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Sample records for 80-horsepower turbocharged piston

  1. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Quentin; Alnega, Ahmed

    2011-12-06

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  2. Analysis of thermal stress of the piston during non-stationary heat flow in a turbocharged Diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustof, P.; Hornik, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper, numeric calculations of thermal stresses of the piston in a turbocharged Diesel engine in the initial phase of its work were carried out based on experimental studies and the data resulting from them. The calculations were made using a geometrical model of the piston in a five-cylinder turbocharged Diesel engine with a capacity of about 2300 cm3, with a direct fuel injection to the combustion chamber and a power rating of 85 kW. In order to determine the thermal stress, application of own mathematical models of the heat flow in characteristic surfaces of the piston was required to show real processes occurring on the surface of the analysed component. The calculations were performed using a Geostar COSMOS/M program module. A three-dimensional geometric model of the piston was created in this program based on a real component, in order to enable the calculations and analysis of thermal stresses during non-stationary heat flow. Modelling of the thermal stresses of the piston for the engine speed n=4250 min-1 and engine load λ=1.69 was carried out.

  3. Turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Hanna, Dave; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Krivitzky, Eric M.; Larosiliere, Louis M.; Baines, Nicholas C.

    2013-08-27

    In one example, a turbocharger for an internal combustion engine is described. The turbocharger comprises a casing containing an impeller having a full blade coupled to a hub that rotates about an axis of rotation. The casing includes a bleed port and an injection port. The full blade includes a hub edge, a casing edge, and a first distribution of angles, each angle measured between the axis of rotation and a mean line at the hub edge at a meridional distance along the hub edge. The full blade includes a second distribution of angles, each angle measured between the axis of rotation and a mean line at the casing edge at a meridional distance along the casing edge. Further, various systems are described for affecting the aerodynamic properties of the compressor and turbine components in a way that may extend the operating range of the turbocharger.

  4. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2007-11-13

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  5. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2007-12-04

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  6. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2009-03-24

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  7. Piston

    DOEpatents

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2009-02-24

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  8. Turbocharger apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Leavesley, M.G.

    1993-08-03

    Variable turbocharger apparatus is described comprising a compressor housing, a compressor mounted for rotation in the compressor housing, a turbine housing, a turbine mounted for rotation in the turbine housing, a first inlet for enabling air to be conducted to the compressor, an outlet for air from the compressor, a second inlet for enabling exhaust gases from an engine to be conducted to the turbine, a chamber which surrounds the turbine and which receives the exhaust gases from the second inlet before the exhaust gases are conducted to the turbine, a piston which is positioned between the turbine and the turbine housing and which is slidable backwards and forwards to form a movable wall separating the turbine from the chamber which surrounds the turbine, a bearing assembly for allowing the rotation of the compressor and the turbine, and a heat shield for shielding the bearing assembly from the exhaust gases, the piston having a plurality of vanes, the piston being such that in its closed position it terminates short of an adjacent part of the turbine housing so that there is always a gap between the end of the piston and the adjacent part of the turbine housing whereby exhaust gases from the chamber can always pass through the gap to act on the turbine, the piston being such that in its open position the gap is increased, and the piston being biased to its closed position against pressure from exhaust gases in the chamber during use of the variable turbocharger apparatus whereby the piston slides backwards and forwards to vary the gap in dependence upon engine operating conditions, and the variable turbocharger apparatus being such that the vanes on the piston enter into slots in the heat shield.

  9. Piston engine configuration alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Wyczalek, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a technological assessment of alternate engine component configuration and material alternatives. It includes a comparative analysis of key characteristics of Gasoline, Diesel and Gas Turbine engines built by Daihatsu, Honda, Isuzu, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Suburu, Suzuki and Toyota. The piston engines range from two to ten cylinders with inline, vee and opposed configurations. Furthermore, additional special features and alternative choices include variable compression ratio, ceramic structural components, supercharger, turbocharger, twin turbocharger, supercharger-turbocharger combined and the regenerative gas turbine.

  10. Turbocharged Diesels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    In a number of feasibility studies of turbine rotor designs, engineers of Cummins Engine Company, Inc.'s turbocharger group have utilized a computer program from COSMIC. Part of Cummins research effort is aimed toward introduction of advanced turbocharged engines that deliver extra power with greater fuel efficiency. Company claims use of COSMIC program substantially reduced software development costs.

  11. Reciprocating piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Eickmann, K.

    1986-01-07

    This patent describes a reciprocating combustion engine consisting of a cylinder, a piston reciprocating in the cylinder, a top for closing one end of the cylinder, inlets and outlets extending to and from the cylinder for the intake of combustible gas and the expelling of burned exhaust gases. The engine also consists of a device for ignition of the combustible gas, a means of cooling the cylinder and top, a turbine of a turbocharger connected to the outlet, and a compressor of the turbocharger connected to the inlet.

  12. Composite piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A composite piston structure is disclosed which provides a simple and reliable means for joining a carbon-carbon or ceramic piston cap with a metallic piston body. Attachment is achieved by means of a special geometry which compensates for differences in thermal expansion without complicated mechanical fastening devices. The shape employs a flange created by opposed frustoconical shapes with coincident vertices intersecting on the radial centerline of the piston in order to retain the piston cap. The use of carbon-carbon for the piston cap material allows a close fit between the piston and a cylinder wall, eliminating the need for piston rings. The elimination of extra mechanical parts of previous composite pistons provides a lightweight composite piston capable of extended high temperature operation.

  13. Lightweight piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A lightweight piston composed of carbon-carbon composites is presented. The use of carbon-carbon composites over conventional materials, such as aluminum, reduces piston weight and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocation engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance is so small as to eliminate the necessity for piston rings. Use of the carbon-carbon composite has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  14. Advanced turbocharger design study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culy, D. G.; Heldenbrand, R. W.; Richardson, N. R.

    1984-01-01

    The advanced Turbocharger Design Study consisted of: (1) the evaluation of three advanced engine designs to determine their turbocharging requirements, and of technologies applicable to advanced turbocharger designs; (2) trade-off studies to define a turbocharger conceptual design and select the engine with the most representative requirements for turbocharging; (3) the preparation of a turbocharger conceptual design for the Curtiss Wright RC2-32 engine selected in the trade-off studies; and (4) the assessment of market impact and the preparation of a technology demonstration plan for the advanced turbocharger.

  15. Linear Motor Free Piston Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, David P.

    1995-02-01

    A Linear Motor Free Piston Compressor (LMFPC), a free piston pressure recovery system for fuel cell powerplants was developed. The LMFPC consists of a reciprocating compressor and a reciprocating expander which are separated by a piston. In the past energy efficient turbochargers have been used for pressure large (over 50 kW) fuel cell powerplants by recovering pressure energy from the powerplant exhaust. A free piston compressor allows pressurizing 3 - 5 kW sized fuel cell powerplants. The motivation for pressurizing PEM fuel cell powerplants is to improve fuel cell performance. Pressurization of direct methanol fuel cells will be required if PEM membranes are to be used Direct methanol oxidation anode catalysts require high temperatures to operate at reasonable power densities. The elevated temperatures above 80 C will cause high water loss from conventional PEM membranes unless pressurization is employed. Because pressurization is an energy intensive process, recovery of the pressure energy is required to permit high efficiency in fuel cell powerplants. A complete LMFPC which can pressurize a 3 kW fuel cell stack was built. This unit is one of several that were constructed during the course of the program.

  16. Double bowl piston

    DOEpatents

    Meffert, Darrel Henry; Urven, Jr., Roger Leroy; Brown, Cory Andrew; Runge, Mark Harold

    2007-03-06

    A piston for an internal combustion engine is disclosed. The piston has a piston crown with a face having an interior annular edge. The piston also has first piston bowl recessed within the face of the piston crown. The first piston bowl has a bottom surface and an outer wall. A line extending from the interior annular edge of the face and tangent with the outer wall forms an interior angle greater than 90 degrees with the face of the piston. The piston also has a second piston bowl that is centrally located and has an upper edge located below a face of the piston crown.

  17. Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization

    DOEpatents

    Serres, Nicolas

    2010-11-09

    A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

  18. Collapsible pistons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, R. N. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A piston assembly is described for use in a hypervelocity gun comprising a forward cylindrical section longitudinally spaced from a rearward cylindrical section by an intermediate section. The intermediate section is longitudinally collapsible when subjected to a predetermined force, to allow the distance between the forward and rearward sections to be suddenly reduced.

  19. Hydraulic assist turbocharger system

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, R.J.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a turbocharger system for supplying charge air to a combustion engine. It comprises a pair of turbochargers each having a first turbine and compressor mounted on a common shaft for concurrent rotation, the first turbine being adapted to be rotatably driven by exhaust gases from the combustion engine to rotatably drive the compressor to produce charge air for supply to the engine, the turbocharger further including a second turbine mounted on the shaft, the second turbine comprising an hydraulic turbine for rotatably driving the common shaft to rotatably drive the compressor; pump means for producing a supply of hydraulic fluid under pressure; conduit means for delivering the hydraulic fluid under pressure to the second turbine to rotatably drive the second turbine; electrohydraulic control valve means for regulating passage of the hydraulic fluid through the conduit means to selectively control rotatable driving of the shaft by the second turbine in accordance with engine operating parameters; and a common support frame having the pair of turbochargers and the control valve means and the pump means mounted thereon to define a substantially unitary package adapted for facilitated mounting onto the engine.

  20. Piston rod seal

    DOEpatents

    Lindskoug, Stefan

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal of the type comprising a gland through which the piston rod is passed the piston is provided with a sleeve surrounding the piston rod and extending axially so as to axially partly overlap the gland when the piston is in its bottom dead center position.

  1. Method of turbocharger control

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, K.M.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes a method of turbocharger control in a vehicle having an engine and a turbocharger for increasing the density of at least the air entering a cylinder of the engine. The turbocharger has at least a compressor and a turbine coupled by a shaft and a nozzle to increase the angular momentum of the flow of gas to the turbine. The nozzle has a housing and movable vanes to vary the angle and velocity that the exhaust gas hits the wheel of the turbine, and actuator for moving the vanes, a can separated by a diaphragm and having an A side and B side for actuating the actuator, solenoid-actuated valves for controlling the pressure in the A and B sides of the can, an electronic control unit (ECU) having memory for storing data and predetermined values and for actuating and de-actuating the solenoid-actuated valves, a plurality of inputs to the ECU for providing input data indicative of engine temperature, engine speed, vehicle speed, intake manifold pressure, throttle angle, engine knock and charge air temperature.

  2. Turbocharger control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, Y.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a turbocharger control system utilized in an internal combustion engine having a turbocharger turbine with a downstream passage, a combustion chamber, an exhaust treatment device, an actuator, a link mechanism connected to the actuator, a compressor, and a throttle valve. The engine also has an engine intake manifold, air flow passage means leading from the compressor to the throttle valve and an exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber. The system comprises: bypass passage means connecting the exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber to the turbocharger turbine with the downstream passage of the turbine so as to connect the combustion chamber directly to the exhaust treatment device around the turbine; a waste gate valve connected to the actuator by means of the link mechanism so as to close the bypass passage wherein the actuator comprises a first chamber continuously communicating with atmospheric pressure, a second chamber connected to the air flow passage means leading from the compressor to the throttle valve, and a third chamber connected to the engine intake manifold; first spring means interposed in the first chamber for biasing the waste gate valve toward a closed position; and second spring means interposed in the third chamber and having a stronger spring load characteristic than the first spring means for biasing the waste gate valve towards an opened position.

  3. Turbocharger control system

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, K.; Nomura, I.

    1987-04-21

    A turbocharger control system is described utilizing a carburetor system. This system includes a carburetor having an air-fuel induction passage, a fuel supply passage for supplying fuel to the air-fuel induction passage, and a turbocharger compressor impeller disposed upstream of a throttle valve and compressing an air-fuel mixture flow delivered to an engine intake manifold. The turbocharger control system comprises: a surge tank provided in the intake manifold; an air control valve including means for controlling an air bleeding amount supplied to the air induction passage in response to changes in pressure of the surge tank. The air control valve further comprises a valve housing having an end wall and including a first, second and third chamber formed therein. A diaphragm has a valve member for controlling communication between the second chamber and the third chamber in response to a pressure existing in the first chamber, a spring biasing the diaphragm in a direction such that the valve member is maintained in a closed position against the pressure in the first chamber. A valve seat plate is in contact with the valve member. The first chamber is connected with the surge tank and the second chamber is connected with the fuel supply passage, and the third chamber is connected with atmosphere. The first chamber is defined by a valve housing of the air control valve, the end wall and the diaphragm and the valve member has a tapered form.

  4. Variable-volume turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, N.; Matsura, Y.; Takemoto, T.; Kohketsu, S.

    1988-01-19

    A variable-volume turbocharger device is described comprising a turbine housing having at least first and second exhaust gas passages divided by a partition wall provided in the housing. The first exhaust gas passage has a large flow characteristic and the second exhaust gas passage has a small flow characteristic. A first valve means operable to open and shut the first exhaust gas passage, and a second valve means operative to open and shut the second exhaust gas passage independently from the first valve means, each of the valve means having a valve member which cooperates with a valve seat to open and shut the corresponding exhaust gas passage, the valve members being arranged so as to open toward the upstream side of the flowing direction of exhaust gas with respect to the valve seats.

  5. Turbocharger control system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujawa, C.S.; Masteller, S.B.

    1986-06-10

    A turbocharger control system is described for an engine having a turbocharger with a variable output compressor driven by a variable input turbine, the compressor boosting the pressure of an input manifold of the engine and the turbine being run from the exhaust gases of the engine. The control system consists of: a computing circuit including input circuit means for receiving input signals representative of operational parameters of the engine, programmable memory means for storing predetermined tabular data and sequential and computational instructions, processor means responsive to the memory means for receiving the input signals and generating output signals as a function of the input signals, tabular data, and instructions, and output circuit means for outputing the plurality of output signals, sensor means connected to the engine and the computing circuit for sensing the pressure in the manifold, the temperature of the exhaust gases, the speed of the engine, and position of the throttle, compressor and turbine actuators of the engine and generating signals representative thereof; and actuator means connected to the output circuit means for controlling the position of the actuators in response to predetermined ones of the output signals, respectively; the computing circuit, sensor means, and actuator means defining a turbine control loop for regulating the input of the exhaust gasses to the turbine as a function of the error difference between an optimum manifold pressure of the engine and the actual manifold pressure of the engine; and a compressor control loop for regulating the output of air flow from the compressor as a function of the speed and acceleration of the engine.

  6. Fail-soft turbocharger control system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujawa, C.S.; Masteller, S.B.

    1986-08-05

    A fail-soft turbocharger control system is described for an engine with a first bank and a second bank of cylinders and a first turbocharger and second turbocharger associated therewith. Each turbocharger has a variable output compressor boosting the pressure of an input manifold to the associated bank of cylinders and a variable input turbine driving the compressor powered by the exhaust gases of the bank of cylinders for the control system.

  7. Piston and connecting rod assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor); Chatten, John K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A piston and connecting rod assembly includes a piston crown, a piston skirt, a connecting rod, and a bearing insert. The piston skirt is a component separate from the piston crown and is connected to the piston crown to provide a piston body. The bearing insert is a component separate from the piston crown and the piston skirt and is fixedly disposed within the piston body. A bearing surface of a connecting rod contacts the bearing insert to thereby movably associate the connecting rod and the piston body.

  8. 14 CFR 33.34 - Turbocharger rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbocharger rotors. 33.34 Section 33.34... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.34 Turbocharger rotors. Each turbocharger case must be designed and constructed to be able to contain fragments of...

  9. 14 CFR 33.34 - Turbocharger rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbocharger rotors. 33.34 Section 33.34... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.34 Turbocharger rotors. Each turbocharger case must be designed and constructed to be able to contain fragments of...

  10. 14 CFR 33.34 - Turbocharger rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbocharger rotors. 33.34 Section 33.34... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.34 Turbocharger rotors. Each turbocharger case must be designed and constructed to be able to contain fragments of...

  11. 14 CFR 33.34 - Turbocharger rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger rotors. 33.34 Section 33.34... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.34 Turbocharger rotors. Each turbocharger case must be designed and constructed to be able to contain fragments of...

  12. Stirling cycle piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G. R.

    1985-02-12

    This device is an improvement over the conventional type of Stirling cycle engine where the expander piston is connected to a crankshaft and the displacer piston is connected to the same or another crankshaft for operation. The improvement is based on both the expansion and displacer pistons being an integral unit having regenerating means which eliminate the mechanisms that synchronize the regeneration mode.

  13. High pressure ratio turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Woollenweber, W.E.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes a turbocharger system for an internal combustion engine. It comprises means forming a turbine adapted to be driven by exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising: a turbine wheel having a central core and outwardly extending vanes, the turbine wheel being rotatable about a central axis; a meridionally divided volute for exhaust gas surrounding the turbine wheel, the meridionally divided volute including a divider wall defining first and second volute passageways with openings at the turbine wheel; means forming a high-pressure compressor driven by the turbine means, the high-pressure compressor comprising: rotating compressor blades, the compressor blades adapted to be driven in rotation about the central axis by the turbine means to deliver a flow of air at high pressures for an internal combustion engine, and blades being moveable about longitudinal axes generally transverse to the central axis to impart positive or negative pre-whirl motion to the air leaving the stator blades prior to entering the rotating blades of the compressor stage; closure means for providing a flow of engine exhaust gas from one of the first and second volute passageways into the turbine wheel; and a control means for operating the closure means and the stator blades in synchronization.

  14. Turbocharging the DA465 gasoline engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng-Qi; Zong, Li-Jun; Wang, Yin-Yan

    2008-06-01

    In order to improve performance of the DA465Q gasoline engine, a substantial amount of research was done to optimize its turbocharging system. The research led to the GT12 turbocharger being selected and its turbocharging parameters being settled. Based on these tests, rational matching was worked out for respective components of the turbocharging system. Results show that this turbocharger allows the engine to easily meet the proposed requirements for power and economic performance, giving insight into further performance improvements for gasoline engines.

  15. Lightweight piston architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is an improvement in a lightweight carbon-carbon composite piston, the improvement uses near-net shape knitted or warp-interlock preforms to improve the structural qualities of the piston. In its preferred embodiment, a one piece, tubular, closed-ended, knitted preform (a sock) of carbon fibers embedded within the matrix of the piston structure forms the crown, side wall, skirt and inner surface of the piston, and wrap-interlock preforms strengthen the piston crown and wrist pin bosses.

  16. Turbine adapted maps for turbocharger engine matching

    SciTech Connect

    Tancrez, M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Fajardo, P.; Varnier, O.

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents a new representation of the turbine performance maps oriented for turbocharger characterization. The aim of this plot is to provide a more compact and suited form to implement in engine simulation models and to interpolate data from turbocharger test bench. The new map is based on the use of conservative parameters as turbocharger power and turbine mass flow to describe the turbine performance in all VGT positions. The curves obtained are accurately fitted with quadratic polynomials and simple interpolation techniques give reliable results. Two turbochargers characterized in an steady flow rig were used for illustrating the representation. After being implemented in a turbocharger submodel, the results obtained with the model have been compared with success against turbine performance evaluated in engine tests cells. A practical application in turbocharger matching is also provided to show how this new map can be directly employed in engine design. (author)

  17. Advanced turbocharger rotor for variable geometry turbocharging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, R.J.; Mulloy, J.M.; Yonushonis, T.M.; Weber, H.G.; Patel, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Turbocharging of diesel engines has enhanced fuel economy and reduced diesel engine emissions. The initial applications of turbochargers to heavy duty diesel engines during the early 1970`s reduced Bosch smoke (a measure of particulate matter used at the time) from 2.4 to 0.6 units. Current turbochargers are optimized at one set of engine conditions and by necessity, at the off-design conditions or transient conditions the fuel economy and emissions performance are penalized. A rotor was designed and a prototype fabricated which showed as much as a 10% efficiency improvement at off-design conditions. The leading edges are blunt and rounded to accept the flow from the turbine nozzles at a variety of inlet conditions with a minimum of losses. The rotor efficiency is better at all conditions and the advantage improves as it operates at conditions further from the design point. Unfortunately, the conventional materials from which this turbine rotor was constructed had inadequate strength to allow its use on engines, and had such high rotational inertia that transient response would have been severely compromised.

  18. New line of high efficiency turbochargers

    SciTech Connect

    Chellini, R,

    1994-11-01

    The French firm Hispano Suiza has recently introduced the first of a new family of high-efficiency turbochargers. The design objectives for these turbochargers is to combine the most advanced technology in both the compressor and turbine components. The HS 5800 New Generation Turbocharger is suited for diesel engines in the 1700-3000 kW power range for a single turbocharger unit. When the HS 4800 and HS 6800 sizes are introduced the line will cover a range of engines from 1200 to 9000 kW. 5 figs.

  19. Exhaust gas turbocharger for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Regar, K.N.

    1982-01-26

    An exhaust gas turbocharger is described for a diesel engine, the turbocharger including a compressor, an exhaust gas turbine, and a shaft joining the compressor and turbine. A flywheel is mounted on another shaft, and a device, such as a freewheel, alternatively couples and uncouples the flywheel shaft and turbocharger shaft. The flywheel shaft is in two sections, and a summation mechanism, such as a planetary gear arrangement, is between the two shaft sections. The summation mechanism is controlled by a hydrostatic device and/or an electronic device. A brake is provided for selectively preventing rotation of the flywheel shaft section between the summation mechanism and the turbocharger shaft.

  20. Free piston stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a basic introduction to free piston Stirling engine technology through a review of specialized background material. It also includes information based on actual construction and operation experience with these machines, as well as theoretical and analytical insights into free piston Stirling engine technology.

  1. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  2. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, W.D.C.; Bilodeau, D.; Marusak, T.; Dutram, L. Jr.; Brady, J.

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to escape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  3. Free piston inertia compressor

    DOEpatents

    Richards, William D. C.; Bilodeau, Denis; Marusak, Thomas; Dutram, Jr., Leonard; Brady, Joseph

    1981-01-01

    A free piston inertia compressor comprises a piston assembly including a connecting rod having pistons on both ends, the cylinder being split into two substantially identical portions by a seal through which the connecting rod passes. Vents in the cylinder wall are provided near the seal to permit gas to excape the cylinder until the piston covers the vent whereupon the remaining gas in the cylinder functions as a gas spring and cushions the piston against impact on the seal. The connecting rod has a central portion of relatively small diameter providing free play of the connecting rod through the seal and end portions of relatively large diameter providing a limited tolerance between the connecting rod and the seal. Finally, the seal comprises a seal ring assembly consisting of a dampener plate, a free floating seal at the center of the dampener plate and a seal retainer plate in one face of the dampener plate.

  4. Cooled spool piston compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hydraulically powered gas compressor receives low pressure gas and outputs a high pressure gas. The housing of the compressor defines a cylinder with a center chamber having a cross-sectional area less than the cross-sectional area of a left end chamber and a right end chamber, and a spool-type piston assembly is movable within the cylinder and includes a left end closure, a right end closure, and a center body that are in sealing engagement with the respective cylinder walls as the piston reciprocates. First and second annual compression chambers are provided between the piston enclosures and center housing portion of the compressor, thereby minimizing the spacing between the core gas and a cooled surface of the compressor. Restricted flow passageways are provided in the piston closure members and a path is provided in the central body of the piston assembly, such that hydraulic fluid flows through the piston assembly to cool the piston assembly during its operation. The compressor of the present invention may be easily adapted for a particular application, and is capable of generating high gas pressures while maintaining both the compressed gas and the compressor components within acceptable temperature limits.

  5. 14 CFR 23.909 - Turbocharger systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the turbocharger compressor or turbine. (c) Each turbocharger case must be able to contain fragments of a compressor or turbine that fails at the highest speed that is obtainable with normal speed... following— (1) The mounting provisions of the intercooler must be designed to withstand the loads imposed...

  6. 14 CFR 23.909 - Turbocharger systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the turbocharger compressor or turbine. (c) Each turbocharger case must be able to contain fragments of a compressor or turbine that fails at the highest speed that is obtainable with normal speed... following— (1) The mounting provisions of the intercooler must be designed to withstand the loads imposed...

  7. 14 CFR 23.909 - Turbocharger systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the turbocharger compressor or turbine. (c) Each turbocharger case must be able to contain fragments of a compressor or turbine that fails at the highest speed that is obtainable with normal speed... following— (1) The mounting provisions of the intercooler must be designed to withstand the loads imposed...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbocharger bleed air system. 23.1109... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... contamination following any probable failure of the turbocharger or its lubrication system. (b) The...

  13. Future of ceramic turbochargers: promises and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.P.

    1984-11-01

    The turbocharger is the most likely near-term application of a mass-produced ceramic component applicable to both gasoline and diesel engines. A ten-fold increase in turbocharger use is projected for the US market over the next eight years, and the total worldwide demand at the end of that time will exceed six million units per year. Ceramic turbochargers are expected to play a significant role in that growth. Overall turbocharger costs could decline as much as 50% during the next eight years, largely due to the use of ceramics, and ceramic turbochargers could capture more than 75% of the total market. The difficulties of mass-producing ceramic rotors and other components are discussed as a primary pitfall to the introduction and development of this advanced technology.

  14. Fluid-operated piston

    SciTech Connect

    Ledermen, F.E.

    1987-01-13

    An improvement is described in a friction torque transmitting device having a piston slidably disposed in a cylinder and being selectively pressurized therein for controlling the engagement of frictional plates. The improvement comprises: a rigid piston body generally U-shaped in cross section; an elastomeric covering portion bonded on the piston body and incorporating therein a pair of lip seal portions for engaging the cylinder and cooperating therewith to form a fluid tight joint; valve means formed in the bonded portion for permitting air bleed from the cylinder; a reaction ring bonded to the elastomeric covering; and a spring portion integral with the elastomeric portion operatively disposed between the piston body and the reaction ring.

  15. Turbocharger with dual function actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.D.; Janik, M.; Tomoyasu, R.S.

    1990-01-16

    This patent describes an exhaust gas driven turbocharger. It comprises: a housing, a shaft rotatably mounted in the housing, a turbine wheel and a compressor wheel mounted in the housing on the shaft for rotation therewith. The housing defining a turbine inlet passage and a compressor inlet passage for communicating exhaust gas to the turbine wheel and ambient air to the compressor wheel respectively and further defining a turbine outlet passage and a compressor outlet passage for communicating exhaust gas and compressed air respectively from the housing a wastegate valve for venting the turbine inlet passage.

  16. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  17. Rotordynamics and bearing design of turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen Jeng

    2012-05-01

    Turbochargers have gained significant attention in recent years. They are already widely used in automotive, locomotive, and marine applications with diesel engines. They are also applied in the aerospace application to increase the engine performance now. The turbochargers used in automotive and aerospace industry are very light-weight with operating speeds above 100,000 rpm. The turbochargers used in locomotive and marine applications are relatively heavy in size and power compared to the automotive and aerospace applications, and the maximum continuous operating speeds are around 30,000 rpm depending on the diesel engine power rating. Floating ring bushings, semi-floating dampers, ball bearings, and ball bearings with dampers are commonly used in automotive applications for small turbochargers. However, these bearings may not be appropriate for large turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Instead, multi-lobed bearings with and without squeeze film dampers are commonly used in these heavy-duty turbochargers. This paper deals with the rotordynamic characteristics of larger turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Various bearing designs are discussed. Bearing design parameters are studied and optimal values are suggested. Test results are also presented to support the analytical simulation.

  18. Variable capacity turbocharger control device

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiguchi, F.; Noguchi, M.; Hatanaka, K.

    1987-07-14

    A device is described for controlling a turbocharger having a compressor and a turbine coupled to the compressor, the device comprising: means for determining the supercharge pressure of air from the compressor; variable capacity means for varying the flow rate of exhaust gas introduced into the turbine in a low speed state of an engine connected to the turbocharger, the variable capacity means responsive to a first control signal; exhaust gas bypass means for controlling the flow rate of the exhaust gas bypassing the variable capacity means and the turbine in a high speed state of the engine, the bypass means responsive to a second control signal; a control means, responsive to operating parameters for the engine, for generating the first and second control signals; and the control means for detecting an acceleration state of the engine and responsive to the determined supercharge procedure and generating the second control signal for controlling the operation of the exhaust gas bypass means. The exhaust gas bypass means reduces the flow rate of the exhaust gas introduced into the turbine only when the determined supercharge pressure reaches a predetermined pressure in an acceleration state of the engine.

  19. A turbocharger for the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.R. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that the large-bore engines of the 1970s and 1980s have seen tremendous amounts of technological improvements. The key buzzwords were: Lower the emissions, and improve the fuel consumption. As the 1990s approach dramatic improvements in specific outputs along with continued research to further improve emissions and fuel consumption. One of the keys to success will have to be the degree to which the industry responds with improvements in turbocharger performance. In 1985, Cooper Bessemer Rotating Products Division began a program to develop the turbocharger of the 1990s. This paper will describe the development of the CB turbocharger series from concept to early production.

  20. Compression retaining piston

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglino, A.V. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    A piston apparatus is described for maintaining compression between the piston wall and the cylinder wall, that comprises the following: a generally cylindrical piston body, including: a head portion defining the forward end of the body; and a continuous side wall portion extending rearward from the head portion; a means for lubricating and preventing compression loss between the side wall portion and the cylinder wall, including an annular recessed area in the continuous side wall portion for receiving a quantity of fluid lubricant in fluid engagement between the wall of the recessed and the wall of the cylinder; a first and second resilient, elastomeric, heat resistant rings positioned in grooves along the wall of the continuous side wall portion, above and below the annular recessed area. Each ring engages the cylinder wall to reduce loss of lubricant within the recessed area during operation of the piston; a first pump means for providing fluid lubricant to engine components other than the pistons; and a second pump means provides fluid lubricant to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston. The first and second pump means obtains lubricant from a common source, and the second pump means including a flow line supplies oil from a predetermined level above the level of oil provided to the first pump means. This is so that should the oil level to the second pump means fall below the predetermined level, the loss of oil to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston would result in loss of compression and shut down of the engine.

  1. Analysis of Piston Slap Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, S.

    2015-05-01

    Piston slap is the major force contibuting towards noise levels in combustion engines.This type of noise depends upon a number of factors such as the piston-liner gap, type of lubricant used, number of piston pins as well as geometry of the piston. In this work the lateral and rotary motion of the piston in the gap between the cylinder liner and piston has been analyzed. A model that can predict the forces and response of the engine block due to slap has been dicussed. The parameters such as mass, spring and damping constant have been predicted using a vibrational mobility model.

  2. Reciprocating piston internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.

    1986-04-15

    A reciprocating piston internal combustion engine is described which consists of: a piston movably disposed within an engine cylinder, the piston having a top surface and a piston ring, the engine cylinder and the top surface of the piston defining a combustion chamber, the piston having first and second sections which are divided by a vertical plane containing an axis of a piston pin, the first section being formed with a major thrust surface and the second section being formed with a minor thrust surface; and means for thrusting the piston against a major thrust side wall of the cylinder before the piston reaches top dead center in the cylinder, the thrusting means comprising: means defining a space in the piston, the space communicating with the combustion chamber and being located in the piston second section; a movable member disposed within the space, the movable member being capable of being thrust in the direction of a minor thrust side wall of the cylinder by gas pressure within the combustion chamber and being arranged to thrust the piston ring against the minor thrust side wall when thrust by the gas pressure; and means for producing gas pressure within the combustion chamber such that the gas pressure enters the space at the compression stroke of the engine so that the movable member receives the gas pressure and is thrust toward the minor thrust side wall of the cylinder such that the piston is thrust against a major thrust side wall of the cylinder.

  3. Preliminary analysis of turbochargers rotors dynamic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monoranu, R.; Ştirbu, C.; Bujoreanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Turbocharger rotors for the spark and compression ignition engines are resistant steels manufactured in order to support the exhaust gas temperatures exceeding 1200 K. In fact, the mechanical stress is not large as the power consumption of these systems is up to 10 kW, but the operating speeds are high, ranging between 30000 ÷ 250000 rpm. Therefore, the correct turbochargers functioning involves, even from the design stage, the accurate evaluation of the temperature effects, of the turbine torque due to the engine exhaust gases and of the vibration system behaviour caused by very high operating speeds. In addition, the turbocharger lubrication complicates the model, because the classical hydrodynamic theory cannot be applied to evaluate the floating bush bearings. The paper proposes a FEM study using CATIA environment, both as modeling medium and as tool for the numerical analysis, in order to highlight the turbocharger complex behaviour. An accurate design may prevent some major issues which can occur during its operation.

  4. Development of large radial turbine turbochargers

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, K.R.; Hirst, P.; Kay, P.

    1996-12-31

    The use of fully radial turbochargers for medium speed diesel engines have largely been restricted to distillate fuel operation at relatively modest pressure ratios. Pressures on costs per kW have forced the industry to push for increases in rating and range of operation for these machines. The development of a high pressure ratio radial turbocharger with the capability to operate reliably on heavy fuel has become a high priority. This paper discusses the development of a range of such machines to cover engine output of between 500 kW and 1.6 MW. The original design of the first turbocharger in the range, the NAPIER 047, is reviewed together with the development and operational experiences gained to date. These have been incorporated into the latest two turbochargers in the range, the NAPIER 057 and 067. The paper includes descriptions of the means taken to achieve minimum time to market and low cost of manufacture.

  5. Turbocharged engine exhaust gas recirculation system

    SciTech Connect

    Stachowicz, R.W.

    1984-01-24

    Improved exhaust gas recirculation systems for turbocharged gas engines that include an exhaust pipe, a turbocharger connected thereto, and a carburetor connected with a source of gas for the engine. The recirculation system includes an air conduit extending from the turbocharger compressor discharge to a venturi, an exhaust gas conduit that extends from a connection with the exhaust pipe between the engine and the turbocharger to the venturi, a second air conduit that extends from the exhaust pipe to a connection with the first air conduit, and control valves located in the exhaust gas conduit and in the second air conduit. The valves are closed when the engine is being started or idling at no load and open when a load is imposed or when engine rpm's are increased. No pumps, blowers, etc. are needed because the system operates on a differential in pressure created within the system to cause the exhaust gas recirculation.

  6. Free-piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blarigan, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A combustion system which can utilize high compression ratios, short burn durations, and homogeneous fuel/air mixtures in conjunction with low equivalence ratios. In particular, a free-piston, two-stroke autoignition internal combustion engine including an electrical generator having a linear alternator with a double-ended free piston that oscillates inside a closed cylinder is provided. Fuel and air are introduced in a two-stroke cycle fashion on each end, where the cylinder charge is compressed to the point of autoignition without spark plugs. The piston is driven in an oscillating motion as combustion occurs successively on each end. This leads to rapid combustion at almost constant volume for any fuel/air equivalence ratio mixture at very high compression ratios. The engine is characterized by high thermal efficiency and low NO.sub.x emissions. The engine is particularly suited for generating electrical current in a hybrid automobile.

  7. Development of high efficiency ball-bearing turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, K.; Kurasawa, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Ikeya, N.

    1987-01-01

    Turbochargers have become very popular on passenger cars since the first mass-produced turbocharged passenger cars were put on market in Japan in 1979. Turbo lag is one of the most serious problem since the first mass-production started. Several new technologies such as a variable geometry turbocharger, ceramic turbocharger, etc. have been introduced to improve acceleration performance. A variable geometry turbocharger changes the area of gas flow passage and increases exhaust gas speed at low engine speed. A ceramic turbocharger reduces inertia moment of a turbine wheel and shaft. Turbocharger mechanical efficiency has equal importance as compressor efficiency and turbine efficiency. This paper describes the test results of ball bearing turbochargers.

  8. Turbocharger control device with optical turbocharger shaft speed sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, M.; Kawahata, Y.; Akagi, M.

    1986-02-25

    A turbocharger control device for use in conjunction with an internal combustion engine, is described which consists of: a turbine operatively connected to an exhaust manifold of the engine to be driven to rotate by exhaust gases; a centrifugal compressor; a shaft connecting the compressor for rotation with the turbine; a casing surrounding, in part, the compressor and the shaft; photo projecting means positioned adjacent to the shaft within the casing; photo receiving means positioned diametrically opposite the photo projecting means on the opposite side and adjacent to the shaft within the casing; the shaft being provided with a diametrically penetrating hole; light source means; first means for coupling the light source means and the photo projecting means in respect to the transmission of light and for isolating the light source means from the casing in respect to the transmission of vibration and heat, converter means, including a photo-voltage converter; second means for coupling the converter means and the photo receiving means in respect to the transmission of light and for isolating the photo-voltage converter from the casing in respect to the transmission of vibration and heat; the photo-voltage converter generating an electrical signal in response to light pulse signals transmitted from the photo receiving means; control means connected electrically to the converter means for generating a control signal in response to the electrical signal; an actuator operatively connected to the control means for movement in response to the control signal.

  9. Carbon-carbon piston development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    A new piston concept, made of carbon-carbon refractory-composite material, has been developed that overcomes a number of the shortcomings of aluminum pistons. Carbon-carbon material, developed in the early 1960's, is lighter in weight than aluminum, has higher strength and stiffness than aluminum and maintains these properties at temperatures over 2500 F. In addition, carbon-carbon material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent resistance to thermal shock. An effort, called the Advanced Carbon-Carbon Piston Program was started in 1986 to develop and test carbon-carbon pistons for use in spark ignition engines. The carbon-carbon pistons were designed to be replacements for existing aluminum pistons, using standard piston pin assemblies and using standard rings. Carbon-carbon pistons can potentially enable engines to be more reliable, more efficient and have greater power output. By utilizing the unique characteristics of carbon-carbon material a piston can: (1) have greater resistance to structural damage caused by overheating, lean air-fuel mixture conditions and detonation; (2) be designed to be lighter than an aluminum piston thus, reducing the reciprocating mass of an engine, and (3) be operated in a higher combustion temperature environment without failure.

  10. Analysis of piston secondary motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yeow-Chong; Ripin, Zaidi Mohd

    2013-09-01

    A nonlinear model of the piston with reciprocating, lateral and rotational degree of freedom is developed to investigate the piston secondary motion and the induced vibration behavior of the engine block by the piston slap. The model parameters are obtained from mobility measurement. The gap between the piston skirt and the cylinder liner is modeled as a translational hard stop which is the nonlinear component in the model. The value of the friction coefficient between the piston ring and the cylinder liner is determined by correlating the experimental data with the friction force equation. During the piston slap on the cylinder liner, the high damping coefficient and stiffness of the translational hard stop are added to the equation for the piston secondary motion. The model is validated by experimental data obtained from three laser displacement sensors which capture the distinct modes of the piston secondary motion directly from the piston assembly under motorized conditions. The predicted trend of the piston secondary motion and the vibration response of cylinder block are appropriate and compare well with the measured results.

  11. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-12-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  12. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  13. Nonlinear oscillations of automotive turbocharger turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Bernhard; Sievert, Mario

    2009-04-01

    Turbines, especially turbines supported in hydrodynamic bearings, often exhibit interesting oscillation effects, which result from the bearing nonlinearities. In the present work, an automotive turbocharger rotor is investigated. The rotor of the turbocharger examined here is supported in full-floating ring bearings, which give rise to complex system vibrations. Frequency spectra of run-up measurements, carried out on a hot-gas turbocharger test rig, are presented. The occurring nonlinear effects—self-excited vibrations, oil whirl/whip phenomena, subharmonics, superharmonics, combination frequencies and jump phenomena—are explained in detail with the help of a gyroscopic eigenvalue analysis and by run-up simulations with a multibody model of the rotor/bearing system. The influence of different operating conditions—oil supply pressure, oil supply temperature and rotor imbalance—on the rotor oscillations and the system bifurcations is studied.

  14. Advanced Turbo-Charging Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-02-27

    The objective of this project is to conduct analysis, design, procurement and test of a high pressure ratio, wide flow range, and high EGR system with two stages of turbocharging. The system needs to meet the stringent 2010MY emissions regulations at 20% + better fuel economy than its nearest gasoline competitor while allowing equivalent vehicle launch characteristics and higher torque capability than its nearest gasoline competitor. The system will also need to meet light truck/ SUV life requirements, which will require validation or development of components traditionally used only in passenger car applications. The conceived system is termed 'seriessequential turbocharger' because the turbocharger system operates in series at appropriate times and also sequentially when required. This is accomplished using intelligent design and control of flow passages and valves. Components of the seriessequential system will also be applicable to parallel-sequential systems which are also expected to be in use for future light truck/SUV applications.

  15. Computer-aided simulation of piston and piston ring dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.; Peeken, H.; Lechtape-Grueter, R.; Lang, J.

    1996-10-01

    A numerical computer simulation program was developed, aiding in finding optimum design parameters in the multibody-system piston, piston-rings, and cylinder with respect to optimum sealing, minimal friction, and minimum noise stimulation(impact impulse). In the simulation of piston secondary movement and piston ring motion, forces arising from the combustion process, subsonic/supersonic gas flow between the combustion chamber and the crank case, inertial forces and forces resulting from the hydrodynamic lubrication between cylinder liner and piston shaft and piston rings and between piston ring flanks and piston grooves are considered. In addition it is possible to account for effects of global, three-dimensional ring deformation as well as local piston deformation, roughness effects in lubricated contacts, and variable viscosity and variable oil supply. The governing differential equations for the pressure as well as the deformation are solved via finite element techniques, while initial value problems are solved by efficient implicit time integration schemes. The application of the developed computer code is presented in examples.

  16. Piston and piston ring for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Tokoro, N.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes internal combustion engine comprising: a cylinder block having at least one cylinder bore, the cylinder bore having an inner cylinder bore surface; a piston located within the cylinder bore of the cylinder block, so as to be displaceable upwardly and downwardly in the longitudinal direction of the cylinder bore, the piston including at least one annular groove having upper and lower surfaces, at least the lower surface being an inclined surface such that a bottom of the annular groove is lower than an outer edge of the annular groove; and a piston ring including an outer peripheral portion and an inner peripheral portion, the inner peripheral portion of the piston ring being located within the annular groove of the piston for sliding engagement with the inclined surface of the annular groove of the piston, and inner edge of the inner peripheral portion of the piston ring being located apart from the bottom of the annular groove of the piston and below the outer edge of the annular groove, and the outer peripheral portion of the piston ring being in contact with the cylinder bore surface of the cylinder block.

  17. Turbocharger with downstream pressure-gain combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Sherikar, S.V.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a turbocharger. It comprises: an internal combustion engine; a compressor located upstream of the internal combustion engine for increasing the inlet pressure of the internal combustion engine; a turbine located down stream of the internal combustion engine and mechanically coupled to the compressor for driving the compressor; and a pressure-gain combustor located downstream of the turbine for decreasing the outlet pressure of the internal combustion engineer and thus increasing the turbine power output and improving the starting characteristics of the turbocharger.

  18. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total...

  19. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total...

  20. Free-piston cutting machine

    DOEpatents

    Ciccarelli, Gaby; Subudhi, Manomohan; Hall, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    A cutting machine includes a gun barrel for receiving a projectile. A compression tube is disposed in flow communication with the barrel and includes a piston therein. A reservoir is disposed in flow communication with the tube and receives a first gas under pressure. A second gas fills the compression tube on a front face of the piston. And, the pressurized first gas is discharged into the tube on a back face of the piston to accelerate the piston through the tube for compressing the second gas, and in turn launching the projectile through the barrel to impact a workpiece.

