors including peripheral neuropathy, trauma, joint deformities and perfusion abnormalities. The foot becomes vulnerable and insensitive to minor injuries caused by excessive pressure, mechanically or minimum thermal insults that can determine the primum movens of a foot ulcer. Due to the trauma, the subcutaneous tissues are exposed to bacterial colonization. Therefore, the wound can develop an infection. So, the first step in the treatment of the lesion is the evaluation of tissue damage, in order to guide therapy and prognosis. Wagner's classification, used by over 25 years, is still one of the best known systems of lesion classification; however, it is giving way to the most recent Texas's classification. However, in both systems infection have a minority role. Therefore, the Infectious Diseases Society of America has developed a classification system that divides infections in mild, moderate and severe. The purpose of this classification is to recognize the severe patients because they require immediate hospitalization, parenteral antibiotic therapy and specific instrumental examinations. PMID:22982693

  7. Universal footing with jetting system

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.S.

    1988-08-02

    A universal footing and jetting system is described for supporting marine structures on various types of seafloor materials, comprising: (a) a spud-can structure forming an enlarged footing base particularly useful in soft type sediments and operable to be mounted beneath a marine structure to provide a foundation therefor in seafloor sediments; (b) a high-strength spike means mounted on the bottom of the spud-can structure which is operable to indent into coral and rock type seafloors for stability against sliding and for supporting the marine structure thereon; (c) a jetting system for distributing fluid under pressure to a plurality of jet nozzles positioned about top, bottom, and side surfaces of the spud-can; the plurality of jet nozzles being selectively operative for directing jet flow in upwardly, downwardly and sideways directions; (d) at least one high pressure source for supplying fluid under pressure to the jetting system; (e) the fluid under pressure being operable to be expelled from the jet nozzles about the spud-can surfaces for causing fluidization and boiling of seafloor soils in the immediate area adjacent to and surrounding the spud-can structure for penetration and self burial of the universal footing into the seafloor.

  8. Wind Simulation

    2008-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that provides an hourly simulation of a wind energy system, which includes a calculation of wind turbine output as a power-curve fit of wind speed.

  9. Aeroacoustic research in wind tunnels: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, J.; Arndt, R. E. A.

    1973-01-01

    The increasing attention given to aerodynamically generated noise brings into focus the need for quality experimental research in this area. To meet this need several specialized anechoic wind tunnels have been constructed. In many cases, however, budgetary constraints and the like make it desirable to use conventional wind tunnels for this work. Three basic problems are inherent in conventional facilities: (1) high background noise, (2) strong frequency dependent reverberation effects, and (3) unique instrumentation problems. The known acoustic characteristics of several conventional wind tunnels are evaluated and data obtained in a smaller 4- x 5-foot wind tunnel which is convertible from a closed jet to an open jet mode are presented. The data from these tunnels serve as a guideline for proposed modifications to a 7- x 10-foot wind tunnel. Consideration is given to acoustic treatment in several different portions of the wind tunnel.

  10. 40 CFR 80.142-80.154 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 80.142-80.154 Section 80.142-80.154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline §§ 80.142-80.154...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1200-80.1219 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 80.1200-80.1219 Section 80.1200-80.1219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene §§ 80.1200-80.1219 General Information...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1200-80.1219 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 80.1200-80.1219 Section 80.1200-80.1219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene §§ 80.1200-80.1219 General Information...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1200-80.1219 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1200-80.1219 Section 80.1200-80.1219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene §§ 80.1200-80.1219 General Information...

  14. 40 CFR 80.134-80.135 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 80.134-80.135 Section 80.134-80.135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §§ 80.134-80.135...

  15. 40 CFR 80.134-80.135 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.134-80.135 Section 80.134-80.135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §§ 80.134-80.135...

  16. 40 CFR 80.134-80.135 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 80.134-80.135 Section 80.134-80.135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §§ 80.134-80.135...

