Science.gov

Sample records for 80-horsepower turbocharged piston

  1. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Quentin; Alnega, Ahmed

    2011-12-06

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  2. Turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Hanna, Dave; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Krivitzky, Eric M.; Larosiliere, Louis M.; Baines, Nicholas C.

    2013-08-27

    In one example, a turbocharger for an internal combustion engine is described. The turbocharger comprises a casing containing an impeller having a full blade coupled to a hub that rotates about an axis of rotation. The casing includes a bleed port and an injection port. The full blade includes a hub edge, a casing edge, and a first distribution of angles, each angle measured between the axis of rotation and a mean line at the hub edge at a meridional distance along the hub edge. The full blade includes a second distribution of angles, each angle measured between the axis of rotation and a mean line at the casing edge at a meridional distance along the casing edge. Further, various systems are described for affecting the aerodynamic properties of the compressor and turbine components in a way that may extend the operating range of the turbocharger.

  3. Turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, C.E.

    1986-09-23

    A turbocharger is described which consists of: a turbine having a turbine wheel carried within a turbine housing and rotatably driven by exhaust gases from an internal combustion engine; a compressor having a compressor wheel carried within a compressor housing and rotatably driven by the turbine for supplying charge air to the internal combustion engine; a common shaft connected between the turbine wheel and the compressor wheel; a center housing connected between the turbine housing and the compressor housing around the common shaft and including bearing means to rotatably support the common shaft; an annular ring disposed around the compressor housing and including a plurality of bolt openings therein aligned with the bolt openings in the turbine housing; and a plurality of bolts extending between the turbine housing and the annular ring in the openings therein.

  4. Analysis of thermal stress of the piston during non-stationary heat flow in a turbocharged Diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustof, P.; Hornik, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper, numeric calculations of thermal stresses of the piston in a turbocharged Diesel engine in the initial phase of its work were carried out based on experimental studies and the data resulting from them. The calculations were made using a geometrical model of the piston in a five-cylinder turbocharged Diesel engine with a capacity of about 2300 cm3, with a direct fuel injection to the combustion chamber and a power rating of 85 kW. In order to determine the thermal stress, application of own mathematical models of the heat flow in characteristic surfaces of the piston was required to show real processes occurring on the surface of the analysed component. The calculations were performed using a Geostar COSMOS/M program module. A three-dimensional geometric model of the piston was created in this program based on a real component, in order to enable the calculations and analysis of thermal stresses during non-stationary heat flow. Modelling of the thermal stresses of the piston for the engine speed n=4250 min-1 and engine load λ=1.69 was carried out.

  5. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2007-12-04

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  6. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2009-03-24

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  7. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2007-11-13

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  8. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2009-02-24

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  9. PISTON

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, Christopher Meyer

    2014-01-08

    This presentation was a part of the guest lecture series for graduate classes at the University of Oregon on many-core visualization. It discussed a practical introduction to high-level data parallelism using thrust and PISTON; presented an overview of PISTON and PINION; provided tutorial examples; additional details on research results.

  10. Advanced turbocharger design study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culy, D. G.; Heldenbrand, R. W.; Richardson, N. R.

    1984-01-01

    The advanced Turbocharger Design Study consisted of: (1) the evaluation of three advanced engine designs to determine their turbocharging requirements, and of technologies applicable to advanced turbocharger designs; (2) trade-off studies to define a turbocharger conceptual design and select the engine with the most representative requirements for turbocharging; (3) the preparation of a turbocharger conceptual design for the Curtiss Wright RC2-32 engine selected in the trade-off studies; and (4) the assessment of market impact and the preparation of a technology demonstration plan for the advanced turbocharger.

  11. Composite piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A composite piston structure is disclosed which provides a simple and reliable means for joining a carbon-carbon or ceramic piston cap with a metallic piston body. Attachment is achieved by means of a special geometry which compensates for differences in thermal expansion without complicated mechanical fastening devices. The shape employs a flange created by opposed frustoconical shapes with coincident vertices intersecting on the radial centerline of the piston in order to retain the piston cap. The use of carbon-carbon for the piston cap material allows a close fit between the piston and a cylinder wall, eliminating the need for piston rings. The elimination of extra mechanical parts of previous composite pistons provides a lightweight composite piston capable of extended high temperature operation.

  12. Lightweight piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A lightweight piston composed of carbon-carbon composites is presented. The use of carbon-carbon composites over conventional materials, such as aluminum, reduces piston weight and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocation engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance is so small as to eliminate the necessity for piston rings. Use of the carbon-carbon composite has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  13. Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Serres, Nicolas

    2010-11-09

    A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

  14. 14 CFR 23.909 - Turbocharger systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Turbocharger systems. (a) Each turbocharger must be approved under the engine type certificate or it must be shown that the turbocharger system, while in its normal engine installation and operating in the...

  15. 14 CFR 23.909 - Turbocharger systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Turbocharger systems. (a) Each turbocharger must be approved under the engine type certificate or it must be shown that the turbocharger system, while in its normal engine installation and operating in the...

  16. Double bowl piston

    DOEpatents

    Meffert, Darrel Henry; Urven, Jr., Roger Leroy; Brown, Cory Andrew; Runge, Mark Harold

    2007-03-06

    A piston for an internal combustion engine is disclosed. The piston has a piston crown with a face having an interior annular edge. The piston also has first piston bowl recessed within the face of the piston crown. The first piston bowl has a bottom surface and an outer wall. A line extending from the interior annular edge of the face and tangent with the outer wall forms an interior angle greater than 90 degrees with the face of the piston. The piston also has a second piston bowl that is centrally located and has an upper edge located below a face of the piston crown.

  17. Advanced turbocharger rotor for variable geometry turbocharging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, R.J.; Mulloy, J.M.; Yonushonis, T.M.; Weber, H.G.; Patel, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Turbocharging of diesel engines has enhanced fuel economy and reduced diesel engine emissions. The initial applications of turbochargers to heavy duty diesel engines during the early 1970`s reduced Bosch smoke (a measure of particulate matter used at the time) from 2.4 to 0.6 units. Current turbochargers are optimized at one set of engine conditions and by necessity, at the off-design conditions or transient conditions the fuel economy and emissions performance are penalized. A rotor was designed and a prototype fabricated which showed as much as a 10% efficiency improvement at off-design conditions. The leading edges are blunt and rounded to accept the flow from the turbine nozzles at a variety of inlet conditions with a minimum of losses. The rotor efficiency is better at all conditions and the advantage improves as it operates at conditions further from the design point. Unfortunately, the conventional materials from which this turbine rotor was constructed had inadequate strength to allow its use on engines, and had such high rotational inertia that transient response would have been severely compromised.

  18. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  19. Free-piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hammett, R.B.

    1992-09-08

    This patent describes an apparatus utilizing energy to pump gas. It comprises a piston fitted to a using, a pressure chamber to one side of the piston comprising means to increase the pressure or volume of gas in the pressure chamber to cause outward acceleration of the piston; a rebounding vole to the other side of the piston opposing the outward movement of the piston by the gas pressure in the rebounding volume; and an outlet port in the casing located so as to be uncovered by the piston substantially before the piston has reached the outward end of the stroke of the piston.

  20. Linear motor free piston compressor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, D.P.

    1995-02-17

    A Linear Motor Free Piston Compressor (LMFPC), a free piston pressure recovery system for fuel cell powerplants was developed. The LMFPC consists of a reciprocating compressor and a reciprocating expander which are separated by a piston. In the past energy efficient turbochargers have been used for pressure large (over 50 kW) fuel cell powerplants by recovering pressure energy from the powerplant exhaust. A free piston compressor allows pressurizing 3 - 5 kW sized fuel cell powerplants. The motivation for pressurizing PEM fuel cell powerplants is to improve fuel cell performance. Pressurization of direct methanol fuel cells will IC required if PEM membranes are to be used. Direct methanol oxidation anode catalysts require high temperatures to operate at reasonable power densities. The elevated temperatures above 80 deg C will cause high water loss from conventional PEM membranes unless pressurization is employed. Because pressurization is an energy intensive process, recovery of the pressure energy is required to permit high efficiency in fuel cell powerplants. A complete LMFPC which can pressurize a 3 kW fuel cell stack was built. This unit is one of several that were constructed during the course of the program.

  1. Turbocharger with dual function actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.D.; Janik, M.; Tomoyasu, R.S.

    1990-01-16

    This patent describes an exhaust gas driven turbocharger. It comprises: a housing, a shaft rotatably mounted in the housing, a turbine wheel and a compressor wheel mounted in the housing on the shaft for rotation therewith. The housing defining a turbine inlet passage and a compressor inlet passage for communicating exhaust gas to the turbine wheel and ambient air to the compressor wheel respectively and further defining a turbine outlet passage and a compressor outlet passage for communicating exhaust gas and compressed air respectively from the housing a wastegate valve for venting the turbine inlet passage.

  2. Compressor wheel assembly for turbochargers

    SciTech Connect

    Joco, F.M.

    1987-11-10

    In a turbocharger having a housing, this patent describes: a rotatable shaft having a threaded end; bearing means for rotatably mounting the shaft to the housing; a boreless turbine wheel secured to an end of the shaft opposite the threaded end; a boreless compressor wheel having a boreless hub supporting a circumferentially arranged array of impeller blades; and an attachment member mounted on the hub generally at one axial end thereof in a position generally centered on a central axis of the hub. The attachment member includes means for attachment to the threaded end of the shaft.

  3. Rotordynamics and bearing design of turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen Jeng

    2012-05-01

    Turbochargers have gained significant attention in recent years. They are already widely used in automotive, locomotive, and marine applications with diesel engines. They are also applied in the aerospace application to increase the engine performance now. The turbochargers used in automotive and aerospace industry are very light-weight with operating speeds above 100,000 rpm. The turbochargers used in locomotive and marine applications are relatively heavy in size and power compared to the automotive and aerospace applications, and the maximum continuous operating speeds are around 30,000 rpm depending on the diesel engine power rating. Floating ring bushings, semi-floating dampers, ball bearings, and ball bearings with dampers are commonly used in automotive applications for small turbochargers. However, these bearings may not be appropriate for large turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Instead, multi-lobed bearings with and without squeeze film dampers are commonly used in these heavy-duty turbochargers. This paper deals with the rotordynamic characteristics of larger turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Various bearing designs are discussed. Bearing design parameters are studied and optimal values are suggested. Test results are also presented to support the analytical simulation.

  4. Preliminary analysis of turbochargers rotors dynamic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monoranu, R.; Ştirbu, C.; Bujoreanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Turbocharger rotors for the spark and compression ignition engines are resistant steels manufactured in order to support the exhaust gas temperatures exceeding 1200 K. In fact, the mechanical stress is not large as the power consumption of these systems is up to 10 kW, but the operating speeds are high, ranging between 30000 ÷ 250000 rpm. Therefore, the correct turbochargers functioning involves, even from the design stage, the accurate evaluation of the temperature effects, of the turbine torque due to the engine exhaust gases and of the vibration system behaviour caused by very high operating speeds. In addition, the turbocharger lubrication complicates the model, because the classical hydrodynamic theory cannot be applied to evaluate the floating bush bearings. The paper proposes a FEM study using CATIA environment, both as modeling medium and as tool for the numerical analysis, in order to highlight the turbocharger complex behaviour. An accurate design may prevent some major issues which can occur during its operation.

  5. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  6. Lightweight piston architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is an improvement in a lightweight carbon-carbon composite piston, the improvement uses near-net shape knitted or warp-interlock preforms to improve the structural qualities of the piston. In its preferred embodiment, a one piece, tubular, closed-ended, knitted preform (a sock) of carbon fibers embedded within the matrix of the piston structure forms the crown, side wall, skirt and inner surface of the piston, and wrap-interlock preforms strengthen the piston crown and wrist pin bosses.

  7. Turbocharger for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, H.; Miyazaki, H.

    1987-11-03

    A turbocharger is described comprising: a housing assembly; a compressor wheel arranged in the housing assembly; a compressor whell arranged in the housing assembly; and a shaft rotatably connected in the housing assembly. The turbine wheel is made from one-piece ceramic material and has a base portion, angularly spaced blades on the base portion, and a support portion extending axially from the base portion. The shaft is made from a metal material, and has an axial bore opening at one end. The support portion has an increased diameter which is in a tight-fit relationship with respect to the bore in order to fixedly connect the wheel to the shaft without using any additional connecting means, so that an axially extending first annular slit is formed between the outer surface of the support portion and the inner surface of the bore on the side of the increased diameter portion near the base portion. A second annular slit is formed between the facing end surfaces of the shaft and the base portion. The first and second annular slits are connected to each other and alone serve to allow for differential thermal expansion between the shaft and the turbine wheel.

  8. Turbocharged engine with exhaust purifier

    SciTech Connect

    Tadokoro, T.; Matsuda, I.; Okimoto, H.

    1986-09-23

    The patent described a control system for an automobile engine having intake and exhaust systems for respectively conducting intake gases to and exhaust gases from the engine, which comprises, in combination: a turbocharger including a turbine disposed in the exhaust system and adapted to be driven by the flow of the exhaust gases therethrough and a blower disposed in the intake system and drivingly connected with the turbine for supercharging the intake gases; and exhaust purifying device disposed in the exhaust system downstream of the turbine with respect to the direction of flow of the exhaust gases; a regulating means for varying the effective cross-section of a portion of the exhaust system leading to the turbine; a control means for controlling the regulating means in dependence on an operating condition of the engine, the control means causing the regulating means to decrease the effective cross-section during a low speed operating condition, but to increase the effective cross-section during a high speed operating condition of the engine.

  9. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air systems used for cabin pressurization: (a) The cabin air system may not be subject to...

  11. Advanced Turbo-Charging Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-02-27

    The objective of this project is to conduct analysis, design, procurement and test of a high pressure ratio, wide flow range, and high EGR system with two stages of turbocharging. The system needs to meet the stringent 2010MY emissions regulations at 20% + better fuel economy than its nearest gasoline competitor while allowing equivalent vehicle launch characteristics and higher torque capability than its nearest gasoline competitor. The system will also need to meet light truck/ SUV life requirements, which will require validation or development of components traditionally used only in passenger car applications. The conceived system is termed 'seriessequential turbocharger' because the turbocharger system operates in series at appropriate times and also sequentially when required. This is accomplished using intelligent design and control of flow passages and valves. Components of the seriessequential system will also be applicable to parallel-sequential systems which are also expected to be in use for future light truck/SUV applications.

  12. Free piston stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a basic introduction to free piston Stirling engine technology through a review of specialized background material. It also includes information based on actual construction and operation experience with these machines, as well as theoretical and analytical insights into free piston Stirling engine technology.

  13. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  14. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, William D. C.; Bilodeau, Denis; Marusak, Thomas; Dutram, Jr., Leonard; Brady, Joseph

    1981-01-01

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to excape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  15. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, W.D.C.; Bilodeau, D.; Marusak, T.; Dutram, L. Jr.; Brady, J.

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to escape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  16. Reciprocating piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.

    1986-09-02

    This patent describes a reciprocating piston engine wherein there is included the combination of one or more pistons individually reciprocatably mounted each within a cylinder, an intake valve located within a cylinder through which fuel and air can be admitted into the cylinder, compressed and the fuel burned to drive a piston during a power stroke, an exhaust valve located within a cylinder through which burned fuel can be exhausted by movement of a piston to expell the burned gases during an exhaust stroke, a piston having a crown side and a side opposite the crown side to which a piston shaft is attached, the crown side of the piston facing into the cylinder wherein the intake and exhaust valves are located, an elongated roller gear to which the piston shaft is attached, the elongated roller gear is open centered and has an inside face thereof provided with a continuous array of teeth, a drive shaft, a roller gear pinion operatively engaged with the drive shaft, rotation of which produces rotation of the drive shaft, the roller gear pinion being provided with a continuous array of teeth for continuous meshing engagement with the teeth on the inside face of the elongated roller gear, movement of a piston acting through a piston shaft and elongated roller gear producing rotation of the drive shaft via action upon roller gear pinion, the impovement comprising, in the combination, a pair of rails, one each of which is disposed on opposite sides of the teeth of the elongated roller gear, a pair of rollers, one each of which is disposed on opposite sides adjacent and parallel to the teeth of roller gear pinion, the rollers of the roller gear pinion contacting and rolling along the rails of the elongated roller gear to maintain a proper relationship and root clearance between the meshing teeth of an elongated roller gear and a roller gear pinion for effecting the continuous rolling and meshing engagement.

  17. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  18. Piston and valve assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rolder, G. K.

    1985-10-01

    A downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of either the free or fixed type lifts formation fluid from the bottom of a borehole to the surface of the ground. The downhole pump has a power piston which actuates a production plunger. A valve means is concentrically arranged within the power piston. A stationary, hollow valve control rod extends through the power piston and through the valve means, with a lower marginal end of the control rod terminating within the production plunger. Power fluid flows through the control rod and to the valve means. As the power piston reciprocates within the engine cylinder, means on the control rod actuates the valve means between two alternant positions so that power fluid is applied to the bottom face of the power piston to thereby cause the power piston to reciprocate upward; and thereafter, the control rod causes the valve means to shift to the other position, whereupon spent power fluid is exhausted from the engine cylinder. The spent power fluid is admixed with production fluid and is conducted to the surface of the ground.

  19. Compression retaining piston

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglino, A.V. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    A piston apparatus is described for maintaining compression between the piston wall and the cylinder wall, that comprises the following: a generally cylindrical piston body, including: a head portion defining the forward end of the body; and a continuous side wall portion extending rearward from the head portion; a means for lubricating and preventing compression loss between the side wall portion and the cylinder wall, including an annular recessed area in the continuous side wall portion for receiving a quantity of fluid lubricant in fluid engagement between the wall of the recessed and the wall of the cylinder; a first and second resilient, elastomeric, heat resistant rings positioned in grooves along the wall of the continuous side wall portion, above and below the annular recessed area. Each ring engages the cylinder wall to reduce loss of lubricant within the recessed area during operation of the piston; a first pump means for providing fluid lubricant to engine components other than the pistons; and a second pump means provides fluid lubricant to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston. The first and second pump means obtains lubricant from a common source, and the second pump means including a flow line supplies oil from a predetermined level above the level of oil provided to the first pump means. This is so that should the oil level to the second pump means fall below the predetermined level, the loss of oil to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston would result in loss of compression and shut down of the engine.

  20. Study of fuel consumption and cooling system in low heat rejection turbocharged diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Taymaz, I.; Gur, M.; Cally, I.; Mimaroglu, A.

    1998-07-01

    In a conventional internal combustion engine, approximately one-third of total fuel input energy is converted to useful work. Since the working gas in a practical engine cycle is not exhausted at ambient temperature, a major part of the energy is lost with the exhaust gases. In addition another major part of energy input is rejected in the form of heat via the cooling system. If the energy normally rejected to the coolant could be recovered instead on the crankshaft as useful work, then a substantial improvement in fuel economy would result. At the same time, the cooling water, antifreeze, thermostat, radiator, water pump, cooling fan, and associated hoses and clamps could be eliminated. A new trend in the field of internal combustion engines is to insulate the heat transfer surfaces such as the combustion chamber, cylinder wall, cylinder head, piston and valves by ceramic insulating materials for the improvement of engine performance and elimination of cooling system. In this study, the effect of insulated heat transfer surfaces on direct injected and turbocharged diesel engine fuel consumption and cooling system were investigated. The research engine was a four-stroke, direct injected, six cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine. This engine was tested at different speeds and loads conditions without coating. Then, combustion chamber surfaces, cylinder head, valves and piston crown faces was coated with ceramic materials. Ceramic layers were made of CaZrO{sub 3} and MgZrO{sub 3} and plasma coated onto base of the NiCrAl bond coat. The ceramic coated research engine was tested at the same operation conditions as the standard (without coating) engine. The results indicate a reduction in fuel consumption and heat losses to engine cooling system of the ceramic coated engine.

  1. 77 FR 34206 - Airworthiness Directives; Hartzell Engine Technologies Turbochargers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Technologies Turbochargers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for... airplanes with Hartzell Engine Technologies (HET) turbochargers, part numbers (P/Ns) 406610-0005 and 406610... Technologies, LLC, 2900 Selma Highway, Montgomery, AL 36108, phone: 334-386-5400; fax: 334-386-5450;...

  2. Free-piston engine

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A combustion system which can utilize high compression ratios, short burn durations, and homogeneous fuel/air mixtures in conjunction with low equivalence ratios. In particular, a free-piston, two-stroke autoignition internal combustion engine including an electrical generator having a linear alternator with a double-ended free piston that oscillates inside a closed cylinder is provided. Fuel and air are introduced in a two-stroke cycle fashion on each end, where the cylinder charge is compressed to the point of autoignition without spark plugs. The piston is driven in an oscillating motion as combustion occurs successively on each end. This leads to rapid combustion at almost constant volume for any fuel/air equivalence ratio mixture at very high compression ratios. The engine is characterized by high thermal efficiency and low NO.sub.x emissions. The engine is particularly suited for generating electrical current in a hybrid automobile.

  3. Dry piston coal feeder

    DOEpatents

    Hathaway, Thomas J.; Bell, Jr., Harold S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a solids feeder for feeding dry coal to a pressurized gasifier at elevated temperatures substantially without losing gas from the gasifier by providing a lock having a double-acting piston that feeds the coals into the gasifier, traps the gas from escaping, and expels the trapped gas back into the gasifier.

  4. Accelerating means and method for a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Witchger, E.S.

    1986-05-06

    A turbocharger is described which consists of: a housing having an engine exhaust input; shaft means having a longitudinal axis and rotatable in the housing on the axis; a compressor wheel and turbine wheel secured to the shaft means, the turbine wheel being in communication with the exhaust whereby the compressor wheel is driven by the turbine wheel on the axis; nozzle ring means rotatably mounted in the housing for rotation on an axis, the nozzle ring means having a plurality of vanes disposed in the exhaust gas flow path from the exhaust input of the housing means to the turbine wheel; and brake means on the housing and operable, when actuated, to inhibit rotation of the nozzle ring means.

  5. Rotordynamics and Design Methods of an Oil-Free Turbocharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of supporting a turbocharger rotor on air foil bearings is investigated based upon predicted rotordynamic stability, load accommodations, and stress considerations. It is demonstrated that foil bearings offer a plausible replacement for oil-lubricated bearings in diesel truck turbochargers. Also, two different rotor configurations are analyzed and the design is chosen which best optimizes the desired performance characteristics. The method of designing machinery for foil bearing use and the assumptions made are discussed.

  6. Carbon-carbon piston development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    A new piston concept, made of carbon-carbon refractory-composite material, has been developed that overcomes a number of the shortcomings of aluminum pistons. Carbon-carbon material, developed in the early 1960's, is lighter in weight than aluminum, has higher strength and stiffness than aluminum and maintains these properties at temperatures over 2500 F. In addition, carbon-carbon material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent resistance to thermal shock. An effort, called the Advanced Carbon-Carbon Piston Program was started in 1986 to develop and test carbon-carbon pistons for use in spark ignition engines. The carbon-carbon pistons were designed to be replacements for existing aluminum pistons, using standard piston pin assemblies and using standard rings. Carbon-carbon pistons can potentially enable engines to be more reliable, more efficient and have greater power output. By utilizing the unique characteristics of carbon-carbon material a piston can: (1) have greater resistance to structural damage caused by overheating, lean air-fuel mixture conditions and detonation; (2) be designed to be lighter than an aluminum piston thus, reducing the reciprocating mass of an engine, and (3) be operated in a higher combustion temperature environment without failure.

  7. Rotordynamic Design Analysis of an Oil-Free Turbocharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    1997-01-01

    Modern heavy duty diesel engines utilize turbochargers for increased power output. Also, a wide range of power levels can be achieved with one engine displacement through the use of different turbocharger configurations, eliminating the need for several different sized engines. These are the reasons that virtually all diesel truck engines currently marketed use turbochargers. However, because these turbochargers rely on ring seals and oil-lubricated floating sleeve bearings, they often suffer breakdowns. These turbochargers operate at elevated temperatures which often causes the oil to degrade and even coke to the bearing surfaces. This can lead to catastrophic failure, increased particulate emissions from oil leaks, and, in extreme cases, engine fires. Replacing the oil lubricated bearings from these turbochargers with some other device is desirable to eliminate these inherent problems. Foil bearings are compliant selecting bearings lubricated by air and are well suited to high speed, light load applications. Thus, foil bearings present one potential replacement for oil-lubricated sleeve bearings. Their use as such is investigated in this work.

  8. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total...

  9. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total...

  10. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total...

  11. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total...

  12. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total...

  13. Free-piston cutting machine

    DOEpatents

    Ciccarelli, Gaby; Subudhi, Manomohan; Hall, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    A cutting machine includes a gun barrel for receiving a projectile. A compression tube is disposed in flow communication with the barrel and includes a piston therein. A reservoir is disposed in flow communication with the tube and receives a first gas under pressure. A second gas fills the compression tube on a front face of the piston. And, the pressurized first gas is discharged into the tube on a back face of the piston to accelerate the piston through the tube for compressing the second gas, and in turn launching the projectile through the barrel to impact a workpiece.

  14. 49 CFR 230.93 - Pistons and piston rods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pistons and piston rods. 230.93 Section 230.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives...

  15. Turbocharger bearing retention and lubrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes exhausts gas driven turbocharger. It comprises a housing, a shaft within the housing having a longitudinal axis of rotation and a pair of ends, a compressor wheel mounted within the housing on one end of the shaft for rotation therewith, a turbine wheel mounted within the housing on the other end of the shaft for rotation therewith, means for communicating air to the compressor wheel, means for communicating exhaust gas to the turbine wheel to cause the latter to rotate the shaft and the compressor wheel mounted thereon to compress the air communicated to the compressor wheel, and bearing means mounting the shaft for rotation relative to the housing, the bearing means including a bearing outer ring, a bearing inner ring, and ball bearing elements supporting the bearing outer ring on the bearing inner ring, a bearing locating aperture in the bearing outer ring, and an elongated bearing location pin having a longitudinal axis of symmetry extending transversely to the longitudinal axis of the shaft.

  16. Thermal Fluctuations in Casimir Pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.

    2012-07-01

    We present analytical and simple expressions to determine the free energy, internal energy, entropy, as well as the pressure acting at the interface of a perfectly conducting rectangular Casimir piston. We show that infrared divergencies linear in temperature become cancelled within the piston configuration, and show a continuous behavior consistent with intuitive expectations.

  17. Carbon-Carbon Turbocharger Housing Unit for Intermittent Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved, lightweight, turbine housing unit for an intermittent combustion reciprocating internal combustion engine turbocharger is prepared from a lay-up or molding of carbon-carbon composite materials in a single-piece or two-piece process. When compared to conventional steel or cast iron, the use of carbon-carbon composite materials in a turbine housing unit reduces the overall weight of the engine and reduces the heat energy loss used in the turbocharging process. This reduction in heat energy loss and weight reduction provides for more efficient engine operation.

  18. Turbocharger with improved roller bearing shaft support

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes an exhaust gas driven turbocharger. It comprises: a housing, a shaft within the housing having a pair of ends, a compressor wheel mounted within the housing on one end of the shaft for rotation therewith, a turbine wheel mounted within the housing on the other end of the shaft for rotation therewith, means for communicating air through the compressor wheel, means for communicating exhaust gas through the turbine wheel to cause the latter to rotate the shaft and the compressor wheel mounted thereon to compress the air communicated through the compressor wheel, and bearing means mounting the shaft for rotation relative to the housing, the bearing means including a bearing outer ring, a bearing inner ring, and ball bearing elements supporting the bearing outer ring on the bearing inner ring, the ball bearing elements includes a first set of the elements and a second set of the elements spaced axially from the first set, the bearing outer ring being a rigid, uninterrupted member providing an uninterrupted structural link between the first and second sets to establish the axial spacing between the sets, a pair of axially spaced faying surfaces on the inner ring engaging corresponding faying surfaces on the shaft to support the inner ring on the shaft, the shaft defining a circumferentially extending surface between the faying surfaces on the inner ring cooperating with the shaft to define an air gap therebetween, one of the faying surfaces on the inner ring having a diameter greater than the diameter of the other of the faying surfaces on the inner ring.

  19. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat. No. 4.909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially. the carbon fabric or tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel. to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar. or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U" channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also be accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum-alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  1. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2016-09-27

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  2. Researches on the Piston Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  3. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  4. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  5. Study of the optical piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werij, H. G. C.; Haverkort, J. E. M.; Woerdman, J. P.

    1986-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the optical piston, a consequence of the phenomenon of light-induced drift (LID), observed in binary mixtures of Na vapor and a buffer gas, is reported. Good agreement has been found between experiment and existing theory as far as the shape of the Na density profile in the piston is concerned. The piston velocity is anomalously low; this is accounted for by incorporating the effects of adsorption and desorption into the theory. Furthermore, a rate-equation model for LID is introduced which incorporates the fine and hyperfine structure of the level scheme of the Na absorbers; this gives insight into the sublevel velocity distributions and the nonequilibrium part of the total velocity distribution during LID.

  6. Combustion mode switching with a turbocharged/supercharged engine

    DOEpatents

    Mond, Alan; Jiang, Li

    2015-09-22

    A method for switching between low- and high-dilution combustion modes in an internal combustion engine having an intake passage with an exhaust-driven turbocharger, a crankshaft-driven positive displacement supercharger downstream of the turbocharger and having variable boost controllable with a supercharger bypass valve, and a throttle valve downstream of the supercharger. The current combustion mode and mass air flow are determined. A switch to the target combustion mode is commanded when an operating condition falls within a range of predetermined operating conditions. A target mass air flow to achieve a target air-fuel ratio corresponding to the current operating condition and the target combustion mode is determined. The degree of opening of the supercharger bypass valve and the throttle valve are controlled to achieve the target mass air flow. The amount of residual exhaust gas is manipulated.

  7. A sequential turbocharging method for highly-rated truck diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Borila, Y.G.

    1986-01-01

    A sequential turbocharging method specifically developed for highly-turbocharged truck diesel engines is presented here together with the first experimental results. The key element of the method is the use of turbochargers of unequal size, with single entry turbines, in combination with a pulse converter. The first engine test showed a significant improvement of engine performance, especially of low-speed torque and response, without the usual compromise on high-speed performance. The main conclusions of the test was that with this sequential turbocharging method, engine performance is very competitive up to a bmep of 16 bar at rated power and 20 bar at peak torque.

  8. The turbocharged and intercooled 2. 3 liter engine for the Volvo 760

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, J.; Bengtsson, A.; Eriksson, S.

    1984-01-01

    In 1981 Volvo launched the 2.1l turbocharged engine for the 240 model. Since then, the market interest for turbocharged engines has increased rapidly and along with this the demand for more efficient engines. The use of intercooler and micro-computer controlled fuel- and ignition systems in passenger car applications made it possible to develop a second generation of turbocharged engines with the capability to meet these demands. This paper describes the 2.3l turbocharged engine and its development for the US-version of the 1984 760 model.

  9. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  10. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  11. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  12. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  13. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  14. Two piston V-type Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A two piston Stirling engine which includes a heat exchanger arrangement placing the cooler and regenerator directly adjacent the compression space for minimal cold duct volume; a sealing arrangement which eliminates the need for piston seals, crossheads and piston rods; and a simplified power control system.

  15. Sibling cycle piston and valving method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Matthew P. (Inventor); Bauwens, Luc (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A double-acting, rotating piston reciprocating in a cylinder with the motion of the piston providing the valving action of the Sibling Cycle through the medium of passages between the piston and cylinder wall. The rotating piston contains regenerators ported to the walls of the piston. The piston fits closely in the cylinder at each end of the cylinder except in areas where the wall of the cylinder is relieved to provide passages between the cylinder wall and the piston leading to the expansion and compression spaces, respectively. The piston reciprocates as it rotates. The cylinder and piston together comprise an integral valve that seqentially opens and closes the ports at the ends of the regenerators alternately allowing them to communicate with the expansion space and compression space and blocking that communication. The relieved passages in the cylinder and the ports in the piston are so arranged that each regenerator is sequentially (1) charged with compressed working gas from the compression space; (2) isolated from both expansion and compression spaces; (3) discharged of working gas into the expansion space; and (4) simultaneously charged with working gas from the expansion space while being discharged of working gas into the compression space, in the manner of the Sibling Cycle. In an alterate embodiment, heat exchangers are external to the cylinder and ports in the cylinder wall are alternately closed by the wall of the piston and opened to the expansion and compression spaces through relieved passages in the wall of the reciprocating, rotating piston.

  16. Comparison of Nitinol Stapes Pistons with Conventional Stapes Pistons: A Cadaver Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of Nitinol Stapes Pistons with Conventional Stapes Pistons: A Cadaver Study Samuel A. Spear1 and James V. Crawford2 1 48th Medical Group, ENT...cited. Objective. To visually compare the Nitinol “smart” stapes prosthesis to conventional manual crimping stapes pistons in temporal bone cadaver...answer questions about each stapes piston. The answers to the survey were then recorded for analysis. Results. 8 of 9 Nitinol pistons were described as

  17. A Method of Measuring Piston Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin; Mangniello, Eugene J

    1940-01-01

    A method that makes use of thermocouples has been developed to measure the temperature of engine pistons operating at high speeds. The thermocouples installed on the moving piston are connected with a potentiometer outside the engine by means of pneumatically operated plungers, which make contact with the piston thermocouples for about 10 crankshaft degrees at the bottom of the piston stroke. The equipment is operated satisfactory at engine speeds of 2,400 r.p.m. and shows promise of successful operation at higher engine speeds. Measurements of piston temperatures in a liquid-cooled compression-ignition engine and in an air-cooled spark-ignition are presented.

  18. Piston-Skirt Lubrication System For Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Edgar C.; Burzynski, Marion, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Piston-skirt lubrication system provides steady supply of oil to piston rings of gas compressor. No need for oil-filled crankcase or external oil pump. Instead, part of each piston acts as its own oil pump circulating oil from reservoir. Annular space at bottom of piston and cylinder constitutes working volume of small oil pump. Depending on application, reservoir open to atmosphere, or sealed and pressurized in bellows to prevent contact between oil and atmosphere. Filter removes particles worn away from piston rings and cylinder wall during normal operation.

  19. Spray bottle apparatus with force multiply pistons

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, Eugene A.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and corresponding piston which is acted upon by the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  20. Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Gordon, Norman R.; DeFord, Henry S.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  1. 75 FR 16662 - Airworthiness Directives; Kelly Aerospace Energy Systems, LLC Rebuilt Turbochargers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... are issuing this AD to prevent separation or seizure of the turbocharger turbine, which could result... failed. Two had turbine wheel head separation and the third had a turbine shaft seizure. Investigation... condition, if not corrected, could result in separation or seizure of the turbocharger turbine, which...

  2. Experimental Evaluation of a Method for Turbocharging Four-Stroke, Single Cylinder, Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchman, Michael; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Turbocharging an engine increases specific power, improves fuel economy, reduces emissions, and lowers cost compared to a naturally aspirated engine of the same power output. These advantages make turbocharging commonplace for multi-cylinder engines. Single cylinder engineers are not commonly turbocharged due to the phase lag between the exhaust stroke, which powers the turbocharger, and the intake stroke, when air is pumped into the engine. Our proposed method of turbocharging single cylinder engines is to add an ``air capacitor'' to the intake manifold, an additional volume that acts as a buffer to store compressed air between the exhaust and intake strokes, and smooth out the pressure pulses from the turbocharger. This talk presents experimental results from a single cylinder, turbocharged diesel engine fit with various sized air capacitors. Power output from the engine was measured using a dynamometer made from a generator, with the electrical power dissipated with resistive heating elements. We found that intake air density increases with capacitor size as theoretically predicted, ranging from 40 to 60 percent depending on heat transfer. Our experiment was able to produce 29 percent more power compared to using natural aspiration. These results validated that an air capacitor and turbocharger may be a simple, cost effective means of increasing the power density of single cylinder engines.

  3. The Friction of Piston Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischbein, Hans W

    1945-01-01

    The coefficient of friction between piston ring and cylinder liner was measured in relation to gliding acceleration, pressure, temperature, quantity of oil and quality of oil. Comparing former lubrication-technical tests, conclusions were drawn as to the state of friction. The coefficients of friction as figured out according to the hydrodynamic theory were compared with those measured by tests. Special tests were made on "oiliness." The highest permissible pressure was measured and the ratio of pressure discussed.

  4. Piston and spring powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Samodovitz, A. J.

    1985-12-10

    The invention is an improved piston engine, either two stroke or four stroke. In one, two stroke, one cylinder embodiment, the improvement comprises two springs connecting between the piston and the base of the piston. These springs are relatively relaxed when the crank is at top dead center. Then during the power/intake stroke, some of the fuel's energy is delivered to the crankshaft and some is used to compress the springs. The stored energy in the springs is delivered to the crankshaft during the exhaust/compression stroke while the springs return to their relatively relaxed condition. As a result, energy is delivered to the crankshaft during both strokes of the cycle, and the engine runs smooth. In one, four stroke, two cylinder embodiment, each cylinder has springs as described above, the cranks of each cylinder are aligned, and the cam sets one cylinder in the power stroke while the other is in the intake stroke. As a result, the engine runs smooth because energy is delivered to the crankshaft during all four strokes of the cycle, during two of the strokes by the burning fuel and during the other two by the release of energy in the springs. In both embodiments, a heavy crankshaft is not needed because of the more uniform power delivery.

  5. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  6. Compact crank drive mechanism with guided pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.A.; Beale, W.T.

    1988-04-19

    This patent describes an improved engine of the type having at least two pistons which reciprocate with a desired phase difference in two adjacent cylinders in a housing and having a crankshaft linked to the pistons by a crank drive mechanism formed by a yoke and a rocking lever. The yoke has a central pair of pivot axes and a pair of laterally distal pivot axes spaced on opposite sides of the central axes and each connected by a connecting rod to a different one of the pistons. One of the cental pivot axes is rotatably attached to a throw of the crankshaft. The rocking lever is pivotally attached to one end to the second central pivot axis of the yoke and extending laterally into pivotal attachment with the housing wherein the improvement comprises: (a) a first one of the pistons having a rigidly attached piston rod to form a first rocker piston which is pivotally connected to the yoke distal pivot axis which is laterally opposite the rocking lever, the first piston having a portion extending substantially into its cylinder, and (b) the second piston having a rocker piston having rigidly attached piston rod pivotally attached to the other yoke distal pivot axis.

  7. Hydraulic radial piston pump intake porting arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.T.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes a hydraulic radial piston pump having a slider block mounted on an eccentric of a rotary shaft in a hydraulic fluid supplied cavity. A piston is mounted in a cylinder disposed radially to the shaft. The piston has a flat working face at one end operating in the cylinder and a flat pad at an opposite end slidably engaged by a flat face of the slider block so as to force the piston outward on a compression stroke on shaft rotation. A yoke retains the piston to the slider block so as to retract the piston inward on an intake stroke on shaft rotation characterized by intake porting means for communicating the cavity with the working end of the piston. It comprises an intake passage extending centrally and axially through the piston from the working end to the pad resulting in an annular face at both piston ends. An elongated intake slot in the face of the slider block extends from a point continuously open to the cavity to a point that opens to the intake passage at the pad end on relative movement of the slider block during the intake stroke to just prior to the compression stroke. The annular faces at the working and pad ends of the piston having substantially equal areas to prevent hydraulic film from developing between the slider block and pad and thereby prevent their separation during compression.

  8. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  9. Numerical investigation of CAI Combustion in the Opposed- Piston Engine with Direct and Indirect Water Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyszczek, R.; Mazuro, P.; Teodorczyk, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is focused on the CAI combustion control in a turbocharged 2-stroke Opposed-Piston (OP) engine. The barrel type OP engine arrangement is of particular interest for the authors because of its robust design, high mechanical efficiency and relatively easy incorporation of a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR). The other advantage of such design is that combustion chamber is formed between two moving pistons - there is no additional cylinder head to be cooled which directly results in an increased thermal efficiency. Furthermore, engine operation in a Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) mode at high compression ratios (CR) raises a possibility of reaching even higher efficiencies and very low emissions. In order to control CAI combustion such measures as VCR and water injection were considered for indirect ignition timing control. Numerical simulations of the scavenging and combustion processes were performed with the 3D CFD multipurpose AVL Fire solver. Numerous cases were calculated with different engine compression ratios and different amounts of directly and indirectly injected water. The influence of the VCR and water injection on the ignition timing and engine performance was determined and their application in the real engine was discussed.

  10. Cast CF8C-Plus Stainless Steel for Turbocharger Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shyam, A.; Evans, N.D.; Pattabiraman, K. (Honeywell Turbo Technologies

    2010-06-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project is to provide the critical test data needed to qualify CF8C-Plus cast stainless steel for commercial production and use for turbocharger housings with upgraded performance and durability relative to standard commercial cast irons or stainless steels. The turbocharger technologies include, but are not limited to, heavy-duty highway diesel engines, and passenger vehicle diesel and gasoline engines. This CRADA provides additional critical high-temperature mechanical properties testing and data analysis needed to quality the new CF8C-Plus steels for turbocharger housing applications.

  11. Reciprocating piston pump system with screw drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor); Moore, Nicholas R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump system of the reciprocating piston type is described, which facilitates direct motor drive and cylinder sealing. A threaded middle potion of the piston is engaged by a nut connected to rotate with the rotor of an electric motor, in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded piston portion, with an oil-carrying groove in the nut being interrupted. A fluid emitting seal located at the entrance to each cylinder, can serve to center the piston within the cylinder, wash the piston, and to aid in sealing. The piston can have a long stroke to diameter ratio to minimize reciprocations and wear on valves at high pressures. The voltage applied to the motor can be reversed prior to the piston reaching the end of its stroke, to permit pressure on the piston to aid in reversing the motor.

  12. Liquid-metal-piston MHD generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generator uses a slug or piston of liquid potassium as the working fluid. An expanding vapor of the metal is allowed to reciprocate the liquid-metal-piston through a magnetic field and the expansion energy is converted directly into electrical energy.

  13. Double acting stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  14. Piston measurement by quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Soazic; Rouyer, Claude; Marre, Gabrielle; Blanchot, Nathalie; Montant, Sébastien; Wattellier, Benoit

    2006-09-01

    We present what is to our knowledge a new method for measuring the relative piston between two independent beams separated by a physical gap, typical of petawatt facilities. The feasibility of this measurement, based on quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry, has been demonstrated experimentally: piston has been measured with accuracy and sensitivity better than 50 nm.

  15. Collapsible pistons for light-gas guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Moving and expandable parts of gun consist of pump-tube diaphragm, piston, launch-tube diaphragm, and saboted projectile. As a result of improved piston design, pressure cycle has been significantly improved by smoother buildup, increasing muzzle velocities up to 50%.

  16. Investigation on the radial micro-motion about piston of axial piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Zhang, Junhui; Yang, Huayong; Zhang, Bin

    2013-03-01

    The limit working parameters and service life of axial piston pump are determined by the carrying ability and lubrication characteristic of its key friction pairs. Therefore, the design and optimization of the key friction pairs are always a key and difficult problem in the research on axial piston pump. In the traditional research on piston/cylinder pair, the assembly relationship of piston and cylinder bore is simplified into ideal cylindrical pair, which can not be used to analyze the influences of radial micro-motion of piston on the distribution characteristics of oil-film thickness and pressure in details. In this paper, based on the lubrication theory of the oil film, a numerical simulation model is built, taking the influences of roughness, elastic deformation of piston and pressure-viscosity effect into consideration. With the simulation model, the dynamic characteristics of the radial micro-motion and pressure distribution are analyzed, and the relationships between radial micro-motion and carrying ability, lubrication condition, and abrasion are discussed. Furthermore, a model pump for pressure distribution measurement of oil film between piston and cylinder bore is designed. The comparison of simulation and experimental results of pressure distribution shows that the simulation model has high accuracy. The experiment and simulation results demonstrate that the pressure distribution has peak values that are much higher than the boundary pressure in the piston chamber due to the radial micro-motion, and the abrasion of piston takes place mainly on the hand close to piston ball. In addition, improvement of manufacturing roundness and straightness of piston and cylinder bore is helpful to improve the carrying ability of piston/cylinder pair. The proposed research provides references for designing piston/cylinder pair, and helps to prolong the service life of axial piston pump.

  17. Turbocharger with variable nozzle having vane sealing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Philippe; Petitjean, Dominique; Ruquart, Anthony; Dupont, Guillaume; Jeckel, Denis

    2011-11-15

    A variable nozzle for a turbocharger includes a plurality of vanes rotatably mounted on a nozzle ring and disposed in a nozzle flow path defined between the nozzle ring and an opposite nozzle wall. Either or both of the faces of the nozzle ring and nozzle wall include(s) at least one step that defines sealing surfaces positioned to be substantially abutted by airfoil surfaces of the vanes in the closed position of the vanes and to be spaced from the airfoil surfaces in positions other than the closed position. This substantial abutment between the airfoil surfaces and the sealing surfaces serves to substantially prevent exhaust gas from leaking past the ends of the airfoil portions. At the same time, clearances between the nozzle ring face and the end faces of the airfoil portions can be sufficiently large to prevent binding of the vanes under all operating conditions.