  1. Rotating head and piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gomm, T.J.; Messick, N.C.

    1992-07-21

    This patent describes a rotary piston combustion engine. It comprises a housing means, an engine block housing a single toroidal bore, a piston carrier ring spaced outwardly along the entire perimeter of the toroidal bore with at least one finger extending inwardly for piston attachment, a power transfer cylinder, a power output shaft, an auxiliary shaft with driven gearing means meshing with the driving gearing means, a rotating head with windows for piston passage, a trapezoidal porting means in the engine block and in the rotating head, an exhaust port means.

  2. 49 CFR 230.93 - Pistons and piston rods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pistons and piston rods. 230.93 Section 230.93 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives...

  3. 14 CFR 33.34 - Turbocharger rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger rotors. 33.34 Section 33.34 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.34...

  4. Control logic for exhaust gas driven turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Adeff, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes a method of controlling an exhaust gas driven turbocharger supplying charge air for an internal combustion engine powering vehicle, the turbocharger being adjustable from a normal mode to a power mode in which the charge air available to the engine during vehicle acceleration is increased over that available when the turbocharger is in the normal mode, the vehicle including engine power control means switchable by the vehicle operator from a normal mode to a power mode so that the vehicle operator may selectively elect either the normal mode or the power mode, comprising the steps of measuring the speed of the vehicle, permitting the vehicle operator to elect either the power mode or the normal mode for a subsequent vehicle acceleration, and then adjusting the turbocharger to the power mode when the speed of the vehicle is less than a predetermined reference speed and the vehicle operator has elected to power mode to increase the charge air available to the engine and thereby increasing engine power on a subsequent acceleration of the vehicle.

  5. Study of fuel consumption and cooling system in low heat rejection turbocharged diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Taymaz, I.; Gur, M.; Cally, I.; Mimaroglu, A.

    1998-07-01

    In a conventional internal combustion engine, approximately one-third of total fuel input energy is converted to useful work. Since the working gas in a practical engine cycle is not exhausted at ambient temperature, a major part of the energy is lost with the exhaust gases. In addition another major part of energy input is rejected in the form of heat via the cooling system. If the energy normally rejected to the coolant could be recovered instead on the crankshaft as useful work, then a substantial improvement in fuel economy would result. At the same time, the cooling water, antifreeze, thermostat, radiator, water pump, cooling fan, and associated hoses and clamps could be eliminated. A new trend in the field of internal combustion engines is to insulate the heat transfer surfaces such as the combustion chamber, cylinder wall, cylinder head, piston and valves by ceramic insulating materials for the improvement of engine performance and elimination of cooling system. In this study, the effect of insulated heat transfer surfaces on direct injected and turbocharged diesel engine fuel consumption and cooling system were investigated. The research engine was a four-stroke, direct injected, six cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine. This engine was tested at different speeds and loads conditions without coating. Then, combustion chamber surfaces, cylinder head, valves and piston crown faces was coated with ceramic materials. Ceramic layers were made of CaZrO{sub 3} and MgZrO{sub 3} and plasma coated onto base of the NiCrAl bond coat. The ceramic coated research engine was tested at the same operation conditions as the standard (without coating) engine. The results indicate a reduction in fuel consumption and heat losses to engine cooling system of the ceramic coated engine.

  6. Stirling engine with improved piston ring assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Meijer, R.J.

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes an engine having a reciprocating piston axially stroking within a walled cylinder by a pressure differential acting on opposite axial sides of the piston and an annular piston ring disposed in an annular piston ring groove around the piston for sealing between the piston and the wall of the cylinder to resist leakage past the piston. The improvement described here is in the piston ring. This piston ring is endowed with a flat radially outwardly facing annular axial surface confronting the cylinder wall, temperature responsive means arranged within the groove for coaction with the piston ring to forcefully urge the piston ring radially outwardly when the engine is cold such that the flat radially outwardly facing annular axial surface of the piston ring is urged flat against the cylinder wall but to relax from urging the piston ring outwardly when the engine becomes warm. The piston ring groove has two contiguous axial portions one of which extends radially deeper into the piston than the other, the piston ring being of generally L-shape in cross section so that it has two leg portions consisting of a radially extending leg portion and an axially extending leg portion. The radially extended leg portion is disposed in cooperative association with the one axial portion of the groove and the axially extending leg portion being disposed in cooperative association with the other axial portion of the groove. The temperature responsive means is disposed within the one axial portion of the piston ring groove to be coactive on the radially extending leg portion of the piston ring, and annular sealing means disposed within the groove for sealing between the piston ring and piston to resist leakage between the piston ring and piston.

  7. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat. No. 4.909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially. the carbon fabric or tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel. to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar. or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U" channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also be accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum-alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  8. Advanced diesel electronic fuel injection and turbocharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, N. J.; Barkhimer, R. L.; Steinmeyer, D. C.; Kelly, J. E.

    1993-12-01

    The program investigated advanced diesel air charging and fuel injection systems to improve specific power, fuel economy, noise, exhaust emissions, and cold startability. The techniques explored included variable fuel injection rate shaping, variable injection timing, full-authority electronic engine control, turbo-compound cooling, regenerative air circulation as a cold start aid, and variable geometry turbocharging. A Servojet electronic fuel injection system was designed and manufactured for the Cummins VTA-903 engine. A special Servojet twin turbocharger exhaust system was also installed. A series of high speed combustion flame photos was taken using the single cylinder optical engine at Michigan Technological University. Various fuel injection rate shapes and nozzle configurations were evaluated. Single-cylinder bench tests were performed to evaluate regenerative inlet air heating techniques as an aid to cold starting. An exhaust-driven axial cooling air fan was manufactured and tested on the VTA-903 engine.

  9. A small pelton turbine for steam turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Rautenberg, M.; Abdelkader, M.; Malobabic, M.; Mobarak, A.

    1984-08-01

    The use of exhaust gas turbocharger for internal combustion engines is usually accompanied by mechanical loss. This loss is due to the raise of exhaust gas back pressure with the increase of engine speed. This back pressure prevents the discharge of the exhaust gas from the engine and causes mechanical loss. To avoid this undesirable phenomenon, a Clausius-Rankine cycle is used. In this case the thermal energy in the exhaust gas is used to vaporise water in a steam generator. The generated steam expands in a steam turbocharger which supercharges the engine. A small Pelton steam turbine has been designed and fabricated. The expected output for this small turbine is 10 kW. A computer program has been prepared to estimate the values of optimum cycle parameters.

  10. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  11. Researches on the Piston Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  12. An experimental procedure to determine heat transfer properties of turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, J. R.; Olmeda, P.; Páez, A.; Vidal, F.

    2010-03-01

    Heat transfer phenomena in turbochargers have been a subject of investigation due to their importance for the correct determination of compressor real work when modelling. The commonly stated condition of adiabaticity for turbochargers during normal operation of an engine has been revaluated because important deviations from adiabatic behaviour have been stated in many studies in this issue especially when the turbocharger is running at low rotational speeds/loads. The deviations mentioned do not permit us to assess properly the turbine and compressor efficiencies since the pure aerodynamic effects cannot be separated from the non-desired heat transfer due to the presence of both phenomena during turbocharger operation. The correction of the aforesaid facts is necessary to properly feed engine models with reliable information and in this way increase the quality of the results in any modelling process. The present work proposes a thermal characterization methodology successfully applied in a turbocharger for a passenger car which is based on the physics of the turbocharger. Its application helps to understand the thermal behaviour of the turbocharger, and the results obtained constitute vital information for future modelling efforts which involve the use of the information obtained from the proposed methodology. The conductance values obtained from the proposed methodology have been applied to correct a procedure for measuring the mechanical efficiency of the tested turbocharger.

  13. 77 FR 34206 - Airworthiness Directives; Hartzell Engine Technologies Turbochargers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Technologies Turbochargers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request for... airplanes with Hartzell Engine Technologies (HET) turbochargers, part numbers (P/Ns) 406610-0005 and...

  14. Internal combustion engine with an exhaust gas turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Hiereth, H.; Withalm, G.

    1981-06-09

    An internal combustion engine with an exhaust-gas turbocharger, particularly a mixture-compressing internal combustion engine, is disclosed in which a bleeder valve is provided which during the operation of the internal combustion engine in the partial load range conducts the exhaust gases in bypassing relationship to the turbine of the exhaust gas turbocharger.

  15. A flexible system for the simulation of turbocharged diesel engines and turbocharging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaty, T.; Codan, E.; Skopil, M.

    1996-12-31

    A fully flexible simulation system enables substitution of the conventional tests performed on turbocharged diesel engines. The supercharging systems can be calculated either by filling and emptying or by the differential method for 1-D unsteady flow during steady-state or transient operation. During sophisticated simulations, some conservation problems were observed. Their theoretical explanation and a practical solution are presented.

  16. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures is disclosed. The improvement consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat.No. 4,909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially, the carbon fabric of tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar, or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U"-channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  17. Piston reciprocating compressed air engine

    SciTech Connect

    Cestero, L.G.

    1987-03-24

    A compressed air engine is described comprising: (a). a reservoir of compressed air, (b). two power cylinders each containing a reciprocating piston connected to a crankshaft and flywheel, (c). a transfer cylinder which communicates with each power cylinder and the reservoir, and contains a reciprocating piston connected to the crankshaft, (d). valve means controlled by rotation of the crankshaft for supplying compressed air from the reservoir to each power cylinder and for exhausting compressed air from each power cylinder to the transfer cylinder, (e). valve means controlled by rotation of the crankshaft for supplying from the transfer cylinder to the reservoir compressed air supplied to the transfer cylinder on the exhaust strokes of the pistons of the power cylinders, and (f). an externally powered fan for assisting the exhaust of compressed air from each power cylinder to the transfer cylinder and from there to the compressed air reservoir.

  18. Solar powered free-piston stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, G.M.

    1988-05-24

    A method of controlling the operation of a free piston Stirling engine including a displacer piston having an integral electrical linear driver, an alternator piston driven by the displacer piston and including means for generating an electric current and variable volume gas springs in the cylinders for the displacer and alternator piston is described comprising the steps of: sensing the output voltage if the generated electric current; controlling the movement of the displacer piston by varying the volume of the gas spring in the displacer cylinder and the status of linear driver responsively to the sensed output voltage; sensing the frequency of the linear driver responsively to the sensed output voltage; sensing the frequency of the alternator piston; and controlling the frequency of the alternator piston by varying the volume of the gas spring of the alternator cylinder responsive to the sensed frequency.

  19. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  20. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  1. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  2. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  3. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows... Driving Wheel Brake 6 Engine Truck Brake 8 Tender Brake 9...

  4. Method of assembling a variable nozzle turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Burdette, F.; Fluery, J.; Roessler, M.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a turbocharger having an exhaust gas driven turbine rotatably mounted to a shaft having a compressor impeller thereon, a compressor housing enclosing the compressor impeller. It also has a center housing including bearing means for rotatably supporting the shaft, and a turbine housing enclosing the turbine and forming a volute therein. A method is described of assembling the turbocharger with a spring loaded nozzle ring comprising the steps of: mounting a flange member having a central opening to the center housing; pivotably mounting vanes to the nozzle ring; sliding a tube member having a tab at each end within the central opening; indexing one of the tabs within a slot in the flange member; sliding the nozzle ring onto the tube member; indexing the other tab within a slot in the nozzle ring; simultaneously mounting the turbine housing to the flange member and biasing the nozzle ring toward the turbine housing such that the vanes are spring loaded against a portion of the turbine housing.

  5. Two piston V-type Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A two piston Stirling engine which includes a heat exchanger arrangement placing the cooler and regenerator directly adjacent the compression space for minimal cold duct volume; a sealing arrangement which eliminates the need for piston seals, crossheads and piston rods; and a simplified power control system.

  6. Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston.

    PubMed

    Munakata, T; Ogawa, H

    2001-09-01

    Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston are investigated, based on the mass ratio expansion of the master equation for the piston velocity distribution function. Simple theory for piston motion and relaxation of an ideal gas in a cylinder turns out to reproduce our numerical experiments quantitatively.

  7. Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, Toyonori; Ogawa, Hideki

    2001-09-01

    Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston are investigated, based on the mass ratio expansion of the master equation for the piston velocity distribution function. Simple theory for piston motion and relaxation of an ideal gas in a cylinder turns out to reproduce our numerical experiments quantitatively.

  8. Sibling cycle piston and valving method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Matthew P. (Inventor); Bauwens, Luc (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A double-acting, rotating piston reciprocating in a cylinder with the motion of the piston providing the valving action of the Sibling Cycle through the medium of passages between the piston and cylinder wall. The rotating piston contains regenerators ported to the walls of the piston. The piston fits closely in the cylinder at each end of the cylinder except in areas where the wall of the cylinder is relieved to provide passages between the cylinder wall and the piston leading to the expansion and compression spaces, respectively. The piston reciprocates as it rotates. The cylinder and piston together comprise an integral valve that seqentially opens and closes the ports at the ends of the regenerators alternately allowing them to communicate with the expansion space and compression space and blocking that communication. The relieved passages in the cylinder and the ports in the piston are so arranged that each regenerator is sequentially (1) charged with compressed working gas from the compression space; (2) isolated from both expansion and compression spaces; (3) discharged of working gas into the expansion space; and (4) simultaneously charged with working gas from the expansion space while being discharged of working gas into the compression space, in the manner of the Sibling Cycle. In an alterate embodiment, heat exchangers are external to the cylinder and ports in the cylinder wall are alternately closed by the wall of the piston and opened to the expansion and compression spaces through relieved passages in the wall of the reciprocating, rotating piston.

  9. Double acting stirling engine piston ring

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.B.

    1986-04-15

    A pressure balanced piston ring is described for limiting the leakage of a high pressure region on one side of the piston ring to a region of low pressure on the opposite side of the piston ring along a cylinder wall. The piston ring apparatus consists of: a piston ring of low elastic modulus material maintained in a circumferential groove in the reciprocating piston; two elastomeric seals, positioned on opposite axial sides of the piston ring so as to isolate an inner surface from the high and low pressure regions; means for balancing the pressure on the inner surface of the piston ring with the average pressure in a leak path between the piston ring and the cylinder wall, thereby rendering friction and wear of the piston ring independent of the high and low pressures; and means for exerting a predetermined force on the piston ring to maintain contact with the cylinder wall and control the friction between the piston ring and the cylinder wall and leakage between the high and low pressure regions.

  10. The Waukesha Turbocharger Control Module: A tool for improved engine efficiency and response

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, J.R.; Reinbold, E.O.; Mueller, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Waukesha Turbocharger Control Module allows optimum control of turbochargers on lean burn gaseous fueled engines. The Turbocharger Control Module is user programmed to provide either maximum engine efficiency or best engine response to load changes. In addition, the Turbocharger Control Module prevents undesirable turbocharger surge. The Turbocharger Control Module consists of an electronic control box, engine speed, intake manifold pressure, ambient temperature sensors, and electric actuators driving compressor bypass and wastegate valves. The Turbocharger Control Module expands the steady state operational environment of the Waukesha AT27GL natural gas engine from sea level to 1,525 m altitude with one turbocharger match and improves the engine speed turn down by 80 RPM. Finally, the Turbocharger Control Module improves engine response to load changes.

  11. Effect of some piston variables on piston and ring assembly friction

    SciTech Connect

    Uras, H.M.; Patterson, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The piston and ring assembly friction of a lightweight piston with lower compression height has been compared to that of a production assembly. Additional weight was added to the lightweight piston to study the effect of that variable alone. The lightweight piston reduced friction, especially in motoring tests. Within the speed range tested (up to 1640 rpm) the friction reduction of the lightweight piston could not be attributed to the lower mass itself.

  12. Method for reducing piston deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Brownawell, D.W.; Thaler, W.A.; Bannister, E.; Ladwig, P.K.

    1990-03-06

    This patent describes a method for reducing piston deposits in an internal combustion engine lubricated with a lubricating oil containing a soluble weak base and circulating within the lubrication system of the engine. It comprises: circulating the lubricating oil to the piston ring zone of the engine where fuel combustion acids are introduced into the oil, contacting, at the piston ring zone, the combustion acids with the weak base such that at lest a portio of the acids are neutralized to form a soluble neutral salt containing the weak base and the combustion acids, circulating the lubricating oil containing the soluble neutral salt to a heterogenous strong base immobilized within the lubrication system of the engine downstream of the piston ring zone, and contacting the soluble neutral salt with the heterogeneous strong base, thereby causing at least a portion of the weak base in the salt to be displaced into the lubricating oil and resulting in the formation of a strong base/combustion acid salt which is immobilized with the heterogenous strong base.

  13. Buoyancy engine utilizing pistons and crankshaft

    SciTech Connect

    De Shon, D.A.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a buoyancy engine utilizing pistons and crankshaft, comprising: cylinders, disposed in a vessel contained liquid; the vessel sitting on a base and having an air exhaust orifice at its top; hydrodynamically designed pistons, disposed within the cylinders, designed with air holding spaces to hold injected air, and attached by connecting rods to a hydrodynamically designed crankshaft; sealed connecting rod bearings which connect the piston rods to the crankshaft; wrist pins which connected the piston rods to the pistons, the crankshaft supported on sealed bearing in the vessel walls, and which is rotated by the upward motion of the relatively buoyant pistons which are attached; the crankshaft designed so that its lobes to which the pistons are attached are at angles which insure that power developed by pistons in their lift cycle is successively converted into continuing rotational force on the crankshaft; computer-controlled air injectors, programmed to crankshaft rotational speed, positioned to inject air, compressed by a compressor, into the pistons at the bottom of each piston's stroke, the pistons having pistons rings to retain the air in the piston during its upward power stroke; and vents incorporated into their design for the release of air at the top of their power stroke. An exhaust port in each cylinder conducts air released from pistons to be released into the ambient liquid; a flywheel attached to the crankshaft, stores a part of the mechanical energy produced, provides continuity to the series of energy developing cycles of the pistons; a generator attached to the crankshaft, produces electric power from the rotation of the crankshaft.

  14. A Method of Measuring Piston Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin; Mangniello, Eugene J

    1940-01-01

    A method that makes use of thermocouples has been developed to measure the temperature of engine pistons operating at high speeds. The thermocouples installed on the moving piston are connected with a potentiometer outside the engine by means of pneumatically operated plungers, which make contact with the piston thermocouples for about 10 crankshaft degrees at the bottom of the piston stroke. The equipment is operated satisfactory at engine speeds of 2,400 r.p.m. and shows promise of successful operation at higher engine speeds. Measurements of piston temperatures in a liquid-cooled compression-ignition engine and in an air-cooled spark-ignition are presented.

  15. Piston-Skirt Lubrication System For Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Edgar C.; Burzynski, Marion, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Piston-skirt lubrication system provides steady supply of oil to piston rings of gas compressor. No need for oil-filled crankcase or external oil pump. Instead, part of each piston acts as its own oil pump circulating oil from reservoir. Annular space at bottom of piston and cylinder constitutes working volume of small oil pump. Depending on application, reservoir open to atmosphere, or sealed and pressurized in bellows to prevent contact between oil and atmosphere. Filter removes particles worn away from piston rings and cylinder wall during normal operation.

  16. Prediction of transient exhaust soot for a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoping, B.; Shu, H.

    1995-12-31

    A generalized computer model for prediction of transient exhaust soot and response of turbocharged diesel engines is developed. It includes detailed thermodynamic and dynamic processes. This model utilizes a multi-zone combustion submodel that emphasizes simple and economical calculations for combustion behavior and zonal soot, so overall transient exhaust soot can be predicted. This model is applied to a turbocharged diesel engine. The steady state exhaust soot and performance are calculated and validated, and on the basis, the exhaust soot and response under three classes of transient operating conditions are predicted. The parametric study is carried out by using this model. The effects of valve overlap period, exhaust manifold volume, turbocharger inertia and ambient pressure are predicted. Applications of this model have proved that it is a convenient analytical tool in the study for turbocharged diesel engines. 18 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Development of turbocharger for improving passenger car acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Koike, Takaaki; Furukawa, Hiromu; Ikeya, Nobuyuki; Sakakida, Masaru

    1996-09-01

    Recently, passenger cars require better acceleration from low engine speed including starting-up in order to decrease the amount of particulate matter (PM) of diesel engines or to improve the driver`s feeling. However, turbocharged cars generally have worse response than the non turbo cars because it takes a few seconds to get the turbocharger rotate up to high speed, usually called Turbo-lag. In order to solve this, various technologies have been developed for a turbocharger itself as well as for charging system such as the sequential system. Here in this paper, the authors focus on the development of the following turbocharger technology to reduce Turbo-lag and to achieve better transient response.

  18. Method and device for spin-testing of turbocharger rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, K.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes a method for spin-testing a turbocharger rotor. The rotor includes a shaft portion which is fixed to an assembly of component parts which include a thrust bearing, a spacer, at least one of a sleeve portion and compressor rotor portion, and a lock nut. The improvement comprises: preparing an integral composite member consisting of at least two of the component parts; dynamically balancing the turbocharger rotor, without the shaft portion fixed to the assembly; placing the turbocharger rotor and the integral composite member in a testing device, such that the shaft portion and the assembly are fixed to each other by the lock nut, and are rotatable as a unit; and rotating the turbocharger rotor and the assembly in the testing device, to effect the spin-testing.

  19. Electronic control for a motor vehicle variable geometry turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.F.; Yuille, R.D.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a motor vehicle power plant including a combustion engine, and engine exhaust gas driven turbocharger adapted to boost the pressure of a combustible mixture supplied to the engine, and an adjustable turbocharger control mechanism for effectively varying the turbocharger geometry to provide increased or decreased boost for a given engine operating condition. The method of adjusting the control mechanism, comprises: sensing the actual pressure of the combustible mixture supplied to the engine; determining based on the sensed pressure whether the engine is operating in a vacuum mode wherein the pressure of the mixture is less than atmospheric pressure, or a boost mode wherein the turbocharger boosts the pressure of the mixture above atmospheric pressure; and generating a control signal in accordance with sensed engine and vehicle conditions.

  20. Electrically-Assisted Turbocharger Development for Performance and Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Milton

    2000-08-20

    Turbocharger transient lag inherently imposes a tradeoff between a robust engine response to transient load shifts and exhaust emissions. By itself, a well matched turbocharger for an engine has limited flexibility in improving this transient response. Electrically-assisted turbocharging has been seen as an attractive option to improve response and lower transient emissions. This paper presents the results of a multi-year joint CRADA between DDC and ORNL. Virtual lab diesel simulation models characterized the performance improvement potential of an electrically assisted turbocharger technology. Operating requirements to reduce transient duration between load shift time by up to 50% were determined. A turbomachine has been conceptualized with an integrated motor-generator, providing transient burst boost plus energy recovery capability. Numerous electric motor designs were considered, and a prototype motor was developed, fabricated, and is undergoing tests. Power controls have been designed and fabricated.

  1. Pre-turbocharger alcohol fumigation in a diesel tractor

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.W.; Bashford, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    An M and W alcohol Conversion kit was installed on an AC 7040 turbocharged diesel tractor. The unit was dynamometer tested with 100 proof and 185 proof ethanol. This system injects alcohol into the intake air stream and permits reduction of diesel fuel-consumption by 10-15 percent. Turbocharger blade wear, as well as other problems with the system, are presented. 8 refs.

  2. Rotordynamics and Design Methods of an Oil-Free Turbocharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of supporting a turbocharger rotor on air foil bearings is investigated based upon predicted rotordynamic stability, load accommodations, and stress considerations. It is demonstrated that foil bearings offer a plausible replacement for oil-lubricated bearings in diesel truck turbochargers. Also, two different rotor configurations are analyzed and the design is chosen which best optimizes the desired performance characteristics. The method of designing machinery for foil bearing use and the assumptions made are discussed.

  3. Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Gordon, Norman R.; DeFord, Henry S.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  4. Spray bottle apparatus with force multiply pistons

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, Eugene A.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and corresponding piston which is acted upon by the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  5. Iron piston having selectively hardened ring groove

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, D.E.; Lindsay, J.E.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a long-lasting cast iron piston body for an internal combustion engine, the piston body comprising a generally cylindrical sidewall and having an annular groove in the wall encircling the body for receiving a piston ring. The groove is defined by opposed faces that intersect the wall, the piston body being composed predominantly of gray iron characterized by an as-cast pearlitic microstructure, the groove face comprising an integrally cast, selectively hardened iron band adjacent the piston sidewall and encircling the piston body. The band is characterized by a martensitic microstructure substantially harder than the pearlitic microstructure and is effective to reduce wear resulting from a piston ring seated within the groove.

  6. Rotordynamic Design Analysis of an Oil-Free Turbocharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    1997-01-01

    Modern heavy duty diesel engines utilize turbochargers for increased power output. Also, a wide range of power levels can be achieved with one engine displacement through the use of different turbocharger configurations, eliminating the need for several different sized engines. These are the reasons that virtually all diesel truck engines currently marketed use turbochargers. However, because these turbochargers rely on ring seals and oil-lubricated floating sleeve bearings, they often suffer breakdowns. These turbochargers operate at elevated temperatures which often causes the oil to degrade and even coke to the bearing surfaces. This can lead to catastrophic failure, increased particulate emissions from oil leaks, and, in extreme cases, engine fires. Replacing the oil lubricated bearings from these turbochargers with some other device is desirable to eliminate these inherent problems. Foil bearings are compliant selecting bearings lubricated by air and are well suited to high speed, light load applications. Thus, foil bearings present one potential replacement for oil-lubricated sleeve bearings. Their use as such is investigated in this work.

  7. Accelerating means and method for a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Witchger, E.S.

    1986-05-06

    A turbocharger is described which consists of: a housing having an engine exhaust input; shaft means having a longitudinal axis and rotatable in the housing on the axis; a compressor wheel and turbine wheel secured to the shaft means, the turbine wheel being in communication with the exhaust whereby the compressor wheel is driven by the turbine wheel on the axis; nozzle ring means rotatably mounted in the housing for rotation on an axis, the nozzle ring means having a plurality of vanes disposed in the exhaust gas flow path from the exhaust input of the housing means to the turbine wheel; and brake means on the housing and operable, when actuated, to inhibit rotation of the nozzle ring means.

  8. The Friction of Piston Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischbein, Hans W

    1945-01-01

    The coefficient of friction between piston ring and cylinder liner was measured in relation to gliding acceleration, pressure, temperature, quantity of oil and quality of oil. Comparing former lubrication-technical tests, conclusions were drawn as to the state of friction. The coefficients of friction as figured out according to the hydrodynamic theory were compared with those measured by tests. Special tests were made on "oiliness." The highest permissible pressure was measured and the ratio of pressure discussed.

  9. Piston and spring powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Samodovitz, A. J.

    1985-12-10

    The invention is an improved piston engine, either two stroke or four stroke. In one, two stroke, one cylinder embodiment, the improvement comprises two springs connecting between the piston and the base of the piston. These springs are relatively relaxed when the crank is at top dead center. Then during the power/intake stroke, some of the fuel's energy is delivered to the crankshaft and some is used to compress the springs. The stored energy in the springs is delivered to the crankshaft during the exhaust/compression stroke while the springs return to their relatively relaxed condition. As a result, energy is delivered to the crankshaft during both strokes of the cycle, and the engine runs smooth. In one, four stroke, two cylinder embodiment, each cylinder has springs as described above, the cranks of each cylinder are aligned, and the cam sets one cylinder in the power stroke while the other is in the intake stroke. As a result, the engine runs smooth because energy is delivered to the crankshaft during all four strokes of the cycle, during two of the strokes by the burning fuel and during the other two by the release of energy in the springs. In both embodiments, a heavy crankshaft is not needed because of the more uniform power delivery.

  10. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  11. Influence of exhaust-gas turbocharger development on the profitability of diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper begins by establishing the present state reached in turbocharger development as regards overall efficiency and pressure ratio, and describes results obtained on the turbocharger test-beds as well as design details. Then, based on calculations and the results measured in practice on actual engines, the effects of fitting improved turbochargers on the thermodynamic performance of engines are explained. 5 refs.

  12. Spool valve and piston power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, H.A.

    1992-01-21

    This patent describes an engine. It comprises cylinders each containing a piston disposed therein for reciprocating movement, a crankshaft connected to one end of each piston, a drive shaft connected to an end of the crankshaft, a source of pressurized fluid connected by conduits to each cylinder, each piston comprising: a first sealing member acting as the piston head, a second sealing member acting as the bottom of the piston, an arm connected at one end thereof to the bottom of the piston and connected at the other end thereof to the crankshaft, a lower fluid chamber formed by the bottom of the piston and a housing surrounding the arm and the crankshaft, a first port associated with each cylinder for delivering pressurized fluid to the head of the piston, a second port associated with each cylinder for removing pressurized fluid selectively from the upper chamber or delivering pressurized fluid to the lower chamber, a third port for removing pressurized fluid from the lower chamber, and a fourth part connected to the source of pressurized fluid and associated with each cylinder for delivering pressurized fluid to the upper chamber whereby the reciprocating movement of each piston is translated into rotary movement of the drive shaft through the crankshaft.

  13. Piston for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Tokoro, N.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes a piston for an internal combustion engine comprising: a crown having a circumferentially extending oil-ring groove in an outer portion of the crown, the oil-ring groove having slits on thrust and thurst-opposing sides of the piston; a skirt integrally connected to the crown and extending downward, the skirt having a circumferentially extending faucet rib on an inside surface of a lower portion of the skirt; a pair of opposed bosses protruding inward from an inside surface of the piston and extending in a direction perpendicular with a thrust and thurst-opposing direction of the piston, the bosses being opposed to each other.

  14. Turbocharger bearing retention and lubrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes exhausts gas driven turbocharger. It comprises a housing, a shaft within the housing having a longitudinal axis of rotation and a pair of ends, a compressor wheel mounted within the housing on one end of the shaft for rotation therewith, a turbine wheel mounted within the housing on the other end of the shaft for rotation therewith, means for communicating air to the compressor wheel, means for communicating exhaust gas to the turbine wheel to cause the latter to rotate the shaft and the compressor wheel mounted thereon to compress the air communicated to the compressor wheel, and bearing means mounting the shaft for rotation relative to the housing, the bearing means including a bearing outer ring, a bearing inner ring, and ball bearing elements supporting the bearing outer ring on the bearing inner ring, a bearing locating aperture in the bearing outer ring, and an elongated bearing location pin having a longitudinal axis of symmetry extending transversely to the longitudinal axis of the shaft.

  15. Non-contact type seal device for turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Washimi, K.; Shibata, M.; Ugajin, M.

    1987-02-24

    A non-contact type seal device is described for a turbocharger, comprising: a retainer mounted in a compressor chamber of a housing of the turbocharger; a collar attached to a compressor wheel mounting portion of a rotor shaft of the turbocharger; and a ring provided on an inner peripheral surface of the retainer, an annular groove receiving the ring being formed in an outer peripheral surface of the collar; a first gap being formed between the outer peripheral surface of the collar and the inner peripheral surface of the retainer; a second gap being formed between the inner surface of the annular groove and each of inner and opposite end surfaces of the ring; and a threaded groove being formed in the inner peripheral surface of the retainer in opposition to the outer peripheral surface of the collar.

  16. Collapsible pistons for light-gas guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    Moving and expandable parts of gun consist of pump-tube diaphragm, piston, launch-tube diaphragm, and saboted projectile. As a result of improved piston design, pressure cycle has been significantly improved by smoother buildup, increasing muzzle velocities up to 50%.

  17. Double acting stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  18. Reciprocating piston pump system with screw drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor); Moore, Nicholas R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump system of the reciprocating piston type is described, which facilitates direct motor drive and cylinder sealing. A threaded middle potion of the piston is engaged by a nut connected to rotate with the rotor of an electric motor, in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded piston portion, with an oil-carrying groove in the nut being interrupted. A fluid emitting seal located at the entrance to each cylinder, can serve to center the piston within the cylinder, wash the piston, and to aid in sealing. The piston can have a long stroke to diameter ratio to minimize reciprocations and wear on valves at high pressures. The voltage applied to the motor can be reversed prior to the piston reaching the end of its stroke, to permit pressure on the piston to aid in reversing the motor.

  19. Improved piston rings for a stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Cast-iron piston rings coated with commercially-available antifriction materials improves cylinder life of high-performance Stirling engine. Ring is efficient heat conductor between piston and cylinder. Device has low thermal expansion which maintains minimum gap in ring, good radial force characteristics, and essentially indefinite life.

  20. Wear reduction systems liquid piston ring

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R.J.; Chen, T.N.; DiNanno, L.

    1990-09-01

    The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of achieving an acceptable wear rate for the cylinder liner, piston, and piston rings in a coal/water-slurry-fueled engine that utilized the concept of a liquid piston ring above the conventional piston rings and to identify technical barriers and required research and development. The study included analytical modeling of the system, a bench study of the fluid motion in the liquid piston ring, and a single-cylinder test rig for wear comparison. A system analysis made on the different variations of the liquid supply system showed the desirability of the once-through version from the standpoint of system simplicity. The dynamics of the liquid ring were modeled to determine the important design parameters that influence the pressure fluctuation in the liquid ring during a complete engine cycle and the integrity of the liquid ring. This analysis indicated the importance of controlling heat transfer to the liquid ring through piston and liner to avoid boiling the liquid. A conceptual piston design for minimizing heat transfer is presented in this report. Results showed that the liquid piston ring effectively reduced the solid particles on the wall by scrubbing, especially in the case where a surfactant was added to the water. The wear rates were reduced by a factor of 2 with the liquid ring. However, leakage of the contaminated liquid ring material past the top ring limited the effectiveness of the liquid ring concept. 8 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Carbon-Carbon Turbocharger Housing Unit for Intermittent Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved, lightweight, turbine housing unit for an intermittent combustion reciprocating internal combustion engine turbocharger is prepared from a lay-up or molding of carbon-carbon composite materials in a single-piece or two-piece process. When compared to conventional steel or cast iron, the use of carbon-carbon composite materials in a turbine housing unit reduces the overall weight of the engine and reduces the heat energy loss used in the turbocharging process. This reduction in heat energy loss and weight reduction provides for more efficient engine operation.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2016-09-27

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  4. Numerical investigation of CAI Combustion in the Opposed- Piston Engine with Direct and Indirect Water Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyszczek, R.; Mazuro, P.; Teodorczyk, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is focused on the CAI combustion control in a turbocharged 2-stroke Opposed-Piston (OP) engine. The barrel type OP engine arrangement is of particular interest for the authors because of its robust design, high mechanical efficiency and relatively easy incorporation of a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR). The other advantage of such design is that combustion chamber is formed between two moving pistons - there is no additional cylinder head to be cooled which directly results in an increased thermal efficiency. Furthermore, engine operation in a Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) mode at high compression ratios (CR) raises a possibility of reaching even higher efficiencies and very low emissions. In order to control CAI combustion such measures as VCR and water injection were considered for indirect ignition timing control. Numerical simulations of the scavenging and combustion processes were performed with the 3D CFD multipurpose AVL Fire solver. Numerous cases were calculated with different engine compression ratios and different amounts of directly and indirectly injected water. The influence of the VCR and water injection on the ignition timing and engine performance was determined and their application in the real engine was discussed.

  5. Predictive optimization of piston and ring stability

    SciTech Connect

    Knowland, C.G.; Russell, C.J.

    1996-09-01

    A fundamental aspect of the engine development process involves the determination of acceptable piston and ring profiles. There exists a fine balance between the requirements of the piston skirt or ring profile to resist scuffing together with the overall product objectives of reduced oil consumption, blow-by and engine noise. Taking into account these varying and often conflicting considerations, in addition to the time and cost implications of repetitive development testing, drives them towards the necessity for some form of predictive optimization scheme. Benefits from the application of such a predictive tool include: development of piston skirt profiles for adequate running clearance under operating conditions; optimization of piston stability as a function of such parameters as piston pin offset; enhanced bore reaction forces for improved NVH predictions; reduced levels of blow-by and improved oil control.

  6. A two ring piston for gasoline engines

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J.W.; Murray, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Low mass, low friction and low compression height pistons are vital in order to sustain the drive to obtain utmost fuel economy and design refinement in reciprocating piston engines. Much has already been done and a further step forward in the attainment of the objectives is the introduction of a fully durable two ring piston. Developments at Hepworth and Grandage have led to a successful design which meets the present requirements of engine manufacturers in terms of performance and durability and has the potential to reduce weight and compresion height and probably to reduce friction. The compression ring of the two ring piston system can be used with advantage as the top compression ring of an orthodox three ring piston.

  7. A comparison of transient vehicle performance using a fixed geometry, wastegated turbocharger and a variable geometry turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, R.R.; Gall, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of an exhaust-driven boosting device can significantly improve the performance of a vehicle using a small displacement engine. One of the concerns relative to the performance of vehicles using these devices is ''turbo lag,'' or the period of time during which no boost is generated. This paper presents the results of designed experiments comparing the performance of a fixed geometry, wastegated turbocharger to a variable geometry turbocharger incorporating a low-loss bearing system. In addition, experimental tests are presented for the naturally aspirated engine in the same vehicle. The results of the experiments show improvements with the use of pressure boosting and that there are signifcant differences in the boosting devices tested; specifically, the use of a variable geometry turbocharger demonstrates significant reduction in the length of time required to reach boost and reduced acceleration times for the tests conducted.

  8. Dual fuel control of a high speed turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Few, P.C.; Sardari, P.

    1987-01-01

    The modification of a Ford 7600 turbocharged diesel engine to a dual fuel engine using methane as the supplementary fuel has been carried out. The paper describes the preliminary work of dual fuel control. Two systems are examined and their behaviour is presented.

  9. Application of ceramics to turbocharger rotors for passenger cars

    SciTech Connect

    Katano, Y.; Ando, M.; Itoh, T.; Sasaki, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Nissan has been developing and marketing ceramic turbocharger rotors for five years. This paper outlines the major theories and techniques used in ceramic fabrication, joining of ceramic and metal components, and machining of ceramics. It also presents a dynamic stress analysis using DYNA3D and describes techniques used in performing impact damage experiments, reliability evaluation, and lifetime preprediction.

  10. Idling control device for internal combustion engine with turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, H.; Kondo, T.

    1986-09-23

    An idling control device is described for an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger, comprising: an air intake pipe having an inlet at an upstream end thereof adapted to accept air which is to be supplied through the air intake pipe to the internal combustion engine a turbocharger having a housing incorporated in the air intake pipe between the inlet and the outlet, a throttle valve incorporated in the air intake pipe between the turbocharger and the outlet, a surge tank incorporated in the air intake pipe between the throttle valve and the outlet; a bypass air passage means provided in parallel with the air intake pipe between upstream of the turbocharger and downstream of the throttle valve; a flow-control valve incorporated in the bypass air passage means; an actuator operatively associated with the flow-control valve, a computer operatively associated with the actuator and arranged to receive signals relating to operating conditions of the engine; a check valve incorporated in the bypass air passage means downstream of the flow-control valve.

  11. Device for controlling supercharging pressure of an exhaust gas turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Y.

    1988-04-12

    A supercharge pressure control apparatus is described comprising: a turbocharger having an exhaust turbine rotated by exhaust gas flow of an internal combustion engine and a compressor rotated by the exhaust gas flow toward the turbine and having a valve member disposed in the turbine.

  12. Method of controlling a variable geometry type turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Hirabayashi, Y.

    1988-08-23

    This patent describes a method of controlling the supercharging pressure of a variable geometry type turbocharger having a bypass, comprising the following steps which are carried out successively: receiving signals from an engine speed sensor and from an engine knocking sensor; receiving a signal from a throttle valve sensor; judging whether or not an engine is being accelerated, and proceeding to step below if the engine is being accelerated and to step below if the engine is not being accelerated, i.e., if the engine is in a constant speed operation; determining a first correction value and proceeding to step below; judging whether or not the engine is knocking, and proceeding to step (d) if knocking is occurring and to step (f) below if no knocking is occurring; determining a second correction value and proceeding to step; receiving signals from the engine speed sensor and from an airflow meter which measures the quantity of airflow to be supplied to the engine; calculating an airflow rate per engine revolution; determining a duty valve according to the calculated airflow rate; transmitting the corrected duty value to control means for controlling the geometry of the variable geometry type turbocharger and the opening of bypass of the turbocharger, thereby controlling the supercharging pressure of the turbocharger.

  13. Squeeze bottle apparatus with force multiplying pistons

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Gordon, Norman R.; DeFord, Henry S.; Eschbach, Eugene A.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber, and a corresponding piston which is acted upon by the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area, thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  14. Phasing piston error in segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junlun; Zhao, Weirui

    2016-08-22

    To achieve a diffraction-limited imaging, the piston errors between the segments of the segmented primary mirror telescope should be reduced to λ/40 RMS. We propose a method to detect the piston error by analyzing the intensity distribution on the image plane according to the Fourier optics principle, which can capture segments with the piston errors as large as the coherence length of the input light and reduce these to 0.026λ RMS (λ = 633nm). This method is adaptable to any segmented and deployable primary mirror telescope. Experiments have been carried out to validate the feasibility of the method. PMID:27557192

  15. Adjustable expandable cryogenic piston and ring

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Peter O.; Pallaver, Carl B.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a reciprocating expansion engine for cryogenic refrigeration is improved by changing the pistons and rings so that the piston can be operated from outside the engine to vary the groove in which the piston ring is located. This causes the ring, which is of a flexible material, to be squeezed so that its contact with the wall is subject to external control. This control may be made manually or it may be made automatically in response to instruments that sense the amount of blow-by of the cryogenic fluid and adjust for an optimum blow-by.

  16. Phasing piston error in segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junlun; Zhao, Weirui

    2016-08-22

    To achieve a diffraction-limited imaging, the piston errors between the segments of the segmented primary mirror telescope should be reduced to λ/40 RMS. We propose a method to detect the piston error by analyzing the intensity distribution on the image plane according to the Fourier optics principle, which can capture segments with the piston errors as large as the coherence length of the input light and reduce these to 0.026λ RMS (λ = 633nm). This method is adaptable to any segmented and deployable primary mirror telescope. Experiments have been carried out to validate the feasibility of the method.

  17. Tests of oil scraper piston ring and piston fitted with oil drain holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdewell, H S

    1922-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine whether or not a properly located and properly designed oil scraper piston ring, installed on a piston provided with oil drain holes of sufficient area, would prevent the excessive oiling of the Liberty engine, particularly with the engine running at idling speed with full oil pressure. Results showed that excessive oiling was in fact prevented. It is strongly recommended that scraper rings and pistons be adopted for aircraft engines.

  18. Drift stabilizer for reciprocating free-piston devices

    DOEpatents

    Ward, William C.; Corey, John A.; Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-20

    A free-piston device has a stabilized piston drift. A piston having a frequency of reciprocation over a stroke length and with first and second sides facing first and second variable volumes, respectively, for containing a working fluid defining an acoustic wavelength at the frequency of reciprocation. A bypass tube waveguide connects the first and second variable volumes at all times during reciprocation of the piston. The waveguide has a relatively low impedance for steady flow and a relatively high impedance for oscillating flow at the frequency of reciprocation of the piston, so that steady flow returns fluid leakage from about the piston between the first and second volumes while oscillating flow is not diverted through the waveguide. Thus, net leakage about the piston is returned during each stroke of the piston while oscillating leakage is not allowed and pressure buildup on either the first or second side of the piston is avoided to provide a stable piston location.

  19. Stirling engine with improved sealing piston ring assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Meijer, R.J.

    1987-06-02

    This patent describes an engine having a reciprocating piston axially stroking within a walled cylinder by a pressure differential of a working fluid acting on opposite first and second axial sides of the piston. An annular sealing piston ring assembly is disposed in an annular piston ring groove around the piston having a cylindrical inner wall. The piston ring assembly for seals between the piston and the wall of the cylinder to resist leakage of the working fluid past the piston, wherein the sealing piston ring assembly comprises a main piston ring member formed of metal and having oppositely axially facing generally flat annular end surfaces. A radially outwardly facing generally cylindrical surface confronts the cylinder wall and a radially inwardly facing generally cylindrical surface.