  17. 40 CFR 80.134-80.135 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 80.134-80.135 Section 80.134-80.135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §§ 80.134-80.135...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1433-80.1439 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1433-80.1439 Section 80.1433-80.1439 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1433-80.1439...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1156-80.1159 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1156-80.1159 Section 80.1156-80.1159 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1156-80.1159...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1417-80.1424 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1417-80.1424 Section 80.1417-80.1424 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1417-80.1424...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1408-80.1414 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1408-80.1414 Section 80.1408-80.1414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1408-80.1414...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1417-80.1424 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1417-80.1424 Section 80.1417-80.1424 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1417-80.1424...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1116-80.1124 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1116-80.1124 Section 80.1116-80.1124 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1116-80.1124...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1108-80.1114 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1108-80.1114 Section 80.1108-80.1114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1108-80.1114...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1144-80.1149 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1144-80.1149 Section 80.1144-80.1149 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1144-80.1149...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1444-80.1448 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1444-80.1448 Section 80.1444-80.1448 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1444-80.1448...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1133-80.1140 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1133-80.1140 Section 80.1133-80.1140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1133-80.1140...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1433-80.1439 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1433-80.1439 Section 80.1433-80.1439 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1433-80.1439...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1116-80.1124 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1116-80.1124 Section 80.1116-80.1124 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1116-80.1124...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1102-80.1103 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1102-80.1103 Section 80.1102-80.1103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1102-80.1103...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1444-80.1448 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1444-80.1448 Section 80.1444-80.1448 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1444-80.1448...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1108-80.1114 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1108-80.1114 Section 80.1108-80.1114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1108-80.1114...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1144-80.1149 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1144-80.1149 Section 80.1144-80.1149 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1144-80.1149...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1133-80.1140 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1133-80.1140 Section 80.1133-80.1140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1133-80.1140...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1102-80.1103 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1102-80.1103 Section 80.1102-80.1103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1102-80.1103...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1408-80.1414 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.1408-80.1414 Section 80.1408-80.1414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1408-80.1414...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1156-80.1159 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 80.1156-80.1159 Section 80.1156-80.1159 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Renewable Fuel Standard §§ 80.1156-80.1159...

  18. 40 CFR 80.142-80.154 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 80.142-80.154 Section 80.142-80.154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline §§ 80.142-80.154...

  19. 40 CFR 80.134-80.135 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 80.134-80.135 Section 80.134-80.135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §§ 80.134-80.135...

  20. Wind Tunnel Interference Effects on Tilt Rotor Testing Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koning, Witold J. F.

    2015-01-01

    variable. Power differences between free field and wind tunnel cases were found from -7 % to 0 % in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel test section and -1.6 % to 4.8 % in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel, depending on the TTR orientation, tunnel velocity and blade setting. The TTR will be used in 2016 to test the Bell 609 rotor in a similar fashion to the research in this report.

  1. The Five-Foot Bookshelf: Readings on Middle-Level Education and Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenzweig, Susan

    1997-01-01

    It would be hard to squeeze over 1,750 books on middle-level school reform onto a five-foot bookcase! With 22 experts' assistance, a manageable, three-part annotated bibliography of 80 books, reports, and journal articles covering core research areas, state reports, and critical reading was assembled. Samuel Totten's own bibliography (in section…

  2. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  3. Foot Plantar Pressure Measurement System: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Zayegh, Aladin; Begg, Rezaul K.; Wahab, Yufridin

    2012-01-01

    Foot plantar pressure is the pressure field that acts between the foot and the support surface during everyday locomotor activities. Information derived from such pressure measures is important in gait and posture research for diagnosing lower limb problems, footwear design, sport biomechanics, injury prevention and other applications. This paper reviews foot plantar sensors characteristics as reported in the literature in addition to foot plantar pressure measurement systems applied to a variety of research problems. Strengths and limitations of current systems are discussed and a wireless foot plantar pressure system is proposed suitable for measuring high pressure distributions under the foot with high accuracy and reliability. The novel system is based on highly linear pressure sensors with no hysteresis. PMID:23012576