  18. Method for evaluating the reliability of compressor impeller of turbocharger for vehicle application in plateau area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zengquan; Wang, A.-na; Zhuang, Li; Wang, Jinwei

    2016-10-01

    As turbocharging diesel engines for vehicle application are applied in plateau area, the environmental adaptability of engines has drawn more attention. For the environmental adaptability problem of turbocharging diesel engines for vehicle application, the present studies almost focus on the optimization of performance match between turbocharger and engine, and the reliability problem of turbocharger is almost ignored. The reliability problem of compressor impeller of turbocharger for vehicle application when diesel engines operate in plateau area is studied. Firstly, the rule that the rotational speed of turbocharger changes with the altitude height is presented, and the potential failure modes of compressor impeller are analyzed. Then, the failure behavior models of compressor impeller are built, and the reliability models of compressor impeller operating in plateau area are developed. Finally, the rule that the reliability of compressor impeller changes with the altitude height is studied, the measurements for improving the reliability of the compressor impellers of turbocharger operating in plateau area are given. The results indicate that when the operating speed of diesel engine is certain, the rotational speed of turbocharger increases with the increase of altitude height, and the failure risk of compressor impeller with the failure modes of hub fatigue and blade resonance increases. The reliability of compressor impeller decreases with the increase of altitude height, and it also decreases as the increase of number of the mission profile cycle of engine. The method proposed can not only be used to evaluating the reliability of compressor impeller when diesel engines operate in plateau area but also be applied to direct the structural optimization of compressor impeller.

  19. Squeeze bottle apparatus with force multiplying pistons

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Gordon, Norman R.; DeFord, Henry S.; Eschbach, Eugene A.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber, and a corresponding piston which is acted upon by the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area, thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  20. Phasing piston error in segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junlun; Zhao, Weirui

    2016-08-22

    To achieve a diffraction-limited imaging, the piston errors between the segments of the segmented primary mirror telescope should be reduced to λ/40 RMS. We propose a method to detect the piston error by analyzing the intensity distribution on the image plane according to the Fourier optics principle, which can capture segments with the piston errors as large as the coherence length of the input light and reduce these to 0.026λ RMS (λ = 633nm). This method is adaptable to any segmented and deployable primary mirror telescope. Experiments have been carried out to validate the feasibility of the method.

  1. Adjustable expandable cryogenic piston and ring

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Peter O.; Pallaver, Carl B.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a reciprocating expansion engine for cryogenic refrigeration is improved by changing the pistons and rings so that the piston can be operated from outside the engine to vary the groove in which the piston ring is located. This causes the ring, which is of a flexible material, to be squeezed so that its contact with the wall is subject to external control. This control may be made manually or it may be made automatically in response to instruments that sense the amount of blow-by of the cryogenic fluid and adjust for an optimum blow-by.

  2. Linkage arms for minimizing piston wobble

    SciTech Connect

    Langstroth, S.W.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine having a block within which at least one piston is attached to a crankshaft by a connecting rod between the crankpin of the crankshaft and the wrist pin of the piston. This patent describes improvement in a fixed gear concentric with the axis of the crankshaft and coupled to the block; a follower gear concentric with the crankpin; at least one intermediate gear coupling the fixed gear to the follower gear; wherein the ratio of the gears is such that the follower gear orbits the fixed gear and does not rotate; and linkage arms interconnecting the follower gear and the piston for preventing the rotation of the piston about the wrist pin.

  3. Drift stabilizer for reciprocating free-piston devices

    DOEpatents

    Ward, William C.; Corey, John A.; Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-20

    A free-piston device has a stabilized piston drift. A piston having a frequency of reciprocation over a stroke length and with first and second sides facing first and second variable volumes, respectively, for containing a working fluid defining an acoustic wavelength at the frequency of reciprocation. A bypass tube waveguide connects the first and second variable volumes at all times during reciprocation of the piston. The waveguide has a relatively low impedance for steady flow and a relatively high impedance for oscillating flow at the frequency of reciprocation of the piston, so that steady flow returns fluid leakage from about the piston between the first and second volumes while oscillating flow is not diverted through the waveguide. Thus, net leakage about the piston is returned during each stroke of the piston while oscillating leakage is not allowed and pressure buildup on either the first or second side of the piston is avoided to provide a stable piston location.

  4. Spherical Joint Piston and Connecting Rod Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy, the NASA Lewis Research Center manages a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Technology (HDET) research program. The overall program objectives are to reduce fuel consumption through increased engine efficiency, reduce engine exhaust emissions, and provide options for the use of alternative fuels. The program is administered with a balance of research contracts, university research grants, and focused in-house research. The Cummins Engine Company participates in the HDET program under a cost-sharing research contract. Cummins is researching and developing in-cylinder component technologies for heavy-duty diesel engines. An objective of the Cummins research is to develop technologies for a low-emissions, 55-percent thermal efficiency (LE-55) engine. The best current-production engines in this class achieve about 46-percent thermal efficiency. Federal emissions regulations are driving this technology. Regulations for heavy duty diesel engines were tightened in 1994, more demanding emissions regulations are scheduled for 1998, and another step is planned for 2002. The LE-55 engine emissions goal is set at half of the 1998 regulation level and is consistent with plans for 2002 emissions regulations. LE-55 engine design requirements to meet the efficiency target dictate a need to operate at higher peak cylinder pressures. A key technology being developed and evaluated under the Cummins Engine Company LE-55 engine concept is the spherical joint piston and connecting rod. Unlike conventional piston and connecting rod arrangements which are joined by a pin forming a hinged joint, the spherical joint piston and connecting rod use a ball-and-socket joint. The ball-and-socket arrangement enables the piston to have an axisymmetric design allowing rotation within the cylinder. The potential benefits of piston symmetry and rotation are reduced scuffing, improved piston ring sealing, improved lubrication, mechanical and thermal

  5. Turbocharger with turbine backplate and center housing oil shield

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.; Ho, I.C.

    1991-06-25

    This paper describes a turbocharger. It comprises: a center housing, a compressor housing, and a turbine housing, means for securing the turbine housing and the compressor housing to the center housing, the center housing including a circumferentially extending wall defining a cavity therewithin, means carried by the center housing for rotatably supporting a shaft in the cavity, the shaft including portions extending into the compressor housing and into the turbine housing, a turbine wheel mounted on the portion of the shaft in the turbine housing, a compressor wheel mounted on the portion of the shaft in the compressor housing, the cavity having opposite ends facing the turbine and compressor housings respectively, the end facing the turbine housing being an open end, and an annular backplate member separate from the center housing and from the turbine housing, the annular backplate member circumscribing the shaft for closing the open end of the center housing, the securing means including fastening means extending between the center housing and the turbine housing, the backplate member including a portion clamped between the center housing and the turbine housing by compressive forces generated by the fastening means and transmitted from the turbine housing to the compressor housing through the portion of the backplate member, and a circumferentially extending shroud between the annular backplate member and the turbine wheel.

  6. Device for supporting nozzle vanes of a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.

    1987-08-11

    A turbocharger is described which consists of: a center housing having a radially outwardly extending annular flange at one end thereof; a turbine housing fixed to the annular flange and having an exhaust gas inflow chamber therein; a turbine wheel rotatably arranged in the turbine housing; a radially outwardly extending backplate arranged between the turbine wheel and the one end of the center housing and having an outer peripheral portion held between the annular flange and the turbine housing; an annular exhaust gas inlet passage formed between the backplate and the turbine housing and radially inwardly extending from the exhaust gas inflow chamber toward the turbine wheel; guide vanes rotatably arranged in the annular exhaust gas inlet passage, each of the guide vanes having a shaft which extends through both the backplate and the annular flange and projects beyond an exterior surface of the annular flange; axially extending bushes each being received and mounted in at least one of a first bore and a respective corresponding second bore and rotatably supporting a corresponding shaft therein; and stop means effectively based on at least one of the backplate and the annular flange, this stop means having two axially oppositely-facing shoulder means arranged for cooperating with the bushes.

  7. Influence of heat transfer between turbine and compressor on the performance of small turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenberg, M.; Malobabic, M.; Mobarak, A.

    When operating a turbocharger with an engine the turbine transfers a considerable amount of heat to its environment and to the compressor. Therefore the flow processes in the turbine as well as in the compressor are strongly diabatic. The definition and the experimental determination of turbine and compressor efficiency require a clear distinction between adiabatic and diabatic efficiencies since the heat flux between turbine and compressor must be taken into account. The influence of the heat flux between turbine and compressor on the compression process was studied at two turbochargers for passenger cars of different design. The essential difference of the two turbochargers is the arrangement of turbine and compressor, because the type of bearing is different for each charger. While one turbocharger has sliding bearings, the other charger exhibits roller bearings. The experiments were performed with hot and cold operation of the chargers. The results of the measurements show that the heat flux transferred from the turbine to the compressor and thus the compressor exit temperature depends to a large extent on the mechanical design of the turbocharger.

  8. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Zongxuan

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  9. Process for Making Carbon-Carbon Turbocharger Housing Unit for Intermittent Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved. lightweight, turbine housing unit for an intermittent combustion reciprocating internal combustion engine turbocharger is prepared from a lay-up or molding of carbon-carbon composite materials in a single-piece or two-piece process. When compared to conventional steel or cast iron, the use of carbon-carbon composite materials in a turbine housing unit reduces the overall weight of the engine and reduces the heat energy loss used in the turbo-charging process. This reduction in heat energy loss and weight reduction provides for more efficient engine operation.

  10. 220000-r/min, 2-kW PM Motor Drive for Turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Toshihiko; Takata, Yosuke; Yamashita, Yukio; Komatsu, Yoshimi; Ibaraki, Seiichi

    This paper describes an ultra high-speed permanent-magnet synchronous motor drive, which is embedded in a turbocharger of an internal-combustion engine. The electrical drive makes it possible to enhance output power of the turbocharger in a motoring mode and to retrieve combustion energy from exhaust gas in a regenerating mode. Computer simulations and experimental tests are conducted to examine various operation characteristics of a prototype. The experimental data demonstrate 220000-r/min operation at 2.2-kW inverter output power, which agree with the simulation results well and prove feasibility of the proposed system.

  11. Balancing mechanism for reciprocating piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, N.; Ogino, T.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a balancing mechanism for a reciprocating piston internal combustion engine which includes a cylinder, a piston reciprocatable in the cylinder, a crankcase, a crankshaft mounted in the crankshaft, a crankpin connected to the piston, and a pair of crank arms bridging the crankshaft and crankpin. The crank arms and crankpin rotate with the crankshaft during operation and form a rotating mass. The balancing mechanism comprises at least one rotating counterweight attached to and rotating with the crankshaft, and eccentric journal means on the crankshaft adjacent the crank arms, rotating with the crankshaft. The journal means has an axis spaced to the side of the crankshaft axis which is opposite from the crankpin. The rotating counterweight and the eccentric journal means counterbalancing the rotating mass.

  12. Piston-rotaxanes as molecular shock absorbers.

    PubMed

    Sevick, E M; Williams, D R M

    2010-04-20

    We describe the thermomechanical response of a new molecular system that behaves as a shock absorber. The system consists of a rodlike rotaxane connected to a piston and tethered to a surface. The response of this system is dominated by the translational entropy of the rotaxane rings and can be calculated exactly. The force laws are contrasted with those for a rigid rod and a polymer. In some cases, the rotaxanes undergo a sudden transition to a tilted state when compressed. These piston-rotaxanes provide a potential motif for the design of a new class of materials with a novel thermomechanical response.

  13. Free piston space Stirling technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dochat, G. R.; Dhar, M.

    1989-01-01

    MTI recently completed an initial technology feasibility program for NASA by designing, fabricating and testing a space power demonstrator engine (SPDE). This program, which confirms the potential of free-piston Stirling engines, provided the major impetus to initiate a free-piston Stirling space engine (SSE) technology program. The accomplishments of the SPDE program are reviewed, and an overview of the SSE technology program and technical status to date is provided. It is shown that progress in both programs continues to justify its potential for either nuclear or solar space power missions.

  14. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2011-11-01

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  15. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2006-05-09

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  16. Heat Transfer Analysis of the NAHBE Piston Cap,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    r~~~ U____________ ____s HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS :~ OF THE NAHBE PISTON CAP* Engineering and Wea pons Report EW-l1—77...transfer variations in thecap of a nodified piston engine (NN~BE) was made. The objective was to estimatethe regenerative heating effect d~e to the cap...ABSTRACT The piston modification for the NAHBE (Naval Academy Heat Bal ance Engine ) consists of a cap which extends above the standard piston used

  17. Effects of unbalance location on dynamic characteristics of high-speed gasoline engine turbocharger with floating ring bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longkai; Bin, Guangfu; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Dingqu

    2016-03-01

    For the high-speed gasoline engine turbocharger rotor, due to the heterogeneity of multiple parts material, manufacturing and assembly errors, running wear in impeller and uneven carbon of turbine, the random unbalance usually can be developed which will induce excessive rotor vibration, and even lead to nonlinear vibration accidents. However, the investigation of unbalance location on the nonlinear high-speed turbocharger rotordynamic characteristics is less. In order to discuss the rotor unbalance location effects of turbocharger with nonlinear floating ring bearings(FRBs), the realistic turbocharger of gasoline engine is taken as a research object. The rotordynamic equations of motion under the condition of unbalance are derived by applied unbalance force and nonlinear oil film force of FRBs. The FE model of turbocharger rotor-bearing system is modeled which includes the unbalance excitation and nonlinear FRBs. Under the conditions of four different applied locations of unbalance, the nonlinear transient analyses are performed based on the rotor FEM. The differences of dynamic behavior are obvious to the turbocharger rotor systems for four conditions, and the bifurcation phenomena are different. From the results of waterfall and transient response analysis, the speed for the appearance of fractional frequency is not identical and the amplitude magnitude is different from the different unbalance locations, and the non-synchronous vibration does not occur in the turbocharger and the amplitude is relative stable and minimum under the condition 4. The turbocharger vibration and non-synchronous components could be reduced or suppressed by controlling the applied location of unbalance, which is helpful for the dynamic design, fault diagnosis and vibration control of the high-speed gasoline engine turbochargers.

  18. MAN B&W radial turbochargers after 32000 hours of HFO operation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    In late 1990, the first three of 36 reengined 6L28/32H gen-sets built by MAN B&W Diesel A/S in Holeby, Denmark, were delivered for the Atlantic-class container vessel MV OOCL Inspiration (ex. Ile de France), owned by Sea-Land Service. One of the determining factors for the re-engining contract was the expected 2O000 hour interval between overhauls. The gen-sets are optimized for an output of 1260 kW at 720 r/min (bmep = 17.8 bar), and are supercharged by high-efficiency, water-free MAN B&W model NR20/R turbochargers. The supercharging principle is constant-pressure turbocharging. The service rating of these gen-sets normally is 80% (sea load), with part-load operation down to 30% load not uncommon. Unrestricted part-load operation in spite of the lower air excess ratio as compared to pulse-pressure turbocharging is one of the preconditions for real heavy-fuel oil capability, and the MAN B&W turbochargers play a significant part in achieving this. The result of the inspection was that both compressor and turbine were clean and without detectable deposits, as were the diffuser and the nozzle ring, where hardly any erosion marks and no blade shortening due to erosion could be found.

  19. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  20. Stabilizing gas bearing in free piston machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhar, Manmohan (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    In a free piston engine, to reduce dynamic loads on the reciprocating elements caused by a time varying pressure gradient across the gas bearing and close clearance seals provided therein, drain galleries are incorporated at the ends of the gas bearings to isolate the same, and circumferentially spaced grooves are incorporated in the close clearance seal region.

  1. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  2. How Hot Can a Fire Piston Get?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Brown, J. A.; Cunningham, O. A.; Goad, B. C.

    2010-01-01

    The fire piston is just a sealed syringe containing a small amount of tinder. When the plunger is forced downwards, the air inside is compressed and heats up, setting fire to the tinder. It has been used as a convenient and portable way of starting fires "over a wide area from northern Burma and Siam through the Malay Peninsula and the Malayan…

  3. Inherently flushing piston rod for a reciprocating pump

    SciTech Connect

    Besic, D.; Smith, W.C.

    1990-10-23

    This patent describes an inherently flushing piston rod for use in a reciprocating pump. It comprises: a piston portion having an axial bore formed therethrough, the axial bore having a first end and a second end, the first end of the axial bore lying in fluid contact with the external environment of the piston portion; a flexible diaphragm disposed within the axial bore through the piston portion whereby the flexible diaphragm and the piston portion define a reserve flushing zone; a pair of annular wiper elements extending radially from the piston portion, the annular wiper elements and the piston portion defining an annular flushing space therebetween; the piston portion having a radially-extending channel formed therethrough, the radially-extending channel fluidly connecting the axial bore through the piston portion and the annular flushing space; and a means for providing flushing fluid to the second end of the axial bore through the piston portion; a means for preventing flow from the axial bore through the piston portion to the means for supplying flushing fluid.

  4. Free-piston regenerative hot gas hydraulic engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A displacer piston which is driven pneumatically by a high-pressure or low-pressure gas is included in a free-piston regenerative hydraulic engine. Actuation of the displacer piston circulates the working fluid through a heater, a regenerator and a cooler. The present invention includes an inertial mass such as a piston or a hydraulic fluid column to effectively store and supply energy during portions of the cycle. Power is transmitted from the working fluid to a hydraulic fluid across a diaphragm or lightweight piston to achieve a hydraulic power out-put. The displacer piston of the present invention may be driven pneumatically, hydraulically or electromagnetically. In addition, the displacer piston and the inertial mass of the present invention may be positioned on the same side of the diaphragm member or may be separated by the diaphragm member.

  5. An evaluation of 1D loss model collections for the off-design performance prediction of automotive turbocharger compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.; Dietrich, M.

    2013-12-01

    Single-zone modelling is used to assess different collections of impeller 1D loss models. Three collections of loss models have been identified in literature, and the background to each of these collections is discussed. Each collection is evaluated using three modern automotive turbocharger style centrifugal compressors; comparisons of performance for each of the collections are made. An empirical data set taken from standard hot gas stand tests for each turbocharger is used as a baseline for comparison. Compressor range is predicted in this study; impeller diffusion ratio is shown to be a useful method of predicting compressor surge in 1D, and choke is predicted using basic compressible flow theory. The compressor designer can use this as a guide to identify the most compatible collection of losses for turbocharger compressor design applications. The analysis indicates the most appropriate collection for the design of automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressors.

  6. High pressure rotary piston coal feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. F.; Gencsoy, H. T.; Strimbeck, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    This feeder concept uniquely combines the functions of solids feeding, metering, and pressurization into one compact system. Success with the rotary-piston concept would provide a lower-cost alternative to lock-hopper systems. The design of the feeder is presented, with special emphasis on the difficult problem of seal design. Initial tests will be to check seal performance. Subsequent tests will evaluate solids-feeding ability.

  7. Analysis of Variation of Piston Temperature with Piston Dimensions and Undercrown Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J C; Schramm, W B

    1948-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented that permits estimation of the changes in piston-temperature distribution induced by variations in the crown thickness, the ring-groove-pad thickness, and the undercrown surface heat-transfer coefficient. The analysis consists of the calculation of operating temperatures at various points in the piston body on the basis of the experimentally determined surface heat-transfer coefficients and boundary-region temperatures, as well as arbitrarily selected surface coefficients. Surface heat-transfer coefficients were estimated from the internal temperature gradients obtained by hardness surveys of aluminum pistons that had been operated under severe conditions in a liquid-cooled, single-cylinder, 5 1/2 by 6-inch test engine.

  8. Stability Analysis of a Turbocharger Rotor System Supported on Floating Ring Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Shi, Z. Q.; Zhen, D.; Gu, F. S.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    The stability of a turbocharger rotor is governed by the coupling of rotor dynamics and fluid dynamics because the high speed rotor system is supported on a pair of hydrodynamic floating ring bearings which comprise of inner and outer fluid films in series. In order to investigate the stability, this paper has developed a finite element model of the rotor system with consideration of such exciting forces as rotor imbalance, hydrodynamic fluid forces, lubricant feed pressure and dead weight. The dimensionless analytical expression of nonlinear oil film forces in floating ring bearings have been derived on the basis of short bearing theory. Based on numerical simulation, the effects of rotor imbalance, lubricant viscosity, lubricant feed pressure and bearing clearances on the stability of turbocharger rotor system have been studied. The disciplines of the stability of two films and dynamic performances of rotor system have been provided.

  9. Improving Power Density of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Prahl, Joseph; Loparo, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Analyses and experiments demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and displacer motion in a free piston Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis shows the theoretical limits of power density improvement due to ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. More realistic models based on nodal analysis show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal, often producing less power than engines that use sinusoidal piston and displacer motion. Constrained optimization using nodal analysis predicts that Stirling engine power density can be increased by as much as 58 using optimized higher harmonic piston and displacer motion. An experiment is conducted in which an engine designed for sinusoidal motion is forced to operate with both second and third harmonics, resulting in a maximum piston power increase of 14. Analytical predictions are compared to experimental data showing close agreement with indirect thermodynamic power calculations, but poor agreement with direct electrical power measurements.

  10. Improving Power Density of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Analyses and experiments demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and displacer motion in a free-piston Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis shows the theoretical limits of power density improvement due to ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. More realistic models based on nodal analysis show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal, often producing less power than engines that use sinusoidal piston and displacer motion. Constrained optimization using nodal analysis predicts that Stirling engine power density can be increased by as much as 58 percent using optimized higher harmonic piston and displacer motion. An experiment is conducted in which an engine designed for sinusoidal motion is forced to operate with both second and third harmonics, resulting in a piston power increase of as much as 14 percent. Analytical predictions are compared to experimental data and show close agreement with indirect thermodynamic power calculations, but poor agreement with direct electrical power measurements.

  11. Improving Free-Piston Stirling Engine Power Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2016-01-01

    Analyses and experiments demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and displacer motion in a free piston Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis shows the theoretical limits of power density improvement due to ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. More realistic models based on nodal analysis show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal, often producing less power than engines that use sinusoidal piston and displacer motion. Constrained optimization using nodal analysis predicts that Stirling engine power density can be increased by as much as 58% using optimized higher harmonic piston and displacer motion. An experiment is conducted in which an engine designed for sinusoidal motion is forced to operate with both second and third harmonics, resulting in a maximum piston power increase of 14%. Analytical predictions are compared to experimental data showing close agreement with indirect thermodynamic power calculations, but poor agreement with direct electrical power measurements.

  12. A nonlinear Kalman filtering approach to embedded control of turbocharged diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Siano, Pierluigi; Arsie, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    The development of efficient embedded control for turbocharged Diesel engines, requires the programming of elaborated nonlinear control and filtering methods. To this end, in this paper nonlinear control for turbocharged Diesel engines is developed with the use of Differential flatness theory and the Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter. It is shown that the dynamic model of the turbocharged Diesel engine is differentially flat and admits dynamic feedback linearization. It is also shown that the dynamic model can be written in the linear Brunovsky canonical form for which a state feedback controller can be easily designed. To compensate for modeling errors and external disturbances the Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter is used and redesigned as a disturbance observer. The filter consists of the Kalman Filter recursion on the linearized equivalent of the Diesel engine model and of an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory which enables to obtain estimates for the state variables of the initial nonlinear model. Once the disturbances variables are identified it is possible to compensate them by including an additional control term in the feedback loop. The efficiency of the proposed control method is tested through simulation experiments.

  13. Magnetorheological valve based actuator for improvement of passively controlled turbocharger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahiuddin, I.; Mazlan, S. A.; Imaduddin, F.; Ubaidillah, Ichwan, B.

    2016-03-01

    Variable geometry turbochargers have been widely researched to fulfil the current engine stringent regulations. The passively controlled turbocharger (PCT) concept has been proposed to reduce energy consumption by utilizing the emission energy to move the actuator. However, it only covered a small range operating condition. Therefore, a magnetorheological(MR) Valve device, as typical smart material devices to enhance a passive device, is proposed to improve the PCT. Even though the benefits have been considered for the compactness and easiness to connect to an electrical system, the number of publications regarding the MR application within engine system is hard to be found. Therefore, this paper introduces a design of an MR Valve in a turbocharger. The main challenge is to make sure its capability to produce a sufficient total pressure drop. To overcome the challenge, its material properties, shape and pressure drop calculation has been analyzed to fulfil the requirement. Finally, to get a more understanding of actuator performance, the actuator response was simulated by treating the exhaust gas pressure as an input. It shows that the new MR actuator has a potential dynamic to improve the PCT controllability.

  14. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-08-01671 Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P. J.; Wilson, M.

    2014-11-28

    Results were obtained on residual stresses in the weld of the steel shaft to the Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel for turbochargers. Neutron diffraction studies at the HFIR Residual Stress Facility showed asymmetric tensile stresses after electron-beam welding of the wheel and shaft. A post-weld heat-treatment was found to relieve and reduce the residual stresses. Results were also obtained on cast CF8C-Plus steel as an upgrade alternative to cast irons (SiMo, Ni-resist) for higher temperature capability and performance for the turbocharger housing. CF8C-Plus steel has demonstrated creep-rupture resistance at 600-950oC, and is more creep-resistant than HK30Nb, but lacks oxidation-resistance at 800oC and above in 10% water vapor. New modified CF8C-Plus Cu/W steels with Cr and Ni additions show better oxidation resistance at 800oC in 10% water vapor, and have capability to higher temperatures. For automotive gasoline engine turbocharger applications, higher temperatures are required, so at the end of this project, testing began at 1000oC and above.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of friction-welded joints in tial turbocharger components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. G.; Kropf, A. J.; Vissers, D. R.; Sun, W. M.; Katsoudas, J.; Yang, N.; Fei, D.

    2012-05-01

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) is an advanced intermetallic material and is being investigated for application in turbocharger components for diesel engines. A TiAl turbocharger rotor consists of a cast TiAl turbine wheel and a Ti-alloy shaft that are joined by friction welding. Although friction welding is an established industrial process, it is still challenging to join dissimilar materials especially for brittle intermetallics. These joints are therefore required to be inspected using a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. In this study, synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (CT) developed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory was used for NDE characterization of friction-welded joint in three TiAl turbocharger rotors. The filtered synchrotron X-ray source has high peak energies to penetrate thick metallic materials, and the detector (imager) has high spatial resolutions to resolve small flaws. The CT inspections revealed detailed 3D crack distributions within poorly welded joints. The crack detection sensitivity and resolution was calibrated and found to be correlated well with destructive examination.

  16. Improving Free-Piston Stirling Engine Specific Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2015-01-01

    This work uses analytical methods to demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and/or displacer motion in a Stirling engine. Isothermal analysis was used to show the potential benefits of ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. Nodal analysis is used to show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal in real Stirling engines. Constrained optimization was used to identify piston and displacer waveforms that increase Stirling engine specific power.

  17. Improving Free-Piston Stirling Engine Specific Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell Henry

    2014-01-01

    This work uses analytical methods to demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and/or displacer motion in a Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis was used to show the potential benefits of ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. Nodal analysis is used to show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal in real Stirling engines. Constrained optimization was used to identify piston and displacer waveforms that increase Stirling engine specific power.

  18. The research on flow pulsation characteristics of axial piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingchao; Wang, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    The flow pulsation is an important factor influencing the axial piston pump performance. In this paper we implement modeling and simulation of the axial piston pump with AMESim software to explore the flow pulsation characteristics under various factors . Theory analysis shows the loading pressure, angular speed, piston numbers and the accumulator impose evident influence on the flow pulsation characteristics. This simulation and analysis can be used for reducing the flow pulsation rate via properly setting the related factors.

  19. Internal position and limit sensor for free piston machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor); Wood, James Gary (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A sensor for sensing the position of a reciprocating free piston in a free piston Stirling machine. The sensor has a disk mounted to an end face of the power piston coaxially with its cylinder and reciprocating with the piston The disk includes a rim around its outer perimeter formed of an electrically conductive material A coil is wound coaxially with the cylinder, spaced outwardly from the outer perimeter of the disk and mounted in fixed position relative to the pressure vessel, preferably on the exterior of the pressure vessel wall.

  20. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégot, Sylvie; Layes, Guillaume; Lanzetta, François; Nika, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of a free piston Stirling engine. The model and the detailed calculation of pressures losses are exposed. Stability of the machine is studied by the observation of the eigenvalues of the model matrix. Model validation based on the comparison with NASA experimental results is described. The influence of operational and construction parameters on performance and stability issues is exposed. The results show that most parameters that are beneficial for machine power seem to induce irregular mechanical characteristics with load, suggesting that self-sustained oscillations could be difficult to maintain and control.

  1. High turbulence combustion chamber for turbocharged lean burn gaseous fueled engine

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, R.S.

    1988-12-27

    This patent describes a gaseous fueled engine having at least a cylinder with an fuel/air intake and combustion product exhaust to be used in a cylinder head having a flat lower surface enclosing one end of the cylinder, and a piston with a flat top piston head slidably received in the cylinder. The improvement consists of: a. an ignition device extending from the flat lower surface of the cylinder head in the center of the cylinder, and b. a baffleless combustion chamber eccentrically located in the head of the piston with respect to the piston axis such that ignition of the fuel/air mixture by the ignition device occurs within but on the outer periphery of the combustion chamber.

  2. LINC-NIRVANA piston control elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brix, Mario; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Bertram, Thomas; Rost, Steffen; Borelli, Jose Luis; Herbst, Thomas M.; Kuerster, Martin; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer

    2010-07-01

    We review the status of hardware developments related to the Linc-Nirvana optical path difference (OPD) control. The status of our telescope vibration measurements is given. We present the design concept of a feed-forward loop to damp the impact of telescope mirror vibrations on the OPD seen by Linc-Nirvana. At the focus of the article is a description of the actuator of the OPD control loop. The weight and vibration optimized construction of this actuator (aka piston mirror) and its mount has a complex dynamical behavior, which prevents classical PI feedback control from delivering fast and precise motion of the mirror surface. Therefore, an H-; optimized control strategy will be applied, custom designed for the piston mirror. The effort of realizing a custom controller on a DSP to drive the piezo is balanced by the outlook of achieving more than 5x faster servo bandwidths. The laboratory set-up to identify the system, and verify the closed loop control performance is presented. Our goal is to achieve 30 Hz closed-loop control bandwidth at a precision of 30 nm.

  3. CNC grinding of valve housing piston holes

    SciTech Connect

    Ashbaugh, F.A.

    1991-11-01

    Grinding has traditionally been used for machining operations requiring close dimensional tolerances and better surface finishes than can be obtained from other metal removal techniques. Using a grinding process for the last metal removal operation, the close tolerances and surface finishes can be easily held while eliminating the adverse conditions from the current metal removal processes. Pre-machined test parts were sent to a machine tool supplier to have the critical inside features of a typical piston bore finish machined using an internal CNC grinder equipped with high-frequency spindles. The piston bore and sealing angle were ground using a standard 120-grit silicon carbide wheel. The wafer step was machined using a solid carbide tool designed and built at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Six consecutive parts were machined for evaluation. The repeatability on all six parts was within print requirements. The inside corner radii was less than 0.002 in. and the surface finish was 8.2 arithmetical average or better as defined by ANSI B46.1, Surface Texture. Machining parts by this grinding process would eliminate bellmouth, chatter, waviness, and traveler polishing operations. It would produce a superior surface finish, small inside radii, and small easily removable burrs. It would also hold tolerances closer and significantly reduce scrap, rework, rejects, and deviations. 1 fig.

  4. Fluid powered linear piston motor with harmonic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, David W.

    2016-09-20

    A motor is disclosed that includes a module assembly including a piston that is axially cycled. The piston axial motion is coupled to torque couplers that convert the axial motion into rotary motion. The torque couplers are coupled to a rotor to rotate the rotor.

  5. Entropic Damping of the Motion of a Piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2017-03-01

    The concept of an "entropic force" can be introduced by considering a familiar setup, namely a horizontal cylinder enclosing an ideal monatomic gas by a piston of cross-sectional area A and mass m that can slide without friction. The surrounding atmospheric pressure Patm keeps the piston from flying out of the cylinder. The cylinder and piston have negligible heat capacity (compared to the gas), but the gas is not thermally insulated from the surroundings at room temperature TR. Ignore any viscosity or turbulence of the enclosed gas or surrounding air. Two specific and illustrative situations are analyzed here. In the first, the piston is massless, m = 0. The piston is temporarily held in place by a pin while the gas is quickly adjusted to initial pressure Pi = Patm and temperature slightly larger than that of the room, say Ti = 1.1TR, using a heater and regulator. The piston is then released from rest, vi = 0. In the second case, the piston has inertia, m > 0, and the gas is initially in both mechanical and thermal equilibrium with the surroundings so that Pi = Patm and Ti = TR. The piston is now given a quick inward push, vi < 0. In both situations, the aim is the same: Describe the subsequent evolution of the system.

  6. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  7. Free-piston Sirling engine technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochat, G. R.

    1982-03-01

    The program will utilize the Technology Demonstrator Engine system as a test bed to evaluate specific loss mechanisms within the engine during operation. This will provide meaningful information and test data to increase understanding of free-piston operation, and will be of benefit to application development programs for heat-activated heat pumps, fluid pumps, engine generators, etc. The evaluation will include the current analytical procedures for calculating the specific losses, perform a series of tests designed to isolate each loss, comparison of actual changes in engine performance with predicted change, and in engine performance with predicted change, and to determine the adequacy of present analytical methods. Recommendations to improve overall engine/system performance and/or analytical methods will be made.

  8. New Outboard Motor Firing on All Pistons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Seven years ago, NASA was in the planning stages of producing an aluminum alloy with higher strength and resistance at elevated temperatures for aerospace applications. At that time, a major automobile manufacturer happened to approach NASA for solutions to lowering engine emissions and the costs associated with developing aluminum engine pistons. The Space Agency realized the answers to the manufacturer's problems could lie within the proposed alloy. Jonathan Lee, a structural materials engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center s Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing Department, and PoShou Chen, a scientist with Huntsville, Alabama-based Morgan Research Corporation, partook in the development project as the inventors. The resulting NASA High-Strength Aluminum Alloy, or "MSFC-398," was capable of casting metal components at both high volume and low cost, making it extremely attractive for commercial application, not just in automotives, but in a variety of other industries, as well. NASA patented the technology and introduced it for public licensing in 2001.

  9. Ultralean combustion in general aviation piston engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirivella, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The role of ultralean combustion in achieving fuel economy in general aviation piston engines was investigated. The aircraft internal combustion engine was reviewed with regard to general aviation requirements, engine thermodynamics and systems. Factors affecting fuel economy such as those connected with an ideal leanout to near the gasoline lean flammability limit (ultralean operation) were analyzed. A Lycoming T10-541E engine was tested in that program (both in the test cell and in flight). Test results indicate that hydrogen addition is not necessary to operate the engine ultralean. A 17 percent improvement in fuel economy was demonstrated in flight with the Beechcraft Duke B60 by simply leaning the engine at constant cruiser power and adjusting the ignition for best timing. No detonation was encountered, and a 25,000 ft ceiling was available. Engine roughness was shown to be the limiting factor in the leanout.

  10. TCM aircraft piston engine emission reduction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezy, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technology necessary to safely reduce general aviation piston engine exhaust emissions to meet the EPA 1980 Emission Standards with minimum adverse effects on cost, weight, fuel economy, and performance was demonstrated. A screening and assessment of promising emission reduction concepts was provided, and the preliminary design and development of those concepts was established. A system analysis study and a decision making procedure were used by TCM to evaluate, trade off, and rank the candidate concepts from a list of 14 alternatives. Cost, emissions, and 13 other design criteria considerations were defined and traded off against each candidate concept to establish its merit and emission reduction usefulness. A computer program was used to aid the evaluators in making the final choice of three concepts.

  11. Piston core properties and disturbance effects.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, H.W.; Rice, T.L.; Mayne, P.W.; Singh, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory geotechnical data on piston cores for 31 sites on the mid-Atlantic Upper Continental Slope show the near-surface sediments vary from normally consolidated to somewhat overconsolidated clayey silts and silty clays of low to high plasticity. They also exhibit normalized behavior and their index property correlations with the effective-stress friction angle, the undrained strength ratio, and the compression index are reasonably consistent with existing knowledge. Because existing knowledge concerning disturbance effect suggests that in-situ preconsolidation stress values should lie between those derived from the triaxial and laboratory vane data, the preconsolidation stress values obtained from the consolidation data appear to be appreciably smaller than in-situ values. -from ASCE Publications Information

  12. Effects of air injection on a turbocharged Teledyne Continential Motors TSIO-360-C engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. V.; Kempke, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    A turbocharged fuel injected aircraft engine was operated over a range of test conditions that included that EPA five-mode emissions cycle and fuel air ratio variations for individual modes while injecting air into the exhaust gas. Air injection resulted in a decrease of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide while exceeding the maximum recommended turbine inlet temperature of 1650 F at the full rich mixture of the engine. Leanout tests indicated that the EPA standards could be met through the combined use of fuel management and air injection.

  13. Transient Characteristics of Free Piston Vuilleurnier Cycle Heat Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsue, Junji; Fujimoto, Norioki; Shirai, Hiroyuki

    A dynamic analysis of a free piston Vuilleumier cycle heat pump was performed using a time-stepping integration method to investigate transient characteristics under power controlling. The nonlinear relationship between displacement and force for pistons was taken into account for the motion of reciprocating components. The force for pistons is mainly caused by the pressure change of working gas varying with piston displacements; moreover nonlinear viscous dissipative force due to the oscillating flow of working gas in heat exchangers and discontinuous damping force caused by solid friction at piston seals and rod seals are included. The displacements of pistons and pressure changes in the Vuilleumier cycle heat pump were integrated by an ideal isothermal thermodynamic relationship. It was assumed that the flow friction was proportional to the kinematic pressure of working gas, and that the solid friction at the seals was due to the functions of the working gas pressure and the tension of seal springs. In order to investigate the transient characteristics of a proposed free piston Vuilleumier cycle heat pump machine when hot-side working gas temperatures and alternate force were changed, some calculations were performed and discussed. These calculation results make clear transient characteristics at starting and power controlling. It was further found that only a small amount of starter power is required in particular conditions. During controlling, the machine becomes unstable when there is ar elatively large reduction in cooling or heating power. Therefore, an auxiliary device is additionally needed to obtain stable operation, such as al inear motor.

  14. Hot piston ring/cylinder liner materials: Selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    In current designs of the automotive (kinematic) Stirling engine, the piston rings are made of a reinforced polymer and are located below the pistons because they cannot withstand the high temperatures in the upper cylinder area. Theoretically, efficiency could be improved if hot piston rings were located near the top of the pistons. Described is a program to select piston ring and cylinder coating materials to test this theory. Candidate materials were screened, then subjected to a pin or disk friction and wear test machine. Tests were performed in hydrogen at specimen temperatures up to 760 C to simulate environmental conditions in the region of the hot piston ring reversal. Based on the results of these tests, a cobalt based alloy, Stellite 6B, was chosen for the piston rings and PS200, which consists of a metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix with dispersed solid lubricants, was chosen as the cylinder coating. Tests of a modified engine and a baseline engine showed that the hot ring reduced specific fuel consumption by up to 7 percent for some operating conditions and averaged about 3 percent for all conditions evaluated. Related applications of high-temperature coatings for shaft seals and as back-up lubricants are also described.

  15. Loss terms in free-piston Stirling engine models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Lloyd B.

    1992-01-01

    Various models for free piston Stirling engines are reviewed. Initial models were developed primarily for design purposes and to predict operating parameters, especially efficiency. More recently, however, such models have been used to predict engine stability. Free piston Stirling engines have no kinematic constraints and stability may not only be sensitive to the load, but also to various nonlinear loss and spring constraints. The present understanding is reviewed of various loss mechanisms for free piston Stirling engines and how they have been incorporated into engine models is discussed.

  16. Effects of semi-floating ring bearing outer clearance on the subsynchronous oscillation of turbocharger rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Zhou, Ming; Xu, Quanyong

    2016-09-01

    Semi-floating ring bearing(SFRB) is developed to control the vibration of turbocharger rotor. The outer clearance of SFRB affects the magnitude and frequency of nonlinear whirl motion, which is significant for the design of turbocharger. In order to explore the effects of outer clearance, a transient finite element analysis program for rotor and oil film bearing is built and validated by a published experimental case. The nonlinear dynamic behaviors of rotor-SFRB system are simulated. According to the simulation results, two representative subsynchronous oscillations excited by the two bearings respectively are discovered. As the outer clearance of SFRB increases from 24 μm to 60 μm, the low-frequency subsynchronous oscillation experiences three steps, including a strong start, a gradual recession and a combination with the other one. At the same time, the high-frequency subsynchronous oscillation starts to appear gradually, then strengthens, and finally combines. If gravity and unbalance are neglected, the combination will start starts from high rotor speed and extents to low rotor speed, just like a "zipper". It is found from the quantitative analysis that when the outer clearance increases, the vibration amplitude experiences large value firstly, then reduction, and suddenly increasing after combination. A useful design principle of SFRB outer clearance for minimum vibration amplitude is proposed: the outer clearance value should be chosen to keep the frequency of two subsynchronous oscillations clearly separated and their amplitudes close.

  17. Flatness-based embedded adaptive fuzzy control of turbocharged diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Siano, Pierluigi; Arsie, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    In this paper nonlinear embedded control for turbocharged Diesel engines is developed with the use of Differential flatness theory and adaptive fuzzy control. It is shown that the dynamic model of the turbocharged Diesel engine is differentially flat and admits dynamic feedback linearization. It is also shown that the dynamic model can be written in the linear Brunovsky canonical form for which a state feedback controller can be easily designed. To compensate for modeling errors and external disturbances an adaptive fuzzy control scheme is implemanted making use of the transformed dynamical system of the diesel engine that is obtained through the application of differential flatness theory. Since only the system's output is measurable the complete state vector has to be reconstructed with the use of a state observer. It is shown that a suitable learning law can be defined for neuro-fuzzy approximators, which are part of the controller, so as to preserve the closed-loop system stability. With the use of Lyapunov stability analysis it is proven that the proposed observer-based adaptive fuzzy control scheme results in H∞ tracking performance.

  18. Experimental Evaluation of the Free Piston Engine - Linear Alternator (FPLA)

    SciTech Connect

    Leick, Michael T.; Moses, Ronald W.

    2015-03-01

    This report describes the experimental evaluation of a prototype free piston engine - linear alternator (FPLA) system developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The opposed piston design wa developed to investigate its potential for use in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The system is mechanically simple with two - stroke uniflow scavenging for gas exchange and timed port fuel injection for fuel delivery, i.e. no complex valving. Electrical power is extracted from piston motion through linear alternators wh ich also provide a means for passive piston synchronization through electromagnetic coupling. In an HEV application, this electrical power would be used to charge the batteries. The engine - alternator system was designed, assembled and operated over a 2 - year period at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. This report primarily contains a description of the as - built system, modifications to the system to enable better performance, and experimental results from start - up, motoring, and hydrogen combus tion tests.

  19. 26. Detail showing piston which is one of two steam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Detail showing piston which is one of two steam powered drive units for winches for Marine Railways #1. and #2, Marine Railway Headhouse. - Thames Tow Boat Company, Foot of Farnsworth Street, New London, New London County, CT

  20. 58. Detail of steam pistons and gears for driving winches ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Detail of steam pistons and gears for driving winches to Marine Railways #1 and #2, Marine Railway Headhouse, ground floor, looking north. - Thames Tow Boat Company, Foot of Farnsworth Street, New London, New London County, CT

  1. Inducing dynamical bistability by reversible compression of an optical piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnoering, Gabriel; Genet, Cyriaque

    2015-04-01

    We study the reversible crossover between stable and bistable phases of an overdamped Brownian bead inside an optical piston. The interaction potentials are solved developing a method based on Kramers's theory that exploits the statistical properties of the stochastic motion of the bead. We evaluate precisely the energy balance of the crossover. We show that the deformation of the optical potentials induced by the compression of the piston is related to a production of heat balanced between potential energy changes and the total amount of work performed by the piston. This reveals how specific thermodynamic processes can be designed and controlled with a high level of precision by tailoring the optical landscapes of the piston.

  2. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, B.A.; Harvey, M.N.

    2000-02-15

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  3. Pump having pistons and valves made of electroactive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a pump for inducing a displacement of a fluid from a first medium to a second medium, including a conduit coupled to the first and second media, a transducing material piston defining a pump chamber in the conduit and being transversely displaceable for increasing a volume of the chamber to extract the fluid from the first medium to the chamber and for decreasing the chamber volume to force the fluid from the chamber to the second medium, a first transducing material valve mounted in the conduit between the piston and the first medium and being transversely displaceable from a closed position to an open position to admit the fluid to the chamber, and control means for changing a first field applied to the piston to displace the piston for changing the chamber volume and for changing a second field applied to the first valve to change the position of the first valve.

  4. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Harvey, Michael N.

    2001-01-30

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  5. 13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, parallel motion links and steam chest. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  6. Structural design of Stirling engine with free pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Gavlas, Stanislav; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    Stirling engine is a device that converts thermal energy to mechanical work, which is mostly used to drive a generator of electricity. Advantage of Stirling engine is that it works with closed-cycle, where working medium is regularly cooled and heated, which acts on the working piston. This engine can be made in three modifications - alpha, beta, gamma. This paper discusses the design of the gamma Stirling engine with free pistons.

  7. Visceral-locomotory pistoning in crawling caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Simon, Michael A; Woods, William A; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V; Simon, Sharotka M; van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Trimmer, Barry A

    2010-08-24

    Animals with an open coelom do not fully constrain internal tissues, and changes in tissue or organ position during body movements cannot be readily discerned from outside of the body. This complicates modeling of soft-bodied locomotion, because it obscures potentially important changes in the center of mass as a result of internal tissue movements. We used phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray imaging and transmission light microscopy to directly visualize internal soft-tissue movements in freely crawling caterpillars. Here we report a novel visceral-locomotory piston in crawling Manduca sexta larvae, in which the gut slides forward in advance of surrounding tissues. The initiation of gut sliding is synchronous with the start of the terminal prolegs' swing phase, suggesting that the animal's center of mass advances forward during the midabdominal prolegs' stance phase and is therefore decoupled from visible translations of the body. Based on synchrotron X-ray data and transmission light microscopy results, we present evidence for a two-body mechanical system with a nonlinear elastic gut that changes size and translates between the anterior and posterior of the animal. The proposed two-body system--the container and the contained--is unlike any form of legged locomotion previously reported and represents a new feature in our emerging understanding of crawling.