  20. Comparison of Nitinol Stapes Pistons with Conventional Stapes Pistons: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Samuel A.; Crawford, James V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To visually compare the Nitinol “smart” stapes prosthesis to conventional manual crimping stapes pistons in temporal bone cadaver specimens. Main Outcome Measures. 10 otolaryngologists were given a photograph of the randomly ordered stapes pistons and asked to use the pictures to answer questions about each stapes piston. The answers to the survey were then recorded for analysis. Results. 8 of 9 Nitinol pistons were described as circular, and 3 of 9 manual crimped pistons were described as circular (P < .05). 6 of 9 Nitinol pistons were considered to be in contact with >66% of the incus and 3 of 9 to be in contact with 34–66% of the incus. 3 of 9 manually crimped pistons were considered to be in contact with >66% of the incus, 3 with 34–66% contact and 3 with less than 34% contact. Conclusions. The Nitinol “smart” stapes pistons were considered to provide a more circular and circumferential crimping and to have greater contact with the long process of the incus than conventional stapes pistons. PMID:23724262

  1. Linkage arms for minimizing piston wobble

    SciTech Connect

    Langstroth, S.W.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine having a block within which at least one piston is attached to a crankshaft by a connecting rod between the crankpin of the crankshaft and the wrist pin of the piston. This patent describes improvement in a fixed gear concentric with the axis of the crankshaft and coupled to the block; a follower gear concentric with the crankpin; at least one intermediate gear coupling the fixed gear to the follower gear; wherein the ratio of the gears is such that the follower gear orbits the fixed gear and does not rotate; and linkage arms interconnecting the follower gear and the piston for preventing the rotation of the piston about the wrist pin.

  2. Hydraulic generator with free-piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bouthers, P.; Breting, O.

    1983-11-15

    A hydraulic generator is disclosed with a free-piston engine and hydropneumatic return cushion and with an associated hydraulic-fluid pumping piston feeding a hydraulic accumulator intended to be charged between two detected levels of pressure. The generator includes a lock device for the free piston at the power-stroke dead center with voluntary control, and servo-control means for this lock device with means for detection of the aforementioned two pressure levels, to assure locking the piston in response to detection of the aforementioned highest pressure level and to assure its unlocking in response to detection of the aforementioned lowest pressure level, and thus an automatic intermittent running of said engine.

  3. Turbocharging of small internal combustion engine as a means of improving engine/application system fuel economy-further turbocharger improvements. Final report Oct 80-Feb 82

    SciTech Connect

    Arvin, J.R.

    1982-04-01

    Improvements to a small diesel engine turbocharger were made based on data gathered during a previous Army contract. The improved turbocharger was fabricated and tested on a small, four cylinder, 239 CID diesel engine. Engine dynamometer test data revealed a 2 to 9 percent reduction in fuel consumption at all points over the operating envelope. A turbocharger was operated for 1011 hours at speeds between 70000 and 78000 rpm without incident. The ball bearings were in excellent condition at the end of the test. A math model of the engine and turbocharger was generated. The model was used to estimate 13 Mode Federal Diesel Emissions Cycle, the LA4 driving cycle and the application of the variable area turbine nozzle (VATN) turbocharger to a diesel engine driven generator set. A recommendation was made to build a gen set demo unit. A fuel savings of 8 to 10 percent was estimated for a 30KW DED generator set.

  4. Spherical Joint Piston and Connecting Rod Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy, the NASA Lewis Research Center manages a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Technology (HDET) research program. The overall program objectives are to reduce fuel consumption through increased engine efficiency, reduce engine exhaust emissions, and provide options for the use of alternative fuels. The program is administered with a balance of research contracts, university research grants, and focused in-house research. The Cummins Engine Company participates in the HDET program under a cost-sharing research contract. Cummins is researching and developing in-cylinder component technologies for heavy-duty diesel engines. An objective of the Cummins research is to develop technologies for a low-emissions, 55-percent thermal efficiency (LE-55) engine. The best current-production engines in this class achieve about 46-percent thermal efficiency. Federal emissions regulations are driving this technology. Regulations for heavy duty diesel engines were tightened in 1994, more demanding emissions regulations are scheduled for 1998, and another step is planned for 2002. The LE-55 engine emissions goal is set at half of the 1998 regulation level and is consistent with plans for 2002 emissions regulations. LE-55 engine design requirements to meet the efficiency target dictate a need to operate at higher peak cylinder pressures. A key technology being developed and evaluated under the Cummins Engine Company LE-55 engine concept is the spherical joint piston and connecting rod. Unlike conventional piston and connecting rod arrangements which are joined by a pin forming a hinged joint, the spherical joint piston and connecting rod use a ball-and-socket joint. The ball-and-socket arrangement enables the piston to have an axisymmetric design allowing rotation within the cylinder. The potential benefits of piston symmetry and rotation are reduced scuffing, improved piston ring sealing, improved lubrication, mechanical and thermal

  5. Measuring the benefits and costs of ceramic turbochargers: the perspective from the driver's seat

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.P.

    1986-08-01

    The development of high-strength structural ceramics has many implications for advanced engine technology. Turbocharger rotors are an ideal early application of structural ceramics and are already in production in small volumes. Aside from the technical achievement this represents, what are the measurable benefits to empolying this new technology to production vehicles from the manufacturers and drivers point of view. This paper examines the results of a number of back-to-back performance tests of production vehicles equipped with ceramic and conventional turbochargers. The purpose was to more clearly quantify the benefits of this advanced turbocharger technology. A variety of acceleration tests were conducted by both independents and manufacturers. In addition, personal observations are included from more than 20,000 miles and a year of experience driving a production turbocharged car with a ceramic turbocharger. Benefits and costs of using this new technology in turbochargers are discussed, with emphasis on changes in vehicle behavior and related marketing implications.

  6. The turbocharged and intercooled 2. 3 liter engine for the Volvo 760

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, J.; Bengtsson, A.; Eriksson, S.

    1984-01-01

    In 1981 Volvo launched the 2.1l turbocharged engine for the 240 model. Since then, the market interest for turbocharged engines has increased rapidly and along with this the demand for more efficient engines. The use of intercooler and micro-computer controlled fuel- and ignition systems in passenger car applications made it possible to develop a second generation of turbocharged engines with the capability to meet these demands. This paper describes the 2.3l turbocharged engine and its development for the US-version of the 1984 760 model.

  7. Methanol as a fuel for a lean turbocharged spark ignition engine

    SciTech Connect

    Pannone, G.M.; Johnson, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    Lean turbocharged operation with methanol was characterized using a single-cylinder spark, ignition engine. Efficiency, exhaust emissions, and combustion properties were measured over a range of air/fuel ratios at two naturally-aspirated and three turbocharged conditions. When compared to stoichiometric, naturally-aspirated operation, the lean turbocharged conditions improved efficiency while reducing carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen emissions. However, unburned fuel and aldehyde emissions increased. If used in conjunction with an oxidizing catalyst and appropriate feedback controls, lean turbocharged operation has the potential of improving efficiency and exhaust emissions performance over a stoichiometric, three-way catalyst system.

  8. Effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shigeta; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    Since the automobile turbochargers are installed in an engine compartment with limited space, the ducts upstream of the turbocharger compressor may be curved in a complex manner. In the present paper, the effect of a curved duct upstream on performance of small centrifugal compressors for automobile turbochargers is discussed. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a turbocharger compressor validated for the compressor model with the straight pipe applied to the compressor with the curved pipe are executed, and the deterioration of the performance for the curved pipe is confirmed. It is also found that the deterioration of compressor performance is caused by the interaction of the secondary flow and the impeller.

  9. Method and apparatus for determining when to initiate cleaning of turbocharger turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R. A.; Condrac, E. J.

    1985-10-22

    A method and apparatus for determining when to initiate the cleaning of the turbine blades of a turbocharger is disclosed. The performance of the compressor portion of the turbocharger is monitored and upon a degradation in performance being detected it is indicated that fouling of the turbine blades has occurred. In response to this indication a water injection system is energized for supplying atomized water under high pressure to the exhaust gas powering the turbocharger to effectively clean the turbine blades. Means are provided for decreasing the speed of the turbocharger during the cleaning cycle to allow for an effective cleaning operation.

  10. Laser initiated piston actuator X51-8284-1

    SciTech Connect

    Spomer, E.

    1993-04-27

    This contract is a follow on effort in the development of a laser initiated piston actuator. During the previous contract a miniature piston actuator was developed which had two system related problems. First, during operation of the actuator, combustion gases would escape past the piston shank, overheating the surrounding materials. Secondly, the function of the device seemed to be overly brisant. The purpose of this contract was to improve the performance of the laser initiated piston actuator by developing a means of sealing the device, and to reduce the velocity of the piston. Three sealing concepts were tested; a silicone pad placed on the powder side of the piston, a stainless steel cup placed on the powder side of the piston, and copper plating on the shank of the piston. Piston velocity was to be reduced by changing the powder charge to BCTK or reducing the amount of Ti/KClO{sub 4}.

  11. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Zongxuan

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  12. Exhaust pressure pulsation observation from turbocharger instantaneous speed measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macián, V.; Luján, J. M.; Bermúdez, V.; Guardiola, C.

    2004-06-01

    In internal combustion engines, instantaneous exhaust pressure measurements are difficult to perform in a production environment. The high temperature of the exhaust manifold and its pulsating character make its application to exhaust gas recirculation control algorithms impossible. In this paper an alternative method for estimating the exhaust pressure pulsation is presented. A numerical model is built which enables the exhaust pressure pulses to be predicted from instantaneous turbocharger speed measurements. Although the model is data based, a theoretical description of the process is also provided. This combined approach makes it possible to export the model for different engine operating points. Also, compressor contribution in the turbocharger speed pulsation is discussed extensively. The compressor contribution is initially neglected, and effects of this simplified approach are analysed.

  13. Combustion mode switching with a turbocharged/supercharged engine

    SciTech Connect

    Mond, Alan; Jiang, Li

    2015-09-22

    A method for switching between low- and high-dilution combustion modes in an internal combustion engine having an intake passage with an exhaust-driven turbocharger, a crankshaft-driven positive displacement supercharger downstream of the turbocharger and having variable boost controllable with a supercharger bypass valve, and a throttle valve downstream of the supercharger. The current combustion mode and mass air flow are determined. A switch to the target combustion mode is commanded when an operating condition falls within a range of predetermined operating conditions. A target mass air flow to achieve a target air-fuel ratio corresponding to the current operating condition and the target combustion mode is determined. The degree of opening of the supercharger bypass valve and the throttle valve are controlled to achieve the target mass air flow. The amount of residual exhaust gas is manipulated.

  14. Apparatus and method for treating air from a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, D.O.

    1987-11-24

    This patent describes an apparatus for cooling and removing moisture from compressed air passing from a turbocharger and the like to an intake of an engine comprising: an air duct connecting the turbocharger to the intake of the engine; heat pipes extending across the air duct for receiving heat from the compressed air passing through the air duct; a portion of the heat pipes extending from the air duct into a zone of ambient air external to the air duct for transferring heat received from the compressed air to the ambient air thus cooling the compressed air; and a lower extension of the air duct forming a coalescer zone receiving the compressed air after cooling by the heat pipes extending across the air duct for removing moisture therefrom.

  15. Development of ceramic turbocharger rotors for high-temperature use

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, H.; Kato, K.; Matsuhisa, T.; Mizuno, T. )

    1993-01-01

    A ceramic turbocharger rotor (CTR) for high-temperature use has been developed. The features of this rotor are the use of silicon nitride, which maintains high mechanical strength up to 1,200C, and a new joining technique between the ceramic rotor and its metal shaft. The CTR is expected to cope with stoichiometric mixture burning engines, which produce a higher exhaust gas temperature for fuel economy, and the impact resistance of the rotor against foreign object damage (FOD) has been markedly increased, over that of earlier rotors, resulting in higher reliability. This paper describes the development of ceramic turbocharger rotors for high-temperature use, focusing on the mechanical strength of silicon nitride and the joining of the ceramic rotor and its metal shaft.

  16. Compounded turbocharged rotary internal combustion engine fueled with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, P.E.

    1992-10-15

    This patent describes a compounded engine. It comprises: a first Wankel engine having a housing with a trochoidal inner surface containing a generally triangular shaped rotor, the engine containing a fuel supply system suitable for operating the engine with natural gas as a fuel; a turbocharge compressing air for combustion by the engine, the turbocharger being driven by the exhaust gases which exit from the engine; a combustion chamber in fluid communication with the exhaust from the engine after that exhaust has passed through the turbocharger, the chamber having an ignition device suitable for igniting hydrocarbons in the engine exhaust, whereby the engine timing, and the air and fuel mixture of the engine are controlled so that when the engine exhaust reaches the combustion chamber the exhaust contains a sufficient amount of oxygen and hydrocarbons to enable ignition and combustion of the engine exhaust in the combustion chamber without the addition of fuel or air, and whereby the engine operating conditions are controlled to vary the performance of the secondary combustor; and a controllable ignition device to ignite the exhaust gases in the combustion chamber at predetermined times.

  17. Sealing system for piston rod of hot gas engine

    SciTech Connect

    Lundholm, S.G.; Ringqvist, S.A.

    1980-11-25

    An improvement to a sealing system for restricting fluid flow around a piston rod between a piston cylinder and crankshaft space in a hot gas engine where a seal element is secured around the piston rod in an intermediate chamber, the improvement including a link in the crankshaft space connecting, and permitting relative radial motion between, the piston rod and the crosshead and an o-ring having a diameter substantially greater than that of the piston rod and being secured between a lower ring securing the seal element in place around the piston rod and a wall of the intermediate chamber for frictionally restricting radial movement of the lower ring.

  18. Nutating spider crank reciprocating piston machine

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes reciprocating piston apparatus. It comprises a housing; a shaft journalled on the housing for rotation about a shaft axis; a plurality of cylinders each having a central longitudinal axis and disposed parallel to the shaft axis and located on the housing at positions angularly-spaced circumferentially about the shaft; a plurality of double-acting pistons having piston axes and centers, each the piston having a transverse bore therein and being respectively mounted for reciprocation within corresponding ones of the cylinders, each the bore having a longitudinal central axis normal to the respective cylinder axis; a mutating spider having a central hub portion mounted on the shaft obliquely of the shaft axis, and having a plurality of branches extending radially outward from the hub portion and terminating at terminal ends; and means directly connecting the terminal ends centrally to corresponding ones of the bores for transferring motion between reciprocation of the pistons and rotation of the shaft, and for restraining the spider from rotating with the shaft.

  19. Insulated Piston Heads for Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricoire, A.; Kjellman, B.; Wigren, J.; Vanvolsem, M.; Aixala, L.

    2009-06-01

    Widely studied in the 1980s, the insulation of pistons in engines aimed at reducing the heat losses and thus increasing the indicated efficiency. However, those studies stopped in the beginning of the 1990s because of NO x emission legislation and also because of lower oil prices. Currently, with the improvement of exhaust after treatment systems (diesel particulate filter, selective catalytic reduction, and diesel oxidation catalyst) and engine technologies (exhaust gas recirculation), there are more trade-offs for NO x reduction. In addition, the fast rise of the oil prices tends to lead back to insulation technologies in order to save fuel. A 1 mm thick plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating with a graded transition between the topcoat and the bondcoat was deposited on top of a serial piston for heavy-duty truck engines. The effects of the insulated pistons on the engine performance are also discussed, and the coating microstructure is analyzed after engine test.

  20. Balancing mechanism for reciprocating piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, N.; Ogino, T.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a balancing mechanism for a reciprocating piston internal combustion engine which includes a cylinder, a piston reciprocatable in the cylinder, a crankcase, a crankshaft mounted in the crankshaft, a crankpin connected to the piston, and a pair of crank arms bridging the crankshaft and crankpin. The crank arms and crankpin rotate with the crankshaft during operation and form a rotating mass. The balancing mechanism comprises at least one rotating counterweight attached to and rotating with the crankshaft, and eccentric journal means on the crankshaft adjacent the crank arms, rotating with the crankshaft. The journal means has an axis spaced to the side of the crankshaft axis which is opposite from the crankpin. The rotating counterweight and the eccentric journal means counterbalancing the rotating mass.

  1. Internal combustion engine having opposed pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Puzio, E.T.

    1993-07-20

    An internal combustion apparatus is described having opposed sets of pistons comprising: (a) an inner crankcase means defining an inner chamber means therein, the inner crankcase means further defining a first connecting arm aperture means and a second connecting arm aperture means therein; (b) a crankshaft means rotatably mounted within the inner chamber means of the inner crankcase means and defining a crankshaft axis means extending axially there through, the crankshaft means defining a driving means peripherally therearound to facilitate distribution of driving power therefrom; (c) a first outer crankcase means defining a first outer chamber means in fluid flow communication with respect to the inner chamber means through the first connecting arm aperture means; (d) a second outer crankcase means defining a second outer chamber means in fluid flow communication with respect to the inner chamber means through the second connecting arm aperture means, the second outer crankcase means defining a second piston bore means extending longitudinally therein; (e) a crank pin means positioned extending through the crank pin aperture in the crankshaft means, the crank pin means being rotatable with respect to the crank pin aperture means; (f) a first connecting arm means fixedly secured with respect to one end of the crank pin means and extending through the first connecting arm aperture means into the first outer crankcase means; (g) a second connecting arm means fixedly secured with respect to the other end of the crank pin means and extending through the second connecting arm aperture means into the second outer crankcase means; (h) a first piston assembly means positioned extending through the first piston bore means to be reciprocally axially movable therein; (i) a second piston assembly means positioned extending through the second piston bore means to be reciprocally axially movable therein.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of a Method for Turbocharging Four-Stroke, Single Cylinder, Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchman, Michael; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Turbocharging an engine increases specific power, improves fuel economy, reduces emissions, and lowers cost compared to a naturally aspirated engine of the same power output. These advantages make turbocharging commonplace for multi-cylinder engines. Single cylinder engineers are not commonly turbocharged due to the phase lag between the exhaust stroke, which powers the turbocharger, and the intake stroke, when air is pumped into the engine. Our proposed method of turbocharging single cylinder engines is to add an ``air capacitor'' to the intake manifold, an additional volume that acts as a buffer to store compressed air between the exhaust and intake strokes, and smooth out the pressure pulses from the turbocharger. This talk presents experimental results from a single cylinder, turbocharged diesel engine fit with various sized air capacitors. Power output from the engine was measured using a dynamometer made from a generator, with the electrical power dissipated with resistive heating elements. We found that intake air density increases with capacitor size as theoretically predicted, ranging from 40 to 60 percent depending on heat transfer. Our experiment was able to produce 29 percent more power compared to using natural aspiration. These results validated that an air capacitor and turbocharger may be a simple, cost effective means of increasing the power density of single cylinder engines.

  3. Exhaust gas diverter for divided volute turbocharger of internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Meistrick, Z.S.; Pitzi, V.J.

    1992-09-15

    This patent describes a divided volute turbocharger diverter disposed between the exhaust manifold of an internal combustion engine and the turbine of the turbocharger, it comprises: first and second volute passageways; an interconnection passageway interconnecting the first and second volute passageways; an a diverter member disposed in only the first of the first and second volute passageways.

  4. Air fuel ratio control apparatus and method for an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Sawamoto, K.; Ikeura, K.; Morita, T.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1984-05-29

    Normally, an air-fuel ratio is controlled in accordance with the engine speed and the intake air quantity of an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger. When the output pressure of the turbocharger increases excessively, an intake relief valve opens to decrease the intake air quantity. In this case, the fuel injection quantity is controlled solely in accordance with the engine speed.

  5. Engine piston having an insulating air gap

    DOEpatents

    Jarrett, Mark Wayne; Hunold,Brent Michael

    2010-02-02

    A piston for an internal combustion engine has an upper crown with a top and a bottom surface, and a lower crown with a top and a bottom surface. The upper crown and the lower crown are fixedly attached to each other using welds, with the bottom surface of the upper crown and the top surface of the lower crown forming a mating surface. The piston also has at least one centrally located air gap formed on the mating surface. The air gap is sealed to prevent substantial airflow into or out of the air gap.

  6. Piston ring designs for reduced friction

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.H.; Newman, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    To reduce parasitic losses, a project was initiated to design, develop and bring to production a piston ring set which reduces engine friction while maintaining ring performance. In this paper, theoretical considerations affecting piston ring friction, and their implication in ring design, are discussed. An estimate of friction reduction and fuel economy improvement which can be achieved is calculated. Features of the resulting designs are reviewed, and friction, dynamometer, and vehicle test results are presented. Future ring design changes for reduced friction are reviewed.

  7. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2011-11-01

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  8. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2006-05-09

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  9. Ringless piston experiments. Natural gas engine technology advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. J.

    1991-12-01

    A two stroke 250 cc test engine was designed to experimentally evaluate ringless piston operation. The test engine had a crosshead to minimize the side loads on the ringless piston. The crankcase was sealed and it was possible to eliminate oil in the combustion chamber. A ringless molybdenum piston with labyrinth seals was designed and tested. Ringed-to-ringless power ratios greater than 90 percent were achieved by controlling piston-to-liner clearance via cylinder cooling.

  10. Study of turbocharger shaft motion by means of non-invasive optical techniques: Application to the behaviour analysis in turbocharger lubrication failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, J. V.; Serrano, J. R.; Dolz, V.; López, M. A.; Bouffaud, F.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a novel non-invasive technique to estimate the turbocharger shaft whirl motion. The aim of this article is to present a system for monitoring the shaft motion of a turbocharger, which will be used in turbocharger destructive testing. To achieve this, a camera and a light source were installed in a turbocharger test bench with a controlled lubrication circuit. An image recording methodology and a process algorithm have been developed, in order to estimate the shaft motion. This processing consists on differentiating specific zones of the image, in order to obtain their coordinates. Two reference points have been configured on the compressor side, which help to calculate the relative position of the shaft, avoiding the errors due to structural vibrations. Maximum eccentricity of the turbocharger has been determined and it has been compared with shaft motion when it is spinning in different conditions. A luminosity study has been also done, in order to improve the process and to obtain locus of shaft position in a picture exposition time period. The technique has been applied to diagnosis of a lubrication failure test and the main results will be presented in this article: like shaft motion figures; thermodynamic variables and pictures of the shaft while it is spinning at abnormal lubrication conditions. The measuring components used in this technique have the ability to withstand the catastrophic failure of the turbocharger in this type of test.

  11. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  12. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  13. Engine makers tap carbon-carbon pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1994-05-01

    This article describes the use of a carbon-carbon composite, developed for nose cones and rocket nozzles, for pistons in modern internal combustion engines. The topics of the article include the carbon-carbon composite mechanical and physical characteristics, initial research, manufacturing methods, fabrication techniques, initial testing in 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines, and current research.

  14. How Hot Can a Fire Piston Get?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Brown, J. A.; Cunningham, O. A.; Goad, B. C.

    2010-01-01

    The fire piston is just a sealed syringe containing a small amount of tinder. When the plunger is forced downwards, the air inside is compressed and heats up, setting fire to the tinder. It has been used as a convenient and portable way of starting fires "over a wide area from northern Burma and Siam through the Malay Peninsula and the Malayan…

  15. Stabilizing gas bearing in free piston machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhar, Manmohan (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    In a free piston engine, to reduce dynamic loads on the reciprocating elements caused by a time varying pressure gradient across the gas bearing and close clearance seals provided therein, drain galleries are incorporated at the ends of the gas bearings to isolate the same, and circumferentially spaced grooves are incorporated in the close clearance seal region.

  16. Emission of a Dual-Fuel Turbocharged Compression Ignition Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rózycki, Andrzej

    2012-02-01

    The paper describes the results of a four-cylinder dual fuel turbocharged compression ignition engine. The aim of the study was to determine the maximum CNG share in thefuel mixture delivered into the cylinder. Analysis of the investigation results showed that the CNG energy share in the fuel charge delivered into the cylinder can reach 45%. At that level of CNG energy share a 15% reduction in maximum torque is achieved in comparison with the standard fuelling. The unburnt hydrocarbon emission increases significantly. Emissions of other principal pollutants reach values comparable with those obtained at standard fuelling.

  17. Laser light stripe measurements assure correct piston assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Norbert; Frohn, Heiko

    1993-12-01

    Two VIKON-3D optical inspection systems assure the correct assembly of piston rings and guard rings in a new Volkswagen piston/rod assembly line. Both systems use laser light stripe measurements to locate and identify the relevant parts with high accuracy. The piston ring assembly is checked dynamically in video real time using laser light stripe and parallel projection techniques. In addition structured light is used to verify the correct piston/rod assembly. Both inspection systems are fully integrated into the manufacturing line. All types of pistons assembled can be checked without any mechanical changes to the measurement setup.

  18. A spherical joint piston design for high speed diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Wiczynski, P.D.; Mielke, S.; Conrow, R.

    1996-09-01

    A spherical joint piston and connecting rod have been developed through design proof-of-concept. The spherical joint allows piston rotation. The benefits of a rotating, symmetrical piston are: mechanical and thermal load symmetry, improved ring sealing and lubrication, and reduced bearing loads, scuffing, clearances and oil consumption. The assembly includes a squeeze cast, fiber reinforced aluminum spherical joint piston. Reinforcement is located in the piston bowl and skirt. The connecting rod consists of a spherical small end positioned on an elliptical cross-sectioned shank blended into a conventional big end. The assembly has operated at cylinder pressures exceeding of 24 MPa.

  19. Free-piston regenerative hot gas hydraulic engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A displacer piston which is driven pneumatically by a high-pressure or low-pressure gas is included in a free-piston regenerative hydraulic engine. Actuation of the displacer piston circulates the working fluid through a heater, a regenerator and a cooler. The present invention includes an inertial mass such as a piston or a hydraulic fluid column to effectively store and supply energy during portions of the cycle. Power is transmitted from the working fluid to a hydraulic fluid across a diaphragm or lightweight piston to achieve a hydraulic power out-put. The displacer piston of the present invention may be driven pneumatically, hydraulically or electromagnetically. In addition, the displacer piston and the inertial mass of the present invention may be positioned on the same side of the diaphragm member or may be separated by the diaphragm member.

  20. Method of making and apparatus for composite pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartsock, D.L.

    1986-06-03

    A method is described of making a composite piston for a reciprocating engine, comprising: (a) forming members to constitute the composite piston, including: (i) a piston member comprised of a material selected from plastic and metal having a density of less than about 0.15 lb/in/sup 3/, the piston member having a top, a side, and a cast in place metallic ring in the side of the piston member, the ring presenting an annular grooved wall disposed at a location radially opposite a depending portion of the carrier member when the latter is in the wrapped position, (ii) a ceramic facing member adapted to extend over the top of the piston, (iii) a carrier member effective to separate the facing member from the piston member while securing the facing member and piston member together for conjoint movement, the carrier member having one side adapted to wrap over the top of the piston with a portion depending along at least a portion of the piston side, (b) assembling the members by securing the ceramic facing member to the opposite side of the carrier member and wrapping the one side of the carrier member over the piston top with the portion depending along at least a portion of the piston side; and (c) with the carrier member wrapped about the piston, directing a high energy beam across a zone of the carrier member radially aligned with the grooved wall and effective to melt the portion of the carrier member intersected by the beam, causing the melted material to flow into the groove to fill the same and lock the piston member to the carrier member upon solidification.

  1. A Method for Turbocharging Four-Stroke Single Cylinder Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchman, Michael; Winter, Amos

    2014-11-01

    Turbocharging is not conventionally used with single cylinder engines due to the timing mismatch between when the turbo is powered and when it can deliver air to the cylinder. The proposed solution involves a fixed, pressurized volume - which we call an air capacitor - on the intake side of the engine between the turbocharger and intake valves. The capacitor acts as a buffer and would be implemented as a new style of intake manifold with a larger volume than traditional systems. This talk will present the flow analysis used to determine the optimal size for the capacitor, which was found to be four to five times the engine capacity, as well as its anticipated contributions to engine performance. For a capacitor sized for a one-liter engine, the time to reach operating pressure was found to be approximately two seconds, which would be acceptable for slowly accelerating applications and steady state applications. The air density increase that could be achieved, compared to ambient air, was found to vary between fifty percent for adiabatic compression and no heat transfer from the capacitor, to eighty percent for perfect heat transfer. These increases in density are proportional to, to first order, the anticipated power increases that could be realized. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. 1122374.

  2. Cast CF8C-Plus Stainless Steel for Turbocharger Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shyam, A.; Evans, N.D.; Pattabiraman, K. (Honeywell Turbo Technologies

    2010-06-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project is to provide the critical test data needed to qualify CF8C-Plus cast stainless steel for commercial production and use for turbocharger housings with upgraded performance and durability relative to standard commercial cast irons or stainless steels. The turbocharger technologies include, but are not limited to, heavy-duty highway diesel engines, and passenger vehicle diesel and gasoline engines. This CRADA provides additional critical high-temperature mechanical properties testing and data analysis needed to quality the new CF8C-Plus steels for turbocharger housing applications.

  3. Turbocharger chiller modeling and test evaluation. Final report, March-November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kountz, K.J.; Wurm, J.

    1996-07-01

    The objectives of this project were: To determine the technoeconomic feasibility of a natural gas-fired turbocharger-based chiller system, arranged in a combined-fluid Rankine/Rankine cycle; To design the turbocharger chiller system for a 50 RT cooling rating point capacity, using available vehicle turbocharges and standard chiller heat exchanger technology; and To evaluate several low, medium, and high pressure refrigerants and refrigerant/lubricant pairs for their thermodynamic and thermal stability characteristics and applicability to the chiller cycle.

  4. Turbocharger for two-cycle engines and method of operation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, R.M.

    1986-07-15

    This patent describes a turbocharger for a two-cycle engine having an oil mist containing crankcase and burning a mixture of liquid fuel containing lubricating oil therein wherein the turbocharger comprises a shaft mounted in a housing for rotation by an exhaust-driven turbine on one end to a drive compressor on the other end connected to supply pressurized air for the fuel/air mixture of the engine, the improvement to supply lubrication to the shaft and automatically enrichen the fuel/air mixture during high speed turbocharging.

  5. Exhaust pipe arrangement for a turbocharged multi-cylinder internal combustion engine having catalytic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Gauffres, U.J.

    1984-04-24

    An exhaust pipe arrangement for internal combustion engines is disclosed which includes an exhaust gas turbocharger, a bypass conduit for circumventing the turbocharger, a blow off valve, a starter catalyst disposed in an exhaust pipe, an oxygen sensor, and a main catalyst connected downstream of the turbocharger, starter catalyst, and oxygen sensor. To reduce the exhaust gas counterpressure and relieve the load on the starter catalyst at the same time, the starter catalyst is arranged upstream of a junction of the bypass conduit entering into the exhaust pipe.

  6. Partially stabilized zirconia piston bowl reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Hartsock, D.L.

    1987-10-01

    The Weibull based ''Simplified Structural Ceramic Design Technique'' was used to calculate the reliability of a partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) piston bowl design. The details of the method and a set of sample calculations are presented. Test results of the piston bowl showed cracks in regions which had a high calculated probability of failure. In addition cracks developed in a region of high compressive/shear stress. Since Weibull reliability analysis only uses tensile stresses this area did not have a high calculated probability of failure. Several hypotheses are presented for the mode of failure in this region. The simplified technique was used to predict what the necessary material properties would have to be for successful PSZ insert of the design shown.

  7. Compression ratio control in reciprocating piston engines

    SciTech Connect

    Doundoulakis, G.J.

    1989-08-29

    The patent describes compression ratio control for reciprocating piston engines. It comprises: a reciprocating engine crankcase; a plurality of compression/expansion cylinders rigidly attached to the crankcase; each of the cylinders including a curved surface and a cylinder head; a fuel mixture in-taken in the cylinders; a piston reciprocating along each cylinder's curved surface for providing compression/expansion to the fuel mixture; a crank mechanism including a crankshaft rotating about an axial line that is substantially equidistant from the heads, crankcheek lobes radially extending from the crankshaft, crankpins inside and in contact with crankpin bearings, axially extending between the crankcheek lobes, and crankshaft journal bearings for providing low frictional support to the crankshaft; a connecting rod for each of the cylinders connecting the piston with the crankpin; crankshaft positioning; a first transmission gear, a crankshaft gear for meshing with the transmission gear, and a slot cut on the crankcase; wherein the constraint in the displacement of the crankshaft in the horizontal sense is provided by the vertical edges of the slot, and wherein the vertical edges of the slot are preferably being curved with a radius of curvature substantially equal to the average pitch diameter of the crankshaft gear and thee first transmission gear for accurate meshing of the gears.

  8. A simulation study of the behavior of a two-stage turbocharging system during surge

    SciTech Connect

    Cheese, P.; Hetet, J.F.; Tauzia, X.; Roy, P.; Inozu, B.

    1996-12-31

    Turbocharger matching for a high rated two-stage turbocharged Diesel engine is rather difficult due to the power balance between the two turbocharger stages. Compressor surge is a predominant factor, especially for naval applications for which operation ranges are quite wide. In this paper, a simulation study of a two-stage turbocharged system that includes a low pressure and a high pressure compressor is presented. Equations that are specific to such a system are added to a basic model and the resulting set of equations is solved using ACSL. The influence of the geometry of the charging air system on the compressor surge is analyzed according to the primary engine parameters (cylinder pressure, engine speed and distribution diagram)

  9. Research on the capability testing and analyzing system of the embedded turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingfu; Li, Liang; Dong, Yu; Dong, Chun

    2006-11-01

    At present, the domestic turbocharger's ex-factory testing used to adopting pointer indicators which read testing data by manpower. In order to improve the turbocharger capability test and the efficiency of the automatic intelligent degree, the paper designs a new turbocharger capability testing system which adopts the embedded processor ARM7 as its core. The system contains test platform, embedded acquisition system and PC capability analyzing software, realizes many functions such as data acquisition, parameter supervising, capability analyses and long distance transmission etc. Applied by the ChongQing JiangJin Runoff Turbocharger Factory, it is turn out to be that the system has perfect function, credible run, precise testing data, friendly software interface and simple manipulation to improve the testing efficiency and have a bright future.

  10. Analysis of Variation of Piston Temperature with Piston Dimensions and Undercrown Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J C; Schramm, W B

    1948-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented that permits estimation of the changes in piston-temperature distribution induced by variations in the crown thickness, the ring-groove-pad thickness, and the undercrown surface heat-transfer coefficient. The analysis consists of the calculation of operating temperatures at various points in the piston body on the basis of the experimentally determined surface heat-transfer coefficients and boundary-region temperatures, as well as arbitrarily selected surface coefficients. Surface heat-transfer coefficients were estimated from the internal temperature gradients obtained by hardness surveys of aluminum pistons that had been operated under severe conditions in a liquid-cooled, single-cylinder, 5 1/2 by 6-inch test engine.

  11. Improving Free-Piston Stirling Engine Power Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2016-01-01

    Analyses and experiments demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and displacer motion in a free piston Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis shows the theoretical limits of power density improvement due to ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. More realistic models based on nodal analysis show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal, often producing less power than engines that use sinusoidal piston and displacer motion. Constrained optimization using nodal analysis predicts that Stirling engine power density can be increased by as much as 58% using optimized higher harmonic piston and displacer motion. An experiment is conducted in which an engine designed for sinusoidal motion is forced to operate with both second and third harmonics, resulting in a maximum piston power increase of 14%. Analytical predictions are compared to experimental data showing close agreement with indirect thermodynamic power calculations, but poor agreement with direct electrical power measurements.

  12. Improving Free-Piston Stirling Engine Specific Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell Henry

    2014-01-01

    This work uses analytical methods to demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and/or displacer motion in a Stirling Engine. Isothermal analysis was used to show the potential benefits of ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. Nodal analysis is used to show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal in real Stirling engines. Constrained optimization was used to identify piston and displacer waveforms that increase Stirling engine specific power.

  13. Improving Free-Piston Stirling Engine Specific Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2015-01-01

    This work uses analytical methods to demonstrate the potential benefits of optimizing piston and/or displacer motion in a Stirling engine. Isothermal analysis was used to show the potential benefits of ideal motion in ideal Stirling engines. Nodal analysis is used to show that ideal piston and displacer waveforms are not optimal in real Stirling engines. Constrained optimization was used to identify piston and displacer waveforms that increase Stirling engine specific power.

  14. Particulate extraction arrangement for automotive turbocharger or the like

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, N.; Kato, N.; Kawamura, M.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes an engine system including an exhaust manifold; a turbocharger having a scroll into which exhaust gas from the engine is introduced; a valve for selectively by-passing exhaust gases from the manifold around the scroll into an exhaust conduit; and a particulate separation device operatively interposed between the exhaust manifold, the scroll and the valve, the separation device comprising; a chamber; a first port which establishes fluid communication between the chamber and the manifold; a second port, the second port establishing fluid communication between the chamber and the scroll; and a third port, the third port establishing fluid communication between the chamber and the exhaust conduit via the valve; the chamber including means for inducing particulate matter which is carried thereinto from the manifold through the first port to separate from the exhaust gases and gravitate toward the third port and for inducing particulate matter free exhaust gases to pass through the second port.

  15. Design and evaluation of silicon nitride turbocharger rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Takama, K.; Sasaki, S.; Shimizu, T.; Kamiya, N. )

    1993-01-01

    Two types of silicon nitride ceramic rotor have been introduced into the Japanese market by Toyota Motor Corporation, named CT26 and CT12A, to improve engine acceleration response by the reduction in moment of inertia. In order to design a suitable blade shape for a ceramic rotor, the critical stress of the blade was determined by the results obtained experimentally from correlating the fracture origin over spin-tested rotors with centrifugal stress at fracture. A suitable blade shape has been determined for the CT26 turbocharger rotor type, which is identical to the metal rotor except for the disk diameter of hub back face and the blade thickness. The CT12A type is of similar design to the CT26 type; all dimensions could be reduced except for the inlet blade thickness, which is determined by foreign object damage (FOD) resistance.

  16. Turbocharger with variable nozzle having vane sealing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Philippe; Petitjean, Dominique; Ruquart, Anthony; Dupont, Guillaume; Jeckel, Denis

    2011-11-15

    A variable nozzle for a turbocharger includes a plurality of vanes rotatably mounted on a nozzle ring and disposed in a nozzle flow path defined between the nozzle ring and an opposite nozzle wall. Either or both of the faces of the nozzle ring and nozzle wall include(s) at least one step that defines sealing surfaces positioned to be substantially abutted by airfoil surfaces of the vanes in the closed position of the vanes and to be spaced from the airfoil surfaces in positions other than the closed position. This substantial abutment between the airfoil surfaces and the sealing surfaces serves to substantially prevent exhaust gas from leaking past the ends of the airfoil portions. At the same time, clearances between the nozzle ring face and the end faces of the airfoil portions can be sufficiently large to prevent binding of the vanes under all operating conditions.

  17. Continuously proportional variable geometry turbocharger system and method of control

    SciTech Connect

    Younessi, R.; Rini, G.T.

    1992-06-23

    This patent describes a system for performing closed loop control of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) utilized in an internal combustion engine. It comprises VGT actuator means for changing the geometric configuration of the VGT in response to an actuator control signal; sensor means for detecting selected engine operating parameters including a VGT actuator parameter and an engine intake manifold parameter, and generating output signals representative thereof; means for outputting a target VGT actuator parameter value and a target intake manifold parameter valve based on the values of selected sensor means output signals; means for determining whether the engine is in a steady state or a transient state of operation based on the values of selected sensor means output signals; and means for developing an actuator control signal based on one of the target parameter values as a function of the determined engine operating state.

  18. Engine with speed responsive multi-ratio turbocharger drive

    SciTech Connect

    McCreary, Ch.H.

    1984-05-01

    An internal combustion engine, especially of the two stroke cycle diesel type, has a turbocharger with a supplemental mechanical drive for maintaining a minimum speed ratio relative to engine speed, when exhaust energy is insufficient to provide a higher speed, so as to maintain adequate charging air for engine operation throughout the engine speed range. In order to provide more efficient operation during engine operation at idle and in a lower portion of the operating range where a reduced amount of charging air is adequate, a secondary lower speed ratio is provided by the mechanical drive system. A speed responsive clutch is included to disconnect the higher speed primary drive during engine operation in the lower speed range and permit operation at the more efficient secondary speed ratio.

  19. Internal position and limit sensor for free piston machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor); Wood, James Gary (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A sensor for sensing the position of a reciprocating free piston in a free piston Stirling machine. The sensor has a disk mounted to an end face of the power piston coaxially with its cylinder and reciprocating with the piston The disk includes a rim around its outer perimeter formed of an electrically conductive material A coil is wound coaxially with the cylinder, spaced outwardly from the outer perimeter of the disk and mounted in fixed position relative to the pressure vessel, preferably on the exterior of the pressure vessel wall.

  20. PIFFO -- Piston friction force measurements during engine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F.; Geiger, U.; Hermsen, F.G.

    1996-09-01

    Fuel consumption of a modern combustion engine is significantly influenced by the mechanical friction losses. Particularly in typical city driving, the reduction of the engine friction losses offers a remarkable potential in emission and fuel consumption reduction. The analysis of the engine friction distribution of modern engines shows that the piston group has a high share at total engine friction. This offers a high potential to optimize piston group friction. The paper presents results of recent research and development work in the field of the tribological system piston/piston ring/cylinder bore.

  1. Studies of a heat-pipe cooled piston crown

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Cao, Y.; Wang, R.; Mignano, F.; Chen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Designing pistons with effective cooling is crucial to preventing piston failure and improving engine service life. A piston design that incorporates the heat-pipe cooling technology may provide a new approach that could improve the thermal-tribological performance of heavy-duty diesel engine pistons. A simplified piston crown with an annular reciprocating heat pipe is constructed to demonstrate this concept. The piston crown is experimentally tested on a specially designed reciprocating apparatus. Experimental data indicate that the annular heat-pipe cooling can greatly assist in reducing the temperature gradient and peak temperature along the ring bank. In order to predict the performance in a more realistic piston working condition, a three-dimensional finite element modeling is used to analyze the thermal performance of this annular heat-pipe cooled crown (AHPCC). The heat-transfer coefficient under the reciprocal environment of the experimental apparatus and the effective thermal conductance of the heat pipe are determined by correlating the numerical calculations with the experimental measurements. The results indicate that the heat-pipe-cooling concept presented in this paper can provide an effective means for piston temperature control under real piston operating conditions.

  2. Hydraulic assist turbocharger system and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, R.J.

    1986-11-18

    This patent describes a hydraulic assist turbocharger system for supplying charge air to a combustion engine, comprising: an hydraulic assist turbocharger having a first turbine driven by engine exhaust gases, a compressor rotatably driven by the first turbine for supplying charge air to the engine, and an hydraulic turbine for selective supplemental driving of the compressor; hydraulic fluid supply means for selectively supplying an hydraulic fluid under pressure into rotatable driving communicating with the hydraulic turbine, the fluid supply means including at least two nozzles for passage of the fluid under pressure into driving communication with the hydraulic turbine; means for selectively preventing passage of the fluid under pressure through at least one of the nozzles and for permitting passage of the fluid under pressure through at least one other of the nozzles during an engine starting procedure. This is to decrease the available nozzle flow area open to fluid passage and thereby increase the pressure of hydraulic fluid during the engine starting procedure to correspondingly increase supplemental driving of the compressor resulting in increased supply of charge air to the engine; and means for selectively decreasing the viscosity of the hydraulic fluid during a starting procedure of increase the flow rate of the hydraulic fluid into driving communication with the hydraulic turbine during the starting procedure to correspondingly increase supplemental driving of the compressor resulting in increased supply of charge air to the engine. The hydraulic fluid supply means comprises pump means for providing the hydraulic fluid under pressure for flow through the nozzles into driving communication with the hydraulic turbine.