  4. Laboratory evaluation of footings for lunar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, Koon M.; Golis, Kelly M.; Johnson, Stewart W.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are the results of laboratory experiments with diffferent footing shapes for lunar telescopes. These experiments used a variety of soils including some to simulate regolith response. Based on what is known of regolith and regolith-structure interaction, a shallow-multiple-contact points footing foundation can be adequately designed to support lunar telescopes. Plane-strain load-displacement tests were conducted with different footings and different lunar simulants in a deep transparent plexiglass container. The model footings considered include the rectangular, hemispherical, and spudcan designs. Simulants used to reproduce the mechanical properties of the lunar regolith were fly ash, crushed basalt with and without glass, and a processed lunar simulant. Load-displacement curves were obtained for the different footings in Ottawa sand and in the crushed basalt with glass. The spudcan footing was found to be self-digging and yet stiff, thus providing excellent lateral stability in a large variety of soils.

  5. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Orell, A.; Foster, N.

    2015-08-01

    The cover of the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report.According to the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, distributed wind reached a cumulative capacity of almost 1 GW (906 MW) in the United States in 2014, reflecting nearly 74,000 wind turbines deployed across all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In total, 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity was added in 2014, representing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment across 24 states. In 2014, America's distributed wind energy industry supported a growing domestic industrial base as exports from United States-based small wind turbine manufacturers accounted for nearly 80% of United States-based manufacturers' sales.

  6. [Knowledge, attitudes and practices for the prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Natalia de Sá, Policarpo; Moura, Jayne Ramos Araujo; de Melo Júnior, Eugênio Barbosa; de Almeida, Paulo César; de Macêdo, Suyanne Freire; da Silva, Ana Roberta Vilarouca

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge, attitudes and practices for the prevention of diabetic foot in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. This study was based on a cross-sectional survey conducted in two Family Health Units, in the city of Picos--PI, Brazil, with 85 diabetics of both sexes, by means of a semi-structured Knowledge, Attitude and Practice questionnaire. There was a predominance of females in the study (62.4%). On the topic of foot care, 49.4% had no knowledge on hygiene or what to observe in their feet. In relation to nail care, 56.5% were unaware of the correct way to cut nails. Regarding attitudes, 80% were willing to engage in self-care. In terms of practice, results showed that activities such as washing, drying, moisturizing and massaging were not executed together. It is therefore necessary to develop educational strategies to create awareness, both for diabetics and health professionals, on the effective prevention of diabetic foot. PMID:25474838

  7. [Knowledge, attitudes and practices for the prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Natalia De Sá, Policarpo; Moura, Jayne Ramos Araujo; Júnior, Eugênio Barbosa De Melo; De Almeida, Paulo César; De Macêdo, Suyanne Freire; Da Silva, Ana Roberta Vilarouca

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge, attitudes and practices for the prevention of diabetic foot in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. This study was based on a cross-sectional survey conducted in two Family Health Units, in the city of Picos--PI, Brazil, with 85 diabetics of both sexes, by means of a semi-structured Knowledge, Attitude and Practice questionnaire. There was a predominance of females in the study (62.4%). On the topic of foot care, 49.4% had no knowledge on hygiene or what to observe in their feet. In relation to nail care, 56.5% were unaware of the correct way to cut nails. Regarding attitudes, 80% were willing to engage in self-care. In terms of practice, results showed that activities such as washing, drying, moisturizing and massaging were not executed together. It is therefore necessary to develop educational strategies to create awareness, both for diabetics and health professionals, on the effective prevention of diabetic foot. PMID:25508617