  8. Fluid Dynamics in Rotary Piston Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Wappenschmidt, Johannes; Sonntag, Simon J; Buesen, Martin; Gross-Hardt, Sascha; Kaufmann, Tim; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Autschbach, Ruediger; Goetzenich, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical circulatory support can maintain a sufficient blood circulation if the native heart is failing. The first implantable devices were displacement pumps with membranes. They were able to provide a sufficient blood flow, yet, were limited because of size and low durability. Rotary pumps have resolved these technical drawbacks, enabled a growing number of mechanical circulatory support therapy and a safer application. However, clinical complications like gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic insufficiency, thromboembolic complications, and impaired renal function are observed with their application. This is traced back to their working principle with attenuated or non-pulsatile flow and high shear stress. Rotary piston pumps potentially merge the benefits of available pump types and seem to avoid their complications. However, a profound assessment and their development requires the knowledge of the flow characteristics. This study aimed at their investigation. A functional model was manufactured and investigated with particle image velocimetry. Furthermore, a fluid-structure interaction computational simulation was established to extend the laboratory capabilities. The numerical results precisely converged with the laboratory measurements. Thus, the in silico model enabled the investigation of relevant areas like gap flows that were hardly feasible with laboratory means. Moreover, an economic method for the investigation of design variations was established.

  9. Calibrating the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolnik, Marianne

    2012-10-01

    The Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) is a subsystem of the PHENIX detector. The MPC, an electromagnetic calorimeter, is effective at measuring the energy of photons and electrons produced from collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The MPC outputs a voltage signal that we then convert into an energy reading. One common way to calibrate electromagnetic calorimeters is to use photons from π^0 decays. Since many of the photons that enter the detector are the result of natural pion decay, we can pair up the photons and create π^0 candidates. We then plot their masses tower by tower and with the correct cuts a mass peak will appear close to the position predicted by the simulation PISA of the PHENIX detector. Then, we relate the mass peaks from the measured data to mass peaks from simulated data to adjust the gains. Once the MPC is calibrated we can use it to study Au+Au collisions. Previously, the detector has been used to study spin physics using data collected from p+p collisions, and cold nuclear matter effects using d+Au collisions. These new calibrations will allow us to measure new global variables such as transverse energy in both the forward and backward kinematic regions, 3.1< |η| < 3.9.

  10. Electromagnetic liquid pistons for capillarity-based pumping.

    PubMed

    Malouin, Bernard A; Vogel, Michael J; Olles, Joseph D; Cheng, Lili; Hirsa, Amir H

    2011-02-07

    The small scales associated with lab-on-a-chip technologies lend themselves well to capillarity-dominated phenomena. We demonstrate a new capillarity-dominated system where two adjoining ferrofluid droplets can behave as an electronically-controlled oscillator or switch by an appropriate balance of magnetic, capillary, and inertial forces. Their oscillatory motion can be exploited to displace a surrounding liquid (akin to an axial piston pump), forming electromagnetic "liquid pistons." Such ferrofluid pistons can pump a precise volume of liquid via finely tunable amplitudes (cf. pump stroke) or resonant frequencies (cf. pump speed) with no solid moving parts for long-term operation without wear in a small device. Furthermore, the rapid propagation of electromagnetic fields and the favorable scaling of capillary forces with size permit micron sized devices with very fast operating speeds (∼kHz). The pumping dynamics and performance of these liquid pistons is explored, with experimental measurements showing good agreement with a spherical cap model. While these liquid pistons may find numerous applications in micro- and mesoscale fluidic devices (e.g., remotely activated drug delivery), here we demonstrate the use of these liquid pistons in capillarity-dominated systems for chip-level, fast-acting adaptive liquid lenses with nearly perfect spherical interfaces.

  11. Method of Fabricating Chopped-Fiber Composite Piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional piston molding is fabricated from a mixture of chopped, carbon tow filaments of variable length, which are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and molded by conventional molding processes into a near net shape, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part. Continuous reinforcement in the form of carbon-carbon composite tapes or pieces of fabric can be also laid in the mold before or during the charging of the mold with the chopped-fiber mixture, to enhance the strength in the crown and wrist-pin areas. The molded chopped-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite parts are then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. These pyrolized parts are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches, which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston molds are machined to final piston dimensions, and piston ring grooves are added. To prevent oxidation and/or to seal the piston surface or near surface, the chopped-fiber piston is coated with ceramic and/or metallic sealants: and/or coated with a catalyst.

  12. Oxygen fugacity and piston cylinder capsule assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, S.

    2011-12-01

    A double capsule assembly designed to control oxygen fugacity in piston cylinder experiments has been tested at 1200 °C and 10 kbar. The assembly consists of an outer Pt-capsule containing a solid buffer (Ni-NiO or Co-CoO plus H2O) and an inner AuPd-capsule containing the sample, H2O and a Pt-wire. To prevent direct contact with the buffer phases the AuPd-capsule is embedded in finely ground Al2O3 along with some coarser, fractured Al2O3 facilitating fluid inclusion formation. No water loss is observed in the sample even after 48 hrs but a slight increase in water content is observed in longer duration runs due to oxygen and hydrogen diffusion into the AuPd-capsule. Carbon from the furnace also diffuses through the outer Pt-capsule but reacts with H2O in the outer capsule to form CO2 and never reaches the inner capsule. Oxygen fugacity of runs in equilibrium with the Ni-NiO and Co-CoO buffers was measured by analyzing the Fe content of the Pt-wire in the sample1 and by analyzing Fe dissolved in the AuPd capsule2. The second method gives values that are in good agreement with established buffer whereas results from the first method are one half to one log units higher than the established values. References 1. E. Medard, C. A. McCammon, J. A. Barr, T. L. Grove, Am. Mineral. 93, 1838 (2008). 2. J. Barr, T. Grove, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 160, 631 (2010)

  13. Effects of air injection on a turbocharged Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-360-C engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. V.; Kempke, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for tests performed to assess the effects of exhaust manifold injection air flow rate on emissions and on exhaust gas temperature and turbine inlet temperature for a range of engine operating conditions (speed, torque, and fuel-air ratios) of a fuel-injected turbocharged six-cylinder air-cooled Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-360-C engine. Air injection into the exhaust gas at 80 F resulted in a decrease in hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide while exceeding the maximum recommended turbine inlet temperature of 1650 F at the full rich mixture of the engine. The EPA standards could be met within present turbine inlet temperature limits using commercially available air pumps, provided that the fuel-air ratios were leaned in the taxi, climb, and approach modes.

  14. Neural control of fast nonlinear systems--application to a turbocharged SI engine with VCT.

    PubMed

    Colin, Guillaume; Chamaillard, Yann; Bloch, Gérard; Corde, Gilles

    2007-07-01

    Today, (engine) downsizing using turbocharging appears as a major way in reducing fuel consumption and pollutant emissions of spark ignition (SI) engines. In this context, an efficient control of the air actuators [throttle, turbo wastegate, and variable camshaft timing (VCT)] is needed for engine torque control. This paper proposes a nonlinear model-based control scheme which combines separate, but coordinated, control modules. Theses modules are based on different control strategies: internal model control (IMC), model predictive control (MPC), and optimal control. It is shown how neural models can be used at different levels and included in the control modules to replace physical models, which are too complex to be online embedded, or to estimate nonmeasured variables. The results obtained from two different test benches show the real-time applicability and good control performance of the proposed methods.

  15. Magnetic Piston Propagation in a 100-ns Plasma Opening Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, A.; Grabowski, C.; Chakrabarti, N.; Maron, Y.; Fruchtman, A.

    1998-11-01

    The propagation of a magnetic piston through the plasma of a 90-ns, 170-kA POS is observed by studying the electron density, magnetic field, and ion velocity evolution. For the prefilled plasma n_e=(2.2± 0.5)× 10^14 cm-3, and T_e=5.5± 1 eV. The plasma composition is studied from absolute line intensities and collisional-radiative calculations. Most of the plasma ions are protons (90% near the cathode) with the rest being mainly CIV. The Hall-MHD conditions are not fulfilled for our experiment and ion motion is significant. The 3D-resolved ne evolution during the current pulse is studied from the line intensities of ions doped in the plasma using laser evaporation, and the magnetic field from Zeeman splitting. A diagonal magnetic piston propagates from the generator towards the load at about half the proton Alfven velocity. The protons are specularly reflected by the piston, while the heavy ions cross the potential hill in the piston, acquiring a lower velocity. The proton reflection causes an increase of ne ahead of the piston, followed by a sharp (10-20 ns) and substantial drop in ne (to 10-50% from the initial value). The magnetic field distribution studied using chordal observation, and theoretical analysis of ne and the magnetic field evolution are presented.

  16. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Fleming, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  17. A CWT-based methodology for piston slap experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, M.; Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2017-03-01

    Noise and vibration control in mechanical systems has become ever more significant for automotive industry where the comfort of the passenger compartment represents a challenging issue for car manufacturers. The reduction of piston slap noise is pivotal for a good design of IC engines. In this scenario, a methodology has been developed for the vibro-acoustic assessment of IC diesel engines by means of design changes in piston to cylinder bore clearance. Vibration signals have been analysed by means of advanced signal processing techniques taking advantage of cyclostationarity theory. The procedure departs from the analysis of the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) in order to identify a representative frequency band of piston slap phenomenon. Such a frequency band has been exploited as the input data in the further signal processing analysis that involves the envelope analysis of the second order cyclostationary component of the signal. The second order harmonic component has been used as the benchmark parameter of piston slap noise. An experimental procedure of vibrational benchmarking is proposed and verified at different operational conditions in real IC engines actually equipped on cars. This study clearly underlines the crucial role of the transducer positioning when differences among real piston-to-cylinder clearances are considered. In particular, the proposed methodology is effective for the sensors placed on the outer cylinder wall in all the tested conditions.

  18. Spherical rotary piston machine as an artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Wipf, S L

    1991-01-01

    A positive displacement pump with six rotary pistons was proposed as an artificial heart. The pump's design was characterized by high symmetry and compactness. Thus, a spherical volume of 4 1/4 inch diameter sufficed for a pump delivering 10 L/min at 120 pulses/min with the pistons turning at 30 rpm. The pistons and four connecting gears were the only moving parts. The pump functions in two separate halves as left and right ventricles, with two of the six pistons each having inlet and outlet passages, and one of them replacing mitral and pulmonary valves with the other, tricuspid and aortic valves. The function of the intraventricular septum was provided by the other four pistons whose interiors also accommodated driving motors each capable of 0.4 Nm torque for a combined power of 5 watts. There were no stagnant regions in the pumping volume, and at all internal surfaces in contact with blood, there was periodic shear stress not exceeding approximately 300 Pa.

  19. Three-dimensional Casimir piston for massive scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S.C. Teo, L.P.

    2009-08-15

    We consider Casimir force acting on a three-dimensional rectangular piston due to a massive scalar field subject to periodic, Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Exponential cut-off method is used to derive the Casimir energy. It is shown that the divergent terms do not contribute to the Casimir force acting on the piston, thus render a finite well-defined Casimir force acting on the piston. Explicit expressions for the total Casimir force acting on the piston is derived, which show that the Casimir force is always attractive for all the different boundary conditions considered. As a function of a - the distance from the piston to the opposite wall, it is found that the magnitude of the Casimir force behaves like 1/a{sup 4} when a{yields}0{sup +} and decays exponentially when a{yields}{infinity}. Moreover, the magnitude of the Casimir force is always a decreasing function of a. On the other hand, passing from massless to massive, we find that the effect of the mass is insignificant when a is small, but the magnitude of the force is decreased for large a in the massive case.

  20. Free-piston reciprocating cryogenic expander utilizing phase controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jeongmin; Park, Jiho; Kim, Kyungjoong; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2017-02-01

    In a free-piston expander which eliminates mechanical linkages, a prescribed behaviour of the free-piston movement is the key to an expander performance. In this paper, we have proposed an idea of reducing complexity of the free-piston expander. It is to replace both multiple solenoid valves and reservoirs that are indispensable in a previous machine with a combination of a single orifice-reservoir assembly. It functions as a phase controller like that of a pulse tube refrigerator so that it generates time-delay of pressure variation between the warm-end and the reservoir resulting in the intended expansion of the cold-end volume down to the pre-set reservoir pressure. The modeling of this unique free-piston reciprocating expander utilizing phase controller is developed to understand and predict the performance of the new-type expander. Additionally, the operating parameters are analysed at the specified conditions to enable one to develop a more efficient free-piston type cryogenic expander.

  1. P-REx: the piston drift reconstruction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Fu, Qiang; Widmann, Felix; Peter, Diethard

    2016-08-01

    For sensitive infra-red long-baseline interferometry, it is crucial to control the differential piston between the apertures. Classically this is achieved with a fringe tracker which measures the movement of the interferometric fringes. In this paper, we describe a new method to reconstruct the piston variation introduced by atmospheric turbulence with real-time data from adaptive optics wave-front sensing. Concurrently, the dominant wind speed vector can also be retrieved. The method is analyzed in simulation for atmospheric turbulence of various strength, and wind vectors varying with layer altitude. The results from the simulations show that this method could help to reliably retrieve the piston variation and wind speed from wavefront sensor data. The method is related to concepts of predictive control AO algorithms and reconstruction of the point spread function.

  2. Piston-cylinder apparatus for high-pressure impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R.; da Jornada, J. A. H.

    1997-01-01

    A simple piston-cylinder apparatus was developed for impedance spectroscopy at pressures up to 3 GPa and temperatures up to 500 °C. The apparatus is of the compound cylinder type, with the innermost cylinder made of a commercially available low-cost alumina-based ceramic, with pistons of hard metal that allow electric connections. Cell electrical resistance was higher than 1 MΩ at T<300 °C and higher than 100 kΩ at 400 °C. The inductivity in the wires and pistons was about 2 μH. The sample was enclosed in a h-BN capsule, which insured a good hydrostaticity without disturbing the measurement. The equipment proved to be very useful in determining the activation volume of the conduction process in several ionic conductors.

  3. RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, J.

    1985-01-01

    A free piston Stirling engine was tested. The tests performed over the past several years on the single cylinder engine were designed to investigate the dynamics of a free piston Stirling engine. The data are intended to be used primarily for computer code validation. The tests designed to investigate the sensitivity of the engine performance to variations in working space pressure, heater and cooler temperatures, regenerator porosity, power piston mass and displacer dynamics were completed. In addition, some data were recorded with alternate working fluids. A novel resonant balance system for the engine was also tested. Some preliminary test results of the tests performed are presented along with an outline of future tests to be run with the engine coupled to a hydraulic output unit. A description of the hydraulic output unit is given.

  4. High pressure rotary piston coal feeder for coal gasification applications

    DOEpatents

    Gencsoy, Hasan T.

    1977-05-24

    The subject development is directed to an apparatus for feeding pulverized coal into a coal gasifier operating at relatively high pressures and elevated temperatures. This apparatus is a rotary piston feeder which comprises a circular casing having a coal loading opening therein diametrically opposed from a coal discharge and contains a rotatable discoid rotor having a cylinder in which a reciprocateable piston is disposed. The reciprocation of the piston within the cylinder is provided by a stationary conjugate cam arrangement whereby the pulverized coal from a coal hopper at atmospheric pressure can be introduced into the cylinder cavity and then discharged therefrom into the high-pressure gasifier without the loss of high pressure gases from within the latter.

  5. Turbocharging of Small Internal Combustion Engines as a Means of Improving Engine/Application System Fuel Economy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    which allows reduced blade tip running clearances - thereby improving compressor and turbine efficiency. Additionally, the rotor system is overhung ...turbocharger follows: The rotor consists of an overhung back-to-back compressor/ turbine arrangement with the bearings located in the relatively cool...program to define the balancing tolerance of the individual rotating components as well as the assembled rotor . I I I F. Define and carry out a

  6. Lightweight piston-rod assembly for a reciprocating machine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    In a reciprocating machine, there is provided a hollow piston including a dome portion on one end and a base portion on the opposite end. The base portion includes a central bore into which a rod is hermetically fixed in radial and angular alignment. The extending end of the rod has a reduced diameter portion adapted to fit into the central bore of a second member such as a cross-head assembly, and to be secured thereto in radial and axial alignment with the piston.

  7. Development free-piston Stirling test-bed engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochat, G. R.; Vitale, N. G.; Moynihan, T. M.

    The free-piston Stirling Technology Demonstrator Engine (TDE) designed and instrumented to provide data to aid in understanding free-piston Stirling engine operation and performance, is described. It is noted that the system includes instrumentation to measure the internal thermodynamic operation and to permit calculation of system power flows. Near-term testing of the engine will assess three mechanisms for engine loss. It is pointed out that recent testing has demonstrated that the power and efficiency are strong functions of heater head temperature. A maximum power output of 1,800 watts and a thermodynamic efficiency of 30% have been demonstrated at 450 C and 40 bar.

  8. Wear-resistant nodular iron for automotive piston rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatavuk, J.; Mariano, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Progress in automotive engine development demands new cost-effective materials with higher mechanical properties and improved wear resistance as compared to existing materials. For example, niobium, as niobium carbide, improves the wear resistance of a typical nodular iron used for piston rings. Niobium prompts the precipitation of stable and hard niobium carbides in the liquid; these particles do not interfere with the subsequent heat treatment of the iron. Industrial production of new niobium-alloyed piston rings was accomplished with a minimum of disruption in normal production processes.

  9. Non-adiabatic pumping in an oscillating-piston model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuchem, Maya; Dittrich, Thomas; Cohen, Doron

    2012-05-01

    We consider the prototypical "piston pump" operating on a ring, where a circulating current is induced by means of an AC driving. This can be regarded as a generalized Fermi-Ulam model, incorporating a finite-height moving wall (piston) and non-trivial topology (ring). The amount of particles transported per cycle is determined by a layered structure of phase space. Each layer is characterized by a different drift velocity. We discuss the differences compared with the adiabatic and Boltzmann pictures, and highlight the significance of the "diabatic" contribution that might lead to a counter-stirring effect.

  10. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Free Piston Linear Alternator

    SciTech Connect

    Janson Wu; Nicholas Paradiso; Peter Van Blarigan; Scott Goldsborough

    1998-11-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) free piston powered linear alternator has been conducted to determine if improvements can be made in the thermal and conversion efficiencies of modern electrical generator systems. Performance of a free piston engine was investigated using a rapid compression expansion machine and a full cycle thermodynamic model. Linear alternator performance was investigated with a computer model. In addition linear alternator testing and permanent magnet characterization hardware were developed. The development of the two-stroke cycle scavenging process has begun.

  11. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Heather Christine [Dublin, CA; Roberts, Jeffrey James [Livermore, CA

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  12. Mathematical modeling of bent-axis hydraulic piston motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the DSN 70-m antennas uses 16 bent-axis hydraulic piston motors as part of the antenna drive system. On each of the two antenna axes, four motors are used to drive the antenna and four motors provide counter torque to remove the backlash in the antenna drive train. This article presents a mathematical model for bent-axis hydraulic piston motors. The model was developed to understand the influence of the hydraulic motors on the performance of the DSN 70-m antennas' servo control system.

  13. Steady and Unsteady Velocity Measurements in a Small Turbocharger Turbine with Computational Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamanis, N.; Palfreyman, D.; Arcoumanis, C.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.

    2006-07-01

    The detailed flow characteristics of three high-pressure-ratio mixed-flow turbines were investigated under both steady and pulsating flow conditions. Two rotors featured a constant inlet blade angle, one with 12 blades and the second with 10. The third rotor was shorter and had a nominally constant incidence angle. The rotors find application on an automotive high-speed large commercial diesel turbocharger. The steady flow entering and exiting the blades has been quantified by a laser Doppler velocimetry system. The measurements were performed at a plane 3.0-mm ahead of the rotor leading edge and 9.5-mm downstream the rotor trailing edge. The turbine test conditions corresponded to the peak efficiency point at two rotational speeds, 29,400 and 41,300-rpm. The results were resolved in a blade-to-blade sense to examine fully the nature of the flow at turbocharger representative conditions. A correlation between the combined effects of incidence and exit flow angle with the isentropic efficiency has been verified. Regarding pulsating flow, the velocity data and their corresponding instantaneous velocity triangles were resolved in a blade-to-blade sense to understand better the complex phenomenon. The results highlighted the potential of a nominally constant incidence design to absorb better the inadequacy of the volute to discharge the exhaust gas uniformly along the blade leading edge. A double vortex rotating in a clockwise sense propagated on the plane normal to the meridional direction. This should be attributed to the effect of the passing blade that was acting as a blockage to the flow. The phenomenon was more pronounced near the suction and pressure surfaces of the blade, but diminished at the mid-passage region where the flow exhibited its best level of guidance. The full mixed flow turbine stage under transient conditions was modelled firstly with a 'steady' inlet and secondly with a 'pulsating' inlet boundary condition. In both cases comparison was made to

  14. Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall

    DOEpatents

    Hoult, David P.

    1985-01-01

    A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal.

  15. Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall

    DOEpatents

    Hoult, D.P.

    1985-09-10

    A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal. 4 figs.

  16. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  17. Spherical-wave expansions of piston-radiator fields.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, R C; Yaghjian, A D

    1991-09-01

    Simple spherical-wave expansions of the continuous-wave fields of a circular piston radiator in a rigid baffle are derived. These expansions are valid throughout the illuminated half-space and are useful for efficient numerical computation in the near-field region. Multipole coefficients are given by closed-form expressions which can be evaluated recursively.

  18. Electromagnetic liquid pistons for capillarity-based pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malouin, Bernard; Olles, Joseph; Cheng, Lili; Hirsa, Amir; Vogel, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Two adjoining ferrofluid droplets can behave as an electronically-controlled oscillator or switch by an appropriate balance of magnetic, capillary, and inertial forces. Their motion can be exploited to displace a surrounding liquid, forming electromagnetic liquid pistons. Such ferrofluid pistons can pump a precise volume of liquid via finely tunable amplitudes or resonant frequencies with no solid moving parts. Here we demonstrate the use of these liquid pistons in capillarity-dominated systems for variable focal distance liquid lenses with nearly perfect spherical interfaces. These liquid/liquid lenses feature many promising qualities not previously realized together in a liquid lens, including large apertures, immunity to evaporation, invariance to orientation relative to gravity, and low driving voltages. The dynamics of these liquid pistons is examined, with experimental measurements showing good agreement with a spherical cap model. A centimeter-scale lens was shown to respond in excess of 30 Hz, with resonant frequencies over 1 kHz predicted for scaled down systems.

  19. Improved piston ring materials for 650 deg C service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorndahl, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A program to develop piston ring material systems which will operate at 650C was performed. In this program, two candidate high temperature piston ring substrate materials, Carpenter 709-2 and 440B, were hot formed into the piston ring shape and subsequently evaluated. In a parallel development effort ceramic and metallic piston ring coating materials were applied to cast iron rings by various processing techniques and then subjected to thermal shock and wear evaluation. Finally, promising candidate coatings were applied to the most thermally stable hot formed substrate. The results of evaluation tests of the hot formed substrate show that Carpenter 709-2 has greater thermal stability than 440B. Of the candidate coatings, plasma transferred arc (PTA) applied tungsten carbide and molybdenum based systems exhibit the greatest resistance to thermal shock. For the ceramic based systems, thermal shock resistance was improved by bond coat grading. Wear testing was conducted to 650C (1202F). For ceramic systems, the alumina/titania/zirconia/yttria composition showed highest wear resistance. For the PTA applied systems, the tungsten carbide based system showed highest wear resistance.

  20. Raising the efficiency of piston-drive helium expansion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Chernetskii, V.D.; Mironova, N.A.

    1986-07-01

    Operating tests of a cryogenic helium installation show that, at normal operating-mode parameters, the temperature of the gas flowing out through the gap between the piston and cylinder of a piston-drive expansion machine is much higher than its inlet temperature to the machine. The fact that preheated gas enters the expansion engine in line with a reverse current increases the temperature differnce between the direct and and reverse streams in the heat exchanger, thereby lowering the refrigeration capacity and the efficiency of the installation's operation as a whole. Shown, is a diagram of the DPG-4-24/0.2 piston-drive expansion engine, and figures of the warmup of helium flowing out of the expander cylinder vs. inlet temperature to the expander, and heat flow to the helium flowing out of the cylinder vs. temperature at the inlet to the expander. It is concluded that the design of the cylinder piston unit widely used is not an optimal design since gas circulation that develops from the reciprocating motion of the rod results in an additional refrigeration loss for the entire cryogenic helium installation.

  1. Wear compensating seal means for rotary piston coal feeder

    DOEpatents

    Gencsoy, Hasan T.; Gardner, John F.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a wear compensating seal arrangement for use in a rotary piston feeder utilized for feeding pulverized coal into a gasifier operating at relatively high pressures and elevated temperatures. The rotary piston feeder has a circular casing with a coal loading opening therein diametrically opposed from a coal discharge and contains a rotatable disoidal rotor having a cylinder in which a reciprocatable piston is disposed. The reciprocation of the piston within the cylinder is provided by a stationary conjugate cam whereby pulverized coal from a coal hopper at atmospheric pressure can be introduced into the cylinder and then discharged therefrom into the high pressure gasifier while maintaining minimal losses of producer gas and the expenditure of minimal energy which would detract from the efficiency of the gasification. The seal arrangement of the present invention is disposed between the rotor and the casing about the coal discharge and prevents the high pressure gases from within the gasifier from escaping between these relatively movable parts during operation of the coal feeder. The seal utilizes a primary seal in contact with the rotor and a secondary seal supporting the primary seal. The primary seal is continuously urged towards the rotor by springs and the high pressure producer gas.

  2. Thermal observations of gas pistoning at Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.B.; Harris, A.J.L.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    Data acquired by three continuously recording thermal infrared thermometers situated on the north rim of Pu'u'O' o Crater at Kilauea Volcano during 2002 revealed episodes of periodic thermal pulses originating from a degassing vent on the crater floor. These thermal pulses are interpreted as gas release (jetting events) associated with gas pistoning, a mechanism observed previously at both Mauna Ulu and Pu'u'O' o. During a 35-day-long period spanning June and July 2002, gas pistoning was frequently the dominant mode of gas release, with as many as several hundred pulses occurring in uninterrupted series. On other days, degassing alternated between periods of quasi-continuous gas jetting and intervals of gas pistoning that contained a few to a few dozen pulses. Characteristic time intervals between pistoning events ranged from 2 up to 7 min. We identify three types of pistoning. Type 1 involves emission of lava, followed by gas jetting and drain back; type 2 is the same but the elevated position of the vent does not allow postjet drain back; and type 3 involves gas jetting only with no precursory lava flow. To explain gas pistoning, we apply a model whereby a stagnant cap of degassed magma develops in the conduit below the vent. Gas bubbles rise through the magma column and collect under the cap. The collective buoyancy of these bubbles pushes the cap upward. When the cap reaches the surface, it erupts from the vent as a lava flow. Unloading of the conduit magma in this way results in an abrupt pressure drop (i.e., the overburden felt by the bubbles is reduced), causing explosive gas expansion in the form of gas jetting from the vent. This terminates the event and lava drains back into the conduit to start the cycle anew. In the case where there is no surface lava emission or drain back, the cap instead pushes into and spreads out within a subsurface cavity. Again, this unloads the conduit magma and terminates in explosive gas release. Once gas is expelled, lava in

  3. Production of Diesel Engine Turbocharger Turbine from Low Cost Titanium Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, T. R.; Mayer, R.

    2012-05-04

    Turbochargers in commercial turbo-diesel engines are multi-material systems where usually the compressor rotor is made of aluminum or titanium based material and the turbine rotor is made of either a nickel based superalloy or titanium, designed to operate under the harsh exhaust gas conditions. The use of cast titanium in the turbine section has been used by Cummins Turbo Technologies since 1997. Having the benefit of a lower mass than the superalloy based turbines; higher turbine speeds in a more compact design can be achieved with titanium. In an effort to improve the cost model, and develop an industrial supply of titanium componentry that is more stable than the traditional aerospace based supply chain, the Contractor has developed component manufacturing schemes that use economical Armstrong titanium and titanium alloy powders and MgR-HDH powders. Those manufacturing schemes can be applied to compressor and turbine rotor components for diesel engine applications with the potential of providing a reliable supply of titanium componentry with a cost and performance advantage over cast titanium.

  4. Comparison of Propane and Methane Performance and Emissions in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

  5. Effect of Guide Vane in Ring Groove Arrangement for a Small Turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Daisaku; Nagoshi, Keiichi; Tanimura, Motoki; Ishida, Masahiro; Ueki, Hironobu

    2010-06-01

    A high-pressure ratio and a wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. Ring groove arrangement is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on the suction pipe and the shroud casing wall are connected by means of the annular passage, and the stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. It is well known that the ring groove arrangement shows the following two merits; (1) the formation of recirculation flow removes the low energy fluid around the downstream groove located near the splitter blade leading edge, (2) the flow incidence can be reduced because the recirculation flow merges again with the incoming main flow upstream of the impeller inlet. In the present study, the ring groove arrangement was applied to the high speed centrifugal compressor, in addition, in order to suppress too large pre-whirl due to the recirculation flow, the effects of guide vane installed in the annular passage and the ring groove configuration on the pre-whirl were analyzed numerically. The numerical flow analysis was carried out by using the commercial code produced by ANSYS-CFX. The simulation results show the multi-ring grooves are fairly effective in combination with the suitable configuration of guide vanes for improvement in the inlet velocity distortion.

  6. Effect of the plasma piston size on the efficiency of the electrodynamic acceleration of a body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobyshevskii, E. M.; Rozov, S. I.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Sokolov, V. M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the experiments reported here was to investigate the effect of the size of the plasma piston on velocity saturation during the electrodynamic acceleration of a body in rail-gun accelerators. An analysis of the results suggests that the observed decrease of the efficiency of the accelerating action of an expanded plasma piston is associated with the increased permeability of the piston with respect to the gas enclosed between the piston and the body. This conclusion is consistent with the concept of the plasma piston as a combination of merging and separating arc channels.

  7. Electromagnetic Casimir piston in higher-dimensional spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, L. P.

    2011-05-15

    We consider the Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field in a higher-dimensional spacetime of the form MxN, where M is the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime and N is an n-dimensional compact manifold. The Casimir force acting on a planar piston that can move freely inside a closed cylinder is investigated. Different combinations of perfectly conducting boundary conditions and infinitely permeable boundary conditions are imposed on the cylinder and the piston. It is verified that if the piston and the cylinder have the same boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pulled towards the closer end of the cylinder. However, if the piston and the cylinder have different boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pushed to the middle of the cylinder. By taking the limit where one end of the cylinder tends to infinity, one obtains the Casimir force acting between two parallel plates inside an infinitely long cylinder. The asymptotic behavior of this Casimir force in the high temperature regime and the low temperature regime are investigated for the case where the cross section of the cylinder in M is large. It is found that if the separation between the plates is much smaller than the size of N, the leading term of the Casimir force is the same as the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the (4+n)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. However, if the size of N is much smaller than the separation between the plates, the leading term of the Casimir force is 1+h/2 times the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime, where h is the first Betti number of N. In the limit the manifold N vanishes, one does not obtain the Casimir force in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime if h is nonzero. Therefore the data obtained from Casimir experiments suggest that the first Betti number of the extra dimensions should be zero.

  8. Liner surface improvements for low friction piston ring packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderberg, C.; Dimkovski, Z.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The development of engine components in the automotive industry is governed by several constraints such as environmental legislation and customer expectations. About a half of the frictional losses in an internal combustion engine come from the interactions between the piston assembly and cylinder liner surface. The tribological considerations in the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner have attracted much attention over the past few decades. Many non-conventional cylinder liner finishes have been, and are being, developed with the aim to reduce friction losses and oil consumption, but the effects of the surface finish on piston ring pack performance is not well understood. One way of reducing friction in the cylinder system is to reduce the tangential load from the piston ring pack, focusing on the oil control ring. However, the side-effect of this is a disappointingly increased oil consumption. In this study a number of different cylinder liner surface specifications were developed and implemented in test engines with the aim of maintaining the level for oil consumption when decreasing the tangential load for the piston ring pack. To improve our understanding of the result, the same surfaces were evaluated in elastic and elasto-plastic rough contact and hydrodynamic flow simulation models. It is shown that oil consumption is strongly related to surface texture on the cylinder liners and at lower speeds (900-1200 rpm), a ‘rougher surface’ with a high core (e.g. Sk) and valley roughness (e.g. Svk) results in higher oil consumption. At the medium speed range (1200-3600 rpm), oil consumption continues to dominate for the ‘rough’ surfaces but with a visible influence of a lower oil consumption for a decreased roughness within the ‘rough’ surface group. ‘Smooth’ surfaces with a ‘smooth’ core (Sk), irrespective of the valley component (Svk), show similar oil consumption. For engine speeds above 3600 rpms, an increase in plateau

  9. General aviation piston-engine exhaust emission reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempke, E. E., Jr.; Houtman, W. H.; Westfield, W. T.; Duke, L. C.; Rezy, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    To support the promulgation of aircraft regulations, two airports were examined, Van Nuys and Tamiami. It was determined that the carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from piston-engine aircraft have a significant influence on the CO levels in the ambient air in and around airports, where workers and travelers would be exposed. Emissions standards were set up for control of emissions from aircraft piston engines manufactured after December 31, 1979. The standards selected were based on a technologically feasible and economically reasonable control of carbon monoxide. It was concluded that substantial CO reductions could be realized if the range of typical fuel-air ratios could be narrowed. Thus, improvements in fuel management were determined as reasonable controls.

  10. Piston-Driven Fluid Ejectors In Silicon Mems

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Jakubczak II, Jerome F.

    2005-05-03

    A surface-micromachined fluid-ejection apparatus is disclosed which utilizes a piston to provide for the ejection of jets or drops of a fluid (e.g. for ink-jet printing). The piston, which is located at least partially inside a fluid reservoir, is moveable into a cylindrical fluid-ejection chamber connected to the reservoir by a microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator which is located outside the reservoir. In this way, the reservoir and fluid-ejection chamber can be maintained as electric-field-free regions thereby allowing the apparatus to be used with fluids that are electrically conductive or which may react or break down in the presence of a high electric field. The MEM actuator can comprise either an electrostatic actuator or a thermal actuator.

  11. Free piston variable-stroke linear-alternator generator

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, C.M.

    1998-12-15

    A free-piston variable stroke linear-alternator AC power generator for a combustion engine is described. An alternator mechanism and oscillator system generates AC current. The oscillation system includes two oscillation devices each having a combustion cylinder and a flying turnbuckle. The flying turnbuckle moves in accordance with the oscillation device. The alternator system is a linear alternator coupled between the two oscillation devices by a slotted connecting rod. 8 figs.

  12. Free piston variable-stroke linear-alternator generator

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1998-01-01

    A free-piston variable stroke linear-alternator AC power generator for a combustion engine. An alternator mechanism and oscillator system generates AC current. The oscillation system includes two oscillation devices each having a combustion cylinder and a flying turnbuckle. The flying turnbuckle moves in accordance with the oscillation device. The alternator system is a linear alternator coupled between the two oscillation devices by a slotted connecting rod.

  13. A magnetically driven piston pump for ultra-clean applications.

    PubMed

    LePort, F; Neilson, R; Barbeau, P S; Barry, K; Bartoszek, L; Counts, I; Davis, J; deVoe, R; Dolinski, M J; Gratta, G; Green, M; Montero Díez, M; Müller, A R; O'Sullivan, K; Rivas, A; Twelker, K; Aharmim, B; Auger, M; Belov, V; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Burenkov, A; Cleveland, B; Conley, R; Cook, J; Cook, S; Craddock, W; Daniels, T; Dixit, M; Dobi, A; Donato, K; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Franco, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Green, C; Hägemann, C; Hall, C; Hall, K; Hallman, D; Hargrove, C; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Hodgson, J; Juget, F; Kaufman, L J; Karelin, A; Ku, J; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K; Leonard, D S; Lutter, G; Mackay, D; MacLellan, R; Marino, M; Mong, B; Morgan, P; Odian, A; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Pushkin, K; Rollin, E; Rowson, P C; Schmoll, B; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K; Slutsky, S; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Swift, M; Vuilleumier, J-L; Vuilleumier, J-M; Wichoski, U; Wodin, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y-R

    2011-10-01

    A magnetically driven piston pump for xenon gas recirculation is presented. The pump is designed to satisfy extreme purity and containment requirements, as is appropriate for the recirculation of isotopically enriched xenon through the purification system and large liquid xenon time projection chamber of EXO-200. The pump, using sprung polymer gaskets, is capable of pumping more than 16 standard liters per minute of xenon gas with 750 Torr differential pressure.

  14. A magnetically driven piston pump for ultra-clean applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LePort, F.; Neilson, R.; Barbeau, P. S.; Barry, K.; Bartoszek, L.; Counts, I.; Davis, J.; deVoe, R.; Dolinski, M. J.; Gratta, G.; Green, M.; Díez, M. Montero; Müller, A. R.; O'Sullivan, K.; Rivas, A.; Twelker, K.; Aharmim, B.; Auger, M.; Belov, V.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Cleveland, B.; Conley, R.; Cook, J.; Cook, S.; Craddock, W.; Daniels, T.; Dixit, M.; Dobi, A.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W.; Farine, J.; Fierlinger, P.; Franco, D.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Green, C.; Hägemann, C.; Hall, C.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; Herrin, S.; Hughes, M.; Hodgson, J.; Juget, F.; Kaufman, L. J.; Karelin, A.; Ku, J.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K.; Leonard, D. S.; Lutter, G.; Mackay, D.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M.; Mong, B.; Morgan, P.; Odian, A.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Prescott, C. Y.; Pushkin, K.; Rollin, E.; Rowson, P. C.; Schmoll, B.; Sinclair, D.; Skarpaas, K.; Slutsky, S.; Stekhanov, V.; Strickland, V.; Swift, M.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Wichoski, U.; Wodin, J.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y.-R.

    2011-10-01

    A magnetically driven piston pump for xenon gas recirculation is presented. The pump is designed to satisfy extreme purity and containment requirements, as is appropriate for the recirculation of isotopically enriched xenon through the purification system and large liquid xenon time projection chamber of EXO-200. The pump, using sprung polymer gaskets, is capable of pumping more than 16 standard liters per minute of xenon gas with 750 Torr differential pressure.

  15. An Investigation of the Motion of Spring Suspended Pistons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-18

    for Stirling and Pulse Tube cryocoolers . The advantage that they have over conventional compressors that use rotary drives is the combination of... cryocoolers of various designs and sizes. Satisfactory clearance seals have been achieved in all of these. Despite this it has been apparent for some...such as used in cryogenic coolers. The classic ‘Oxford’ cryocooler has a clearance seal between the piston and the cylinder which is maintained by the

  16. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A. ); Henein, N.A. . Center for Automotive Research)

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-[omega]) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, [omega], have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-[omega]) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  17. Effect of self recirculation casing treatment on the performance of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancedo, Matthieu

    Increase in emission regulations in the transport industry brings the need to have more efficient engines. A path followed by the automobile industry is to downsize the size of the internal combustion engine and increase the air density at the intake to keep the engine power when needed. Typically a centrifugal compressor is used to force the air into the engine, it can be powered from the engine shaft (superchargers) or extracting energy contained into the hot exhaust gases with a turbine (turbochargers). The flow range of the compressor needs to match the one of the engine. However compressors mass flow operating range is limited by choke on the high end and surge on the low end. In order to extend the operation at low mass flow rates, the use of passive devices for turbocharger centrifugal compressors was explored since the late 80's. Hence, casing treatments including flow recirculation from the inducer part of the compressor have been shown to move the surge limit to lower flows. Yet, the working mechanisms are still not well understood and thus, to optimize the design of this by-pass system, it is necessary to determine the nature of the changes induced by the device both on the dynamic stability of the pressure delivery and on the flow at the inlet. The compressor studied here features a self-recirculating casing treatment at the inlet. The recirculation passage could be blocked to carry a direct comparison between the cases with and without the flow feature. To grasp the effect on compressor stability, pressure measurements were taken in the different constituting elements of the compressor. The study of the mean pressure variations across the operating map showed that the tongue region is a limiting element. Dynamic pressure measurements revealed that the instabilities generated near the inducer when the recirculation is blocked increase the overall instability levels at the compressor outlet and propagating pressure waves starting at the tongue occurred

  18. Thermal design of a natural gas - diesel dual fuel turbocharged V18 engine for ship propulsion and power plant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvartzides, S.; Karmalis, I.

    2016-11-01

    A detailed method is presented on the thermal design of a natural gas - diesel dual fuel internal combustion engine. An 18 cylinder four stroke turbocharged engine is considered to operate at a maximum speed of 500 rpm for marine and power plant applications. Thermodynamic, heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena are mathematically analyzed to provide a real cycle analysis together with a complete set of calculated operation conditions, power characteristics and engine efficiencies. The method is found to provide results in close agreement to published data for the actual performance of similar engines such as V18 MAN 51/60DF.

  19. Numerical analysis of flow interaction of turbine system in two-stage turbocharger of internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. B.; Zhuge, W. L.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the goal of energy conservation and emission reduction, high intake pressure is needed to meet the demand of high power density and high EGR rate for internal combustion engine. Present power density of diesel engine has reached 90KW/L and intake pressure ratio needed is over 5. Two-stage turbocharging system is an effective way to realize high compression ratio. Because turbocharging system compression work derives from exhaust gas energy. Efficiency of exhaust gas energy influenced by design and matching of turbine system is important to performance of high supercharging engine. Conventional turbine system is assembled by single-stage turbocharger turbines and turbine matching is based on turbine MAP measured on test rig. Flow between turbine system is assumed uniform and value of outlet physical quantities of turbine are regarded as the same as ambient value. However, there are three-dimension flow field distortion and outlet physical quantities value change which will influence performance of turbine system as were demonstrated by some studies. For engine equipped with two-stage turbocharging system, optimization of turbine system design will increase efficiency of exhaust gas energy and thereby increase engine power density. However flow interaction of turbine system will change flow in turbine and influence turbine performance. To recognize the interaction characteristics between high pressure turbine and low pressure turbine, flow in turbine system is modeled and simulated numerically. The calculation results suggested that static pressure field at inlet to low pressure turbine increases back pressure of high pressure turbine, however efficiency of high pressure turbine changes little; distorted velocity field at outlet to high pressure turbine results in swirl at inlet to low pressure turbine. Clockwise swirl results in large negative angle of attack at inlet to rotor which causes flow loss in turbine impeller passages and decreases turbine

  20. Development of an accelerating piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, J.; Loiseau, J.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest for a number of scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. In the implosion-driven launcher (ILD) concept, explosives are used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures than the propellant of conventional light-gas guns. The propellant of the IDL is compressed through the linear implosion of a pressurized tube. The imploding tube behaves like a piston which travels into the light gas at the explosive detonation velocity, thus forming an increasingly long column of shock-compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill designed IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This work will focus on the implementation of a novel launch cycle in which the explosively driven piston is accelerated in order to gradually increase driver gas compression, thus maintaining a relatively constant projectile driving pressure. The theoretical potential of the concept as well as the experimental development of an accelerating piston driver will be examined.

  1. Simulation of cracking cores when molding piston components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, Alena; Soukup, Josef

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with pistons casting made from aluminum alloy. Pistons are casting at steel mold with steel core. The casting is provided by gravity casting machine. The each machine is equipped by two metal molds, which are preheated above temperature 160 °C before use. The steel core is also preheated by flame. The metal molds and cores are heated up within the casting process. The temperature of the metal mold raise up to 200 °C and temperature of core is higher. The surface of the core is treated by nitration. The mold and core are cooled down by water during casting process. The core is overheated and its top part is finally cracked despite its intensive water-cooling. The life time cycle of the core is decreased to approximately 5 to 15 thousands casting, which is only 15 % of life time cycle of core for production of other pistons. The article presents the temperature analysis of the core.

  2. The Role of Tribology in the Development of an Oil-Free Turbocharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    Gas-turbine-based aeropropulsion engines are technologically mature. Thus, as with any mature technology, revolutionary approaches will be needed to achieve the significant performance gains that will keep the U.S. propulsion manufacturers well ahead of foreign competition. One such approach is the development of oil-free turbomachinery utilizing advanced foil air bearings, seals, and solid lubricants. By eliminating oil-lubricated bearings and seals and supporting an engine rotor on an air film, significant improvements can be realized. For example, the entire oil system including pipes, lines, filters, cooler, and tanks could be removed, thereby saving considerable weight. Since air has no thermal decomposition temperature, engine systems could operate without excessive cooling. Also, since air bearings have no diameter-rpm fatigue limits (D-N limits), engines could be designed to operate at much higher speeds and higher density, which would result in a smaller aeropropulsion package. Because of recent advances in compliant foil air bearings and high temperature solid lubricants, these technologies can be applied to oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to develop these technologies and to demonstrate a project along the path to an oil-free gas turbine engine, NASA has undertaken the development of an oil-free turbocharger for a heavy duty diesel engine. This turbomachine can reach 120000 rpm at a bearing temperature of 540 C (1000 F) and, in comparison to oil-lubricated bearings, can increase efficiency by 10 to 15 percent because of reduced friction. In addition, because there are no oil lubricants, there are no seal-leakage-induced emissions.

  3. The Effect of Piston-Head Temperature on Knock-Limited Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imming, Harry S.