  3. Lubrication and friction of piston and piston rings in internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Miltsios, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    A model was developed for determining the lubrication regime under which the piston and piston rings operate in the internal combustion engine, and for calculating the friction force of each component at each crank angle. The ring is assumed to have a circular profile in the direction of motion. The profile changes in time because tilting of the ring is taken into account. In the circumferential direction, two cases are examined. In the first, the ring is assumed to be a perfect circle, and the bore cross-section elliptic. The finite-element method is used to solve the two-dimensional Reynolds equation. In the second, the clearance between ring and bore is assumed to be constant, and the one-dimensional Reynolds equation is used. The ring is treated as infinitely long, and an integration of the Reynolds equation is performed. The piston is treated like the one-dimensional case of the ring, except that a correction factor is used to take care of the fact that the piston skirt has dimensions of the same magnitude in both direction. For all cases, mixed lubrication is considered when the oil film thickness becomes lower than a specified value.

  4. Fluorocarbon seal replaces metal piston ring in low density gas environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morath, W. D.; Morgan, N. E.

    1967-01-01

    Reinforced fluorocarbon cupseal, which provides an integral lip-type seal, replaces the metal piston rings in piston-cylinder configurations used in the compression of low density gases. The fluorocarbon seal may be used as cryogenic compressor piston seals.

  5. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégot, Sylvie; Layes, Guillaume; Lanzetta, François; Nika, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of a free piston Stirling engine. The model and the detailed calculation of pressures losses are exposed. Stability of the machine is studied by the observation of the eigenvalues of the model matrix. Model validation based on the comparison with NASA experimental results is described. The influence of operational and construction parameters on performance and stability issues is exposed. The results show that most parameters that are beneficial for machine power seem to induce irregular mechanical characteristics with load, suggesting that self-sustained oscillations could be difficult to maintain and control.

  6. Analysis of reciprocating compressor piston rod failures

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, H.A.; Drosjack, M.J.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the analysis of five piston rod failures which occurred on reciprocating compressors. Calculations are shown for rod stress which includes nominal rod loading sources as well as additional loads due to unusual pressure losses in the compressor valves, flexure of the rods due to misalignment, and manufacturing errors. The additional loads were incorporated on the basis of field measurements. The stress values are used with Baquin's equation to produce fatigue life curves for the rods. Based on the calculations, recommendations for modified rods were made. The calculation procedures are described in a manner which will permit their application to other reciprocating compressors.

  7. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  8. External combustion engine with improved piston and crankshaft linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, F.

    1991-03-12

    This patent describes improvement in an external heat engine having a piston mounted for movement between a first position and a second position, means for forcibly moving the piston from the first position to the second position (power stroke), a crankshaft rotatable about a main axis, and means for linking the piston and crankshaft so that linear movement of the piston from the first position to the second position during the power stroke is transformed into rotational movement of the crankshaft, the power stroke corresponding to a first portion of one rotation of the crankshaft about the main axis, the piston moving from the second position to the first position during a second portion of one rotation of the crankshaft (compression stroke). The improvement comprises: means for linking the piston and crankshaft comprises a rotatable member; means connected to the piston for rotatably supporting the rotatable member, the rotatable member being rotatable about a first point and being connected to the crankshaft at a second point offset from the first point, for rotation about the first point in response to rotation of the crankshaft about its main axis, the first point being disposed so that when the piston is in the first position, the first point is substantially aligned with the main axis of the crankshaft during a third portion of one rotation of the crankshaft about the main axis.

  9. Fluid powered linear piston motor with harmonic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, David W.

    2016-09-20

    A motor is disclosed that includes a module assembly including a piston that is axially cycled. The piston axial motion is coupled to torque couplers that convert the axial motion into rotary motion. The torque couplers are coupled to a rotor to rotate the rotor.

  10. CNC grinding of valve housing piston holes

    SciTech Connect

    Ashbaugh, F.A.

    1991-11-01

    Grinding has traditionally been used for machining operations requiring close dimensional tolerances and better surface finishes than can be obtained from other metal removal techniques. Using a grinding process for the last metal removal operation, the close tolerances and surface finishes can be easily held while eliminating the adverse conditions from the current metal removal processes. Pre-machined test parts were sent to a machine tool supplier to have the critical inside features of a typical piston bore finish machined using an internal CNC grinder equipped with high-frequency spindles. The piston bore and sealing angle were ground using a standard 120-grit silicon carbide wheel. The wafer step was machined using a solid carbide tool designed and built at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Six consecutive parts were machined for evaluation. The repeatability on all six parts was within print requirements. The inside corner radii was less than 0.002 in. and the surface finish was 8.2 arithmetical average or better as defined by ANSI B46.1, Surface Texture. Machining parts by this grinding process would eliminate bellmouth, chatter, waviness, and traveler polishing operations. It would produce a superior surface finish, small inside radii, and small easily removable burrs. It would also hold tolerances closer and significantly reduce scrap, rework, rejects, and deviations. 1 fig.

  11. Piston ring conformability in a distorted bore

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanik, E.

    1996-09-01

    Some different equations to calculate the maximum deformation that a given ring can conform to, are found in the bibliography. These equations do not consider the ring end gap and ovality, gas pressure acting on it, nor the actual bore shape, but only the maximum amplitude for a given term (from a fourier Series that describes the bore shape). A more exact prediction can be done with Finite Element tools or specific codes for piston ring simulation; those approaches are not usually carried out, except in special cases or in more fundamental studies. Experimental measurements were carried out to verify the simple conformability criteria. Deformed shapes were produced in a static jig and areas of non contact, between ring and the deformed bore shapes, were measured. Based on these measurements, a semi-empirical equation is proposed to calculate the limit of piston ring conformability. The proposed equation is simple enough to be calculated in the initial engine design phases (where the required inputs to more detailed methods are not available) or on a day-by-day basis. If bore deformation surpasses the ring conformability, the percentage of ring periphery contacting the bore can be estimated, in a first approximation, by the linear regression empirically found in the experiments.

  12. Differential piston and valving system for detonation device

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.S.

    1988-07-26

    A method of producing repeated detonations in a detonation chamber is described comprising: a. arranging a movable differential piston in a differential cylinder around a fixed wall of the detonation chamber so as to form a fluid flow passageway between the detonation chamber wall and the piston; and b. arranging valves to cooperate with the differential piston so that a power stroke of the differential piston draws cooling and purging air into contact with the detonation chamber wall and compresses recharging air and so that a return stroke of the differential piston forces the cooling and purging air through the passageway into the detonation chamber to purge exhaust gas from the detonation chamber and subsequently admits compressed recharging air through the passageway and into the detonation chamber.

  13. Piston ring microwelding: Field/lab correlation and prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Shuster, M.; Mahler, F.; Deis, M.; Macy, D.; Frame, R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will discuss the microwelding phenomenon between aluminum pistons and iron piston rings in internal combustion engines. The mechanism of microwelding as observed on field run engine hardware has been correlated with the microwelding mechanism generated in an accelerated laboratory bench test. Hardness distribution measurements, metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and EDS spectrometer have been used in the analysis of this surface damage mechanism. In this work, the metallurgical parameters were formulated which describe the microwelding phenomenon after field usage and after accelerated testing. It was demonstrated that the high output water-cooled two-stroke engine accelerated bench test reproduces the field run engine microwelding phenomenon in 30 minutes. It was shown that the best prevention of the microwelding phenomenon was provided when the piston and piston ring surfaces were separated by a soft, wear and heat resistant coating, integrally bonded to the piston ring.

  14. Powder-lubricant piston ring for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, H.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a diesel engine fueled by coal-water slurry. It comprises: a distal end including a piston head impinging upon a combustion chamber formed between the piston and a cylinder of the diesel engine; a proximal end including means for attaching the piston to a reciprocating arm means; a heat dam between the distal end and the proximal end, the heat dam including a portion of substantially decreased diameter thereby forming a debris chamber within the piston; the distal portion including a particulate return valve communicating from the debris chamber to the combustion chamber wherein residue from the coal-water slurry is returned from the debris chamber to the combustion chamber; and at least one powder-lubricated ring circumferentially extending around the piston head wherein lubricant powder is disposed between the powder-lubricant powder is disposed between the powder-lubricant ring and a wall of the cylinder.

  15. Ultralean combustion in general aviation piston engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirivella, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The role of ultralean combustion in achieving fuel economy in general aviation piston engines was investigated. The aircraft internal combustion engine was reviewed with regard to general aviation requirements, engine thermodynamics and systems. Factors affecting fuel economy such as those connected with an ideal leanout to near the gasoline lean flammability limit (ultralean operation) were analyzed. A Lycoming T10-541E engine was tested in that program (both in the test cell and in flight). Test results indicate that hydrogen addition is not necessary to operate the engine ultralean. A 17 percent improvement in fuel economy was demonstrated in flight with the Beechcraft Duke B60 by simply leaning the engine at constant cruiser power and adjusting the ignition for best timing. No detonation was encountered, and a 25,000 ft ceiling was available. Engine roughness was shown to be the limiting factor in the leanout.

  16. TCM aircraft piston engine emission reduction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezy, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technology necessary to safely reduce general aviation piston engine exhaust emissions to meet the EPA 1980 Emission Standards with minimum adverse effects on cost, weight, fuel economy, and performance was demonstrated. A screening and assessment of promising emission reduction concepts was provided, and the preliminary design and development of those concepts was established. A system analysis study and a decision making procedure were used by TCM to evaluate, trade off, and rank the candidate concepts from a list of 14 alternatives. Cost, emissions, and 13 other design criteria considerations were defined and traded off against each candidate concept to establish its merit and emission reduction usefulness. A computer program was used to aid the evaluators in making the final choice of three concepts.

  17. Powder-lubricated piston ring development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshmat, H.

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new particulate lubrication concept for reducing piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-water slurry-fueled diesels by replacing the present oil-lubricated system with powder lubrication that would utilize coal ash, either alone or in combination with another powder. The feasibility of this particular lubrication concept for reducing ring/liner wear was demonstrated in a series of experiments utilizing redesigned and properly selected components. Wear performance for suitable ring/liner materials lubricated with a powder that incorporates the abrasive ash particles was evaluated in terms of load capacity, friction, and rate of wear for the best combination of ring design, ring and liner materials, and powder constituents. In addition, the use of a powder-lubricated system in the upper portion of the cylinder isolated the particulates from the lower portions of the engine, thus further reducing engine wear.

  18. Powder-lubricated piston ring development

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, H.

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new particulate lubrication concept for reducing piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-water slurry-fueled diesels by replacing the present oil-lubricated system with powder lubrication that would utilize coal ash, either alone or in combination with another powder. The feasibility of this particular lubrication concept for reducing ring/liner wear was demonstrated in a series of experiments utilizing redesigned and properly selected components. Wear performance for suitable ring/liner materials lubricated with a powder that incorporates the abrasive ash particles was evaluated in terms of load capacity, friction, and rate of wear for the best combination of ring design, ring and liner materials, and powder constituents. In addition, the use of a powder-lubricated system in the upper portion of the cylinder isolated the particulates from the lower portions of the engine, thus further reducing engine wear. (VC)

  19. Thermo-optical piston in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G.

    2014-12-09

    The new steady state of the gas – thermo-optical pressure difference is considered. This condition occurs in the gas that is in a closed capillary in the field of resonant laser radiation and a temperature gradient. The pressure difference at the ends of the capillary is determined by the interaction of three fluxes – thermal creep, the light-induced drift and Poiseuille flux. Laser radiation and the temperature gradient play the role of thermo-optical piston (TOP) which compresses the gas in different ends of the capillary. The problem is solved based on the linearized Boltzmann kinetic equations that take into account the induced and spontaneous transitions in atoms or molecules. Expressions for the kinetic coefficients defining TOP-effect are obtained in the case of a nearly free-molecular regime. Numerical estimates of the TOP-effect are given for sodium vapor.

  20. New Outboard Motor Firing on All Pistons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Seven years ago, NASA was in the planning stages of producing an aluminum alloy with higher strength and resistance at elevated temperatures for aerospace applications. At that time, a major automobile manufacturer happened to approach NASA for solutions to lowering engine emissions and the costs associated with developing aluminum engine pistons. The Space Agency realized the answers to the manufacturer's problems could lie within the proposed alloy. Jonathan Lee, a structural materials engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center s Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing Department, and PoShou Chen, a scientist with Huntsville, Alabama-based Morgan Research Corporation, partook in the development project as the inventors. The resulting NASA High-Strength Aluminum Alloy, or "MSFC-398," was capable of casting metal components at both high volume and low cost, making it extremely attractive for commercial application, not just in automotives, but in a variety of other industries, as well. NASA patented the technology and introduced it for public licensing in 2001.

  1. Piston core properties and disturbance effects.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, H.W.; Rice, T.L.; Mayne, P.W.; Singh, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory geotechnical data on piston cores for 31 sites on the mid-Atlantic Upper Continental Slope show the near-surface sediments vary from normally consolidated to somewhat overconsolidated clayey silts and silty clays of low to high plasticity. They also exhibit normalized behavior and their index property correlations with the effective-stress friction angle, the undrained strength ratio, and the compression index are reasonably consistent with existing knowledge. Because existing knowledge concerning disturbance effect suggests that in-situ preconsolidation stress values should lie between those derived from the triaxial and laboratory vane data, the preconsolidation stress values obtained from the consolidation data appear to be appreciably smaller than in-situ values. -from ASCE Publications Information

  2. Turbocharger with turbine backplate and center housing oil shield

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.; Ho, I.C.

    1991-06-25

    This paper describes a turbocharger. It comprises: a center housing, a compressor housing, and a turbine housing, means for securing the turbine housing and the compressor housing to the center housing, the center housing including a circumferentially extending wall defining a cavity therewithin, means carried by the center housing for rotatably supporting a shaft in the cavity, the shaft including portions extending into the compressor housing and into the turbine housing, a turbine wheel mounted on the portion of the shaft in the turbine housing, a compressor wheel mounted on the portion of the shaft in the compressor housing, the cavity having opposite ends facing the turbine and compressor housings respectively, the end facing the turbine housing being an open end, and an annular backplate member separate from the center housing and from the turbine housing, the annular backplate member circumscribing the shaft for closing the open end of the center housing, the securing means including fastening means extending between the center housing and the turbine housing, the backplate member including a portion clamped between the center housing and the turbine housing by compressive forces generated by the fastening means and transmitted from the turbine housing to the compressor housing through the portion of the backplate member, and a circumferentially extending shroud between the annular backplate member and the turbine wheel.

  3. Cam drive diesel engine utilizing double acting pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Gassman, W.J.

    1991-05-21

    This patent describes a improved double acting piston internal combustion engine. It comprises: a least one double acting piston positioned in an internal combustion engine cylinder having first and second combustion chambers located at opposed ends thereof, the at least one double acting piston having first and second piston heads on opposed ends thereof, the first and second piston heads communicating with the first and second combustion chambers respectively, and cam drive means operably associated with the at least one double acting piston, the cam drive means operably converting a combustion actuated reciprocable movement of the at least one double acting piston into a rotational drive movement, thereby to effect a rotation movement of a drive shaft means so that the drive shaft means functions as a power takeoff for the internal combustion engine, and further including cam groove means positioned in the cam drive means, the follower means operably engaging the cam groove means to effect the rotational drive movement, and wherein the follower means comprises a radially extending pin orthogonally positioned relative to a reciprocable movement axis of the at least one double acting position, and further including a drive ring means slidably movable over a circumferential surface of the cam drive means, the drive ring means retaining the follower means therein and directing the follower means into the cam groove means.

  4. Hot piston ring/cylinder liner materials: Selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    In current designs of the automotive (kinematic) Stirling engine, the piston rings are made of a reinforced polymer and are located below the pistons because they cannot withstand the high temperatures in the upper cylinder area. Theoretically, efficiency could be improved if hot piston rings were located near the top of the pistons. Described is a program to select piston ring and cylinder coating materials to test this theory. Candidate materials were screened, then subjected to a pin or disk friction and wear test machine. Tests were performed in hydrogen at specimen temperatures up to 760 C to simulate environmental conditions in the region of the hot piston ring reversal. Based on the results of these tests, a cobalt based alloy, Stellite 6B, was chosen for the piston rings and PS200, which consists of a metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix with dispersed solid lubricants, was chosen as the cylinder coating. Tests of a modified engine and a baseline engine showed that the hot ring reduced specific fuel consumption by up to 7 percent for some operating conditions and averaged about 3 percent for all conditions evaluated. Related applications of high-temperature coatings for shaft seals and as back-up lubricants are also described.

  5. Preliminary results on performance testing of a turbocharged rotary combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Rice, W. J.; Schock, H. J.; Pringle, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of a turbocharged rotary engine at power levels above 75 kW (100 hp) was studied. A twin rotor turbocharged Mazda engine was tested at speeds of 3000 to 6000 rpm and boost pressures to 7 psi. The NASA developed combustion diagnostic instrumentation was used to quantify indicated and pumping mean effect pressures, peak pressure, and face to face variability on a cycle by cycle basis. Results of this testing showed that a 5900 rpm a 36 percent increase in power was obtained by operating the engine in the turbocharged configuration. When operating with lean carburetor jets at 105 hp (78.3 kW) and 4000 rpm, a brake specific fuel consumption of 0.45 lbm/lb-hr was measured.

  6. The third-generation turbocharged engine for the Audi 5000 CS and 5000 CS Quattro

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, D.

    1986-01-01

    In September 1985 the new Audi 5000 CS Quattro was introduced to the American market. This luxurious high performance touring sedan has been equipped with a more advanced turbocharged engine with intercooler and electronic engine management giving improved performance, excellent torque, faster response and better fuel economy. The basic engine is the tried-and-tested Audi 5-cylinder unit. The turbocharged engine's ancillary systems, the electronic ignition control and fuel injection have all been newly developed, carefully optimized and well matched in the special demands of a turbocharged engine. The ignition system controls the engine and fuel injection and delivers analog and digital signals to the car's instrument panel display. The system also has an integrated self-diagnostic function.

  7. Loss terms in free-piston Stirling engine models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Lloyd B.

    1992-01-01

    Various models for free piston Stirling engines are reviewed. Initial models were developed primarily for design purposes and to predict operating parameters, especially efficiency. More recently, however, such models have been used to predict engine stability. Free piston Stirling engines have no kinematic constraints and stability may not only be sensitive to the load, but also to various nonlinear loss and spring constraints. The present understanding is reviewed of various loss mechanisms for free piston Stirling engines and how they have been incorporated into engine models is discussed.

  8. Engine including a piston member having a high top ring groove

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, R.L.; Kamman, K.R.; Ballheimer, B.; Shoup, S.G.

    1990-07-17

    This patent describes an improvement in an engine. It is of the type having a block defining an upper bore, a cylinder liner located in the block bore and defining a piston bore, a cylinder head connected to the block, and a piston assembly including a steel piston member disposed for reciprocation in the piston bore.

  9. 220000-r/min, 2-kW PM Motor Drive for Turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Toshihiko; Takata, Yosuke; Yamashita, Yukio; Komatsu, Yoshimi; Ibaraki, Seiichi

    This paper describes an ultra high-speed permanent-magnet synchronous motor drive, which is embedded in a turbocharger of an internal-combustion engine. The electrical drive makes it possible to enhance output power of the turbocharger in a motoring mode and to retrieve combustion energy from exhaust gas in a regenerating mode. Computer simulations and experimental tests are conducted to examine various operation characteristics of a prototype. The experimental data demonstrate 220000-r/min operation at 2.2-kW inverter output power, which agree with the simulation results well and prove feasibility of the proposed system.

  10. Process for Making Carbon-Carbon Turbocharger Housing Unit for Intermittent Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved. lightweight, turbine housing unit for an intermittent combustion reciprocating internal combustion engine turbocharger is prepared from a lay-up or molding of carbon-carbon composite materials in a single-piece or two-piece process. When compared to conventional steel or cast iron, the use of carbon-carbon composite materials in a turbine housing unit reduces the overall weight of the engine and reduces the heat energy loss used in the turbo-charging process. This reduction in heat energy loss and weight reduction provides for more efficient engine operation.

  11. 13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of disassembled steam engine showing cylinder, piston rod, parallel motion links and steam chest. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  12. Experimental Evaluation of the Free Piston Engine - Linear Alternator (FPLA).

    SciTech Connect

    Leick, Michael T.; Moses, Ronald W.

    2015-03-01

    This report describes the experimental evaluation of a prototype free piston engine - linear alternator (FPLA) system developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The opposed piston design wa developed to investigate its potential for use in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The system is mechanically simple with two - stroke uniflow scavenging for gas exchange and timed port fuel injection for fuel delivery, i.e. no complex valving. Electrical power is extracted from piston motion through linear alternators wh ich also provide a means for passive piston synchronization through electromagnetic coupling. In an HEV application, this electrical power would be used to charge the batteries. The engine - alternator system was designed, assembled and operated over a 2 - year period at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. This report primarily contains a description of the as - built system, modifications to the system to enable better performance, and experimental results from start - up, motoring, and hydrogen combus tion tests.

  13. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Harvey, Michael N.

    2001-01-30

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  14. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Harvey, Michael N.

    2000-02-15

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  15. A contribution to film coefficient estimation in piston cooling galleries

    SciTech Connect

    Torregrosa, A.J.; Broatch, A.; Olmeda, P.; Martin, J.

    2010-02-15

    The need to reduce fuel consumption and exhaust emissions in internal combustion engines has been drastically increased during last years. One of the most important processes affecting these parameters is heat transfer from the in-cylinder gas to the surrounding walls, as this mechanism has a direct influence on the combustion process. Regarding the different walls (liner, cylinder head and piston surfaces), heat flow to the piston is especially important, as it is essential to avoid excessively high temperatures that could result in material damage and/or oil cracking. With this purpose different cooling strategies are used, among which the improvement of the piston cooling system by using oil galleries is preferred. In this work, the heat flow through the oil gallery in a Diesel piston was investigated on a dedicated test bench. This bench consists of a controlled heat source and a piston oil cooling system in which different test conditions were evaluated in order to obtain a correlation for the film coefficient associated with piston oil cooling. These experimental results were then incorporated into a lumped model for engine heat transfer. Finally, in order to evaluate the accuracy of this model and the effects of the correlation for oil gallery coefficient on engine heat flows, results obtained on a conventional engine test bench equipped with a Diesel engine, in which two piston temperatures had been measured, were used. The results show an improvement in piston temperature predictions when compared with those obtained using a previously reported expression for the calculation of the oil film coefficient. (author)

  16. [Cytotoxicity evaluation of the disposable medical syringe piston].

    PubMed

    He, Huahong; Li, Wei; Wu, Ting

    2010-03-01

    When some testing institutions performed biological evaluation to the disposable medical syringe piston, cytotoxicity was found. According to the biological evaluation testing Selection Guide proposed by Ministry of Health and the Comments of Sample Provider, We performed biological evaluation to one sample by using 5 tests of basic biological evaluation. Cytotoxicity was found, which was probably caused by the residue of the lotion. This research provides reference for objective evaluation of disposable medical syringe piston and safe guarantee of the product.

  17. Structural design of Stirling engine with free pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusov, Jozef; Gavlas, Stanislav; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    Stirling engine is a device that converts thermal energy to mechanical work, which is mostly used to drive a generator of electricity. Advantage of Stirling engine is that it works with closed-cycle, where working medium is regularly cooled and heated, which acts on the working piston. This engine can be made in three modifications - alpha, beta, gamma. This paper discusses the design of the gamma Stirling engine with free pistons.

  18. The problems of piston skirt microgeometry in combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskra, A.; Babiak, M.; Wróblewski, E.

    2016-09-01

    Geometry of the slot between piston bearing surface and cylinder bore affects the friction losses of the IC engine to the far extent. It appears that these losses depend more on the area covered with oil than the thickness of oil layer separating collaborating parts. Barrel-shaped or stepwise piston bearing surface is the way to reduce the oil covered area. Turns out that the referred to friction losses contributes more to area covered by the oil film than the film thickness of the separation elements cooperating. The method to reduce the area covered by the oil film is a modification of the bearing surface of the piston by adjusting the profile. This paper presents the results of simulation leading to the reduction in friction losses and abrasive wear of piston bearing surface and cylinder bore. Covering the piston bearing surface with a thin layer of graphite one can get an extremely advantageous tribological properties of the piston assembly which means the expected parameters of oil film and in a case of film rupture-an ignorable abrasive wear of the graphite layer and/or cylinder bore.

  19. Method of Fabricating Chopped-Fiber Composite Piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional piston molding is fabricated from a mixture of chopped, carbon tow filaments of variable length, which are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and molded by conventional molding processes into a near net shape, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part. Continuous reinforcement in the form of carbon-carbon composite tapes or pieces of fabric can be also laid in the mold before or during the charging of the mold with the chopped-fiber mixture, to enhance the strength in the crown and wrist-pin areas. The molded chopped-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite parts are then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. These pyrolized parts are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches, which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston molds are machined to final piston dimensions, and piston ring grooves are added. To prevent oxidation and/or to seal the piston surface or near surface, the chopped-fiber piston is coated with ceramic and/or metallic sealants: and/or coated with a catalyst.

  20. Electromagnetic liquid pistons for capillarity-based pumping.

    PubMed

    Malouin, Bernard A; Vogel, Michael J; Olles, Joseph D; Cheng, Lili; Hirsa, Amir H

    2011-02-01

    The small scales associated with lab-on-a-chip technologies lend themselves well to capillarity-dominated phenomena. We demonstrate a new capillarity-dominated system where two adjoining ferrofluid droplets can behave as an electronically-controlled oscillator or switch by an appropriate balance of magnetic, capillary, and inertial forces. Their oscillatory motion can be exploited to displace a surrounding liquid (akin to an axial piston pump), forming electromagnetic "liquid pistons." Such ferrofluid pistons can pump a precise volume of liquid via finely tunable amplitudes (cf. pump stroke) or resonant frequencies (cf. pump speed) with no solid moving parts for long-term operation without wear in a small device. Furthermore, the rapid propagation of electromagnetic fields and the favorable scaling of capillary forces with size permit micron sized devices with very fast operating speeds (∼kHz). The pumping dynamics and performance of these liquid pistons is explored, with experimental measurements showing good agreement with a spherical cap model. While these liquid pistons may find numerous applications in micro- and mesoscale fluidic devices (e.g., remotely activated drug delivery), here we demonstrate the use of these liquid pistons in capillarity-dominated systems for chip-level, fast-acting adaptive liquid lenses with nearly perfect spherical interfaces.

  1. Piston designs keep pace with increased engine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, P.

    1996-12-01

    Piston technology for medium-speed diesel engines is having to keep pace with steadily increasing engine performance criteria. Specific output of medium-speed diesel engines has increased some 50% since 1970, according to Walter Griffiths, chief engineer at the UK-based AE Geotze Special Products Ltd. To satisfy the higher performance now required, a two-piece piston has been developed and went into production in 1995. This type still uses an aluminum alloy forged body, but incorporates a steel crown. The composite piston can carry higher engine ratings and resists the abrasive deposits formed by heavy fuel operation. It has become well established for bore sizes above 300 mm and is becoming increasingly specified for engines down to 200 mm. The latest solution to the carbon deposits on the top of the piston that has gained widespread acceptance within the industry is to reduce the diameter of the bore above the top ring and cut back the top land to maintain the normal operating clearance. This requires an insert to be fitted into the liner after the piston has been assembled. The effect is to limit the carbon build-up on the top land to a specific diameter, which is always less than the bore diameter. Thus there is no possibility of top land contact with the bore over the effective stroke of the piston rings. 2 figs.

  2. Effects of unbalance location on dynamic characteristics of high-speed gasoline engine turbocharger with floating ring bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longkai; Bin, Guangfu; Li, Xuejun; Liu, Dingqu

    2016-03-01

    For the high-speed gasoline engine turbocharger rotor, due to the heterogeneity of multiple parts material, manufacturing and assembly errors, running wear in impeller and uneven carbon of turbine, the random unbalance usually can be developed which will induce excessive rotor vibration, and even lead to nonlinear vibration accidents. However, the investigation of unbalance location on the nonlinear high-speed turbocharger rotordynamic characteristics is less. In order to discuss the rotor unbalance location effects of turbocharger with nonlinear floating ring bearings(FRBs), the realistic turbocharger of gasoline engine is taken as a research object. The rotordynamic equations of motion under the condition of unbalance are derived by applied unbalance force and nonlinear oil film force of FRBs. The FE model of turbocharger rotor-bearing system is modeled which includes the unbalance excitation and nonlinear FRBs. Under the conditions of four different applied locations of unbalance, the nonlinear transient analyses are performed based on the rotor FEM. The differences of dynamic behavior are obvious to the turbocharger rotor systems for four conditions, and the bifurcation phenomena are different. From the results of waterfall and transient response analysis, the speed for the appearance of fractional frequency is not identical and the amplitude magnitude is different from the different unbalance locations, and the non-synchronous vibration does not occur in the turbocharger and the amplitude is relative stable and minimum under the condition 4. The turbocharger vibration and non-synchronous components could be reduced or suppressed by controlling the applied location of unbalance, which is helpful for the dynamic design, fault diagnosis and vibration control of the high-speed gasoline engine turbochargers.

  3. The axial motion of a piston ring in the piston ring groove

    SciTech Connect

    Brownawell, M E

    1983-06-01

    The piston ring axial motion model developed by Furuhama, Dowson and Hoult was modified using the parallel plate squeeze equation to account for oil in the ring grooves. The improved model was used to predict ring motion and the ring transition time from one ring land to the other. The ring axial motion was measured in detail on an engine with a clear plexiglas cylinder using a high-speed motion picture camera. The observed ring motion and transit times were compared to those predicted by the new model. The model was found to correctly predict the motion of the rings and the scaling with lubricant viscosity and engine speed.

  4. 75 FR 16662 - Airworthiness Directives; Kelly Aerospace Energy Systems, LLC Rebuilt Turbochargers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Examining the AD Docket You may... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... three reports of infant mortality turbine wheel failure in rebuilt turbochargers, since June of 2007....

  5. Internal combustion engine supercharging: turbocharger vs. pressure wave compressor. Performance comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Atanasiu Catalin; Chiru, Anghel

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims on comparison between a turbocharged engine and a pressure wave charged engine. The comparison was accomplished using the engine simulation software AVL Boost, version 2010. The grahps were extracted using AVL Impress, version 2010. The performance increase is limited by the mechanical side of the simulated engine.

  6. Ceramic turbochargers: a case study of a near-term application of high-strength ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.P.; Johnson, L.R.

    1984-08-01

    The most likely near-term, high-volume application of structural ceramics in heat engines is in turbocharger rotors. These will be the first mass-produced ceramic components applicable to both gasoline and diesel engines. The principal objective of this study is to estimate relative costs of ceramic turbocharger rotors vs conventional metal rotors. Thus the focus is on the economics, manufacturing, marketing strategies, and benefits related to the introduction and use of ceramic turbochargers, rather than on the detailed technical issues surrounding the microstructure and processing aspects of the new ceramic technologies. The use of ceramics first in rotors and later in other turbocharger components will have significant impacts on cost, size, performance, and overall market growth of turbos. The Japanese appear to have the lead in developing and producing ceramic turbo components, and the implications for continued US competitiveness are clear: the nation that attains the ultimate lead will dominate in the worldwide development and production of advanced ceramics for many industrial and commercial applications.

  7. MAN B&W radial turbochargers after 32000 hours of HFO operation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    In late 1990, the first three of 36 reengined 6L28/32H gen-sets built by MAN B&W Diesel A/S in Holeby, Denmark, were delivered for the Atlantic-class container vessel MV OOCL Inspiration (ex. Ile de France), owned by Sea-Land Service. One of the determining factors for the re-engining contract was the expected 2O000 hour interval between overhauls. The gen-sets are optimized for an output of 1260 kW at 720 r/min (bmep = 17.8 bar), and are supercharged by high-efficiency, water-free MAN B&W model NR20/R turbochargers. The supercharging principle is constant-pressure turbocharging. The service rating of these gen-sets normally is 80% (sea load), with part-load operation down to 30% load not uncommon. Unrestricted part-load operation in spite of the lower air excess ratio as compared to pulse-pressure turbocharging is one of the preconditions for real heavy-fuel oil capability, and the MAN B&W turbochargers play a significant part in achieving this. The result of the inspection was that both compressor and turbine were clean and without detectable deposits, as were the diffuser and the nozzle ring, where hardly any erosion marks and no blade shortening due to erosion could be found.

  8. An evaluation of 1D loss model collections for the off-design performance prediction of automotive turbocharger compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.; Dietrich, M.

    2013-12-01

    Single-zone modelling is used to assess different collections of impeller 1D loss models. Three collections of loss models have been identified in literature, and the background to each of these collections is discussed. Each collection is evaluated using three modern automotive turbocharger style centrifugal compressors; comparisons of performance for each of the collections are made. An empirical data set taken from standard hot gas stand tests for each turbocharger is used as a baseline for comparison. Compressor range is predicted in this study; impeller diffusion ratio is shown to be a useful method of predicting compressor surge in 1D, and choke is predicted using basic compressible flow theory. The compressor designer can use this as a guide to identify the most compatible collection of losses for turbocharger compressor design applications. The analysis indicates the most appropriate collection for the design of automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressors.

  9. Spherical rotary piston machine as an artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Wipf, S L

    1991-01-01

    A positive displacement pump with six rotary pistons was proposed as an artificial heart. The pump's design was characterized by high symmetry and compactness. Thus, a spherical volume of 4 1/4 inch diameter sufficed for a pump delivering 10 L/min at 120 pulses/min with the pistons turning at 30 rpm. The pistons and four connecting gears were the only moving parts. The pump functions in two separate halves as left and right ventricles, with two of the six pistons each having inlet and outlet passages, and one of them replacing mitral and pulmonary valves with the other, tricuspid and aortic valves. The function of the intraventricular septum was provided by the other four pistons whose interiors also accommodated driving motors each capable of 0.4 Nm torque for a combined power of 5 watts. There were no stagnant regions in the pumping volume, and at all internal surfaces in contact with blood, there was periodic shear stress not exceeding approximately 300 Pa.

  10. Transtibial prosthetic suspension: less pistoning versus easy donning and doffing.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Hossein; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Eshraghi, Arezoo; Ali, Sadeeq; Sævarsson, Stefan Karl; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pirouzi, Gholam Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Poor suspension increases slippage of the residual limb inside the socket during ambulation. The main purpose of this article is to evaluate the pistoning at the prosthetic liner-socket interface during gait and assess patients' satisfaction with two different liners. Two prostheses with seal-in and locking liners were fabricated for each of the 10 subjects with transtibial amputation. The Vicon motion system was used to measure the pistoning during gait. The subjects were also asked to complete a Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire. The results revealed higher pistoning inside the socket during gait with the locking liner than with the seal-in liner (p < 0.05). The overall satisfaction with the locking liner was higher (p < 0.05) because of the relative ease with which the patients could don and doff the device. As such, pistoning may not be the main factor that determines patients' overall satisfaction with the prosthesis and other factors may also contribute to comfort and satisfaction with prostheses. The article also verifies the feasibility of the Vicon motion system for measuring pistoning during gait.

  11. Numerical and semiclassical analysis of some generalized Casimir pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Schaden, M.

    2009-05-15

    The Casimir force due to a scalar field in a cylinder of radius r with a spherical cap of radius R>r is computed numerically in the world-line approach. A geometrical subtraction scheme gives the finite interaction energy that determines the Casimir force. The spectral function of convex domains is obtained from a probability measure on convex surfaces that is induced by the Wiener measure on Brownian bridges the convex surfaces are the hulls of. Due to reflection positivity, the vacuum force on the piston by a scalar field satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions is attractive in these geometries, but the strength and short-distance behavior of the force depend strongly on the shape of the piston casing. For a cylindrical casing with a hemispherical head, the force on the piston does not depend on the dimension of the casing at small piston elevation a<piston near its periphery. A semiclassical estimate reproduces the numerical results for the small-distance behavior of the force within statistical errors, whereas the proximity force approximation is off by one order of magnitude when R{approx}r.

  12. Spherical rotary piston machine as an artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Wipf, S L

    1991-01-01

    A positive displacement pump with six rotary pistons was proposed as an artificial heart. The pump's design was characterized by high symmetry and compactness. Thus, a spherical volume of 4 1/4 inch diameter sufficed for a pump delivering 10 L/min at 120 pulses/min with the pistons turning at 30 rpm. The pistons and four connecting gears were the only moving parts. The pump functions in two separate halves as left and right ventricles, with two of the six pistons each having inlet and outlet passages, and one of them replacing mitral and pulmonary valves with the other, tricuspid and aortic valves. The function of the intraventricular septum was provided by the other four pistons whose interiors also accommodated driving motors each capable of 0.4 Nm torque for a combined power of 5 watts. There were no stagnant regions in the pumping volume, and at all internal surfaces in contact with blood, there was periodic shear stress not exceeding approximately 300 Pa. PMID:1751131

  13. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Flemig, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficiency of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficieny points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  14. Magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curwen, P. W.; Fleming, D. P.; Rao, D. K.; Wilson, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery currently being developed for long-term space missions are assessed. The study was performed for a 50-kWe Reference Stirling Space Power Converter (RSSPC) which currently uses hydrostatic gas bearings to support the reciprocating displacer and power piston assemblies. Active magnetic bearings of the attractive electromagnetic type are feasible for the RSSPC power piston. Magnetic support of the displacer assembly would require unacceptable changes to the design of the current RSSPC. However, magnetic suspension of both displacer and power piston is feasible for a relative-displacer version of the RSSPC. Magnetic suspension of the RSSPC power piston can potentially increase overall efficiency by 0.5 to 1 percent (0.1 to 0.3 efficiency points). Magnetic bearings will also overcome several operational concerns associated with hydrostatic gas bearing systems. These advantages, however, are accompanied by a 5 percent increase in specific mass of the RSSPC.

  15. RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A free piston Stirling engine was tested. The tests performed over the past several years on the single cylinder engine were designed to investigate the dynamics of a free piston Stirling engine. The data are intended to be used primarily for computer code validation. The tests designed to investigate the sensitivity of the engine performance to variations in working space pressure, heater and cooler temperatures, regenerator porosity, power piston mass and displacer dynamics were completed. In addition, some data were recorded with alternate working fluids. A novel resonant balance system for the engine was also tested. Some preliminary test results of the tests performed are presented along with an outline of future tests to be run with the engine coupled to a hydraulic output unit. A description of the hydraulic output unit is given.

  16. High pressure rotary piston coal feeder for coal gasification applications

    DOEpatents

    Gencsoy, Hasan T.

    1977-05-24

    The subject development is directed to an apparatus for feeding pulverized coal into a coal gasifier operating at relatively high pressures and elevated temperatures. This apparatus is a rotary piston feeder which comprises a circular casing having a coal loading opening therein diametrically opposed from a coal discharge and contains a rotatable discoid rotor having a cylinder in which a reciprocateable piston is disposed. The reciprocation of the piston within the cylinder is provided by a stationary conjugate cam arrangement whereby the pulverized coal from a coal hopper at atmospheric pressure can be introduced into the cylinder cavity and then discharged therefrom into the high-pressure gasifier without the loss of high pressure gases from within the latter.

  17. Effect of piston second land shape on oil consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hideki; Kusama, Kazunori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki; Ariga, Susumu

    1996-12-31

    Focusing on the oil flow characteristics in piston land areas, the authors measured variables affecting oil flow in an actual engine and conducted computer-aided analysis in order to develop a technique to reduce oil consumption. Since volume of the second land influences piston ring behavior, the volume has to be determined so that blow-up gas flow is reduced. As a means of sizing the second land volume, a V-shaped groove may be made in the second land. This particular groove shape made it possible to prevent the flow of oil into the combustion chamber. The behavior of oil on the piston land was observed through a glass cylinder installed on the engine. The effect of the land design on the oil flow was analyzed by using a computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) code.

  18. Hot piston ring/cylinder liner materials - Selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    A materials testing program to determine whether automotive Stirling engine efficiency can be improved by locating 'hot piston rings' near the top of the pistons is described. Candidate materials were screened theoretically and experimentally by friction and wear tests. Based on the test results, a cobalt-based alloy, Stellite 6B, was chosen for the piston rings and PS200, which consists of a metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix with dispersed solid lubricants, was chosen as the cylinder coating. Tests of a modified engine and a baseline engine showed that the hot ring did reduce specific fuel consumption by up to 7 percent for some operating conditions and averaged about three percent for all conditions evaluated. Related applications of high-temperature coatings for shaft seals and as backup lubricants for gas bearings are also described.

  19. Analytical and experimental investigation of ringless-piston concept. Interim report, September 1986-December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, D.W.; Wood, C.D.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to analytically and experimentally investigate the concept of a ringless-piston internal-combustion engine. A joint objective was to design, build, and test a ringless piston to improve ringless-piston engine performance. A computer model was developed to predict ringed and ringless-piston engine performance. Experimental performance data were then collected by operating a small, liquid-cooled, two-stroke gasoline engine with and without the piston ring on the stock aluminum and Southwest Research Institute prototype steel piston. The experimental performance data were then compared with the results of the computer model. The results showed that a piston engine can operate without piston rings.

  20. Lightweight piston-rod assembly for a reciprocating machine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    In a reciprocating machine, there is provided a hollow piston including a dome portion on one end and a base portion on the opposite end. The base portion includes a central bore into which a rod is hermetically fixed in radial and angular alignment. The extending end of the rod has a reduced diameter portion adapted to fit into the central bore of a second member such as a cross-head assembly, and to be secured thereto in radial and axial alignment with the piston.

  1. Continuing Development for Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Allen A.; Qiu, Songgang; Redinger, Darin L.; Augenblick, John E.; Petersen, Stephen L.

    2004-02-01

    Long-life radioisotope power generators based on free-piston Stirling engines are an energy-conversion solution for future space applications. The high efficiency of Stirling machines makes them more attractive than the thermoelectric generators currently used in space. Stirling Technology Company (STC) has been developing free-piston Stirling machines for over 30 years, and its family of Stirling generators is ideally suited for reliable, maintenance-free operation. This paper describes recent progress and status of the STC RemoteGen™ 55 W-class Stirling generator (RG-55), presents an overview of recent testing, and discusses how the technology demonstration design has evolved toward space-qualified hardware.

  2. Mathematical modeling of bent-axis hydraulic piston motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartos, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the DSN 70-m antennas uses 16 bent-axis hydraulic piston motors as part of the antenna drive system. On each of the two antenna axes, four motors are used to drive the antenna and four motors provide counter torque to remove the backlash in the antenna drive train. This article presents a mathematical model for bent-axis hydraulic piston motors. The model was developed to understand the influence of the hydraulic motors on the performance of the DSN 70-m antennas' servo control system.

  3. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Free Piston Linear Alternator

    SciTech Connect

    Janson Wu; Nicholas Paradiso; Peter Van Blarigan; Scott Goldsborough

    1998-11-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) free piston powered linear alternator has been conducted to determine if improvements can be made in the thermal and conversion efficiencies of modern electrical generator systems. Performance of a free piston engine was investigated using a rapid compression expansion machine and a full cycle thermodynamic model. Linear alternator performance was investigated with a computer model. In addition linear alternator testing and permanent magnet characterization hardware were developed. The development of the two-stroke cycle scavenging process has begun.