  8. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  9. Foot Type Biomechanics Part 1: Structure and Function of the Asymptomatic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Hillstrom, Howard J.; Song, Jinsup; Kraszewski, Andrew P.; Hafer, Jocelyn F.; Mootanah, Rajshree; Dufour, Alyssa B.; PT, Betty (Shingpui) Chow; Deland, Jonathan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Differences in foot structure are thought to be associated with differences in foot function during movement. Many foot pathologies are of a biomechanical nature and often associated with foot type. Fundamental to the understanding of foot pathomechanics is the question: do different foot types have distinctly different structure and function? Aim To determine if objective measures of foot structure and function differ between planus, rectus and cavus foot types in asymptomatic individuals. Methods Sixty-one asymptomatic healthy adults between 18 and 77 years old, that had the same foot type bilaterally (44 planus feet, 54 rectus feet, and 24 cavus feet), were recruited. Structural and functional measurements were taken using custom equipment, an emed-x plantar pressure measuring device, a GaitMatII gait pattern measurement system, and a goniometer. Generalized Estimation Equation modeling was employed to determine if each dependent variable of foot structure and function was significantly different across foot type while accounting for potential dependencies between sides. Post hoc testing was performed to assess pairwise comparisons. Results Several measures of foot structure (malleolar valgus index and arch height index) were significantly different between foot types. Gait pattern parameters were invariant across foot types. Peak pressure, maximum force, pressure-time-integral, force-time-integral and contact area were significantly different in several medial forefoot and arch locations between foot types. Planus feet exhibited significantly different center of pressure excursion indices compared to rectus and cavus feet. Conclusions Planus, rectus and cavus feet exhibited significantly different measures of foot structure and function. PMID:23107625

  10. Recognizing familiar objects by hand and foot: Haptic shape perception generalizes to inputs from unusual locations and untrained body parts.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca

    2014-02-01

    The limits of generalization of our 3-D shape recognition system to identifying objects by touch was investigated by testing exploration at unusual locations and using untrained effectors. In Experiments 1 and 2, people found identification by hand of real objects, plastic 3-D models of objects, and raised line drawings placed in front of themselves no easier than when exploration was behind their back. Experiment 3 compared one-handed, two-handed, one-footed, and two-footed haptic object recognition of familiar objects. Recognition by foot was slower (7 vs. 13 s) and much less accurate (9 % vs. 47 % errors) than recognition by either one or both hands. Nevertheless, item difficulty was similar across hand and foot exploration, and there was a strong correlation between an individual's hand and foot performance. Furthermore, foot recognition was better with the largest 20 of the 80 items (32 % errors), suggesting that physical limitations hampered exploration by foot. Thus, object recognition by hand generalized efficiently across the spatial location of stimuli, while object recognition by foot seemed surprisingly good given that no prior training was provided. Active touch (haptics) thus efficiently extracts 3-D shape information and accesses stored representations of familiar objects from novel modes of input. PMID:24197503

  11. Wind tunnel pressurization and recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pejack, Edwin R.; Meick, Joseph; Ahmad, Adnan; Lateh, Nordin; Sadeq, Omar

    1988-01-01

    The high density, low toxicity characteristics of refrigerant-12 (dichlorofluoromethane) make it an ideal gas for wind tunnel testing. Present limitations on R-12 emissions, set to slow the rate of ozone deterioration, pose a difficult problem in recovery and handling of large quantities of R-12. This preliminary design is a possible solution to the problem of R-12 handling in wind tunnel testing. The design incorporates cold temperature condensation with secondary purification of the R-12/air mixture by adsorption. Also discussed is the use of Freon-22 as a suitable refrigerant for the 12 foot wind tunnel.

  12. The diabetic foot: a review.

    PubMed

    Ricco, J B; Thanh Phong, L; Schneider, F; Illuminati, G; Belmonte, R; Valagier, A; Régnault De La Mothe, G