    1944-01-01

    To determine the effect of piston-head temperature on knock-limited power. Tests were made in a supercharged CFR engine over a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.055 to 0.120, using S-3 reference fuel, AN-F-28, Amendment-2, aviation gasoline, and AN-F-28 plus 2 percent xylidines by weight. Tests were run at a compression ratio of 7.0 with inlet-air temperatures of 150 F and 250 F and at a compression ratio of 8.0 with an inlet-air temperature of 250 F. All other engine conditions were held constant. The piston-head temperature was varied by circulation of oil through passages in the crown of a liquid-cooled piston. This method of piston cooling decreased the piston-head temperature about 80 F. The data are not intended to constitute a recommendation as to the advisability of piston cooling in practice.

  4. Statistics of injected power on a bouncing ball subjected to a randomly vibrating piston.

    PubMed

    García-Cid, Alfredo; Gutiérrez, Pablo; Falcón, Claudio; Aumaître, Sébastien; Falcon, Eric

    2015-09-01

    We present an experimental study on the statistical properties of the injected power needed to maintain an inelastic ball bouncing constantly on a randomly accelerating piston in the presence of gravity. We compute the injected power at each collision of the ball with the moving piston by measuring the velocity of the piston and the force exerted on the piston by the ball. The probability density function of the injected power has its most probable value close to zero and displays two asymmetric exponential tails, depending on the restitution coefficient, the piston acceleration, and its frequency content. This distribution can be deduced from a simple model assuming quasi-Gaussian statistics for the force and velocity of the piston.

  5. Optimum step design for centering of pistons moving in an incompressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects are analyzed for a stepped piston moving within a tight clearance tube filled with an incompressible fluid. Hydrostatic effects are analyzed and a complete solution is obtained and an optimum step design for centering of the piston is suggested. The axial speed resulting from an axial driving force is calculated, and some experimental results for pistons falling in a water-filled tube are presented.

  6. Optimum step design for centering of pistons moving in an incompressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects are analyzed for a stepped piston moving within a tight clearance tube filled with an incompressible fluid. Together with the hydrostatic effects that were analyzed in an earlier paper, a complete solution is obtained and an optimum step design for centering of the piston is suggested. The axial speed resulting from an axial driving force is calculated, and some experimental results for pistons falling in a water filled tube are presented.

  7. A Nonsimilar Solution for Blast Waves Driven by an Asymptotic Piston Expansion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    piston (contact surface) expands . Such a technique is presented here; it is nonsimilar and assumes an asymptotic energy input to the blast wave. The...is extended here to describe the more realistic case of blast waves driven by an asymptotic piston -like motion of an expanding inner gas. For the same...ASYMPTOTIC PISTON EXPA .(U) ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND ABERDEEN PROVI. M L BUNDY. JUN 83 UNCLaSSIFED AR -TR-82497 SBI-AD-F388 272

  8. Assessment of 25 kW free-piston Stirling technology alternatives for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erbeznik, Raymond M.; White, Maurice A.; Penswick, L. B.; Neely, Ronald E.; Ritter, Darren C.; Wallace, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The final design, construction, and testing of a 25-kW free-piston advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) are examined. The final design of the free-piston hydraulic ASCS consists of five subsystems: heat transport subsystem (solar receiver and pool boiler), free-piston hydraulic Stirling engine, hydraulic subsystem, cooling subsystem, and electrical and control subsystem. Advantages and disadvantages are identified for each technology alternative. Technology alternatives considered are gas bearings vs flexure bearings, stationary magnet linear alternator vs moving magnetic linear alternator, and seven different control options. Component designs are generated using available in-house procedures to meet the requirements of the free-piston Stirling convertor configurations.

  9. Simulation of the instantaneous free piston Stirling engine-electrical load interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdizadeh, N.S.; Stouffs, P.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper the authors consider a gamma type free piston engine (that is, a configuration with a power piston cylinder and a separate displacer cylinder) with the MARTINI configuration (that is, with a free piston but a kinematically driven displacer). In the modeled engine, the displacer is driven by an electrical motor and there are two symmetrical, free, power pistons. This configuration ensures a complete balancing of the engine. The free pistons bear the moving parts of the linear electric alternators. This engine may be considered for solar to electrical energy conversion for land or space applications, for instance. A dynamic simulation of this engine has been developed using a decoupled analysis. The motion equation of the free piston induces a strong coupling between the electrical load and the thermodynamics inside the free piston Stirling engine. From the thermodynamics point of view, the piston-displacer phase lag is an important parameter. It is shown that if the electrical circuit elements (R-L-C) are constants, the phase lag between the free pistons and displacer motions is far from the optimum. However this phase lag can be controlled by means of a variable electrical resistance. For both cases of stand-alone engine with an independent electrical load, or grid-connected engine, it is shown how one can in a very simple way multiply the net electrical power by a factor 4 to 10 and the efficiency by a factor 1.25 to 2 without any engine geometry modification.

  10. Unsteady response of flow system around balance piston in a rocket pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Shimura, T.; Uchiumi, M.; Hayashi, M.; Matsui, J.

    2013-03-01

    In the rocket engine turbopump, a self-balancing type of axial thrust balancing system using a balance piston is often applied. In this study, the balancing system in liquid-hydrogen (LH2) rocket pump was modeled combining the mechanical structure and the flow system, and the unsteady response of the balance piston was investigated. The axial vibration characteristics of the balance piston with a large amplitude were determined, sweeping the frequency of the pressure fluctuation on the inlet of the balance piston. This vibration was significantly affected by the compressibility of LH2.

  11. Assessment of 25 kW free-piston Stirling technology alternatives for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbeznik, Raymond M.; White, Maurice A.; Penswick, L. B.; Neely, Ronald E.; Ritter, Darren C.; Wallace, David A.

    The final design, construction, and testing of a 25-kW free-piston advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) are examined. The final design of the free-piston hydraulic ASCS consists of five subsystems: heat transport subsystem (solar receiver and pool boiler), free-piston hydraulic Stirling engine, hydraulic subsystem, cooling subsystem, and electrical and control subsystem. Advantages and disadvantages are identified for each technology alternative. Technology alternatives considered are gas bearings vs flexure bearings, stationary magnet linear alternator vs moving magnetic linear alternator, and seven different control options. Component designs are generated using available in-house procedures to meet the requirements of the free-piston Stirling convertor configurations.

  12. Free-piston Stirling technology for space power

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space power. This work is being carried out under NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The overall goal of CSTI`s High Capacity Power element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space missions. The Stirling cycle offers an attractive power conversion concept for space power needs. Discussed in this paper is the completion of the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) testing - culminating in the generation of 25 kW of engine power from a dynamically-balanced opposed-piston Stirling engine at a temperature ratio of 2.0. Engine efficiency was approximately 22 percent. The SPDE recently has been divided into two separate single-cylinder engines, called Space Power Research Engines (SPRE), that now serve as test beds for the evaluation of key technology disciplines. These disciplines include hydrodynamic gas bearings, high-efficiency linear alternators, space qualified heat pipe heat exchangers, oscillating flow code validation, and engine loss understanding. The success of the SPDE at 650 K has resulted in a more ambitious Stirling endeavor - the design, fabrication, test and evaluation of a designed-for-space 25 kW per cylinder Stirling Space Engine (SSE). The SSE will operate at a hot metal temperature of 1050 K using superalloy materials. This design is a low temperature confirmation of the 1300 K design. It is the 1300 K free-piston Stirling power conversion system that is the ultimate goal; to be used in conjunction with the SP-100 reactor. The approach to this goal is in three temperature steps. However, this paper concentrates on the first two phases of this program - the 650 K SPDE and the 1050 K SSE.

  13. Structure Limits for a 30mm Annular Piston.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Properties ," BRL Report #1359, Mar 1971. 4. Republic Steel Corp., "Precipitation Hardenable Stainless Steel, PH13 -8MO, 15-5 PH, PH15-7MO, 17-4 PH, 17...u * 3 *1938 - Serving the Army for Fifty Years - 1988 STRUCTURE LIMITS FOR A *30-MMA ANN.,\\ULAR PISTON CRIS WATSON DTIC MAY 1988 JUN 14 8 APPROVED...NAME OF FUNDING/SPONSORING 8 b OFFICE SYMBOL 9 PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATIONj (If applicable) r-c ADDRESS (City, State

  14. NACA Investigation of Fuel Performance in Piston-Type Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Henry C

    1951-01-01

    This report is a compilation of many of the pertinent research data acquired by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on fuel performance in piston engines. The original data for this compilation are contained in many separate NACA reports which have in the present report been assembled in logical chapters that summarize the main conclusions of the various investigations. Complete details of each investigation are not included in this summary; however, such details may be found, in the original reports cited at the end of each chapter.

  15. Free-Piston Stirling Machine for Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, James Gary (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A free piston Stirling machine including a thermal buffer tube extending from the machine's expansion space and surrounded by its heat rejector and its regenerator, a displacer cylinder extending from the thermal buffer tube to the compression space and surrounded by the heat rejecting heat exchanger, and a displacer that reciprocates within an excursion limit that extends into the regenerator by no more than 20% of the length of the regenerator during normal operation and preferably within excursion limits that are substantially the length of the heat rejector.

  16. Tilt/Tip/Piston Manipulator with Base-Mounted Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad

    2006-01-01

    A proposed three-degree-of-freedom (tilt/tip/piston) manipulator, suitable for aligning an optical or mechanical component, would offer several advantages over prior such manipulators: Unlike in some other manipulators, no actuator would support the weight of another actuator: All of the actuators would be mounted on a base. Hence, there would be less manipulated weight. The basic geometry of the manipulator would afford mechanical advantage: that is, actuator motions would be larger than the motions they produce in the manipulated object. Mechanical advantage inherently increases the accuracy and resolution of manipulation. Unlike in some other manipulators, it would not be necessary to route power and/or data lines through manipulator joints. The proposed manipulator (see figure) would include three prismatic actuators (T1N1, T2N2, and T3N3) mounted on the base and operating in the same plane. Examples of suitable prismatic actuators include lead-screw mechanisms, linear hydraulic motors, piezoelectric linear drives, inchworm-movement linear stepping motors, and linear flexure drives. The actuators would control the lengths of links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. Three spherical joints (P1, P2, and P3) would be located at the corners of an equilateral triangle of side length q on the platform holding the object to be manipulated. Three inextensible limbs (R1P1, R2P2, and R3P3) having length r would connect the spherical joints on the platform to revolute joints (R1, R2, and R3) at the ends of the actuator-controlled links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. By varying the lengths of these links, one could control the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates of the platform. Closed-form equations for direct or forward kinematics of the manipulator (given the lengths of the variable links, find the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have been derived. The equations of inverse kinematics (find the variable link lengths needed to obtain the desired tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have also

  17. Vortex motion in axisymmetric piston-cylinder configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Smith, G. E.; Springer, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    By using the Beam and Warming implicit-factored method of solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, velocities were calculated inside axisymmetric piston cylinder configurations during the intake and compression strokes. Results are presented in graphical form which show the formation, growth and breakup of those vortices which form during the intake stroke by the jet issuing from the valve. It is shown that at bore-to-stroke ratio of less than unity, the vortices may breakup during the intake stroke. It is also shown that vortices which do not breakup during the intake stroke coalesce during the compression stroke.

  18. PIV measurements of the flow at the inlet of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor with recirculation casing treatment near the inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancedo, Matthieu; Gutmark, Ephraim; Guillou, Erwann

    2016-02-01

    Turbocharging reciprocating engines is a viable solution in order to meet the new regulations for emissions and fuel efficiency in part because turbochargers allow to use smaller, more efficient engines (downsizing) while maintaining power. A major challenge is to match the flow range of a dynamic turbomachine (the centrifugal compressor in the turbocharger) with a positive displacement pump (the engine) as the flow range of the latter is typically higher. The operating range of the compressor is thus of prime interest. At low mass flow rate (MFR), the compressor range is limited by the occurrence of surge. To control and improve it, numerous and varied methods have been used. Yet, an automotive application requires that the solution remains relatively simple and preferably passive. A common feature that has been demonstrated to improve the surge line is the use of flow recirculation in the inducer region through a circumferential bleed slot around the shroud, also called "ported shroud", similar to what has been developed for axial compressors in the past. The compressor studied here features such a device. In order to better understand the effect of the recirculation slot on the compressor functioning, flow measurements were performed at the inlet using particle image velocimetry and the results were correlated with pressure measurements nearby. Measurements were taken on a compressor with and without recirculation and across the full range of normal operation and during surge using a phase-locking method to obtain average flow fields throughout the entire surge cycle. When the recirculation is blocked, it was found that strong backflow develops at low MFR perturbing the incoming flow and inducing significant preswirl. The slot eliminated most of the backflow in front of the inducer making the compressor operation more stable. The measurements performed during surge showed strong backflow occurring periodically during the outlet pressure drop and when the

  19. Free-piston Stirling technology for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space power. This work is being carried out under NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The overall goal of CSTI's High Capacity Power element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space missions. The Stirling cycle offers an attractive power conversion concept for space power needs. Discussed here is the completion of the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) testing-culminating in the generation of 25 kW of engine power from a dynamically-balanced opposed-piston Stirling engine at a temperature ratio of 2.0. Engine efficiency was approximately 22 percent. The SPDE recently has been divided into two separate single-cylinder engines, called Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), that now serve as test beds for the evaluation of key technology disciplines. These disciplines include hydrodynamic gas bearings, high-efficiency linear alternators, space qualified heat pipe heat exchangers, oscillating flow code validation, and engine loss understanding.

  20. The frictionless damping of a piston in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringuier, E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper revisits Rüchardt’s experiment and the two-chamber variant of Clark and Katz, where the oscillating motion of a freely sliding piston involves the adiabatic exponent of the gas enclosed in a thermally isolated chamber. While the common theoretical account of the experiment correctly predicts the frequency of the oscillation, the damping is usually ascribed to a linear frictional force of an undetermined mechanical nature. In this paper, we argue that the irreversibility of the damped motion calls for a thermodynamical treatment involving dissipation (entropy production). The theory of Rüchardt’s experiment is reworked at the undergraduate level by allowing entropy to change owing to heat transfer into or out of the chamber. It is calculated that a linear heat transfer can explain the observed damping without assuming any mechanical friction. The calculation is quantitatively supported by an experiment. It is also calculated that the mechanical and thermal equilibrations occur at the same rate. Besides possibly improving Rüchardt and Clark-and-Katz apparatuses by shedding light on the damping, the paper helps to better grasp thermodynamics, and how to use entropy, by constrasting the mechanical and thermodynamical reasonings on the example of the damped motion of a piston.

  1. The low-cost and precise piston gas pressure regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasik, Mateusz; Skoczylas, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    The present paper discusses the concept and functioning of an innovative instrument for precise stabilization of gas pressure. The piston gas pressure regulator was constructed at the Strata Mechanics Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The tests to which the instrument was subjected involved observing the values of stabilized pressure at the level of 10 bar and 3 bar, for various gas flow rates at the outlet of the instrument. The piston gas pressure regulator operates within the range of 0-10 bar and the gas flow range of 0-240 cm3 min-1. The precision of the process of stabilizing the initial pressure is  ±0.005 bar, regardless of the gas pressure value and the flow rate observed at the outlet of the instrument. Although the pressure transducer’s accuracy is 0.25% of the full range, the conducted tests of the regulator demonstrated that the obtained changeability of the stabilized pressure is at least two times lower. Unlike some other gas pressure regulators available on the market, the instrument constructed by the authors of the present paper is highly precise when it comes to the process of stabilization, and inexpensive to build.

  2. π0 Reconstruction using the Muon Piston Calorimeter Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Dhruv; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Muon-Piston Calorimeter Extension (MPC-EX) is a new detector in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that was installed for the recent Run 15 of the experiment. In polarized p+p and polarized p+A collisions, an important measurement is the yield and momentum distribution of direct photons. Unaffected by the strong force, direct photons traverse the dense medium in the collision zone mostly unchanged, thereby providing information about the initial stages of the collision. However, there is a huge background of photons from other sources, primarily π0 which decay into two photons. The opening angle between the decay photons becomes smaller with higher energies of the original π0. For energies greater than ~20 GeV, the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) cannot distinguish the two decay photons from a single photon, as their showers merge. The MPC-EX, an 8-layer tungsten and silicon sensor sandwich in front of the MPC, can measure and image the shower development, and help distinguish between direct photons and π0 decay photons up to higher energies than the MPC alone. We will describe the MPC-EX detector and its readout, and present the calibration procedures applied to the data in order to obtain the π0 spectrum. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  3. New 5 Kilowatt Free-piston Stirling Space Convertor Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Chapman, Peter A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Vision for Exploration of the moon may someday require a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kW. In the 1990s, Mechanical Technology Inc. s Stirling Engine Systems Division (some of whose Stirling personnel are now at Foster-Miller, Inc.) developed a 25 kW free piston Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kW engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA and DoE have been developing dual 55 W and 80 W Stirling convertor systems for potential use with radioisotope heat sources. Total test times of all convertors in this effort exceed 120,000 hours. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kW, single convertor for potential use in a lunar surface reactor power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 W/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Auburn University awarded a subcontract to Foster-Miller, Inc. to undertake development of the 5 kW Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  4. A free-piston Stirling cryocooler using metal diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-12-01

    A novel concept for a free-piston Stirling cryocooler has been proposed. The concept uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer of a free-piston Stirling cryocooler. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals, potentially resulting in a long-life mechanism. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicates the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. Sage predicted the macroscopic behaviour of the prototype well but did not provide sufficient insights to improve performance significantly. This paper presents details of the development, modelling and testing of the proof-of-concept prototype and a second, improved prototype.

  5. Focused, phased-array plane piston and spherically-shaped concave piston transducers: comparison for the same aperture and focal point.

    PubMed

    Warriner, Renée K; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2012-04-01

    It has sometimes been assumed that the phased-array plane piston transducer and the spherically-shaped concave piston transducer are equivalent structures when both have the same aperture and focal point. This assumption has not been previously examined, nor has an expression for the on-axis impulse response of the focused, phased-array plane piston transducer been derived. It is shown in this paper how such an expression can be obtained. Comparisons of the impulse response for both structures show similarities, as well as some differences that could be significant as the observation point approaches the focal point. Comparisons are also performed for wide-band pulses close to the focus as well as for sinusoidal excitation. A physical explanation for the cause of the impulse response discrepancy is shown to be due to the nature of the piston focusing delay and its effect on the Rayleigh integral.

  6. Durability, Performance, and Emission of Diesel Engines Using Carbon Fiber Piston and Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afify, E. M.; Roberts, W. L.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the research conducted by NC State University in investigating the durability, performance and emission of a carbon fiber piston and liner in our single cylinder research Diesel engine. Both the piston and liner were supplied to NC State University by NASA LaRC and manufactured by C-CAT under a separate contract to NASA LaRC. The carbon-carbon material used to manufacture the piston and liner has significantly lower thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, and superior strength characteristics at elevated temperatures when compared to conventional piston materials such as aluminum. The results of the carbon-carbon fiber piston testing were compared to a baseline configuration, which used a conventional aluminum piston in a steel liner. The parameters measured were the brake specific fuel consumption, ignition delay, frictional horsepower, volumetric efficiency, and durability characteristics of the two pistons. Testing was performed using a naturally aspirated Labeco Direct Injection single cylinder diesel engine. Two test cases were performed over a range of loads and speeds. The fixed test condition between the aluminum and carbon-carbon piston configurations was the brake mean effective pressure. The measured data was the fuel consumption rate, volumetric efficiency, load, speed, cylinder pressure, needle lift, and exhaust gas temperature. The cylinder pressure, and fuel consumption, exhaust gas temperature, and needle lift were recorded using a National Instruments DAQ board and a PC. All test cases used Diesel no. 2 for fuel.

  7. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers with piston-shaped membranes: fabrication and experimental characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongli; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Haeggstrom, Edward O; Ergun, A Sanli; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2009-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) featuring piston-shaped membranes (piston CMUTs) were developed to improve device performance in terms of transmission efficiency, reception sensitivity, and fractional bandwidth (FBW). A piston CMUT has a relatively flat active moving surface whose membrane motion is closer to ideal piston-type motion compared with a CMUT with uniformly thick membranes (classical CMUT). Piston CMUTs with a more uniform surface displacement profile can achieve high output pressure with a relatively small electrode separation. The improved device capacitance and gap uniformity also enhance detection sensitivity. By adding a center mass to the membrane, a large ratio of second-order resonant frequency to first-order resonant frequency was achieved. This improved the FBW. Piston CMUTs featuring membranes of different geometric shapes were designed and fabricated using wafer bonding. Fabricating piston CMUTs is a more complex process than fabricating CMUTs with uniformly thick membranes. However, no yield loss was observed. These devices achieved ~100% improvement in transduction performance (transmission and reception) over classical CMUTs. For CMUTs with square and rectangular membranes, the FBW increased from ~110% to ~150% and from ~140% to ~175%, respectively, compared with classical CMUTs. The new devices produced a maximum output pressure exceeding 1 MPa at the transducer surface. Performance optimization using geometric membrane shape configurations was the same in both piston CMUTs and classical CMUTs.

  8. A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbo compounded diesel engine system: A description of the thermodynamic and heat transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Ekchian, J. E.; Frank, R. M.; Heywood, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbocompounded direct-injection diesel engine system was developed in order to study the performance characteristics of the total system as major design parameters and materials are varied. Quasi-steady flow models of the compressor, turbines, manifolds, intercooler, and ducting are coupled with a multicylinder reciprocator diesel model, where each cylinder undergoes the same thermodynamic cycle. The master cylinder model describes the reciprocator intake, compression, combustion and exhaust processes in sufficient detail to define the mass and energy transfers in each subsystem of the total engine system. Appropriate thermal loading models relate the heat flow through critical system components to material properties and design details. From this information, the simulation predicts the performance gains, and assesses the system design trade-offs which would result from the introduction of selected heat transfer reduction materials in key system components, over a range of operating conditions.

  9. A dual-piston ring-driven X-spring transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Alexander L.; Butler, John L.; Pendleton, Robert L.; Ead, Richard M.

    2004-05-01

    Tonpilz transducers generally consist of a stack of piezoelectric material sandwiched between a single piston and an inertial tail mass or between two pistons. The result is a transducer with a large length-to-diameter ratio. The X-spring transducer design, based on U.S. Patent 4845688, allows a means for a shorter transducer length through an orthogonal piezoelectric drive system coupled to the pistons by lever arms. We present here a low-frequency, dual-piston piezoelectric ceramic ring driven version with a length of only 10 in. and a diameter of 19 in. Both single-element and two-element array results are presented. The measured response is shown to be in agreement with the finite-element model with a smooth, wideband 300- to 550-Hz response for this dual-piston, ring-driven X-spring transducer. [Work supported by a Phase II SBIR, through NUWC, Newport, RI 02841.

  10. CFD Modeling of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Gedeon, David; Simon, Terrence W.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is funding Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a reliable Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code that can predict engine performance with the goal of significant improvements in accuracy when compared to one-dimensional (1-D) design code predictions. The funding also includes conducting code validation experiments at both the University of Minnesota (UMN) and CSU. In this paper a brief description of the work-in-progress is provided in the two areas (CFD and Experiments). Also, previous test results are compared with computational data obtained using (1) a 2-D CFD code obtained from Dr. Georg Scheuerer and further developed at CSU and (2) a multidimensional commercial code CFD-ACE+. The test data and computational results are for (1) a gas spring and (2) a single piston/cylinder with attached annular heat exchanger. The comparisons among the codes are discussed. The paper also discusses plans for conducting code validation experiments at CSU and UMN.

  11. The Sedov Blast Wave as a Radial Piston Verification Test

    DOE PAGES

    Pederson, Clark; Brown, Bart; Morgan, Nathaniel

    2016-06-22

    The Sedov blast wave is of great utility as a verification problem for hydrodynamic methods. The typical implementation uses an energized cell of finite dimensions to represent the energy point source. We avoid this approximation by directly finding the effects of the energy source as a boundary condition (BC). Furthermore, the proposed method transforms the Sedov problem into an outward moving radial piston problem with a time-varying velocity. A portion of the mesh adjacent to the origin is removed and the boundaries of this hole are forced with the velocities from the Sedov solution. This verification test is implemented onmore » two types of meshes, and convergence is shown. Our results from the typical initial condition (IC) method and the new BC method are compared.« less

  12. Advanced Technology Spark-Ignition Aircraft Piston Engine Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckas, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    The advanced technology, spark ignition, aircraft piston engine design study was conducted to determine the improvements that could be made by taking advantage of technology that could reasonably be expected to be made available for an engine intended for production by January 1, 1990. Two engines were proposed to account for levels of technology considered to be moderate risk and high risk. The moderate risk technology engine is a homogeneous charge engine operating on avgas and offers a 40% improvement in transportation efficiency over present designs. The high risk technology engine, with a stratified charge combustion system using kerosene-based jet fuel, projects a 65% improvement in transportation efficiency. Technology enablement program plans are proposed herein to set a timetable for the successful integration of each item of required advanced technology into the engine design.

  13. Design optimization of an opposed piston brake caliper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergent, Nicolas; Tirovic, Marko; Voveris, Jeronimas

    2014-11-01

    Successful brake caliper designs must be light and stiff, preventing excessive deformation and extended brake pedal travel. These conflicting requirements are difficult to optimize owing to complex caliper geometry, loading and interaction of individual brake components (pads, disc and caliper). The article studies a fixed, four-pot (piston) caliper, and describes in detail the computer-based topology optimization methodology applied to obtain two optimized designs. At first sight, relatively different designs (named 'Z' and 'W') were obtained by minor changes to the designable volume and boundary conditions. However, on closer inspection, the same main bridge design features could be recognized. Both designs offered considerable reduction of caliper mass, by 19% and 28%, respectively. Further finite element analyses conducted on one of the optimized designs (Z caliper) showed which individual bridge features and their combinations are the most important in maintaining caliper stiffness.

  14. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  15. Thermally driven piston assembly and position control therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, III, Donald L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermally driven piston assembly's housing has (i) a first material slidingly fitted therein, and (ii) at least one plug of a second material slidingly fitted therein and abutting the first material. The first material is one (e.g., a liquid crystal elastomer) that undergoes a stiffness change and/or a dimensional change when subjected to a temperature change in the temperature range of interest. When subjected to the temperature change while in the housing, the first material is restricted to changing dimensionally along a single dimension. The second material retains its shape and size throughout the temperature range of interest. As a result, the plug moves in the housing in correspondence with the dimensional change of the first material or the plug's movement is damped by the stiffness change of the first material.

  16. Preliminary Study of a Piston Pump for Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold E.; Kohl, Robert C.

    1959-01-01

    Preliminary data are presented covering the performance of a low-speed, five-cylinder piston pump designed for handling boiling hydrogen. This pump was designed for a flow of 55 gallons per minute at 240 rpm with a discharge pressure of 135 pounds per square inch. Tests were made using JP-4 fuel, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Pump delivery and endurance characteristics were satisfactory for the range of operation covered. In connection with the foregoing pump development, the cavitation characteristics of a preliminary visual model, glass-cylinder pump and of a simple reciprocating disk were studied. Subcooling of approximately 0.60 F was obtained from the cavitation produced by reciprocating a disk in boiling nitrogen and in boiling water. The subcooling obtained in a similar manner with liquid hydrogen was somewhat less.

  17. Thermodynamics of slow solutions to the gas-piston equations.

    PubMed

    Gubbiotti, G; Chiuchiù, D

    2016-10-01

    Despite its historical importance, a perfect gas enclosed by a pistons and in contact with a thermal reservoirs is a system still largely under study. Its thermodynamic properties are not yet well understood when driven under nonequilibrium conditions, and analytic formulas that describe the heat exchanged with the reservoir are rare. In this paper we prove a power series expansions for the heat when both the external force and the reservoir temperature are slowly varying over time but the overall process is not quasistatic. To do so, we use the dynamical equations from [Cerino et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 032128 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.032128] and an uncommon application of the regular perturbation technique.

  18. The Sedov Blast Wave as a Radial Piston Verification Test

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, Clark; Brown, Bart; Morgan, Nathaniel

    2016-06-22

    The Sedov blast wave is of great utility as a verification problem for hydrodynamic methods. The typical implementation uses an energized cell of finite dimensions to represent the energy point source. We avoid this approximation by directly finding the effects of the energy source as a boundary condition (BC). Furthermore, the proposed method transforms the Sedov problem into an outward moving radial piston problem with a time-varying velocity. A portion of the mesh adjacent to the origin is removed and the boundaries of this hole are forced with the velocities from the Sedov solution. This verification test is implemented on two types of meshes, and convergence is shown. Our results from the typical initial condition (IC) method and the new BC method are compared.

  19. Free-piston stirling engine endurance test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dochat, G.; Rauch, J.; Antonelli, G.

    1983-01-01

    The Free-Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) has the potential to be a long-lived, highly reliable, power conversion device attractive for many product applications such as space, residential, or remote-site power. The purpose of endurance testing the FPSE is to demonstrate its potential for long life. The endurance program was directed at obtaining 1000 operational hours under various test conditions: low power, full stroke, duty cycle, and stop/start. Critical performance parameters were measured to note any change and/or trend. Inspections were conducted to measure and compare critical seal/bearing clearance. The engine performed well throughout the program, completing the 1000 hours. Hardware inspection, including the critical clearances, showed no significant change in hardware or clearance dimensions. The performance parameters did not exhibit any increasing or decreasing trends. The test program confirms the potential for long-life FPSE applications. Additional testing is planned to increase the test hours to 10,000.

  20. Axial piston pump wear plates, Delta-Q Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.K.; White, M.B.

    1994-04-06

    The Savannah River Technical Center visually examined several axial piston pump wear plates from Delta-Q Corporation in an effort to determine the cause of the scratches. The investigation found the material and hardness to be approximately consistent with vendor specifications. The visual examination revealed gouges and tears on plates 1 - 4, silicon and aluminum contamination on plates 2 & 3 and a heavy inclusion content in the base metal. The scratches were most likely attributable to either metal debris created by the protruding metal around the gouges and tears or the silicon and aluminum contamination. The heavy inclusion content may have contributed by providing sites for the gouges and tears to develop during fabrication. It is recommended that tighter controls be introduced during procurement to ensure cleaner, inclusion controlled, steel and controlling the silicon and aluminum contamination during process assembly of the pumps. Specific surface texture requirements may also be considered for final machining.

  1. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-06

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  2. 5-kWe Free-piston Stirling Engine Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Peter A.; Vitale, Nicholas A.; Walter, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The high reliability, long life, and efficient operation of Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSEs) make them an attractive power system to meet future space power requirements with less mass, better efficiency, and less total heat exchanger area than other power convertor options. FPSEs are also flexible in configuration as they can be coupled with many potential heat sources and various heat input systems, heat rejection systems, and power management and distribution systems. Development of a 5-kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly (SCA) is underway to demonstrate the viability of an FPSE for space power. The design is a scaled-down version of the successful 12.5-kWe Component Test Power Converter (CTPC) developed under NAS3-25463. The ultimate efficiency target is 25% overall convertor efficiency (electrical power out over heat in). For the single cylinder prototype now in development, cost and time constraints required use of economical and readily available materials (steel versus beryllium) and components (a commercially available linear alternator) and thus lower efficiency. The working gas is helium at 150 bar mean pressure. The design consists of a displacer suspended on internally pumped gas bearings and a power piston/alternator supported on flexures. Non-contacting clearance seals are used between internal volumes. Heat to and from the prototype convertor is done via pumped liquid loops passing through shell and tube heat exchangers. The preliminary and detail designs of the convertor, controller, and support systems (heating loop, cooling loop, and helium supply system) are complete and all hardware is on order. Assembly and test of the prototype at Foster- Miller is planned for early 2008, when work will focus on characterizing convertor dynamics and steady-state operation to determine maximum power output and system efficiency. The device will then be delivered to Auburn University where assessments will include start-up and shutdown characterization and

  3. Accomplishments in free-piston stirling tests at NASA GRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Skupinski, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    A power system based on the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) has been identified for potential use on deep space missions, as well as for Mars rovers that may benefit from extended operation. The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for developing the generator and the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is supporting DOE in this effort. The generator is based on a free-piston Stirling power convertor that has been developed by the Stirling Technology Company (STC) under contract to DOE. The generator would be used as a high-efficiency alternative to the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) that have been used on many previous missions. The increased efficiency leads to a factor of 3 to 4 reduction in the inventory of plutonium required to heat the generator. GRC has been involved in the development of Stirling power conversion technology for over 25 years. The support provided to this project by GRC has many facets and draws upon the lab's scientists and engineers that have gained experience in applying their skills to the previous Stirling projects. This has created a staff with an understanding of the subtleties involved in applying their expertise to Stirling systems. Areas include materials, structures, tribology, controls, electromagnetic interference, permanent magnets, alternator analysis, structural dynamics, and cycle performance. One of the key areas of support to the project is in the performance testing of the free-piston Stirling convertors. Since these power convertors are the smallest, lowest power Stirling machines that have been tested at GRC, a new laboratory was equipped for this project. Procedures and test plans have been created, instrumentation and data systems developed, and Stirling convertors have been tested. This paper will describe the GRC test facility, the test procedures that are used, present some of the test results and outline plans for the future. .

  4. Layered clustering multi-fault diagnosis for hydraulic piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Wang, Shaoping; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Efficient diagnosis is very important for improving reliability and performance of aircraft hydraulic piston pump, and it is one of the key technologies in prognostic and health management system. In practice, due to harsh working environment and heavy working loads, multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump may occur simultaneously after long time operations. However, most existing diagnosis methods can only distinguish pump faults that occur individually. Therefore, new method needs to be developed to realize effective diagnosis of simultaneous multiple faults on aircraft hydraulic pump. In this paper, a new method based on the layered clustering algorithm is proposed to diagnose multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump that occur simultaneously. The intensive failure mechanism analyses of the five main types of faults are carried out, and based on these analyses the optimal combination and layout of diagnostic sensors is attained. The three layered diagnosis reasoning engine is designed according to the faults' risk priority number and the characteristics of different fault feature extraction methods. The most serious failures are first distinguished with the individual signal processing. To the desultory faults, i.e., swash plate eccentricity and incremental clearance increases between piston and slipper, the clustering diagnosis algorithm based on the statistical average relative power difference (ARPD) is proposed. By effectively enhancing the fault features of these two faults, the ARPDs calculated from vibration signals are employed to complete the hypothesis testing. The ARPDs of the different faults follow different probability distributions. Compared with the classical fast Fourier transform-based spectrum diagnosis method, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can diagnose the multiple faults, which occur synchronously, with higher precision and reliability.

  5. CFD analysis of a diaphragm free-piston Stirling cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a novel free-piston Stirling cryocooler that uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicated the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. The diaphragm's large diameter and short stroke produces a significant radial component to the oscillating flow fields inside the cryocooler which were not modelled in the one-dimensional analysis tool Sage that was used to design the prototypes. Compared with standard pistons, the diaphragm geometry increases the gas-to-wall heat transfer due to the higher velocities and smaller hydraulic diameters. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the cryocooler was constructed to understand the underlying fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms with the aim of further improving performance. The CFD modelling of the heat transfer in the radial flow fields created by the diaphragms shows the possibility of utilizing the flat geometry for heat transfer, reducing the need for, and the size of, expensive heat exchangers. This paper presents details of a CFD analysis used to model the flow and gas-to-wall heat transfer inside the second prototype cryocooler, including experimental validation of the CFD to produce a robust analysis.

  6. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These include (1) a generic free-piston Stirling technology project being conducted to develop technologies generic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, cost-shared effort with the Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and (2) a free-piston Stirling space power technology feasibility demonstration project being conducted in support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), DOE, NASA, SP-100 project. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kW free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, design and fabrication under contract of a hydraulic output modification for RE-1000 engine tests, and a 1000-hour endurance test, under contract, of a 3 kWe free-piston Stirling/alternator engine. The newly initiated space power technology feasibility demonstration effort addresses the capability of scaling a free-piston Stirling/alternator system to about 25 kWe; developing thermodynamic cycle efficiency greater than or equal to 70 percent of Carnot at temperature ratios in the order of 1.5 to 2.0; achieving a power conversion unit specific weight of 6 kg/kWe; operating with noncontacting gas bearings; and dynamically balancing the system. Planned engine and component design and test efforts are described.

  7. Open Loop Heat Pipe Radiator Having a Free-Piston for Wiping Condensed Working Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An open loop heat pipe radiator comprises a radiator tube and a free-piston. The radiator tube has a first end, a second end, and a tube wall, and the tube wall has an inner surface and an outer surface. The free-piston is enclosed within the radiator tube and is capable of movement within the radiator tube between the first and second ends. The free-piston defines a first space between the free-piston, the first end, and the tube wall, and further defines a second space between the free-piston, the second end, and the tube wall. A gaseous-state working fluid, which was evaporated to remove waste heat, alternately enters the first and second spaces, and the free-piston wipes condensed working fluid from the inner surface of the tube wall as the free-piston alternately moves between the first and second ends. The condensed working fluid is then pumped back to the heat source.

  8. Dynamically balanced, hydraulically driven compressor/pump apparatus for resonant free piston Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, John A.

    1984-05-29

    A compressor, pump, or alternator apparatus is designed for use with a resonant free piston Stirling engine so as to isolate apparatus fluid from the periodically pressurized working fluid of the Stirling engine. The apparatus housing has a first side closed by a power coupling flexible diaphragm (the engine working member) and a second side closed by a flexible diaphragm gas spring. A reciprocally movable piston is disposed in a transverse cylinder in the housing and moves substantially at right angles relative to the flexible diaphragms. An incompressible fluid fills the housing which is divided into two separate chambers by suitable ports. One chamber provides fluid coupling between the power diaphragm of the RFPSE and the piston and the second chamber provides fluid coupling between the gas spring diaphragm and the opposite side of the piston. The working members of a gas compressor, pump, or alternator are driven by the piston. Sealing and wearing parts of the apparatus are mounted at the external ends of the transverse cylinder in a double acting arrangement for accessibility. An annular counterweight is mounted externally of the reciprocally movable piston and is driven by incompressible fluid coupling in a direction opposite to the piston so as to damp out transverse vibrations.

  9. Fuel Consumption Reduction for Diesel Power Generator Sets through the Application of an Advanced Turbocharger Operating at Constant Speed.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    an overhung rotor supported by two ball bearings located near the cool enviroment at the compressor inlet, and a self-contained lubrication system...development of a 11 turbo- charger which features variable area turbine nozzles (VATN), all bear- ing supported rotor , a4a.,ejcontained lubric tion system. e...controller for the VATN. The controller is simply a spring acting on a piston which is balancing the spring force against the pressure difference across the

  10. On the identification of piston slap events in internal combustion engines using tribodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolatabadi, N.; Theodossiades, S.; Rothberg, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    Piston slap is a major source of vibration and noise in internal combustion engines. Therefore, better understanding of the conditions favouring piston slap can be beneficial for the reduction of engine Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH). Past research has attempted to determine the exact position of piston slap events during the engine cycle and correlate them to the engine block vibration response. Validated numerical/analytical models of the piston assembly can be very useful towards this aim, since extracting the relevant information from experimental measurements can be a tedious and complicated process. In the present work, a coupled simulation of piston dynamics and engine tribology (tribodynamics) has been performed using quasi-static and transient numerical codes. Thus, the inertia and reaction forces developed in the piston are calculated. The occurrence of piston slap events in the engine cycle is monitored by introducing six alternative concepts: (i) the quasi-static lateral force, (ii) the transient lateral force, (iii) the minimum film thickness occurrence, (iv) the maximum energy transfer, (v) the lubricant squeeze velocity and (vi) the piston-impact angular duration. The validation of the proposed methods is achieved using experimental measurements taken from a single cylinder petrol engine in laboratory conditions. The surface acceleration of the engine block is measured at the thrust- and anti-thrust side locations. The correlation between the theoretically predicted events and the measured acceleration signals has been satisfactory in determining piston slap incidents, using the aforementioned concepts. The results also exhibit good repeatability throughout the set of measurements obtained in terms of the number of events occurring and their locations during the engine cycle.

  11. Loss terms in free-piston Stirling-engine models. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    Various models for free piston Stirling engines are reviewed. Initial models were developed primarily for design purposes and to predict operating parameters, especially efficiency. More recently, however, such models have been used to predict engine stability. Free piston Stirling engines have no kinematic constraints and stability may not only be sensitive to the load, but also to various nonlinear loss and spring constraints. The present understanding is reviewed of various loss mechanisms for free piston Stirling engines and how they have been incorporated into engine models is discussed.

  12. Design of wireless temperature measurement system for piston based on CC2530

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongyu, Ge; Jin, Wang; Yimin, Wu; Guodong, Wu

    2016-11-01

    Temperature measurement of piston is important to analysis its temperature field. Since it is difficult to extract the temperature signal in the piston by hard line, a multi-channel wireless measurement system of piston temperature is developed. The wireless SOC CC2530 is used. NTC thermistors with glass package are selected as temperature sensors. The realization of hardware and the design of software flowchart are explained in detail. The actual test demonstrates that the system has high measurement accuracy and strong practical value.

  13. Method of estimating time scales of atmospheric piston and its application at Dome C (Antarctica)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerer, A.; Sarazin, M.; Butterley, T.; Wilson, R

    2007-07-20

    Temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston are critical for interferometers as they determine their sensitivity. We characterize an instrumental setup,termed the piston scope, that aims at measuring the atmospheric time constant, {tau}0, through the image motion in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer.High-resolution piston scope measurements have been obtained at the observatory of Paranal, Chile in April 2006. The derived atmospheric parameters are shown to be consistent with data from the astronomical site monitor, provided that the atmospheric turbulence is displaced along a single direction.The piston scope measurements of lower temporal and spatial resolution were recorded for what is believed to be the first time in February 2005 at the Antarctic site of Dome C. Their reanalysis in terms of the new data calibration sharpens the conclusions of a first qualitative examination [Appl. Opt. 45, 5709 (2006)].

  14. Optimized design and predicted performance of a deep ocean 50 m piston coring system

    SciTech Connect

    Karnes, C. H.; Burchett, S. N.; Dzwilewski, P. T.

    1980-01-01

    Calculational techniques are described which were developed or adapted for the purpose of analyzing the mechanical response of a proposed piston coring system capable of recovering high quality 50 m long cores. The analysis includes the effects of barrel geometry on the mass required to penetrate 50 m of an assumed sediment, the effects of non-vertical entry and pullout on the stresses within the barrel, and the effects of steel cable or parachute piston restraints on the resulting core sample distortion. The results show that a wall thickness of 50 mm in the upper section is necessary to survive an entry of up to 1.5/sup 0/ from vertical or a recovery angle of up to 5/sup 0/. They also show that a mass of 15,400 kg and a pullout force of 330 kN are required. It is shown that active piston control is necessary to eliminate piston motion during penetration.

  15. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using piston cooling for a GDCI engine

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Gregory T; Husted, Harry L; Sellnau, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of nozzles, at least one nozzle per cylinder, with each nozzle configured to spray oil onto the bottom side of a piston of the engine to cool that piston. Independent control of the oil spray from the nozzles is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the oil spray onto the piston in that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in in a cylinder of the engine and controlling an oil spray targeted onto the bottom of a piston disposed in that cylinder is also presented.

  16. 21. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, ENGINE/PUMP HOUSE EXTENSION, HIGH PRESSURE PISTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, ENGINE/PUMP HOUSE EXTENSION, HIGH PRESSURE PISTON OF STEAM ENGINE NO. 4; CONTROL PANEL MOUNTED ON THE ENGINE; FLOOR VALVES CONTROL THE STEAM. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. Method of estimating time scales of atmospheric piston and its application at Dome C (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Kellerer, A; Sarazin, M; Butterley, T; Wilson, R

    2007-07-20

    Temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston are critical for interferometers as they determine their sensitivity. We characterize an instrumental setup, termed the piston scope, that aims at measuring the atmospheric time constant, tau(0), through the image motion in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer. High-resolution piston scope measurements have been obtained at the observatory of Paranal, Chile in April 2006. The derived atmospheric parameters are shown to be consistent with data from the astronomical site monitor, provided that the atmospheric turbulence is displaced along a single direction. The piston scope measurements of lower temporal and spatial resolution were recorded for what is believed to be the first time in February 2005 at the Antarctic site of Dome C. Their reanalysis in terms of the new data calibration sharpens the conclusions of a first qualitative examination [Appl. Opt. 45, 5709 (2006)].

  18. Overview of free-piston Stirling technology at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The activities include: (1) a generic free-piston Stirling technology project being conducted to develop technologies synergistic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, cost-shared effort with the Department of Energy (DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)), and (2) a free-piston Stirling space power technology demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), DOE, and NASA/Lewis. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kW free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development and validation of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, and fabrication and initial testing of an hydraulic output modification for the RE-1000 engine. The space power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including early test results.

  19. Modernizing the Opposed-Piston Engine for More Efficient Military Ground Vehicle Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    paper introduces the Achates Power opposed-piston engine, providing detailed, measured results of its power density, thermal efficiency and low heat ...efficiency and lack of cylinder heads, OP engines have lower heat rejection to coolant. Moreover, as a two-stroke engine, they have inherently high...markets, high thermal efficiency, high specific power and low heat rejection make the Achates Power opposed-piston engine ideally suited for military

  20. Mechanical and thermal analysis of the internal combustion engine piston using Ansys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioată, V. G.; Kiss, I.; Alexa, V.; Raţiu, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The piston is one of the most important components of the internal combustion engine. Piston fail mainly due to mechanical stresses and thermal stresses. In this paper is determined by using the finite element method, stress and displacement distribution due the flue gas pressure and temperature, separately and combined. The FEA is performed by CAD and CAE software. The results are compared with those obtained by the analytical method and conclusions have been drawn.