  4. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Heather Christine; Roberts, Jeffrey James

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  5. Non-adiabatic pumping in an oscillating-piston model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuchem, Maya; Dittrich, Thomas; Cohen, Doron

    2012-05-01

    We consider the prototypical "piston pump" operating on a ring, where a circulating current is induced by means of an AC driving. This can be regarded as a generalized Fermi-Ulam model, incorporating a finite-height moving wall (piston) and non-trivial topology (ring). The amount of particles transported per cycle is determined by a layered structure of phase space. Each layer is characterized by a different drift velocity. We discuss the differences compared with the adiabatic and Boltzmann pictures, and highlight the significance of the "diabatic" contribution that might lead to a counter-stirring effect.

  6. Isuzu's new 12. 0L micro-computer controlled turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, M.; Sakata, S.; Hamanaka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Isuzu Motors Limited introduced in the Japanese market a new micro-computer controlled turbocharged 6RA1TC diesel engine which powers new Isuzu heavy-duty trucks in 1983. This engine has successfully achieved both fuel economy and vehicle performance. This was realized by the combination of the newly developed micro-computer controlled fuel injection system and turbocharged air-to-air intercooled four valve low friction diesel engine. The purpose of the computer control system is flexible and precise control of fuel flow rate and fuel injection timing. This provides maximum engine performance and driveability, best fuel economy combined with the gearing of the vehicle, and easy operation for drivers. Additionally, this engine offers the following features: Good cold startability; Constant speed Cruise Control; Automatic schedule idling speed during warm-up; Stable low speed idling; Light and quick throttle response; Monitoring display for best fuel economy operation; Monitor display for engine diagnosis.

  7. Fuel flow regulator control for a diesel engine with exhaust gas driven turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, G.C.

    1984-03-06

    A fuel flow regulator for an internal combustion engine having an exhaust gas turbocharger is disclosed. The fuel flow regulator responds to intake manifold pressure. Thus the fuel flow regulator increases the maximum fuel flow to the internal combustion engine from a first maximum predetermined fuel flow rate when the intake manifold pressure is at a first predetermined intake air pressure level to a second predetermined maximum fuel flow rate when the intake air manifold pressure is at a second predetermined intake air pressure level. Additionally, the fuel flow regulator decreases fuel flow to a third maximum fuel flow rate which is less than the first predetermined maximum fuel flow rate when the intake manifold pressure is greater than the second predetermined intake air pressure level. Therefore, the fuel flow regulator protects the internal combustion engine from overboost of the engine by the turbocharger and for overfueling the engine.

  8. Stability Analysis of a Turbocharger Rotor System Supported on Floating Ring Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Shi, Z. Q.; Zhen, D.; Gu, F. S.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    The stability of a turbocharger rotor is governed by the coupling of rotor dynamics and fluid dynamics because the high speed rotor system is supported on a pair of hydrodynamic floating ring bearings which comprise of inner and outer fluid films in series. In order to investigate the stability, this paper has developed a finite element model of the rotor system with consideration of such exciting forces as rotor imbalance, hydrodynamic fluid forces, lubricant feed pressure and dead weight. The dimensionless analytical expression of nonlinear oil film forces in floating ring bearings have been derived on the basis of short bearing theory. Based on numerical simulation, the effects of rotor imbalance, lubricant viscosity, lubricant feed pressure and bearing clearances on the stability of turbocharger rotor system have been studied. The disciplines of the stability of two films and dynamic performances of rotor system have been provided.

  9. Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall

    DOEpatents

    Hoult, D.P.

    1985-09-10

    A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal. 4 figs.

  10. Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall

    DOEpatents

    Hoult, David P.

    1985-01-01

    A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal.

  11. The identification of linear and non-linear models of a turbocharged automotive diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, S. A.; Chen, S.; Backhouse, R. J.

    1989-04-01

    The identification results obtained from a study on a Leyland TL11 turbocharged, direct injection diesel engine are presented. Two sets of data corresponding to low and high engine speed tests, which were recorded from experimental trials on the engine, are analysed. The identification of both linear and non-linear difference equation models are described to represent the relationship between the fuel rack position (input) and the engine speed (output).

  12. Turbocharged two-stroke internal combustion engine with four-stroke capability

    SciTech Connect

    Burrahm, R.W.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes, in a turbocharged two-stroke internal combustion engine without crankcase scavenging and having means for operating the exhaust valves in accordance with either two-stroke or four-stroke operation, a means for enabling the intake of combustible gas into cylinders of the engine during four-stroke operation through a port in each cylinder from a combustible gas source. It comprises: a valve mounted on each port responsive to pressure within the cylinder.

  13. Control studies of an automotive turbocharged diesel engine with variable geometry turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Winterbone, D.E.; Jai In, S.

    1988-01-01

    Major advances are being made in engine hardware, control theories and microcomputer technology. The application of advanced control and monitoring techniques to engines should enable them to meet all the restrictions imposed upon them while they operate to their full potential. Variable geometry turbocharging of automotive diesel engines is a good example of a case where the control implications need to be considered carefully. This paper reports a technique for developing the dynamic characteristics of turbocharged diesel engines with variable geometry turbine and compares the results with measurements obtained on an engine. It is the first step in the design process for a true, dynamic, multivariable controller. Most current systems are simply scheduling devices with little understanding or consideration of possible interactions between various control loops. A non-linear simulation model for a turbocharged diesel engine was used to investigate the performance of the engine. Major features of the program, aspects of constructing a model for control purposes and identification procedures of the engine dynamic are discussed.

  14. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number NFE-08-01671 Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P. J.; Wilson, M.

    2014-11-28

    Results were obtained on residual stresses in the weld of the steel shaft to the Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel for turbochargers. Neutron diffraction studies at the HFIR Residual Stress Facility showed asymmetric tensile stresses after electron-beam welding of the wheel and shaft. A post-weld heat-treatment was found to relieve and reduce the residual stresses. Results were also obtained on cast CF8C-Plus steel as an upgrade alternative to cast irons (SiMo, Ni-resist) for higher temperature capability and performance for the turbocharger housing. CF8C-Plus steel has demonstrated creep-rupture resistance at 600-950oC, and is more creep-resistant than HK30Nb, but lacks oxidation-resistance at 800oC and above in 10% water vapor. New modified CF8C-Plus Cu/W steels with Cr and Ni additions show better oxidation resistance at 800oC in 10% water vapor, and have capability to higher temperatures. For automotive gasoline engine turbocharger applications, higher temperatures are required, so at the end of this project, testing began at 1000oC and above.

  15. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of friction-welded joints in tial turbocharger components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. G.; Kropf, A. J.; Vissers, D. R.; Sun, W. M.; Katsoudas, J.; Yang, N.; Fei, D.

    2012-05-01

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) is an advanced intermetallic material and is being investigated for application in turbocharger components for diesel engines. A TiAl turbocharger rotor consists of a cast TiAl turbine wheel and a Ti-alloy shaft that are joined by friction welding. Although friction welding is an established industrial process, it is still challenging to join dissimilar materials especially for brittle intermetallics. These joints are therefore required to be inspected using a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. In this study, synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (CT) developed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory was used for NDE characterization of friction-welded joint in three TiAl turbocharger rotors. The filtered synchrotron X-ray source has high peak energies to penetrate thick metallic materials, and the detector (imager) has high spatial resolutions to resolve small flaws. The CT inspections revealed detailed 3D crack distributions within poorly welded joints. The crack detection sensitivity and resolution was calibrated and found to be correlated well with destructive examination.

  16. Magnetorheological valve based actuator for improvement of passively controlled turbocharger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahiuddin, I.; Mazlan, S. A.; Imaduddin, F.; Ubaidillah, Ichwan, B.

    2016-03-01

    Variable geometry turbochargers have been widely researched to fulfil the current engine stringent regulations. The passively controlled turbocharger (PCT) concept has been proposed to reduce energy consumption by utilizing the emission energy to move the actuator. However, it only covered a small range operating condition. Therefore, a magnetorheological(MR) Valve device, as typical smart material devices to enhance a passive device, is proposed to improve the PCT. Even though the benefits have been considered for the compactness and easiness to connect to an electrical system, the number of publications regarding the MR application within engine system is hard to be found. Therefore, this paper introduces a design of an MR Valve in a turbocharger. The main challenge is to make sure its capability to produce a sufficient total pressure drop. To overcome the challenge, its material properties, shape and pressure drop calculation has been analyzed to fulfil the requirement. Finally, to get a more understanding of actuator performance, the actuator response was simulated by treating the exhaust gas pressure as an input. It shows that the new MR actuator has a potential dynamic to improve the PCT controllability.

  17. Supercharging pressure control system for an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Otobe, Y.; Niikura, M.; Wazaki, Y.

    1987-10-06

    This patent describes a supercharging pressure control system for an internal combustion engine having an intake passage, a throttle valve, an exhaust passage, a turbocharger having a turbine arranged in the exhaust passage, and a compressor arranged in the intake passage. It consists of: a bypass exhaust passage bypassing the turbine of the turbocharger; a waste gate valve disposed for selectively closing and opening the bypass exhaust passage; an actuator for actuating the waste gate valve. The actuator has a pressure chamber and is operatively connected to the waste gate valve such that a change in pressure within the pressure chamber causes displacement of the waste gate valve either in a direction of closing same or in a direction of opening same. The pressure chamber communicates with the intake passage at a location downstream of the compressor of the turbocharger and upstream of the throttle valve. The electronic control means are operable to control through feedback the pressure in the intake passage at the downstream side of the throttle valve to reach a target value, by actuating the control valve in dependence on the difference between the target value and the pressure value detected by the second sensor. The feedback control is carried out when the detected value of the throttle valve opening exceeds a predetermined valve opening value.

  18. A nonlinear Kalman filtering approach to embedded control of turbocharged diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Siano, Pierluigi; Arsie, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    The development of efficient embedded control for turbocharged Diesel engines, requires the programming of elaborated nonlinear control and filtering methods. To this end, in this paper nonlinear control for turbocharged Diesel engines is developed with the use of Differential flatness theory and the Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter. It is shown that the dynamic model of the turbocharged Diesel engine is differentially flat and admits dynamic feedback linearization. It is also shown that the dynamic model can be written in the linear Brunovsky canonical form for which a state feedback controller can be easily designed. To compensate for modeling errors and external disturbances the Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter is used and redesigned as a disturbance observer. The filter consists of the Kalman Filter recursion on the linearized equivalent of the Diesel engine model and of an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory which enables to obtain estimates for the state variables of the initial nonlinear model. Once the disturbances variables are identified it is possible to compensate them by including an additional control term in the feedback loop. The efficiency of the proposed control method is tested through simulation experiments.

  19. Method and apparatus for controlling a variable capacity turbine of an automotive turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Hirabayashi, Y.

    1988-09-13

    This patent describes a method of controlling an internal combustion engine turbocharger which includes a volute passage through which exhaust gases flow from an internal combustion engine associated with the turbocharger and means for throttling the passage in a manner to vary the supercharging capacity of the turbocharger, the steps of: (a) sensing a first engine operational parameter; (b) sensing a second engine operational parameter which varies with the supercharging of the engine; (c) generating a control signal S/sub DM/ for controlling the throttling means in response to the magnitude of the first parameter; (d) modifying the control signal in response to the magnitude of the second parameter; (e) sensing the demand for engine acceleration; (f) modifying the control signal in response to the demand for acceleration in a manner to cause the throttling means to increase the throttling of the passage to at least a predetermined degree until a predetermined event occurs; (g) modifying the control signal in response to the occurrence of the event until the event terminates; (h) maintaining, in the absence of the event, the modification of the control signal derived in step (f) for a predetermined period of time; and (i) varying the predetermined period of time in response to a selected operational parameter.

  20. Study of the turbocharger shaft motion by means of infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, J. R.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.; López, M. A.; Bouffaud, F.

    2015-05-01

    This work describes a technique for measuring the precession movement of the shaft of small automotive turbochargers. The main novelty is that the technique is based on infrared light diode sensors. With presented technique it is possible to perform secure mounting of electronics and also to measure, with good accuracy, far enough from the turbocharger shaft. Both advantages allow applying it even in critical lubrication conditions and when blade contact occurs. The technique's main difficulties arise from the small size of the turbocharger shaft and the high precession movement in critical conditions. In order to generate the optimum albedo reflection for infrared measurement, a special cylindrical nut with larger diameter than the original one is assembled at the shaft tip in the compressor side. Following, shaft balancing, the calibration of the sensors and the compensation of errors from different sources are needed steps before the method is able to identify the main frequencies of shaft motion. Once synchronous and sub-synchronous frequencies have been obtained it is possible to reconstruct the instantaneous position of the shaft to determine its precession movement.

  1. Improved piston ring materials for 650 deg C service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorndahl, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A program to develop piston ring material systems which will operate at 650C was performed. In this program, two candidate high temperature piston ring substrate materials, Carpenter 709-2 and 440B, were hot formed into the piston ring shape and subsequently evaluated. In a parallel development effort ceramic and metallic piston ring coating materials were applied to cast iron rings by various processing techniques and then subjected to thermal shock and wear evaluation. Finally, promising candidate coatings were applied to the most thermally stable hot formed substrate. The results of evaluation tests of the hot formed substrate show that Carpenter 709-2 has greater thermal stability than 440B. Of the candidate coatings, plasma transferred arc (PTA) applied tungsten carbide and molybdenum based systems exhibit the greatest resistance to thermal shock. For the ceramic based systems, thermal shock resistance was improved by bond coat grading. Wear testing was conducted to 650C (1202F). For ceramic systems, the alumina/titania/zirconia/yttria composition showed highest wear resistance. For the PTA applied systems, the tungsten carbide based system showed highest wear resistance.

  2. Spherical-wave expansions of piston-radiator fields.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, R C; Yaghjian, A D

    1991-09-01

    Simple spherical-wave expansions of the continuous-wave fields of a circular piston radiator in a rigid baffle are derived. These expansions are valid throughout the illuminated half-space and are useful for efficient numerical computation in the near-field region. Multipole coefficients are given by closed-form expressions which can be evaluated recursively.

  3. Pistons and Cylinders Made of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved reciprocating internal combustion engine has a plurality of engine pistons, which are fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials, in operative association with an engine cylinder block, or an engine cylinder tube, or an engine cylinder jug, all of which are also fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials.

  4. Wear compensating seal means for rotary piston coal feeder

    DOEpatents

    Gencsoy, Hasan T.; Gardner, John F.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a wear compensating seal arrangement for use in a rotary piston feeder utilized for feeding pulverized coal into a gasifier operating at relatively high pressures and elevated temperatures. The rotary piston feeder has a circular casing with a coal loading opening therein diametrically opposed from a coal discharge and contains a rotatable disoidal rotor having a cylinder in which a reciprocatable piston is disposed. The reciprocation of the piston within the cylinder is provided by a stationary conjugate cam whereby pulverized coal from a coal hopper at atmospheric pressure can be introduced into the cylinder and then discharged therefrom into the high pressure gasifier while maintaining minimal losses of producer gas and the expenditure of minimal energy which would detract from the efficiency of the gasification. The seal arrangement of the present invention is disposed between the rotor and the casing about the coal discharge and prevents the high pressure gases from within the gasifier from escaping between these relatively movable parts during operation of the coal feeder. The seal utilizes a primary seal in contact with the rotor and a secondary seal supporting the primary seal. The primary seal is continuously urged towards the rotor by springs and the high pressure producer gas.

  5. [Lubricant-free piston compressors for mechanized medical instruments].

    PubMed

    Sabitov, V Kh; Repin, V A; Kil'kinov, A A

    1988-01-01

    Piston compressor without lubrication with air blow to packing rings by plunger, disposed in subpiston space, is recommended as the basic scheme of construction of a power supply unit for medical pneumatic tooling. The construction reduces a leak of the compressive medium, increasing the efficiency of a compressor and seal reliability.

  6. Vented piston seal prevents fluid leakage between two chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F.; Morrison, R.

    1964-01-01

    To prevent fluid leakage around piston seals separating two fluids under differential pressure, a venting system has been devised. Two methods may be used for venting seals through internal passages to an external low-pressure area, O-ring or split-ring seals.

  7. Thermal observations of gas pistoning at Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.B.; Harris, A.J.L.; Hoblitt, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    Data acquired by three continuously recording thermal infrared thermometers situated on the north rim of Pu'u'O' o Crater at Kilauea Volcano during 2002 revealed episodes of periodic thermal pulses originating from a degassing vent on the crater floor. These thermal pulses are interpreted as gas release (jetting events) associated with gas pistoning, a mechanism observed previously at both Mauna Ulu and Pu'u'O' o. During a 35-day-long period spanning June and July 2002, gas pistoning was frequently the dominant mode of gas release, with as many as several hundred pulses occurring in uninterrupted series. On other days, degassing alternated between periods of quasi-continuous gas jetting and intervals of gas pistoning that contained a few to a few dozen pulses. Characteristic time intervals between pistoning events ranged from 2 up to 7 min. We identify three types of pistoning. Type 1 involves emission of lava, followed by gas jetting and drain back; type 2 is the same but the elevated position of the vent does not allow postjet drain back; and type 3 involves gas jetting only with no precursory lava flow. To explain gas pistoning, we apply a model whereby a stagnant cap of degassed magma develops in the conduit below the vent. Gas bubbles rise through the magma column and collect under the cap. The collective buoyancy of these bubbles pushes the cap upward. When the cap reaches the surface, it erupts from the vent as a lava flow. Unloading of the conduit magma in this way results in an abrupt pressure drop (i.e., the overburden felt by the bubbles is reduced), causing explosive gas expansion in the form of gas jetting from the vent. This terminates the event and lava drains back into the conduit to start the cycle anew. In the case where there is no surface lava emission or drain back, the cap instead pushes into and spreads out within a subsurface cavity. Again, this unloads the conduit magma and terminates in explosive gas release. Once gas is expelled, lava in

  8. Integrated Optic Segment Piston Sensor for the GMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Francis; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Gardhouse, Rusty; Conan, Rodolphe; Espeland, Brady; Bouchez, Antonin

    2013-12-01

    Integrated optic segment piston sensor (IOPS) for the Giant Mag- ellan Telescope (GMT) uses single mode laser written waveguides to measure segment piston of the GMT primary mirrors. Light in the H-band (from 1.5 to 1.6 µm) incident on each segment originating from an off-axis guide star is coupled into separate laser written single mode waveguides in a fused silica substrate. Light from neighbouring segments is interfered in several coupling regions where waveguides are in spatial proximity allowing coupling, in order to produce an inter- ference signal at the output. The output signal magnitude is directly related to the phase difference at the waveguide input, originating from the segment piston. IOPS is located in the on-instrument wavefront sensor of the GMT, which includes a deformable mirror for low order Zernike mode cor- rection. Residual image motion (tip-tilt modes) in the on-instrument wavefront sensor are measured by a tip-tilt sensor in the K-band. Small residual tip-tilt modes caused by atmospheric dispersion at the IOPS input will reduce performance significantly as these modes are seen by IOPS as segment piston. This aliasing effect also exists for higher order modes, but with a reduced magnitude. The input of IOPS is dithered by a small amount with a steering mirror. The corresponding drop in reference signals from each segment allows for the detection and correction of tip-tilt modes at the IOPS input to less than 5 nm. Segment piston sensitivity of less than 35 nm RMS is achieved with Strehl at the IOPS input greater than15% with a detector integration time of 7.5 seconds and dithered input.

  9. Effect of the plasma piston size on the efficiency of the electrodynamic acceleration of a body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobyshevskii, E. M.; Rozov, S. I.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Sokolov, V. M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the experiments reported here was to investigate the effect of the size of the plasma piston on velocity saturation during the electrodynamic acceleration of a body in rail-gun accelerators. An analysis of the results suggests that the observed decrease of the efficiency of the accelerating action of an expanded plasma piston is associated with the increased permeability of the piston with respect to the gas enclosed between the piston and the body. This conclusion is consistent with the concept of the plasma piston as a combination of merging and separating arc channels.

  10. Analytical and experimental investigation of ringless-piston concept. Final report, September 1986-November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, D.W.; Wood, C.D.

    1988-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to analytically and experimentally investigate the concept of a ringless-piston internal combustion engine. A joint objective was to design, build, and test a ringless piston to improve ringless piston engine performance. A computer model was developed to predict ringed and ringless piston engine performance. Experimental performance data were then collected by operating a small, liquid-cooled, two-stroke gasoline engine with and without the piston ring on the stock aluminum and Southwest Research Institute prototype steel piston. The experimental performance data were then compared with the results of the computer model. The results showed that a piston engine can operate without piston rings. Ringless-piston engine power and efficiency were found to be defined by the expression C/NBS, where C = piston-to-bore diametrical clearance, N = engine speed in rpm, B = engine bore, and S = engine stroke. There was good agreement between predicted and measured performance reperformance can be improved by using piston and liner materials that have similar coefficients of thermal expansion.

  11. Assembly of piston and connecting rod in internal-combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H.; Ozu, T.

    1987-01-13

    This patent describes an assembly of a piston and a connecting rod in an internal-combustion engine comprising: a generally cylindrical piston pin; a connecting rod integrally formed with and extending from only a lower surface of the piston pin at a point midway between either end of the piston pin; a piston having a skirt and a crown disposed on an upper surface of the skirt, the skirt having a concave bearing recess of semicylindrical shape on a lower surface thereof, the recess having a length at least equal so that of the piston pin; a metal bearing pieces of semicylindrical shape disposed in the concave bearing recess across the entire length thereof, an upper half of the piston pin being held in a semicylindrical recess defined by the metal bearing piece; a pair of space metal bearing halves of semicylindrical shape disposed, respectively, over a lower half of the piston pin on either side of the connecting rod; a pair of bearing caps, each of the bearing caps having a concave bearing recess, each of the bearing caps being fitted over one of the metal bearing halves to pivotally couple the piston pin to the piston; and bolt means fixedly attaching the pair of bearing caps to the skirt of the piston.

  12. Fuel consumption reduction for diesel power generator sets through the application of an advanced turbocharger operating at constant speed. Final report 30 Mar-8 Oct 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Arvin, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    The objective of the current research is to demonstrate that a 30KW-400Hz precision gen set, equipped with a VATN (variable area turbine nozzles) turbocharger, can comply with DoD gen set transient specifications. Heretofore poor turbocharger transient response (turbo lag) caused the turbocharged, DED gen set to lose frequency beyond acceptable DoD limits during an instantaneous change in load from 0 to full load. Engine operating conditions were calculated using a computer math model. The turbocharger, with controller, was installed on a four cylinder diesel engine and tested at the engine manufacturer's (White Engine Co.) facility. Fuel consumption data was used to further refine the engine math model. Calculations confirmed at least a 9% fuel savings for the 30KW-400Hz gen set. From the effort of this contract, it can be concluded that a DED precision gen set equipped with a VATN turbocharger can comply with DoD transient requirements.

  13. Liner surface improvements for low friction piston ring packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderberg, C.; Dimkovski, Z.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The development of engine components in the automotive industry is governed by several constraints such as environmental legislation and customer expectations. About a half of the frictional losses in an internal combustion engine come from the interactions between the piston assembly and cylinder liner surface. The tribological considerations in the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner have attracted much attention over the past few decades. Many non-conventional cylinder liner finishes have been, and are being, developed with the aim to reduce friction losses and oil consumption, but the effects of the surface finish on piston ring pack performance is not well understood. One way of reducing friction in the cylinder system is to reduce the tangential load from the piston ring pack, focusing on the oil control ring. However, the side-effect of this is a disappointingly increased oil consumption. In this study a number of different cylinder liner surface specifications were developed and implemented in test engines with the aim of maintaining the level for oil consumption when decreasing the tangential load for the piston ring pack. To improve our understanding of the result, the same surfaces were evaluated in elastic and elasto-plastic rough contact and hydrodynamic flow simulation models. It is shown that oil consumption is strongly related to surface texture on the cylinder liners and at lower speeds (900-1200 rpm), a ‘rougher surface’ with a high core (e.g. Sk) and valley roughness (e.g. Svk) results in higher oil consumption. At the medium speed range (1200-3600 rpm), oil consumption continues to dominate for the ‘rough’ surfaces but with a visible influence of a lower oil consumption for a decreased roughness within the ‘rough’ surface group. ‘Smooth’ surfaces with a ‘smooth’ core (Sk), irrespective of the valley component (Svk), show similar oil consumption. For engine speeds above 3600 rpms, an increase in plateau

  14. Apparatus for controlling the flow of exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger and a catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, K.; Omata, K.

    1984-03-20

    An apparatus for controlling the flow of the exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine including a turbocharger, a catalytic converter in an exhaust duct, and a throttle valve in an intake duct, wherein the apparatus comprises a bypass passage bypassing a turbine of the turbocharger, a waste gate valve which controls the amount of the exhaust gas passing therethrough, an actuator for actuating the waste gate valve which has first and second pressure chambers separated from one another, and a switching valve which selectively connects the second pressure chamber to the atmosphere or to the intake vacuum area, the first pressure chamber being connected to the delivery pressure area of the turbocharger by means of a conduit which is connected to an atmospheric pressure area via a restriction.

  15. Wavefront reconstruction and piston measurement using Ronchi test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penalver, Dayana H.; Granados-Agustin, Fermin; Romero-Antequera, David L.

    2011-10-01

    Ronchi test represents an economical alternative, with ease implementation and uncertainties in the order of wavelength, to measure the piston between the elements of a segmented mirror. The current trend of using non monolithic surfaces as imaging systems in telescopes or adaptive optical systems in medical devices, open the field for the development of new wavefront sensors that would retrieve information allowing an optimal disposition of the segments to form an image with minimum of optical aberration. This paper uses the Ronchi test to reconstruct the wavefront, and measure the piston between two adjacent mirrors. Based on a geometrical relation, we have developed a computer software that determine the distance between the mirrors and the light source using a nonlinear optimization algorithm. In order to achieve this goal, it is necessary to perform a several stages processing to the input images. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction is carried out using a combined nonlinear optimization and least square algorithm.

  16. Piston and tilt interferometry for segmented wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Deprez, M; Bellanger, C; Lombard, L; Wattellier, B; Primot, J

    2016-03-15

    We present a novel interferometric technique dedicated to the measurement of relative phase differences (pistons) and tilts of a periodically segmented wavefront. Potential applications include co-phasing of segmented mirrors of Keck-like telescopes as well as coherent laser beam combining. The setup only requires a holes mask selecting the center part of each element, a diffracting component, and a camera. Recorded interferogram is made of many subareas with sinusoidal fringe pattern. From each pattern, piston is extracted from fringe shift and tilts from fringe frequency and orientation. The pattern analysis is simple enough to enable kilohertz rate operation. The λ ambiguities are solved by a two-wavelength measurement. This technique is compatible with a very high number of elements and can be operated in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. PMID:26977638

  17. Piston-Driven Fluid Ejectors In Silicon Mems

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Jakubczak II, Jerome F.

    2005-05-03

    A surface-micromachined fluid-ejection apparatus is disclosed which utilizes a piston to provide for the ejection of jets or drops of a fluid (e.g. for ink-jet printing). The piston, which is located at least partially inside a fluid reservoir, is moveable into a cylindrical fluid-ejection chamber connected to the reservoir by a microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator which is located outside the reservoir. In this way, the reservoir and fluid-ejection chamber can be maintained as electric-field-free regions thereby allowing the apparatus to be used with fluids that are electrically conductive or which may react or break down in the presence of a high electric field. The MEM actuator can comprise either an electrostatic actuator or a thermal actuator.

  18. General aviation piston-engine exhaust emission reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempke, E. E., Jr.; Houtman, W. H.; Westfield, W. T.; Duke, L. C.; Rezy, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    To support the promulgation of aircraft regulations, two airports were examined, Van Nuys and Tamiami. It was determined that the carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from piston-engine aircraft have a significant influence on the CO levels in the ambient air in and around airports, where workers and travelers would be exposed. Emissions standards were set up for control of emissions from aircraft piston engines manufactured after December 31, 1979. The standards selected were based on a technologically feasible and economically reasonable control of carbon monoxide. It was concluded that substantial CO reductions could be realized if the range of typical fuel-air ratios could be narrowed. Thus, improvements in fuel management were determined as reasonable controls.

  19. Free piston variable-stroke linear-alternator generator

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1998-01-01

    A free-piston variable stroke linear-alternator AC power generator for a combustion engine. An alternator mechanism and oscillator system generates AC current. The oscillation system includes two oscillation devices each having a combustion cylinder and a flying turnbuckle. The flying turnbuckle moves in accordance with the oscillation device. The alternator system is a linear alternator coupled between the two oscillation devices by a slotted connecting rod.

  20. Free piston variable-stroke linear-alternator generator

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, C.M.

    1998-12-15

    A free-piston variable stroke linear-alternator AC power generator for a combustion engine is described. An alternator mechanism and oscillator system generates AC current. The oscillation system includes two oscillation devices each having a combustion cylinder and a flying turnbuckle. The flying turnbuckle moves in accordance with the oscillation device. The alternator system is a linear alternator coupled between the two oscillation devices by a slotted connecting rod. 8 figs.

  1. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A. ); Henein, N.A. . Center for Automotive Research)

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-[omega]) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, [omega], have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-[omega]) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  2. Development of an accelerating piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, J.; Loiseau, J.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest for a number of scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. In the implosion-driven launcher (ILD) concept, explosives are used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures than the propellant of conventional light-gas guns. The propellant of the IDL is compressed through the linear implosion of a pressurized tube. The imploding tube behaves like a piston which travels into the light gas at the explosive detonation velocity, thus forming an increasingly long column of shock-compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill designed IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This work will focus on the implementation of a novel launch cycle in which the explosively driven piston is accelerated in order to gradually increase driver gas compression, thus maintaining a relatively constant projectile driving pressure. The theoretical potential of the concept as well as the experimental development of an accelerating piston driver will be examined.

  3. The piston ring shape and its effects on engine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Ryan, T.W.; Winter, J.; Dixon, R.

    1996-09-01

    The paper presents the latest research results on the piston ring free shape. A new free shape measurement method with optical gauging was developed. Three numerical models to compute the contact force distribution of piston ring were developed using finite element analysis (FEA). These numerical methods have been compared with each other, and validated with the experimental results of ring deformation in a ring gage. The contact force distribution of a piston ring at working condition was also studied. It consists of the ring thermal boundary conditions (RTBC) validation, 3-D FEA thermal analysis and thermal contact force computation based on validated wire-cable element model. The RTBC for heavy duty diesel engine has been validated for the first time using a CUMMINS L10 engine test. Three different free shapes have been tested. The wear band measurements of tested rings all show tremendous improvements over the standard top ring. It was found that the tip contact concentration is a key factor of tip scuffing during break-in. A procedure to define a free shape producing uniform contact force distribution at working condition was developed.

  4. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  5. System for lubrication of a brake air compressor associated with a turbocharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.C.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes a system for use with a vehicle which includes a turbocharged internal combustion engine having a lubricating system wherein lubricating oil from an engine oil reservoir is circulated within the engine and also to and from an associated brake system air compressor which supplies compressed air for operation of the vehicle air braking system. This patent describes improvement in passing supercharged air to an oil crankcase of the air compressor to cause lubricating oil to drain therefrom and return to the engine oil reservoir.

  6. Effects of air injection on a turbocharged Teledyne Continential Motors TSIO-360-C engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. V.; Kempke, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    A turbocharged fuel injected aircraft engine was operated over a range of test conditions that included that EPA five-mode emissions cycle and fuel air ratio variations for individual modes while injecting air into the exhaust gas. Air injection resulted in a decrease of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide while exceeding the maximum recommended turbine inlet temperature of 1650 F at the full rich mixture of the engine. Leanout tests indicated that the EPA standards could be met through the combined use of fuel management and air injection.

  7. Study on rotational frequency noise in a centrifugal compressor for automobile turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaki, Daichi; Sakuka, Yuta; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2014-02-01

    The rotational frequency noise (also known as the pulsation noise) due to the mistuning of impeller blade rows introduced at the manufacturing stage of the impellers is observed in the small-sized centrifugal compressor for automobile turbochargers. The present paper addresses the elucidation of the generating mechanism and parameter dependency such as the kind and degree of mistuning. In order to analyze numerically the rotational frequency noise due to mistuning, the unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of the whole compressor including volute is executed, and the resultant time history of the pressure is fed into the spectral analysis.

  8. Development of a Collins-type cryocooler floating piston control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Jake; Hannon, Charles L.; Brisson, John

    2012-06-01

    The Collins-type cryocooler uses a floating piston design for the working fluid expansion. The piston floats between a cold volume, where the working fluid is expanded, and a warm volume. The piston is shuttled between opposite ends of the closed cylinder by opening and closing valves connecting several reservoirs at various pressures to the warm volume. Ideally, these pressures should be distributed between the high and low system pressure to gain good control of the piston motion. In this work, a numerical quasi-steady thermodynamic model is developed for the piston cycle. The model determines the steady state pressure distribution of the reservoirs for a given control algorithm. The results are then extended to show how valve timing modifications can be used to overcome helium leakage past the piston during operation.

  9. Statistics of injected power on a bouncing ball subjected to a randomly vibrating piston.

    PubMed

    García-Cid, Alfredo; Gutiérrez, Pablo; Falcón, Claudio; Aumaître, Sébastien; Falcon, Eric

    2015-09-01

    We present an experimental study on the statistical properties of the injected power needed to maintain an inelastic ball bouncing constantly on a randomly accelerating piston in the presence of gravity. We compute the injected power at each collision of the ball with the moving piston by measuring the velocity of the piston and the force exerted on the piston by the ball. The probability density function of the injected power has its most probable value close to zero and displays two asymmetric exponential tails, depending on the restitution coefficient, the piston acceleration, and its frequency content. This distribution can be deduced from a simple model assuming quasi-Gaussian statistics for the force and velocity of the piston.

  10. The Effect of Piston-Head Temperature on Knock-Limited Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imming, Harry S.

    1944-01-01

    To determine the effect of piston-head temperature on knock-limited power. Tests were made in a supercharged CFR engine over a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.055 to 0.120, using S-3 reference fuel, AN-F-28, Amendment-2, aviation gasoline, and AN-F-28 plus 2 percent xylidines by weight. Tests were run at a compression ratio of 7.0 with inlet-air temperatures of 150 F and 250 F and at a compression ratio of 8.0 with an inlet-air temperature of 250 F. All other engine conditions were held constant. The piston-head temperature was varied by circulation of oil through passages in the crown of a liquid-cooled piston. This method of piston cooling decreased the piston-head temperature about 80 F. The data are not intended to constitute a recommendation as to the advisability of piston cooling in practice.

  11. a Simple Model to Estimate the Impact Force Induced by Piston Slap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHO, S.-H.; AHN, S.-T.; KIM, Y.-H.

    2002-08-01

    The dynamics of piston's secondary motion (lateral and rotational motion) across the clearance between piston and cylinder inner wall of reciprocating machines are analyzed. This paper presents an analytical model, which can predict the impact forces and vibratory response of engine block surface induced by the piston slap of an internal combustion engine. A piston is modelled on a three-degree-of-freedom system to represent its planar motion. When slap occurs, the impact point between piston skirt and cylinder inner wall is modelled on a two-degree-of-freedom vibratory system. The equivalent parameters such as mass, spring constant, and damping constant of piston and cylinder inner wall are estimated by using measured (driving) point mobility. Those parameters are used to calculate the impact force and for estimating the vibration level of engine block surfaces. The predicted results are compared with experimental results to verify the model.

  12. Statistics of injected power on a bouncing ball subjected to a randomly vibrating piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Cid, Alfredo; Gutiérrez, Pablo; Falcón, Claudio; Aumaître, Sébastien; Falcon, Eric

    2015-09-01

    We present an experimental study on the statistical properties of the injected power needed to maintain an inelastic ball bouncing constantly on a randomly accelerating piston in the presence of gravity. We compute the injected power at each collision of the ball with the moving piston by measuring the velocity of the piston and the force exerted on the piston by the ball. The probability density function of the injected power has its most probable value close to zero and displays two asymmetric exponential tails, depending on the restitution coefficient, the piston acceleration, and its frequency content. This distribution can be deduced from a simple model assuming quasi-Gaussian statistics for the force and velocity of the piston.

  13. Optimum step design for centering of pistons moving in an incompressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects are analyzed for a stepped piston moving within a tight clearance tube filled with an incompressible fluid. Hydrostatic effects are analyzed and a complete solution is obtained and an optimum step design for centering of the piston is suggested. The axial speed resulting from an axial driving force is calculated, and some experimental results for pistons falling in a water-filled tube are presented.

  14. Assessment of 25 kW free-piston Stirling technology alternatives for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbeznik, Raymond M.; White, Maurice A.; Penswick, L. B.; Neely, Ronald E.; Ritter, Darren C.; Wallace, David A.

    The final design, construction, and testing of a 25-kW free-piston advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) are examined. The final design of the free-piston hydraulic ASCS consists of five subsystems: heat transport subsystem (solar receiver and pool boiler), free-piston hydraulic Stirling engine, hydraulic subsystem, cooling subsystem, and electrical and control subsystem. Advantages and disadvantages are identified for each technology alternative. Technology alternatives considered are gas bearings vs flexure bearings, stationary magnet linear alternator vs moving magnetic linear alternator, and seven different control options. Component designs are generated using available in-house procedures to meet the requirements of the free-piston Stirling convertor configurations.

  15. The piston-flow interaction as a model for the deflagration-to-detonation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brailovsky, Irina; Kagan, Leonid; Sivashinsky, Gregory

    2011-01-15

    The piston-flow interaction induced by a piston pushing hydraulically resisted gas through a long tube is discussed. It is shown that the hydraulic resistance causes a significant precompression and preheating of the gas adjacent to the piston's edge. In the case of an explosive premixture this development may lead to a localized autoignition triggering detonation. It is suggested that the problem may serve as a guide for understanding the deflagration-to-detonation transition in tubes, with the piston modeling the impact of the advancing flame. (author)

  16. Simulation of the instantaneous free piston Stirling engine-electrical load interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdizadeh, N.S.; Stouffs, P.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper the authors consider a gamma type free piston engine (that is, a configuration with a power piston cylinder and a separate displacer cylinder) with the MARTINI configuration (that is, with a free piston but a kinematically driven displacer). In the modeled engine, the displacer is driven by an electrical motor and there are two symmetrical, free, power pistons. This configuration ensures a complete balancing of the engine. The free pistons bear the moving parts of the linear electric alternators. This engine may be considered for solar to electrical energy conversion for land or space applications, for instance. A dynamic simulation of this engine has been developed using a decoupled analysis. The motion equation of the free piston induces a strong coupling between the electrical load and the thermodynamics inside the free piston Stirling engine. From the thermodynamics point of view, the piston-displacer phase lag is an important parameter. It is shown that if the electrical circuit elements (R-L-C) are constants, the phase lag between the free pistons and displacer motions is far from the optimum. However this phase lag can be controlled by means of a variable electrical resistance. For both cases of stand-alone engine with an independent electrical load, or grid-connected engine, it is shown how one can in a very simple way multiply the net electrical power by a factor 4 to 10 and the efficiency by a factor 1.25 to 2 without any engine geometry modification.

  17. Numerical simulation of the operation of piston rings in a reciprocating engine

    SciTech Connect

    Saghir, H.; Arques, P.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the authors present results concerning the tightness of a combustion chamber by rings placed on a piston. The authors have developed a program of simulation of the operation of rings on a piston in movement. This program takes into account: the unstationary reciprocating movement of the ring in the piston ring groove and flows of gases between the combustion chamber, volumes delimited by the set rings-piston-cylinder and the crankcase. These flows are executed in rear of the ring or directly by the clearance to the cup of the ring.

  18. An investigation into the passive acoustic effect of the turbine in an automotive turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, K. S.; Torregrosa, A. J.; Broatch, A.; Fernández, T.

    2006-08-01

    The turbine of an automotive turbocharger is one of many elements in the exhaust line which lie between the primary noise source, namely the gas pulsations through the exhaust valves, and the primary noise radiation element, the exhaust tailpipe orifice. Like every other element of the exhaust system, it has a passive acoustic effect on the propagation of the primary exhaust noise. Thus knowledge of the passive acoustic effect of the turbine is essential to an understanding of the overall acoustic effectiveness of an exhaust system. In particular, if a comprehensive model of the acoustic propagation through the entire exhaust system of a turbocharged engine is sought, an acoustic model of the turbine is a prerequisite. This paper presents such a model as well as an experimental technique from which measured data can be obtained to verify the model and to characterise the acoustic behaviour of the turbine in a more general sense. In the first instance, the one-dimensional nonlinear equations of the fluid flow are solved for steady flow, to determine the background conditions for acoustic propagation including the mean convective flow distribution. The nonlinear time-domain flow equations are then linearised and solved for a single frequency of sound. At low frequencies, there is good agreement between measured and predicted results. System resonances that are observed at high frequencies can also be explained by the model.

  19. Cylinder-averaged histories of nitrogen oxide in a DI diesel with simulated turbocharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Ronald J.; Borman, Gary L.; Bower, Glenn R.

    1994-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted using the dumping technique (total cylinder sampling) to produce cylinder mass-averaged nitric oxide histories. Data were taken using a four stroke diesel research engine employing a quiescent chamber, high pressure direct injection fuel system, and simulated turbocharging. Two fuels were used to determine fuel cetane number effects. Two loads were run, one at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the other at a ratio of 0.3. The engine speed was held constant at 1500 rpm. Under the turbocharged and retarded timing conditions of this study, nitric oxide was produced up to the point of about 85% mass burned. Two different models were used to simulate the engine mn conditions: the phenomenological Hiroyasu spray-combustion model, and the three dimensional, U.W.-ERO modified KIVA-2 computational fluid dynamic code. Both of the models predicted the correct nitric oxide trend. Although the modified KIVA-2 combustion model using Zeldovich kinetics correctly predicted the shapes of the nitric oxide histories, it did not predict the exhaust concentrations without arbitrary adjustment based on experimental values.

  20. Effects of semi-floating ring bearing outer clearance on the subsynchronous oscillation of turbocharger rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Zhou, Ming; Xu, Quanyong

    2016-06-01

    Semi-floating ring bearing(SFRB) is developed to control the vibration of turbocharger rotor. The outer clearance of SFRB affects the magnitude and frequency of nonlinear whirl motion, which is significant for the design of turbocharger. In order to explore the effects of outer clearance, a transient finite element analysis program for rotor and oil film bearing is built and validated by a published experimental case. The nonlinear dynamic behaviors of rotor-SFRB system are simulated. According to the simulation results, two representative subsynchronous oscillations excited by the two bearings respectively are discovered. As the outer clearance of SFRB increases from 24 μm to 60 μm, the low-frequency subsynchronous oscillation experiences three steps, including a strong start, a gradual recession and a combination with the other one. At the same time, the high-frequency subsynchronous oscillation starts to appear gradually, then strengthens, and finally combines. If gravity and unbalance are neglected, the combination will start starts from high rotor speed and extents to low rotor speed, just like a "zipper". It is found from the quantitative analysis that when the outer clearance increases, the vibration amplitude experiences large value firstly, then reduction, and suddenly increasing after combination. A useful design principle of SFRB outer clearance for minimum vibration amplitude is proposed: the outer clearance value should be chosen to keep the frequency of two subsynchronous oscillations clearly separated and their amplitudes close.

  1. Flatness-based embedded adaptive fuzzy control of turbocharged diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Siano, Pierluigi; Arsie, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    In this paper nonlinear embedded control for turbocharged Diesel engines is developed with the use of Differential flatness theory and adaptive fuzzy control. It is shown that the dynamic model of the turbocharged Diesel engine is differentially flat and admits dynamic feedback linearization. It is also shown that the dynamic model can be written in the linear Brunovsky canonical form for which a state feedback controller can be easily designed. To compensate for modeling errors and external disturbances an adaptive fuzzy control scheme is implemanted making use of the transformed dynamical system of the diesel engine that is obtained through the application of differential flatness theory. Since only the system's output is measurable the complete state vector has to be reconstructed with the use of a state observer. It is shown that a suitable learning law can be defined for neuro-fuzzy approximators, which are part of the controller, so as to preserve the closed-loop system stability. With the use of Lyapunov stability analysis it is proven that the proposed observer-based adaptive fuzzy control scheme results in H∞ tracking performance.