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is among the most frequent complications of diabetes. Neuropathy and ischaemia are the initiating factors and infection is mostly a consequence. We have shown in this review that any DFU should be considered to have vascular impairment. DFU will generally heal if the toe pressure is >55 mmHg and a transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) <30 mmHg has been considered to predict that a diabetic ulcer may not heal. The decision to intervene is complex and made according to the symptoms and clinical findings. If both an endovascular and a bypass procedure are possible with an equal outcome to be expected, endovascular treatments should be preferred. Primary and secondary mid-term patency rates are better after bypass, but there is no difference in limb salvage. Bedridden patients with poor life expectancy and a non-revascularisable leg are indications for performing a major amputation. A deep infection is the immediate cause of amputation in 25% to 50% of diabetic patients. Patients with uncontrolled abscess, bone or joint involvement, gangrene, or necrotising fasciitis have a "foot-at risk" and need prompt surgical intervention with debridement and revascularisation. As demonstrated in this review, foot ulcer in diabetic is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early referral, non-invasive vascular testing, imaging and intervention are crucial to improve DFU healing and to prevent amputation. Diabetics are eight to twenty-four times more likely than non-diabetics to have a lower limb amputation and it has been suggested that a large part of those amputations could be avoided by an early diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24126512

  13. Large-scale V/STOL testing. [in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. G.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.; Falarski, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Several facets of large-scale testing of V/STOL aircraft configurations are discussed with particular emphasis on test experience in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. Examples of powered-lift test programs are presented in order to illustrate tradeoffs confronting the planner of V/STOL test programs. It is indicated that large-scale V/STOL wind-tunnel testing can sometimes compete with small-scale testing in the effort required (overall test time) and program costs because of the possibility of conducting a number of different tests with a single large-scale model where several small-scale models would be required. The benefits of both high- and full-scale Reynolds numbers, more detailed configuration simulation, and number and type of onboard measurements increase rapidly with scale. Planning must be more detailed at large scale in order to balance the trade-offs between the increased costs, as number of measurements and model configuration variables increase and the benefits of larger amounts of information coming out of one test.

  14. Vicmico algogas '80 project

    SciTech Connect

    De Luzuriaga, E.R.

    1980-12-01

    The conversion of the Victorias Milling Co. distillery into an anhydrous alcohol distillery as part of the Alcogas '80 Project is reported. The company received a loan of 7.5 million for the purchase of molasses and for the production of anhydrous alcohol which will be sold to PNOC for blending with gasoline for alcogas fuel.

  15. Erosion: Wind

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion refers to the detachment, transport and deposition of sediment by wind. It is a dynamic, physical process where loose, dry, bare soils are transported by strong winds. Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that affects over 500 million ha of land worldwide and creates between 500 an...

  16. Meteorology (Wind)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-25

    Wind speed at 50 m (m/s) The average and percent difference minimum and ... are given.   Percent of time for ranges of wind speed at 50 m (percent) Percentage [frequency] of time that wind ... be adjusted to heights from 10 to 300 meters using the Gipe power law. Wind speeds may be adjusted for different terrain by selecting from ...

  17. Identifying foot fractures and dislocations.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Fiona; Brown, Craig

    2014-10-01

    As the roles of emergency nurse practitioners expand, more patients with minor injuries are being managed independently by nursing staff. Injuries to the foot and ankle are common among such patients, and X-rays are frequently performed to aid their diagnoses. Some of these fractures and dislocations are subtle and difficult to identify, so practitioners must adopt a structured approach to reading X-rays. This article describes some of these injuries and offers advice, including X-ray illustrations, on how to identify them. PMID:25270819