  1. Advanced Small Free-Piston Stirling Convertors for Space Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Lane, Neill

    2004-02-01

    This paper reports on the current status of an advanced 35 We free-piston Stirling convertor currently being developed under NASA SBIR Phase II funding. Also described is a further advanced and higher performance ~80 watt free-piston convertor being developed by Sunpower and Boeing/Rocketdyne for NASA under NRA funding. Exceptional overall convertor (engine plus linear alternator) thermodynamic performance (greater than 50% of Carnot) with specific powers around 100 We /kg appear reasonable at these low power levels.

  2. Control scheme for power modulation of a free piston Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Dhar, Manmohan

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a control scheme for power modulation of a free-piston Stirling engine-linear alternator power generator system. The present invention includes connecting an autotransformer in series with a tuning capacitance between a linear alternator and a utility grid to maintain a constant displacement to piston stroke ratio and their relative phase angle over a wide range of operating conditions.

  3. An investigation of the fluid-structure interaction of piston/cylinder interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, Matteo

    The piston/cylinder lubricating interface represents one of the most critical design elements of axial piston machines. Being a pure hydrodynamic bearing, the piston/cylinder interface fulfills simultaneously a bearing and sealing function under oscillating load conditions. Operating in an elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime, it also represents one of the main sources of power loss due to viscous friction and leakage flow. An accurate prediction of the time changing tribological interface characteristics in terms of fluid film thickness, dynamic pressure field, load carrying ability and energy dissipation is necessary to create more efficient interface designs. The aim of this work is to deepen the understanding of the main physical phenomena defining the piston/cylinder fluid film and to discover the impact of surface elastic deformations and heat transfer on the interface behavior. For this purpose, a unique fully coupled multi-body dynamics model has been developed to capture the complex fluid-structure interaction phenomena affecting the non-isothermal fluid film conditions. The model considers the squeeze film effect due to the piston micro-motion and the change in fluid film thickness due to the solid boundaries elastic deformations caused by the fluid film pressure and by the thermal strain. The model has been verified comparing the numerical results with measurements taken on special designed test pumps. The fluid film calculated dynamic pressure and temperature fields have been compared. Further validation has been accomplished comparing piston/cylinder axial viscous friction forces with measured data. The model has been used to study the piston/cylinder interface behavior of an existing axial piston unit operating at high load conditions. Numerical results are presented in this thesis.

  4. Development of EPA aircraft piston engine emission standards. [for air quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houtman, W.

    1976-01-01

    Piston engine light aircraft are significant sources of carbon monoxide in the vicinity of high activity general aviation airports. Substantial reductions in carbon monoxide were achieved by fuel mixture leaning using improved fuel management systems. The air quality impact of the hydrocarbon and oxides of nitrogen emissions from piston engine light aircraft were insufficient to justify the design constraints being confronted in present control system developments.

  5. The development and testing of ceramic components in piston engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McEntire, B.J.; Willis, R.W.; Southam, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    Within the past 10--15 years, ceramic hardware has been fabricated and tested in a number of piston engine applications including valves, piston pins, roller followers, tappet shims, and other wear components. It has been shown that, with proper design and installation, ceramics improve performance, fuel economy, and wear and corrosion resistance. These results have been obtained using rig and road tests on both stock and race engines. Selected summaries of these tests are presented in this review paper.

  6. New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Convertor Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has recently funded development of a 5 kW (or greater) free-piston Stirling conversion system for reactor power systems. A nominal 5 kW convertor allows two of these units to be dynamically balanced. A group of three dual-convertor combinations would yield the desired 30 kW. The status of this program will be presented. Goals include a specific power in excess of 140 W/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and AC output. The initial step is the design and development of a nominal 5 kW per cylinder Stirling convertor assembly (SCA) which will serve as a prototype of one or more SCAs that will make up the final 30 kW Stirling Convertor Power System. Assumed requirements for this new convertor for lunar fission power systems will be presented. The primary objective of this development effort will be to demonstrate a 5 kW SCA that can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems.

  7. An innovative piston corer for large‐volume sediment samples

    PubMed Central

    Haselmair, Alexandra; Stachowitsch, Michael; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coring is one of several standard procedures to extract sediments and their faunas from open marine, estuarine, and limnic environments. Achieving sufficiently deep penetration, obtaining large sediment volumes in single deployments, and avoiding sediment loss upon retrieval remain problematic. We developed a piston corer with a diameter of 16 cm that enables penetration down to 1.5 m in a broad range of soft bottom types, yields sufficient material for multiple analyses, and prevents sediment loss due to a specially designed hydraulic core catcher. A novel extrusion system enables very precise slicing and preserves the original sediment stratification by keeping the liners upright. The corer has moderate purchase costs and a robust and simple design that allows for a deployment from relatively small vessels as available at most marine science institutions. It can easily be operated by two to three researchers rather than by specially trained technicians. In the northern Adriatic Sea, the corer successfully extracted more than 50 cores from a range of fine mud to coarse sand, at water depths from three to 45 m. The initial evaluation of the cores demonstrated their usefulness for fauna sequences along with heavy metal, nutrient and pollutant analyses. Their length is particularly suited for historical ecological work requiring sedimentary and faunal sequences to reconstruct benthic communities over the last millennia. PMID:28111529

  8. Precision tip-tilt-piston actuator that provides exact constraint

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    1999-01-01

    A precision device which can precisely actuate three degrees of freedom of an optic mount, commonly referred to as tip, tilt, and piston. The device consists of three identical flexure mechanisms, an optic mount to be supported and positioned, a structure that supports the flexure mechanisms, and three commercially available linear actuators. The advantages of the precision device is in the arrangement of the constraints offered by the flexure mechanism and not in the particular design of the flexure mechanisms, as other types of mechanisms could be substituted. Each flexure mechanism constrains two degrees of freedom in the plane of the mechanisms and one direction is actuated. All other degrees of freedom are free to move within the range of flexure mechanisms. Typically, three flexure mechanisms are equally spaced in angle about to optic mount and arranged so that each actuated degree of freedom is perpendicular to the plane formed by the optic mount. This arrangement exactly constrains the optic mount and allows arbitrary actuated movement of the plane within the range of the flexure mechanisms. Each flexure mechanism provides a mechanical advantage, typically on the order of 5:1, between the commercially available actuator and the functional point on the optic mount. This improves resolution by the same ratio and stiffness by the square of the ratio.

  9. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  10. LED Monitoring System of the Phenix Muon Piston Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motschwiller, Steven

    2010-11-01

    The Muon Piston Calorimeter in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC has a monitoring system consisting of LEDs and PIN diodes to calibrate out the time dependent changes to the detector. The LEDs track the temperature and radiation-damage changes to the response of the MPC, while the absolute calibration can be done using 0̂ decays. To execute this, LEDs flash light through the PbWO4 crystal to the Avalanche Photo Diodes The MPC is made up of 416 independent electromagnetic calorimeter towers. By using the LEDs we can correct for changes in the gains of each tower in the MPC, on a run by run basis. Because the LED value only gives a relative measurement of the gain over time, this method of calibration can only be used in conjunction with absolute calibrations provided by 0̂ decays or by minimum ionizing peaks . This work will be used to make a final measurement on Transverse energy at √sNN = 200 GV in Au+Au collisions.

  11. Oxygen fugacity control in piston-cylinder experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, Sigurdur

    2012-09-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop and test a capsule assembly for use in piston-cylinder experiments where oxygen fugacity could be controlled in the vicinity of the QFM buffer without H2O loss or carbon contamination of the sample material. The assembly consists of an outer Pt-capsule containing a solid buffer (Ni-NiO or Co-CoO) plus H2O and an inner AuPd-capsule, containing the sample, H2O and a Pt-wire. No H2O loss is observed from the sample, even after 48 h, but a slight increase in H2O content is found in longer runs due to oxygen and hydrogen diffusion into the AuPd-capsule. Oxygen fugacity of runs in equilibrium with the Ni-NiO (NNO) and Co-CoO (CoCO) buffers was measured by analyzing Fe dissolved in the Pt-wire and in the AuPd-capsule. The second method gives values that are in good agreement with established buffer values, whereas results from the first method are one half to one log units higher than the established values.

  12. Progress in High Power Free-Piston Stirling Convertor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.; Walter, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration Policy has established a vision for human exploration of the moon and Mars. One option for power for future outposts on the lunar and Martian surfaces is a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. A 25 kW convertor was developed in the 1990s under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in such a possible lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Foster-Miller, Inc. is developing the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  13. Investigation of the misfueling of reciprocating piston aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, J. Holland, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Aircraft Misfueling Detection Project was developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center/Wallops Flight Facility at Wallops Island, Virginia. Its purpose was to investigate the misfueling of reciprocating piston aircraft engines by the inadvertent introduction of jet fuel in lieu of or as a contaminant of aviation gasoline. The final objective was the development of a device(s) that will satisfactorily detect misfueling and provide pilots with sufficient warning to avoid injury, fatality, or equipment damage. Two devices have been developed and successfully tested: one, a small contamination detection kit, for use by the pilot, and a second, more sensitive, modified gas chromatograph for use by the fixed-base operator. The gas chromatograph, in addition to providing excellent quality control of the fixed-base operator's fuel handling, is a very good backup for the detection kit in the event it produces negative results. Design parameters were developed to the extent that they may be applied easily to commercial production by the aircraft industry.

  14. Advanced Controller for the Free-Piston Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Scott S.; Jamison, Mike; Roth, Mary Ellen; Regan, Timothy F.

    2004-01-01

    The free-piston Stirling power convertor is being considered as an advanced power conversion technology to be used for future NASA deep space missions requiring long life radioisotope power systems. This technology has a conversion efficiency of over 25%, which is significantly higher than the efficiency of the Radioisotope Thermal-electric Generators (RTG) now in use. The NASA Glenn Research Center has long been recognized as a leader in Stirling technology and is responsible for the development of advanced technologies that are intended to significantly improve key characteristics of the Stirling convertor. The advanced technologies identified for development also consider the requirements of potential future missions and the new capabilities that have become available in the associated technical areas. One of the key areas identified for technology development is the engine controller. To support this activity, an advanced controller is being developed for the Stirling power convertor. This controller utilizes active power factor correction electronics and microcontroller-based controls. The object of this paper is to present an overview of the advanced controller concept with modeling, simulation and hardware test data.

  15. Control and monitoring of oxygen fugacity in piston cylinder experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matjuschkin, Vladimir; Brooker, Richard A.; Tattitch, Brian; Blundy, Jon D.; Stamper, Charlotte C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a newly developed capsule design that resolves some common problems associated with the monitoring and control of oxygen fugacity ( fO2) in high-pressure piston cylinder experiments. The new fO2 control assembly consists of an AuPd outer capsule enclosing two inner capsules: one of AuPd capsule containing the experimental charge (including some water), and the other of Pt containing a solid oxygen buffer plus water. The inner capsules are separated by crushable alumina. The outer capsule is surrounded by a Pyrex sleeve to simultaneously minimise hydrogen loss from the cell and carbon infiltration from the graphite furnace. Controlled fO2 experiments using this cell design were carried out at 1.0 GPa and 1,000 °C. We used NiPd, CoPd and (Ni, Mg)O fO2 sensors, whose pressure sensitivity is well calibrated, to monitor the redox states achieved in experiments buffered by Re-ReO2, Ni-NiO and Co-CoO, respectively. Results for the fO2 sensors are in good agreement with the intended fO2 established by the buffer, demonstrating excellent control for durations of 24-48 h, with uncertainties less than ± 0.3 log bar units of fO2.

  16. Optimizing the performance of a solar liquid piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. L.

    The 0.1-m solar liquid piston pump (SLPP) model is shown to exhibit stable operation over a wide range of conditions, provided the heat input (at T = 85 C) and the heat rejected (at T = 22 C) are maintained above the critical values for stalling. Under these conditions, the pumps operation is affected primarily by the heating coil position and the geometries of the inlet and outlet water tubes. It is found that the optimum output power of the model SLPP is 4.5 W at a pumping heat of 2 m, a mass flow rate of 0.23 kg/s, and an overall efficiency of 1%. It is noted that further optimization of the model would at best only marginally increase the output power and efficiency. It is thought that larger mass flow rates can be obtained by increasing the cross sectional area of the working tube and/or staging a number of pumps in parallel. It is possible to increase the pump head by staging a number of pumps in series.

  17. Developmental Considerations on the Free-piston Stirling Power Convertor for Use in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been considered a candidate for radioisotope power systems for space for more than a decade. Prior to the free-piston Stirling architecture, systems were designed with kinematic Stirling engines with rotary alternators to convert heat to electricity. These systems were proposed with lightly loaded linkages to achieve the necessary life. When the free-piston configuration was initially proposed, it was thought to be attractive due to the relatively high conversion efficiency, acceptable mass, and the potential for long life and high reliability. These features have consistently been recognized by teams that have studied technology options for radioisotope power systems. Since free-piston Stirling power conversion was first considered for space power applications, there have been major advances in three general areas of development: demonstration of life and reliability, the success achieved by Stirling cryocoolers in flight, and the overall developmental maturity of the technology for both flight and terrestrial applications. Based on these advances, free-piston Stirling convertors are currently being developed for a number of terrestrial applications. They commonly operate with the power, efficiency, life, and reliability as intended, and much of the development now centers on system integration. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of free-piston Stirling power conversion technology over the past decade, review the status, and discuss the challenges that remain.

  18. Developmental Considerations on the Free-Piston Stirling Power Convertor for Use in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been considered a candidate for radioisotope power systems for space for more than a decade. Prior to the free-piston Stirling architecture, systems were designed with kinematic Stirling engines with rotary alternators to convert heat to electricity. These systems were proposed with lightly loaded linkages to achieve the necessary life. When the free-piston configuration was initially proposed, it was thought to be attractive due to the relatively high conversion efficiency, acceptable mass, and the potential for long life and high reliability. These features have consistently been recognized by teams that have studied technology options for radioisotope power systems. Since free-piston Stirling power conversion was first considered for space power applications, there have been major advances in three general areas of development: demonstration of life and reliability, the success achieved by Stirling cryocoolers in flight, and the overall developmental maturity of the technology for both flight and terrestrial applications. Based on these advances, free-piston Stirling convertors are currently being developed for a number of terrestrial applications. They commonly operate with the power, efficiency, life, and reliability as intended, and much of the development now centers on system integration. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of free-piston Stirling power conversion technology over the past decade, review the status, and discuss the challenges that remain.

  19. Analysis of Ignition Behavior in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine Using Propane and Methane as Primary Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2013-05-24

    This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (© pilot ¼ 0.2-0.6 and © overall ¼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant © pilot (> 0.5), increasing © overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing © overall (at constant © pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

  20. Application of advanced diesel technology to inland waterway towboats three-wheel turbocharger system. Final report, Feb 88-Mar 91

    SciTech Connect

    Priebe, R.J.; Rowland, D.P.

    1991-03-01

    The report represents the development, test and evaluation of Three Wheel Turbocharger System on the DDC Series 149 Marine engine. The program included development and performance testing in a test cell and demonstration of the system in actual revenue service aboard an inland waterways towboat. The Detroit Diesel Series 149 Marine engines rated at 700 SHP were tested aboard the M/V ABBIE-C, owned and operated by Compass Marine Services, Inc. Both port and starboard engines were fully instrumented to measure engine operating parameters, propeller shaft torque and fuel consumption. The data was collected by a computer based data acquisition system. The development, testing and demonstration program consisted of six task levels including TWT System design and development, Towboat DDC 12V-149NA (2 engines) baseline testing and DDC 8V-149 engine testing with one engine configured as TIB/DDEC model and the second as TWT/DDEC model. The TWT system in conjunction with DDEC significantly improved air-fuel ratio and transient response of the 8V-149 TWT/DDEC engine which proved to be 15% more fuel efficient than the 12V-149NA engines.

  1. Comparison of emissions and efficiency of a turbocharged lean-burn natural gas and Hythane-fueled engine

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.F.; Wallace, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the potential for reduced exhaust emissions and improved efficiency, by way of lean-burn engine fueling with hydrogen supplemented natural gas (Hythane). The emissions and efficiency of the Hythane fuel (15% hydrogen, 85% natural gas by volume), were compared to the emissions and efficiency of pure natural gas using a turbocharged, spark ignition, 3.1 L, V-6 engine. The feasibility of heavy duty engine fueling with Hythane was assessed through testing conducted at engine speed and load combinations typical of heavy-duty engine operation. Comparison of the efficiency and emissions at MBT spark timing revealed that Hythane fueling of the test engine resulted in consistently lower brake specific energy consumption and emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), at a given equivalence ratio. There was no clear trend with respect to MBT oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. It was also discovered that an improved NO{sub x}-THC tradeoff resulted when Hythane was used to fuel the test engine. Consequently, Hythane engine operating parameters can be adjusted to achieve a concurrent reduction in NO{sub x} and THC emissions relative to natural gas fueling.

  2. Space Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Scaling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.

    1989-01-01

    The design feasibility study is documented of a single cylinder, free piston Stirling engine/linear alternator (FPSE/LA) power module generating 150 kW-electric (kW sub e), and the determination of the module's maximum feasible power level. The power module configuration was specified to be a single cylinder (single piston, single displacer) FPSE/LA, with tuning capacitors if required. The design requirements were as follows: (1) Maximum electrical power output; (2) Power module thermal efficiency equal to or greater than 20 percent at a specific mass of 5 to 8 kg/kW(sub e); (3) Heater wall temperature/cooler wall temperature = 1050 K/525 K; (4) Sodium heat-pipe heat transport system, pumped loop NaK (sodium-potassium eutectic mixture) rejection system; (5) Maximum power module vibration amplitude = 0.0038 cm; and (6) Design life = 7 years (60,000 hr). The results show that a single cylinder FPSE/LA is capable of meeting program goals and has attractive scaling attributes over the power range from 25 to 150 kW(sub e). Scaling beyond the 150 kW(sub e) power level, the power module efficiency falls and the power module specific mass reaches 10 kg/kW(sub e) at a power output of 500 kW(sub e). A discussion of scaling rules for the engine, alternator, and heat transport systems is presented, along with a detailed description of the conceptual design of a 150 kW(sub e) power module that meets the requirements. Included is a discussion of the design of a dynamic balance system. A parametric study of power module performance conducted over the power output range of 25 to 150 kW(sub e) for temperature ratios of 1.7, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 is presented and discussed. The results show that as the temperature ratio decreases, the efficiency falls and specific mass increases. At a temperature ratio of 1.7, the 150 kW(sub e) power module cannot satisfy both efficiency and specific mass goals. As the power level increases from 25 to 150 kW(sub e) at a fixed temperature ratio, power

  3. DISTURBED ZONE AND PISTON SHOCK AHEAD OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Eselevich, V.; Eselevich, M.

    2012-12-10

    The 2010 June 13 coronal mass ejection (CME) propagating toward the position angle P.A. Almost-Equal-To 245 Degree-Sign (measured counterclockwise from the Sun's north pole) was studied from the SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO C2, C3 data. We show that ahead of the CME frontal structure, as a result of its interaction with the undisturbed solar wind, a disturbed region (with an increased and disturbed plasma density), whose size increases as the CME travels away from the Sun, emerges gradually. Discontinuity formation at the disturbed zone front is observed in the narrow P.A. Almost-Equal-To 245 Degree-Sign -250 Degree-Sign range. Its characteristics satisfy the properties of a piston collision shock. In the other directions relative to the CME motion axis (P.A. > 250 Degree-Sign and P.A. < 245 Degree-Sign ), there exists only the disturbed zone, whose density gradually decreases with distance. The discontinuity that was always observed at all distances where measurements were made is absent. The analysis of this CME and several other limb CMEs with different velocities from the MK4, LASCO C2, C3, and STEREO/COR2 data confirmed the previously established laws of piston shock formation ahead of a CME, which are as follows: (1) Shock formation ahead of a CME in a vicinity along its propagation axis may occur at various distances R = R{sub u} from the Sun's center. Its formation is determined by fulfilling a local inequality u(R) > V{sub A} (R), where u(R) is a CME velocity relative to the surrounding solar wind and V{sub A} (R) is a local Alfven velocity that is approximately equal to the velocity of fast magnetic sound in the solar corona. (2) At R < 6 R{sub Sun }, the shock front width {delta}{sub F} is on the order of the proton mean free path {lambda}{sub p}, and the mechanism for energy dissipation at the front is, apparently, collisional. (3) At R {approx}> 10-15 R{sub Sun }, one observes the formation of a new discontinuity {delta}{sup *}{sub F} << {lambda}{sub p} wide

  4. Shallowly driven fluctuations in lava lake outgassing (gas pistoning), Kīlauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim; Sutton, A. J.; Lev, Einat; Thelen, Wes; Fee, David

    2016-01-01

    Lava lakes provide ideal venues for directly observing and understanding the nature of outgassing in basaltic magmatic systems. Kīlauea Volcano's summit lava lake has persisted for several years, during which seismic and infrasonic tremor amplitudes have exhibited episodic behavior associated with a rise and fall of the lava surface (;gas pistoning;). Since 2010, the outgassing regime of the lake has been tied to the presence or absence of gas pistoning. During normal behavior (no gas pistoning), the lake is in a ;spattering; regime, consisting of higher tremor amplitudes and gas emissions. In comparison, gas piston events are associated with an abrupt rise in lava level (up to 20 m), during which the lake enters a ;non-spattering; regime with greatly decreased tremor and gas emissions. We study this episodic behavior using long-term multidisciplinary monitoring of the lake, including seismicity, infrasound, gas emission and geochemistry, and time-lapse camera observations. The non-spattering regime (i.e. rise phase of a gas piston cycle) reflects gas bubbles accumulating near the top of the lake, perhaps as a shallow foam, while spattering regimes represent more efficient decoupling of gas from the lake. We speculate that the gas pistoning might be controlled by time-varying porosity and/or permeability in the upper portions of the lava lake, which may modulate foam formation and collapse. Competing models for gas pistoning, such as deeply sourced gas slugs, or dynamic pressure balances, are not consistent with our observations. Unlike other lava lakes which have cyclic behavior that is thought to be controlled by deeply sourced processes, external to the lake itself, we show an example of lava lake fluctuations driven by cycles of activity at shallow depth and close to the lake's surface. These observations highlight the complex and unsteady nature of outgassing from basaltic magmatic systems.

  5. One-Dimensional Shock Wave Formation by an Accelerating Piston. Ph.D. Thesis - Ohio State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    The formation of a shock wave by a solid accelerating piston was studied. A theoretical solution using the method of characteristics for a perfect gas showed that a complex wave system exists, and that the compressed gas can have large gradients in temperature, density and entropy. Experiments were performed with a piston tube where piston speed, shock speed and pressure were measured. The comparison of theory and experiment was good.

  6. Gas-enabled resonance and rectified motion of a piston in a vibrated housing filled with a viscous liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis A.; Torczynski, John R.; Clausen, Jonathan R.; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2015-11-16

    Herein, we show how introducing a small amount of gas can completely change the motion of a solid object in a viscous liquid during vibration. We analyze an idealized system exhibiting this behavior: a piston moving in a liquid-filled housing, where the gaps between the piston and the housing are narrow and depend on the piston position. Recent experiments have shown that vibration causes some gas to move below the piston and the piston to subsequently move downward and compress its supporting spring. Herein, we analyze the analogous but simpler situation in which the gas regions are replaced by bellows with similar pressure-volume relationships. We show that these bellows form a spring (analogous to the pneumatic spring formed by the gas regions) which enables the piston and the liquid to oscillate in a mode that does not exist without this spring. This mode is referred to here as the Couette mode because the liquid in the gaps moves essentially in Couette flow (i.e., with almost no component of Poiseuille flow). Since Couette flow by itself produces extremely low damping, the Couette mode has a strong resonance. We show that, near this resonance, the dependence of the gap geometry on the piston position produces a large rectified (net) force on the piston during vibration. As a result, this force can be much larger than the piston weight and the strength of its supporting spring and is in the direction that decreases the flow resistance of the gap geometry.

  7. Numerical Study of a Novel Piston-type Synthetic Jet Actuator with a Quick-return Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Eriqitai; Hong, Liang

    2017-03-01

    A novel designed piston-type synthetic jet actuator has been developed, which has a quick-return characteristic. When moving to the Top Dead Centre, the piston in high speed route moves faster than the classical one. Compared with classical piston-type SJA, the pressure ratio of the cavity, jet velocity and the jet momentum of the novel SJA increase significantly, which greatly enhances the performance of the actuator. A parametric study has been carried out focusing on the affection in different actuation frequencies and duty cycle. Results show that the performance of the quick-return piston-type SJA is significantly improved.

  8. Primary pressure standards based on dimensionally characterized piston/cylinder assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. W.; Jain, K.; Miiller, A. P.; Bowers, W. J.; Olson, D. A.

    2006-02-01

    NIST has characterized two large diameter (35.8 mm) piston/cylinder assemblies as primary pressure standards in the range 0.05 MPa to 1.0 MPa with uncertainties approaching the best mercury manometers. The realizations of the artefacts as primary standards are based on the dimensional characterization of the piston and cylinder, and models of the normal and shear forces on the base and flanks of the piston. We have studied two piston/cylinder assemblies, known at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as PG 38 and PG 39, using these methods. The piston and cylinder of both assemblies were accurately dimensioned by Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). All artefacts appeared to be round within ±30 nm and straight within ±100 nm over a substantial fraction of their heights. PG 39 was dimensioned a second time by PTB, three years after the initial measurement, and showed no significant change in dimensions or effective area. Comparisons of the effective area of PG 38 and PG 39 from dimensional measurements, against those obtained with calibration against the NIST ultrasonic interferometer manometer (UIM), are in agreement within the combined standard (k = 1) uncertainty of the dimensional measurements and the UIM. A cross-float comparison of PG 38 versus PG 39 also agreed with the dimensional characterization within their combined standard uncertainties and with the UIM calibrations. The expanded (k = 2) relative uncertainty of the effective area is about 6.0 × 10-6 for both assemblies.

  9. Overview of the 1986 free-piston Stirling activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Lewis Research Center's free-piston Stirling engine research is presented, including efforts to improve and advance its design for use in specific space power applications. These efforts are a part of the SP-100 program being conducted to support the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA. Such efforts include: (1) the testing and improvement of 25 kWe Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE); (2) the preliminary design of 25 kWe single-cylinder Experimental stirling Space Engine (ESSE); and, (3) a study to determine the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator to 150 kWe. Other NASA Lewis free-piston Stirling engine activities will be described, directed toward the advancement of general free-piston Stirling engine technology and its application in specific terrestrial applications. One such effort, supported by DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DRNL), is the development of a free-piston Stirling engine which produces hydraulic power. Finally, a terrestrial solar application involving a conceptual design of a 25 kWe Solar Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) capable of delivering power to an electric utility grid will be discussed. The latter work is supported by DOE/Sandia National Laboratory (SNLA).

  10. Activating the nuclear piston mechanism of 3D migration in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Harlin, Heather M; Korsak, Lulu I T; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2017-01-02

    Primary human fibroblasts have the remarkable ability to use their nucleus like a piston, switching from low- to high-pressure protrusions in response to the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) matrix. Although migrating tumor cells can also change how they migrate in response to the 3D matrix, it is not clear if they can switch between high- and low-pressure protrusions like primary fibroblasts. We report that unlike primary fibroblasts, the nuclear piston is not active in fibrosarcoma cells. Protease inhibition rescued the nuclear piston mechanism in polarized HT1080 and SW684 cells and generated compartmentalized pressure. Achieving compartmentalized pressure required the nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linker protein nesprin 3, actomyosin contractility, and integrin-mediated adhesion, consistent with lobopodia-based fibroblast migration. In addition, this activation of the nuclear piston mechanism slowed the 3D movement of HT1080 cells. Together, these data indicate that inhibiting protease activity during polarized tumor cell 3D migration is sufficient to restore the nuclear piston migration mechanism with compartmentalized pressure characteristic of nonmalignant cells.

  11. Optical Nanofluidic Piston: Assay for Dynamic Force-Compression of Single Confined Polymer Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshid, Ahmed; Zimny, Philip; Macos, Patrick; Massarelli, Geremia; Tétreault-La Roche, David; Reisner, Walter

    2014-03-01

    While single-molecule approaches now have a long-history in polymer physics, past methodology has a key limitation : it is not currently possible to apply well-defined forces to a precise number of chains in a well-defined volume. To this end,we have developed a nanofluidic assay for the study of DNA compression in vitro, the optical nanofluidic piston. The optical nanofluidic piston is a nanofluidic analog of a macroscopic piston-cylinder apparatus based on a nanosphere (``the piston'') optically trapped inside a 200-400nm nanochannel with embedded barrier (the ``cylinder''). The nanofluidic piston enables quantification of force required to compress single or multiple chains within a defined volume. We present combined fluorescence and force-measurements for the compression of T4 DNA under a variety of compression rates. Surprisingly, we find that compression occurs on a force-scale roughly 100x higher than that predicted by equilibrium theories, suggesting that the DNA is present in highly entangled states during the compression. Moreover, we observe that compression at high rates induces a ``shock-wave'' of high-polymer concentration near the bead, suggesting that our setup can quantitatively access novel non-equilibrium polymer phenomena.

  12. Development of free-piston Stirling engine performance and optimization codes based on Martini simulation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, William R.

    1989-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code is described that could be used to design and optimize a free-displacer, free-piston Stirling engine similar to the RE-1000 engine made by Sunpower. The code contains options for specifying displacer and power piston motion or for allowing these motions to be calculated by a force balance. The engine load may be a dashpot, inertial compressor, hydraulic pump or linear alternator. Cycle analysis may be done by isothermal analysis or adiabatic analysis. Adiabatic analysis may be done using the Martini moving gas node analysis or the Rios second-order Runge-Kutta analysis. Flow loss and heat loss equations are included. Graphical display of engine motions and pressures and temperatures are included. Programming for optimizing up to 15 independent dimensions is included. Sample performance results are shown for both specified and unconstrained piston motions; these results are shown as generated by each of the two Martini analyses. Two sample optimization searches are shown using specified piston motion isothermal analysis. One is for three adjustable input and one is for four. Also, two optimization searches for calculated piston motion are presented for three and for four adjustable inputs. The effect of leakage is evaluated. Suggestions for further work are given.

  13. Overview of free-piston Stirling technology at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (Lewis) free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities include: (1) a generic free-piston Stirling technology project being conducted to develop technologies synergistic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, cost-shared effort with the Department of Energy (DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ONRL)), and (2) a free-piston Stirling space-power technology demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), DOE, and NASA/Lewis. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kw free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development and validation of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, and fabrication and initial testing of an hydraulic output modification for the RE-1000 engine. The space power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including early test results.

  14. Piston-assisted proton pumping in Complex I of mitochondria membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourokh, Lev; Filonenko, Ilan

    2014-03-01

    Proton-pumping mechanism of Complex I remains mysterious because its electron and proton paths are well separated and the direct Coulomb interaction seems to be negligible. The structure of this enzyme was resolved very recently and its functionality was connected the shift of the helix HL. We model the helix as a piston oscillating between the protons and electrons. We assume that positive charges are accumulated near the edges of the helix. In the oxidized state, the piston is attracted to electrons, so its distance to the proton sites increases, the energy of these sites decreases and the sites can be populated. When electrons proceed to the drain, elastic forces return the piston to the original position and the energies of populated proton sites increase, so the protons can be transferred to the positive site of the membrane. In this work, we explore a simplified model when the interaction of the piston with electrons is replaced by a periodic force. We derive quantum Heisenberg equations for the proton operators and solve them jointly with the Langevin equation for the piston position. We show that the proton pumping is possible in such structure with parameters closely resembling the real system. We also address the feasibility of using such mechanism in nanoelectronics.

  15. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A generic free-piston Stirling technology project is being conducted to develop technologies generic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, cost-shared effort. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kW free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, design and fabrication under contract of a hydraulic output modification for RE-1000 engine tests, and a 1000-hour endurance test, under contract, of a 3 kWe free-piston Stirling/alternator engine. A newly initiated space power technology feasibility demonstration effort addresses the capability of scaling a free-piston Stirling/alternator system to about 25 kWe; developing thermodynamic cycle efficiency or equal to 70 percent of Carnot at temperature ratios in the order of 1.5 to 2.0; achieving a power conversion unit specific weight of 6 kg/kWe; operating with noncontacting gas bearings; and dynamically balancing the system. Planned engine and component design and test efforts are described.

  16. Simulating Rectified Motion of a Piston in a Housing Subjected to Vibrational Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonthan; Torczynski, John; Romero, Louis; O'Hern, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    We employ ALE finite element simulations to investigate the behavior of a piston in a housing subjected to vertical vibrations. The housing is filled with a viscous liquid to damp the piston motion and has bellows at both ends to represent air bubbles present in real systems. The piston has a roughly cylindrical hole along its axis, and a post attached to the housing penetrates partway into this hole. Protrusions from the hole and the post form a gap with a length that varies as the piston moves and forces liquid through this gap. Under certain conditions, nonlinearities in the system can drive the piston to move downward and compress the spring that holds it up against gravity. This behavior is investigated using ALE finite element simulations, and these results are compared with theoretical predictions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Emission reduction potential of using gas-to-liquid and dimethyl ether fuels on a turbocharged diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Xinling, Li; Zhen, Huang

    2009-03-15

    A study of engine performance characteristics and both of regulated (CO, HC, NO(x), and smoke) and unregulated (ultrafine particle number, mass concentrations and size distribution) emissions for a turbocharged diesel engine fueled with conventional diesel, gas-to-liquid (GTL) and dimethyl ether (DME) fuels respectively at different engine loads and speeds have been carried out. The results indicated that fuel components significantly affected the engine performance and regulated/unregulated emissions. GTL exhibited almost the same power and torque output as diesel, while improved fuel economy. GTL significantly reduced regulated emissions with average reductions of 21.2% in CO, 15.7% in HC, 15.6% in NO(x) and 22.1% in smoke in comparison to diesel, as well as average reductions in unregulated emissions of total ultrafine particle number (N(tot)) and mass (M(tot)) emissions by 85.3% and 43.9%. DME can significantly increase torque and power, compared with the original diesel engine, as well as significantly reduced regulated emissions of 40.1% in HC, 48.2% in NO(x) and smoke free throughout all the engine conditions. However, N(tot) for DME is close to that for diesel. The reason is that the accumulation mode particle number emissions for DME are very low due to the characteristics of oxygen content and no C-C bond, which promotes the processes of nucleation and condensation of the semi-volatile compounds in the exhaust gas, as a result, a lot of nucleation mode particles produce.

  18. A new sliding joint to accommodate recoil of a free-piston-driven expansion tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Morgan, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a new device to decouple free-piston driver recoil and its associated mechanical vibration from the acceleration tube and test section of The University of Queensland's X3 expansion tube. A sliding joint is introduced to the acceleration tube which axially decouples the facility at this station. When the facility is fired, the upstream section of the facility, which includes the free-piston driver, can recoil upstream freely. The downstream acceleration tube remains stationary. This arrangement provides two important benefits. Firstly, it eliminates nozzle movement relative to the test section before and during the experiment. This has benefits in terms of experimental setup and alignment. Secondly, it prevents transmission of mechanical disturbances from the free-piston driver to the acceleration tube, thereby eliminating mechanically-induced transducer noise in the sensitive pressure transducers installed in this low-pressure tube. This paper details the new design, and presents experimental confirmation of its performance.

  19. Nitrited-Steel Piston Rings for Engines of High Specific Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, John H; Bisson, Edmond E; Schmiedlin, Ralph F

    1945-01-01

    Stability and control characteristics determined from tests in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel of a 0.2375-scale model of the Douglas XA-26 airplane are compared with those measured in flight tests of a Douglas A-26b airplane. Several designs of nitrided-steel piston rings were performance-tested under variable conditions of output. The necessity of good surface finish and conformity of the ring to the bore was indicated in the preliminary tests. Nitrided-steel rings of the same dimensions as cast-iron rings operating on the original piston were unsatisfactory, and the final design was a lighter, rectangular, thin-face-width ring used on a piston having a maximum cross-head area and a revised skirt shape. Results were obtained from single-cylinder and multicylinder engine runs.

  20. Validity of nonequilibrium work relations for the rapidly expanding quantum piston.

    PubMed

    Quan, H T; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    Recent work by Teifel and Mahler [Eur. Phys. J. B 75, 275 (2010)] raises legitimate concerns regarding the validity of quantum nonequilibrium work relations in processes involving moving hard walls. We study this issue in the context of the rapidly expanding one-dimensional quantum piston. Utilizing exact solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we find that the evolution of the wave function can be decomposed into static and dynamic components, which have simple semiclassical interpretations in terms of particle-piston collisions. We show that nonequilibrium work relations remain valid at any finite piston speed, provided both components are included, and we study explicitly the work distribution for this model system.

  1. Test Method Designed to Evaluate Cylinder Liner-Piston Ring Coatings for Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    Research on advanced heat engine concepts, such as the low-heat-rejection engine, have shown the potential for increased thermal efficiency, reduced emissions, lighter weight, simpler design, and longer life in comparison to current diesel engine designs. A major obstacle in the development of a functional advanced heat engine is overcoming the problems caused by the high combustion temperatures at the piston ring/cylinder liner interface, specifically at top ring reversal (TRR). Therefore, advanced cylinder liner and piston ring materials are needed that can survive under these extreme conditions. To address this need, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have designed a tribological test method to help evaluate candidate piston ring and cylinder liner materials for advanced diesel engines.

  2. Analysis of a system modelling the motion of a piston in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Debayan; Takahashi, Takéo; Tucsnak, Marius

    2016-09-01

    We study a free boundary problem modelling the motion of a piston in a viscous gas. The gas-piston system fills a cylinder with fixed extremities, which possibly allow gas from the exterior to penetrate inside the cylinder. The gas is modeled by the 1D compressible Navier-Stokes system and the piston motion is described by the second Newton's law. We prove the existence and uniqueness of global in time strong solutions. The main novelty brought in by our results is that they include the case of nonhomogeneous boundary conditions which, as far as we know, have not been studied in this context. Moreover, even for homogeneous boundary conditions, our results require less regularity of the initial data than those obtained in previous works.

  3. A Theoritical Study of an Inertial-Type Free Piston Expander-Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Hiroyuki; Hijikata, Kunio; Nagasaki, Takao

    The expander-compressor is one of the most important parts of a Rankine cycle-vapor compression heat pump system. Since simplicity and ease of sealing are desired, a novel design incorporating an "inertial-type free piston expander-compressor" is presented in this paper. It is composed of one cylinder and one free piston, and the inertia of the piston is used to transmit energy. One numerical model, called the multinode model, is used to calculate the heat transfer coefficient between the gas and the cylinder wall, which is in turn input to another model, called the three-node model, by which the coefficient of performance is calculated. The estimated performance is sufficient for practical applications.

  4. A linear motor and compact cylinder-piston driver for left ventricular bypass.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X

    1990-01-01

    A simple, portable, reliable and noise-free pneumatic driver has been developed. It consists of a linear motor attached to a cylinder piston, in one unit. The motor coil is directly wound on the cylinder, and the permanent magnet is fixed to the piston. As a continuous voltage square wave is applied to the coil, the cylinder reciprocates on the piston periodically, producing air pressure and vacuum alternately. In conjunction with a locally made diaphragm pump, the driver was tested in vitro and in vivo. Results demonstrated that the device could drive the diaphragm pump and so support the circulation of an experimental animal. The driver weighs 12 kg. For 200 mmHg air pressure and -80 mmHg vacuum the power consumed is 30 W. Its noise is about 30 dB, less than that of an artificial valve and pump.

  5. Design and construction of the X-2 two-stage free piston driven expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolan, Con

    1995-01-01

    This report outlines the design and construction of the X-2 two-stage free piston driven expansion tube. The project has completed its construction phase and the facility has been installed in the new impulsive research laboratory where commissioning is about to take place. The X-2 uses a unique, two-stage driver design which allows a more compact and lower overall cost free piston compressor. The new facility has been constructed in order to examine the performance envelope of the two-stage driver and how well it couple to sub-orbital and super-orbital expansion tubes. Data obtained from these experiments will be used for the design of a much larger facility, X-3, utilizing the same free piston driver concept.

  6. Friction measurements in piston-cylinder apparatus using quartz-coesite reversible transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akella, J.

    1979-01-01

    The value of friction determined by monitoring piston displacement as a function of nominal pressure on compression and decompression cycles at 1273 K is compared with the friction value obtained by reversing the quartz-coesite transition at 1273 and 1073 K in a talc-glass-alsimag cell (Akella and Kennedy, 1971) and a low-friction salt cell (Mirwald et al., 1975). Quenching runs at 1273 K gave double values of friction of 0.25 GPa for the talc-glass-alsimag cell and 0.03 GPa for the salt cell. The piston-displacement technique gave somewhat higher values. Use of piston-displacement hysteresis loops in evaluating the actual pressure on a sample may lead to overestimates for decompression runs and underestimates for compression runs.

  7. Pre-compression volume on flow ripple reduction of a piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Song, Yuechao; Yang, Huayong

    2013-11-01

    Axial piston pump with pre-compression volume(PCV) has lower flow ripple in large scale of operating condition than the traditional one. However, there is lack of precise simulation model of the axial piston pump with PCV, so the parameters of PCV are difficult to be determined. A finite element simulation model for piston pump with PCV is built by considering the piston movement, the fluid characteristic(including fluid compressibility and viscosity) and the leakage flow rate. Then a test of the pump flow ripple called the secondary source method is implemented to validate the simulation model. Thirdly, by comparing results among the simulation results, test results and results from other publications at the same operating condition, the simulation model is validated and used in optimizing the axial piston pump with PCV. According to the pump flow ripples obtained by the simulation model with different PCV parameters, the flow ripple is the smallest when the PCV angle is 13°, the PCV volume is 1.3×10-4 m3 at such operating condition that the pump suction pressure is 2 MPa, the pump delivery pressure 15 MPa, the pump speed 1 000 r/min, the swash plate angle 13°. At the same time, the flow ripple can be reduced when the pump suction pressure is 2 MPa, the pump delivery pressure is 5 MPa,15 MPa, 22 MPa, pump speed is 400 r/min, 1 000 r/min, 1 500 r/min, the swash plate angle is 11°, 13°, 15° and 17°, respectively. The finite element simulation model proposed provides a method for optimizing the PCV structure and guiding for designing a quieter axial piston pump.

  8. Compression of helium to high pressures and temperatures using a ballistic piston apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, B. P.; Rovel, G. P.; Lewis, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Some preliminary experiments are described which were carried out in a high enthalpy laboratory to investigate the compression of helium, a typical shock-tube driver gas, to very high pressures and temperatures by means of a ballistic piston. The purpose of these measurements was to identify any problem areas in the compression process, to determine the importance of real gas effects duDC 47355s process, and to establish the feasibility of using a ballistic piston apparatus to achieve temperatures in helium in excess of 10,000 K.

  9. Design of an interferometric system for piston measurements in segmented primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, Josep; Laguarta, Ferran; Pizarro, Carlos; Tomas, Nuria; Pinto, Agusti

    2000-10-01

    Recently, telescopes with segmented primary mirrors are becoming increasingly popular due to their ability of achieving large apertures without the inconveniences caused by the fabrication and handling of monolithic surfaces with 8m (or over) in diameter. The difference in position of each pair of adjacent segments along the local normal of their interface (called piston hereafter), however, needs to be precisely measured in order to provide a diffraction- limited image. If a system yielding the nanometric accuracy required in piston measurements worked in daylight hours, the resultant saving in observation time would be an important advance on a majority of the state-of-the-art piston measurement systems. An interferometric piston measurement instrument accomplishing such objectives has been designed starting from the usual Michelson configuration at the CD6 (Terrassa, Spain), and its final test has been carried out in the test workbench of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC, Canary Islands, Spain). Its optical layout relies on projecting the reference arm of the interferometer onto one of the segments of the pair considered, along the direction of the local normal to the surface while the measurement arm is projected onto the interface which divides the pair of segments considered. The field of view and its illumination are calculated to be equivalent in both segments. The lateral shift of the fringes in both interferograms determines the piston error present. A combination of monochromatic and white light is used, in order to remove the (lambda) /2 phase ambiguities present in piston measurements without losing the required resolution in the measurement. In this paper, the optical design of this interferometric piston measurement instrument will be presented. The particular configuration used in the interferometer, the implementation of an imaging system allowing to see both the interface of the segments and the interference fringes, the effect of the

  10. Rupture-disk-less shock-tube with compression tube driven by free piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ogura, E.; Sato, S.; Funabiki, K.

    A new technique is proposed for a shock tube driven by a freely moving piston. In a conventional free-piston-driven shock tube, a rupture disk is employed between the compression tube and the shock generation tube. In the present method, however, the conventional rupture disk is replaced by a newly developed fast action valve which is activated by the compressed gas generated in the compression tube. The present method enables us to generate high Mach number shock waves of arbitrary strength with good reproducibility. The performance of the new method is demonstrated experimentally. This also enables us to be carefree to scattering of fragments of the rupture disk.

  11. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Curwen, P.W.; Rao, D.K.; Wilson, D.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes work performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061, {open_quotes}A Feasibility Assessment of Magnetic Bearings for Free-Piston Stirling Space Engines.{close_quotes} The work was performed over the period from July 1990 through August 1991. The objective of the effort was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in future long-term space missions.

  12. Validation of thermodynamic and mechanical models of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlini, M.; Cichy, M.; Mancini, M.