  2. Free-piston Stirling technology for space power

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space power. This work is being carried out under NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The overall goal of CSTI`s High Capacity Power element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space missions. The Stirling cycle offers an attractive power conversion concept for space power needs. Discussed in this paper is the completion of the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) testing - culminating in the generation of 25 kW of engine power from a dynamically-balanced opposed-piston Stirling engine at a temperature ratio of 2.0. Engine efficiency was approximately 22 percent. The SPDE recently has been divided into two separate single-cylinder engines, called Space Power Research Engines (SPRE), that now serve as test beds for the evaluation of key technology disciplines. These disciplines include hydrodynamic gas bearings, high-efficiency linear alternators, space qualified heat pipe heat exchangers, oscillating flow code validation, and engine loss understanding. The success of the SPDE at 650 K has resulted in a more ambitious Stirling endeavor - the design, fabrication, test and evaluation of a designed-for-space 25 kW per cylinder Stirling Space Engine (SSE). The SSE will operate at a hot metal temperature of 1050 K using superalloy materials. This design is a low temperature confirmation of the 1300 K design. It is the 1300 K free-piston Stirling power conversion system that is the ultimate goal; to be used in conjunction with the SP-100 reactor. The approach to this goal is in three temperature steps. However, this paper concentrates on the first two phases of this program - the 650 K SPDE and the 1050 K SSE.

  3. Vacuum stress and closed paths in rectangles, pistons and pistols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulling, S. A.; Kaplan, L.; Kirsten, K.; Liu, Z. H.; Milton, K. A.

    2009-04-01

    Rectangular cavities are solvable models that nevertheless touch on many of the controversial or mysterious aspects of the vacuum energy of quantum fields. This paper is a thorough study of the two-dimensional scalar field in a rectangle by the method of images, or closed classical (or optical) paths, which is exact in this case. For each point r and each specularly reflecting path beginning and ending at r, we provide formulae for all components of the stress tensor Tμν(r), for all values of the curvature coupling constant ξ and all values of an ultraviolet cutoff parameter. Arbitrary combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions on the four sides can be treated. The total energy is also investigated, path by path. These results are used in an attempt to clarify the physical reality of the repulsive (outward) force on the sides of the box predicted by calculations that neglect both boundary divergences and the exterior of the box. Previous authors have studied 'piston' geometries that avoid these problems and have found the force to be attractive. We consider a 'pistol' geometry that comes closer to the original problem of a box with a movable lid. We find again an attractive force, although its origin and detailed behavior are somewhat different from the piston case. However, the pistol (and the piston) model can be criticized for extending idealized boundary conditions into short distances where they are physically implausible. Therefore, it is of interest to see whether leaving the ultraviolet cutoff finite yields results that are more plausible. We then find that the force depends strongly on a geometrical parameter; it can be made repulsive, but only by forcing that parameter into the regime where the model is least convincing physically.

  4. Vortex motion in axisymmetric piston-cylinder configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I. P.; Smith, G. E.; Springer, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    By using the Beam and Warming implicit-factored method of solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, velocities were calculated inside axisymmetric piston cylinder configurations during the intake and compression strokes. Results are presented in graphical form which show the formation, growth and breakup of those vortices which form during the intake stroke by the jet issuing from the valve. It is shown that at bore-to-stroke ratio of less than unity, the vortices may breakup during the intake stroke. It is also shown that vortices which do not breakup during the intake stroke coalesce during the compression stroke.

  5. Free-Piston Stirling Machine for Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, James Gary (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A free piston Stirling machine including a thermal buffer tube extending from the machine's expansion space and surrounded by its heat rejector and its regenerator, a displacer cylinder extending from the thermal buffer tube to the compression space and surrounded by the heat rejecting heat exchanger, and a displacer that reciprocates within an excursion limit that extends into the regenerator by no more than 20% of the length of the regenerator during normal operation and preferably within excursion limits that are substantially the length of the heat rejector.

  6. Tilt/Tip/Piston Manipulator with Base-Mounted Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad

    2006-01-01

    A proposed three-degree-of-freedom (tilt/tip/piston) manipulator, suitable for aligning an optical or mechanical component, would offer several advantages over prior such manipulators: Unlike in some other manipulators, no actuator would support the weight of another actuator: All of the actuators would be mounted on a base. Hence, there would be less manipulated weight. The basic geometry of the manipulator would afford mechanical advantage: that is, actuator motions would be larger than the motions they produce in the manipulated object. Mechanical advantage inherently increases the accuracy and resolution of manipulation. Unlike in some other manipulators, it would not be necessary to route power and/or data lines through manipulator joints. The proposed manipulator (see figure) would include three prismatic actuators (T1N1, T2N2, and T3N3) mounted on the base and operating in the same plane. Examples of suitable prismatic actuators include lead-screw mechanisms, linear hydraulic motors, piezoelectric linear drives, inchworm-movement linear stepping motors, and linear flexure drives. The actuators would control the lengths of links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. Three spherical joints (P1, P2, and P3) would be located at the corners of an equilateral triangle of side length q on the platform holding the object to be manipulated. Three inextensible limbs (R1P1, R2P2, and R3P3) having length r would connect the spherical joints on the platform to revolute joints (R1, R2, and R3) at the ends of the actuator-controlled links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. By varying the lengths of these links, one could control the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates of the platform. Closed-form equations for direct or forward kinematics of the manipulator (given the lengths of the variable links, find the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have been derived. The equations of inverse kinematics (find the variable link lengths needed to obtain the desired tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have also

  7. Acceleration of a slab driven by a constant pressure piston

    SciTech Connect

    Diez, J. A.; Thomas, L. P.

    1989-08-01

    The sequence of shock and rarefaction waves, which occur in a plane layer of ideal gas initially at rest when it is driven toward the vacuum by a very high constant pressure piston, is studied. In the rarefaction flow that relaxes the layer compressed by the first strong shock, a second shock is generated. The time and position of its formation are obtained by an exact analytical expression. The subsequent motion and intensity of the shock wave are approximated by the Chester--Chisnell--Whitham (CCW) method. Then, the Lagrangian distribution of entropy in the layer is analytically derived.

  8. NACA Investigation of Fuel Performance in Piston-Type Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Henry C

    1951-01-01

    This report is a compilation of many of the pertinent research data acquired by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on fuel performance in piston engines. The original data for this compilation are contained in many separate NACA reports which have in the present report been assembled in logical chapters that summarize the main conclusions of the various investigations. Complete details of each investigation are not included in this summary; however, such details may be found, in the original reports cited at the end of each chapter.

  9. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements.

    PubMed

    Kepa, M W; Ridley, C J; Kamenev, K V; Huxley, A D

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2. PMID:27587156

  10. Vortex motion in axisymmetric piston-cylinder configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, T.I.P.; Smith, G.E.; Springer, G.S.

    1982-09-01

    By using the Beam and Warming implicit-factored method of solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, velocities were calculated inside axisymmetric piston cylinder configurations during the intake and compression strokes. Results are presented in graphical form which show the formation, growth and breakup of those vortices which form during the intake stroke by the jet issuing from the valve. It is shown that at bore-to-stroke ratio of less than unity, the vortices may breakup during the intake stroke. It is also shown that vortices which do not breakup during the intake stroke coalesce during the compression stroke.

  11. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, M. W.; Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V.; Huxley, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2.

  12. Performance simulation of a combustion engine charged by a variable geometry turbocharger. I - Prerequirements, boundary conditions and model development. II - Simulation algorithm, computed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malobabic, M.; Buttschardt, W.; Rautenberg, M.

    The paper presents a theoretical derivation of the relationship between a variable geometry turbocharger and the combustion engine, using simplified boundary conditions and model restraints and taking into account the combustion process itself as well as the nonadiabatic operating conditions for the turbine and the compressor. The simulation algorithm is described, and the results computed using this algorithm are compared with measurements performed on a test engine in combination with a controllable turbocharger with adjustable turbine inlet guide vanes. In addition, the results of theoretical parameter studies are presented, which include the simulation of a given turbocharger with variable geometry in combination with different sized combustion engines and the simulation of different sized variable-geometry turbochargers in combination with a given combustion engine.

  13. Durability, Performance, and Emission of Diesel Engines Using Carbon Fiber Piston and Liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afify, E. M.; Roberts, W. L.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the research conducted by NC State University in investigating the durability, performance and emission of a carbon fiber piston and liner in our single cylinder research Diesel engine. Both the piston and liner were supplied to NC State University by NASA LaRC and manufactured by C-CAT under a separate contract to NASA LaRC. The carbon-carbon material used to manufacture the piston and liner has significantly lower thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, and superior strength characteristics at elevated temperatures when compared to conventional piston materials such as aluminum. The results of the carbon-carbon fiber piston testing were compared to a baseline configuration, which used a conventional aluminum piston in a steel liner. The parameters measured were the brake specific fuel consumption, ignition delay, frictional horsepower, volumetric efficiency, and durability characteristics of the two pistons. Testing was performed using a naturally aspirated Labeco Direct Injection single cylinder diesel engine. Two test cases were performed over a range of loads and speeds. The fixed test condition between the aluminum and carbon-carbon piston configurations was the brake mean effective pressure. The measured data was the fuel consumption rate, volumetric efficiency, load, speed, cylinder pressure, needle lift, and exhaust gas temperature. The cylinder pressure, and fuel consumption, exhaust gas temperature, and needle lift were recorded using a National Instruments DAQ board and a PC. All test cases used Diesel no. 2 for fuel.

  14. The combustion process in a DI diesel hydraulic free piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Somhorst, J.H.E.; Achten, P.A.J.

    1996-09-01

    In a free piston engine the piston is neither connected to a crankshaft mechanism nor to any other kinematic system. Instead the piston movement is determined by the free forces that act upon it. This difference between the kinematic principle of the crankshaft engine and the free piston principle has a significant influence on the combustion process. In this paper the combustion process in a free piston engine is described on the basis of experiments. The experimental data were obtained from measurements on the free piston engine that has been developed by the Dutch company Innas. This article discusses the influence of the free piston principle on cold start, ignition delay, heat release, heat transfer, indicated efficiency and emissions. In the optimum point the engine has an indicated efficiency of 51%, a NOx emission of 6 gr/kWhi and a soot emission corresponding to a Bosch Filter Number of less than 0.5. The combustion process of the free piston engine is furthermore characterized by a nearly constant volume combustion process.

  15. Advanced Controller Developed for the Free-Piston Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Scott S.

    2005-01-01

    A free-piston Stirling power convertor is being considered as an advanced power-conversion technology for future NASA deep-space missions requiring long-life radioisotope power systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center has identified key areas where advanced technologies can enhance the capability of Stirling energy-conversion systems. One of these is power electronic controls. Current power-conversion technology for Glenn-tested Stirling systems consists of an engine-driven linear alternator generating an alternating-current voltage controlled by a tuning-capacitor-based alternating-current peak voltage load controller. The tuning capacitor keeps the internal alternator electromotive force (EMF) in phase with its respective current (i.e., passive power factor correction). The alternator EMF is related to the piston velocity, which must be kept in phase with the alternator current in order to achieve stable operation. This tuning capacitor, which adds volume and mass to the overall Stirling convertor, can be eliminated if the controller can actively drive the magnitude and phase of the alternator current.

  16. The corrugation instability of a piston-driven shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jason

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a shock wave that is driven into an inviscid fluid by the steady motion of a two-dimensional planar piston with small corrugations on its surface. This problem was first considered by Freeman [Proc. Royal Soc. A. 228, 341 (1955)], who showed that piston-driven shocks are unconditionally stable when the medium through which they propagate is an ideal gas. Here, we generalize his work to account for a fluid with an arbitrary equation of state. We find that shocks are stable when - 1 < h

  17. π0 Reconstruction using the Muon Piston Calorimeter Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Dhruv; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Muon-Piston Calorimeter Extension (MPC-EX) is a new detector in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that was installed for the recent Run 15 of the experiment. In polarized p+p and polarized p+A collisions, an important measurement is the yield and momentum distribution of direct photons. Unaffected by the strong force, direct photons traverse the dense medium in the collision zone mostly unchanged, thereby providing information about the initial stages of the collision. However, there is a huge background of photons from other sources, primarily π0 which decay into two photons. The opening angle between the decay photons becomes smaller with higher energies of the original π0. For energies greater than ~20 GeV, the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) cannot distinguish the two decay photons from a single photon, as their showers merge. The MPC-EX, an 8-layer tungsten and silicon sensor sandwich in front of the MPC, can measure and image the shower development, and help distinguish between direct photons and π0 decay photons up to higher energies than the MPC alone. We will describe the MPC-EX detector and its readout, and present the calibration procedures applied to the data in order to obtain the π0 spectrum. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  18. New 5 Kilowatt Free-piston Stirling Space Convertor Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Chapman, Peter A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Vision for Exploration of the moon may someday require a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kW. In the 1990s, Mechanical Technology Inc. s Stirling Engine Systems Division (some of whose Stirling personnel are now at Foster-Miller, Inc.) developed a 25 kW free piston Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kW engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA and DoE have been developing dual 55 W and 80 W Stirling convertor systems for potential use with radioisotope heat sources. Total test times of all convertors in this effort exceed 120,000 hours. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kW, single convertor for potential use in a lunar surface reactor power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 W/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Auburn University awarded a subcontract to Foster-Miller, Inc. to undertake development of the 5 kW Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  19. The low-cost and precise piston gas pressure regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasik, Mateusz; Skoczylas, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    The present paper discusses the concept and functioning of an innovative instrument for precise stabilization of gas pressure. The piston gas pressure regulator was constructed at the Strata Mechanics Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The tests to which the instrument was subjected involved observing the values of stabilized pressure at the level of 10 bar and 3 bar, for various gas flow rates at the outlet of the instrument. The piston gas pressure regulator operates within the range of 0-10 bar and the gas flow range of 0-240 cm3 min-1. The precision of the process of stabilizing the initial pressure is  ±0.005 bar, regardless of the gas pressure value and the flow rate observed at the outlet of the instrument. Although the pressure transducer’s accuracy is 0.25% of the full range, the conducted tests of the regulator demonstrated that the obtained changeability of the stabilized pressure is at least two times lower. Unlike some other gas pressure regulators available on the market, the instrument constructed by the authors of the present paper is highly precise when it comes to the process of stabilization, and inexpensive to build.

  20. Modeling aerosols formed in the ring - pack of reciprocating piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallstream, Brian Ellis

    The hydrocarbon emissions of an internal combustion engine are directly correlated with the engine's oil consumption. This oil consumption is associated with reverse blow-by, a condition in which gases flow past the ring-pack from the crankcase to the combustion chamber. This reverse blow-by breaks down the oil film on the cylinder walls and entrains oil particles in the gas flow during the downstroke of the piston. In this project a numerical model was developed that accurately describes the formation of aerosols in the ring pack by simulating the mechanisms by which oil globules are broken up, atomized, and entrained in a gas flowing through an orifice. The results of this numerical model are in good agreement with experimental values. Thus, this numerical model gives insight into the parameters that govern oil consumption. A discussion is also presented regarding the general applications of atomization and how past researchers have developed and advanced the theories of atomization.Included in this discussion is an introduction to past models of oil consumption and the conditions needed for aerosols to form within the ring-pack of a piston.

  1. The frictionless damping of a piston in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringuier, E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper revisits Rüchardt’s experiment and the two-chamber variant of Clark and Katz, where the oscillating motion of a freely sliding piston involves the adiabatic exponent of the gas enclosed in a thermally isolated chamber. While the common theoretical account of the experiment correctly predicts the frequency of the oscillation, the damping is usually ascribed to a linear frictional force of an undetermined mechanical nature. In this paper, we argue that the irreversibility of the damped motion calls for a thermodynamical treatment involving dissipation (entropy production). The theory of Rüchardt’s experiment is reworked at the undergraduate level by allowing entropy to change owing to heat transfer into or out of the chamber. It is calculated that a linear heat transfer can explain the observed damping without assuming any mechanical friction. The calculation is quantitatively supported by an experiment. It is also calculated that the mechanical and thermal equilibrations occur at the same rate. Besides possibly improving Rüchardt and Clark-and-Katz apparatuses by shedding light on the damping, the paper helps to better grasp thermodynamics, and how to use entropy, by constrasting the mechanical and thermodynamical reasonings on the example of the damped motion of a piston.

  2. Piston ring friction and vehicle fuel economy: Final report, November 1, 1983-January 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hoult, D.P.

    1987-08-01

    This project has involved three major tasks. They are: (1) The measurement of the transition of a piston ring, in a running engine, as it moves from the bottom to the top of the groove in the piston. (2) A theoretical analysis of the dynamics of a single piston ring. (3) The setup and calibration of a laser fluorescence measurement technique for oil film thickness measurements. Highlights of the results are (a) the discovery of a gas lubricated piston ring design, which holds promise for substantial reduction in piston ring friction, and successful operation at high temperatures; (b) the application of the quantum mechanical principals necessary to correctly calibrate the laser-fluorescence technique in a running engine.

  3. Neural control of fast nonlinear systems--application to a turbocharged SI engine with VCT.

    PubMed

    Colin, Guillaume; Chamaillard, Yann; Bloch, Gérard; Corde, Gilles

    2007-07-01

    Today, (engine) downsizing using turbocharging appears as a major way in reducing fuel consumption and pollutant emissions of spark ignition (SI) engines. In this context, an efficient control of the air actuators [throttle, turbo wastegate, and variable camshaft timing (VCT)] is needed for engine torque control. This paper proposes a nonlinear model-based control scheme which combines separate, but coordinated, control modules. Theses modules are based on different control strategies: internal model control (IMC), model predictive control (MPC), and optimal control. It is shown how neural models can be used at different levels and included in the control modules to replace physical models, which are too complex to be online embedded, or to estimate nonmeasured variables. The results obtained from two different test benches show the real-time applicability and good control performance of the proposed methods. PMID:17668664

  4. Effects of air injection on a turbocharged Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-360-C engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. V.; Kempke, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for tests performed to assess the effects of exhaust manifold injection air flow rate on emissions and on exhaust gas temperature and turbine inlet temperature for a range of engine operating conditions (speed, torque, and fuel-air ratios) of a fuel-injected turbocharged six-cylinder air-cooled Teledyne Continental Motors TSIO-360-C engine. Air injection into the exhaust gas at 80 F resulted in a decrease in hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide while exceeding the maximum recommended turbine inlet temperature of 1650 F at the full rich mixture of the engine. The EPA standards could be met within present turbine inlet temperature limits using commercially available air pumps, provided that the fuel-air ratios were leaned in the taxi, climb, and approach modes.

  5. Neural control of fast nonlinear systems--application to a turbocharged SI engine with VCT.

    PubMed

    Colin, Guillaume; Chamaillard, Yann; Bloch, Gérard; Corde, Gilles

    2007-07-01

    Today, (engine) downsizing using turbocharging appears as a major way in reducing fuel consumption and pollutant emissions of spark ignition (SI) engines. In this context, an efficient control of the air actuators [throttle, turbo wastegate, and variable camshaft timing (VCT)] is needed for engine torque control. This paper proposes a nonlinear model-based control scheme which combines separate, but coordinated, control modules. Theses modules are based on different control strategies: internal model control (IMC), model predictive control (MPC), and optimal control. It is shown how neural models can be used at different levels and included in the control modules to replace physical models, which are too complex to be online embedded, or to estimate nonmeasured variables. The results obtained from two different test benches show the real-time applicability and good control performance of the proposed methods.

  6. Fundamental Combustion Characteristics of Sewage Sludge in Fluidized Bed Incinerator with Turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo; Nagasawa, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Koseki, Takami; Hirose, Hitoshi; Ochi, Shuichi

    An epoch-making incineration plant, which is equipped with a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor coupled to a turbocharger, for the recovery of the energy contained in sewage sludge is proposed. This plant has three main advantages. (1) A pressure vessel is unnecessary because the maximum operating pressure is 0.3 MPa (absolute pressure). The material cost for plant construction can be reduced. (2) CO2 emissions originating from power generation can be decreased because the FDF (Forced Draft Fan) and the IDF (Induced Draft Fan) are omitted. (3) Steam in the flue gas becomes a working fluid of the turbocharger, so that in addition to the combustion air, the surplus air is also generable. Therefore, this proposed plant will not only save energy but also the generate energy. The objective of this study is to elucidate the fundamental combustion characteristics of the sewage sludge using a lab-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). The tested fuels are de-watered sludge and sawdust. The temperature distribution in the furnace and N2O emissions in the flue gas are experimentally clarified. As the results, for sludge only combustion, the temperature in the sand bed decreases by drying and pyrolysis, and the pyrolysis gas burns in the freeboard so that the temperature rises. On the other hand, the residual char of sawdust after pyrolysis burns stably in the sand bed for the co-firing of sludge and sawdust. Thus the temperature of the co-firing is considerably higher than that of the sludge only combustion. N2O emissions decreases with increasing freeboard temperature, and are controlled by the temperature for all experimental conditions. These data can be utilize to operation the demonstration plant.

  7. Fabrication of a mechanically aligned single-wafer MEMS turbine with turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelekies, S. O.; Schuhmann, T.; Gardner, W. G.; Camacho, A.; Protz, J. M.

    2010-10-01

    We describe the fabrication of a turbocharged, microelectromechanical system (MEMS) turbine. The turbine will be part of a standalone power unit and includes extra layers to connect the turbine to a generator. The project goal is to demonstrate the successful combination of several features, namely: silicon fusion bonding (SFB), a micro turbocharger [2], two rotors, mechanical alignment between two wafers [1], and the use of only one 5" silicon wafer. The dimension of the actual turbine casing will be 14mm. The turbine rotor will have a diameter of 8mm. Given these dimensions, MEMS processes are an adequate way to fabricate the device, but it will be necessary to stack up seven different layers to build the turbine, as it is not possible to construct it out of one thick wafer. SFB will be used for bonding because it permits the great precision necessary for high quality alignment. Yet a more precise alignment will be necessary between the layers that contain the turbine rotor, to decrease imbalance and guarantee operation at a very high rpm. To achieve these tight tolerances, a mechanical alignment feature announced by Liudi Jiang [1] is used. The alignment accuracy is expected to be around 200nm. Despite the fact that the turbine consists of multiple layers, it will be fabricated on only one silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. As a result, all layers are exposed to the same process flow. The fabrication process includes MEMS technology as photolithography, nine deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) steps, and six SFB operations. A total of 14 masks are necessary for the fabrication.

  8. Fluid-film lubrication with an application to piston rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahanian, Mohsen

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation consists of four related studies. The first part provides dimensionless film thickness equations for four fluid-fllm lubrication regimes found for nonconformal surfaces while considering side-leakage effects. These regimes are isoviscous rigid, piezoviscous rigid, isoviscous elastic, and piezoviscous elastic. The influence or lack of influence of elastic effects from the solid surfaces and pressure-viscosity effects from the lubricant is a factor that distinguishes these regimes. Results are presented as a map of the lubrication regimes for four values of the ellipticity parameter. The second part deals with integrating artificial intelligence and conventional numerical design techniques to aid in tribological design. The study concentrates on the application of contact stresses. The result is a computer code, the Design Expert for Contact Stress, which incorporates and combines an expert system with numerical analysis techniques to aid the user in designing machine elements. This menu-driven program also performs a design compatibility analysis, which evaluates the compatibility between the specifications and the design, provides a rating on the overall design, lists reasons for the evaluation, and gives suggestions for improvements. The third part investigates the rheological effects in elastohydrodynamic lubrication. In this study the effects on fluid viscosity of pressure, temperature, shear strain rate, shear stress, and time are examined. A number of non-Newtonian models are introduced. The effects of pressure on fluid density are described. The role of solidification pressure on the density of the lubricants is also examined. The possible influence of a lubricant's viscoelastic behavior on its viscosity is considered. Finally, the influence of rheological effects on elastohydrodynamic lubrication is explained. The last part describes fundamental research into the basic mechanisms involved in piston ring lubrication. A recently developed

  9. CFD Modeling of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Gedeon, David; Simon, Terrence W.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is funding Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a reliable Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code that can predict engine performance with the goal of significant improvements in accuracy when compared to one-dimensional (1-D) design code predictions. The funding also includes conducting code validation experiments at both the University of Minnesota (UMN) and CSU. In this paper a brief description of the work-in-progress is provided in the two areas (CFD and Experiments). Also, previous test results are compared with computational data obtained using (1) a 2-D CFD code obtained from Dr. Georg Scheuerer and further developed at CSU and (2) a multidimensional commercial code CFD-ACE+. The test data and computational results are for (1) a gas spring and (2) a single piston/cylinder with attached annular heat exchanger. The comparisons among the codes are discussed. The paper also discusses plans for conducting code validation experiments at CSU and UMN.

  10. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engine power generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Z. X.; Nasar, S. A.; Rosswurm, Mark

    This paper presents a stability analysis of the free-piston Stirling engine and linear alternator power generation system. Such a system operates under sustained mechanical oscillators, stability of the system is important for proper operation, and as a criterion in selecting the tuning capacitor. The stability criterion of the system is that the rate of change in power dissipation and electric power output is always faster than the rate of the power generated by the engine. The dynamic equations and model of the system are developed in this paper. Frequency domain analysis and Bode plot techniques are utilized in the study. The stable operating frequency region corresponding to different levels of power output are then determined.

  11. Experimental and theoretical analysis of a Solar Liquid Piston Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.L.; Brew-Hammoud, A.

    1985-08-01

    The Solar Liquid Piston Pump (SLPP) is driven by oscillations of an enclosed column of liquid Freon 113. Cyclic evaporation and condensation from heating and cooling coils at the top of the liquid column generate the oscillations. The frequency and amplitude of the oscillations are enhanced by momentum forces in the inlet, outlet, and working tubes. Three geometrically different experimental models of a SLPP have been tested. To optimize the performance of the SLPP, a theoretical model was required to account for the large number of interdependent parametres that could be varied. A semiemperical time-incremented computer model was developed. A theoretical cycle was assumed and the heat transfer and fluid friction coefficient adjusted, within reasonable limits, so that the theoretical pressurevolume diagrams agreed closely with experimental ones. Input parameters were then varied for the theoretical model and compared to experimental results available. The theoretical model successfully predicted performance trends of the SLPP.

  12. Free-piston Stirling component test power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dochat, George; Dhar, Manmohan

    1991-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been evaluating free-piston Stirling power converters (FPSPCs) for use on a wide variety of space missions. They provide high reliability, long life, and efficient operation and can be coupled with all potential heat sources, various heat input and heat rejection systems, and various power management and distribution systems. FPSPCs can compete favorably with alternative power conversion systems over a range of hundreds of watts to megawatts. Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is developing FPSPC technology under contract to NASA Lewis Research Center and will demonstrate this technology in two full-scale power converters operating at space temperature conditions. The testing of the first of these, the component test power converter (CTPC), was initiated in Spring 1991 to evaluate mechanical operation at space operating temperatures. The CTPC design, hardware fabrication, and initial test results are reviewed.

  13. Powder-lubricated piston ring development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, H.

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new particulate lubrication concept for reducing piston ring/cylinder liner wear in coal-water slurry-fueled diesels by replacing the present oil-lubricated system with powder lubrication that would utilize coal ash, either alone or in combination with another powder. The feasibility of this particular lubrication concept for reducing ring/liner wear was demonstrated in a series of experiments utilizing redesigned and properly selected components. Wear performance for suitable ring/liner materials lubricated with a powder that incorporates the abrasive ash particles was evaluated in terms of load capacity, friction, and rate of wear for the best combination of ring design, ring and liner materials, and powder constituents. In addition, the use of a powder-lubricated system in the upper portion of the cylinder isolated the particulates from the lower portions of the engine, thus further reducing engine wear. (VC)

  14. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-01

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  15. Integrated two-cylinder liquid piston Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ning; Rickard, Robert; Pluckter, Kevin; Sulchek, Todd

    2014-10-06

    Heat engines utilizing the Stirling cycle may run on low temperature differentials with the capacity to function at high efficiency due to their near-reversible operation. However, current approaches to building Stirling engines are laborious and costly. Typically the components are assembled by hand and additional components require a corresponding increase in manufacturing complexity, akin to electronics before the integrated circuit. We present a simple and integrated approach to fabricating Stirling engines with precisely designed cylinders. We utilize computer aided design and one-step, planar machining to form all components of the engine. The engine utilizes liquid pistons and displacers to harness useful work from heat absorption and rejection. As a proof of principle of the integrated design, a two-cylinder engine is produced and characterized and liquid pumping is demonstrated.

  16. Thermodynamics of slow solutions to the gas-piston equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Chiuchiù, D.

    2016-10-01

    Despite its historical importance, a perfect gas enclosed by a pistons and in contact with a thermal reservoirs is a system still largely under study. Its thermodynamic properties are not yet well understood when driven under nonequilibrium conditions, and analytic formulas that describe the heat exchanged with the reservoir are rare. In this paper we prove a power series expansions for the heat when both the external force and the reservoir temperature are slowly varying over time but the overall process is not quasistatic. To do so, we use the dynamical equations from [Cerino et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 032128 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.032128] and an uncommon application of the regular perturbation technique.

  17. A drag measurement technique for free piston shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, S. R.; Simmons, J. M.; Tuttle, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique is described for measuring drag with 100-microsecond rise time on a nonlifting model in a free piston shock tunnel. The technique involves interpretation of the stress waves propagating within the model and its support. A finite element representation and spectral methods are used to obtain a mean square optimal estimate of the time history of the aerodynamic loading. Thus, drag is measured instantaneously and the previous restriction caused by the mechanical time constant of balances is overcome. The effectiveness of the balance is demonstrated by measuring the drag on cones with 5 and 15 deg semi-vertex angles in nominally Mach 5.6 flow with stagnation enthalpies from 2.6 to 33 MJ/kg.

  18. Thermally driven piston assembly and position control therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, III, Donald L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermally driven piston assembly's housing has (i) a first material slidingly fitted therein, and (ii) at least one plug of a second material slidingly fitted therein and abutting the first material. The first material is one (e.g., a liquid crystal elastomer) that undergoes a stiffness change and/or a dimensional change when subjected to a temperature change in the temperature range of interest. When subjected to the temperature change while in the housing, the first material is restricted to changing dimensionally along a single dimension. The second material retains its shape and size throughout the temperature range of interest. As a result, the plug moves in the housing in correspondence with the dimensional change of the first material or the plug's movement is damped by the stiffness change of the first material.

  19. Advanced Technology Spark-Ignition Aircraft Piston Engine Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckas, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    The advanced technology, spark ignition, aircraft piston engine design study was conducted to determine the improvements that could be made by taking advantage of technology that could reasonably be expected to be made available for an engine intended for production by January 1, 1990. Two engines were proposed to account for levels of technology considered to be moderate risk and high risk. The moderate risk technology engine is a homogeneous charge engine operating on avgas and offers a 40% improvement in transportation efficiency over present designs. The high risk technology engine, with a stratified charge combustion system using kerosene-based jet fuel, projects a 65% improvement in transportation efficiency. Technology enablement program plans are proposed herein to set a timetable for the successful integration of each item of required advanced technology into the engine design.

  20. Preliminary Study of a Piston Pump for Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold E.; Kohl, Robert C.

    1959-01-01

    Preliminary data are presented covering the performance of a low-speed, five-cylinder piston pump designed for handling boiling hydrogen. This pump was designed for a flow of 55 gallons per minute at 240 rpm with a discharge pressure of 135 pounds per square inch. Tests were made using JP-4 fuel, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Pump delivery and endurance characteristics were satisfactory for the range of operation covered. In connection with the foregoing pump development, the cavitation characteristics of a preliminary visual model, glass-cylinder pump and of a simple reciprocating disk were studied. Subcooling of approximately 0.60 F was obtained from the cavitation produced by reciprocating a disk in boiling nitrogen and in boiling water. The subcooling obtained in a similar manner with liquid hydrogen was somewhat less.

  1. Accomplishments in free-piston stirling tests at NASA GRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Skupinski, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    A power system based on the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) has been identified for potential use on deep space missions, as well as for Mars rovers that may benefit from extended operation. The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for developing the generator and the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is supporting DOE in this effort. The generator is based on a free-piston Stirling power convertor that has been developed by the Stirling Technology Company (STC) under contract to DOE. The generator would be used as a high-efficiency alternative to the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) that have been used on many previous missions. The increased efficiency leads to a factor of 3 to 4 reduction in the inventory of plutonium required to heat the generator. GRC has been involved in the development of Stirling power conversion technology for over 25 years. The support provided to this project by GRC has many facets and draws upon the lab's scientists and engineers that have gained experience in applying their skills to the previous Stirling projects. This has created a staff with an understanding of the subtleties involved in applying their expertise to Stirling systems. Areas include materials, structures, tribology, controls, electromagnetic interference, permanent magnets, alternator analysis, structural dynamics, and cycle performance. One of the key areas of support to the project is in the performance testing of the free-piston Stirling convertors. Since these power convertors are the smallest, lowest power Stirling machines that have been tested at GRC, a new laboratory was equipped for this project. Procedures and test plans have been created, instrumentation and data systems developed, and Stirling convertors have been tested. This paper will describe the GRC test facility, the test procedures that are used, present some of the test results and outline plans for the future. .

  2. 5-kWe Free-piston Stirling Engine Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Peter A.; Vitale, Nicholas A.; Walter, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The high reliability, long life, and efficient operation of Free-Piston Stirling Engines (FPSEs) make them an attractive power system to meet future space power requirements with less mass, better efficiency, and less total heat exchanger area than other power convertor options. FPSEs are also flexible in configuration as they can be coupled with many potential heat sources and various heat input systems, heat rejection systems, and power management and distribution systems. Development of a 5-kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly (SCA) is underway to demonstrate the viability of an FPSE for space power. The design is a scaled-down version of the successful 12.5-kWe Component Test Power Converter (CTPC) developed under NAS3-25463. The ultimate efficiency target is 25% overall convertor efficiency (electrical power out over heat in). For the single cylinder prototype now in development, cost and time constraints required use of economical and readily available materials (steel versus beryllium) and components (a commercially available linear alternator) and thus lower efficiency. The working gas is helium at 150 bar mean pressure. The design consists of a displacer suspended on internally pumped gas bearings and a power piston/alternator supported on flexures. Non-contacting clearance seals are used between internal volumes. Heat to and from the prototype convertor is done via pumped liquid loops passing through shell and tube heat exchangers. The preliminary and detail designs of the convertor, controller, and support systems (heating loop, cooling loop, and helium supply system) are complete and all hardware is on order. Assembly and test of the prototype at Foster- Miller is planned for early 2008, when work will focus on characterizing convertor dynamics and steady-state operation to determine maximum power output and system efficiency. The device will then be delivered to Auburn University where assessments will include start-up and shutdown characterization and

  3. Data-Parallel Halo Finder Operator in PISTON

    SciTech Connect

    Widanagamaachchi, W. N.

    2012-08-01

    PISTON is a portable framework which supports the development of visualization and analysis operators using a platform-independent, data-parallel programming model. Operators such as isosurface, cut-surface and threshold have been implemented in this framework, with the exact same operator code achieving good parallel performance on different architectures. An important analysis operator in cosmology is the halo finder. A halo is a cluster of particles and is considered a common feature of interest found in cosmology data. As the number of cosmological simulations carried out in the recent past has increased, the resultant data of these simulations and the required analysis tasks have increased as well. As a consequence, there is a need to develop scalable and efficient tools to carry out the needed analysis. Therefore, we are currently implementing a halo finder operator using PISTON. Researchers have developed a wide variety of techniques to identify halos in raw particle data. The most basic algorithm is the friend-of-friends (FOF) halo finder, where the particles are clustered based on two parameters: linking length and halo size. In a FOF halo finder, all particles which lie within the linking length are considered as one halo and the halos are filtered based on the halo size parameter. A naive implementation of a FOF halo finder compares each and every particle pair, requiring O(n{sup 2}) operations. Our data-parallel halo finder operator uses a balanced k-d tree to reduce this number of operations in the average case, and implements the algorithm using only the data-parallel primitives in order to achieve portability and performance.

  4. CFD analysis of a diaphragm free-piston Stirling cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughley, Alan; Sellier, Mathieu; Gschwendtner, Michael; Tucker, Alan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of a novel free-piston Stirling cryocooler that uses a pair of metal diaphragms to seal and suspend the displacer. The diaphragms allow the displacer to move without rubbing or moving seals. When coupled to a metal diaphragm pressure wave generator, the system produces a complete Stirling cryocooler with no rubbing parts in the working gas space. Initial modelling of this concept using the Sage modelling tool indicated the potential for a useful cryocooler. A proof-of-concept prototype was constructed and achieved cryogenic temperatures. A second prototype was designed and constructed using the experience gained from the first. The prototype produced 29 W of cooling at 77 K and reached a no-load temperature of 56 K. The diaphragm's large diameter and short stroke produces a significant radial component to the oscillating flow fields inside the cryocooler which were not modelled in the one-dimensional analysis tool Sage that was used to design the prototypes. Compared with standard pistons, the diaphragm geometry increases the gas-to-wall heat transfer due to the higher velocities and smaller hydraulic diameters. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the cryocooler was constructed to understand the underlying fluid-dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms with the aim of further improving performance. The CFD modelling of the heat transfer in the radial flow fields created by the diaphragms shows the possibility of utilizing the flat geometry for heat transfer, reducing the need for, and the size of, expensive heat exchangers. This paper presents details of a CFD analysis used to model the flow and gas-to-wall heat transfer inside the second prototype cryocooler, including experimental validation of the CFD to produce a robust analysis.

  5. Hot piston ring/cylinder liner materials: Selection and evaluation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sliney, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    In current designs of the automotive (kinematic) Stirling engine, the piston rings are made of a reinforced polymer and are located near the bottom of the pistons because they cannot withstand the high temperatures in the upper cylinder region. Theoretically, efficiency could be improved if ''hot piston rings'' were located near the top of the pistons. This paper describes a program to select piston ring and cylinder coating materials to test this theory. Candidate materials were screened theoretically and in a pin on disk friction and wear test machine. Tests were performed in hydrogen at specimen temperatures up to 760/sup 0/C to simulate environmental conditions in the region of ''hot piston ring'' reversal. Based upon the results of these tests, a cobalt based alloy, Stellite 6B, was chosen for the piston rings and PS200, which consists of a metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix with dispersed solid lubricants, was chosen as the cylinder coating. Tests of a modified engine and a baseline engine showed that the hot ring did reduce specific fuel consumption by up to 7% for some operating conditions and averaged about 3% for all conditions evaluated. Related applications of high-temperature coatings for shaft seals and as back-up lubricants for gas bearings are also described. 16 refs., 16 figs.

  6. Dynamically balanced, hydraulically driven compressor/pump apparatus for resonant free piston Stirling engines

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1984-05-29

    A compressor, pump, or alternator apparatus is designed for use with a resonant free piston Stirling engine so as to isolate apparatus fluid from the periodically pressurized working fluid of the Stirling engine. The apparatus housing has a first side closed by a power coupling flexible diaphragm (the engine working member) and a second side closed by a flexible diaphragm gas spring. A reciprocally movable piston is disposed in a transverse cylinder in the housing and moves substantially at right angles relative to the flexible diaphragms. An incompressible fluid fills the housing which is divided into two separate chambers by suitable ports. One chamber provides fluid coupling between the power diaphragm of the RFPSE and the piston and the second chamber provides fluid coupling between the gas spring diaphragm and the opposite side of the piston. The working members of a gas compressor, pump, or alternator are driven by the piston. Sealing and wearing parts of the apparatus are mounted at the external ends of the transverse cylinder in a double acting arrangement for accessibility. An annular counterweight is mounted externally of the reciprocally movable piston and is driven by incompressible fluid coupling in a direction opposite to the piston so as to damp out transverse vibrations.

  7. Dynamic counterbalancing the single-piston linear compressor of a Stirling cryogenic cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Nachman, I.; Pundak, N.

    2009-05-01

    Low vibration Stirling cryocoolers often rely on dual-piston linear compressors, the known disadvantages of which, as compared to their single-piston rivals, are: low reliability, increased power consumption, price, bulk, sensitivity to external vibration and g-forces. However, because of the inherently low level of vibration export, as required in numerous vibration sensitive electronic and electro-optic applications, the dual-piston approach has become prevalent in today's industrial practice. The authors report on the novel approach to the passive control of a fundamental component of a vibration export from a single-piston compressor down to the levels typical for the actively controlled dual-piston rival. The technique relies on the newly proposed principle of dynamic counterbalancing, where an auxiliary movable mass is flexibly attached to a movable piston assembly and to the stationary compressor casing using auxiliary mechanical springs. The proper design of such a "spring-mass-spring" counterbalancer yields zero vibration export at minimum electrical power and current consumed by the motor. Based on the theoretical analysis, the design of the single-piston compressor of 1 W@77 K Ricor model K529N Stirling cryocooler was enhanced by adding such a counterbalancer. The obtained experimental results are in full agreement with the theoretical prediction. From experiment, the vibration export at driving frequency was reduced 57-fold at practically the same electrical current and power consumed by the compressor actuator as compared with the basic cooler.

  8. Open Loop Heat Pipe Radiator Having a Free-Piston for Wiping Condensed Working Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An open loop heat pipe radiator comprises a radiator tube and a free-piston. The radiator tube has a first end, a second end, and a tube wall, and the tube wall has an inner surface and an outer surface. The free-piston is enclosed within the radiator tube and is capable of movement within the radiator tube between the first and second ends. The free-piston defines a first space between the free-piston, the first end, and the tube wall, and further defines a second space between the free-piston, the second end, and the tube wall. A gaseous-state working fluid, which was evaporated to remove waste heat, alternately enters the first and second spaces, and the free-piston wipes condensed working fluid from the inner surface of the tube wall as the free-piston alternately moves between the first and second ends. The condensed working fluid is then pumped back to the heat source.

  9. On the identification of piston slap events in internal combustion engines using tribodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolatabadi, N.; Theodossiades, S.; Rothberg, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    Piston slap is a major source of vibration and noise in internal combustion engines. Therefore, better understanding of the conditions favouring piston slap can be beneficial for the reduction of engine Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH). Past research has attempted to determine the exact position of piston slap events during the engine cycle and correlate them to the engine block vibration response. Validated numerical/analytical models of the piston assembly can be very useful towards this aim, since extracting the relevant information from experimental measurements can be a tedious and complicated process. In the present work, a coupled simulation of piston dynamics and engine tribology (tribodynamics) has been performed using quasi-static and transient numerical codes. Thus, the inertia and reaction forces developed in the piston are calculated. The occurrence of piston slap events in the engine cycle is monitored by introducing six alternative concepts: (i) the quasi-static lateral force, (ii) the transient lateral force, (iii) the minimum film thickness occurrence, (iv) the maximum energy transfer, (v) the lubricant squeeze velocity and (vi) the piston-impact angular duration. The validation of the proposed methods is achieved using experimental measurements taken from a single cylinder petrol engine in laboratory conditions. The surface acceleration of the engine block is measured at the thrust- and anti-thrust side locations. The correlation between the theoretically predicted events and the measured acceleration signals has been satisfactory in determining piston slap incidents, using the aforementioned concepts. The results also exhibit good repeatability throughout the set of measurements obtained in terms of the number of events occurring and their locations during the engine cycle.

  10. Fiber-reinforced piston for internal combustion engines and associated method of construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, K.; Daimaru, A.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes a fiber reinforced piston for an internal combustion engine comprising a top land and a ring region provided with an uppermost ring groove. The top land and the ring region are defined by a reinforced part of the piston formed by a matrix metal reinforced with inorganic fibers. The reinforced part of the piston is circularly symmetrical around an axis of the piston and forms an annulus around a top portion of the piston. The reinforced part has a cross-section, in a plane containing the axis of the piston, of substantially rectangular shape except for the uppermost ring groove. The piston has an upper crown surface, the reinforced part being formed as a cylindrical shell having an upper radial surface which is continuously formed in the upper crown surface. A lower radial surface and an inner cylindrical surface join the upper and lower radial surfaces and an outer cylindrical surface has a radius equal to that of the outer cylindrical surface of the piston. The uppermost ring groove has an upper annular side wall surface, a lower annular side wall surface and an annular bottom surface connecting the upper and lower annular side wall surfaces, the inner cylindrical surface of the reinforced part having a smaller radius than that of the annular bottom surface of the uppermost ring groove. The reinforced part extends in the axial direction of the piston from the upper crown surface to a position below the lower annular side surface of the uppermost ring groove. The uppermost ring groove is totally defined within the reinforced part.

  11. Development of cost-effective manufacturing process for producing ceramic turbocharger rotors. Volume 1. Final report, October 1985-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, R.J.; Mullen, R.L.; Baker, D.E.; Yeh, H.C.

    1987-08-14

    Ceramic turbine rotors for turbochargers, because of the material's low density, offer faster turbocharger rotor acceleration which improves engine response and vehicle acceleration. Ceramics use relatively low-cost materials instead of the currently used expensive, exotic, and sometimes scarce-metal elements and, hopefully, will allow the production of less-expensive rotors. Only in the past few years have prototype ceramic rotors been produced. The U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Command (TACOM) established a program to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a cost-effective ceramic rotor for military use with Garrett Automotive as the prime contractor and the AiResearch Casting Company (ACC) as the major subcontractor. While ACC has been able to produce small (passenger car) ceramic rotors, within the timeframe of this program, ACC was not able to produce a satisfactory large turbocharger rotor. A major goal of this program was to develop a domestic source for rotor production, but from Garrett's experience no other U.S. company was capable. Therefore, to conclude the program with demonstration hardware, a Japanese supplier of known capability (Kyocera) was asked to make the rotors.

  12. Loss terms in free-piston Stirling-engine models. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    Various models for free piston Stirling engines are reviewed. Initial models were developed primarily for design purposes and to predict operating parameters, especially efficiency. More recently, however, such models have been used to predict engine stability. Free piston Stirling engines have no kinematic constraints and stability may not only be sensitive to the load, but also to various nonlinear loss and spring constraints. The present understanding is reviewed of various loss mechanisms for free piston Stirling engines and how they have been incorporated into engine models is discussed.

  13. The two-piston problem revisited: Generalization from reversible to irreversible expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Anacleto, Joaquim Alberto C.; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the adiabatic two-piston problem for an ideal gas confined between two pistons of equal mass and extend recent work based on the reversible approximation. More realistic equations that account for the roles of the gas temperature and particle mass are applied to extend the analysis of the expansion of the gas from reversible to irreversible behavior to the limit of free expansion. The evolution of quantities, such as temperature, piston speed, adiabatic reversibility coefficients, and entropy, is obtained, and differences between the irreversible and the reversible solutions are investigated.

  14. Directionality of sperm whale sonar clicks and its relation to piston radiation theory.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kristian; Møhl, Bertel

    2006-02-01

    This paper investigates the applicability to sperm whales of the theory of sound radiating from a piston. The theory is applied to a physical model and to a series of sperm whale clicks. Results show that wave forms of off-axis signals can be reproduced by convolving an on-axis signal with the spatial impulse response of a piston. The angle of a recorded click can be estimated as the angle producing the spatial impulse response that gives the best match with the observation when convolved with the on-axis wave form. It is concluded that piston theory applies to sperm whale sonar click emission.

  15. 21. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, ENGINE/PUMP HOUSE EXTENSION, HIGH PRESSURE PISTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW TO NORTHWEST, ENGINE/PUMP HOUSE EXTENSION, HIGH PRESSURE PISTON OF STEAM ENGINE NO. 4; CONTROL PANEL MOUNTED ON THE ENGINE; FLOOR VALVES CONTROL THE STEAM. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  16. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using piston cooling for a GDCI engine

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Gregory T; Husted, Harry L; Sellnau, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of nozzles, at least one nozzle per cylinder, with each nozzle configured to spray oil onto the bottom side of a piston of the engine to cool that piston. Independent control of the oil spray from the nozzles is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the oil spray onto the piston in that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in in a cylinder of the engine and controlling an oil spray targeted onto the bottom of a piston disposed in that cylinder is also presented.

  17. Overview of free-piston Stirling technology at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The activities include: (1) a generic free-piston Stirling technology project being conducted to develop technologies synergistic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, cost-shared effort with the Department of Energy (DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)), and (2) a free-piston Stirling space power technology demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), DOE, and NASA/Lewis. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kW free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development and validation of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, and fabrication and initial testing of an hydraulic output modification for the RE-1000 engine. The space power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including early test results.

  18. Evolution of ideal gas mixtures confined in an insulated container by two identical pistons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo C.; Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2010-09-01

    We study the quasistatic adiabatic expansion of monatomic-diatomic ideal gas mixtures bounded by identical pistons and obtain closed form expressions for the temperature of the gas as a function of the time. We find that the temperature decreases as an inverse power of the time for large times, with the exponent as a function of the monatomic to diatomic gas ratio. The piston speeds increase from zero to a maximum value determined by the heat capacity of the gas and the masses of the pistons. Plots of the temperature and piston speed versus the logarithm of the time show points of inflection, which are interpreted as signaling the onset of steady state behavior. These points shift to later times as the monatomic to diatomic gas ratio is varied from purely monatomic to purely diatomic.

  19. Method of estimating time scales of atmospheric piston and its application at Dome C (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Kellerer, A; Sarazin, M; Butterley, T; Wilson, R

    2007-07-20

    Temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston are critical for interferometers as they determine their sensitivity. We characterize an instrumental setup, termed the piston scope, that aims at measuring the atmospheric time constant, tau(0), through the image motion in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer. High-resolution piston scope measurements have been obtained at the observatory of Paranal, Chile in April 2006. The derived atmospheric parameters are shown to be consistent with data from the astronomical site monitor, provided that the atmospheric turbulence is displaced along a single direction. The piston scope measurements of lower temporal and spatial resolution were recorded for what is believed to be the first time in February 2005 at the Antarctic site of Dome C. Their reanalysis in terms of the new data calibration sharpens the conclusions of a first qualitative examination [Appl. Opt. 45, 5709 (2006)]. PMID:17609723

  20. Optimized design and predicted performance of a deep ocean 50 m piston coring system

    SciTech Connect

    Karnes, C. H.; Burchett, S. N.; Dzwilewski, P. T.

    1980-01-01

    Calculational techniques are described which were developed or adapted for the purpose of analyzing the mechanical response of a proposed piston coring system capable of recovering high quality 50 m long cores. The analysis includes the effects of barrel geometry on the mass required to penetrate 50 m of an assumed sediment, the effects of non-vertical entry and pullout on the stresses within the barrel, and the effects of steel cable or parachute piston restraints on the resulting core sample distortion. The results show that a wall thickness of 50 mm in the upper section is necessary to survive an entry of up to 1.5/sup 0/ from vertical or a recovery angle of up to 5/sup 0/. They also show that a mass of 15,400 kg and a pullout force of 330 kN are required. It is shown that active piston control is necessary to eliminate piston motion during penetration.

  1. Method of estimating time scales of atmospheric piston and its application at Dome C (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Kellerer, A; Sarazin, M; Butterley, T; Wilson, R

    2007-07-20

    Temporal fluctuations of the atmospheric piston are critical for interferometers as they determine their sensitivity. We characterize an instrumental setup, termed the piston scope, that aims at measuring the atmospheric time constant, tau(0), through the image motion in the focal plane of a Fizeau interferometer. High-resolution piston scope measurements have been obtained at the observatory of Paranal, Chile in April 2006. The derived atmospheric parameters are shown to be consistent with data from the astronomical site monitor, provided that the atmospheric turbulence is displaced along a single direction. The piston scope measurements of lower temporal and spatial resolution were recorded for what is believed to be the first time in February 2005 at the Antarctic site of Dome C. Their reanalysis in terms of the new data calibration sharpens the conclusions of a first qualitative examination [Appl. Opt. 45, 5709 (2006)].

  2. Holographic vibration analysis of turbocharger turbine wheel instruction for use and benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambard, Jean-Pierre; Thouvenin, Denis

    2004-06-01

    Since the early 1990's, holography has been used worldwide to study the vibration of mechanical parts at the design stage. The so-called <

  3. The development and testing of ceramic components in piston engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McEntire, B.J.; Willis, R.W.; Southam, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    Within the past 10--15 years, ceramic hardware has been fabricated and tested in a number of piston engine applications including valves, piston pins, roller followers, tappet shims, and other wear components. It has been shown that, with proper design and installation, ceramics improve performance, fuel economy, and wear and corrosion resistance. These results have been obtained using rig and road tests on both stock and race engines. Selected summaries of these tests are presented in this review paper.

  4. Development of EPA aircraft piston engine emission standards. [for air quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houtman, W.

    1976-01-01

    Piston engine light aircraft are significant sources of carbon monoxide in the vicinity of high activity general aviation airports. Substantial reductions in carbon monoxide were achieved by fuel mixture leaning using improved fuel management systems. The air quality impact of the hydrocarbon and oxides of nitrogen emissions from piston engine light aircraft were insufficient to justify the design constraints being confronted in present control system developments.

  5. Control scheme for power modulation of a free piston Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Dhar, Manmohan

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a control scheme for power modulation of a free-piston Stirling engine-linear alternator power generator system. The present invention includes connecting an autotransformer in series with a tuning capacitance between a linear alternator and a utility grid to maintain a constant displacement to piston stroke ratio and their relative phase angle over a wide range of operating conditions.

  6. Developmental Considerations on the Free-piston Stirling Power Convertor for Use in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been considered a candidate for radioisotope power systems for space for more than a decade. Prior to the free-piston Stirling architecture, systems were designed with kinematic Stirling engines with rotary alternators to convert heat to electricity. These systems were proposed with lightly loaded linkages to achieve the necessary life. When the free-piston configuration was initially proposed, it was thought to be attractive due to the relatively high conversion efficiency, acceptable mass, and the potential for long life and high reliability. These features have consistently been recognized by teams that have studied technology options for radioisotope power systems. Since free-piston Stirling power conversion was first considered for space power applications, there have been major advances in three general areas of development: demonstration of life and reliability, the success achieved by Stirling cryocoolers in flight, and the overall developmental maturity of the technology for both flight and terrestrial applications. Based on these advances, free-piston Stirling convertors are currently being developed for a number of terrestrial applications. They commonly operate with the power, efficiency, life, and reliability as intended, and much of the development now centers on system integration. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of free-piston Stirling power conversion technology over the past decade, review the status, and discuss the challenges that remain.

  7. Developmental Considerations on the Free-Piston Stirling Power Convertor for Use in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been considered a candidate for radioisotope power systems for space for more than a decade. Prior to the free-piston Stirling architecture, systems were designed with kinematic Stirling engines with rotary alternators to convert heat to electricity. These systems were proposed with lightly loaded linkages to achieve the necessary life. When the free-piston configuration was initially proposed, it was thought to be attractive due to the relatively high conversion efficiency, acceptable mass, and the potential for long life and high reliability. These features have consistently been recognized by teams that have studied technology options for radioisotope power systems. Since free-piston Stirling power conversion was first considered for space power applications, there have been major advances in three general areas of development: demonstration of life and reliability, the success achieved by Stirling cryocoolers in flight, and the overall developmental maturity of the technology for both flight and terrestrial applications. Based on these advances, free-piston Stirling convertors are currently being developed for a number of terrestrial applications. They commonly operate with the power, efficiency, life, and reliability as intended, and much of the development now centers on system integration. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of free-piston Stirling power conversion technology over the past decade, review the status, and discuss the challenges that remain.

  8. Progress in High Power Free-Piston Stirling Convertor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.; Walter, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration Policy has established a vision for human exploration of the moon and Mars. One option for power for future outposts on the lunar and Martian surfaces is a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. A 25 kW convertor was developed in the 1990s under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in such a possible lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Foster-Miller, Inc. is developing the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  9. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  10. Optimizing the performance of a solar liquid piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. L.

    The 0.1-m solar liquid piston pump (SLPP) model is shown to exhibit stable operation over a wide range of conditions, provided the heat input (at T = 85 C) and the heat rejected (at T = 22 C) are maintained above the critical values for stalling. Under these conditions, the pumps operation is affected primarily by the heating coil position and the geometries of the inlet and outlet water tubes. It is found that the optimum output power of the model SLPP is 4.5 W at a pumping heat of 2 m, a mass flow rate of 0.23 kg/s, and an overall efficiency of 1%. It is noted that further optimization of the model would at best only marginally increase the output power and efficiency. It is thought that larger mass flow rates can be obtained by increasing the cross sectional area of the working tube and/or staging a number of pumps in parallel. It is possible to increase the pump head by staging a number of pumps in series.

  11. Investigation of the misfueling of reciprocating piston aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, J. Holland, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Aircraft Misfueling Detection Project was developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center/Wallops Flight Facility at Wallops Island, Virginia. Its purpose was to investigate the misfueling of reciprocating piston aircraft engines by the inadvertent introduction of jet fuel in lieu of or as a contaminant of aviation gasoline. The final objective was the development of a device(s) that will satisfactorily detect misfueling and provide pilots with sufficient warning to avoid injury, fatality, or equipment damage. Two devices have been developed and successfully tested: one, a small contamination detection kit, for use by the pilot, and a second, more sensitive, modified gas chromatograph for use by the fixed-base operator. The gas chromatograph, in addition to providing excellent quality control of the fixed-base operator's fuel handling, is a very good backup for the detection kit in the event it produces negative results. Design parameters were developed to the extent that they may be applied easily to commercial production by the aircraft industry.

  12. New 5 Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Space Convertor Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has recently funded development of a 5 kW (or greater) free-piston Stirling conversion system for reactor power systems. A nominal 5 kW convertor allows two of these units to be dynamically balanced. A group of three dual-convertor combinations would yield the desired 30 kW. The status of this program will be presented. Goals include a specific power in excess of 140 W/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and AC output. The initial step is the design and development of a nominal 5 kW per cylinder Stirling convertor assembly (SCA) which will serve as a prototype of one or more SCAs that will make up the final 30 kW Stirling Convertor Power System. Assumed requirements for this new convertor for lunar fission power systems will be presented. The primary objective of this development effort will be to demonstrate a 5 kW SCA that can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems.

  13. Oxygen fugacity control in piston-cylinder experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, Sigurdur

    2012-09-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop and test a capsule assembly for use in piston-cylinder experiments where oxygen fugacity could be controlled in the vicinity of the QFM buffer without H2O loss or carbon contamination of the sample material. The assembly consists of an outer Pt-capsule containing a solid buffer (Ni-NiO or Co-CoO) plus H2O and an inner AuPd-capsule, containing the sample, H2O and a Pt-wire. No H2O loss is observed from the sample, even after 48 h, but a slight increase in H2O content is found in longer runs due to oxygen and hydrogen diffusion into the AuPd-capsule. Oxygen fugacity of runs in equilibrium with the Ni-NiO (NNO) and Co-CoO (CoCO) buffers was measured by analyzing Fe dissolved in the Pt-wire and in the AuPd-capsule. The second method gives values that are in good agreement with established buffer values, whereas results from the first method are one half to one log units higher than the established values.

  14. The Influence of Cylinder Lubrication on Piston Slap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerges, S. N. Y.; de Luca, J. C.; Lalor, N.

    2002-10-01

    A model has been developed for determining the time history of piston slap impact force. This model takes into account the influence of the oil film on the impact behaviour, which was found to be an important factor. However, it was also found that entrapped gas bubbles in the oil are equally significant. Three test rigs were designed and built to study these effects on the impact phenomenon and extensive tests were carried out. The impact force time history has been determined using Reynolds' theory. Results have shown that Reynolds' theory for fluid film squeezing can be applied for oil film damping determination. However, the experimental results have also shown that when gas is entrapped during the impact, this theory considerably overpredicts the magnitude of the impact. An eight-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter model was developed through the dynamic analysis of each component of an internal combustion engine's reciprocating system. The effective damping factor derived from this model was found to be inversely proportional to the oil film thickness cubed, as expected from Reynolds' theory. A dynamic model has been proposed, where the oil film mixed with bubbles is considered to be analogous to a serial spring and damping system. By incorporating a spring in series with this damper, the effect of the bubbles can also be predicted.

  15. LED Monitoring System of the Phenix Muon Piston Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motschwiller, Steven

    2010-11-01

    The Muon Piston Calorimeter in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC has a monitoring system consisting of LEDs and PIN diodes to calibrate out the time dependent changes to the detector. The LEDs track the temperature and radiation-damage changes to the response of the MPC, while the absolute calibration can be done using 0̂ decays. To execute this, LEDs flash light through the PbWO4 crystal to the Avalanche Photo Diodes The MPC is made up of 416 independent electromagnetic calorimeter towers. By using the LEDs we can correct for changes in the gains of each tower in the MPC, on a run by run basis. Because the LED value only gives a relative measurement of the gain over time, this method of calibration can only be used in conjunction with absolute calibrations provided by 0̂ decays or by minimum ionizing peaks . This work will be used to make a final measurement on Transverse energy at √sNN = 200 GV in Au+Au collisions.

  16. Combustion characteristics of a turbocharged DI compression ignition engine fueled with petroleum diesel fuels and biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Canakci, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    In this study, the combustion characteristics and emissions of two different petroleum diesel fuels (No. 1 and No. 2) and biodiesel from soybean oil were compared. The tests were performed at steady state conditions in a four-cylinder turbocharged DI diesel engine at full load at 1400-rpm engine speed. The experimental results compared with No. 2 diesel fuel showed that biodiesel provided significant reductions in PM, CO, and unburned HC, the NO(x) increased by 11.2%. Biodiesel had a 13.8% increase in brake-specific fuel consumption due to its lower heating value. However, using No. 1 diesel fuel gave better emission results, NO(x) and brake-specific fuel consumption reduced by 16.1% and 1.2%, respectively. The values of the principal combustion characteristics of the biodiesel were obtained between two petroleum diesel fuels. The results indicated that biodiesel may be blended with No. 1 diesel fuel to be used without any modification on the engine. PMID:16822672

  17. Effect of Guide Vane in Ring Groove Arrangement for a Small Turbocharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Daisaku; Nagoshi, Keiichi; Tanimura, Motoki; Ishida, Masahiro; Ueki, Hironobu

    2010-06-01

    A high-pressure ratio and a wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. Ring groove arrangement is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on the suction pipe and the shroud casing wall are connected by means of the annular passage, and the stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. It is well known that the ring groove arrangement shows the following two merits; (1) the formation of recirculation flow removes the low energy fluid around the downstream groove located near the splitter blade leading edge, (2) the flow incidence can be reduced because the recirculation flow merges again with the incoming main flow upstream of the impeller inlet. In the present study, the ring groove arrangement was applied to the high speed centrifugal compressor, in addition, in order to suppress too large pre-whirl due to the recirculation flow, the effects of guide vane installed in the annular passage and the ring groove configuration on the pre-whirl were analyzed numerically. The numerical flow analysis was carried out by using the commercial code produced by ANSYS-CFX. The simulation results show the multi-ring grooves are fairly effective in combination with the suitable configuration of guide vanes for improvement in the inlet velocity distortion.

  18. Comparison of Propane and Methane Performance and Emissions in a Turbocharged Direct Injection Dual Fuel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

  19. Dynamic behaviours of a full floating ring bearing supported turbocharger rotor with engine excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Wang, W. J.; Peng, Z. J.

    2011-09-01

    The rotor dynamic behaviour of turbochargers (TC) has been paid significant attention because of its importance in their healthy operation. Commonly, the TC is firmly mounted on engines and they will definitely suffer from the vibrations originated from engines in operation. However, only a limited number of papers have been published with consideration of this phenomenon. In this paper, a finite element model of a TC rotor supported by nonlinear floating ring bearings has been established. The nonlinear bearing forces have been calculated by a newly proposed analytical method. An efficient numerical integration approach has been employed to conduct the investigation including the traditional unbalance and the considered engine excitation effects in question. The results show that the unbalance will place considerable influence on the rotor response at a low working speed. At high speeds, the effect will be prevented by the dominant sub-synchronous vibrations, which also prohibit the appearance of a chaotic state. The novel investigation with the proposed model considering engine excitation reveals that the engine induced vibration will greatly affect the TC rotor response at relatively lower rotor speeds as well. At higher speed range, the dominant effect of sub-synchronous vibrations is still capable of keeping the same orbit shapes as that without engine excitation from a relative viewpoint.

  20. Modelling of Outer and Inner Film Oil Pressure for Floating Ring Bearing Clearance in Turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Shi, Zhanqun; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Floating ring bearing is widely used in turbochargers to undertake the extreme condition of high rotating speed and high operating temperature. It is also the most concerned by the designers and users alike due to its high failure rate and high maintenance cost. Any little clearance change may result in oil leakage, which in turn cause blue smoke or black smoke according to leakage types. However, there is no condition monitoring of this bearing because it is almost impossible to measure the clearance especially the inner clearance, in which the inner oil film directly bears the high speed rotation. In stead of measuring clearance directly, this paper has proposed a method that uses film pressure as a measure to monitor the bearing clearance and its variation. A non-linear mathematical model is developed by using Reynolds equations with non-linear oil film pressure. A full description of the outer and inner film is provided along both axial and radial directions. A numerical simulation is immediately carried out. Variable clearance changes are investigated using the mathematical model. Results show the relationship between clearance and film pressure.

  1. A numerical study of automotive turbocharger mixed flow turbine inlet geometry for off design performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, T.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mixed flow turbines represent a potential solution to the increasing requirement for high pressure, low velocity ratio operation in turbocharger applications. While literature exists for the use of these turbines at such operating conditions, there is a lack of detailed design guidance for defining the basic geometry of the turbine, in particular, the cone angle - the angle at which the inlet of the mixed flow turbine is inclined to the axis. This investigates the effect and interaction of such mixed flow turbine design parameters. Computational Fluids Dynamics was initially used to investigate the performance of a modern radial turbine to create a baseline for subsequent mixed flow designs. Existing experimental data was used to validate this model. Using the CFD model, a number of mixed flow turbine designs were investigated. These included studies varying the cone angle and the associated inlet blade angle. The results of this analysis provide insight into the performance of a mixed flow turbine with respect to cone and inlet blade angle.

  2. Nonlinear effects of unbalance in the rotor-floating ring bearing system of turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Wang, W. J.; Peng, Z. J.

    2013-01-01

    Turbocharger (TC) rotor-floating ring bearing (FRB) system is characterised by high speed as well as high non-linearity. Using the run-up and run-down simulation method, this paper systematically investigates the influence of unbalance on the rotordynamic characteristics of a real TC-FRB system over the speed range from 0 Hz to 3500 Hz. The rotor is discretized by the finite element method, and the desired oil film forces at each simulation step are calculated by an efficient analytical method. The imposed unbalance amount and distribution are the variables considered in the performed non-stationary simulations. The newly obtained results evidently show the distinct phenomena brought about by the variations of the unbalance offset, which confirms that the unbalance level is a critical parameter for the system response. In the meantime, the variations of unbalance distribution, i.e. out-of-phase and in-phase unbalance, can lead to entirely different simulation results as well, which proves the distribution of unbalance is not negligible during the dynamic analysis of the rotor-FRB system. Additionally, considerable effort has been placed on the description as well as discussion of a unique phenomenon termed Critical Limit Cycle Oscillation (CLC Oscillation), which is of great importance and interest to the TC research and development.

  3. Production of Diesel Engine Turbocharger Turbine from Low Cost Titanium Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, T. R.; Mayer, R.

    2012-05-04

    Turbochargers in commercial turbo-diesel engines are multi-material systems where usually the compressor rotor is made of aluminum or titanium based material and the turbine rotor is made of either a nickel based superalloy or titanium, designed to operate under the harsh exhaust gas conditions. The use of cast titanium in the turbine section has been used by Cummins Turbo Technologies since 1997. Having the benefit of a lower mass than the superalloy based turbines; higher turbine speeds in a more compact design can be achieved with titanium. In an effort to improve the cost model, and develop an industrial supply of titanium componentry that is more stable than the traditional aerospace based supply chain, the Contractor has developed component manufacturing schemes that use economical Armstrong titanium and titanium alloy powders and MgR-HDH powders. Those manufacturing schemes can be applied to compressor and turbine rotor components for diesel engine applications with the potential of providing a reliable supply of titanium componentry with a cost and performance advantage over cast titanium.

  4. One-Dimensional Shock Wave Formation by an Accelerating Piston. Ph.D. Thesis - Ohio State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    The formation of a shock wave by a solid accelerating piston was studied. A theoretical solution using the method of characteristics for a perfect gas showed that a complex wave system exists, and that the compressed gas can have large gradients in temperature, density and entropy. Experiments were performed with a piston tube where piston speed, shock speed and pressure were measured. The comparison of theory and experiment was good.

  5. Shallowly driven fluctuations in lava lake outgassing (gas pistoning), Kīlauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim; Sutton, A. J.; Lev, Einat; Thelen, Wes; Fee, David

    2016-01-01

    Lava lakes provide ideal venues for directly observing and understanding the nature of outgassing in basaltic magmatic systems. Kīlauea Volcano's summit lava lake has persisted for several years, during which seismic and infrasonic tremor amplitudes have exhibited episodic behavior associated with a rise and fall of the lava surface ("gas pistoning"). Since 2010, the outgassing regime of the lake has been tied to the presence or absence of gas pistoning. During normal behavior (no gas pistoning), the lake is in a "spattering" regime, consisting of higher tremor amplitudes and gas emissions. In comparison, gas piston events are associated with an abrupt rise in lava level (up to 20 m), during which the lake enters a "non-spattering" regime with greatly decreased tremor and gas emissions. We study this episodic behavior using long-term multidisciplinary monitoring of the lake, including seismicity, infrasound, gas emission and geochemistry, and time-lapse camera observations. The non-spattering regime (i.e. rise phase of a gas piston cycle) reflects gas bubbles accumulating near the top of the lake, perhaps as a shallow foam, while spattering regimes represent more efficient decoupling of gas from the lake. We speculate that the gas pistoning might be controlled by time-varying porosity and/or permeability in the upper portions of the lava lake, which may modulate foam formation and collapse. Competing models for gas pistoning, such as deeply sourced gas slugs, or dynamic pressure balances, are not consistent with our observations. Unlike other lava lakes which have cyclic behavior that is thought to be controlled by deeply sourced processes, external to the lake itself, we show an example of lava lake fluctuations driven by cycles of activity at shallow depth and close to the lake's surface. These observations highlight the complex and unsteady nature of outgassing from basaltic magmatic systems.

  6. Space Power Free-Piston Stirling Engine Scaling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.

    1989-01-01

    The design feasibility study is documented of a single cylinder, free piston Stirling engine/linear alternator (FPSE/LA) power module generating 150 kW-electric (kW sub e), and the determination of the module's maximum feasible power level. The power module configuration was specified to be a single cylinder (single piston, single displacer) FPSE/LA, with tuning capacitors if required. The design requirements were as follows: (1) Maximum electrical power output; (2) Power module thermal efficiency equal to or greater than 20 percent at a specific mass of 5 to 8 kg/kW(sub e); (3) Heater wall temperature/cooler wall temperature = 1050 K/525 K; (4) Sodium heat-pipe heat transport system, pumped loop NaK (sodium-potassium eutectic mixture) rejection system; (5) Maximum power module vibration amplitude = 0.0038 cm; and (6) Design life = 7 years (60,000 hr). The results show that a single cylinder FPSE/LA is capable of meeting program goals and has attractive scaling attributes over the power range from 25 to 150 kW(sub e). Scaling beyond the 150 kW(sub e) power level, the power module efficiency falls and the power module specific mass reaches 10 kg/kW(sub e) at a power output of 500 kW(sub e). A discussion of scaling rules for the engine, alternator, and heat transport systems is presented, along with a detailed description of the conceptual design of a 150 kW(sub e) power module that meets the requirements. Included is a discussion of the design of a dynamic balance system. A parametric study of power module performance conducted over the power output range of 25 to 150 kW(sub e) for temperature ratios of 1.7, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 is presented and discussed. The results show that as the temperature ratio decreases, the efficiency falls and specific mass increases. At a temperature ratio of 1.7, the 150 kW(sub e) power module cannot satisfy both efficiency and specific mass goals. As the power level increases from 25 to 150 kW(sub e) at a fixed temperature ratio, power

  7. Gas-enabled resonance and rectified motion of a piston in a vibrated housing filled with a viscous liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis A.; Torczynski, John R.; Clausen, Jonathan R.; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2015-11-16

    Herein, we show how introducing a small amount of gas can completely change the motion of a solid object in a viscous liquid during vibration. We analyze an idealized system exhibiting this behavior: a piston moving in a liquid-filled housing, where the gaps between the piston and the housing are narrow and depend on the piston position. Recent experiments have shown that vibration causes some gas to move below the piston and the piston to subsequently move downward and compress its supporting spring. Herein, we analyze the analogous but simpler situation in which the gas regions are replaced by bellows with similar pressure-volume relationships. We show that these bellows form a spring (analogous to the pneumatic spring formed by the gas regions) which enables the piston and the liquid to oscillate in a mode that does not exist without this spring. This mode is referred to here as the Couette mode because the liquid in the gaps moves essentially in Couette flow (i.e., with almost no component of Poiseuille flow). Since Couette flow by itself produces extremely low damping, the Couette mode has a strong resonance. We show that, near this resonance, the dependence of the gap geometry on the piston position produces a large rectified (net) force on the piston during vibration. As a result, this force can be much larger than the piston weight and the strength of its supporting spring and is in the direction that decreases the flow resistance of the gap geometry.

  8. Numerical analysis of flow interaction of turbine system in two-stage turbocharger of internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. B.; Zhuge, W. L.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the goal of energy conservation and emission reduction, high intake pressure is needed to meet the demand of high power density and high EGR rate for internal combustion engine. Present power density of diesel engine has reached 90KW/L and intake pressure ratio needed is over 5. Two-stage turbocharging system is an effective way to realize high compression ratio. Because turbocharging system compression work derives from exhaust gas energy. Efficiency of exhaust gas energy influenced by design and matching of turbine system is important to performance of high supercharging engine. Conventional turbine system is assembled by single-stage turbocharger turbines and turbine matching is based on turbine MAP measured on test rig. Flow between turbine system is assumed uniform and value of outlet physical quantities of turbine are regarded as the same as ambient value. However, there are three-dimension flow field distortion and outlet physical quantities value change which will influence performance of turbine system as were demonstrated by some studies. For engine equipped with two-stage turbocharging system, optimization of turbine system design will increase efficiency of exhaust gas energy and thereby increase engine power density. However flow interaction of turbine system will change flow in turbine and influence turbine performance. To recognize the interaction characteristics between high pressure turbine and low pressure turbine, flow in turbine system is modeled and simulated numerically. The calculation results suggested that static pressure field at inlet to low pressure turbine increases back pressure of high pressure turbine, however efficiency of high pressure turbine changes little; distorted velocity field at outlet to high pressure turbine results in swirl at inlet to low pressure turbine. Clockwise swirl results in large negative angle of attack at inlet to rotor which causes flow loss in turbine impeller passages and decreases turbine

  9. Effect of self recirculation casing treatment on the performance of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancedo, Matthieu

    Increase in emission regulations in the transport industry brings the need to have more efficient engines. A path followed by the automobile industry is to downsize the size of the internal combustion engine and increase the air density at the intake to keep the engine power when needed. Typically a centrifugal compressor is used to force the air into the engine, it can be powered from the engine shaft (superchargers) or extracting energy contained into the hot exhaust gases with a turbine (turbochargers). The flow range of the compressor needs to match the one of the engine. However compressors mass flow operating range is limited by choke on the high end and surge on the low end. In order to extend the operation at low mass flow rates, the use of passive devices for turbocharger centrifugal compressors was explored since the late 80's. Hence, casing treatments including flow recirculation from the inducer part of the compressor have been shown to move the surge limit to lower flows. Yet, the working mechanisms are still not well understood and thus, to optimize the design of this by-pass system, it is necessary to determine the nature of the changes induced by the device both on the dynamic stability of the pressure delivery and on the flow at the inlet. The compressor studied here features a self-recirculating casing treatment at the inlet. The recirculation passage could be blocked to carry a direct comparison between the cases with and without the flow feature. To grasp the effect on compressor stability, pressure measurements were taken in the different constituting elements of the compressor. The study of the mean pressure variations across the operating map showed that the tongue region is a limiting element. Dynamic pressure measurements revealed that the instabilities generated near the inducer when the recirculation is blocked increase the overall instability levels at the compressor outlet and propagating pressure waves starting at the tongue occurred

  10. Efficiency at maximum power output for an engine with a passive piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Tomohiko G.; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2016-08-01

    Efficiency at maximum power (MP) output for an engine with a passive piston without mechanical controls between two reservoirs is studied theoretically. We enclose a hard core gas partitioned by a massive piston in a temperature-controlled container and analyze the efficiency at MP under a heating and cooling protocol without controlling the pressure acting on the piston from outside. We find the following three results: (i) The efficiency at MP for a dilute gas is close to the Chambadal-Novikov-Curzon-Ahlborn (CNCA) efficiency if we can ignore the sidewall friction and the loss of energy between a gas particle and the piston, while (ii) the efficiency for a moderately dense gas becomes smaller than the CNCA efficiency even when the temperature difference of the reservoirs is small. (iii) Introducing the Onsager matrix for an engine with a passive piston, we verify that the tight coupling condition for the matrix of the dilute gas is satisfied, while that of the moderately dense gas is not satisfied because of the inevitable heat leak. We confirm the validity of these results using the molecular dynamics simulation and introducing an effective mean-field-like model which we call the stochastic mean field model.

  11. Development of free-piston Stirling engine performance and optimization codes based on Martini simulation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, William R.

    1989-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code is described that could be used to design and optimize a free-displacer, free-piston Stirling engine similar to the RE-1000 engine made by Sunpower. The code contains options for specifying displacer and power piston motion or for allowing these motions to be calculated by a force balance. The engine load may be a dashpot, inertial compressor, hydraulic pump or linear alternator. Cycle analysis may be done by isothermal analysis or adiabatic analysis. Adiabatic analysis may be done using the Martini moving gas node analysis or the Rios second-order Runge-Kutta analysis. Flow loss and heat loss equations are included. Graphical display of engine motions and pressures and temperatures are included. Programming for optimizing up to 15 independent dimensions is included. Sample performance results are shown for both specified and unconstrained piston motions; these results are shown as generated by each of the two Martini analyses. Two sample optimization searches are shown using specified piston motion isothermal analysis. One is for three adjustable input and one is for four. Also, two optimization searches for calculated piston motion are presented for three and for four adjustable inputs. The effect of leakage is evaluated. Suggestions for further work are given.

  12. Optical Nanofluidic Piston: Assay for Dynamic Force-Compression of Single Confined Polymer Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshid, Ahmed; Zimny, Philip; Macos, Patrick; Massarelli, Geremia; Tétreault-La Roche, David; Reisner, Walter

    2014-03-01

    While single-molecule approaches now have a long-history in polymer physics, past methodology has a key limitation : it is not currently possible to apply well-defined forces to a precise number of chains in a well-defined volume. To this end,we have developed a nanofluidic assay for the study of DNA compression in vitro, the optical nanofluidic piston. The optical nanofluidic piston is a nanofluidic analog of a macroscopic piston-cylinder apparatus based on a nanosphere (``the piston'') optically trapped inside a 200-400nm nanochannel with embedded barrier (the ``cylinder''). The nanofluidic piston enables quantification of force required to compress single or multiple chains within a defined volume. We present combined fluorescence and force-measurements for the compression of T4 DNA under a variety of compression rates. Surprisingly, we find that compression occurs on a force-scale roughly 100x higher than that predicted by equilibrium theories, suggesting that the DNA is present in highly entangled states during the compression. Moreover, we observe that compression at high rates induces a ``shock-wave'' of high-polymer concentration near the bead, suggesting that our setup can quantitatively access novel non-equilibrium polymer phenomena.

  13. Compact high-efficiency linear cryocooler in single-piston moving magnet design for HOT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühlich, I.; Mai, M.; Rosenhagen, C.; Withopf, A.; Zehner, S.

    2012-06-01

    State of the art Mid Wave IR-technology has the potential to rise the FPA temperature from 77K to 130-150K (High Operation Temperature, HOT). Using a HOT FPA will significantly lower SWaP and keep those parameters finally dominated by the employed cryocooler. Therefore, compact high performance cryocoolers are mandatory. AIM has developed the SX040 cooler, optimized for FPA temperatures of about 95K (presented at SPIE 2010). The SX040 cooler incorporates a high efficient dual piston driving mechanism resulting in a very compact compressor of less than 100mm length. Higher compactness - especially shorter compressors - can be achieved by change from dual to single piston design. The new SX030 compressor has such a single piston Moving Magnet driving mechanism resulting in a compressor length of about 60mm. Common for SX040 and SX030 family is a Moving Magnet driving mechanism with coils placed outside the helium vessel. In combination with high performance plastics for the piston surfaces this design enables lifetimes in excess of 20,000h MTTF. Because of the higher FPA temperature and a higher operating frequency also a new displacer needs to be developed. Based on the existing 1/4" coldfinger interface AIM developed a new displacer optimized for an FPA temperature of 140K and above. This paper gives an overview on the development of this new compact single piston cryocooler. Technical details and performance data will be shown.

  14. The optimal path of piston motion for Otto cycle with linear phenomenological heat transfer law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaojun; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui

    2009-05-01

    An Otto cycle engine with internal and external irreversibilities of friction and heat leakage, in which the heat transfer between the working fluid and the environment obeys linear phenomenological heat transfer law [ q ∝ Δ( T -1)], is studied in this paper. The optimal piston motion trajectory for maximizing the work output per cycle is derived for the fixed total cycle time and fuel consumed per cycle. Optimal control theory is applied to determine the optimal piston trajectories for the cases of with and without piston acceleration constraint on each stroke and the optimal distribution of the total cycle time among the strokes. The optimal piston motion with acceleration constraint for each stroke consists of three segments, including initial maximum acceleration and final maximum deceleration boundary segments, respectively. Numerical examples for optimal configuration are provided, and the obtained results are compared with those obtained with Newton’s heat transfer law [ q ∝ Δ( T)]. The results also show that optimizing the piston motion can improve power and efficiency of the engine by more than 9%. This is primarily due to the decrease in heat leakage loss on the initial portion of the power stroke.

  15. Design and novel type of a magnetorheological damper featuring piston bypass hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes a novel type of magnetorheological (MR) damper configuration from which an excellent ride comfort can be achieved without using a sophisticated controller scheme. The proposed novel MR damper is featured by piston bypass holes to achieve low slope of the damping force in the pre-yield (low-piston-velocity) region and high magnitude of the damping force in the post-yield (high-piston-velocity) region. A mathematical model for the damping force of the proposed MR damper is formulated followed by the investigation on damping characteristics with respect to several geometrical design parameters such as the number of piston bypass hole, the diameter of the hole, the gap size of the orifice, the orifice length, the diameter of the bobbin, and the height of the coil. After selecting the main design parameters from the simulation results, numerical simulations for the damping force characteristics are conducted with eight design parameter sets to evaluate the significant effect on the damping force performance. The proposed MR dampers are then manufactured with the same design parameter sets and the damping force characteristics are experimentally obtained and compared with the analytical simulation results. It is identified from the parametric investigations that the size and the number of the piston bypass hole are very important on damping force characteristics of the proposed MR damper.

  16. Simulating Rectified Motion of a Piston in a Housing Subjected to Vibrational Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonthan; Torczynski, John; Romero, Louis; O'Hern, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    We employ ALE finite element simulations to investigate the behavior of a piston in a housing subjected to vertical vibrations. The housing is filled with a viscous liquid to damp the piston motion and has bellows at both ends to represent air bubbles present in real systems. The piston has a roughly cylindrical hole along its axis, and a post attached to the housing penetrates partway into this hole. Protrusions from the hole and the post form a gap with a length that varies as the piston moves and forces liquid through this gap. Under certain conditions, nonlinearities in the system can drive the piston to move downward and compress the spring that holds it up against gravity. This behavior is investigated using ALE finite element simulations, and these results are compared with theoretical predictions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Rotary hydraulic engine having oppositely disposed pistons in a scotch yoke assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, H.D.

    1986-07-08

    A rotary hydraulic engine is described comprising, in combination; frame means; crankshaft means supported by aid frame means in substantially fixed relation therewith and having an eccentric crank portion; housing means encircling the crankshaft means and being rotatable relative thereto, the housing means defining a plurality of pairs of cylinders disposed in laterally opposed sets such that each cylinder is laterally opposed to and co-axial with an opposed cylinder; a piston slidingly disposed within each of the cylinders; a scotch yoke assembly having a pair of discrete slide members each of which interconnects the pistons disposed within the laterally opposed set of cylinders and has cooperative relation with the eccentric crank portion so as to effect tandem movement of the interconnected pistons and thereby effect relative movement between the housing means and the crankshaft means; external valve means operatively associated with each of the cylinders so as to enable selective application of fluid pressure to the pistons in a manner adapted to effect predetermined sequential movement of the pistons and associated scotch yoke assembly, thereby imparting rotary motion to the housing.

  18. Overview of free-piston Stirling technology at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (Lewis) free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities include: (1) a generic free-piston Stirling technology project being conducted to develop technologies synergistic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, cost-shared effort with the Department of Energy (DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ONRL)), and (2) a free-piston Stirling space-power technology demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), DOE, and NASA/Lewis. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kw free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development and validation of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, and fabrication and initial testing of an hydraulic output modification for the RE-1000 engine. The space power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including early test results.

  19. Overview of the 1986 free-piston Stirling activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Lewis Research Center's free-piston Stirling engine research is presented, including efforts to improve and advance its design for use in specific space power applications. These efforts are a part of the SP-100 program being conducted to support the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA. Such efforts include: (1) the testing and improvement of 25 kWe Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE); (2) the preliminary design of 25 kWe single-cylinder Experimental stirling Space Engine (ESSE); and, (3) a study to determine the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator to 150 kWe. Other NASA Lewis free-piston Stirling engine activities will be described, directed toward the advancement of general free-piston Stirling engine technology and its application in specific terrestrial applications. One such effort, supported by DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DRNL), is the development of a free-piston Stirling engine which produces hydraulic power. Finally, a terrestrial solar application involving a conceptual design of a 25 kWe Solar Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) capable of delivering power to an electric utility grid will be discussed. The latter work is supported by DOE/Sandia National Laboratory (SNLA).

  20. Piston head for an internal combustion engine and a compression ring therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, T.E.

    1989-03-28

    A reciprocating piston for mounting within a cylinder of an internal combustion engine is described, the piston comprising a piston head having an endface forming a wall of a combustion chamber when the piston assumes a predetermined relative position within the cylinder and an annular groove formed in a peripheral surface of the piston head and spaced from the endface. The peripheral surface is adapted to substantially conform to but being spaced inwardly from a wall defining the cylinder; and a compression ring is adjustably mounted within the groove; the groove being spaced a predetermined axial distance from the endface and being provided with spaced inwardly extending side walls. A recessed inner wall defines the depth of the groove; the compression ring having an inner section disposed within the groove with an axial dimension less than the spacing between the groove side walls and an outer section protruding from the groove for sliding sealing engagement with the cylinder wall. The ring inner section is provided with an inner surface and opposite side surfaces, the latter being spaced from the groove side walls, each ring inner section side surface having a first segment extending inwardly from the ring outer section and being in substantially parallel relation with an adjacent groove side wall, and a second segment extending inwardly from the first segment and angularly away from the adjacent groove side wall and terminating at the ring inner surface.

  1. The Role of Tribology in the Development of an Oil-Free Turbocharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    Gas-turbine-based aeropropulsion engines are technologically mature. Thus, as with any mature technology, revolutionary approaches will be needed to achieve the significant performance gains that will keep the U.S. propulsion manufacturers well ahead of foreign competition. One such approach is the development of oil-free turbomachinery utilizing advanced foil air bearings, seals, and solid lubricants. By eliminating oil-lubricated bearings and seals and supporting an engine rotor on an air film, significant improvements can be realized. For example, the entire oil system including pipes, lines, filters, cooler, and tanks could be removed, thereby saving considerable weight. Since air has no thermal decomposition temperature, engine systems could operate without excessive cooling. Also, since air bearings have no diameter-rpm fatigue limits (D-N limits), engines could be designed to operate at much higher speeds and higher density, which would result in a smaller aeropropulsion package. Because of recent advances in compliant foil air bearings and high temperature solid lubricants, these technologies can be applied to oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to develop these technologies and to demonstrate a project along the path to an oil-free gas turbine engine, NASA has undertaken the development of an oil-free turbocharger for a heavy duty diesel engine. This turbomachine can reach 120000 rpm at a bearing temperature of 540 C (1000 F) and, in comparison to oil-lubricated bearings, can increase efficiency by 10 to 15 percent because of reduced friction. In addition, because there are no oil lubricants, there are no seal-leakage-induced emissions.

  2. Measurement of thermal deformation of an engine piston using a conical mirror and ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertazzi, Armando, Jr.; Melao, Iza; Devece, Eugenio

    1998-07-01

    An experimental technique is developed to measure the radial displacement component of cylindrical surfaces using a conical mirror for normal illumination and observation. Single illumination ESPI is used to obtain fringe patterns related to the radial displacement field. Some data processing strategies are presented and discussed to properly extract the measurement data. Data reduction algorithms are developed to quantify and compensate the rigid body displacements: translations and rotations. The displacement component responsible for shape distortion (deformation) can be separated from the total displacement field. The thermal radial deformation of an aluminum engine piston with a steel sash is measured by this technique. A temperature change of about 2 degrees Celsius was applied to the engine piston by means of an electrical wire wrapped up in the first engine piston grove. The fringe patterns are processed and the results are presented as polar graphics and 3D representation. The main advantages and limitations of the developed technique are discussed.

  3. Design and construction of the X-2 two-stage free piston driven expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolan, Con

    1995-01-01

    This report outlines the design and construction of the X-2 two-stage free piston driven expansion tube. The project has completed its construction phase and the facility has been installed in the new impulsive research laboratory where commissioning is about to take place. The X-2 uses a unique, two-stage driver design which allows a more compact and lower overall cost free piston compressor. The new facility has been constructed in order to examine the performance envelope of the two-stage driver and how well it couple to sub-orbital and super-orbital expansion tubes. Data obtained from these experiments will be used for the design of a much larger facility, X-3, utilizing the same free piston driver concept.

  4. Test Method Designed to Evaluate Cylinder Liner-Piston Ring Coatings for Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.

    1997-01-01

    Research on advanced heat engine concepts, such as the low-heat-rejection engine, have shown the potential for increased thermal efficiency, reduced emissions, lighter weight, simpler design, and longer life in comparison to current diesel engine designs. A major obstacle in the development of a functional advanced heat engine is overcoming the problems caused by the high combustion temperatures at the piston ring/cylinder liner interface, specifically at top ring reversal (TRR). Therefore, advanced cylinder liner and piston ring materials are needed that can survive under these extreme conditions. To address this need, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center have designed a tribological test method to help evaluate candidate piston ring and cylinder liner materials for advanced diesel engines.

  5. Friction measurements in piston-cylinder apparatus using quartz-coesite reversible transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akella, J.

    1979-01-01

    The value of friction determined by monitoring piston displacement as a function of nominal pressure on compression and decompression cycles at 1273 K is compared with the friction value obtained by reversing the quartz-coesite transition at 1273 and 1073 K in a talc-glass-alsimag cell (Akella and Kennedy, 1971) and a low-friction salt cell (Mirwald et al., 1975). Quenching runs at 1273 K gave double values of friction of 0.25 GPa for the talc-glass-alsimag cell and 0.03 GPa for the salt cell. The piston-displacement technique gave somewhat higher values. Use of piston-displacement hysteresis loops in evaluating the actual pressure on a sample may lead to overestimates for decompression runs and underestimates for compression runs.

  6. Multiple scales approach to the gas-piston non-equilibrium themodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuchiù, D.; Gubbiotti, G.

    2016-05-01

    The non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a gas inside a piston is a conceptually simple problem where analytic results are rare. For example, it is hard to find in the literature analytic formulas that describe the heat exchanged with the reservoir when the system either relaxes to equilibrium or is compressed over a finite time. In this paper we derive this kind of analytic formula. To achieve this result, we take the equations derived by Cerino et al (2015 Phys. Rev. E 91 032128) describing the dynamic evolution of a gas-piston system, we cast them in a dimensionless form, and we solve the dimensionless equations with the multiple scales expansion method. With the approximated solutions we obtained, we express in a closed form the heat exchanged by the gas-piston system with the reservoir for a large class of relevant non-equilibrium situations.

  7. Final design of a free-piston hydraulic advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, D. A.; Noble, J. E.; Emigh, S. G.; Ross, B. A.; Lehmann, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's (DOEs) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating heat engines for solar distributed receiver systems. The final design is described of an engineering prototype advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) with a free-piston hydraulic engine output capable of delivering about 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for a highly reliable engine with long life because it has only a few moving parts, has noncontacting bearings, and can be hermetically sealed. The ASCS is designed to deliver maximum power per year over a range of solar input with a design life of 30 years (60,000 h). The system includes a liquid Nak pool boiler heat transport system and a free-piston Stirling engine with high-pressure hydraulic output, coupled with a bent axis variable displacement hydraulic motor and a rotary induction generator.

  8. A Tunable Protein Piston That Breaks Membranes to Release Encapsulated Cargo.

    PubMed

    Polka, Jessica K; Silver, Pamela A

    2016-04-15

    Movement of molecules across membranes in response to a stimulus is a key component of cellular programming. Here, we characterize and manipulate the response of a protein-based piston capable of puncturing membranes in a pH-dependent manner. Our protein actuator consists of modified R bodies found in a bacterial endosymbiont of paramecium. We express and purify R bodies from in E. coli; these pistons undergo multiple rounds of rapid extension and retraction. We developed a high throughput screen for mutants with altered pH sensitivity for tuning of the extension process. We show that the R bodies are capable of acting as synthetic pH-dependent pistons that can puncture E. coli membranes to release the trapped content. As such, these protein machines present a novel way to selectively rupture membrane compartments and will be important for programming cellular compartmentalization. PMID:26814170

  9. Validity of nonequilibrium work relations for the rapidly expanding quantum piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, H. T.; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    Recent work by Teifel and Mahler [Eur. Phys. J. BEPJBFY1434-602810.1140/epjb/e2010-00145-y 75, 275 (2010)] raises legitimate concerns regarding the validity of quantum nonequilibrium work relations in processes involving moving hard walls. We study this issue in the context of the rapidly expanding one-dimensional quantum piston. Utilizing exact solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we find that the evolution of the wave function can be decomposed into static and dynamic components, which have simple semiclassical interpretations in terms of particle-piston collisions. We show that nonequilibrium work relations remain valid at any finite piston speed, provided both components are included, and we study explicitly the work distribution for this model system.

  10. Analysis of a system modelling the motion of a piston in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Debayan; Takahashi, Takéo; Tucsnak, Marius

    2016-09-01

    We study a free boundary problem modelling the motion of a piston in a viscous gas. The gas-piston system fills a cylinder with fixed extremities, which possibly allow gas from the exterior to penetrate inside the cylinder. The gas is modeled by the 1D compressible Navier-Stokes system and the piston motion is described by the second Newton's law. We prove the existence and uniqueness of global in time strong solutions. The main novelty brought in by our results is that they include the case of nonhomogeneous boundary conditions which, as far as we know, have not been studied in this context. Moreover, even for homogeneous boundary conditions, our results require less regularity of the initial data than those obtained in previous works.

  11. A multipurpose miniature piston-cylinder diamond-anvil cell for pressures beyond 100 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu. Machavariani, G.; Pasternak, M. P.; Hearne, G. R.; Rozenberg, G. Kh.

    1998-03-01

    A miniature piston-cylinder diamond-anvil cell (DAC) was constructed and tested for pressure operation at and beyond 100 GPa. Its advantages compared to other piston-cylinder DACs are its compactness (22-mm diam by 21-mm high), self-contained force generator, and simple way of operation. Tungsten carbide backing plates are used for supporting the anvils; one with a hemispherical shape allowing for parallelism alignment, and one with a flat circular shape allowing for lateral alignment of the anvils' culets. The force is generated by six M3 Allen screws and is conveyed to the piston via force rings. Pressures to 130 GPa were achieved with beveled culets having 300-μm flats and Re gaskets. Design features, mode of operation, and performance are described. The latter has been demonstrated for the particular case of Mössbauer spectroscopy in La57FeO3.

  12. Piston ring thermal transient effects on lubricant temperatures in advanced engines

    SciTech Connect

    Boisclair, M.E.; Hoult, D.P.; Wong, V.W. )

    1989-07-01

    One class of advanced diesel engines operates with low heat rejection and high operating temperatures; piston-ring/linear lubrication is a major problem for these engines. This study attempts to illustrate the time-dependent thermal environment around the top piston ring and lubricant in these advanced engines. Particular emphasis is passed on the maximum lubricant temperature. The analysis starts with a standard cycle simulation and a global finite-element analysis of the piston and liner in relative motion. A more detailed finite-element model, which considers variable oil film thickness on the linear, focuses on the top ring and lubricant and uses the grove and linear temperatures generated in the global analysis as boundary conditions. Results for different heat rejection engine configurations are presented. The authors observe that because of major transient effects, high lubricant temperature is experienced not only at top ring reversal but also down the linear to bottom ring reversal.

  13. An Analysis of Intermetallic Bonding between a Ring Carrier and an Aluminum Piston Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasijević, Srećko; Dolić, Natalija; Zovko Brodarac, Zdenka; Djurdjević, Mile; Radiša, Radomir

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of the formation of an intermetallic bond between a ring carrier and an aluminum piston alloy. The ring carrier is made of austenitic cast iron (Ni-Resist) to increase the wear resistance of the first ring groove and is applied in highly loaded diesel engines. The most important thing is that the Ni-Resist (ferrous) must be bonded with a non-ferrous piston material during the casting of the piston. A metallographic investigation using an optical microscope in combination with the SEM/EDS analysis of the quality of the intermetallic bonding layer was done. The test results show that if the proper conditions are met, then the preparation of the ring carrier can be made successfully, as can the formation of the metal connection between the two materials of different qualities.

  14. A piston-rotaxane with two potential stripes: force transitions and yield stresses.

    PubMed

    Sevick, Edith M; Williams, David R M

    2013-01-01

    We examine a rod piston-rotaxane system, where the positions of several mobile rings on the axle are controlled by an external force acting on one of the rings. This allows us to access the translational entropy of the rings. For a simple rotaxane molecule with an axle that has uniform ring-axle interactions along its length, the molecule behaves like a miniature piston filled with a one-dimensional ideal gas. We then examine the effect of two stripes on the axle, having different ring-axle interactions with the mobile rings, so that one section is of high energy (repulsive) for the rings and another section is of lower energy (or attractive). This kind of rotaxane can exhibit rapid changes in displacement or force, and in particular, this molecule can exhibit a yield stress in which the piston suddenly compresses under a small increase in the applied force. PMID:24177696

  15. Nitrited-Steel Piston Rings for Engines of High Specific Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, John H; Bisson, Edmond E; Schmiedlin, Ralph F

    1945-01-01

    Stability and control characteristics determined from tests in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel of a 0.2375-scale model of the Douglas XA-26 airplane are compared with those measured in flight tests of a Douglas A-26b airplane. Several designs of nitrided-steel piston rings were performance-tested under variable conditions of output. The necessity of good surface finish and conformity of the ring to the bore was indicated in the preliminary tests. Nitrided-steel rings of the same dimensions as cast-iron rings operating on the original piston were unsatisfactory, and the final design was a lighter, rectangular, thin-face-width ring used on a piston having a maximum cross-head area and a revised skirt shape. Results were obtained from single-cylinder and multicylinder engine runs.

  16. Effects of bearing outer clearance on the dynamic behaviours of the full floating ring bearing supported turbocharger rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Wang, W. J.; Peng, Z. J.

    2012-08-01

    As a high speed rotating device, the modern turbocharger rotor is commonly supported by floating ring bearings (FRBs). The high nonlinearity there can always lead to quite complex and interesting phenomena rarely observed in other rotating applications. Using the run-up and run-down simulation method, this paper originally and systematically discusses the effect of bearing outer clearance on the rotordynamic characteristics of a realistic turbocharger rotor over the speed range up to 3000 Hz. The rotor is discretized by the Finite Element Method and supported by analytically calculated bearing forces. The linear analysis is proved to be effective in predicting the first two nonlinear jumps but inadequate to study the rotordynamic characteristics at higher rotor speeds. The nonlinearly simulated results show the appearances of distinct and interesting phenomena within the considered range of FRB outer clearance, which can be further divided into four groups. Within the same group, the simulation results are qualitatively similar to each other but quite dissimilar from the results from different groups. Moreover, the unwelcome Critical Limit Cycle Oscillation can be avoided by increasing the outer clearance size. Additionally, in some cases, the run-down simulations reveal distinct frequency maps as compared to the corresponding run-ups. Furthermore, it is seen that ring speed ratios can be considerably affected by the nonlinear jumps. Therefore, FRB outer clearance should be thoroughly examined to achieve the best rotordynamic performance.

  17. Pre-compression volume on flow ripple reduction of a piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Song, Yuechao; Yang, Huayong

    2013-11-01

    Axial piston pump with pre-compression volume(PCV) has lower flow ripple in large scale of operating condition than the traditional one. However, there is lack of precise simulation model of the axial piston pump with PCV, so the parameters of PCV are difficult to be determined. A finite element simulation model for piston pump with PCV is built by considering the piston movement, the fluid characteristic(including fluid compressibility and viscosity) and the leakage flow rate. Then a test of the pump flow ripple called the secondary source method is implemented to validate the simulation model. Thirdly, by comparing results among the simulation results, test results and results from other publications at the same operating condition, the simulation model is validated and used in optimizing the axial piston pump with PCV. According to the pump flow ripples obtained by the simulation model with different PCV parameters, the flow ripple is the smallest when the PCV angle is 13°, the PCV volume is 1.3×10-4 m3 at such operating condition that the pump suction pressure is 2 MPa, the pump delivery pressure 15 MPa, the pump speed 1 000 r/min, the swash plate angle 13°. At the same time, the flow ripple can be reduced when the pump suction pressure is 2 MPa, the pump delivery pressure is 5 MPa,15 MPa, 22 MPa, pump speed is 400 r/min, 1 000 r/min, 1 500 r/min, the swash plate angle is 11°, 13°, 15° and 17°, respectively. The finite element simulation model proposed provides a method for optimizing the PCV structure and guiding for designing a quieter axial piston pump.

  18. Exploratory development of a twin-spool turbocharger for a high-output diesel engine. Final report, September 1983-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, R.; King, J.F.; Harp, J.L.

    1986-08-01

    The analysis, design, fabrication, and experimental testing of a twin-spool turbocharger was conducted for the Cummins NTC-475 diesel engine. Two major designs of the twin-spool turbocharger were fabricated and tested: 1) Compact design, concentric shaft-to-shaft bearing coupled turbocharger incorporating a) split 40/sup 0/ backswept impeller, b) split AiResearch Ti8A85 turbine rotor, c) adjustable vaned compressor diffuser, and d) nozzleless AiResearch turbine (volute) housing; and 2) Independently supported (shafts dynamically de-coupled) concentric shaft design incorporating a) separate structures for bearing support of the inner shaft b) split 25/sup 0/ backswept compressor impeller, c) split T18A40/Ti8A85 turbine rotor/exducer combination, and d) divided volute, adjustable-nozzle turbine housing. While bench tests were performed on both designs, engine testing was successfully carried out using the latter designs. Tests indicated that the second twin-spool configuration gave performance comparable to the originally equipped two-stage turbocharger system of the NTC-475 diesel engine (rated BHP of 425 hp at 2100 RPM, best BSFC of 0.35 at engine lug) with the added benefit of extending engine lugging range to 1200 RPM (from 1300 RPM, as originally equipped). This configuration gave peak compressor efficiency of about 75% and peak turbine efficiency of about 80%, both attributed to the reduction inducer angle of attack and exducer exit swirl angle made possible by the twin-spool concept.

  19. 75 FR 36034 - Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Lead Emissions From Piston-Engine Aircraft Using Leaded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... provide comment on the ANPR. DATES: The comment period for the ANPR published April 28, 2010 (75 FR 22440... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 87 RIN 2060-AP79 Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Lead Emissions From Piston... Rulemaking on Lead Emissions From Piston-Engine Aircraft Using Leaded Aviation Gasoline (hereinafter...

  20. Vibration-Induced Rectified Motion of a Piston in a Liquid-Filled Cylinder with Bellows to Mimic Gas Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torczynski, J. R.; Romero, L. A.; Clausen, J. R.; O'Hern, T. J.

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a piston within a cylinder is investigated. A spring suspends the piston against gravity. The cylinder is filled with a viscous liquid and has compressible bellows at the top and bottom to mimic gas regions. A fixed post with protrusions extends into a hole through the piston with opposing protrusions. The length of the gap formed by the protrusions depends on the piston's vertical position. The outer gap between the piston and the cylinder is extremely small. Hence, as the piston moves, the displaced liquid passes through the variable-length gap, and the liquid force on the piston depends on its position. When this system is subjected to vertical vibrations, this dependence can produce a nonzero net force. With bellows, this net force can become large enough for the piston to compress the spring. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Compression of helium to high pressures and temperatures using a ballistic piston apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, B. P.; Rovel, G. P.; Lewis, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Some preliminary experiments are described which were carried out in a high enthalpy laboratory to investigate the compression of helium, a typical shock-tube driver gas, to very high pressures and temperatures by means of a ballistic piston. The purpose of these measurements was to identify any problem areas in the compression process, to determine the importance of real gas effects duDC 47355s process, and to establish the feasibility of using a ballistic piston apparatus to achieve temperatures in helium in excess of 10,000 K.

  2. Design of an interferometric system for piston measurements in segmented primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, Josep; Laguarta, Ferran; Pizarro, Carlos; Tomas, Nuria; Pinto, Agusti

    2000-10-01

    Recently, telescopes with segmented primary mirrors are becoming increasingly popular due to their ability of achieving large apertures without the inconveniences caused by the fabrication and handling of monolithic surfaces with 8m (or over) in diameter. The difference in position of each pair of adjacent segments along the local normal of their interface (called piston hereafter), however, needs to be precisely measured in order to provide a diffraction- limited image. If a system yielding the nanometric accuracy required in piston measurements worked in daylight hours, the resultant saving in observation time would be an important advance on a majority of the state-of-the-art piston measurement systems. An interferometric piston measurement instrument accomplishing such objectives has been designed starting from the usual Michelson configuration at the CD6 (Terrassa, Spain), and its final test has been carried out in the test workbench of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC, Canary Islands, Spain). Its optical layout relies on projecting the reference arm of the interferometer onto one of the segments of the pair considered, along the direction of the local normal to the surface while the measurement arm is projected onto the interface which divides the pair of segments considered. The field of view and its illumination are calculated to be equivalent in both segments. The lateral shift of the fringes in both interferograms determines the piston error present. A combination of monochromatic and white light is used, in order to remove the (lambda) /2 phase ambiguities present in piston measurements without losing the required resolution in the measurement. In this paper, the optical design of this interferometric piston measurement instrument will be presented. The particular configuration used in the interferometer, the implementation of an imaging system allowing to see both the interface of the segments and the interference fringes, the effect of the

  3. A transient tribodynamic approach for the calculation of internal combustion engine piston slap noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolatabadi, N.; Littlefair, B.; De la Cruz, M.; Theodossiades, S.; Rothberg, S. J.; Rahnejat, H.

    2015-09-01

    An analytical/numerical methodology is presented to calculate the radiated noise due to internal combustion engine piston impacts on the cylinder liner through a film of lubricant. Both quasi-static and transient dynamic analyses coupled with impact elasto-hydrodynamics are reported. The local impact impedance is calculated, as well as the transferred energy onto the cylinder liner. The simulations are verified against experimental results for different engine operating conditions and for noise levels calculated in the vicinity of the engine block. Continuous wavelet signal processing is performed to identify the occurrence of piston slap noise events and their spectral content, showing good conformance between the predictions and experimentally acquired signals.

  4. The effect of electrode material on the motion of a plasma piston in rail accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.

    2015-10-01

    The acceleration of a plasma piston in the channels of rail accelerators with copper and graphite electrodes is studied experimentally. It is found that the plasma velocity is reduced by 15-20% (at equal discharge currents) when graphite electrodes are used instead of copper ones. This may be attributed to an increase in the erosion graphite mass that is drawn into motion by the plasma piston. It is concluded based on the interpretation of the obtained data that the current flow in the channels of rail accelerators is governed at high plasma speeds by the processes of thermoautoelectron emission.

  5. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    SciTech Connect

    Curwen, P.W.; Rao, D.K.; Wilson, D.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes work performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061, {open_quotes}A Feasibility Assessment of Magnetic Bearings for Free-Piston Stirling Space Engines.{close_quotes} The work was performed over the period from July 1990 through August 1991. The objective of the effort was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in future long-term space missions.

  6. Separation of combustion noise and piston-slap in diesel engine—Part II: Separation of combustion noise and piston-slap using blind source separation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servière, C.; Lacoume, J.-L.; El Badaoui, M.

    2005-11-01

    This paper is devoted to blind separation of combustion noise and piston-slap in diesel engines. The two phenomena are recovered only from signals issued from accelerometers placed on one of the cylinders. A blind source separation (BSS) method is developed, based on a convolutive model of non-stationary mixtures. We introduce a new method based on the joint diagonalisation of the time varying spectral matrices of the observation records and a new technique to handle the problem of permutation ambiguity in the frequency domain. This method is then applied to real data and the estimated sources are validated by several physical arguments. So, the contribution of the piston-slap and the combustion noise can be recovered for all the sensors. The energy of the two phenomena can then be given with regards to the position of the accelerometers.

  7. Influence of the skin effect in a rail gun on the parameters of the moving plasma piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuferev, V. S.; Gnedina, M. L.; Gnedin, N. Iu.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of the motion of the plasma piston in a rail gun launcher is solved with allowance for the skin effect using plane geometry and the quasi-stationary approximation. The temperature along the piston is assumed to be constant, and the piston is assumed to move as a whole at a velocity equal to that of the accelerated projectile. It is shown that current displacement toward the rear of the piston due to the skin effect leads to an increase in the gasdynamic pressure in the plasma, with a resulting reduction in the extension of the plasmoid. The latter effect is particularly pronounced when the mass of the plasma exceeds that of the piston.

  8. Theseus Assembly Sequence #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft being assembled at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden's Project Manager was

  9. Theseus Engine Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here unloading an engine of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change

  10. Theseus Assembly Sequence #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here assembling the tail of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change

  11. Theseus First Flight - May 24, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft shows off its high aspect-ratio wing as it lifts off from Rogers Dry Lake during its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to

  12. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The twin pusher engines of the prototype Theseus research aircraft can be clearly seen in this photo of the aircraft during a 1996 research flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite

  13. Theseus Tail Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The tail of the Theseus prototype research aircraft is seen here being unloaded at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements

  14. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The twin pusher propeller-driven engines of the Theseus research aircraft can be clearly seen in this photo, taken during a 1996 research flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite

  15. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus research aircraft in flight over Rogers Dry Lake, Edwards, California, during a 1996 research flight. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden's Project Manager was John Del Frate.

  16. Theseus Nose and Pod Cones Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members are seen here unloading the nose and pod cones of the Theseus prototype research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental

  17. Theseus on Take-off for First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft takes off for its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden

  18. Theseus Waits on Lakebed for First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft waits on the lakebed before its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change

  19. Theseus in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft shows off its unique design as it flies low over Rogers Dry Lake during a 1996 test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global

  20. Theseus Assembly Sequence #3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype research aircraft being assembled at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden's Project Manager was

  1. Theseus Waits on Lakebed for First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Theseus prototype remotely-piloted aircraft (RPA) waits on the lakebed before its first test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 24, 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental

  2. The Development of a Control System for a 5 Kilowatt Free Piston Stirling Engine Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Raymond L.; Vitale, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The new NASA Vision for Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, proposes an ambitious program that plans to return astronauts to the moon by the 2018 time frame. A recent NASA study entitled "Affordable Fission Surface Power Study" recommended a 40 kWe, 900 K, NaK-cooled, Stirling convertors for 2020 launch. Use of two of the nominal 5 kW convertors allows the system to be dynamically balanced. A group of four dual-convertor combinations that would yield 40 kWe can be tested to validate the viability of Stirling technology for space fission surface power systems. The work described in this paper deals specifically with the control system for the 5 kW convertor described in the preceding paragraph. This control system is responsible for maintaining piston stroke to a setpoint in the presence of various disturbances including electrical load variations. Pulse starting of the Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) convertor is also an inherent part of such a control system. Finally, the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power is discussed in terms of setpoint control. Several novel ideas have been incorporated into the piston stroke control strategy that will engender a stable response to disturbances in the presence of midpoint drift while providing useful data regarding the position of both the power piston and displacer.

  3. Gas-charged piston-cylinder apparatus for pressures to 4 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getting, Ivan C.; Spetzler, Hartmut A.

    1994-07-01

    An end-loaded piston-cylinder high pressure apparatus which utilizes an argon pressure medium has been developed. This device has a pressurized volume in excess of 3 cm3 and offers the absolute pressure calibration of the piston-cylinder apparatus with the truly hydrostatic and chemically inert enviornment of argon. The vessel is precharged to 0.5 GPa through a port and valve system built into the end-load hardware. No port is required in the wall of the vessel. After precharge, the piston is advanced into the chamber to generate pressure to 4 GPa. Solid argon, at pressures greater than ˜1.3 GPa, is so weak that it requires gas sealing techniques to contain it. The seals consist entirely of unsupported area mitre rings in chamfers. No O-rings or other soft seal components are used. This configuration permits extensive cycling through the melting-freezing pressure of argon without failure. Leak rates are exceedingly low over the entire pressure range. A safety barrier have been constructed which comfortably contains the shock wave and any ejecta associated with failure. At slightly elevated temperatures, argon remains a true fluid. With an internal heater and internal temperature and pressure sensors, this apparatus is intended for high precision, ultrasonic velocity measurement. It will also be useful for truly hydrostatic studies of phase equilibria, diffusion, and partial melts. Deformation studies with truly hydrostatic confining pressure are also planned with the addition of an internal piston to generate differential stress.

  4. Development of Gas-Lubricated Pistons for Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, W.

    1984-01-01

    Static testing of a segmented, gas-lubricated, piston-ring was accomplished. The ring utilizes high-pressure gas generated during the diesel cycle to energize a hydrostatic gas film between the piston and cylinder liner. The configuration was deficient in overall performance, because all segments of a ring set failed to form a fluid-film simultaneously, when exposed to internal preload. The difficulty was traced to the moment balance required to prevent the segments from overturning and contacting the cylinder walls. Some individual sectors formed a film and performed well in every respect including load capability to 6,000 N. These results produce optimism as to the ultimate feasibility of hydrostatic, gas-lubricated piston rings. In addition to test results, the principles of operation, and theoretical developments are presented. Breathable liner concepts are suggested for future consideration. In these configurations, solid hydrostatic pistons are coupled with flexible liners that elastically deform to form a gas-film under hydrostatic pressurization. Breathable liners afford the mechanical simplicity required for mass produced engines, and initial examination indicates satisfactory operation.

  5. Design and Fabrication of a 5-kWe Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Peter A.; Walter, Thomas J.; Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Progress in the design and fabrication of a 5-kWe free-piston Stirling power conversion system is described. A scaled-down version of the successful 12.5-kWe Component Test Power Converter (CTPC) developed under NAS3-25463, this single cylinder prototype incorporates cost effective and readily available materials (steel versus beryllium) and components (a commercial linear alternator). The design consists of a displacer suspended on internally pumped gas bearings and a power piston/alternator supported on flexures. Non-contacting clearance seals are used between internal volumes. Heat to and from the prototype is supplied via pumped liquid loops passing through shell and tube heat exchangers. The control system incorporates several novel ideas such as a pulse start capability and a piston stroke set point control strategy that provides the ability to throttle the engine to match the required output power. It also ensures stable response to various disturbances such as electrical load variations while providing useful data regarding the position of both power piston and displacer. All design and analysis activities are complete and fabrication is underway. Prototype test is planned for summer 2008 at Foster-Miller to characterize the dynamics and steady-state operation of the prototype and determine maximum power output and system efficiency. Further tests will then be performed at Auburn University to determine start-up and shutdown characteristics and assess transient response to temperature and load variations.

  6. Tribological evaluation of piston skirt/cylinder liner contact interfaces under boundary lubrication conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Demas, N. G.; Erck, R. A.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2010-03-01

    The friction and wear between the piston and cylinder liner significantly affects the performance of internal combustion engines. In this paper, segments from a commercial piston/cylinder system were tribologically tested using reciprocating motion. The tribological contact consisted of aluminium alloy piston segments, either uncoated, coated with a graphite/resin coating, or an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : H) coating, in contact with gray cast iron liner segments. Tests were conducted in commercial synthetic motor oils and base stocks at temperatures up to 120 C with a 2 cm stroke length at reciprocating speeds up to 0.15 m s{sup -1}. The friction dependence of these piston skirt and cylinder liner materials was studied as a function of load, sliding speed and temperature. Specifically, an increase in the sliding speed led to a decrease in the friction coefficient below approximately 70 C, while above this temperature, an increase in sliding speed led to an increase in the friction coefficient. The presence of a coating played an important role. It was found that the graphite/resin coating wore quickly, preventing the formation of a beneficial tribochemical film, while the a-C : H coating exhibited a low friction coefficient and provided significant improvement over the uncoated samples. The effect of additives in the oils was also studied. The tribological behaviour of the interface was explained based on viscosity effects and subsequent changes in the lubrication regime, formation of chemical and tribochemical films.

  7. Stochastic stability assessment of a semi-free piston engine generator concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kigezi, T. N.; Gonzalez Anaya, J. A.; Dunne, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    Small engines, as power generators with low-noise and vibration characteristics, are needed in two niche application areas: as electric vehicle range extenders and as domestic micro Combined Heat and Power systems. A recent semi-free piston design known as the AMOCATIC generator fully meets this requirement. The engine potentially allows for high energy conversion efficiencies at resonance derived from having a mass and spring assembly. As with free-piston engines in general, stability and control of piston motion has been cited as the prime challenge limiting the technology's widespread application. Using physical principles, we derive in this paper two important results: an energy balance criterion and a related general stability criterion for a semi-free piston engine. Control is achieved by systematically designing a Proportional Integral (PI) controller using a control-oriented engine model for which a specific stability condition is stated. All results are presented in closed form throughout the paper. Simulation results under stochastic pressure conditions show that the proposed energy balance, stability criterion, and PI controller, operate as predicted to yield stable engine operation at fixed compression ratio.

  8. Numerical solution of the Stratonovich- and Ito–Euler equations: Application to the stochastic piston problem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiu; Lin, Guang; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-03-01

    We consider a piston with a velocity perturbed by Brownian motion moving into a straight tube filled with a perfect gas at rest. The shock generated ahead of the piston can be located by solving the one-dimensional Euler equations driven by white noise using the Stratonovich or Ito formulations. We approximate the Brownian motion with its spectral truncation and subsequently apply stochastic collocation using either sparse grid or the quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) method. In particular, we first transform the Euler equations with an unsteady stochastic boundary into stochastic Euler equations over a fixed domain with a time-dependent stochastic source term. We then solve the transformed equations by splitting them up into two parts, i.e., a ‘deterministic part’ and a ‘stochastic part’. Numerical results verify the Stratonovich–Euler and Ito–Euler models against stochastic perturbation results, and demonstrate the efficiency of sparse grid and QMC for small and large random piston motions, respectively. The variance of shock location of the piston grows cubically in the case of white noise in contrast to colored noise reported in [1], where the variance of shock location grows quadratically with time for short times and linearly for longer times.

  9. A 1987 overview of free-piston Stirling technology for space power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.; Alger, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. NASA Lewis serves as the project office to manage the newly initiated NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program. One of the major elements of this five-year program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable growth candidate. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are comparisons between predicted and experimental engine performance, enhanced performance resulting from regenerator modification, increased operating stroke brought about by isolating the gas bearing flow between the displacer and power piston, identifying excessive energy losses and recommending corrective action, and a better understanding of linear alternator design and operation. Technology work is also conducted on heat exchanger concepts, both design and fabrication. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter.

  10. Investigation into piston-slap-induced vibration for engine condition simulation and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Z.; Chen, J.

    2005-04-01

    Piston slap is a common impact phenomenon existing in the reciprocating engine. It is also a major cause of the complex transient vibration response related to the impact excitation inside the engine. In order to correlate the piston-slap impact with the slap-induced vibration and consequently find out an effective approach for the engine dynamic behaviour simulation and working condition monitoring, an in-depth investigation from theoretical modelling to experimental verification is made in this paper. Firstly, the piston-slap phenomenon inside the reciprocating engine is briefly discussed from the viewpoint of engine mechanics. Based upon this, a nonlinear model is developed to simulate the slap-induced vibration response. Using numerical integration procedure, the slap-induced vibration response and its correlation with the inner-cylinder piston-slap impact are reasonably evaluated. Guided by the simulating results and, by introducing a fast wavelet-packet decomposition and reconstruction algorithm, a specially designed experiment is made to practically measure and extract the slap-induced impact message inside the 6190Z LC diesel engine. Comparison between the simulation and practically measured and reconstructed engine vibration signals verifies the effectiveness and practicality of this approach for more detailed academic research and engineering application.

  11. Overview of free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of free-piston Stirling engine activities, directed toward space power applications. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators are discussed. Technology work was conducted on heat-exchanger concepts to minimize the number of joints as well as to enhance the heat transfer in the heater. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space power converter. Projections are made for future space power requirements over the next few decades along with a recommendation to consider the use of dynamic power conversion systems, either solar or nuclear. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits of a Stirling system over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power. A description of a study to investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space power module to the 150 kWe power range is presented.

  12. Component improvement of free-piston Stirling engine key technology for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The successful performance of the 25 kW Space Power Demonstrator (SPD) engine during an extensive testing period has provided a baseline of free piston Stirling engine technology from which future space Stirling engines may evolve. Much of the success of the engine was due to the initial careful selection of engine materials, fabrication and joining processes, and inspection procedures. Resolution of the few SPD engine problem areas that did occur has resulted in the technological advancement of certain key free piston Stirling engine components. Derivation of two half-SPD, single piston engines from the axially opposed piston SPD engine, designated as Space Power Research (SPR) engines, has made possible the continued improvement of these engine components. The two SPR engines serve as test bed engines for testing of engine components. Some important fabrication and joining processes are reviewed. Also, some component deficiencies that were discovered during SPD engine testing are described and approaches that were taken to correct these deficiencies are discussed. Potential component design modifications, based upon the SPD and SPR engine testing, are also reported.

  13. Avco Lycoming/NASA contract status. [on reduction of emissions from aircraft piston engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The standards promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbon (HC), and oxides-of-nitrogen (NOx) emissions were the basis in a study of ways to reduce emissions from aircraft piston engines. A variable valve timing system, ultrasonic fuel atomization, and ignition system changes were postulated.

  14. PIV measurements of the flow at the inlet of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor with recirculation casing treatment near the inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gancedo, Matthieu; Gutmark, Ephraim; Guillou, Erwann

    2016-02-01

    Turbocharging reciprocating engines is a viable solution in order to meet the new regulations for emissions and fuel efficiency in part because turbochargers allow to use smaller, more efficient engines (downsizing) while maintaining power. A major challenge is to match the flow range of a dynamic turbomachine (the centrifugal compressor in the turbocharger) with a positive displacement pump (the engine) as the flow range of the latter is typically higher. The operating range of the compressor is thus of prime interest. At low mass flow rate (MFR), the compressor range is limited by the occurrence of surge. To control and improve it, numerous and varied methods have been used. Yet, an automotive application requires that the solution remains relatively simple and preferably passive. A common feature that has been demonstrated to improve the surge line is the use of flow recirculation in the inducer region through a circumferential bleed slot around the shroud, also called "ported shroud", similar to what has been developed for axial compressors in the past. The compressor studied here features such a device. In order to better understand the effect of the recirculation slot on the compressor functioning, flow measurements were performed at the inlet using particle image velocimetry and the results were correlated with pressure measurements nearby. Measurements were taken on a compressor with and without recirculation and across the full range of normal operation and during surge using a phase-locking method to obtain average flow fields throughout the entire surge cycle. When the recirculation is blocked, it was found that strong backflow develops at low MFR perturbing the incoming flow and inducing significant preswirl. The slot eliminated most of the backflow in front of the inducer making the compressor operation more stable. The measurements performed during surge showed strong backflow occurring periodically during the outlet pressure drop and when the

  15. Piston Bowl Optimization for RCCI Combustion in a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Reed M; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M; Reitz, Rolf; Kokjohn, Sage

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that that produces low NO{sub x} and PM emissions with high thermal efficiency. Previous RCCI research has been investigated in single-cylinder heavy-duty engines. The current study investigates RCCI operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine at 3 operating points. These operating points were chosen to cover a range of conditions seen in the US EPA light-duty FTP test. The operating points were chosen by the Ad Hoc working group to simulate operation in the FTP test. The fueling strategy for the engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of diesel fuel. At these 3 points, the stock engine configuration is compared to operation with both the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and custom machined pistons designed for RCCI operation. The pistons were designed with assistance from the KIVA 3V computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. By using a genetic algorithm optimization, in conjunction with KIVA, the piston bowl profile was optimized for dedicated RCCI operation to reduce unburned fuel emissions and piston bowl surface area. By reducing these parameters, the thermal efficiency of the engine was improved while maintaining low NOx and PM emissions. Results show that with the new piston bowl profile and an optimized injection schedule, RCCI brake thermal efficiency was increased from 37%, with the stock EURO IV configuration, to 40% at the 2,600 rev/min, 6.9 bar BMEP condition, and NOx and PM emissions targets were met without the need for exhaust after-treatment.

  16. 1987 Overview of the free-piston Stirling technology for space power application

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.; Alger, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. Free-piston Stirling technology is applicable for both solar and nuclear powered systems. As such, NASA Lewis serves as the project office to manage the newly initiated NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program. This 5-yr program provides the technology thrust for providing significant component and subsystem options for increased efficiency, reliability and survivability, and power output growth at reduced specific mass. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable growth candidate. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are comparisons between predicted and experimental engine performance, enhanced performance resulting from regenerator modification, increased operating stroke brought about by isolating the gas bearing flow between the displacer and power piston, identifying excessive energy losses and recommending corrective action, and a better understanding of linear alternator design and operation. Technology work is also conducted on heat exchanger concepts, both design and fabrication, to minimize the number of joints as well as to enhance performance. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits that a Stirling system has over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power.

  17. A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbo compounded diesel engine system: A description of the thermodynamic and heat transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Ekchian, J. E.; Frank, R. M.; Heywood, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbocompounded direct-injection diesel engine system was developed in order to study the performance characteristics of the total system as major design parameters and materials are varied. Quasi-steady flow models of the compressor, turbines, manifolds, intercooler, and ducting are coupled with a multicylinder reciprocator diesel model, where each cylinder undergoes the same thermodynamic cycle. The master cylinder model describes the reciprocator intake, compression, combustion and exhaust processes in sufficient detail to define the mass and energy transfers in each subsystem of the total engine system. Appropriate thermal loading models relate the heat flow through critical system components to material properties and design details. From this information, the simulation predicts the performance gains, and assesses the system design trade-offs which would result from the introduction of selected heat transfer reduction materials in key system components, over a range of operating conditions.

  18. Gas-enabled resonance and rectified motion of a piston in a vibrated housing filled with a viscous liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Romero, Louis A.; Torczynski, John R.; Clausen, Jonathan R.; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2015-11-16

    Herein, we show how introducing a small amount of gas can completely change the motion of a solid object in a viscous liquid during vibration. We analyze an idealized system exhibiting this behavior: a piston moving in a liquid-filled housing, where the gaps between the piston and the housing are narrow and depend on the piston position. Recent experiments have shown that vibration causes some gas to move below the piston and the piston to subsequently move downward and compress its supporting spring. Herein, we analyze the analogous but simpler situation in which the gas regions are replaced by bellowsmore » with similar pressure-volume relationships. We show that these bellows form a spring (analogous to the pneumatic spring formed by the gas regions) which enables the piston and the liquid to oscillate in a mode that does not exist without this spring. This mode is referred to here as the Couette mode because the liquid in the gaps moves essentially in Couette flow (i.e., with almost no component of Poiseuille flow). Since Couette flow by itself produces extremely low damping, the Couette mode has a strong resonance. We show that, near this resonance, the dependence of the gap geometry on the piston position produces a large rectified (net) force on the piston during vibration. As a result, this force can be much larger than the piston weight and the strength of its supporting spring and is in the direction that decreases the flow resistance of the gap geometry.« less

  19. Calibration and comparison of the NASA Lewis free-piston Stirling engine model predictions with RE-1000 test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.

    1987-01-01

    A free-piston Stirling engine performance code is being upgraded and validated at the NASA Lewis Research Center under an interagency agreement between the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and NASA Lewis. Many modifications were made to the free-piston code in an attempt to decrease the calibration effort. A procedure was developed that made the code calibration process more systematic. Engine-specific calibration parameters are often used to bring predictions and experimental data into better agreement. The code was calibrated to a matrix of six experimental data points. Predictions of the calibrated free-piston code are compared with RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine sensitivity test data taken at NASA Lewis. Resonable agreement was obtained between the code predictions and the experimental data over a wide range of engine operating conditions.

  20. Method and apparatus for locating top dead center position of a piston of an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, T.

    1987-05-26

    The method is described of locating the top dead center position of a piston of a diesel internal combustion engine that is reciprocable within a cylinder of the engine and which is connected to the crankshaft of the engine. The steps comprise: while the engine is running detecting light radiation developed within the cylinder when the piston is operating in its compression stroke; developing an electrical signal the magnitude of which varies in accordance with the intensity of the light radiation, the signal having a peak that occurs at a position of the piston that is prior to the top dead center position of the piston; recording data that includes simultaneous crankshaft positions and signal magnitudes for a succession of crankshaft positions during the compression stroke of the engine, determining from the data the peak related crankshaft position at which the peak occurred; and determining engine speed.