  18. FUN3D Airload Predictions for the Full-Scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids, FUN3D, is used to compute the rotor performance and airloads of the UH-60A Airloads Rotor in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel. The flow solver is loosely coupled to a rotorcraft comprehensive code, CAMRAD-II, to account for trim and aeroelastic deflections. Computations are made for the 1-g level flight speed-sweep test conditions with the airloads rotor installed on the NFAC Large Rotor Test Apparatus (LRTA) and in the 40- by 80-ft wind tunnel to determine the influence of the test stand and wind-tunnel walls on the rotor performance and airloads. Detailed comparisons are made between the results of the CFD/CSD simulations and the wind tunnel measurements. The computed trends in solidity-weighted propulsive force and power coefficient match the experimental trends over the range of advance ratios and are comparable to previously published results. Rotor performance and sectional airloads show little sensitivity to the modeling of the wind-tunnel walls, which indicates that the rotor shaft-angle correction adequately compensates for the wall influence up to an advance ratio of 0.37. Sensitivity of the rotor performance and sectional airloads to the modeling of the rotor with the LRTA body/hub increases with advance ratio. The inclusion of the LRTA in the simulation slightly improves the comparison of rotor propulsive force between the computation and wind tunnel data but does not resolve the difference in the rotor power predictions at mu = 0.37. Despite a more precise knowledge of the rotor trim loads and flight condition, the level of comparison between the computed and measured sectional airloads/pressures at an advance ratio of 0.37 is comparable to the results previously published for the high-speed flight test condition.

  19. Investigation of correlation between full-scale and fifth-scale wind tunnel tests of a Bell helicopter Textron Model 222

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reasons for lack of correlation between data from a fifth-scale wind tunnel test of the Bell Helicopter Textron Model 222 and a full-scale test of the model 222 prototype in the NASA Ames 40-by 80-foot tunnel were investigated. This investigation centered around a carefully designed fifth-scale wind tunnel test of an accurately contoured model of the Model 222 prototype mounted on a replica of the full-scale mounting system. The improvement in correlation for drag characteristics in pitch and yaw with the fifth-scale model mounted on the replica system is shown. Interference between the model and mounting system was identified as a significant effect and was concluded to be a primary cause of the lack of correlation in the earlier tests.

  20. [Management of diabetic foot infections].

    PubMed

    Esposito, Silvano; Russo, Enrico; Noviello, Silvana; Leone, Sebastiano

    2012-01-01

    All infected diabetic foot wounds require antibiotic treatment. Antibiotic treatment is influenced by the patient's features as the vascular status, the leukocyte function and the kidney activity. The initial antibiotic regimen is usually chosen empirically and it can be modified on the basis of the microbiological information obtained subsequently. The initial empiric therapy should be based, on one hand, on the grade of infected lesion and, secondly, on the epidemiological data. Almost all of the mild/moderate infected wounds can be treated with antibiotics with a spectrum of activity limited to Gram-positive cocci. Treatment with oral antibiotics is sufficient in most cases in patients with mild/moderate infections. With severe infections is more appropriate to use a broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Furthermore it is safer to start a parenteral therapy, possibly modifying it into an oral administration if the patient has stabilized. The most frequently pathogen observed in diabetic foot infections is Staphylococcus aureus. It is important to understand whether there are elements that may lead to the suspicion of MRSA infection in order to establish an appropriate antimicrobial therapy. PMID:22982695

  1. A computer-controlled, on-board data acquisition system for wind-tunnel testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, H. J.; Cambra, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    A computer-controlled data acquisition system has been developed for the 40x80-foot wind tunnel at Ames Research Center. The system, consisting of several small onboard units installed in the model and a data-managing, data-displaying ground station, is capable of sampling up to 256 channels of raw data at a total sample rate of 128,000 samples/sec. Complete signal conditioning is contained within the on-board units. The sampling sequence and channel gain selection is completely random and under total control of the ground station. Outputs include a bar-graph display, digital-to-analog converters, and digital interface to the tunnel's central computer, an SEL 840MP. The system can be run stand-alone or under the control of the SEL 840MP.

  2. Wind Tunnel Visualization of the Flow Over a Full-Scale F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.; Botha, Gavin J.; James, Kevin D.; Crowder, James P.; Schmitz, Fredric H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proposed paper presents flow visualization performed during experiments conducted on a full-scale F/A-18 aircraft in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind-Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. This investigation used both surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques to examine the flow field on the forebody, canopy, leading edge extensions (LEXs), and wings. The various techniques used to visualize the flow field were fluorescent tufts, flow cones treated with reflective material, smoke in combination with a laser light sheet, and a video imaging system. The flow visualization experiments were conducted over an angle of attack range from 20deg to 45deg and over a sideslip range from -10deg to 10deg. The results show regions of attached and separated flow on the forebody, canopy, and wings. Additionally, the vortical flow is clearly visible over the leading-edge extensions, canopy, and wings.

  3. On Sound Footing: The Health of Your Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe On Sound Footing The Health of Your Feet Your feet ... search Features A Bang to the Brain On Sound Footing Wise Choices Links Foot Health Tips Use ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hand-foot-genital syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions hand-foot-genital syndrome hand-foot-genital syndrome Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hand-foot-genital syndrome is a rare condition that ...

  5. RANZCR Celebrates 80 Years.

    PubMed

    Milross, Chris

    2015-12-01

    2015 marks the 80th anniversary of the formation of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Radiology (ANZAR) in 1935. The association underwent several name changes over the following decades, finally becoming The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) in 1998. The following is the text from the speech given by the President of the College, A/Prof Chris Milross, at the 2015 RANZCR Annual Scientific Meeting to mark the anniversary. PMID:26768091

  6. JCE: 80 Years New

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Participating in the National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education Digital Library project is an exciting prospect for JCE. We expect to be able to make major contributions to the project and derive major benefits from participating in it. Your help in this important undertaking would be most welcome and greatly appreciated. Help us demonstrate that an 80-year-old can dance to a new tune!

  7. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... density. A footing must support every pier. Footings are to be either: (1) Concrete. (i) Four inch nominal precast concrete pads meeting or exceeding ASTM C 90-02a, Standard Specification for Loadbearing Concrete... compressive strength of 1,200 pounds per square inch (psi); or (ii) Six inch minimum poured-in-place...

  8. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... density. A footing must support every pier. Footings are to be either: (1) Concrete. (i) Four inch nominal precast concrete pads meeting or exceeding ASTM C 90-02a, Standard Specification for Loadbearing Concrete... compressive strength of 1,200 pounds per square inch (psi); or (ii) Six inch minimum poured-in-place...

  9. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... density. A footing must support every pier. Footings are to be either: (1) Concrete. (i) Four inch nominal precast concrete pads meeting or exceeding ASTM C 90-02a, Standard Specification for Loadbearing Concrete... compressive strength of 1,200 pounds per square inch (psi); or (ii) Six inch minimum poured-in-place...

  10. Louisiana farm discussion: 8 foot row spacing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This year several tests in growers’ fields were used to compare traditional 6-foot row spacing to 8-foot row spacing. Cane is double-drilled in the wider row spacing. The wider row spacing would accommodate John Deere 3522 harvester. Field data indicate the sugarcane yields are very comparable in 8-...

  11. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? A A A | Print | Share Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and ankle ... extreme and imprudent as it may sound, the cosmetic surgery craze isn't just for faces anymore- ...

  12. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Bookmark Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Depending on the sport, your feet and ankles can certainly take a beating from repetitive play. ... communities: Copyright © 2016 | American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights Reserved. | Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | ...

  13. Comparative Anatomy of the Hand and Foot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postiglione, Ralph A.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an activity to articulate comparison of the hand and foot. Students carefully cut out corresponding hand/foot parts (carpals, tarsals, metacarpals, metatarsals, and phalanges) from enlarged diagrams and paste them on paper for comparative analysis. Sample student inferences and diagrams used for the activity are provided. (JN)

  14. Basketball injuries of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    McDermott, E P

    1993-04-01

    Foot and ankle injuries in basketball are discussed in three unrelated categories in this article. This includes a practical differential diagnosis of ankle sprains, acute conditions of the mid and hindfoot, overuse syndromes of nerve entrapment, fascial strain, synovitis, joint subluxation, and inflammation resulting from repetitive stress. The diagnosis and treatment of tendon inflammation of the extrinsic foot musculature is also reviewed. PMID:8097679

  15. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... methods and practices that prevent the effects of frost heave by one of the following methods: (1) Conventional footings. Conventional footings must be placed below the frost line depth for the site unless an... frost line depth is not available from the LAHJ, a registered professional engineer,...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.312 - Footings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... methods and practices that prevent the effects of frost heave by one of the following methods: (1) Conventional footings. Conventional footings must be placed below the frost line depth for the site unless an... frost line depth is not available from the LAHJ, a registered professional engineer,...

  17. Small joint arthroscopy in foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Yuen, Chi Pan

    2015-03-01

    The clinical application of small joint arthroscopies (metatarsophalangeal joint, Lisfranc joint, Chopart joint, and interphlangeal joint) in the foot has seen significant advancements in the past decades. This article reviews the clinical indications, technical details, outcomes, and potential complications of small joint arthroscopies of the foot. PMID:25726488

  18. A comparison of haemolytic responses in fore-foot and rear-foot distance runners.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Stuart; McDonald, Kirsty A; Dawson, Brian; Stearne, Sarah M; Green, Ben A; Rubenson, Jonas; Clemons, Tristan D; Peeling, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the haemolytic effects of an interval-based running task in fore-foot and rear-foot striking runners. Nineteen male distance runners (10 fore-foot, 9 rear-foot) completed 8 × 3 min repeats at 90% vVO2peak on a motorised treadmill. Pre- and post-exercise venous blood samples were analysed for serum haptoglobin to quantify the haemolytic response to running. Vertical ground reaction forces were also captured via a force plate beneath the treadmill belt. Haptoglobin levels were significantly decreased following exercise (P = 0.001) in both groups (but not between groups), suggesting that the running task created a haemolytic stress. The ground reaction force data showed strong effect sizes for a greater peak force (d = 1.20) and impulse (d = 1.37) in fore-foot runners, and a greater rate of force development (d = 2.74) in rear-foot runners. The lack of difference in haptoglobin response between groups may be explained by the trend for fore-foot runners to experience greater peak force and impulse during the stance phase of their running gait, potentially negating any impact of the greater rate of force development occurring from the rear-foot runners' heel strike. Neither type of runner (fore-foot or rear-foot) appears more susceptible to technique-related foot-strike haemolysis. PMID:26618486

  19. The diabetic foot management - recent advance.

    PubMed

    Sinwar, Prabhu Dayal

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic ulceration of the foot represents a major global medical, social and economic problem. It is the commonest major end-point of diabetic complications. Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in foot ulceration and may act alone, together, or in combination with other factors such as microvascular disease, biomechanical abnormalities, limited joint mobility and increased susceptibility to infection. In the diabetic foot, distal sensory polyneuropathy is seen most commonly. The advent of insulin overcame the acute problems of ketoacidosis and infection, but could not prevent the vascular and neurological complications. Management of diabetic neuropathic ulcer by appropriate and timely removal of callus, control of infection and reduction of weight bearing forces. Management of diabetic ischaemic foot are medical management, surgical management and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of stenosed and occluded lower extremity arteries. Foot ulceration in persons with diabetes is the most frequent precursor to amputation. PMID:25638739

  20. An overview of the Charcot foot pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Kaynak, Gökhan; Birsel, Olgar; Güven, Mehmet Fatih; Öğüt, Tahir

    2013-01-01

    Charcot arthropathy of the foot is a rare but devastating complication of diabetes that remains to be a challenging issue for the foot and ankle surgeons. Charcot foot fails to be an obvious diagnostic option that comes to mind, even in a pathognomonic clinical appearance. The rarity of the disorder, more common pathologies that mimic the condition, and the self-limiting prognosis deviate the clinician from the right diagnosis. The clinical challenges in the diagnosis of Charcot foot require in-depth investigations of its enigmatic nature to establish useful guidelines. Yet, this goal seems to be beyond reach, without a holistic view of the immense literature concerning the pathophysiology of the disorder. The primary objective of this article is to put together and review the recent advancements about the etiology and intrinsic mechanisms of diabetic Charcot foot. PMID:23919113