    1985-12-01

    Two distinctive physical-mathematical models for a free piston Stirling engine have been carried out, the thermodynamic and the dynamic ones, which are linked together by the outputs of the first becoming the inputs of the second. The paper then deals with the results reached by the authors on a test bench constructed ad hoc for a Beale free-piston Stirling engine of low power. The before mentioned models have been also validated by means of a comparison with the results of tests effected on the Stirling Beale engine.

  13. Influence of the skin effect in a rail gun on the parameters of the moving plasma piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuferev, V. S.; Gnedina, M. L.; Gnedin, N. Iu.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of the motion of the plasma piston in a rail gun launcher is solved with allowance for the skin effect using plane geometry and the quasi-stationary approximation. The temperature along the piston is assumed to be constant, and the piston is assumed to move as a whole at a velocity equal to that of the accelerated projectile. It is shown that current displacement toward the rear of the piston due to the skin effect leads to an increase in the gasdynamic pressure in the plasma, with a resulting reduction in the extension of the plasmoid. The latter effect is particularly pronounced when the mass of the plasma exceeds that of the piston.

  14. Effects of High Octane Ethanol Blends on Four Legacy Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and a Turbocharged GDI Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John F; West, Brian H; Huff, Shean P

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting engine and vehicle research to investigate the potential of high-octane fuels to improve fuel economy. Ethanol has very high research octane number (RON) and heat of vaporization (HoV), properties that make it an excellent spark ignition engine fuel. The prospects of increasing both the ethanol content and the octane number of the gasoline pool has the potential to enable improved fuel economy in future vehicles with downsized, downsped engines. This report describes a small study to explore the potential performance benefits of high octane ethanol blends in the legacy fleet. There are over 17 million flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) on the road today in the United States, vehicles capable of using any fuel from E0 to E85. If a future high-octane blend for dedicated vehicles is on the horizon, the nation is faced with the classic chicken-and-egg dilemma. If today’s FFVs can see a performance advantage with a high octane ethanol blend such as E25 or E30, then perhaps consumer demand for this fuel can serve as a bridge to future dedicated vehicles. Experiments were performed with four FFVs using a 10% ethanol fuel (E10) with 88 pump octane, and a market gasoline blended with ethanol to make a 30% by volume ethanol fuel (E30) with 94 pump octane. The research octane numbers were 92.4 for the E10 fuel and 100.7 for the E30 fuel. Two vehicles had gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines, and two featured port fuel injection (PFI). Significant wide open throttle (WOT) performance improvements were measured for three of the four FFVs, with one vehicle showing no change. Additionally, a conventional (non-FFV) vehicle with a small turbocharged direct-injected engine was tested with a regular grade of gasoline with no ethanol (E0) and a splash blend of this same fuel with 15% ethanol by volume (E15). RON was increased from 90.7 for the E0 to 97.8 for the E15 blend. Significant wide open throttle and thermal efficiency performance

  15. Overview of free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power application

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion of which the Stirling cycle is a viable candidate. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Technology work is also conducted on heat-exchanger concepts, both design and fabrication, to minimize the number of joints as well as to enhance the heat transfer in the heater. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. Projections are made for future space-power requirements over the next few decades along with a recommendation to consider the use of dynamic power-conversion systems - either solar or nuclear. A description of a study to investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power module to the 150 kWe power range is presented.

  16. A 1987 overview of free-piston Stirling technology for space power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.; Alger, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. NASA Lewis serves as the project office to manage the newly initiated NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program. One of the major elements of this five-year program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable growth candidate. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are comparisons between predicted and experimental engine performance, enhanced performance resulting from regenerator modification, increased operating stroke brought about by isolating the gas bearing flow between the displacer and power piston, identifying excessive energy losses and recommending corrective action, and a better understanding of linear alternator design and operation. Technology work is also conducted on heat exchanger concepts, both design and fabrication. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter.

  17. Stochastic stability assessment of a semi-free piston engine generator concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kigezi, T. N.; Gonzalez Anaya, J. A.; Dunne, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    Small engines, as power generators with low-noise and vibration characteristics, are needed in two niche application areas: as electric vehicle range extenders and as domestic micro Combined Heat and Power systems. A recent semi-free piston design known as the AMOCATIC generator fully meets this requirement. The engine potentially allows for high energy conversion efficiencies at resonance derived from having a mass and spring assembly. As with free-piston engines in general, stability and control of piston motion has been cited as the prime challenge limiting the technology's widespread application. Using physical principles, we derive in this paper two important results: an energy balance criterion and a related general stability criterion for a semi-free piston engine. Control is achieved by systematically designing a Proportional Integral (PI) controller using a control-oriented engine model for which a specific stability condition is stated. All results are presented in closed form throughout the paper. Simulation results under stochastic pressure conditions show that the proposed energy balance, stability criterion, and PI controller, operate as predicted to yield stable engine operation at fixed compression ratio.

  18. Development of Casting Process for Pressings of Pistons of Car Augmented Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, V. F.; Denisov, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Results of a study aimed at formation of a single-phase fine-grained structure in pistons during their production process involving isostatic pressing of liquid metal prior to the start of crystallization, pressing of the crystallizing metal, and holding under pressure in the process of cooling to the shop temperature are presented.

  19. Component improvement of free-piston Stirling engine key technology for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The successful performance of the 25 kW Space Power Demonstrator (SPD) engine during an extensive testing period has provided a baseline of free piston Stirling engine technology from which future space Stirling engines may evolve. Much of the success of the engine was due to the initial careful selection of engine materials, fabrication and joining processes, and inspection procedures. Resolution of the few SPD engine problem areas that did occur has resulted in the technological advancement of certain key free piston Stirling engine components. Derivation of two half-SPD, single piston engines from the axially opposed piston SPD engine, designated as Space Power Research (SPR) engines, has made possible the continued improvement of these engine components. The two SPR engines serve as test bed engines for testing of engine components. Some important fabrication and joining processes are reviewed. Also, some component deficiencies that were discovered during SPD engine testing are described and approaches that were taken to correct these deficiencies are discussed. Potential component design modifications, based upon the SPD and SPR engine testing, are also reported.

  20. Overview of free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of free-piston Stirling engine activities, directed toward space power applications. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators are discussed. Technology work was conducted on heat-exchanger concepts to minimize the number of joints as well as to enhance the heat transfer in the heater. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space power converter. Projections are made for future space power requirements over the next few decades along with a recommendation to consider the use of dynamic power conversion systems, either solar or nuclear. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits of a Stirling system over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power. A description of a study to investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space power module to the 150 kWe power range is presented.

  1. Design and Fabrication of a 5-kWe Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Peter A.; Walter, Thomas J.; Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Progress in the design and fabrication of a 5-kWe free-piston Stirling power conversion system is described. A scaled-down version of the successful 12.5-kWe Component Test Power Converter (CTPC) developed under NAS3-25463, this single cylinder prototype incorporates cost effective and readily available materials (steel versus beryllium) and components (a commercial linear alternator). The design consists of a displacer suspended on internally pumped gas bearings and a power piston/alternator supported on flexures. Non-contacting clearance seals are used between internal volumes. Heat to and from the prototype is supplied via pumped liquid loops passing through shell and tube heat exchangers. The control system incorporates several novel ideas such as a pulse start capability and a piston stroke set point control strategy that provides the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power. It also ensures stable response to various disturbances such as electrical load variations while providing useful data regarding the position of both power piston and displacer. All design and analysis activities are complete and fabrication is underway. Prototype test is planned for summer 2008 at Foster-Miller to characterize the dynamics and steady-state operation of the prototype and determine maximum power output and system efficiency. Further tests will then be performed at Auburn University to determine start-up and shutdown characteristics and assess transient response to temperature and load variations.

  2. Determination of the nonhermeticity of the piston packing of a compressor in operation

    SciTech Connect

    Solozhentsev, E.D.; Yadrov, V.P.

    1982-11-01

    This study attempts to determine the productivity and the magnitudes of the leaks and overflows of gas between working chambers, and also to determine the nonhermeticity of the piston packings of 3 compressors of this type which arises as a result of wear in the cylinders, wear in the piston rings, in the walls of the piston grooves, and from loss of elasticity in the rings, etc. The structure of the derived mathematical model is determined by the compressor schemes and of the leaks and overflows in it, and is assigned a table of data, each line of which corresponds to one chamber. It notes that due to the large leaks and overflows, the actual output of the compressors is 20% less than the calculated figure (design rating). This is brought about by wear of the cylinder and piston groups. The work which has been performed has made it possible to evaluate this wear. The results obtained have been used to set up measures aimed at increasing the output of type 3.5G-108/35 compressors installed in the technological lines of epichlorohydrin manufacture.

  3. Development of Gas-Lubricated Pistons for Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, W.

    1984-01-01

    Static testing of a segmented, gas-lubricated, piston-ring was accomplished. The ring utilizes high-pressure gas generated during the diesel cycle to energize a hydrostatic gas film between the piston and cylinder liner. The configuration was deficient in overall performance, because all segments of a ring set failed to form a fluid-film simultaneously, when exposed to internal preload. The difficulty was traced to the moment balance required to prevent the segments from overturning and contacting the cylinder walls. Some individual sectors formed a film and performed well in every respect including load capability to 6,000 N. These results produce optimism as to the ultimate feasibility of hydrostatic, gas-lubricated piston rings. In addition to test results, the principles of operation, and theoretical developments are presented. Breathable liner concepts are suggested for future consideration. In these configurations, solid hydrostatic pistons are coupled with flexible liners that elastically deform to form a gas-film under hydrostatic pressurization. Breathable liners afford the mechanical simplicity required for mass produced engines, and initial examination indicates satisfactory operation.

  4. Avco Lycoming/NASA contract status. [on reduction of emissions from aircraft piston engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The standards promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbon (HC), and oxides-of-nitrogen (NOx) emissions were the basis in a study of ways to reduce emissions from aircraft piston engines. A variable valve timing system, ultrasonic fuel atomization, and ignition system changes were postulated.

  5. The Development of a Control System for a 5 Kilowatt Free Piston Stirling Engine Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Raymond L.; Vitale, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The new NASA Vision for Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, proposes an ambitious program that plans to return astronauts to the moon by the 2018 time frame. A recent NASA study entitled "Affordable Fission Surface Power Study" recommended a 40 kWe, 900 K, NaK-cooled, Stirling convertors for 2020 launch. Use of two of the nominal 5 kW convertors allows the system to be dynamically balanced. A group of four dual-convertor combinations that would yield 40 kWe can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems. The work described in this paper deals specifically with the control system for the 5 kW convertor described in the preceding paragraph. This control system is responsible for maintaining piston stroke to a setpoint in the presence of various disturbances including electrical load variations. Pulse starting of the Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) convertor is also an inherent part of such a control system. Finally, the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power is discussed in terms of setpoint control. Several novel ideas have been incorporated into the piston stroke control strategy that will engender a stable response to disturbances in the presence of midpoint drift while providing useful data regarding the position of both the power piston and displacer.

  6. Investigation into piston-slap-induced vibration for engine condition simulation and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Z.; Chen, J.

    2005-04-01

    Piston slap is a common impact phenomenon existing in the reciprocating engine. It is also a major cause of the complex transient vibration response related to the impact excitation inside the engine. In order to correlate the piston-slap impact with the slap-induced vibration and consequently find out an effective approach for the engine dynamic behaviour simulation and working condition monitoring, an in-depth investigation from theoretical modelling to experimental verification is made in this paper. Firstly, the piston-slap phenomenon inside the reciprocating engine is briefly discussed from the viewpoint of engine mechanics. Based upon this, a nonlinear model is developed to simulate the slap-induced vibration response. Using numerical integration procedure, the slap-induced vibration response and its correlation with the inner-cylinder piston-slap impact are reasonably evaluated. Guided by the simulating results and, by introducing a fast wavelet-packet decomposition and reconstruction algorithm, a specially designed experiment is made to practically measure and extract the slap-induced impact message inside the 6190Z LC diesel engine. Comparison between the simulation and practically measured and reconstructed engine vibration signals verifies the effectiveness and practicality of this approach for more detailed academic research and engineering application.

  7. Numerical solution of the Stratonovich- and Ito–Euler equations: Application to the stochastic piston problem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiu; Lin, Guang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-03-01

    We consider a piston with a velocity perturbed by Brownian motion moving into a straight tube filled with a perfect gas at rest. The shock generated ahead of the piston can be located by solving the one-dimensional Euler equations driven by white noise using the Stratonovich or Ito formulations. We approximate the Brownian motion with its spectral truncation and subsequently apply stochastic collocation using either sparse grid or the quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) method. In particular, we first transform the Euler equations with an unsteady stochastic boundary into stochastic Euler equations over a fixed domain with a time-dependent stochastic source term. We then solve the transformed equations by splitting them up into two parts, i.e., a ‘deterministic part’ and a ‘stochastic part’. Numerical results verify the Stratonovich–Euler and Ito–Euler models against stochastic perturbation results, and demonstrate the efficiency of sparse grid and QMC for small and large random piston motions, respectively. The variance of shock location of the piston grows cubically in the case of white noise in contrast to colored noise reported in [1], where the variance of shock location grows quadratically with time for short times and linearly for longer times.

  8. Piston Bowl Optimization for RCCI Combustion in a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Reed M; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M; Reitz, Rolf; Kokjohn, Sage

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that that produces low NO{sub x} and PM emissions with high thermal efficiency. Previous RCCI research has been investigated in single-cylinder heavy-duty engines. The current study investigates RCCI operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine at 3 operating points. These operating points were chosen to cover a range of conditions seen in the US EPA light-duty FTP test. The operating points were chosen by the Ad Hoc working group to simulate operation in the FTP test. The fueling strategy for the engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of diesel fuel. At these 3 points, the stock engine configuration is compared to operation with both the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and custom machined pistons designed for RCCI operation. The pistons were designed with assistance from the KIVA 3V computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. By using a genetic algorithm optimization, in conjunction with KIVA, the piston bowl profile was optimized for dedicated RCCI operation to reduce unburned fuel emissions and piston bowl surface area. By reducing these parameters, the thermal efficiency of the engine was improved while maintaining low NOx and PM emissions. Results show that with the new piston bowl profile and an optimized injection schedule, RCCI brake thermal efficiency was increased from 37%, with the stock EURO IV configuration, to 40% at the 2,600 rev/min, 6.9 bar BMEP condition, and NOx and PM emissions targets were met without the need for exhaust after-treatment.

  9. 1987 Overview of the free-piston Stirling technology for space power application

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.; Alger, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. Free-piston Stirling technology is applicable for both solar and nuclear powered systems. As such, NASA Lewis serves as the project office to manage the newly initiated NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program. This 5-yr program provides the technology thrust for providing significant component and subsystem options for increased efficiency, reliability and survivability, and power output growth at reduced specific mass. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable growth candidate. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are comparisons between predicted and experimental engine performance, enhanced performance resulting from regenerator modification, increased operating stroke brought about by isolating the gas bearing flow between the displacer and power piston, identifying excessive energy losses and recommending corrective action, and a better understanding of linear alternator design and operation. Technology work is also conducted on heat exchanger concepts, both design and fabrication, to minimize the number of joints as well as to enhance performance. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits that a Stirling system has over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power.

  10. Theseus on Take-off for First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft takes off for its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden

  11. Gas-enabled resonance and rectified motion of a piston in a vibrated housing filled with a viscous liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Romero, Louis A.; Torczynski, John R.; Clausen, Jonathan R.; ...

    2015-11-16

    Herein, we show how introducing a small amount of gas can completely change the motion of a solid object in a viscous liquid during vibration. We analyze an idealized system exhibiting this behavior: a piston moving in a liquid-filled housing, where the gaps between the piston and the housing are narrow and depend on the piston position. Recent experiments have shown that vibration causes some gas to move below the piston and the piston to subsequently move downward and compress its supporting spring. Herein, we analyze the analogous but simpler situation in which the gas regions are replaced by bellowsmore » with similar pressure-volume relationships. We show that these bellows form a spring (analogous to the pneumatic spring formed by the gas regions) which enables the piston and the liquid to oscillate in a mode that does not exist without this spring. This mode is referred to here as the Couette mode because the liquid in the gaps moves essentially in Couette flow (i.e., with almost no component of Poiseuille flow). Since Couette flow by itself produces extremely low damping, the Couette mode has a strong resonance. We show that, near this resonance, the dependence of the gap geometry on the piston position produces a large rectified (net) force on the piston during vibration. As a result, this force can be much larger than the piston weight and the strength of its supporting spring and is in the direction that decreases the flow resistance of the gap geometry.« less

  12. Fuel economy and exhaust emissions characteristics of a diesel vehicle: results of the prototype Volkswagen 1. 5-liter turbocharged rabbit tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, R.A.; Quayle, S.S.; Sturm, J.C.

    1981-10-01

    Tests were performed on a prototype Volkswagen (VW) Turbocharged (TC) Rabbit diesel vehicle on a chassis dynamometer. The vehicle was tested for fuel economy and emissions on the Urban Federal Test Procedure (FTP), Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), Congested Urban Expressway (CUE), and New York City Cycle (NYCC). Steady state measurements were performed at three speeds. Particulate measurements were completed at all test conditions. Approximately 250 grams of particulate matter were collected over the HFET cycle for inclusion in the Environmental Protection Agency Diesel Health Effects Research Program. During the urban cycle the vehicle obtained 45.7 mpg, with emission rates of 0.14, 0.89 and 1.07 grams per mile of HC, CO, and NOx, respectively. The Rabbit obtained 56.5 mpg during the HFET cycle.

  13. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Scholten, Travis L.; Rudinger, Kenneth Michael

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography suffers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more effectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  14. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Surface Power, Phase I Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Buffalino, Andrew; Holliday, Ezekiel; Penswick, Barry; Gedeon, David

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the design of a 12 kW dual opposed free-piston Stirling convertor and controller for potential future use in space missions. The convertor is heated via a pumped NaK loop and cooling is provided by a pumped water circuit. Convertor efficiency is projected at 27 percent (AC electrical out/heat in). The controller converts the AC electrical output to 120 Vdc and is projected at 91 percent efficiency. A mechanically simple arrangement, based on proven technology, was selected in which the piston is resonated almost entirely by the working space pressure swing, while the displacer is resonated by planar mechanical springs in the bounce space.

  15. Sparse aperture differential piston measurements using the pyramid wave-front sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Chen, Xinyang; Yan, Zhaojun; Zheng, Lixin; Agapito, Guido; Wang, Chaoyan; Zhu, Nenghong; Zhu, Liyun; Cai, Jianqing; Tang, Zhenghong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we report on the laboratory experiment we settled in the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) to investigate the pyramid wave-front sensor (WFS) ability to measure the differential piston on a sparse aperture. The ultimate goal is to verify the ability of the pyramid WFS work in close loop to perform the phasing of the primary mirrors of a sparse Fizeau imaging telescope. In the experiment we installed on the optical bench we performed various test checking the ability to flat the wave-front using a deformable mirror and to measure the signal of the differential piston on a two pupils setup. These steps represent the background from which we start to perform full close loop operation on multiple apertures. These steps were also useful to characterize the achromatic double pyramids (double prisms) manufactured in the SHAO optical workshop.

  16. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine is discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features are presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept is presented.

  17. The effect of thermal barrier coated piston crown on engine characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Khor, K.A.

    2000-02-01

    While there have been numerous research papers in recent years describing the theoretical benefits obtained from the use of ceramic components in reciprocating engines, the amount of literature that describes practical results is very limited. Although successes have been reported and ceramic components are now in service in production engines, mainly for reduced in-cylinder heat rejection, many researchers have experienced failures or a drop in engine performance. This article presents the work completed on a low heat rejection engine. Extensive experiments were conducted on a three-cylinder SI Daihatsu engine with piston crowns coated with a layer of ceramic, which consisted of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Measurement and comparison of engine performance, in particular fuel consumption, were made before and after the application of YSZ coatings deposited onto the piston crowns. The details of the cylinder pressures during the combustion process were also investigated.

  18. Computer controlled titration with piston burette or peristaltic pump - a comparison.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W

    1996-09-01

    The advantages and problems of the use of piston burettes and peristaltic pumps for dosage of titrant solutions in automatic titrations are shown. For comparison, only the dosing devices were exchanged and all other components and conditions remained unchanged. The results of continuous acid base titration show good agreement and comparable reproducibility. Potentiometric sensors (glass electrodes) with different equilibration behaviour influence the results. The capability of such electrodes was tested. Conductometric measurements allow a much faster detection because there is no equilibration of electrodes. Piston burettes should be used for titration with very high precision, titration with organic solvents and slow titrations. Peristaltic pumps seem to be more suitable for continuous titrations and long time operation without service.

  19. Free-Piston Stirling Convertor Controller Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The free-piston Stirling convertor end-to-end modeling effort at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has produced a software-based test bed in which free-piston Stirling convertors can be simulated and evaluated. The simulation model includes all the components of the convertor - the Stirling cycle engine, linear alternator, controller, and load. This paper is concerned with controllers. It discusses three controllers that have been studied using this model. Case motion has been added to the model recently so that effects of differences between convertor components can be simulated and ameliorative control engineering techniques can be developed. One concern when applying a system comprised of interconnected mass-spring-damper components is to prevent operation in any but the intended mode. The design mode is the only desired mode of operation, but all other modes are considered in controller design.

  20. Generation of magnetized collisionless shocks by a novel, laser-driven magnetic piston

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Constantin, C. G.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Morton, L. A.; Niemann, C.; Winske, D.; Flippo, K. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Gaillard, S. A.

    2012-07-15

    We present experiments on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory which demonstrate key elements in the production of laser-driven, magnetized, laboratory-scaled astrophysical collisionless shocks. These include the creation of a novel magnetic piston to couple laser energy to a background plasma and the generation of a collisionless shock precursor. We also observe evidence of decoupling between a laser-driven fast ion population and a background plasma, in contrast to the coupling of laser-ablated slow ions with background ions through the magnetic piston. 2D hybrid simulations further support these developments and show the coupling of the slow to ambient ions, the formation of a magnetic and density compression pulses consistent with a collisionless shock, and the decoupling of the fast ions.

  1. The effect of preignition on cylinder temperatures, pressures, power output, and piston failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrington, Lester C; Fisher, William F

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a cylinder of a V-type liquid-cooled engine to observe the behavior of the cylinder when operated under preignition conditions. Data were recorded that showed cylinder-head temperatures, time of ignition, engine speed, power output, and change in maximum cylinder pressure as a function of time as the engine entered preignition and was allowed to operate under preignition conditions for a short time. The effects of the following variables on the engine behavior during preignition were investigated: fuel-air ratio, power level, aromatic content of fuel, engine speed, mixture temperature, and preignition source. The power levels at which preignition would cause complete piston failure for the selected engine operating conditions and the types of failure encountered when using various values of clearance between the piston and cylinder barrel were determined. The fuels used had performance numbers high enough to preclude any possibility of knock throughout the test program.

  2. Design & Development of a High Mass Flow Piston Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Hamad Muhammad; Murugan Illikkal, Karthika; D'souza, Francis; Alsayed Mahmood, Mohamed; Mahmud Mostafa, Suhail; Kim, Young Hwan

    2015-05-01

    The idea of having a device that is capable of working in a systematic process allowing control of the boundary layer by means of operated on high-frequency, small-scale, and low energy actuators has caught the interest of the aerodynamicist community. With an eye on the available data and potential flow control advantages, our research team set out to manufacture a compact SJA (Synthetic Jet Actuator) of its own, which would be capable of being installed inside an airfoil. It consists of components such as a single piston cylinder, with variable exit geometry along with the control system that has an electrical actuator which can be regulated in order for it to be capable of producing various operating frequencies. This paper consists of a study into the design of a single piston device SJA and will present all significant data both theoretical and computational regarding its design and performance.

  3. Free-piston Stirling Engine system considerations for various space power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochat, George R.; Dhar, Manmohan

    Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE) have the potential to provide high reliability, long life, and efficient operation. Therefore, they are excellent candidates for the dynamic power conversion module of a space-based, power-generating system. FPSE can be coupled with many potential heat sources (radioisotope, solar, or nuclear reactor), various heat input systems (pumped loop, heat pipe), heat rejection (pumped loop or heat pipe), and various power management and distribution systems (ac, dc, high or low voltage, and fixed or variable load). This paper reviews potential space missions that can be met using free-piston Stirling engines and discusses options of various system integration approaches. This paper briefly outlines the program and recent progress.

  4. Overview of the 1985 NASA Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J.

    1985-01-01

    This effort is keyed on the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of a 25 kWe Stirling space-power technology-feasibility demonstrator engine. Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of a 9000-hr endurance test conducted on a 2 kWe free-piston Stirling/linear alternator system employing hydrostatic gas bearings. Dynamic balancing of the RE-1000 engine (a 1 kWe free-piston Stirling engine) using a passive dynamic absorber will be discussed along with the results of a parametric study showing the relationships of Stirling power converter specific weight and efficiency as functions of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Planned tests will be described covering a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept for potential SP-100 application.

  5. Comparative survey of dynamic analyses of free-piston stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kankam, M.D.; Rauch, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper compares reported dynamic analyses for evaluating the steady-state response and stability of free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) systems. Various analytical approaches are discussed to provide guidance on their salient features. Recommendations are made in the recommendations remarks for an approach which captures most of the inherent properties of the engine. Such an approach has the potential for yielding results which will closely match practical FPSE-load systems.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Eric Gingrich Experimental Setup Single- Cylinder Engine...Laboratory Experiments were conducted in a light-duty single- cylinder engine based on the General Motors/Fiat JTD 1.9L four- cylinder diesel engine. A stock...four cylinder head was installed atop a single cylinder block. Valves for cylinder #2 were activated by the dual overhead cams. The valvetrain for

  7. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1987-08-18

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensile specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen regardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis. 4 figs.

  8. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensil specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen irregardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis.

  9. Comparative survey of dynamic analyses of free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Rauch, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    Reported dynamics analyses for evaluating the steady-state response and stability of free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) systems are compared. Various analytical approaches are discussed to provide guidance on their salient features. Recommendations are made in the recommendations remarks for an approach which captures most of the inherent properties of the engine. Such an approach has the potential for yielding results which will closely match practical FPSE-load systems.

  10. Testing and performance characteristics of a 1-kW free piston Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, J.

    1983-01-01

    A 1 kW single cylinder free piston Stirling engine, configured as a research engine, was tested with helium working gas. The engine features a posted displacer and dashpot load. The test results show the engine power output and efficiency to be lower than those observed during acceptance tests by the manufacturer. Engine tests results are presented for operation at the two heater head temperatures and with two regenerator porosities, along with flow test results for the heat exchangers.

  11. Reciprocating balance weight mechanism for a piston type internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nivi, H.; Field, N.L. III

    1987-08-25

    A balancing mechanism is described for reducing the vibration of a piston type internal combustion engine having a crankshaft and a camshaft, the balancing mechanisms comprising one or more reciprocating balance weights, with each weight comprising an elongate body having a cam follower mounted at either end and with each weight being driven by two rotating cams with at least one of the cams being driven by either the crankshaft or the camshaft.

  12. Development of Electronic Load Controllers for Free-Piston Stirling Convertors Aided by Stirling Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.

    2004-01-01

    The free-piston Stirling convertor end-to-end modeling effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center has produced a software-based test bed in which free-piston Stirling convertors can be simulated and evaluated. The simulation model includes all the components of the convertor: the Stirling cycle engine, heat source, linear alternator, controller, and load. So far, it has been used in evaluating the performance of electronic controller designs. Three different controller design concepts were simulated using the model: 1) Controllers with parasitic direct current loading. 2) Controllers with parasitic alternating current loading. 3) Controllers that maintain a reference current. The free-piston Stirling convertor is an electromechanical device that operates at resonance. It is the function of the electronic load controller to ensure that the electrical load seen by the machine is always great enough to keep the amplitude of the piston and alternator oscillation at the rated value. This is done by regulating the load on the output bus. The controller monitors the instantaneous voltage, regulating it by switching loads called parasitic loads onto the bus whenever the bus voltage is too high and removing them whenever the voltage is too low. In the first type of controller, the monitor-ing and switching are done on the direct-current (dc) bus. In the second type, the alternating current bus is used. The model allows designers to test a controller concept before investing time in hardware. The simulation code used to develop the model also offers detailed models of digital and analog electronic components so that the resulting designs are realistic enough to translate directly into hardware circuits.

  13. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A.; Henein, N.A.

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-{omega}) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, {omega}, have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-{omega}) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  14. Four-piston double-duct liquid metal MHD engine and AC generator

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Operating principles, features and applications of the Liquid Metal (LM) engine are presented. This engine combines a free-piston internal combustion engine with an MHD AC power generator. Liquid metal (LM) oscillates back-and-forth in two separate channels, driven by free pistons coupled magnetically to pistons driven by internal combustion. One of the principal breakthroughs is the concept of using double ducts in a Hartmann configuration for MHD production of alternating current. The LM flows in opposing directions in the two adjacent Hartmann ducts, thus eliminating magnetic-induced instabilities, eliminating vibration, and providing an ideal setup for attaching an output transformer on one side provide to provide useful ranges of current and voltage. Because LM is used, the length of the piston stroke can be easily varied over a large range, thus making possible an engine that, changes size, according to variation in output load requirements. Increasing the stroke length results in increased compression ratio, which requires computer controlled modification of the fuel injection mixture. Higher fuel efficiencies will result, whether the engine is idling or operating at maximum power. Because of viscous dissipation losses in the LM, this engine will be more efficient for larger engines. Applications include any power generation where variable load is required, such as stationary electric generators for remote towns and cities, temporary military encampments, and mobile primary power generators for off-road and on-road automotive equipment, including caterpillars, cars, military vehicles, trucks, and trains. The advantages for automotive propulsion will be described in comparisons with current and developmental vehicles using internal combustion engines. Because the LM-engine generates electricity, an LM-engine vehicle is readily adaptable to hybrid concepts. An R&D program will be outlined for bringing the concept of the LM engine to commercial application.

  15. Qualitative analysis of the behavior of the plasma piston in the channel of a rail-gun launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorskii, A. V.

    1991-12-01

    The principal difficulties associated with the realization of high launching velocities in rail guns are briefly reviewed with emphasis on the difficulties related to the gasdynamic structure of the plasma piston and electrode erosion. These phenomena are analyzed in qualitative terms, with attention given to the conditions under which they occur and to the stability of stationary states. The importance of special measures aimed at ensuring the compactness of the plasma piston at the initial stage of acceleration is emphasized.

  16. Overview of the 1985 NASA Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the 1985 (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities in support of the SP-100 Program is presented. The SP-100 program is being conducted in support of the Department of Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. This effort is keyed on the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of a 25 kW(e) Stirling space-power technology-feasibility demonstrator engine. Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of a 9000-h goal endurance test conducted on a 2 kW(e) free-piston Stirling/linear alternator system employing hydrostatic gas bearings. Dynamic balancing of the RE-1000 engine (a 1 kW(e) free-piston Stirling engine) using a passive dynamic absorber is discussed, along with the results of a parametric study showing the relationships of Stirling power converter specific weight and efficiency as functions of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Planned tests are described covering a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept for potential SP-100 application.

  17. Theoretical Evaluation of the Maximum Work of Free-Piston Engine Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing the adjoint equations that originate from the calculus of variations, we have calculated the maximum thermal efficiency that is theoretically attainable by free-piston engine generators considering the work loss due to friction and Joule heat. Based on the adjoint equations with seven dimensionless parameters, the trajectory of the piston, the histories of the electric current, the work done, and the two kinds of losses have been derived in analytic forms. Using these we have conducted parametric studies for the optimized Otto and Brayton cycles. The smallness of the pressure ratio of the Brayton cycle makes the net work done negative even when the duration of heat addition is optimized to give the maximum amount of heat addition. For the Otto cycle, the net work done is positive, and both types of losses relative to the gross work done become smaller with the larger compression ratio. Another remarkable feature of the optimized Brayton cycle is that the piston trajectory of the heat addition/disposal process is expressed by the same equation as that of an adiabatic process. The maximum thermal efficiency of any combination of isochoric and isobaric heat addition/disposal processes, such as the Sabathe cycle, may be deduced by applying the methods described here.

  18. Influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters of spring-piston air guns.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ronald; Schultz, Benno; Frank, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    In firearm examiners' and forensic specialists' casework as well as in air gun proof testing, reliable measurement of the weapon's muzzle velocity is indispensable. While there are standardized and generally accepted procedures for testing the performance of air guns, the method of seating the diabolo pellets deeper into the breech of break barrel spring-piston air guns has not found its way into standardized test procedures. The influence of pellet seating on the external ballistic parameters was investigated using ten different break barrel spring-piston air guns. Test shots were performed with the diabolo pellets seated 2 mm deeper into the breech using a pellet seater. The results were then compared to reference shots with conventionally loaded diabolo pellets. Projectile velocity was measured with a high-precision redundant ballistic speed measurement system. In eight out of ten weapons, the muzzle energy increased significantly when the pellet seater was used. The average increase in kinetic energy was 31 % (range 9-96 %). To conclude, seating the pellet even slightly deeper into the breech of spring-piston air guns might significantly alter the muzzle energy. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that this effect is taken into account when accurate and reliable measurements of air gun muzzle velocity are necessary.

  19. Modeling and Performance Improvement of the Constant Power Regulator Systems in Variable Displacement Axial Piston Pump

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    An irregular performance of a mechanical-type constant power regulator is considered. In order to find the cause of an irregular discharge flow at the cut-off pressure area, modeling and numerical simulations are performed to observe dynamic behavior of internal parts of the constant power regulator system for a swashplate-type axial piston pump. The commercial numerical simulation software AMESim is applied to model the mechanical-type regulator with hydraulic pump and simulate the performance of it. The validity of the simulation model of the constant power regulator system is verified by comparing simulation results with experiments. In order to find the cause of the irregular performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator system, the behavior of main components such as the spool, sleeve, and counterbalance piston is investigated using computer simulation. The shape modification of the counterbalance piston is proposed to improve the undesirable performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator. The performance improvement is verified by computer simulation using AMESim software. PMID:24282389

  20. Overview of Multi-Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Research at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Mason, Lee S.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2008-01-01

    As a step towards development of Stirling power conversion for potential use in Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems, a pair of commercially available 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors and a pair of commercially available pressure wave generators (which will be plumbed together to create a high power Stirling linear alternator test rig) have been procured for in-house testing at Glenn Research Center (GRC). Delivery of both the Stirling convertors and the linear alternator test rig is expected by October 2007. The 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors will be tested at GRC to map and verify performance. The convertors will later be modified to operate with a NaK liquid metal pumped loop for thermal energy input. The high power linear alternator test rig will be used to map and verify high power Stirling linear alternator performance and to develop power management and distribution (PMAD) methods and techniques. This paper provides an overview of the multi-kilowatt free-piston Stirling power conversion work being performed at GRC.

  1. Overview of Multi-kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Research at GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Mason, Lee S.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2008-01-01

    As a step towards development of Stirling power conversion for potential use in Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems, a pair of commercially available 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors and a pair of commercially available pressure wave generators (which will be plumbed together to create a high power Stirling linear alternator test rig) have been procured for in-house testing at Glenn Research Center. Delivery of both the Stirling convertors and the linear alternator test rig is expected by October, 2007. The 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors will be tested at GRC to map and verify performance. The convertors will later be modified to operate with a NaK liquid metal pumped loop for thermal energy input. The high power linear alternator test rig will be used to map and verify high power Stirling linear alternator performance and to develop power management and distribution (PMAD) methods and techniques. This paper provides an overview of the multi-kilowatt free-piston Stirling power conversion work being performed at GRC.

  2. RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine sensitivity test results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.G.; Geng, S.M.; Lorenz, G.V.

    1986-10-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been testing a 1 kW (1.33 hp) free-piston Stirling engine at the NASA Lewis test facilities. The tests performed over the past several years have been on a single cylinder machine known as the RE-1000. The data recorded were to aid in the investigation of the dynamics and thermodynamics of the free-piston Stirling engine. The data are intended to be used primarily for computer code validation. NASA reports TM-82999, TM-83407, and TM-87126 give initial results of the engine tests. The tests were designed to investigate the sensitivity of the engine performance to variations on the mean pressure of the working space, the working fluid used, heater and cooler temperatures, regenerator porosity, power piston mass and displacer dynamics. These tests have now been completed at NASA Lewis. This report presents some of the detailed data collected in the sensitivity tests. In all, 781 data points were recorded. A complete description of the engine and test facility is given. Many of the data can be found in tabular form, while a microfiche containing all of the data points can be requested from NASA Lewis.

  3. Comparison of Fluoroplastic Causse Loop Piston and Titanium Soft-Clip in Stapedotomy

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Mohammad; Gilanifar, Nafiseh; Roosta, Sareh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Different types of prosthesis are available for stapes replacement. Because there has been no published report on the efficacy of the titanium soft-clip vs the fluoroplastic Causse loop Teflon piston, we compared short-term hearing results of both types of prosthesis in patients who underwent stapedotomy due to otosclerosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 57 ears were included in the soft-clip group and 63 ears were included in the Teflon-piston group. Pre-operative and post-operative air conduction, bone conduction, air-bone gaps, speech discrimination score, and speech reception thresholds were analyzed. Results: Post-operative speech reception threshold gains did not differ significantly between the two groups (P=0.919). However, better post-operative air-bone gap improvement at low frequencies was observed in the Teflon-piston group over the short-term follow-up (at frequencies of 0.25 and 0.50 kHz; P=0.007 and P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Similar post-operative hearing results were observed in the two groups in the short-term. PMID:28229059

  4. Speed enhancements for a 489-actuator, piston-tip-tilt segment, MEMS DM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Besse, Marc; Kempf, Carl J.; He, Min

    2010-08-01

    Iris AO has been developing a 489-actuator, 163 piston-tip-tilt segment, deformable mirror system controlled with a personal computer. The system includes the MEMS-based DM, drive electronics, and a precision factory-calibrated position controller. The position controller implements both position limiting to keep DM segments within the safe operating region and calculates the actuator voltages that correspond to desired DM piston, tip, and tilt positions. This paper describes recent speed enhancements and benchmarking results for the 489-actuator deformable mirror system. Benchmarking showed an execution time of 157.5 μs from the start of the DM piston/tip/tilt (PTT) position controller operation to when the last bit was output from the computer interface card to the DM drive electronics. Initial testing of an asynchronous write operation for the computer interface card shows that the PTT controller function can return within 5 μs of a data transfer, thereby shortening the processor time required for a DM to an estimated 74.4 μs. All aspects that give rise to latencies and bandwidth are presented herein, namely: 1) PTT controller safe-operating-point limiting and voltage calculations; 2) computer interface and DAC latencies; 3) drive electronics bandwidth, and 4) DM bandwidth.

  5. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  6. Fluid dynamic modeling of a free piston engine with labyrinth seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larjola, Jaakko; Honkatukia, Juha; Sallinen, Petri; Backman, Jari

    2010-04-01

    Preliminary design and simulation of a free piston engine suitable for small-scale energy production in distributed energy systems is presented in this paper. The properties, particularly the properties of gas seals of the engine are simulated using a simulation program developed for this case, and the results are utilized in preliminary main design parameter selection. The engine simulation program was developed by combining and modifying the source codes of the simulation and calculation programs obtained from Helsinki University of Technology, Tampere University of Technology, and Lappeenranta University of Technology. Because of the contact-free labyrinth seal used in the piston, the efficiency of the motor is lower than the efficiency of a conventional motor with oil lubricated piston rings. On the other hand, the lack of bearing losses, and the lack of losses associated with a crankshaft system and a gearbox, as well as the lack of lubrication oil expenses, compensates this effect. As a net result, this new motor would perform slightly better than the conventional one. Being completely oil-free, it is very environmentally friendly, and its exhaust gases are completely free of oil residuals which are causing problems in normal gas motors.

  7. Modelling the heart with the atrioventricular plane as a piston unit.

    PubMed

    Maksuti, Elira; Bjällmark, Anna; Broomé, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and clinical studies have proven that the heart pumps by means of minor outer volume changes and back-and-forth longitudinal movements in the atrioventricular (AV) region. The magnitude of AV-plane displacement has also shown to be a reliable index for diagnosis of heart failure. Despite this, AV-plane displacement is usually omitted from cardiovascular modelling. We present a lumped-parameter cardiac model in which the heart is described as a displacement pump with the AV plane functioning as a piston unit (AV piston). This unit is constructed of different upper and lower areas analogous with the difference in the atrial and ventricular cross-sections. The model output reproduces normal physiology, with a left ventricular pressure in the range of 8-130 mmHg, an atrial pressure of approximatly 9 mmHg, and an arterial pressure change between 75 mmHg and 130 mmHg. In addition, the model reproduces the direction of the main systolic and diastolic movements of the AV piston with realistic velocity magnitude (∼10 cm/s). Moreover, changes in the simulated systolic ventricular-contraction force influence diastolic filling, emphasizing the coupling between cardiac systolic and diastolic functions. The agreement between the simulation and normal physiology highlights the importance of myocardial longitudinal movements and of atrioventricular interactions in cardiac pumping.

  8. Piston diaphragm pumps: An economic and reliable tool for slurry pipeline transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Broek, B. van den

    1998-07-01

    Slurry transportation systems by means of pumps and pipelines has been in use now for over 100 years. Hydraulic transportation of slurries is defined as a two-phase transportation of a mixture of a fluid carrier and solids, mainly in enclosed pipelines. In the mid fifties, slurry transportation techniques became more sophisticated, resulting in the design and operation of long distance pipelines for raw materials, such as coal, copper concentrate, iron concentrate, kaolin and phosphate. Nowadays, slurry transportation through pipelines has become a generally accepted means of solids transportation. A major contribution to its acceptance was the development of reliable and efficient high pressure positive displacement piston diaphragm slurry pumps. This paper will deal with the latest development in this field, namely, the high pressure GEHO piston diaphragm pump. In order to create more understanding for the possible applications and use of such piston diaphragm pumps in relation to minerals and waste transportation through pipelines, a number of typical examples will be discussed.

  9. Modeling and performance improvement of the constant power regulator systems in variable displacement axial piston pump.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    An irregular performance of a mechanical-type constant power regulator is considered. In order to find the cause of an irregular discharge flow at the cut-off pressure area, modeling and numerical simulations are performed to observe dynamic behavior of internal parts of the constant power regulator system for a swashplate-type axial piston pump. The commercial numerical simulation software AMESim is applied to model the mechanical-type regulator with hydraulic pump and simulate the performance of it. The validity of the simulation model of the constant power regulator system is verified by comparing simulation results with experiments. In order to find the cause of the irregular performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator system, the behavior of main components such as the spool, sleeve, and counterbalance piston is investigated using computer simulation. The shape modification of the counterbalance piston is proposed to improve the undesirable performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator. The performance improvement is verified by computer simulation using AMESim software.

  10. The properties of an improvised piston pump for the rapid delivery of intravenous fluids.

    PubMed

    Smart, C M; Primrose, C W; Peters, A L; Speirits, E J

    2014-02-01

    To maximise the effect of a small fluid load, it is occasionally desirable to bolus manually with multiple depressions of a large-capacity syringe. This is usually achieved by placing the syringe on the side port of a three-way tap. We modified this technique by placing two-one-way valves in line with the three-way tap, effectively creating a piston pump, the infusion rates via which we compared with those achieved by an inflatable pressure-infuser in a simulated resuscitation. Fluid flow was faster using the piston pump than with the pressure-infuser (mean (SD) time to infuse 2000 ml saline 0.9% via a 16-G cannula 352 (10) s vs 495 (19) s, respectively, p < 0.0001). The piston pump appears to have potential for both tight control of fluid delivery and major high-volume resuscitation. The lightweight nature of the pump and its lack of reliance on gravity may also make it suitable for the pre-hospital setting.

  11. Drainage mechanisms in porous media: From piston-like invasion to formation of corner flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogland, Frouke; Lehmann, Peter; Mokso, Rajmund; Or, Dani

    2016-11-01

    Water drainage from porous media is a highly dynamic process often marked by rapid piston-like air invasion events at the front and other rapid interfacial reconfigurations. Liquid phase entrapped behind the moving front drains at significantly slower rates often via gravity driven flow through corners and crevices. This distribution of slowly draining residual water phase determines the plant available water and biological functioning of soils. The study aims to determine the conditions for the flow regime transition from piston-like invasion at a drainage front to slower corner dominated flow at the pore and sample scale. This transition was observed experimentally for sand and glass beads with fast X-ray tomography, revealing water fragmentation into clusters of full pores interconnected by water corner films. The observed liquid morphology at the transition from piston to corner flow was reproduced by a quasi-static pore network model and predicted by percolation theory. The amount of capillary-retained water at flow transition controlling the subsequent drainage dynamics could be reproduced by an idealized star shaped pore whose geometry is deduced from macroscopic properties of the porous medium. Predictions of water content thresholds at flow transitions were in agreement with other critical saturation values associated with cessation of solute diffusion and of internal drainage (at field capacity) highlighting the criticality of water phase continuity disruption for formation of relatively stable unsaturated conditions controlled by slow corner flow that support life in soil.

  12. Sensitivity to differential piston and to adaptive optics errors with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Hill, John; Hinz, Philip

    2016-08-01

    On-sky adaptive optics wavefront screens have been used and random optical path fluctuations - differential pistons - have been included in numerical simulations for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. We characterize the Point Spread Function (PSF) and the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) by computing respectively the interferometric Strehl and the visibility criteria. We study the contribution of the wavefront disturbance induced by each adaptive optics system and by the optical path difference between the arms of the LBTI. To provide an image of quality (Strehl above 70%) suitable with standard science cases , the requirements for a LBTI mode in the visible wavelengths (750nm) must be at least an adaptive optics wavefront RMS fluctuations below λ/18≍40nm (Strehl above 90%) provided by each adaptive optics system, and a differential piston RMS fluctuations below λ/8≍100nm in the overall LBTI system. The adaptive optics wavefront errors - mainly the differential tip-tilt - appear to be more critical than the differential piston.

  13. The Development of a Control System for a 5 Kilowatt Free Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Raymond L.; Vitale, N.

    2008-01-21

    The new NASA Vision for Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, proposes an ambitious program that plans to return astronauts to the moon by the 2018 time frame. A recent NASA study entitled 'Affordable Fission Surface Power Study' recommended a 40 kWe, 900 K, NaK-cooled, Stirling conversion for 2020 launch. Use of two of the nominal 5 kW converters allows the system to be dynamically balanced. A group of four dual-converter combinations that would yield 40 kWe can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems. The work described in this paper deals specifically with the control system for the 5 kW convertor described in the preceding paragraph. This control system is responsible for maintaining piston stroke to a setpoint in the presence of various disturbances including electrical load variations. Pulse starting of the FSPE convertor is also an inherent part of such a control system. Finally, the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power is discussed in terms of setpoint control. Several novel ideas have been incorporated into the piston stroke control strategy that will engender a stable response to disturbances in the presence of midpoint drift while providing useful data regarding the position of both the power piston and displacer.

  14. The Development of a Control System for a 5 Kilowatt Free Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Raymond L.; Vitale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The new NASA Vision for Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, proposes an ambitious program that plans to return astronauts to the moon by the 2018 time frame. A recent NASA study entitled "Affordable Fission Surface Power Study" recommended a 40 kWe, 900 K, NaK-cooled, Stirling conversion for 2020 launch. Use of two of the nominal 5 kW converters allows the system to be dynamically balanced. A group of four dual-converter combinations that would yield 40 kWe can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems. The work described in this paper deals specifically with the control system for the 5 kW convertor described in the preceding paragraph. This control system is responsible for maintaining piston stroke to a setpoint in the presence of various disturbances including electrical load variations. Pulse starting of the FSPE convertor is also an inherent part of such a control system. Finally, the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power is discussed in terms of setpoint control. Several novel ideas have been incorporated into the piston stroke control strategy that will engender a stable response to disturbances in the presence of midpoint drift while providing useful data regarding the position of both the power piston and displacer.

  15. Assessment of the Free-piston Stirling Convertor as a Long Life Power Convertor for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2001-01-01

    There is currently a renewed interest in the use of free-piston Stirling power convertors for space power applications. More specifically, the Stirling convertor is being developed to be part of the Stirling Radioisotope Power System to supply electric power to spacecraft for NASA deep space science missions. The current development effort involves the Department of Energy, Germantown, MD, the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH, and the Stirling Technology Company, Kennewick, WA. The Stirling convertor will absorb heat supplied from the decay of plutonium dioxide contained in the General Purpose Heat Source modules and convert it into electricity to power the spacecraft. For many years the "potentials" of the free-piston Stirling convertor have been publicized by it's developers. Among these "potentials" were long life and high reliability. This paper will present an overview of the critical areas that enable long life of the free-piston Stirling power convertor, and present some of the techniques that have been used when long life has been achieved.

  16. Study on a high capacity two-stage free piston Stirling cryocooler working around 30 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Zhu, Jian; Chen, Shuai; Dai, Wei; Li, Ke; Pang, Xiaomin; Yu, Guoyao; Luo, Ercang

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a two-stage high-capacity free-piston Stirling cryocooler driven by a linear compressor to meet the requirement of the high temperature superconductor (HTS) motor applications. The cryocooler system comprises a single piston linear compressor, a two-stage free piston Stirling cryocooler and a passive oscillator. A single stepped displacer configuration was adopted. A numerical model based on the thermoacoustic theory was used to optimize the system operating and structure parameters. Distributions of pressure wave, phase differences between the pressure wave and the volume flow rate and different energy flows are presented for a better understanding of the system. Some characterizing experimental results are presented. Thus far, the cryocooler has reached a lowest cold-head temperature of 27.6 K and achieved a cooling power of 78 W at 40 K with an input electric power of 3.2 kW, which indicates a relative Carnot efficiency of 14.8%. When the cold-head temperature increased to 77 K, the cooling power reached 284 W with a relative Carnot efficiency of 25.9%. The influences of different parameters such as mean pressure, input electric power and cold-head temperature are also investigated.

  17. Design and control of a fast tool servo used in noncircular piston turning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng; Yang, Shuyan

    2013-03-01

    Noncircular pistons are becoming more and more popular in the automotive industry. The challenge of machining this kind of pistons (e.g., middle-convex and varying ellipse piston (MCVEP)), lies in the rigorous demand of the cutting feed mechanism for large force generation, high stiffness, fast response, long stroke and high accuracy. The conventional processing methods cannot meet the challenge so a new piezoelectric actuator (PEA) based fast tool servo (FTS) mechanism was developed to incorporate additional functions to a general CNC system that will facilitate the execution of MCVEP turning. Since the desired tool trajectories are approximately periodic signals in MCVEP turning, and the repetitive control can achieve asymptotic tracking and disturbance rejection of periodic signals, a plug-in repetitive control is designed to be added on the conventional PID controller. In the experiments, the designed prototype was used to machine a MCVEP for the gasoline engine, which was equipped with the PEA-based FTS system, as well as the plug-in repetitive controller. The machining test validated the effective of the designed noncircular turning system.

  18. Overview of Multi-Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Research at GRC

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Steven M.; Mason, Lee S.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, L. Barry

    2008-01-21

    As a step towards development of Stirling power conversion for potential use in Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems, a pair of commercially available 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors and a pair of commercially available pressure wave generators (which will be plumbed together to create a high power Stirling linear alternator test rig) have been procured for in-house testing at Glenn Research Center. Delivery of both the Stirling convertors and the linear alternator test rig is expected by October, 2007. The 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors will be tested at GRC to map and verify performance. The convertors will later be modified to operate with a NaK liquid metal pumped loop for thermal energy input. The high power linear alternator test rig will be used to map and verify high power Stirling linear alternator performance and to develop power management and distribution (PMAD) methods and techniques. This paper provides an overview of the multi-kilowatt free-piston Stirling power conversion work being performed at GRC.

  19. Free-piston Stirling engine system considerations for various space power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochat, George R.; Dhar, Manmohan

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Government is evaluating power requirements for future space applications. As power requirements increase solar or nuclear dynamic systems become increasingly attractive. Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE) have the potential to provide high reliability, long life, and efficient operation. Therefore, they are excellent candidates for the dynamic power conversion module of a space-based, power-generating system. FPSE can be coupled with many potential heat sources (radioisotope, solar, or nuclear reactor), various heat input systems (pumped loop, heat pipe), heat rejection (pumped loop or heat pipe), and various power management and distribution systems (AC, DC, high or low voltage, and fixed or variable load). This paper will review potential space missions that can be met using free-piston Stirling engines and discusses options of various system integration approaches. Currently free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power applications is being developed under contract with NASA-Lewis Research Center. This paper will also briefly outline the program and recent progress.

  20. Flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a quasi-one-dimensional channel under the action of a piston

    SciTech Connect

    Kamchatnov, A. M.; Korneev, S. V.

    2010-01-15

    The problem of the flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a channel under the action of a piston is considered. Problems of this kind are topical in connection with experiments on condensate flow control in quasi-one-dimensional (cigar-shaped) traps, in wh ich the repulsive potential produced by a laser beam focused across the trap acts as a piston. A dispersive shock wave characterized by rapid oscillations of the condensate density and flow velocity is shown to be formed in the condensate flow after some instant of time for an arbitrary law of piston motion. The Whitham averaging method is used to obtain a solution for the main parameters of the dispersive shock wave in the case of a uniformly accelerated piston motion. The evolution of the dispersive shock wave immediately after the breaking time, when the dispersionless solution is well approximated by a cubic parabola for the coordinate dependence of the density, is analyzed in the case of an arbitrary piston motion. Comparison shows good agreement of the numerical calculation with the approximate analytical theory. The developed theory complements the previously considered case of a piston moving with a constant velocity and is important for describing the condensate transport in atomic chips.

  1. Influence of sliding surface roughness and oil temperature on piston ring pack operation of an automotive IC engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper a comprehensive model of a piston ring pack motion on an oil film has been presented. The local oil film thickness can be compared to height of the combined roughness of sliding surfaces of piston rings and cylinder liner. Equations describing the mixed lubrication problem based on the empirical mathematical model formulated in works of Patir, Cheng and Greenwood, Tripp have been combined and used in this paper. The developed model takes the following phenomena into account: hydrodynamic and contact forces, spring and gas forces acting on piston rings. The rings motion concerning low and high temperature of cylinder surface has been compared. These results concern cases of hydrodynamic and mixed lubrication. Changes of oil wetted area and contact zone of piston rings have been shown. In addition the oil film thickness distribution along cylinder liner and all the forces acting on piston rings have been analysed and discussed. The results have been presented in form of relevant diagrams. The developed model and software can be utilized for optimization of piston rings design.

  2. Simultaneous piston position and tilt angle sensing for large vertical displacement micromirrors by frequency detection inductive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, V. F.-G.; Xie, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a frequency detection based inductive eddy current sensing mechanism to simultaneously sense the piston position and tilt angle of the mirror plate of large vertical displacement micromirrors that exhibit piston scan ranges above 100 μm. This is accomplished by sensing the inductance change, and thus resonant frequency shift, of two microfabricated sensing coils packaged underneath the mirror plate. For demonstration purpose, the coils were paired with discrete circuit components to oscillate at 11.9 MHz and 12.5 MHz, respectively. The piston position and tilt angle of the mirror plate could be simultaneously monitored over a 500 μm piston scan range, achieving a maximum piston sensitivity of 4.15 kHz/μm with a piston sensing resolution of 96 nm and a maximum tilt angle sensitivity of 60.5 kHz/° with a tilt angle sensing resolution of 0.0013°. Analytical modeling of the coil inductance change via image theory was also conducted, showing that the sensor sensitivity and resolution could be improved by increasing the coil oscillation frequency and decreasing the coil size.

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Spring-Supported Piston in a Vibrated Liquid-Filled Housing: II. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hern, T. J.; Torczynski, J. R.; Clausen, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a piston supported by a spring in a vibrated liquid-filled housing is investigated experimentally. The housing containing the piston and the liquid is subjected to vibrations along its axis. A post fixed to the housing penetrates a hole through the piston and produces a flow resistance that depends on piston position. Flexible bellows attached to the housing ends enable the piston, liquid, and bellows to execute a collective motion that forces little liquid through the flow resistance. The low damping of this motion leads to a resonance, at which the flow-resistance nonlinearity produces a net force on the piston that can cause it to compress its spring. Experiments are performed to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of this system, and these results are compared to theoretical and numerical results. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Seismic Source Mechanism of Gas-Piston Activity at Kilauea Inferred from Inversion of Broadband Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B. A.; Dawson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the Overlook pit crater in Kilauea Caldera are recurring episodes of gas-piston activity. This activity is accompanied by repetitive seismic signals recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use the seismic data to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20-25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kilauea summit. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range of 1 - 10,000 s. Most of the seismic wave field produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ~1 km below the eastern perimeter of Halema'uma'u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east-striking crack (dike) dipping 80° to the north, intersecting a north-striking crack (inclined sheet) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is characterized by a rapid inflation lasting a few minutes trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 minutes, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the magma column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter representation of the shallow magmatic system, the observed pressure and volume variations can be modeled with the following attributes: foam thickness (10 - 50 m), foam cell diameter (0.04 - 0.10 m), and gas-injection velocity (0.01 - 0.06 m s-1). Based on the change in the period of very-long-period oscillations accompanying the onset of the gas-piston signal and tilt evidence, the height of

  5. A wireline piston core barrel for sampling cohesionless sand and gravel below the water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zapico, Michael M.; Vales, Samuel; Cherry, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A coring device has been developed to obtain long and minimally disturbed samples of saturated cohesionless sand and gravel. The coring device, which includes a wireline and piston, was developed specifically for use during hollow-stem auger drilling but it also offers possibilities for cable tool and rotary drilling. The core barrel consists of an inner liner made of inexpensive aluminum or plastic tubing, a piston for core recovery, and an exterior steel housing that protects the liner when the core barrel is driven into the aquifer. The core barrel, which is approximately 1.6m (5.6 feet) long, is advanced ahead of the lead auger by hammering at the surface on drill rods that are attached to the core barrel. After the sampler has been driven 1.5m (5 feet), the drill rods are detached and a wireline is used to hoist the core barrel, with the sample contained in the aluminum or plastic liner, to the surface. A vacuum developed by the piston during the coring operation provides good recovery of both the sediment and aquifer fluids contained in the sediment. In the field the sample tubes can be easily split along their length for on-site inspection or they can be capped with the pore water fluids inside and transported to the laboratory. The cores are 5cm (2 inches) in diameter by 1.5m (5 feet) long. Core acquisition to depths of 35m (115 feet), with a recovery greater than 90 percent, has become routine in University of Waterloo aquifer studies. A large diameter (12.7cm [5 inch]) version has also been used successfully. Nearly continuous sample sequences from sand and gravel aquifers have been obtained for studies of sedimentology, hydraulic conductivity, hydrogeochemistry and microbiology.

  6. Overview of the 1986 free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities include a free-piston Stirling space-power technology feasibility demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power Stirling advanced technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including test results. Future space-power projections are presented along with a description of a study that will investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power module to the 150 kW power range. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. A description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept will be presented whereby the displacer of a 1 kWe free-piston Stirling engine is modified to demonstrate the bearing concept. And finally the goals of a conceptual design for a 25 kWe Solar Advanced Stirling Conversion System capable of delivering electric power to an electric utility grid will be discussed. The solar work is under an interagency agreement between DOE/Sandia National Laboratory and NASA Lewis.

  7. Overview of the 1986 free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities include a free-piston Stirling space-power technology feasibility demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power Stirling advanced technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including test results. Future space-power projections are presented along with a description of a study that will investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power module to the 150 kW power range. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. A description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept is presented whereby the displacer of a 1 kWe free-piston Stirling engine is modified to demonstrate the bearing concept. And finally the goals of a conceptual design for a 25 kWe Solar Advanced Stirling Conversion System capable of delivering electric power to an electric utility grid are discussed.

  8. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Spring-Supported Piston in a Vibrated Liquid-Filled Housing: I. Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torczynski, J. R.; O'Hern, T. J.; Clausen, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a piston supported by a spring in a vibrated liquid-filled housing is analyzed. The liquid is viscous, and the flow passages are narrow and depend on piston position. Ordinarily, the piston motion is highly damped. However, if bellows are added to both ends of the housing, then the piston, liquid, and bellows can execute a collective motion that forces relatively little liquid through the flow passages and thus has low damping and a strong resonance. At this frequency, the motion is large, and the nonlinearity from the flow passages produces a net force on the piston that can cause it to compress its spring. This nonlinear dynamical system is analyzed using a perturbation expansion of the Navier-Stokes equations, and the perturbation results are compared to corresponding ALE Navier-Stokes simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Magnetic piston model for higher ion charge and different electron and ion plasma temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatu, I. N.

    2013-05-15

    A new formula for the magnetic piston model, which explicitly describes how the momentum imparted to the ions by the magnetic pressure depends not only on the ion mass but also on the ion charge, as well as, on the plasma electron and ion temperatures, is derived following Rosenbluth's classical particle-field self-consistent plane approximation analytic calculation. The formula presented in this paper has implications in explaining the experimentally observed separation of the ions of different species and charges by the magnetic field penetrating the plasma and specularly reflecting them.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of UF sub 6 measured with a ballistic piston compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, D. E.; Lalos, G. T.; Schneider, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    From experiments performed with a ballistic piston compressor, certain thermodynamic properties of uranium hexafluoride were investigated. Difficulties presented by the nonideal processes encountered in ballistic compressors are discussed and a computer code BCCC (Ballistic Compressor Computer Code) is developed to analyze the experimental data. The BCCC unfolds the thermodynamic properties of uranium hexafluoride from the helium-uranium hexafluoride mixture used as the test gas in the ballistic compressor. The thermodynamic properties deduced include the specific heat at constant volume, the ratio of specific heats for UF6, and the viscous coupling constant of helium-uranium hexafluoride mixtures.

  11. Electromagnetic unit fuel injector with piston assist solenoid actuated control valve

    SciTech Connect

    Teerman, R. F.; Bosch, R. H.; Wirth, R. C.

    1985-11-05

    An electromagnetic unit fuel injector includes a pump assembly having an external actuated plunger reciprocable in a bushing with flow therefrom during a pump stroke being directed to a fuel injection nozzle of the assembly. Fuel flow from the pump can also flow through a passage means, containing a normally open, substantially pressure-balanced control valve actuated by a solenoid assembly in the valve closing direction to block drain flow during a pump stroke, as desired. A piston, actuated by discharge fuel pressure is operatively connected to the control valve to assist the solenoid in holding the control valve in a closed position.

  12. Tribological experiences of an axial piston pump and motor manufacturer with todays available biodegradable fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, K.H.; Wills, D.K.

    1997-12-31

    Since the late 1970`s, biodegradable fluids have been used in hydrostatics with limited success. Performance has not matched expectations during extensive field testing. For example, fluids reported as having excellent lubricating properties, by bench and field testing, produced excessive wear. Design modifications successfully resolved some of these problems, but wear problems with sealing and bearing surfaces still exist, suggesting that fluid properties may need to be modified. New test procedures measuring wear, e.g., may need to be developed as well because of the correlation problem between reported fluid properties and axial piston pump performance like good lubricity resulted in excessive wear.

  13. Summary of the general aviation manufacturers' position on aircraft piston engine emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The General Aviation Manufacturers recommended that the EPA rescind the aircraft piston engine emissions regulations currently on the books. The reason was the very small emission reduction potential and the very poor benefit-cost ratio involved in this form of emission reduction. The limited resources of this industry can far better be devoted to items of much greater benefit to the citizens of this country - reducing noise, improving fuel efficiency (which will incidently reduce exhaust emissions), and improving the safety, operational, and economic aspects of aircraft, all far greater contributions to our total national transportation system.

  14. Development of a linear piston-type pulse power electric generator for powering electric guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The development of a linear piston-type electric pulse-power generator capable of powering electric guns and EM (rail and coil) guns and ET guns, presently under development, is discussed. The pulse-power generator consists of a cylindrical armature pushed by gases from the combustion of fuel or propellant through an externally produced magnetic field. An arrangement of electrodes and connecting straps serves to extract current from the moving armature and to send it to an external load (the electric gun).

  15. Nitrided-steel Piston Rings for Engines of High Specific Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1944-04-01

    cooperation with the Borg-Vfamer Corporation , Spring Division, Bollwood, 111. The nitrided-steel piston rings were performanco-tested In single-cylinder...engines rjider duot lnjeation have :<eon reported by the V ight Aeronautical Corpor - ation, Thoao t03ta showed that the nltrlded-steol rir^;o are...ARB No. Ho. 4D82 Fig. 6 f .’ -»» 200 400 600 800 Temperatura •°F 1000 Figure 6.- Effect of plston-rlng temperature on diametral

  16. Hypervelocity flows of argon produced in a free piston driven expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure, and flat plate heat transfer rates are used to confirm the presence of quasi-steady flow, and comparisons are made with predictions for the equilibrium flow of an ideal, ionizing, monatomic gas. The results of this work indicate that expansion tubes can be used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon at speeds in excess of Earth orbital velocity.

  17. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, Peter W.; Rao, Dantam K.; Wilson, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a design and analysis study performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061. The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in long-term space missions. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) system consisting of two 25-kWe free-piston Stirling engine modules. Two different versions of the RSSPC engine modules have been defined under NASA Contract NAS3-25463. These modules currently use hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Results of this study show that active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are technically feasible for RSSPC application provided that wire insulation with 60,000-hr life capability at 300 C can be developed for the bearing coils. From a design integration standpoint, both versions of the RSSPC were found to be conceptually amenable to magnetic support of the power piston assembly. However, only one version of the RSSPC was found to be amendable to magnetic support of the displacer assembly. Unacceptable changes to the basic engine design would be required to incorporate magnetic displacer bearings into the second version. Complete magnetic suspension of the RSSPC can potentially increase overall efficiency of the Stirling cycle power converter by 0.53 to 1.4 percent (0.15 to 0.4 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. However, these advantages are accompanied by a 5 to 8 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC, depending on the RSSPC version employed. Additionally, magnetic bearings are much more complex, both mechanically and particularly electronically, than hydrostatic bearings. Accordingly, long

  18. Analysis of oil consumption in cylinder of diesel engine for optimization of piston rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Zhang, Guichang; He, Zhenpeng; Lin, Jiewei; Liu, Hai

    2013-01-01

    The performance and particulate emission of a diesel engine are affected by the consumption of lubricating oil. Most studies on oil consumption mechanism of the cylinder have been done by using the experimental method, however they are very costly. Therefore, it is very necessary to study oil consumption mechanism of the cylinder and obtain the accurate results by the calculation method. Firstly, four main modes of lubricating oil consumption in cylinder are analyzed and then the oil consumption rate under common working conditions are calculated for the four modes based on an engine. Then, the factors that affect the lubricating oil consumption such as working conditions, the second ring closed gap, the elastic force of the piston rings are also investigated for the four modes. The calculation results show that most of the lubricating oil is consumed by evaporation on the liner surface. Besides, there are three other findings: (1) The oil evaporation from the liner is determined by the working condition of an engine; (2) The increase of the ring closed gap reduces the oil blow through the top ring end gap but increases blow-by; (3) With the increase of the elastic force of the ring, both the left oil film thickness and the oil throw-off at the top ring decrease. The oil scraping of the piston top edge is consequently reduced while the friction loss between the rings and the liner increases. A neural network prediction model of the lubricating oil consumption in cylinder is established based on the BP neural network theory, and then the model is trained and validated. The main piston rings parameters which affect the oil consumption are optimized by using the BP neural network prediction model and the prediction accuracy of this BP neural network is within 8%, which is acceptable for normal engineering applications. The oil consumption is also measured experimentally. The relative errors of the calculated and experimental values are less than 10%, verifying the

  19. Input/output models for general aviation piston-prop aircraft fuel economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplane was tested. The following equations were made: (1) for the standard atmosphere; (2) airframe-propeller-atmosphere cruise performance; and (3) naturally aspirated engine cruise performance. Adjustments are made to the compact cruise performance model as follows: corrected quantities, corrected performance plots, algebraic equations, maximize R with or without constraints, and appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation. The following hardwares are recommended: ignition timing regulator, fuel-air mass ration controller, microprocessor, sensors and displays.

  20. Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Peng; Vander Wal, Randy; Boehman, Andre L.; Toops, Todd J.; Daw, C. Stuart; Sun, Chenxi; Lapuerta, Magin; Agudelo, John

    2014-12-26

    The effect of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the morphology of exhaust particulate agglomerates and the nanostructure of primary particles (soot) was investigated with a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The engine was operated at steady state on a dynamometer running at moderate speed with both low (30%) and medium–high (60%) fixed loads, and exhaust particulate was sampled for analysis. Ultra-low sulfur diesel and its 20% v/v blends with soybean methyl ester biodiesel were used. Fuel injection occurred in a single event around top dead center at three different injection pressures. Exhaust particulate samples were characterized with TEM imaging, scanning mobility particle sizing, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and XRD analysis. Particulate morphology and oxidative reactivity were found to vary significantly with rail pressure and with biodiesel blend level. Higher biodiesel content led to increases in the primary particle size and oxidative reactivity but did not affect nanoscale disorder in the as-received samples. For particulates generated with higher injection pressures, the initial oxidative reactivity increased, but there was no detectable correlation with primary particle size or nanoscale disorder.

  1. Impact of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the particulate morphology and soot nanostructures from a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Peng; Vander Wal, Randy; Boehman, Andre L.; ...

    2014-12-26

    The effect of rail pressure and biodiesel fueling on the morphology of exhaust particulate agglomerates and the nanostructure of primary particles (soot) was investigated with a common-rail turbocharged direct injection diesel engine. The engine was operated at steady state on a dynamometer running at moderate speed with both low (30%) and medium–high (60%) fixed loads, and exhaust particulate was sampled for analysis. Ultra-low sulfur diesel and its 20% v/v blends with soybean methyl ester biodiesel were used. Fuel injection occurred in a single event around top dead center at three different injection pressures. Exhaust particulate samples were characterized with TEMmore » imaging, scanning mobility particle sizing, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and XRD analysis. Particulate morphology and oxidative reactivity were found to vary significantly with rail pressure and with biodiesel blend level. Higher biodiesel content led to increases in the primary particle size and oxidative reactivity but did not affect nanoscale disorder in the as-received samples. For particulates generated with higher injection pressures, the initial oxidative reactivity increased, but there was no detectable correlation with primary particle size or nanoscale disorder.« less

  2. Lower-end dynamic characteristics of a magnetically coupled free-piston Stirling engine/compressor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; McEntee, J.

    In a prototype, the engine power piston is connected to the compressor piston through a magnetic coupling; a linear starter is used to start the system and a variable-stiffness gas spring is used to resonate the system lower-end over the operating frequency range of the system. System characteristics of the lower end coupled through the coupling to the engine, and considerations of the engine response, are investigated analytically with a simplified model. The system analysis is also used to obtain an understanding of the free-piston Stirling engine/magnetic coupling/compressor assembly dynamic behavior for variations in engine power and lower-end resonance. In order for the machine to operate without excessively large forces transmitted through the magnetic coupling, the analysis indicates that both the engine and the compressor section should be independently resonant to keep the engine and the lower-end oscillating amplitude identical.

  3. Reduction of the uncertainty of the PTB vacuum pressure scale by a new large area non-rotating piston gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Th; Ahrendt, H.; Jousten, K.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the metrological characterization of a new large area piston gauge (FRS5, Furness Rosenberg Standard) installed at the vacuum metrology laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The operational procedure and the uncertainty budget for pressures between 30 Pa and 11 kPa are given. Comparisons between the FRS5 and a mercury manometer, a rotary piston gauge and a force-balanced piston gauge are described. We show that the reproducibility of the calibration values of capacitance diaphragm gauges is enhanced by a factor of 6 compared with a static expansion primary standard (SE2). Improvements of the SE2 performance by reducing the number of expansions and smaller uncertainties of expansion ratios are discussed.

  4. Time-resolved nature of exhaust gas emissions and piston wall temperature under transient operation in a small diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Reksowardojo, I.K.; Ogawa, Hideyuki; Miyamoto, Noboru; Enomoto, Yoshiteru; Kitamura, Toru

    1996-09-01

    Diesel combustion and exhaust gas emissions under transient operation (when fuel amounts abruptly increased) were investigated under a wide range of operating conditions with a newly developed gas sampling system. The relation between gas emissions and piston wall temperatures was also investigated. The results indicated that after the start of acceleration NOx, THC and smoke showed transient behaviors before reaching the steady state condition. Of the three gases, THC was most affected by piston wall temperature; its concentration decreased as the wall temperature increased throughout the acceleration except immediately after the start of acceleration. The number of cycles, at which gas concentrations reach the steady-state value after the start of acceleration, were about 1.2 times the cycle constant of the piston wall temperature for THC, and 2.3 times for smoke.

  5. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine will be discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept will be presented.

  6. Free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine and drive system for automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Slaby, J. G.; Nussle, R. C.; Miao, D.

    1982-01-01

    The calculated fuel economy for an automotive free piston Stirling hydraulic engine and drive system using a pneumatic accumulator with the fuel economy of both a conventional 1980 spark ignition engine in an X body class vehicle and the estimated fuel economy of a 1984 spark ignition vehicle system are compared. The results show that the free piston Stirling hydraulic system with a two speed transmission has a combined fuel economy nearly twice that of the 1980 spark ignition engine - 21.5 versus 10.9 km/liter (50.7 versus 25.6 mpg) under comparable conditions. The fuel economy improvement over the 1984 spark ignition engine was 81 percent. The fuel economy sensitivity of the Stirling hydraulic system to system weight, number of transmission shifts, accumulator pressure ratio and maximum pressure, auxiliary power requirements, braking energy recovery, and varying vehicle performance requirements are considered. An important finding is that a multispeed transmission is not required. The penalty for a single speed versus a two speed transmission is about a 12 percent drop in combined fuel economy to 19.0 km/liter (44.7 mpg). This is still a 60 percent improvement in combined fuel economy over the projected 1984 spark ignition vehicle.

  7. Design and testing of polysilicon surface-micromachined piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.; Lee, Max K.; Comtois, John H.; Michalicek, M. Adrian

    1998-04-01

    THis paper presents optical testing of polysilicon surface micromachined piston micromirror arrays. Similar piston micromirror arrays were fabricated using two different commercially available surface micromachining foundry processes: the DARPA supported multi-user MEMS processes (MUMPs), and Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT). All test arrays employ square reflecting elements in an 8 X 8 element 203 micrometers square grid. Fabrication constraints limit the MUMPs designs to fill-factors of less than 80 percent. The chemical mechanical polishing planarization step integral to the SUMMiT process allows an as-drawn fill-factor of 95 percent to be easily achieved. MUMPs designs employ both the standard gold metallization and maskless sputtered chromium/gold post-process metallization, while post process metallization is the only option for the SUMMiT design. Testing of the micromirror arrays focuses on microscope interferometer characterization of mirror topography, and measurement of the far field diffraction pattern for each. The measured results show that control of the individual micromirror element surface topography is more important for imaging applications than maximizing the as-drawn fill-factor.

  8. Start-up and control method and apparatus for resonant free piston Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    A resonant free-piston Stirling engine having a new and improved start-up and control method and system. A displacer linear electrodynamic machine is provided having an armature secured to and movable with the displacer and having a stator supported by the Stirling engine housing in juxtaposition to the armature. A control excitation circuit is provided for electrically exciting the displacer linear electrodynamic machine with electrical excitation signals having substantially the same frequency as the desired frequency of operation of the Stirling engine. The excitation control circuit is designed so that it selectively and controllably causes the displacer electrodynamic machine to function either as a generator load to extract power from the displacer or the control circuit selectively can be operated to cause the displacer electrodynamic machine to operate as an electric drive motor to apply additional input power to the displacer in addition to the thermodynamic power feedback to the displacer whereby the displacer linear electrodynamic machine also is used in the electric drive motor mode as a means for initially starting the resonant free-piston Stirling engine.

  9. A numerical model on thermodynamic analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Jian; Hong, Guotong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a new numerical thermodynamic model which bases on the energy conservation law has been used to analyze the free piston Stirling engine. In the model all data was taken from a real free piston Stirling engine which has been built in our laboratory. The energy conservation equations have been applied to expansion space and compression space of the engine. The equation includes internal energy, input power, output power, enthalpy and the heat losses. The heat losses include regenerative heat conduction loss, shuttle heat loss, seal leakage loss and the cavity wall heat conduction loss. The numerical results show that the temperature of expansion space and the temperature of compression space vary with the time. The higher regeneration effectiveness, the higher efficiency and bigger output work. It is also found that under different initial pressures, the heat source temperature, phase angle and engine work frequency pose different effects on the engine’s efficiency and power. As a result, the model is expected to be a useful tool for simulation, design and optimization of Stirling engines.

  10. Multi-objective optimization and design for free piston Stirling engines based on the dimensionless power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Jian; Hong, Guotong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the dimensionless power is used to optimize the free piston Stirling engines (FPSE). The dimensionless power is defined as a ratio of the heat power loss and the output work. The heat power losses include the losses of expansion space, heater, regenerator, cooler and the compression space and every kind of the heat loss calculated by empirical formula. The output work is calculated by the adiabatic model. The results show that 82.66% of the losses come from the expansion space and 54.59% heat losses of expansion space come from the shuttle loss. At different pressure the optimum bore-stroke ratio, heat source temperature, phase angle and the frequency have different values, the optimum phase angles increase with the increase of pressure, but optimum frequencies drop with the increase of pressure. However, no matter what the heat source temperature, initial pressure and frequency are, the optimum ratios of piston stroke and displacer stroke all about 0.8. The three-dimensional diagram is used to analyse Stirling engine. From the three-dimensional diagram the optimum phase angle, frequency and heat source temperature can be acquired at the same time. This study offers some guides for the design and optimization of FPSEs.

  11. Investigation on a free piston stirling cryocooler with large cooling capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, G. Y.; Li, K.; Dai, W.; Luo, E. C.; Wu, Z. H.

    2014-01-01

    Cryocoolers with large cooling powers at 80 K are very promising as they could find important applications in superconducting field such as cooling cables, transformers and fault current limiters. The pulse tube cryocooler has attracted attention due to its virtue of no moving components in the cold region. However, as the cooling power increases, problems inside the thermal buffer tube, such as difficulty in obtaining good flow straightening, existence of Rayleigh streaming, the gravity effect etc., present big obstacles to achieving high thermal efficiency. On the other hand, a free piston Stirling cryocooler, though more complicated due to the existence of the displacer, could avoid these problems with the elimination of the thermal buffer tube. Meanwhile, the efficiency is better than the pulse tube cryocooler around 80 K due to its capability of recovering the acoustic work. In this article, a free piston Stirling cryocooler with about 300 W cooling power at 80 K is designed with our simulation based on thermoacoustic theory. The theoretical analysis and numeric model are given in detail. The phase shift effect of the displacer and the internal energy loss mechanism are discussed. From our calculation, a relative Carnot efficiency of about 50% at 80 K has been obtained analytically.

  12. Progress in Developing a New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Convertor

    SciTech Connect

    Brandhorst, Henry W. Jr.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.

    2008-01-21

    The NASA Vision for Exploration of the Moon envisions a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. In the 1990s, Mechanical Technology, Inc.'s Stirling Engine Systems Division (now a part of Foster-Miller, Inc.) developed a 25 kWe free piston Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA and DoE have been developing dual 55 We and 80 We Stirling convertor systems for use with radioisotope heat sources. Total test times of all convertors in this effort exceed 120,000 hours. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in the Lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Auburn University awarded a subcontract to Foster-Miller, Inc. to undertake development of the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  13. Preliminary results from a four-working space, double-acting piston, Stirling engine controls model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    A four working space, double acting piston, Stirling engine simulation is being developed for controls studies. The development method is to construct two simulations, one for detailed fluid behavior, and a second model with simple fluid behaviour but containing the four working space aspects and engine inertias, validate these models separately, then upgrade the four working space model by incorporating the detailed fluid behaviour model for all four working spaces. The single working space (SWS) model contains the detailed fluid dynamics. It has seven control volumes in which continuity, energy, and pressure loss effects are simulated. Comparison of the SWS model with experimental data shows reasonable agreement in net power versus speed characteristics for various mean pressure levels in the working space. The four working space (FWS) model was built to observe the behaviour of the whole engine. The drive dynamics and vehicle inertia effects are simulated. To reduce calculation time, only three volumes are used in each working space and the gas temperature are fixed (no energy equation). Comparison of the FWS model predicted power with experimental data shows reasonable agreement. Since all four working spaces are simulated, the unique capabilities of the model are exercised to look at working fluid supply transients, short circuit transients, and piston ring leakage effects.

  14. Mechanical and biomechanical analysis of a linear piston design for angular-velocity-based orthotic control.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward D; Samadi, Reza; Goudreau, Louis; Kofman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A linear piston hydraulic angular-velocity-based control knee joint was designed for people with knee-extensor weakness to engage knee-flexion resistance when knee-flexion angular velocity reaches a preset threshold, such as during a stumble, but to otherwise allow free knee motion. During mechanical testing at the lowest angular-velocity threshold, the device engaged within 2 degrees knee flexion and resisted moment loads of over 150 Nm. The device completed 400,000 loading cycles without mechanical failure or wear that would affect function. Gait patterns of nondisabled participants were similar to normal at walking speeds that produced below-threshold knee angular velocities. Fast walking speeds, employed purposely to attain the angular-velocity threshold and cause knee-flexion resistance, reduced maximum knee flexion by approximately 25 degrees but did not lead to unsafe gait patterns in foot ground clearance during swing. In knee collapse tests, the device successfully engaged knee-flexion resistance and stopped knee flexion with peak knee moments of up to 235.6 Nm. The outcomes from this study support the potential for the linear piston hydraulic knee joint in knee and knee-ankle-foot orthoses for people with lower-limb weakness.

  15. Free-piston engine linear generator for hybrid vehicles modeling study. Interim report, January-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, T.J.; Ingram, S.K.

    1995-05-01

    Development of a free piston engine linear generator was investigated for use as an auxiliary power unit for a hybrid electric vehicle. The main focus of the program was to develop an efficient linear generator concept to convert the piston motion directly into electrical power. Computer modeling techniques were used to evaluate five different designs for linear generators. These designs included permanent magnet generators, reluctance generators, linear DC generators, and two and three-coil induction generators. The efficiency of the linear generator was highly dependent on the design concept. The two-coil induction generator was determined to be the best design, with an efficiency of approximately 90 percent.

  16. Stability and non-relativistic limits of rarefaction wave to the 1-D piston problem for the relativistic Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Min; Li, Yachun

    2017-04-01

    We study the 1-D piston problem for the relativistic Euler equations under the assumption that the total variations of both the initial data and the velocity of the piston are sufficiently small. By a modified wave front tracking method, we establish the global existence of entropy solutions including a strong rarefaction wave without restriction on the strength. Meanwhile, we consider the convergence of the entropy solutions to the corresponding entropy solutions of the classical non-relativistic Euler equations as the light speed c→ +∞.

  17. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    In free piston Stirling engine research the integrity of both amplitude and phase of the dynamic pressure measurements is critical to the characterization of cycle dynamics and thermodynamics. It is therefore necessary to appreciate all possible sources of signal distortion when designing pressure measurement systems for this type of research. The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving helium-charged free piston Stirling engines. The scope and limitations of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  18. Recent Advances in Design of Low Cost Film Concentrator and Low Pressure Free Piston Stirling Engines for Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinwaechter, J.; Kleinwaechter, H.; Beale, W.

    1984-01-01

    The free piston Stirling-linear alternator was shown to be scalable to power levels of tens of kilowatts in a form which is simple, efficient, long lived and relatively inexpensive. It avoids entirely the vexing problem of high pressure shaft, and its control requirements are not severe nor do they represent a significant threat to durability. Linear alternators have demonstrated high efficiency and moderate weight, and are capable of delivering 3 phase power from single machines without great increases of cost or complexity. There remains no apparent impediments to the commercial exploitation of the free piston engine for solar electric power generation.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-13

    For Official Use Only UNCLASSIFIED Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel...Now affiliated with U.S. Army TARDEC ** University of Wisconsin-Madison Sandia National Laboratory Advanced Engine Combustion Meeting February...Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, and Reactivity

  20. Output characteristics of a series three-port axial piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Quan, Long; Yang, Yang; Wang, Chengbin; Yao, Liwei

    2012-05-01

    Driving a hydraulic cylinder directly by a closed-loop hydraulic pump is currently a key research area in the field of electro-hydraulic control technology, and it is the most direct means to improve the energy efficiency of an electro-hydraulic control system. So far, this technology has been well applied to the pump-controlled symmetric hydraulic cylinder. However, for the differential cylinder that is widely used in hydraulic technology, satisfactory results have not yet been achieved, due to the asymmetric flow constraint. Therefore, based on the principle of the asymmetric valve controlled asymmetric cylinder in valve controlled cylinder technology, an innovative idea for an asymmetric pump controlled asymmetric cylinder is put forward to address this problem. The scheme proposes to transform the oil suction window of the existing axial piston pump into two series windows. When in use, one window is connected to the rod chamber of the hydraulic cylinder and the other is linked with a low-pressure oil tank. This allows the differential cylinders to be directly controlled by changing the displacement or rotation speed of the pumps. Compared with the loop principle of offsetting the area difference of the differential cylinder through hydraulic valve using existing technology, this method may simplify the circuits and increase the energy efficiency of the system. With the software SimulationX, a hydraulic pump simulation model is set up, which examines the movement characteristics of an individual piston and the compressibility of oil, as well as the flow distribution area as it changes with the rotation angle. The pump structure parameters, especially the size of the unloading groove of the valve plate, are determined through digital simulation. All of the components of the series arranged three distribution-window axial piston pump are designed, based on the simulation analysis of the flow pulse characteristics of the pump, and then the prototype pump is made

  1. Simultaneous high-speed gas property measurements at the exhaust gas recirculation cooler exit and at the turbocharger inlet of a multicylinder diesel engine using diode-laser-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jatana, Gurneesh S; Magee, Mark; Fain, David; Naik, Sameer V; Shaver, Gregory M; Lucht, Robert P

    2015-02-10

    A diode-laser-absorption-spectroscopy-based sensor system was used to perform high-speed (100 Hz to 5 kHz) measurements of gas properties (temperature, pressure, and H(2)O vapor concentration) at the turbocharger inlet and at the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler exit of a diesel engine. An earlier version of this system was previously used for high-speed measurements of gas temperature and H(2)O vapor concentration in the intake manifold of the diesel engine. A 1387.2 N m tunable distributed feedback diode laser was used to scan across multiple H(2)O absorption transitions, and the direct absorption signal was recorded using a high-speed data acquisition system. Compact optical connectors were designed to conduct simultaneous measurements in the intake manifold, the EGR cooler exit, and the turbocharger inlet of the engine. For measurements at the turbocharger inlet, these custom optical connectors survived gas temperatures as high as 800 K using a simple and passive arrangement in which the temperature-sensitive components were protected from high temperatures using ceramic insulators. This arrangement reduced system cost and complexity by eliminating the need for any active water or oil cooling. Diode-laser measurements performed during steady-state engine operation were within 5% of the thermocouple and pressure sensor measurements, and within 10% of the H(2)O concentration values derived from the CO(2) gas analyzer measurements. Measurements were also performed in the engine during transient events. In one such transient event, where a step change in fueling was introduced, the diode-laser sensor was able to capture the 30 ms change in the gas properties; the thermocouple, on the other hand, required 7.4 s to accurately reflect the change in gas conditions, while the gas analyzer required nearly 600 ms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of such a simple and passive arrangement of high-temperature optical connectors as well

  2. Numerical studies of the formation and destruction of vortices in a motored four-stroke piston-cylinder configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, H. J.; Sosoka, D. J.; Ramos, J. I.

    1983-01-01

    A finite-difference procedure which solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy is used to investigate the effects of the compression ratio, engine speed, bore-to-stroke ratio, and air intake flow angle on the turbulent flow field within an axisymmetric piston-cylinder configuration. It is shown that in a four-stroke piston-cylinder configuration, the intake stroke is characterized by the formation of a piston vortex. The piston vortex is stretched during the intake stroke, and the head vortex has an almost constant diameter. For a 0-deg air intake flow angle, both vortices disappear by the end of the compression stroke; for an air intake flow angle of 45 deg, the flow field within the cylinder shows three elongated vortices which persist into the compression stroke and then break up and merge. It is also shown that larger bore-to-stroke ratios give rise to lower turbulent levels than smaller bore-to-stroke ratios and that the turbulent intensity is almost independent of the rpm.

  3. Laser-Driven Magnetic Pistons Relevant to the Formation of Magnetized Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, Erik; Bondarenko, A.; Schaeffer, D.; Constantin, C.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Clark, S.; Winske, D.; Niemann, C.

    2013-06-01

    To study the dynamics that lead to magnetized collisionless shock formation, laboratory experiments were performed at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) that utilize the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and the Phoenix Laboratory Raptor laser to drive sub- and super-Alfvénic laser-plasma explosions through the uniform, magnetized ambient-plasma of the LAPD. The 130 J, 25 ns FWHM, 1053 nm Raptor laser pulse ablates a graphite target that produces a debris-plasma capable of driving diamagnetic cavities ≤55 cm (≤3 c/ωpi) for ≤6 gyro-periods in the low-density (2-5×1012 cm-3), magnetized (200-275 G) Hydrogen (or Helium) plasma of the LAPD. With the deployment of magnetic flux probes, the evolution and growth of the magnetic piston can be measured across the experimental volume, as well as the wave dynamics parallel to the background magnetic field.

  4. Free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator 1000-hour endurance test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, J.; Dochat, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) has the potential to be a long lived, highly reliable, power conversion device attractive for many product applications such as space, residential or remote site power. The purpose of endurance testing the FPSE was to demonstrate its potential for long life. The endurance program was directed at obtaining 1000 operational hours under various test conditions: low power, full stroke, duty cycle and stop/start. Critical performance parameters were measured to note any change and/or trend. Inspections were conducted to measure and compare critical seal/bearing clearances. The engine performed well throughout the program, completing more than 1100 hours. Hardware inspection, including the critical clearances, showed no significant change in hardware or clearance dimensions. The performance parameters did not exhibit any increasing or decreasing trends. The test program confirms the potential for long life FPSE applications.

  5. Calibrating the PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter Using Fits to ADC Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, James; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC), a homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeter located in the forward and backward directions (3.1 < η < 3.9) is being used to measure transverse energy from RHIC Au+Au collisions obtained in 2010. While the detector has been partially calibrated using the reconstruction of neutral pions in an iterative procedure, the calibration constants for some areas of the detector are not converging. In order to improve the initial set of calibration constants, a parameterization of the energy distributions as a function of distance from the beamline (obtained using well calibrated towers) is used to provide initial values to problem towers in the iterative procedure. The work done to produce this parameterization and its effects on the calibration process will be described. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1507841.

  6. Revisiting Cuts for Improved Calibrations of the PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bownes, Emma; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) has been used extensively to study RHIC p+p and d+Au collisions, but has not been used as often in the analysis of Au+Au collisions. Forward/backward measurements of transverse energy 3 . 1 < | η | < 3 . 9 in the beam energy scan are of particular interest for studies of the strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma. Now that new methods are being employed to help calibrate the heavy ion collisions, focus can again be put on the optimal set of cuts for calibrating these runs. Studies leading to the determination of these cuts will be described. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1507841.

  7. Theory of the corrugation instability of a piston-driven shock wave.

    PubMed

    Bates, J W

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the two-dimensional stability of a shock wave driven by a steadily moving corrugated piston in an inviscid fluid with an arbitrary equation of state. For h≤-1 or h>h(c), where h is the D'yakov parameter and h(c) is the Kontorovich limit, we find that small perturbations on the shock front are unstable and grow--at first quadratically and later linearly--with time. Such instabilities are associated with nonequilibrium fluid states and imply a nonunique solution to the hydrodynamic equations. The above criteria are consistent with instability limits observed in shock-tube experiments involving ionizing and dissociating gases and may have important implications for driven shocks in laser-fusion, astrophysical, and/or detonation studies.

  8. Method of estimating time scales of the atmospheric piston and its application at Dome C (Antarctica)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellerer, Aglae; Sarazin, Marc; Coude du Foresto, Vincent; Agabi, Karim; Aristidi, Eric; Sadibekova, Tatyana

    2006-08-01

    Analysis of the first interferometric fringes recorded at Dome C, Antarctica are presented. Measurements were taken 31 January and 1 February 2005 during daytime. Our purpose in performing the analysis was to measure temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston, which are critical for interferometers, and determine their sensitivity.These scales are derived through the motion of the image that is formed in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer.We could establish a lower limit to the coherence time by studying the decay rate of correlation between successive fringes. Coherence times are measured to be larger than 10 ms, i.e., at least three times higher than the median coherence time measured at the site of Paranal(3.3 ms)

  9. Controllability of Free-piston Stirling Engine/linear Alternator Driving a Dynamic Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Rauch, Jeffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic behavior of a Free-Piston Stirling Engine/linear alternator (FPSE/LA) driving a single-phase fractional horse-power induction motor. The controllability and dynamic stability of the system are discussed by means of sensitivity effects of variations in system parameters, engine controller, operating conditions, and mechanical loading on the induction motor. The approach used expands on a combined mechanical and thermodynamic formulation employed in a previous paper. The application of state-space technique and frequency domain analysis enhances understanding of the dynamic interactions. Engine-alternator parametric sensitivity studies, similar to those of the previous paper, are summarized. Detailed discussions are provided for parametric variations which relate to the engine controller and system operating conditions. The results suggest that the controllability of a FPSE-based power system is enhanced by proper operating conditions and built-in controls.

  10. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  11. Direct and Inverse Kinematics of a Novel Tip-Tilt-Piston Parallel Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad

    2004-01-01

    Closed-form direct and inverse kinematics of a new three degree-of-freedom (DOF) parallel manipulator with inextensible limbs and base-mounted actuators are presented. The manipulator has higher resolution and precision than the existing three DOF mechanisms with extensible limbs. Since all of the manipulator actuators are base-mounted; higher payload capacity, smaller actuator sizes, and lower power dissipation can be obtained. The manipulator is suitable for alignment applications where only tip, tilt, and piston motions are significant. The direct kinematics of the manipulator is reduced to solving an eighth-degree polynomial in the square of tangent of half-angle between one of the limbs and the base plane. Hence, there are at most 16 assembly configurations for the manipulator. In addition, it is shown that the 16 solutions are eight pairs of reflected configurations with respect to the base plane. Numerical examples for the direct and inverse kinematics of the manipulator are also presented.

  12. On the Limiting Markov Process of Energy Exchanges in a Rarely Interacting Ball-Piston Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálint, Péter; Gilbert, Thomas; Nándori, Péter; Szász, Domokos; Tóth, Imre Péter

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the process of energy exchanges generated by the elastic collisions between a point-particle, confined to a two-dimensional cell with convex boundaries, and a `piston', i.e. a line-segment, which moves back and forth along a one-dimensional interval partially intersecting the cell. This model can be considered as the elementary building block of a spatially extended high-dimensional billiard modeling heat transport in a class of hybrid materials exhibiting the kinetics of gases and spatial structure of solids. Using heuristic arguments and numerical analysis, we argue that, in a regime of rare interactions, the billiard process converges to a Markov jump process for the energy exchanges and obtain the expression of its generator.

  13. Research on Modelling of Aviation Piston Engine for the Hardware-in-the-loop Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bing; Shu, Wenjun; Bian, Wenchao

    2016-11-01

    In order to build the aero piston engine model which is real-time and accurate enough to operating conditions of the real engine for hardware in the loop simulation, the mean value model is studied. Firstly, the air-inlet model, the fuel model and the power-output model are established separately. Then, these sub models are combined and verified in MATLAB/SIMULINK. The results show that the model could reflect the steady-state and dynamic performance of aero engine, the errors between the simulation results and the bench test data are within the acceptable range. The model could be applied to verify the logic performance and control strategy of controller in the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation.

  14. Mixed Lubrication Simulation of Hydrostatic Spherical Bearings for Hydraulic Piston Pumps and Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Toshiharu

    Mixed and fluid film lubrication characteristics of hydrostatic spherical bearings for swash-plate-type axial piston pumps and motors are studied theoretically under non-steady-state conditions. The basic equations incorporating interference and contact of surface roughness are derived fundamentally through combination of the GW and PC models. Furthermore, a programming code that is applicable to the caulked-socket-type and open-socket-type bearings is developed. Effects of caulking, operating conditions, and the bearing dimension on the motion of the sphere and tribological performance of the bearings are examined. Salient conclusions are the following: The sphere's eccentricity increases in the low supply pressure period. The time-lag of the load change engenders greater motion of the sphere. Caulking of the bearing socket suppresses the sphere's motion. The bearing stiffness increases and power loss decreases for smaller recess angles. Minimum power loss is given under the condition that the bearing socket radius nearly equals the equivalent load radius.

  15. Ocular pulsation correlates with ocular tension: the choroid as piston for an aqueous pump?

    PubMed

    Phillips, C I; Tsukahara, S; Hosaka, O; Adams, W

    1992-01-01

    In 26 random out-patients, including 13 treated glaucoma patients and ocular hypertensives, the higher the ocular tension, the greater the pulse amplitude, by Alcon pneumotonometry, at a statistically significant level. In a single untreated hypertensive, when 2-hourly pneumotonometry was done for 24 h, the correlation was similar and significant. The higher the diastolic blood pressure, the higher the ocular pulsation, also significantly. Pulsation is suggested to be a pump, the choroid being the piston, contributing (1) to an increase in the outflow of aqueous humour and (2) to a homeostatic mechanism contributing to normalization of the intra-ocular pressure, wherein pulsation increases or decreases, as the intraocular pressure increases or decreases, respectively.

  16. Design Study for a Free-piston Vuilleumier Cycle Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsue, Junji; Hoshino, Norimasa; Ikumi, Yonezou; Shirai, Hiroyuki

    Conceptual design for a free-piston Vuilleumier cycle heat pump machine was proposed. The machine was designed based upon the numerical results of a dynamic analysis method. The method included the effect of self excitation vibration with dissipation caused by the flow friction of an oscillating working gas flow and solid friction of seals. It was found that the design values of reciprocating masses and spring constants proposed in published papers related to this study were suitable for practical use. The fundamental effects of heat exchanger elements on dynamic behaviors of the machine were clarified. It has been pointed out that some improvements were required for thermodynamic analysis of heat exchangers and working spaces.

  17. Integration of Rotation and Piston Motions in Coiled-Coil Signal Transduction▿

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rong; Lynn, David G.

    2007-01-01

    A coordinated response to a complex and dynamic environment requires an organism to simultaneously monitor and interpret multiple signaling cues. In bacteria and some eukaryotes, environmental responses depend on the histidine autokinases (HKs). For example, VirA, a large integral membrane HK from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, regulates the expression of virulence genes in response to signals from multiple molecular classes (phenol, pH, and sugar). The ability of this pathogen to perceive inputs from different known host signals within a single protein receptor provides an opportunity to understand the mechanisms of signal integration. Here we exploited the conserved domain organization of the HKs and engineered chimeric kinases to explore the signaling mechanisms of phenol sensing and pH/sugar integration. Our data implicate a piston-assisted rotation of coiled coils for integration of multiple inputs and regulation of critical responses during pathogenesis. PMID:17573470

  18. System analysis of a piston steam engine employing the uniflow principle, a study in optimized performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported which were obtained from a mathematical model of a generalized piston steam engine configuration employing the uniflow principal. The model accounted for the effects of clearance volume, compression work, and release volume. A simple solution is presented which characterizes optimum performance of the steam engine, based on miles per gallon. Development of the mathematical model is presented. The relationship between efficiency and miles per gallon is developed. An approach to steam car analysis and design is presented which has purpose rather than lucky hopefulness. A practical engine design is proposed which correlates to the definition of the type engine used. This engine integrates several system components into the engine structure. All conclusions relate to the classical Rankine Cycle.

  19. Method of estimating time scales of the atmospheric piston and its application at Dome C (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglae; Sarazin, Marc; du Foresto, Vincent Coudé; Agabi, Karim; Aristidi, Eric; Sadibekova, Tatyana

    2006-08-01

    Analysis of the first interferometric fringes recorded at Dome C, Antarctica are presented. Measurements were taken 31 January and 1 February 2005 during daytime. Our purpose in performing the analysis was to measure temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston, which are critical for interferometers, and determine their sensitivity. These scales are derived through the motion of the image that is formed in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer. We could establish a lower limit to the coherence time by studying the decay rate of correlation between successive fringes. Coherence times are measured to be larger than 10 ms, i.e., at least three times higher than the median coherence time measured at the site of Paranal (3.3 ms).

  20. Theory of the corrugation instability of a piston-driven shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the two-dimensional stability of a shock wave driven by a steadily moving corrugated piston in an inviscid fluid with an arbitrary equation of state. For h ≤-1 or h >hc , where h is the D'yakov parameter and hc is the Kontorovich limit, we find that small perturbations on the shock front are unstable and grow—at first quadratically and later linearly—with time. Such instabilities are associated with nonequilibrium fluid states and imply a nonunique solution to the hydrodynamic equations. The above criteria are consistent with instability limits observed in shock-tube experiments involving ionizing and dissociating gases and may have important implications for driven shocks in laser-fusion, astrophysical, and/or detonation studies.

  1. On the Limiting Markov Process of Energy Exchanges in a Rarely Interacting Ball-Piston Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálint, Péter; Gilbert, Thomas; Nándori, Péter; Szász, Domokos; Tóth, Imre Péter

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the process of energy exchanges generated by the elastic collisions between a point-particle, confined to a two-dimensional cell with convex boundaries, and a `piston', i.e. a line-segment, which moves back and forth along a one-dimensional interval partially intersecting the cell. This model can be considered as the elementary building block of a spatially extended high-dimensional billiard modeling heat transport in a class of hybrid materials exhibiting the kinetics of gases and spatial structure of solids. Using heuristic arguments and numerical analysis, we argue that, in a regime of rare interactions, the billiard process converges to a Markov jump process for the energy exchanges and obtain the expression of its generator.

  2. Simulations for the PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter Measurement of Transverse Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, Christopher

    2012-10-01

    The PHENIX detector's Muon Piston Calorimeter measures the energies of photons (most of which are the products of pion decay) in the collisions of particles at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The data acquired from the collisions of gold ions at √sNN=200 GeV will be used to measure the transverse energy over the kinematic acceptance of the detector. Corrections for the detector's hadronic response are needed to complete a measurement of the transverse energy and estimate systematic error. The PHENIX Integrated Simulation Application (PISA) is a software package that integrates both a GEANT3 simulation of the entire PHENIX detector and an event generator. In this case HIJING is being used as the event generator. Progress on the production of these simulations will be reported.

  3. In situ pressure calibration for piston cylinder cells via ruby fluorescence with fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Koyama-Nakazawa, Kazuko; Koeda, Masahito; Hedo, Masato; Uwatoko, Yoshiya

    2007-06-01

    A fiber-optic measurement technique is developed for estimating the pressure inside a piston cylinder cell up to approximately 4 GPa, based on the pressure-induced R1 fluorescence line shift of ruby (ruby scale). Ruby scale and a conventional technique (calibration on phase transitions of bismuth) were simultaneously applied to the cell filled with a pressure transmitting medium of isopropyl alcohol. The pressure readings of the two methods were consistent with each other, and no pressure gradient was observed. The ruby scale has the advantages of real time estimation and easy installation in a small space. Because of these advantages, three fibers were simultaneously introduced in the sample space at the same time, and pressure distribution was measured for Fluorinert (FC70:FC77=1:1), Daphne oil 7373, and Fomblin oil (YHVAC 13014).

  4. Experimental studies on twin PTCs driven by dual piston head linear compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gour, Abhay S.; Joy, Joewin; Sagar, Pankaj; Sudharshan, H.; Mallappa, A.; Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.

    2017-02-01

    An experimental study on pulse tube cryocooler is presented with a twin pulse tube configuration. The study is conducted with a dual piston head linear compressor design which is developed indigenously. The two identical pulse tube cryocoolers are operated by a single linear motor which generates 1800 out of phase dual pressure waves. The advantages of the configuration being the reduction in fabrication cost and the increased cooling power. The compressor is driven at a frequency of 48 Hz using indigenously developed PWM based power supply. The CFD study of pulse tube cryocooler is discussed along with the experimental cool down results. A detailed experimental and FEM based studies on the fabrication procedure of heat exchangers is conducted to ensure better heat transfer in the same.

  5. Development of a Dynamic, End-to-End Free Piston Stirling Convertor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Gerber, Scott S.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic model for a free-piston Stirling convertor is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The model is an end-to-end system model that includes the cycle thermodynamics, the dynamics, and electrical aspects of the system. The subsystems of interest are the heat source, the springs, the moving masses, the linear alternator, the controller, and the end-user load. The envisioned use of the model will be in evaluating how changes in a subsystem could affect the operation of the convertor. The model under development will speed the evaluation of improvements to a subsystem and aid in determining areas in which most significant improvements may be found. One of the first uses of the end-toend model will be in the development of controller architectures. Another related area is in evaluating changes to details in the linear alternator.

  6. Laboratory Experiments on the Generation of Perpendicular, Magnetized Collisionless Shocks by a Laser-Ablated Piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Collisionless shocks occur ubiquitously in space plasmas and have been extensively studied insitu by spacecraft, though they are inherently limited in their flexibility. We present laboratory experiments utilizing a highly flexible laser geometry at UCLA to study the generation of magnetized, perpendicular collisionless shocks by a super-Alfvénic laser-ablated piston. Experiments were carried out on the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD), which can create a highly reproducible 20 m long by Ø1 m H or He magnetized (<= 2 kG) ambient plasma. The 100 J Raptor laser was used to ablate perpendicular to the background magnetic field a carbon target embedded in the LAPD plasma. Emission spectroscopy revealed a significant spread between laser debris charge states, consistent with 2D hybrid simulations that show fast-moving, highly ionized debris slipping through the ambient plasma, while slower, lower charge states drive a diamagnetic cavity. The cavity grew to several ion gyroradii and lasted around one gyroperiod, large and long enough to act like a piston by allowing laminar fields at the cavity edge to transfer energy from the debris to the background plasma. This is confirmed by spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in debris velocities relative to a non-magnetic case, and Thomson scattering, which shows an increase in electron densities and temperatures in the ambient plasma. An increase in the intensity of the ambient plasma seen by gated imaging also indicates an energetic population of electrons coincident with the cavity edge, while Stark-broadened ambient lines may indicate strong local electric fields. Magnetic flux probes reveal that the cavity launches whistler waves parallel to the background field, as well as a super-Alfvénic magnetosonic wave along the blowoff axis that has a magnetic field compression comparable to the Alfvenic Mach number, consistent with simulations that suggest a weak collisionless shock was formed. Supported by DOE and DTRA.

  7. Influence of piston and magnetic coils on the field-dependent damping performance of a mixed-mode magnetorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali, Mohammadjavad; Amri Mazlan, Saiful; Choi, Seung-Bok; Imaduddin, Fitrian; Hamidah Hamdan, Lailatul

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a 2D simulation study of a mixed-mode magnetorheological (MR) damper in which the influence of the geometric elements of the piston and magnetic coil on the MR damper’s performance is investigated by using the Ansoft Maxwell software tool. Four results of the simulation, which are magnetic flux density (B), MR fluid yield stress (τ 0), {τ }0{L}a and W{τ }0{L}a, are used to compare the performance of the MR damper. Multiplication of the yield stress by the active operating mode length ({τ }0{L}a) represents the variable portion of the active (on-state) damping force of the flow mode motion, while the value of W{τ }0{L}a represents the active damping force of the shear mode motion. The contribution of each operating mode (shear and flow) is related to the mixed-mode geometry and piston velocity. Therefore, each operating mode is evaluated separately. In this work, a total of 154 simulations are done in which 74, 20 and 60 simulations are conducted to analyse the effect of the piston radius, coil dimensions (width and length) and coil boundary lengths, respectively, on the performance of the MR damper. The simulation results show that increasing the piston radius can increase the W{τ }0{L}a value and reduce the value. For a given area of magnetic coil housing, a greater housing length in the axial direction of the piston can increase the achieved yield stress of the MR fluid and hence consequently the performance of the MR damper. A minimum boundary length is needed around the magnetic coil in order to attain a supreme magnetic field distribution. However, there is an optimised value for axial coil boundary lengths, which are the lengths of the upper and lower mixed-mode areas.

  8. Experimental investigation of piston heat transfer under conventional diesel and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Splitter, Derek A; Hendricks, Terry Lee; Ghandhi, Jaal B

    2014-01-01

    The piston of a heavy-duty single-cylinder research engine was instrumented with 11 fast-response surface thermocouples, and a commercial wireless telemetry system was used to transmit the signals from the moving piston. The raw thermocouple data were processed using an inverse heat conduction method that included Tikhonov regularization to recover transient heat flux. By applying symmetry, the data were compiled to provide time-resolved spatial maps of the piston heat flux and surface temperature. A detailed comparison was made between conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion operations at matched conditions of load, speed, boost pressure, and combustion phasing. The integrated piston heat transfer was found to be 24% lower, and the mean surface temperature was 25 C lower for reactivity-controlled compression ignition operation as compared to conventional diesel combustion, in spite of the higher peak heat release rate. Lower integrated piston heat transfer for reactivity-controlled compression ignition was found over all the operating conditions tested. The results showed that increasing speed decreased the integrated heat transfer for conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. The effect of the start of injection timing was found to strongly influence conventional diesel combustion heat flux, but had a negligible effect on reactivity-controlled compression ignition heat flux, even in the limit of near top dead center high-reactivity fuel injection timings. These results suggest that the role of the high-reactivity fuel injection does not significantly affect the thermal environment even though it is important for controlling the ignition timing and heat release rate shape. The integrated heat transfer and the dynamic surface heat flux were found to be insensitive to changes in boost pressure for both conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition

  9. In-cylinder flows of a motored four-stroke engine with flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.F.; Yang, H.S.; Yeh, C.-N.

    2008-04-15

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the in-cylinder flow structures and turbulence intensities in the symmetry and offset planes of a motored four-valve, four-stroke engine during the intake and compression strokes are diagnosed by using a particle image velocimeter. Two pistons of different crown shapes (flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons) are studied. The inception, establishment, and evolution of the tumbling vortical flow structures during the intake and compression strokes are clearly depicted. Quantitative strengths of the rotating vortical flow motions are presented by a dimensionless parameter, the tumble ratio, which can represent the mean angular velocity of the vortices in the target plane. The turbulence intensity of the in-cylinder flow is also calculated by using the measured time-varying velocity data. The results show that the flat-crown piston induces higher bulk-averaged tumble ratio and turbulence intensity than the slightly concave-crown piston does because the tumble ratio and turbulence generated by the flat-crown piston in the offset planes during the compression stroke are particularly large. The engine with the flat-crown piston also presents larger torque and power outputs and lower hydrocarbon emission than that with the slightly concave-crown piston. This might be caused by the enhanced combustion in the engine cylinder due to the stronger tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. (author)

  10. Numerical modelling of physical processes in a ballistic laboratory setup with a tapered adapter and plastic piston used for obtaining high muzzle velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, N. V.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modelling of a ballistic setup with a tapered adapter and plastic piston is considered. The processes in the firing chamber are described within the framework of quasi- one-dimensional gas dynamics and a geometrical law of propellant burn by means of Lagrangian mass coordinates. The deformable piston is considered to be an ideal liquid with specific equations of state. The numerical solution is obtained by means of a modified explicit von Neumann scheme. The calculation results given show that the ballistic setup with a tapered adapter and plastic piston produces increased shell muzzle velocities by a factor of more than 1.5-2.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of a Free-Piston Engine with Electrical Generator Using HCCI Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrbai, Mohammad

    Free-piston engines have the potential to challenge the conventional crankshaft engines by their design simplicity and higher operational efficiency. Many studies have been performed to overcome the limitations of the free-piston devices especially the stability and control issues. The investigations within the presented dissertation aim to satisfy many objectives by employing the approach of chemical kinetics to present the combustion process in the free-piston engine. This approach in addition to its advanced accuracy over the empirical methods, it has many other features like the ability to analyze the engine emissions. The effect of the heat release rate (HRR) on the engine performance is considered as the main objective. Understanding the relation between the HRR and the piston dynamics helps in enhancing the system efficiency and identifying the parameters that affect the overall performance. The dissertation covers some other objectives that belongs to the combustion phasing. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), equivalence ratio and the intake temperature represent the main combustion parameters, which have been discussed in this dissertation. To obtain the stability in system performance, the model requires a proper controller to simulate the operation and manage the different system parameters; for this purpose, different controlling techniques have been employed. In addition, the dissertation considers some other topics like engine emissions, fuels and fuels mechanisms. The model of the study describes the processes within a single cylinder, two stroke engine, which includes springs to support higher frequencies, reduce cyclic variations and sustain the engine compression ratio. An electrical generator presents the engine load; the generator supports different load profiles and play the key role in controlling the system. The 1st law of thermodynamics and Newton's 2nd law are applied to couple the piston dynamics with the engine thermodynamics. The model

  12. Electrochemical manipulation of apparent oxygen fugacity in a piston cylinder apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, A.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Walker, D.; Wheeler, K.

    2002-12-01

    Phase stability of mineral assemblages and their physical properties, especially transport properties, are influenced by oxygen fugacity. Redox effects in earth and planetary systems at high pressure include setting of ferric/ferrous iron ratios [controlling the electrical conductivity of crustal and mantle materials] and possible chemical reactions at the Earth's core-mantle boundary. Experimental controls of oxygen fugacity in high-pressure devices have been limited to discrete electrochemical potentials set by buffers such as C-CO, Ni-NiO, and QFM. By contrast, an electric field applied across a silicate sample inside a piston cylinder apparatus establishes a smoothly-varying electrochemical gradient that can be quantified and tied to the oxygen fugacity scale through synchrotron microXANES of polyvalent V and Fe within the silicate. Fugacity gradient samples were synthesized in a modified Boyd-England piston-cylinder configuration. Platinum electrodes were placed at both ends of a 2-mm cylinder of basaltic composition silicate glass containing ~5% Fe and ~2% V. The sample assembly was surrounded by MgO ceramic, sheathed within a Mo faraday sleeve to insulate the sample from the AC field of the heater, and placed within a 0.5 inch diameter pressure vessel. The assembly was sintered at 800°C for 72 hours to eliminate porosity in the MgO capsule, and then heated to 1400°C for 23 hrs at 10 kbar. At high temperature, a 1V potential difference was applied across the electrodes via an external power supply. The sample was then quenched, potted in epoxy, and polished to a thickness of ~30 μm, and analyzed via optical and scanning electron microscopy. Vanadium, with oxidation states of 0 and +II to +V, was used as a chemical marker to evaluate the absolute value of the fO2 conditions across the silicate sample. Synchrotron-based microXANES techniques at GSECARS at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne, IL were used to measure the pre-edge peak height at the vanadium

  13. Status of an advanced radioisotope space power system using free-piston Stirling technology

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.A,; Qiu, S.; Erbeznik, R.M.; Olan, R.W.; Welty, S.C.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a free-piston Stirling engine technology project to demonstrate a high efficiency power system capable of being further developed for deep space missions using a radioisotope (RI) heat source. The key objective is to develop a power system with an efficiency exceeding 20% that can function with a high degree of reliability for 10 years or longer on deep space missions. Primary issues being addressed for Stirling space power systems are weight and the vibration associated with reciprocating pistons. Similar weight and vibration issues have been successfully addressed with Stirling cryocoolers, which are the accepted standard for cryogenic cooling in space. Integrated long-life Stirling engine-generator (or convertor) operation has been demonstrated by the terrestrial Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) and other Stirling Technology Company (STC) programs. Extensive RSG endurance testing includes more than 40,000 maintenance-free, degradation-free hours for the complete convertor, in addition to several critical component and subsystem endurance tests. The Stirling space power convertor project is being conducted by STC under DOE Contract, and NASA SBIR Phase II contracts. The DOE contract objective is to demonstrate a two-convertor module that represents half of a nominal 150-W(e) power system. Each convertor is referred to as a Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC). The ultimate Stirling power system would be fueled by three general purpose heat source (GPHS) modules, and is projected to produce substantially more electric power than the 150-watt target. The system is capable of full power output with one failed convertor. One NASA contract, nearing completion, uses existing 350-W(e) RG-350 convertors to evaluate interactivity of two back-to-back balanced convertors with various degrees of electrical and mechanical interaction. This effort has recently provided the first successful synchronization of two convertors by means of parallel

  14. Increasing reliability of gas-air systems of piston and combined internal combustion engines by improving thermal and mechanic flow characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodov, Yu. M.; Grigor'ev, N. I.; Zhilkin, B. P.; Plotnikov, L. V.; Shestakov, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Results of experimental study of thermal and mechanical characteristics of gas exchange flow in piston and combined engines are presented. Ways for improving intake and exhaust processes to increase reliability of gas-air engine systems are proposed.

  15. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable candidate. Under this program the research findings of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) are presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators. Projections are made for future space-power requirements over the next few decades. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits that a Stirling system has over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power.

  16. A novel single-phase flux-switching permanent magnet linear generator used for free-piston Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ping; Sui, Yi; Tong, Chengde; Bai, Jingang; Yu, Bin; Lin, Fei

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates a novel single-phase flux-switching permanent-magnet (PM) linear machine used for free-piston Stirling engines. The machine topology and operating principle are studied. A flux-switching PM linear machine is designed based on the quasi-sinusoidal speed characteristic of the resonant piston. Considering the performance of back electromotive force and thrust capability, some leading structural parameters, including the air gap length, the PM thickness, the ratio of the outer radius of mover to that of stator, the mover tooth width, the stator tooth width, etc., are optimized by finite element analysis. Compared with conventional three-phase moving-magnet linear machine, the proposed single-phase flux-switching topology shows advantages in less PM use, lighter mover, and higher volume power density.

  17. A fuel-efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplanes. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, R. C. H.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel-efficient cruise performance model which facilitates maximizing the specific range of General Aviation airplanes powered by spark-ignition piston engines and propellers is presented. Airplanes of fixed design only are considered. The uses and limitations of typical Pilot Operating Handbook cruise performance data, for constructing cruise performance models suitable for maximizing specific range, are first examined. These data are found to be inadequate for constructing such models. A new model of General Aviation piston-prop airplane cruise performance is then developed. This model consists of two subsystem models: the airframe-propeller-atmosphere subsystem model; and the engine-atmosphere subsystem model. The new model facilitates maximizing specific range; and by virtue of its implicity and low volume data storge requirements, appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation.

  18. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    A brief overview is presented of the development and technological activities of the free-piston Stirling engine. The engine started as a small scale fractional horsepower engine which demonstrated basic engine operating principles and the advantages of being hermetically sealed, highly efficient, and simple. It eventually developed into the free piston Stirling engine driven heat pump, and then into the SP-100 Space Reactor Power Program from which came the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). The SPDE successfully operated for over 300 hr and delivered 20 kW of PV power to an alternator plunger. The SPDE demonstrated that a dynamic power conversion system can, with proper design, be balanced; and the engine performed well with externally pumped hydrostatic gas bearings.

  19. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the development and technological activities of the free-piston Stirling engine. The engine started as a small scale fractional horsepower engine which demonstrated basic engine operating principles and the advantages of being hermetically sealed, highly efficient, and simple. It eventually developed into the free piston Stirling engine driven heat pump, and then into the SP-100 Space Reactor Power Program from which came the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). The SPDE successfully operated for over 300 hr and delivered 20 kW of PV power to an alternator plunger. The SPDE demonstrated that a dynamic power conversion system can, with proper design, be balanced; and the engine performed well with externally pumped hydrostatic gas bearings.

  20. Positive Darwinian Selection in the Piston That Powers Proton Pumps in Complex I of the Mitochondria of Pacific Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R.; Bielawski, Joseph P.; Gharrett, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation is well understood, but evolution of the proteins involved is not. We combined phylogenetic, genomic, and structural biology analyses to examine the evolution of twelve mitochondrial encoded proteins of closely related, yet phenotypically diverse, Pacific salmon. Two separate analyses identified the same seven positively selected sites in ND5. A strong signal was also detected at three sites of ND2. An energetic coupling analysis revealed several structures in the ND5 protein that may have co-evolved with the selected sites. These data implicate Complex I, specifically the piston arm of ND5 where it connects the proton pumps, as important in the evolution of Pacific salmon. Lastly, the lineage to Chinook experienced rapid evolution at the piston arm. PMID:21969854

  1. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  2. Evaluation of Requirements for Militarization of 3-kW Free-Piston Stirling Engine Generator Set

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    AD _ o EVALUATION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR •i MILITARIZATION OF 3-kW FREE-PISTON STIRLING ENGINE GENERATOR SET S Thomas J. Marusak Mechanical Technology ...PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK Mechanical Technology Inc. AREA & WORK UNIT NUMSERS 968 Albany-Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND...Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is developing the FPSE for stationary com- mercial applications in the size range below 10 kW. Because of the poten

  3. Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-15

    and cylinder liners [10, 11]. More recently, measurements have been made on the piston surface with engines operating under RCCI and CDC combustion...An experimental study has been conducted to provide insight into heat transfer to the piston of a light-duty single- cylinder research engine under...timing or injection timing, when a single fuel is used. RCCI utilizes in- cylinder fuel reactivity stratification by utilizing a second fuel. Typically

  4. Research on detection method of end gap of piston rings based on area array CCD and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Wang, Zhong; Liu, Qi; Li, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Piston ring is one of the most important parts in internal combustion engine, and the width of end gap is an important parameter which should be detected one by one. In comparison to the previous measurements of end gap, a new efficient detection method is presented based on computer vision and image processing theory. This paper describes the framework and measuring principle of the measurement system. In which, the image processing algorithm is highlighted. Firstly, the partial end gap image of piston ring is acquired by the area array CCD; secondly, the end gap edge contour which is connected by single pixel is obtained by grayscale threshold segmentation, mathematical morphology contour edge detection, contour trace and other image processing tools; finally, the distance between the two end gap edge contour lines is calculated by using the least distance method of straight-line fitting. It has been proved by the repetitive experiments that the measurement accuracy can reach 0.01mm. What's more, the detection efficiency of automatic inspected instrument on parameters of piston ring based on this method can reach 10~12 pieces/min.

  5. Opposed piston linear compressor driven two-stage Stirling Cryocooler for cooling of IR sensors in space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhojwani, Virendra; Inamdar, Asif; Lele, Mandar; Tendolkar, Mandar; Atrey, Milind; Bapat, Shridhar; Narayankhedkar, Kisan

    2017-04-01

    A two-stage Stirling Cryocooler has been developed and tested for cooling IR sensors in space application. The concept uses an opposed piston linear compressor to drive the two-stage Stirling expander. The configuration used a moving coil linear motor for the compressor as well as for the expander unit. Electrical phase difference of 80 degrees was maintained between the voltage waveforms supplied to the compressor motor and expander motor. The piston and displacer surface were coated with Rulon an anti-friction material to ensure oil less operation of the unit. The present article discusses analysis results, features of the cryocooler and experimental tests conducted on the developed unit. The two-stages of Cryo-cylinder and the expander units were manufactured from a single piece to ensure precise alignment between the two-stages. Flexure bearings were used to suspend the piston and displacer about its mean position. The objective of the work was to develop a two-stage Stirling cryocooler with 2 W at 120 K and 0.5 W at 60 K cooling capacity for the two-stages and input power of less than 120 W. The Cryocooler achieved a minimum temperature of 40.7 K at stage 2.

  6. Primary pressure standard based on piston-cylinder assemblies. Calculation of effective cross sectional area based on rarefied gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, Felix; Yang, Yuanchao; Ricker, Jacob E.; Hendricks, Jay H.

    2016-10-01

    Currently, the piston-cylinder assembly known as PG39 is used as a primary pressure standard at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the range of 20 kPa to 1 MPa with a standard uncertainty of 3× {{10}-6} as evaluated in 2006. An approximate model of gas flow through the crevice between the piston and sleeve contributed significantly to this uncertainty. The aim of this work is to revise the previous effective cross sectional area of PG39 and its uncertainty by carrying out more exact calculations that consider the effects of rarefied gas flow. The effective cross sectional area is completely determined by the pressure distribution in the crevice. Once the pressure distribution is known, the elastic deformations of both piston and sleeve are calculated by finite element analysis. Then, the pressure distribution is recalculated iteratively for the new crevice dimension. As a result, a new value of the effective area is obtained with a relative difference of 3× {{10}-6} from the previous one. Moreover, this approach allows us to reduce significantly the standard uncertainty related to the gas flow model so that the total uncertainty is decreased by a factor of three.

  7. Development of a residential free-piston Stirling engine heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Robert A.

    After several years of development, the free-piston Stirling engine heat pump (FPSE/HP) has successfully met proof-of-concept targets. The performance targets were achieved during an off-site test and evaluation program conducted at the Lennox Industries Engineering Center. The performance achieved for the module was a cooling thermal coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.91 and a heating thermal COP of 1.62. In addition to its performance achievement, the FPSE/HP module demonstrated good reliability in over 60 days of operation and ran stably and repeatably over a range of ambient conditions from 0 to 105 F. This paper will provide a description of the FPSE/HP module tested at Lennox, describe the developmental history of the FPSE/HP at Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI), and present the results of the Lennox tests. This work has been a collaborative effort of MTI, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Gas Research Institute (GRI). The financial and technical support provided by ORNL, DOE, and GRI was responsible for the success achieved.

  8. Experimental Verification of Modeled Thermal Distribution Produced by a Piston Source in Physiotherapy Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Haro, S. A.; Leija, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To present a quantitative comparison of thermal patterns produced by the piston-in-a-baffle approach with those generated by a physiotherapy ultrasonic device and to show the dependency among thermal patterns and acoustic intensity distributions. Methods. The finite element (FE) method was used to model an ideal acoustic field and the produced thermal pattern to be compared with the experimental acoustic and temperature distributions produced by a real ultrasonic applicator. A thermal model using the measured acoustic profile as input is also presented for comparison. Temperature measurements were carried out with thermocouples inserted in muscle phantom. The insertion place of thermocouples was monitored with ultrasound imaging. Results. Modeled and measured thermal profiles were compared within the first 10 cm of depth. The ideal acoustic field did not adequately represent the measured field having different temperature profiles (errors 10% to 20%). Experimental field was concentrated near the transducer producing a region with higher temperatures, while the modeled ideal temperature was linearly distributed along the depth. The error was reduced to 7% when introducing the measured acoustic field as the input variable in the FE temperature modeling. Conclusions. Temperature distributions are strongly related to the acoustic field distributions. PMID:27999801

  9. Subway platform air quality: Assessing the influences of tunnel ventilation, train piston effect and station design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, T.; Pérez, N.; Reche, C.; Martins, V.; de Miguel, E.; Capdevila, M.; Centelles, S.; Minguillón, M. C.; Amato, F.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2014-08-01

    A high resolution air quality monitoring campaign (PM, CO2 and CO) was conducted on differently designed station platforms in the Barcelona subway system under: (a) normal forced tunnel ventilation, and (b) with daytime tunnel ventilation systems shut down. PM concentrations are highly variable (6-128 μgPM1 m-3, 16-314 μgPM3 m-3, and 33-332 μgPM10 m-3, 15-min averages) depending on ventilation conditions and station design. Narrow platforms served by single-track tunnels are heavily dependent on forced tunnel ventilation and cannot rely on the train piston effect alone to reduce platform PM concentrations. In contrast PM levels in stations with spacious double-track tunnels are not greatly affected when tunnel ventilation is switched off, offering the possibility of significant energy savings without damaging air quality. Sampling at different positions along the platform reveals considerable lateral variation, with the greatest accumulation of particulates occurring at one end of the platform. Passenger accesses can dilute PM concentrations by introducing cleaner outside air, although lateral down-platform accesses are less effective than those positioned at the train entry point. CO concentrations on the platform are very low (≤1 ppm) and probably controlled by ingress of traffic-contaminated street-level air. CO2 averages range from 371 to 569 ppm, changing during the build-up and exchange of passengers with each passing train.

  10. Down to the roughness scale assessment of piston-ring/liner contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checo, H. M.; Jaramillo, A.; Ausas, R. F.; Jai, M.; Buscaglia, G. C.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of surface roughness in hydrodynamic bearings been accounted for through several approaches, the most widely used being averaging or stochastic techniques. With these the surface is not treated “as it is”, but by means of an assumed probability distribution for the roughness. The so called direct, deterministic or measured-surface simulation) solve the lubrication problem with realistic surfaces down to the roughness scale. This leads to expensive computational problems. Most researchers have tackled this problem considering non-moving surfaces and neglecting the ring dynamics to reduce the computational burden. What is proposed here is to solve the fully-deterministic simulation both in space and in time, so that the actual movement of the surfaces and the rings dynamics are taken into account. This simulation is much more complex than previous ones, as it is intrinsically transient. The feasibility of these fully-deterministic simulations is illustrated two cases: fully deterministic simulation of liner surfaces with diverse finishings (honed and coated bores) with constant piston velocity and load on the ring and also in real engine conditions.

  11. Observation of Oil Flow Characteristics in Rolling Piston Rotary Compressor for Reducing Oil Circulation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. j.; Noh, K. Y.; Min, B. C.; Yang, J. S.; Choi, G. M.; Kim, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    The oil circulation rate (OCR) of the rolling piston rotary compressor is a significant factor which affects the performance of refrigeration system. The increase of oil discharge causes decreasing of the heat transfer efficiency in the heat exchanger, pressure drop and lack of oil in lubricate part in compressor. In this study, the internal flow of compressor was visualized to figure out the oil droplet flow characteristics. The experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted in various frequency of compressor to observe the effect of operation frequency on oil droplet flow characteristics for reducing OCR. In situ, measurement of oil droplet diameter and velocity were conducted by using high speed image visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow paths were dominated by copper wire parts driving the motor which was inserted in compressor. In order to verify the reliability of CFD simulation, the tendency of oil flow characteristics in each flow path and the compressor operating conditions were applied in CFD simulation. For reducing OCR, the structure such as vane, disk and ring is installed in the compressor to restrict the main flow path of oil particle. The effect of additional structure for reducing OCR was evaluated using CFD simulation and the results were discussed in detail.

  12. Progress update of NASA's free-piston Stirling space power converter technology project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudenhoefer, James E.; Winter, Jerry M.; Alger, Donald

    1992-08-01

    A progress update is presented of the NASA LeRC Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Project. This work is being conducted under NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power Element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system power output and system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least five fold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss progress toward 1050 K Stirling Space Power Converters. Fabrication is nearly completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC); results of motoring tests of the cold end (525 K), are presented. The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, bearings, superalloy joining technologies, high efficiency alternators, life and reliability testing, and predictive methodologies. This paper will compare progress in significant areas of component development from the start of the program with the Space Power Development Engine (SPDE) to the present work on CTPC.

  13. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  14. Gas dynamics of heat-release-induced waves in supercritical fluids: revisiting the Piston Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorino, Mario Tindaro; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a gasdynamic approach to the modeling of heat-release-induced compression waves in supercritical fluids. We rely on highly resolved one-dimensional fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of CO2 at pseudo-boiling conditions in a closed duct inspired by the experiments of Miura et al.. Near-critical fluids exhibit anomalous variations of thermodynamic variables taken into account by adopting the Peng-Robinson equation of state and Chung's Method. An idealized heat source is applied, away from the boundaries, resulting in the generation of compression waves followed by contact discontinuities bounding a region of hot expanding fluid. For higher heat-release rates such compressions are coalescent with distinct shock-like features (i.e. non-isentropicity and propagation Mach numbers measurably greater than unity) and a non-uniform post-shock state, not present in ideal gas simulations, caused by the highly nonlinear equation of state. Thermoacoustic effects are limited to: (1) a one-way/one-time thermal-to-acoustic energy conversion, and (2) cumulative non-isentropic bulk heating due to the resonating compression waves, resulting in what is commonly referred to as the Piston Effect.

  15. A prototype of volume-controlled tidal liquid ventilator using independent piston pumps.

    PubMed

    Robert, Raymond; Micheau, Philippe; Cyr, Stéphane; Lesur, Olivier; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Liquid ventilation using perfluorochemicals (PFC) offers clear theoretical advantages over gas ventilation, such as decreased lung damage, recruitment of collapsed lung regions, and lavage of inflammatory debris. We present a total liquid ventilator designed to ventilate patients with completely filled lungs with a tidal volume of PFC liquid. The two independent piston pumps are volume controlled and pressure limited. Measurable pumping errors are corrected by a programmed supervisor module, which modifies the inserted or withdrawn volume. Pump independence also allows easy functional residual capacity modifications during ventilation. The bubble gas exchanger is divided into two sections such that the PFC exiting the lungs is not in contact with the PFC entering the lungs. The heating system is incorporated into the metallic base of the gas exchanger, and a heat-sink-type condenser is placed on top of the exchanger to retrieve PFC vapors. The prototype was tested on 5 healthy term newborn lambs (<5 days old). The results demonstrate the efficiency and safety of the prototype in maintaining adequate gas exchange, normal acido-basis equilibrium, and cardiovascular stability during a short, 2-hour total liquid ventilator. Airway pressure, lung volume, and ventilation scheme were maintained in the targeted range.

  16. Domain wall in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator as a magnetoelectric piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the magnetoelectric coupling in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator state induced by interfacing a dynamic magnetization texture to a topological insulator. In particular, we propose that the quantum anomalous Hall insulator with a magnetic configuration of a domain wall, when contacted by electrical reservoirs, acts as a magnetoelectric piston. A moving domain wall pumps charge current between electrical leads in a closed circuit, while applying an electrical bias induces reciprocal domain-wall motion. This pistonlike action is enabled by a finite reflection of charge carriers via chiral modes imprinted by the domain wall. Moreover, we find that, when compared with the recently discovered spin-orbit torque-induced domain-wall motion in heavy metals, the reflection coefficient plays the role of an effective spin-Hall angle governing the efficiency of the proposed electrical control of domain walls. Quantitatively, this effective spin-Hall angle is found to approach a universal value of 2, providing an efficient scheme to reconfigure the domain-wall chiral interconnects for possible memory and logic applications.

  17. Rapid calculations of time-harmonic nearfield pressures produced by rectangular pistons.

    PubMed

    McGough, Robert J

    2004-05-01

    A rapid method for calculating the nearfield pressure distribution generated by a rectangular piston is derived for time-harmonic excitations. This rapid approach improves the numerical performance relative to the impulse response with an equivalent integral expression that removes the numerical singularities caused by inverse trigonometric functions. The resulting errors are demonstrated in pressure field calculations using the time-harmonic impulse response solution for a rectangular source 5 wavelengths wide by 7.5 wavelengths high. Simulations using this source geometry show that the rapid method eliminates the singularities introduced by the impulse response. The results of pressure field computations are then evaluated in terms of relative errors and computational speeds. The results show that, when the same number of Gauss abscissas are applied to both approaches for time-harmonic pressure field calculations, the rapid method is consistently faster than the impulse response, and the rapid method consistently produces smaller maximum errors than the impulse response. For specified maximum error values of 10% and 1%, the rapid method is 2.6 times faster than the impulse response for pressure field calculations performed on a 61 by 101 point grid. The rapid approach achieves even greater reductions in the computation time for smaller errors and larger grids.

  18. Progress update of NASA's free-piston Stirling space power converter technology project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudenhoefer, James E.; Winter, Jerry M.; Alger, Donald

    1992-01-01

    A progress update is presented of the NASA LeRC Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Project. This work is being conducted under NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power Element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system power output and system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least five fold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss progress toward 1050 K Stirling Space Power Converters. Fabrication is nearly completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC); results of motoring tests of the cold end (525 K), are presented. The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, bearings, superalloy joining technologies, high efficiency alternators, life and reliability testing, and predictive methodologies. This paper will compare progress in significant areas of component development from the start of the program with the Space Power Development Engine (SPDE) to the present work on CTPC.

  19. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  20. Seismic source dynamics of gas-piston activity at Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    Since 2008, eruptive activity at the summit of Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i has been confined to the new Overlook pit crater within the Halema`uma`u Crater. Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the new pit are recurring episodes of gas pistoning. The gas-piston activity is accompanied by seismic signals that are recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use raw data recorded with this network to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20-25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kı¯lauea summit. To determine the source centroid location and source mechanism, we minimize the residual error between data and synthetics calculated by the finite difference method for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium that takes topography into account. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range 1-10,000 s. Most of the seismic wavefield produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ˜1 km below the eastern perimeter of the Halema`uma`u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east striking crack (dike) dipping 80°to the north, intersecting a north striking crack (another dike) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is marked by a similar rapid inflation lasting a few minutes, trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 min, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the lava column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter