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Sample records for 80-k synchrotron radiation

  1. Design report on the SSCL prototype 80 K Synchrotron Radiation Liner System

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Q.S.; Barts, T.; Chou, W.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the effort to develop a viable design for an SSC prototype 80 K Synchrotron Radiation Liner System. This liner is designed to be tested in the Superconducting Super Collider Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) facility. The liner is one method under consideration to minimize the presence of photodesorbed gases in the particle beam line vacuum environment. Secondly, the liner is aimed at improving the Collider cryogenic thermal efficiency which would allow a potential luminosity upgrade. The SSC Collider is the first proton superconducting accelerator designed to operate at an energy of 20 TeV (each beam) and a beam current of 72 mA. The Collider will produce a synchrotron power of 0.14 W/m and a total of 18 kW into 4.2 K for the two rings. This radiated power may trigger a serious impact of photodesorbed gases on the operational availability of the Collider. The interaction between beam particle and photodesorbed gases may greatly reduce the beam lifetime and the scattered beam power may lead to quenching of the superconducting magnets. Collider availability may be unacceptable if this concern is not properly addressed. The liner is one method under consideration to minimize the presence of photodesorbed gases in the particle beam line vacuum. Secondly, the liner is aimed improving the Collider`s cryogenic thermal efficiency which would allow a potential luminosity upgrade. The ultimate goal is to require no more than one machine warm up per year for vacuum maintenance during operation of the SSC Collider.

  2. Synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others.

  3. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  4. Synchrotron Radiation II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a unique form of radiation that spans the electro-magnetic spectrum from X-rays through the ultraviolet and visible into the infrared. Tunable monochromators enable scientists to select a narrow band of wavelengths at any point in the spectrum. (Author/BB)

  5. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Synchrotron radiation sources and research

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is an introduction and a review of Synchrotron Radiation sources and the research performed using synchrotron radiation. I will begin with a brief discussion of the two principal uses of particle storage rings: for colliding beams (Collider) and for synchrotron radiation (Radiator). Then I will concentrate on discussions of synchrotron radiation topics, starting with a historical account, followed by descriptions of the features of the storage ring and the features of the radiation from the simplest source -- the bending magnet. I will then discuss the special insertion device sources -- wigglers and undulators -- and their radiations, and end with a brief general account of the research and other applications of synchrotron radiation.

  7. Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW)

    2013-03-01

    "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) is a physical optics computer code for calculation of detailed characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) generated by relativistic electrons in magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration and for simulation of the radiation wavefront propagation through optical systems of beamlines. Frequency-domain near-field methods are used for the SR calculation, and the Fourier-optics based approach is generally used for the wavefront propagation simulation. The code enables both fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation simulations inmore » steady-state and in frequency-/time-dependent regimes. With these features, the code has already proven its utility for a large number of applications in infrared, UV, soft and hard X-ray spectral range, in such important areas as analysis of spectral performances of new synchrotron radiation sources, optimization of user beamlines, development of new optical elements, source and beamline diagnostics, and even complete simulation of SR based experiments. Besides the SR applications, the code can be efficiently used for various simulations involving conventional lasers and other sources. SRW versions interfaced to Python and to IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics), as well as cross-platform library with C API, are available.« less

  8. Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW)

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar, O.; Elleaume, P.

    2013-03-01

    "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) is a physical optics computer code for calculation of detailed characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) generated by relativistic electrons in magnetic fields of arbitrary configuration and for simulation of the radiation wavefront propagation through optical systems of beamlines. Frequency-domain near-field methods are used for the SR calculation, and the Fourier-optics based approach is generally used for the wavefront propagation simulation. The code enables both fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation simulations in steady-state and in frequency-/time-dependent regimes. With these features, the code has already proven its utility for a large number of applications in infrared, UV, soft and hard X-ray spectral range, in such important areas as analysis of spectral performances of new synchrotron radiation sources, optimization of user beamlines, development of new optical elements, source and beamline diagnostics, and even complete simulation of SR based experiments. Besides the SR applications, the code can be efficiently used for various simulations involving conventional lasers and other sources. SRW versions interfaced to Python and to IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics), as well as cross-platform library with C API, are available.

  9. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, Herman

    2003-07-09

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, microfabrication, archaeometry and medical diagnostics. These rings span electron energies from a few hundred MeV to 8 GeV. Several facilities serve 2000 or more users on 30-60 simultaneously operational experimental stations. The largest rings are more than 1 km in circumference, cost about US$1B to build and have annual budgets of about US$100M. This growth is due to the remarkable properties of synchrotron radiation, including its high intensity, brightness and stability; wide spectral range extending from the infra-red to hard x-rays; variable polarization; pulsed time structure; and high vacuum environment. The ever-expanding user community and the increasing number of applications are fueling a continued growth in the number of facilities around the world. In the past few years new types of light sources have been proposed based on linear accelerators. Linac-based sources now being pursued include the free-electron laser (FEL) and energy recovery linac (ERL

  10. Angiography by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, E.; Brown, G. S.; Giacomini, J. C.; Gordon, H. J.; Hofstadter, R.; Kernoff, R. S.; Otis, J. N.; Thomlinson, W.; Thompson, A. C.; Zeman, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    Because coronary disease represents the principal health problem in the Western, industrialized world, and because of the risks and costs associated with conventional methods of visualizing the coronary arteries, an effort has been underway at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory to develop a less invasive coronary imaging procedure based on iodine K-edge dichromography. A pair of line images, recorded within a few milliseconds of each other, is taken with two monochromatic X-ray beams whose energy closely brackets the K-edge of iodine, 33.17 keV. The logarithmic subtraction of the images produced by these beams results in an image which greatly enhances signals arising from attenuation by iodine and almost totally suppresses signals arising from attenuation by soft tissue and bone. The high sensitivity to iodine allows the visualization of arterial structures after an intravenous injection of contrast agent and its subsequent 20-30 fold dilution. The experiments began in 1979, with initial studies done on phantoms and excised pig hearts. The first images of anesthetized dogs were taken in 1982. The results of experiments on dogs will be reviewed, showing the stepwise evolution of the imaging system, leading to the use of the system on human subjects in 1986. The images recorded on human subjects will be described and the remaining problems discussed.

  11. Mossbauer spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Sturhahn, W.

    1993-07-01

    The principles underlying observation of the Mossbauer effect with synchrotron radiation are explained. The current status of the field is reviewed, and prospects for dedicated experimental stations on third generation machines are discussed.

  12. Synchrotron Radiation Research--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienenstock, Arthur; Winick, Herman

    1983-01-01

    Discusses expanding user community seeking access to synchrotron radiation sources, properties/sources of synchrotron radiation, permanent-magnet technology and its impact on synchrotron radiation research, factors limiting power, the density of synchrotron radiation, and research results illustrating benefit of higher flux and brightness. Also…

  13. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  14. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Synchrotron radiation in biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkovic, Nebojsa S.; Gupta, Sayan; Zhan, Chenyang; Chance, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    The Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB) operates five beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Infrared (IR) micro-spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, structural proteomics and macromolecular footprinting are among the major technologies available through the Center. IR micro-spectroscopy is used to examine protein-folding in the microsecond time regime, image bone, neurons, seeds and other biological tissues, as well as image samples of interest in the chemical and environmental sciences. Structural proteomics research of New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) is steadily increasing the number of solved protein structures, with a goal to solve 100-200 structures per year. To speed up the research, a high-throughput method called 'metallomics' was implemented for NYSGRC crystallographers to detect intrinsic anomalous scatterers using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Hydroxyl radical mediated X-ray footprinting is capable of resolving folding events of RNA, at single base resolution on millisecond timescales using a synchrotron white beam. The high brightness of synchrotron source is essential for CSB projects as it permits the use of smaller sample sizes and/or concentration, and allows studies of more complicated biological systems than with conventional sources.

  16. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Yolanda; Martínez-Rovira, Immaculada

    This chapter describes the state-of-art of synchrotron radiation therapies in the treatment of radioresistant tumors. The tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue severely limits the achievement of a curative treatment for some brain tumors, like gliomas. This restriction is especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restrained. One possible solution is the development of new radiotherapy techniques would exploit radically different irradiation modes, as it is the case of synchrotron radiotherapies. Their distinct features allow to modify the biological equivalent doses. In this chapter the three new approaches under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), in Grenoble (France), will be described, namely: stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy, microbeam radiation therapy and minibeam radiation therapy. The promising results obtained in the treatment of high grade brain tumors in preclinical studies have paved the way to the forthcoming clinical trials, currently in preparation.

  17. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    Various fundamental topics which underlie the design and use of optical systems for synchrotron radiation are considered from the viewpoint of linear system theory. These topics include the damped harmonic oscillator, free space propagation of an optical field, electromagnetic theory of optical properties of materials, theory of dispersion, and the Kramers-Kronig relations. 32 refs., 5 figs. (LEW)

  18. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  19. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-08-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotheraphy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatc needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  20. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  1. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  2. Synchrotron Radiation in Life Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Northrup, Paul; Pietri, Ruth; Zhong, Zhong

    2012-05-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) presents itself as a “play-ground” with a large range of methods and techniques suitable to unveil the mysteries of life. Here we attempt to present a few of these methods that complement those employed in the home laboratory. SR diffraction, spectroscopy and imaging methods relevant to the atomic structure determination and characterization of the properties and function of chemical compounds and macromolecules of biological relevance, are introduced.

  3. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Longo, Renata; Olivo, Alessandro; Poropat, Paolo; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico D.; Castelli, Edoardo

    2002-05-01

    A feasibility study of breast CT with synchrotron radiation is currently being carried on at Elettra, the Trieste synchrotron radiation facility. Breast CT cannot be implemented easily with conventional radiographic tubes, due to the high dose that would be delivered to the breast by a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The possibility of tuning the beam energy, available at a synchrotron radiation beamline, allows a significant reduction in the delivered dose, and at the same time the use of monochromatic beams avoids beam hardening artifacts on the reconstructed image. Images of in vitro breast tissue samples have been acquired by means of a high efficiency linear array detector coupled to a VLSI single photon counting readout electronics. The pixel width, determining the pixel size of the reconstructed image, is 200 micrometers , while the pixel height, determining the CT slice thickness, is 300 micrometers . Tomograms have been reconstructed by means of standard filtered backprojection algorithms. Images of normal and pathologic breast tissue samples show a good visibility of glandular structure. The delivered dose was in all cases comparable to the one delivered in clinical planar mammography. Due to the promising results we obtained, in vivo studies are under evaluation.

  4. Synchrotron radiation and industrial research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Rodney P.

    1995-05-01

    Fundamental studies on the properties of many different materials are of prime importance to most industrial concerns. For Unilever, solids (crystalline and amorphous), soft solids and complex fluids are the materials of primary interest. Synchrotron radiation has proved of great value for the analysis of a variety of such materials, because the intense and highly collimated radiation source has enabled us to obtain structural information rapidly as well as in time-resolved mode. In this paper are outlined the types of materials problems faced, and how we use different techniques to elucidate structure (both short and long range order) in zeolites, amorphous solids, as well as in biomaterials such as skin and hair containing lipid phases. Both equilibrium and time-resolved studies are described.

  5. Synchrotron radiation as an infrared source.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Ellis, H; Bartlett, R

    1973-12-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron radiation sources in a number of geographical regions of the world has motivated an evaluation of the radiation from electron accelerators and storage rings as a possible source for ir spectroscopy. As synchrotron radiation can be analytically described, a direct comparison is made with blackbody radiation for typical solid state spectroscopy. Both existing and proposed synchrotron radiation sources are found to be attractive in the ir. The ultrahigh vacuum environment of the source is compatible with clean surface investigations, the analytical description of the radiation is appropriate for calibration studies, and the continuous nature is suitable for Fourier spectroscopy or whenever a white light source is desirable.

  6. Wakefields in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, Tim E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, Ward A.; Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.; Michaelian, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    When the electron bunches in a storage ring are sufficiently short the electrons act coherently producing radiation several orders of magnitude more intense than normal synchrotron radiation. This is referred to as Coherent Syncrotron Radiation (CSR). Due to the potential of CSR to provide a good source of Terahertz radiation for our users, the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been researching the production and application of CSR. CSR has been produced at the CLS for many years, and has been used for a number of applications. However, resonances that permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of 0.074 cm-1, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup, have hampered some experiments. Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes. These results are consistent with observations made by the interferometer in the THz range. Also discussed will be some practical examples of the application of CSR for the study of condensed phase samples using both transmission and Photoacoustic techniques.

  7. Computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.C.; Llacer, J.; Finman, L.C.; Hughes, E.B.; Otis, J.N.; Wilson, S.; Zeman, H.D.

    1983-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional views of objects. The high intensity, natural collimation, monochromaticity and energy tunability of synchrotron x-ray sources could potentially be used to provide CT images of improved quality. The advantages of these systems would be that images could be produced more rapidly with better spatial resolution and reduced beam artifacts. In addition, images, in some cases, could be acquired with elemental sensitivity. As a demonstration of the capability of such a system, CT images were obtained of four slices of an excised pig heart in which the arteries and the cardiac chambers were filled with an iodinated medium. Images were taken with incident x-rays tuned successively to energies just above and below the iodine K edge. Iodine specific images were obtained by logarithmically subtracting the low energy image data from the high energy data and then reconstructing the image. CT imaging using synchrotron radiation may become a convenient and non-destructive method of imaging samples difficult to study by other methods.

  8. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  9. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    Over the past two decades there has been a phenomenal growth in the number of dedicated synchrotron radiation facilities and a corresponding growth in the number of applications in both basic and applied sciences. The high flux and brightness, tunable beams, time structure and polarization of synchrotron radiation provide an ideal x- ray source for many applications in the medical sciences. There is a dual aspect to the field of medical applications of synchrotron radiation. First there are the important in-vitro programs such as structural biology, x-ray microscopy, and radiation cell biology. Second there are the programs that are ultimately targeted at in-vivo applications. The present status of synchrotron coronary angiography, bronchography, multiple energy computed tomography, mammography and radiation therapy programs at laboratories around the world is reviewed.

  10. New theoretical results in synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, V. G.; Gitman, D. M.; Tlyachev, V. B.; Jarovoi, A. T.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remarkable features of the relativistic electron synchrotron radiation is its concentration in small angle Δ ≈ 1/γ (here γ-relativistic factor: γ = E/mc2, E energy, m electron rest mass, c light velocity) near rotation orbit plane [V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V.G. Bulenok, V. Ya. Epp, Kinematical projection of pulsar synchrotron radiation profiles, in: Proceedings of IV ISTC Scientific Advisory Commitee Seminar on Basic Science in ISTC Aktivities, Akademgorodok, Novosibirsk, April 23 27, 2001, p. 293 300]. This theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed feature is peculiar to total (spectrum summarized) radiating intensity. This angular distribution property has been supposed to be (at least qualitatively) conserved and for separate spectrum synchrotron radiation components. In the work of V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V. Ch. Zhukovskii, Development of the theory of synchrotron radiation and related processes. Synchrotron source of JINR: the perspective of research, in: The Materials of the Second International Work Conference, Dubna, April 2 6, 2001, pp. 15 30 and in Angular dependence of synchrotron radiation intensity. http://lanl.arXiv.org/abs/physics/0209097, it is shown that the angular distribution of separate synchrotron radiation spectrum components demonstrates directly inverse tendency the angular distribution deconcentration relatively the orbit plane takes place with electron energy growth. The present work is devoted to detailed investigation of this situation. For exact quantitative estimation of angular concentration degree of synchrotron radiation the definition of radiation effective angle and deviation angle is proposed. For different polarization components of radiation the dependence of introduced characteristics was investigated as a functions of electron energy and number of spectrum component.

  11. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdale, C.M.

    1983-04-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems.

  12. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum

  13. Workshop on detectors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2000-11-22

    Forefront experiments in many scientific areas for which synchrotron sources provide sufficient flux are nonetheless hindered because detectors cannot collect data fast enough, do not cover sufficiently solid angle, or do no have adequate resolution. Overall, the synchrotron facilities, each of which represents collective investments from funding agencies and user institutions ranging from many hundreds of millions to more than a billion dollars, are effectively significantly underutilized. While this chronic and growing problem plagues facilities around the world, it is particularly acute in the United States, where detector research often has to ride on the coat tails of explicitly science-oriented projects. As a first step toward moving out of this predicament, scientists from the U.S. synchrotron facilities held a national workshop in Washington, DC, on October 30-31, 2000. The Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Research aimed to create a national ''roadmap'' for development of synchrotron-radiation detectors.

  14. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  15. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  16. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  17. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  18. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB{sub 66} crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing.

  19. Molecular electronics studies by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wee, Andrew T. S.; Chen Wei; Chi Dongchen; Chen Shi; Wang Li; Gao Xingyu

    2009-01-29

    In molecular electronics research, the molecule-metal interfacial properties crucially control the electronic properties of the devices fabricated. We use synchrotron radiation techniques of PES and NEXAFS, complemented by STM, to study the molecular orientation and interfacial charge transfer processes of model molecule-metal systems.

  20. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-12-31

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ``gold standards`` to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications.

  1. Microangiography in Living Mice Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Falei; Wang Yongting; Xie Bohua; Tang Yaohui; Guan Yongjing; Lu Haiyan; Yang Guoyuan; Xie Honglan; Du Guohao; Xiao Tiqiao

    2010-07-23

    Traditionally, there are no methods available to detect the fine morphologic changes of cerebrovasculature in small living animals such as rats and mice. Newly developed synchrotron radiation microangiography can achieve a fine resolution of several micrometers and had provided us with a powerful tool to study the cerebral vasculature in small animals. The purpose of this study is to identify the morphology of cerebrovasculature especially the structure of Lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) in living mice using the synchrotron radiation source at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in Shanghai, China. Adult CD-1 mice weighing 35-40 grams were anesthetized. Nonionic iodine (Omnipaque, 350 mg I /mL) was used as a contrast agent. The study was performed at the BL13W1 beam line at SSRF. The beam line was derived from a storage ring of electrons with an accelerated energy of 3.5 GeV and an average beam current of 200 mA. X-ray energy of 33.3 keV was used to produce the highest contrast image. Images were acquired every 172 ms by a x-ray camera (Photonic-Science VHR 1.38) with a resolution of 13 {mu}m/pixel. The optimal dose of contrast agent is 100 {mu}l per injection and the injecting rate is 33 {mu}l/sec. The best position for imaging is to have the mouse lay on its right or left side, with ventral side facing the X-ray source. We observed the lenticulostriate artery for the first time in living mice. Our result show that there are 4 to 5 lenticulostriate branches originating from the root of middle cerebral artery in each hemisphere. LSAs have an average diameter of 43{+-}6.8 {mu}m. There were no differences between LSAs from the left and right hemisphere (p<0.05). These results suggest that synchrotron radiation may provide a unique tool for experimental stroke research.

  2. Coherent synchrotron radiation: Theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Courtland L. Bohn

    2002-07-19

    Our understanding of the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bending systems and its impact on beam dynamics has grown considerably over the past few years. The search for understanding has brought a number of surprises, all related to the complexity of the fully self-consistent problem. Herein I survey the associated phenomenology, theory, and experiments while emphasizing important subtleties that have recently been uncovered. I conclude by speculating on courses of future investigations that may prove fruitful.

  3. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  4. Biological applications of synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, Augusto; Cricenti, Antonio; Kwiatek, Wojciech M; Petibois, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Extremely brilliant infrared (IR) beams provided by synchrotron radiation sources are now routinely used in many facilities with available commercial spectrometers coupled to IR microscopes. Using these intense non-thermal sources, a brilliance two or three order of magnitude higher than a conventional source is achievable through small pinholes (<10 μm) with a high signal to-noise ratio. IR spectroscopy is a powerful technique to investigate biological systems and offers many new imaging opportunities. The field of infrared biological imaging covers a wide range of fundamental issues and applied researches such as cell imaging or tissue imaging. Molecular maps with a spatial resolution down to the diffraction limit may be now obtained with a synchrotron radiation IR source also on thick samples. Moreover, changes of the protein structure are detectable in an IR spectrum and cellular molecular markers can be identified and used to recognize a pathological status of a tissue. Molecular structure and functions are strongly correlated and this aspect is particularly relevant for imaging. We will show that the brilliance of synchrotron radiation IR sources may enhance the sensitivity of a molecular signal obtained from small biosamples, e.g., a single cell, containing extremely small amounts of organic matter. We will also show that SR IR sources allow to study chemical composition and to identify the distribution of organic molecules in cells at submicron resolution is possible with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the recent availability of two-dimensional IR detectors promises to push forward imaging capabilities in the time domain. Indeed, with a high current synchrotron radiation facility and a Focal Plane Array the chemical imaging of individual cells can be obtained in a few minutes. Within this framework important results are expected in the next years using synchrotron radiation and Free Electron Laser (FEL) sources for spectro-microscopy and spectral

  5. Synchrotron radiation — 1873 to 1947

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, John P.

    1988-04-01

    In 1873 Maxwell's treatise "Electricity and Magnetism" made it clear that a changing electric current will emit electromagnetic radiation. By the turn of the century, J.J. Thomson was showing that currents in space could be carried by electrons; accordingly, it was reasonable to believe that electrons, when accelerated, would radiate. By 1912, the theory of radiation from accelerated electrons was worked out and buried in the literature. Radiation from accelerated relativistic electrons did not come into prominence again until the 1940's when, finally, it was observed at the Research Laboratory of the General Electric Company. This paper will discuss the early theoretical treatments and will describe the first observations with the G.E. 100 MeV betatron and 75 MeV synchrotron.

  6. Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation: New possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikova, E. N.; Mukhamedzhanov, E. Kh.

    2016-09-01

    Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) is a modern method of studying the structure and properties of condensed matter that can be implemented on third-generation synchrotrons. This method allows one to investigate local properties of media (including magnetic and electronic ones) and observe thermal vibrations, defects, and orbital and charge orderings. A brief review of the advance provided by SR resonant diffraction is presented, and the capabilities of this method for analyzing phase transitions are considered in more detail by the example of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and rubidium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. It is shown that the investigation of the temperature dependence of forbidden reflections not only makes it possible to observe the transition from para- to ferroelectric phase, but also gives information about the proton distribution at hydrogen bonds.

  7. The time variability of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Scott Jay

    1991-02-01

    The time variability of the Jovian synchrotron emission is investigated by analyzing radio observations of Jupiter at decimetric wavelengths. The observations are composed from two distinct sets of measurements addressing both short term (days to weeks) and long term (months to years) variability. The study of long term variations utilizes a set of measurements made several times each month with the NASA Deep Space Network (DNS) antennas operating at 2295 MHz (13.1 cm). The DSN data set, covering 1971 through 1985, is compared with a set of measurements of the solar wind from a number of Earth orbiting spacecraft. The analysis indicates a maximum correlation between the synchrotron emission and the solar wind ram pressure with a two year time lag. Physical mechanisms affecting the synchrotron emission are discussed with an emphasis on radial diffusion. Calculations are performed that suggest the correlation is consistent with inward adiabatic diffusion of solar wind particles driven by Brice's model of ionospheric neutral wind convection (Brice 1972). The implication is that the solar wind could be a source of particles of Jupiter's radiation belts. The investigation of short term variability focuses on a three year Jupiter observing program using the University of California's Hat Creek radio telescope operating at 1400 MHz (21 cm). Measurements are made every two days during the months surrounding opposition. Results from the three year program suggest short term variability near the 10-20 percent level but should be considered inconclusive due to scheduling and observational limitations. A discussion of magneto-spheric processes on short term timescales identifies wave-particle interactions as a candidate source. Further analysis finds that the short term variations could be related to whistler mode wave-particles interactions in the radiation belts associated with atmospheric lightning on Jupiter. However, theoretical calculations on wave particle interactions

  8. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  9. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  10. Synchrotron-Radiation-Based Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Makoto; Masuda, Ryo; Mitsui, Takaya; Higashitaniguchi, Satoshi; Kitao, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Inaba, Chika; Yoda, Yoshitaka

    2009-05-29

    We have developed a new method that yields Moessbauer absorption spectra using synchrotron radiation (SR); this method is applicable for almost all Moessbauer nuclides including those that cannot be measured by previous methods using radioisotope (RI) sources. The Moessbauer spectrum of the 68.752 keV excited state of {sup 73}Ge, which cannot be measured using a RI source, was measured using SR. Our results show that this method can be used to perform advanced Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements owing to the excellent features of SR.

  11. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  12. Bent approximations to synchrotron radiation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.

    1981-01-01

    Ideal optical elements can be approximated by bending flats or cylinders. This paper considers the applications of these approximate optics to synchrotron radiation. Analytic and raytracing studies are used to compare their optical performance with the corresponding ideal elements. It is found that for many applications the performance is adequate, with the additional advantages of lower cost and greater flexibility. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining the practical limitations on the use of the approximate elements in typical beamline configurations. Also considered are the possibilities for approximating very long length mirrors using segmented mirrors.

  13. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Macrander, A. T.; Hill, K. W.; Baronova, E. O.; George, K. M.; Kotick, J.

    2015-10-15

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  14. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  15. Indirect CT Venography at 80 kVp with Sinogram-Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction Compared to 120 kVp with Filtered Back Projection: Assessment of Image Quality and Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee; Ko, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of indirect computed tomographic venography (CTV) using 80 kVp with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and 120 kVp with filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by our institution and informed consent was waived. Sixty-one consecutive patients (M: F = 27: 34, mean age 60 ± 16, mean BMI 23.6 ± 3.6 kg/m2) underwent pelvic and lower extremity CTVs [group A (n = 31, 120 kVp, reconstructed with FBP) vs. group B (n = 30, 80 kVp, reconstructed with SAFIRE)]. The vascular enhancement, image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared. Subjective image analysis for image quality and noise was performed by two radiologists. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Results Compared with group A, higher mean vascular enhancement was observed in the group B (group A vs. B, 118.8 ± 15.7 HU vs. 178.6 ± 39.6 HU, p < 0.001), as well as image noise (12.0 ± 3.8 HU vs. 17.9 ± 6.1 HU, p < 0.001) and CNR (5.1 ± 1.9 vs. 7.6 ± 3.0, p < 0.001). The SNRs were not significantly different in both groups (11.2 ± 4.8 vs. 10.8 ± 3.7, p = 0.617). There was no significant difference in subjective image quality between the two groups (all p > 0.05). The subjective image noise was higher in the group B (p = 0.036 in reader 1, p = 0.005 in reader 2). The inter-observer reliability for assessing subjective image quality was good (ICC 0.746~0.784, p < 0.001). The mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and mean dose length product (DLP) were significantly lower in group B than group A [CTDIvol, 6.4 ± 1.3 vs. 2.2 ± 2.2 mGy (p < 0.001); DLP, 499.1 ± 116.0 vs. 133.1 ± 45.7 mGy × cm (p < 0.001)]. Conclusions CTV using 80 kVp combined with SAFIRE provides lower radiation dose and improved CNR compared to CTV using 120 kVp with FBP. PMID:27662618

  16. Looking Back at International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Gwyn

    2012-03-01

    With the 11th International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation coming up in July 2012 in Lyons, France, we thought it might be of interest to our readers to review all the past meetings in this series. We thank Denny Mills of the APS, Argonne for putting the list together. Prior to these larger meetings, and in the early days, facilities held their own meetings similar to the user meetings of today. However, the meeting held at ACO in Orsay, France in 1977 was the first such meeting with an international flavor and so it is on the list. However it is not counted as number 1 since it was agreed way back to start the numbering with the 1982 DESY meeting. The 2005 USA National Meeting scheduled at CAMD in Baton Rouge had to be canceled due to Hurricane Katrina. It was ultimately held in 2007, with the CLS hosted meeting the following year. And a personal note from the magazine - Synchrotron Radiation News was born at the 1987 meeting in Madison, Wisconsin with a proposal that was put to a special session of the meeting organized by Susan Lord. Initial proposals were to model it after the CERN Courier, but it soon adopted its own distinct flavor.

  17. Thermal loading considerations for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, F.R.; Berglin, E.J.; Fuchs, B.A.; Humpal, H.H.; Karpenko, V.P.; Martin, R.W.; Tirsell, K.G.

    1986-03-26

    Grazing incidence mirrors used to focus synchrotron radiation beams through small distant apertures have severe optical requirements. The surface distortion due to heat loading of the first mirror in a bending magnet beam line is of particular concern when a large fraction of the incident beam is absorbed. In this paper we discuss mirror design considerations involved in minimizing the thermal/mechanical loading on vertically deflecting first surface mirrors required for SPEAR synchrotron radiation beam lines. Topics include selection of mirror material and cooling method, the choice of SiC for the substrate, optimization of the thickness, and the design of the mirror holder and cooling mechanism. Results obtained using two-dimensional, finite-element thermal/mechanical distortion analysis are presented for the case of a 6/sup 0/ grazing incidence SiC mirror absorbing up to 260 W at Beam Line VIII on the SPEAR ring. Test descriptions and results are given for the material used to thermally couple this SiC mirror to a water-cooled block. The interface material is limited to applications for which the equivalent normal heat load is less than 20 W/cm/sup 2/.

  18. Current Status of the Synchrotron Radiation Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinraide, R.; Moore, C. J.; Jacobs, K. D.; Severson, M.; Bissen, M. J.; Frazer, B.; Bisognano, J. J.; Bosch, R. A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M. A.; Gundelach, C. T.; Hansen, R. W. C.; Hochst, H.; Julian, R. L.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Kubala, T.; Legg, R. A.; Pedley, B.; Rogers, G. C.; Stott, J. P.; Wallace, D. J.; Wehlitz, R.; Wiese, L. M.; Taylor, J.; Campuzano, J. C.; De Stasio, G.

    2004-05-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) operates the Aladdin electron storage ring at energies of 800 MeV or 1 GeV in support of a broad range of national and international research programs. A low emittance configuration is in routine operation during 800-MeV shifts and offers improved photon flux density with about the same beam lifetime. An improved undulator compensation algorithm and new optical beam position monitors have been implemented improving beam stability and maintaining vertical beam size variations to < 2% peak-to-peak during undulator scanning. Instrumentation initiatives include construction of a modified Wadsworth beamline (7.8 - 50 eV) and a variable-line-spacing plane-grating monochromator (VLS-PGM, 75 - 2000 eV) to utilize radiation from a permanent magnet undulator. The Wadsworth beamline is being commissioned for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments using high-resolution Scienta analyzers. The VLS-PGM is being constructed for experiments that require higher photon energies and high flux density such as x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is scheduled to be available in early 2004. Recent research at the SRC has produced exciting results in a variety of fields, culminating in eight articles published in Physical Review Letters and three in Nature since October 2002, in addition to articles in many other publications. An outreach program offers research experiences for undergraduates and provides the general public with an awareness of synchrotron radiation. Hands-on workshops and activities on FTIR microscopy and X-PEEM are offered for graduate students and scientists. SRC sponsors a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program and offers opportunities to non-research universities and high schools. Tours and educational events are coordinated with local civic groups and schools. Open houses are offered that include tours, demonstrations, and family activities.

  19. Radiation Safety System for Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J

    2004-03-12

    Radiation Safety System (RSS) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is summarized and reviewed. The RSS, which is designed to protect people from prompt radiation hazards from accelerator operation, consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Beam Containment System (BCS). The ACS prevents people from being exposed to the lethal radiation level inside the shielding housing (called a PPS area at SLAC). The ACS for a PPS area consists of the shielding housing, beam inhibiting devices, and a standard entry module at each entrance. The BCS protects people from the prompt radiation hazards outside a PPS area under both normal and abnormal beam loss situations. The BCS consists of the active power (current/energy) limiting devices, beam stoppers, shielding, and an active radiation monitor system. The policies and practices in setting up the RSS at SLAC are illustrated.

  20. Current status and perspectives of synchrotron radiation in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1996-11-01

    The high flux and brightness, tunable beams, time structure and polarization of synchrotron radiation provide an ideal x-ray source for many medical applications. The present status of synchrotron angiography, multiple energy computed tomography, mammography and radiation therapy at laboratories around the world is reviewed and some future projections for these applications are addressed.

  1. Third generation synchrotron radiation applied to materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, E.N.; Yun, W.

    1993-11-01

    Utility of synchrotron radiation for characterization of materials and ramifications of availability of new third-generation, high-energy, high-intensity sources of synchrotron radiation are discussed. Examples are given of power of x-ray analysis techniques to be expected with these new machines.

  2. Imaging of coronary arteries using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. C.; Zeman, H.; Thomlinson, W.; Rubenstein, E.; Kernoff, R. S.; Hofstadter, R.; Giacomini, J. C.; Gordon, H. J.; Brown, G. S.

    1989-04-01

    Currently the imaging of coronary arteries is dangerous since it requires that a catheter be inserted into a peripheral artery and threaded up to the heart so that contrast agent can be injected directly into the artery being imaged. Using synchrotron radiation it may be possible to use a much safer venous injection of a contrast agent and still have sufficient image contrast to visualize the coronary arteries. A pair of monochromatized X-ray beams are used which have energies that bracket the iodine K absorption edge where the iodine absorption cross section jumps by a factor of six. Therefore, the logarithmic difference image has excellent sensitivity to contrast agent and minimal sensitivity to tissue and bone. Images have been taken of both dogs and humans. Improvements are being made to the imaging system which will substantially improve the image quality.

  3. Exploring actinide materials through synchrotron radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Qun; Yuan, Li-Yong; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wang, Lin; Mei, Lei; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhang, Li; Li, Zi-Jie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2014-12-10

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) based techniques have been utilized with increasing frequency in the past decade to explore the brilliant and challenging sciences of actinide-based materials. This trend is partially driven by the basic needs for multi-scale actinide speciation and bonding information and also the realistic needs for nuclear energy research. In this review, recent research progresses on actinide related materials by means of various SR techniques were selectively highlighted and summarized, with the emphasis on X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering spectroscopy, which are powerful tools to characterize actinide materials. In addition, advanced SR techniques for exploring future advanced nuclear fuel cycles dealing with actinides are illustrated as well.

  4. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  5. Introduction to nuclear resonant scattering with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Toellner, T.S.; Hession, P.; Hu, M.; Sutter, J.

    1997-08-01

    In recent years, the use of synchrotron radiation has enjoyed increasing interest in applications to topics of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The development was initiated by the pioneering experimental work of Gerdau et al. following the original proposal of Ruby to use synchrotron radiation for the excitation of low energy nuclear resonances. From the early experiments it was clear that synchrotron radiation experiments with nuclear resonances would only succeed if familiar energy resolved measurements were replaced with a new time resolved technique. During the last decade, the authors experienced the refinement of this novel method for obtaining hyperfine parameters. This exciting development-materialized because of more intense synchrotron radiation sources at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), powerful new avalanche photo diode detectors, and improved high energy resolution monochromators. Simultaneously the tools for evaluation of the novel time spectra were created, e.g., Sturhahn and Gerdau developed extensive computer codes based on the theoretical descriptions of Hannon and Trammel. Many beautiful demonstrations of the basic features of the coherent elastic scattering channel using Bragg- and Laue-reflections from single crystals deepened the understanding of nuclear resonant scattering. The concepts leading to the application of synchrotron radiation to elastic and inelastic nuclear resonant scattering are discussed. The resulting new experimental techniques are compared to conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy. A survey of situations that favor experiments with synchrotron radiation is offered.

  6. Impact of synchrotron radiation on macromolecular crystallography: a personal view

    PubMed Central

    Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of synchrotron radiation sources almost four decades ago has led to a revolutionary change in the way that diffraction data from macromolecular crystals are being collected. Here a brief history of the development of methodologies that took advantage of the availability of synchrotron sources are presented, and some personal experiences with the utilization of synchrotrons in the early days are recalled. PMID:20567074

  7. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation. Lecture 2. Mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1986-02-01

    The process of reflection of VUV and x-radiation is summarized. The functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are described, which include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image, focusing, and collimation. Fabrication of optical surfaces for synchrotron radiation beamlines are described, and include polishing of a near spherical surface as well as bending a cylindrical surface to toroidal shape. The imperfections present in mirrors, aberrations and surface figure inaccuracy, are discussed. Calculation of the thermal load of a mirror in a synchrotron radiation beam and the cooling of the mirror are covered briefly. 50 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  8. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  9. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    According to the literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so-called 'depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross-section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. We exemplify this formalism in simple limiting cases. We consider the problem of the calculation of the wiggler source size by means of numerical simulations alone, which play the same role of an experiment. We report a significant numerical disagreement between exact calculations and approximations currently used in the literature.

  10. High contrast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itai, Yuji; Takeda, Tohoru; Akatsuka, Takao; Maeda, Tomokazu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Uchida, Akira; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Kazama, Masahiro; Wu, Jin; Ando, Masami

    1995-02-01

    This article describes a new monochromatic x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation with applications in biomedical diagnosis which is currently under development. The system is designed to provide clear images and to detect contrast materials at low concentration for the quantitative functional evaluation of organs in correspondence with their anatomical structures. In this system, with x-ray energy changing from 30 to 52 keV, images can be obtained to detect various contrast materials (iodine, barium, and gadolinium), and K-edge energy subtraction is applied. Herein, the features of the new system designed to enhance the advantages of SR are reported. With the introduction of a double-crystal monochromator, the high-order x-ray contamination is eliminated. The newly designed CCD detector with a wide dynamic range of 60 000:1 has a spatial resolution of 200 μm. The resulting image quality, which is expected to show improved contrast and spatial resolution, is currently under investigation.

  11. METROLOGICAL CHALLENGES OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    SOSTERO,G.

    1999-05-25

    Modern third generation storage rings, require state-of-the-art grazing incidence x-ray optics, in order to monochromate the Synchrotrons Radiation (SR) source photons, and focus them into the experimental stations. Slope error tolerances in the order of 0.5 {micro}Rad RMS, and surface roughness well below 5 {angstrom} RMS, are frequently specified for mirrors and gratings exceeding 300 mm in length. Non-contact scanning instruments were developed, in order to characterize SR optical surfaces, of spherical and aspherical shape. Among these, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a double pencil slope measuring interferometer, has proved to be particularly reliable, and was adopted by several SR optics metrology laboratories. The ELETTRA soft x-rays and optics metrology laboratory, has operated an LTP since 1992. We review the basic operating principles of this instrument, and some major instrumental and environmental improvements, that were developed in order to detect slope errors lower than 1 {micro}Rad RMS on optical surfaces up to one metre in length. A comparison among measurements made on the same reference flat, by different interferometers (most of them were LTPs) can give some helpful indications in order to optimize the quality of measurement.

  12. Imaging using synchrotron radiation for forensic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, F.; Carrato, S.; Mattei, A.; Jerian, M.; Benevoli, L.; Mancini, L.; Zanini, F.; Vaccari, L.; Perucchi, A.; Aquilanti, G.

    2011-03-01

    Forensic science is already taking benefits from synchrotron radiation (SR) sources in trace evidence analysis. In this contribution we show a multi-technique approach to study fingerprints from the morphological and chemical point of view using SR based techniques such as Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRMS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray absorption structure (XAS), and phase contrast microradiography. Both uncontaminated and gunshot residue contaminated human fingerprints were deposited on lightly doped silicon wafers and on poly-ethylene-terephthalate foils. For the uncontaminated fingerprints an univariate approach of functional groups mapping to model FT-IRMS data was used to get the morphology and the organic compounds map. For the gunshot residue contaminated fingerprints, after a preliminary elemental analysis using XRF, microradiography just below and above the absorption edge of the elements of interest has been used to map the contaminants within the fingerprint. Finally, XAS allowed us to determine the chemical state of the different elements. The next step will be fusing the above information in order to produce an exhaustive and easily understandable evidence.

  13. Summary of session 3 on synchrotron radiation and beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Metral, E.; /CERN

    2010-12-01

    We summarize presentations, discussions and general conclusions of the Workshop session on 'Beam Dynamics Issues'. Major subjects include effects due to synchrotron radiation (SR), cryogenic loads, electron cloud, impedances, intra-beam scattering (IBS) and beam-beam interactions.

  14. Stability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: characteristics of synchrotron radiation sources; stability of the orbits; orbit control; nonlinear dynamic stability; and coherent stability and control. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  15. Thermal model and associated novel approach for synchrotron radiation liner with end cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Quan-Sheng; Yu, Kun; Clay, W.; Maddocks, J.; Morales, G.; Zbasnik, J.

    1993-05-01

    An end-conductive cooling approach has been developed to reduce the radial space budget of a synchrotron radiation liner to permit the maximum possible liner tube inner diameter (ID). A thermal model has also been developed to analyze the thermal performance of such liners. This approach is found to be acceptable for a liner in a 5-m-long quadrupole magnet and 3-m-long spool piece, but not for a longer 15-m dipole. The heat transfer and temperature distribution were calculated respectively along the axis of two different liner models: 20 K and 80 K liner with different thicknesses (0.5--2 mm) of liner tubes and different emissivities (0.05--0.3) of liner surface for a variety of magnets. The thermal model is also applied to the case of an 80 K liner connected directly to a 4 K beam position monitor (BPM). In order to utilize the end cooling, a good thermal joint and a compact heat exchanger are designed.

  16. Computerized microtomography using synchrotron radiation from the NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    Results of microtomography experiments that employ filtered radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source X-26 Microprobe beam line are presented. These experiments have yielded images of a freeze-dried caterpillar with a spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m and show that the limit on the spatial resolution with the present apparatus will be 1 to 10 ..mu..m. Directions for improvement in synchrotron microtomography techniques and some possible applications are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Synchrotron radiation for direct analysis of metalloproteins on electrophoresis gels.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Metalloproteomics requires analytical techniques able to assess and quantify the inorganic species in metalloproteins. The most widely used methods are hyphenated techniques, based on the coupling of a high resolution chromatographic method with a high sensitivity method for metal analysis in solution. An alternative approach is the use of methods for solid sample analysis, combining metalloprotein separation by gel electrophoresis and direct analysis of the gels. Direct methods are based on beam analysis, such as lasers, ion beams or synchrotron radiation beams. The aim of this review article is to present the main features of synchrotron radiation based methods and their applications for metalloprotein analysis directly on electrophoresis gels. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence has been successfully employed for sensitive metal identification, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for metal local structure speciation in proteins. Synchrotron based methods will be compared to ion beam and mass spectrometry for direct analysis of metalloproteins in electrophoresis gels.

  18. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Longo, Renata; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Olivo, Alessandro; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bergamaschi, Anna; Poropat, Paolo; Rigon, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Castelli, Edoardo

    2004-05-01

    A system for in vivo breast imaging with monochromatic x-rays has been designed and built at the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste (Italy) and will be operational in 2004. The system design involves the possibility of performing both planar mammography and breast tomography. In the present work, the first results obtained with a test set-up for breast tomography are shown and discussed. Tomographic images of in vitro breasts were acquired using monochromatic x-ray beams in the energy range 20-28 keV and a linear array silicon pixel detector. Tomograms were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection algorithms; the effect of different filters was evaluated. The attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissue were measured, and a quantitative comparison of images acquired at different energies was performed by calculating the differential signal-to-noise ratio of fibroglandular details in adipose tissue. All images required a dose comparable to the dose delivered in clinical, conventional mammography and showed a high resolution of the breast structures without the overlapping effects that limit the visibility of the structures in 2D mammography. A quantitative evaluation of the images proves that the image quality at a given dose increases in the considered energy range and for the considered breast sizes. This work is dedicated to the memory of Paolo Poropat, who died tragically on June 8th, 2002. He was a brilliant experimental scientist and gave relevant contributions to the fields of high energy physics and medical physics. He had a very rich and versatile personality, a brilliant character, a big vitality. We will never forget him, his love of life, the passion and the enthusiasm he put into everything he did.

  19. Initial performance of the Wire Imaging Synchrotron Radiation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Von Zanthier, C.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Kent, J.; King, M.; Watson, S. ); Briggs, D.D.; Rouse, F.; Tinsman, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the initial performance of a novel detector that measures the positions of intense synchrotron-radiation beams with high precision. Two detectors of this kind are used for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The detectors accurately determine the distance between pairs of intense synchrotron beams of typically 1 MeV photons, which are emitted by the primary electron and positron beams of the SLC. The detectors intercept the synchrotron beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton-recoil electrons leaves positive charges on the wires, enabling a determination of beam positions. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Synchrotron radiation vacuum chamber installation and beam size

    SciTech Connect

    Shleifer, M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of storage ring vacuum chamber placement and its effect on the synchrotron radiation fan obtainable. We consider only horizonal errors and thus treat the problem two-dimensionally. Specifically, we describe the correlation between the parameters of the chamber and its position in the magnet and the size of the fan of radiation emerging from a port.

  1. Industrial Use of Synchrotron Radiation:. Love at Second Sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormes, Josef; Warner, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become one of the most valuable tools for many areas of basic and applied research. In some cases, techniques have been developed that rely completely on the specific properties of synchrotron radiation; in many other cases, using synchrotron radiation has opened completely new and exciting opportunities for conventional techniques. In this chapter, the challenges, problems, and advantages of the industrial use of synchrotron radiation will be highlighted, in an admittedly subjective way, based on the experience of the authors at various synchrotron radiation facilities. "Typical" examples of industrial use of SR will be discussed for all areas of industrial activities, i.e., production, quality control and control of regulatory requirements, and research and development. Emphasis will be put on examples from R&D as this is the most intensively used area. Because this field is much too broad for a complete review here, examples will focus on applications from just three major sectors: biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, and automotive and mining. Environmental research is a fourth area that will be partly covered in the section on regulatory requirements.

  2. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MONITOR FOR NSLS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    PINAYEV, I.; SHAFTAN, T.

    2005-11-04

    NSLS booster diagnostics consisted of tune measurement system, system for turn-by-turn measurement on the electron beam, and beam intensity monitor, which is not absolutely calibrated. We present design and implementation of synchrotron light monitor for the booster, which expands diagnostics capabilities. The system allows to measure an orbit, beam sizes and coupling of the electron beam along the ramp.

  3. Overview of United States synchrotron radiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    There has been considerable activity within the past year involving the creation of new and the improvement of existing capabilities for research with synchrotron light. The purpose of this review is to summarize what has happened within the United States. Being a status report, some of the information necessarily has a date attached to it - the date, in this case, being early September 1983.

  4. DAFNE-Light INFN-LNF Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Balerna, A.; Cestelli-Guidi, M.; Cimino, R.; Commisso, M.; Grilli, A.; Pietropaoli, M.; Raco, A.; Sciarra, V.; Tullio, V.; Viviani, G.; De Sio, A.; Gambicorti, L.; Hampai, D.; Pace, E.

    2010-06-23

    DAFNE-Light is the Synchrotron Radiation Facility at the INFN-Frascati National Laboratory (Rome, Italy). Three beamlines are operational, using in parasitic and dedicated mode the intense photon emission of DAFNE, a 0.51 GeV storage ring with a routinely circulating electron current higher than 1 Ampere. Two of these beamlines--the soft x-ray (DXR1) and UV (DXR2)--use one of the DAFNE wiggler magnets as synchrotron radiation source, while the third beamline SINBAD (Synchrotron Infrared Beamline At DAFNE) collects the radiation from a bending magnet. New XUV bending magnet beamlines are nowadays under construction and the low energy one (35-200 eV) will be ready for commissioning by the end of 2009. A presentation of the facility will be given together with some recent scientific results achieved at SINBAD and DXR1 beamlines.

  5. Initial scientific uses of coherent synchrotron radiation inelectron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, D.N.; Feikes, J.; Fried, D.; Holldack, K.; Hubers, H.W.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.C.; Pavlov, S.G.; Schade, U.; Singley, E.J.; Wustefeld, G.

    2004-11-23

    The production of stable, high power, coherent synchrotron radiation at sub-terahertz frequency at the electron storage ring BESSY opens a new region in the electromagnetic spectrum to explore physical properties of materials. Just as conventional synchrotron radiation has been a boon to x-ray science, coherent synchrotron radiation may lead to many new innovations and discoveries in THz physics. With this new accelerator-based radiation source we have been able to extend traditional infrared measurements down into the experimentally poorly accessible sub-THz frequency range. The feasibility of using the coherent synchrotron radiation in scientific applications was demonstrated in a series of experiments: We investigated shallow single acceptor transitions in stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga by means of photoconductance measurements below 1 THz. We have directly measured the Josephson plasma resonance in optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} for the first time and finally we succeeded to confine the sub-THz radiation for spectral near-field imaging on biological samples such as leaves and human teeth.

  6. Diffraction imaging (topography) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, B.; Kuriyama, M.; Dobbyn, R.C.; Laor, U.

    1988-01-01

    Structural information of special interest to crystal growers and device physicists is now available from high resolution monochromatic synchrotron diffraction imaging (topography). In the review, the importance of superior resolution in momentum transfer and in space is described, and illustrations are taken from a variety of crystals: gallium arsenide, cadmium telluride, mercuric iodide, bismuth silicon oxide, and lithium niobate. The identification and understanding of local variations in crystal growth processes are shown. Finally, new experimental opportunities now available for exploitation are indicated.

  7. 12th International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Sciences (ISSRNS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Maciej; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Kowalski, Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    Polish Synchrotron Radiation Society (PTPS - Polskie Towarzystwo Promieniowania Synchrotronowego), founded in 1991, is one of the oldest world scientific societies gathering not only active users of synchrotron radiation, but also a large group of those interested in synchrotron techniques (http://www.synchrotron.org.pl)

  8. Recent developments in photoelectron dynamics using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, T.A.; Krause, M.O.; Taylor, J.W.; Keller, P.R.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Grimm, F.A.; Whitley, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Through a collaborative effort of members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Universities of Wisconsin and Tennessee, a comprehensive study of atoms and molecules using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation is underway at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, Stoughton, Wisconsin. Over 50 molecules and atoms have been investigated. These results, coupled with theory, aim at a better understanding of the dynamics of photoionization and of the wave functions that control these processes. In particular, attention is given to the following topics: metal atomic vapors, generalization of molecular orbital types, autoionization, shape resonances, core shell effects, satellite structure, and the Cooper minimum.

  9. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Y.; Adam, J. F.; Berkvens, P.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Vautrin, M.; Deman, P.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Elleaume, H.; Estève, F.; Bravin, A.

    2010-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT). The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  10. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  11. Synchrotron radiation from a runaway electron distribution in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.; Landreman, M.; Papp, G.; Hollmann, E.

    2013-09-15

    The synchrotron radiation emitted by runaway electrons in a fusion plasma provides information regarding the particle momenta and pitch-angles of the runaway electron population through the strong dependence of the synchrotron spectrum on these parameters. Information about the runaway density and its spatial distribution, as well as the time evolution of the above quantities, can also be deduced. In this paper, we present the synchrotron radiation spectra for typical avalanching runaway electron distributions. Spectra obtained for a distribution of electrons are compared with the emission of mono-energetic electrons with a prescribed pitch-angle. We also examine the effects of magnetic field curvature and analyse the sensitivity of the resulting spectrum to perturbations to the runaway distribution. The implications for the deduced runaway electron parameters are discussed. We compare our calculations to experimental data from DIII-D and estimate the maximum observed runaway energy.

  12. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.; Smith, J.V.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Three energy computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, R.H.; Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Charvet, A.M.; Arfelli, F. |; Chapman, L.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary experiments for digital subtraction computed tomography (CT) at the K-edge of iodine (33.1 keV) were carried out at SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility X17B2) at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major goal was to evaluate the availability of this kind of imaging for in vivo neurological studies. Using the transvenous coronary angiography system, CT images of various samples and phantoms were taken simultaneously at two slightly different energies bracketing the K-absorption edge of iodine. The logarithmic subtraction of the two images resulted in the contrast enhancement of iodine filled structures. An additional CT image was taken at 99.57 keV (second harmonic of the fundamental wave). The third energy allowed the calculation of absolute iodine, tissue and bone images by means of a matrix inversion. A spatial resolution of 0.8 LP/mm was measured in single energy images and iodine concentrations down to 0.082 mg/ml in a 1/4 diameter detail were visible in the reconstructed subtraction image.

  14. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  15. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Effects on Rat Bones Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, Liebert Parreiras; Braz, Delson

    2011-12-13

    In this work, we investigated the consequences of irradiation in the femora and ribs of rats submitted to radiation doses of 5 Gy. Three different sites in femur specimens (head, distal metaphysis and distal epiphysis) and one in ribs (ventral) were imaged using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography to assess trabecular bone microarchitecture. Histomorphometric quantification was calculated directly from the 3D microtomographic images using synchrotron radiation. The 3D microtomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. A better understanding of the biological interactions that occur after exposure to photon radiation is needed in order to optimize therapeutic regimens and facilitate development and strategies that decrease radiation-induced side effects in humans. Results showed significant differences between irradiated and non-irradiated specimens, mostly in head and distal metaphysis bone sites.

  16. Transvenous coronary angiography in humans with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1994-10-01

    The transvenous coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is presently undergoing a significant upgrade to the hardware and software in the synchrotron medical facility. When completed, the project will have reached a level of maturity in the imaging technology which will allow the research team to begin to concentrate on medical research programs. This paper will review the status of the project and imaging technology and will discuss the current upgrades and future advanced technology initiatives. The advantages of using the radiation from a synchrotron, over that from a standard x-ray source, were the motivation for the project. A total of 23 human imaging sessions have been carried out with in the project. The primary goals have been to establish the imaging parameters and protocol necessary to obtain clinically useful images.

  17. Requirements and limitations on beam quality in synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.

    1989-07-01

    The requirements and limitations of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facilities are reviewed. These machines are designed to emit radiation of very high intensity, extreme brightness, very short pulses, and laserlike coherence. These performance goals put severe requirements on the quality of the electron or positron beams. Phenomena affecting the injection process and the beam lifetime are discussed. Gas desorption by synchrotron radiation, collective effects (coupled bunch oscillations) and ion trapping (for an electron beam) play an important role. Low emittance lattices are more sensitive to quadrupole movements and at the same time, in order not to lose the benefits of high brilliance, require tighter tolerances on the allowed movement of the photon beam source. 22 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Technological challenges of third generation synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M. ); Winick, H. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    New third generation'' synchrotron radiation research facilities are now in construction in France, Italy, Japan, Taiwan and the USA. Designs for such facilities are being developed in several other countries. Third generation facilities are based on storage rings with low electron beam emittance and space for many undulator magnets to produce radiation with extremely high brightness and coherent power. Photon beam from these rings will greatly extend present research capabilities and open up new opportunities in imaging, spectroscopy, structural and dynamic studies and other applications. The technological problems of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facilities are reviewed. These machines are designed to emit radiation of very high intensity, extreme brightness, very short pulses, and partial coherence. These performance goals put severe requirements on the quality of the electron or positron beams. Phenomena affecting the injection process and the beam lifetime are discussed. Gas desorption by synchrotron radiation and collective effects play an important role. Low emittance lattices are more sensitive to quadrupole movements and at the same time, in order not to lose the benefits of high brilliance, require tighter tolerances on the allowed movement of the photon beam source. We discuss some of the ways that should be considered to extend the performance capabilities of the facilities in the future. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  19. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Although South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give thousands of African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several sub-Saharan African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan as a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) may be the example followed. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions''. It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  20. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Wague, Ahmadou; Tessema, Guebre; Winick, Herman

    2015-04-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Even though South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give many more African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed, with a mandate to plan a conference. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan, is a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) is an example to follow. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions.'' It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  1. Producing terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at the Hefei Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Rong; Xu, Hong-Liang; Shao, Yan

    2015-07-01

    This paper theoretically proves that an electron storage ring can generate coherent radiation in the THz region using a quick kicker magnet and an AC sextupole magnet. When the vertical chromaticity is modulated by the AC sextupole magnet, the vertical beam collective motion excited by the kicker produces a wavy spatial structure after a number of longitudinal oscillation periods. The radiation spectral distribution was calculated from the wavy bunch parameters at the Hefei Light Source (HLS). When the electron energy is reduced to 400 MeV, extremely strong coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at 0.115 THz should be produced. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375176)

  2. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS.

  3. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  4. Coherent nuclear resonant optics for third generation synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Homma, H.; Kentjana, M.

    1992-06-01

    The insertion-device-based, third-generation, synchrotron radiation sources now under construction in Europe, the USA, and Japan bring new opportunities and challenges in the design and manufacture of x-ray optics. These high brightness sources provide new opportunities to overcome some of the outstanding problems associated with nuclear resonant monochromatization of synchrotron radiation. New methods such as polarizing monochromators, and zone plates provide alternative methods for production of {mu}eV-neV resolution in the hard x-ray regime. The design principles, and characterization, and performance of crystal monochromators and of nuclear coherent scattering optics, including Grazing Incidence Anti Reflection (GIAR) films, multilayers, zone plates, as well as single crystals are discussed.

  5. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi; Gu, Xiang; Xiao, Tiqiao; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  6. Structural studies of endohedral metallofullerenes by synchrotron radiation powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nishibori, E; Takata, M; Sakata, M; Shinohara, H

    1998-05-01

    The endohedral natures of the metallofullerenes Y@C(82) and Sc(2)@C(8)4 are described based on synchrotron radiation powder diffraction experiments. For structural analysis, a combination of the maximum-entropy method (MEM) and Rietveld refinement was employed to analyse the complicated powder pattern. The obtained MEM charge densities show a clear distinction of the endohedral natures of the mono- and dimetallofullerenes.

  7. Polymer research at synchrotron radiation sources: symposium proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, T.P.; Goland, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The twenty-two papers are arranged into eleven sessions entitled: general overviews; time-resolved x-ray scattering; studies using fluorescence, ion-containing polymers; time-resolved x-ray scattering; novel applications of synchrotron radiation; phase transitions in polymers; x-ray diffraction on polymers; recent detector advances; complementary light, x-ray and neutron studies; and neutron scattering studies. Seven of the papers are processed separately; three of the remainder have been previously processed. (DLC)

  8. Control of synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Benson, Stephen; Li, Rui; Roblin, Yves; Tennant, Christopher; Krafft, Geoffrey; Terzic, Balsa; Tsai, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Studies of beam quality during recirculation have been extended to an arc providing bunch compression with positive momentum compaction. It controls both incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) using methods including optics balance and generates little microbunching gain. We detail the dynamical basis for the design, discuss the design process, give an example, and provide simulations of ISR and CSR effects. Reference will be made to a complete analysis of microbunching effects.

  9. Putting synchrotron radiation to work for technology: Analytic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on: Advanced Light Source; Ultra-ESCA: Advanced Capabilities of XPS with High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation; High-Resolution (20 nm) XPS and XANES with the ALS; Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Industry: Current Capabilities, Needs, and Possible Roles for the ALS; Materials Analysis by Photoemission: Is This Practical at ALS?; Applications of Long-Wavelength X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-Ray Powder Diffractometry.

  10. Putting synchrotron radiation to work for technology: Analytic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on: Advanced Light Source; Ultra-ESCA: Advanced Capabilities of XPS with High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation; High-Resolution (20 nm) XPS and XANES with the ALS; Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Industry: Current Capabilities, Needs, and Possible Roles for the ALS; Materials Analysis by Photoemission: Is This Practical at ALS ; Applications of Long-Wavelength X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-Ray Powder Diffractometry.

  11. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesch, J.; Franklin, G. B.; Quinn, B. P.; Paschke, K. D.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab's Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5 T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.

  12. Scaling behavior of circular colliders dominated by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The scaling formulas in this paper — many of which involve approximation — apply primarily to electron colliders like CEPC or FCC-ee. The more abstract “radiation dominated” phrase in the title is intended to encourage use of the formulas — though admittedly less precisely — to proton colliders like SPPC, for which synchrotron radiation begins to dominate the design in spite of the large proton mass. Optimizing a facility having an electron-positron Higgs factory, followed decades later by a p, p collider in the same tunnel, is a formidable task. The CEPC design study constitutes an initial “constrained parameter” collider design. Here the constrained parameters include tunnel circumference, cell lengths, phase advance per cell, etc. This approach is valuable, if the constrained parameters are self-consistent and close to optimal. Jumping directly to detailed design makes it possible to develop reliable, objective cost estimates on a rapid time scale. A scaling law formulation is intended to contribute to a “ground-up” stage in the design of future circular colliders. In this more abstract approach, scaling formulas can be used to investigate ways in which the design can be better optimized. Equally important, by solving the lattice matching equations in closed form, as contrasted with running computer programs such as MAD, one can obtain better intuition concerning the fundamental parametric dependencies. The ground-up approach is made especially appropriate by the seemingly impossible task of simultaneous optimization of tunnel circumference for both electrons and protons. The fact that both colliders will be radiation dominated actually simplifies the simultaneous optimization task. All GeV scale electron accelerators are “synchrotron radiation dominated”, meaning that all beam distributions evolve within a fraction of a second to an equilibrium state in which “heating” due to radiation fluctuations is canceled by the “cooling” in

  13. Synchrotron radiation in strongly coupled conformal field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Chesler, Paul M.; Liu, Hong; Rajagopal, Krishna; Nickel, Dominik

    2010-06-15

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we compute the energy density and angular distribution of the power radiated by a quark undergoing circular motion in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We compare the strong coupling results to those at weak coupling, finding them to be very similar. In both regimes, the angular distribution of the radiated power is in fact similar to that of synchrotron radiation produced by an electron in circular motion in classical electrodynamics: the quark emits radiation in a narrow beam along its velocity vector with a characteristic opening angle {alpha}{approx}1/{gamma}. To an observer far away from the quark, the emitted radiation appears as a short periodic burst, just like the light from a lighthouse does to a ship at sea. Our strong coupling results are valid for any strongly coupled conformal field theory with a dual classical gravity description.

  14. Microbunching Due to Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Bunch Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady

    2001-09-10

    The coherent synchrotron radiation of a bunch in a bunch compressor may lead to the microwave instability producing longitudinal modulation of the bunch. This modulation generates coherent radiation with the wave length small compared to the bunch length. It can also be a source of an undesirable emittance growth in the compressor. We derive and analyze the equation that describes linear evolution of the microwave modulation. Numerical solution of this equation for the LCLS bunch compressor reveals such an instability, in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations.

  15. Synchrotron radiation shielding design and ICRP radiological protection quantities.

    PubMed

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Chapman, Dean

    2015-06-01

    Protection and operational quantities as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) are the two sets of quantities recommended for use in radiological protection for external radiation. Since the '80s, the protection quantities have evolved from the concept of dose equivalent to effective dose equivalent to effective dose, and the associated conversion coefficients have undergone changes. In this work, the influence of three different versions of ICRP photon dose conversion coefficients in the synchrotron radiation shielding calculations of an experimental enclosure has been examined. The versions are effective dose equivalent (ICRP Publication 51), effective dose (ICRP Publication 74), and effective dose (ICRP Publication 116) conversion coefficients. The sources of the synchrotron radiation white beam into the enclosure were a bending magnet, an undulator and a wiggler. The ranges of photons energy from these sources were 10-200 keV for the bending magnet and undulator, and 10-500 keV for the wiggler. The design criterion aimed a radiation leakage less than 0.5 µSv h(-1) from the enclosure. As expected, larger conversion coefficients in ICRP Publication 51 lead to higher calculated dose rates. However, the percentage differences among the calculated dose rates get smaller once shielding is added, and the choice of conversion coefficients set did not affect the final shielding decision. PMID:25906251

  16. Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R. B.; Zhang, H. D.; Corbett, W. J.; Fisher, A. S.; Mok, W. Y.; Tian, K.; Douglas, D.; Wilson, F. G.; Zhang, S.; Mitsuhashi, T. M.; Shkvarunets, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

  17. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  18. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore » beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  19. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A.; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A.; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce. PMID:25075341

  20. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-07-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce.

  1. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Francesco; Oberthür, Dominik; Liang, Mengning; Bean, Richard; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Burkhardt, Anja; Fischer, Pontus; Galli, Lorenzo; Kirian, Richard A; Meyer, Jan; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Chervinskii, Fedor; Speller, Emily; White, Thomas A; Betzel, Christian; Meents, Alke; Chapman, Henry N

    2014-07-01

    A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce. PMID:25075341

  2. Characteristics of radiation safety for synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron laser facilities.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshihiro

    2011-07-01

    Radiation safety problems are discussed for typical electron accelerators, synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. The radiation sources at the beamline of the facilities are SR, including XFEL, gas bremsstrahlung and high-energy gamma ray and photo-neutrons due to electron beam loss. The radiation safety problems for each source are compared by using 8 GeV class SR and XFEL facilities as an example.

  3. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m-1 to 697.41 Fμ m-1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m-1 to 566.11 Fμ m-1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  4. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m‑1 to 697.41 Fμ m‑1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m‑1 to 566.11 Fμ m‑1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  5. Longitudinal bunch dynamics study with coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    An electron bunch circulating in a storage ring constitutes a dynamical system with both longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom. Through a self-interaction with the wakefields created by the bunch, certain of these degrees may get excited, defining a set of eigenmodes analogous to a spectroscopic series. The present study focuses on the longitudinal modes of a single bunch. The excitation of a mode appears as an amplitude modulation at the mode frequency of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by the bunch. The modulations are superimposed on a much larger continuum from CSR emission in the continuous mode. A given eigenmode is classified by the integer m which is the ratio of the mode frequency to the synchrotron frequency. The present measurements extend up to m =8 and focus on the region near the instability thresholds. At threshold the modes are excited sequentially, resembling a staircase when the mode frequencies are plotted as a function of bunch length or synchrotron frequency. Adjacent modes are observed to coexist at the boundaries between the modes. An energy-independent correlation is observed between the threshold current for an instability and the corresponding zero-current bunch length. Measurements were made at five beam energies between 1.0 and 2.9 GeV at the Canadian Light Source. The CSR was measured in the time domain using an unbiased Schottky diode spanning 50-75 GHz.

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  7. Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, A D; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T A

    2012-10-01

    The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

  8. Synchrotron Radiation Diffraction Study of YbInCu4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Yuki; Sato, Hitoshi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa

    2011-05-01

    The structural change of an YbInCu4 single crystal has been investigated associated with the first-order valence-transition at TV = 42 K using synchrotron radiation diffraction. The Yb-Cu and In-Cu interatomic distances abruptly increase below TV, following the lattice expansion with no change in the C15b-type crystal structure. We find that the distance between Cu ions forming the Cu4 cluster in the crystal is almost unchanged across the valence transition. No abrupt change in the thermal rotational motion of the Cu4 cluster is observed at TV.

  9. 3D imaging of fetus vertebra by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Francoise; Pateyron-Salome, Murielle; Denis, Frederic; Braillon, Pierre; Laval-Jeantet, Anne-Marie; Cloetens, Peter

    1997-10-01

    A synchrotron radiation computed microtomography system allowing high resolution 3D imaging of bone samples has been developed at ESRF. The system uses a high resolution 2D detector based on a CCd camera coupled to a fluorescent screen through light optics. The spatial resolution of the device is particularly well adapted to the imaging of bone structure. In view of studying growth, vertebra samples of fetus with differential gestational ages were imaged. The first results show that fetus vertebra is quite different from adult bone both in terms of density and organization.

  10. Transvenous Coronary Angiography in Humans Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, Edward; Hofstadter, Robert; Zeman, Herbert D.; Thompson, Albert C.; Otis, John N.; Brown, George S.; Giacomini, John C.; Gordon, Helen J.; Kernoff, Robert S.; Harrison, Donald C.; Thomlinson, William

    1986-12-01

    The risks and costs of the present method of visualizing the coronary arteries have limited the use of coronary angiography in long-term serial studies needed to establish the natural history of coronary atherosclerosis and its response to interventions. A less invasive method, in which the contrast agent is administered intravenously, has been developed using synchrotron radiation as the illuminating source. The present report describes the initial results in human subjects. The findings indicate that transvenous coronary angiograms can be acquired in this manner. Further refinements in the x-ray imaging system are expected to result in increased x-ray fluence and improved image quality.

  11. Synchrotron Radiation Mössbauer Spectroscopy Using 149Sm Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Satoshi; Masuda, Ryo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Mizuuchi, Kota; Shimizu, Yusei; Hidaka, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Tatsuya; Amitsuka, Hiroshi; Iga, Fumitoshi; Seto, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation 149Sm Mössbauer spectroscopy in the energy domain has successfully been carried out on Sm2O3, SmBe13, and SmB6. The isomer shift values were determined in these compounds to discuss their Sm valence state. We also investigated the time window effect on spectra, which is useful for measuring spectra with "high-energy-resolution". This effect makes it possible to discuss the frequency of valence fluctuation in Sm compounds as well as determine Sm valence state precisely using the 149Sm Mössbauer effect. We discussed the fluctuation of the Sm valence in SmB6.

  12. Metrology laboratory requirements for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Quian, Shinan

    1997-11-01

    New third-generation synchrotron radiation sources that are now, or will soon, come on line will need to decide how to handle the testing of optical components delivered for use in their beam lines. In many cases it is desirable to establish an in-house metrology laboratory to do the work. We review the history behind the formation of the Optical Metrology Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the rationale for its continued existence. We offer suggestions to those who may be contemplating setting up similar facilities, based on our experiences over the past two decades.

  13. Electron correlation explored through electron spectrometry using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.; Whitfield, S.B.; Flemming, M.G. . Dept. of Physics); Krause, M.O. )

    1991-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation facilities as a research tool has made possible experiments which provide new insights into the role which correlation plays in electron dynamics and atomic and molecular structure. Features such as autoionizing resonances, normal and resonant Auger decay modes, and ionization threshold structure have become visible in a wealth of new detail. Some aspects of this information drawn from recent experiments on the alkaline earth metals and the rare gases are presented. The potential for increased flux and resolution inherent in insertion device-based facilities like the Advanced Light Source should advance this understanding even further, and some future directions are suggested. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  14. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes; Belev, George; Dallin, Les; de Jong, Mark; Chapman, Dean

    2015-07-01

    The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam's position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam's position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered in position and angle at the source point. The results are comparable with other methods of beam position measurement and indicate that such a system is feasible in situations where part of the synchrotron beam can be used for the phase-space measurement.

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  16. Study of silicon pixel sensor for synchrotron radiation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Jia, Yun-Cong; Hu, Ling-Fei; Liu, Peng; Yin, Hua-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    The silicon pixel sensor (SPS) is one of the key components of hybrid pixel single-photon-counting detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray detection (SRD). In this paper, the design, fabrication, and characterization of SPSs for single beam X-ray photon detection is reported. The designed pixel sensor is a p+-in-n structure with guard-ring structures operated in full-depletion mode and is fabricated on 4-inch, N type, 320 μm thick, high-resistivity silicon wafers by a general Si planar process. To achieve high energy resolution of X-rays and obtain low dark current and high breakdown voltage as well as appropriate depletion voltage of the SPS, a series of technical optimizations of device structure and fabrication process are explored. With optimized device structure and fabrication process, excellent SPS characteristics with dark current of 2 nA/cm2, full depletion voltage < 50 V and breakdown voltage >150 V are achieved. The fabricated SPSs are wire bonded to ASIC circuits and tested for the performance of X-ray response to the 1W2B synchrotron beam line of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured S-curves for SRD demonstrate a high discrimination for different energy X-rays. The extracted energy resolution is high (<20% for X-ray photon energy >10 keV) and the linear properties between input photo energy and the equivalent generator amplitude are well established. It confirmed that the fabricated SPSs have a good energy linearity and high count rate with the optimized technologies. The technology is expected to have a promising application in the development of a large scale SRD system for the Beijing Advanced Photon Source. Supported by Prefabrication Research of Beijing Advanced Photon Source (R&D for BAPS) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335010)

  17. Noninvasive emittance and energy spread monitor using optical synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorito, R.; Shkvarunets, A.; Castronovo, D.; Cornacchia, M.; Di Mitri, S.; Kishek, R.; Tschalaer, C.; Veronese, M.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a design for a minimally perturbing diagnostic minichicane, which utilizes optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) generated from magnetic bends in the chicane, to measure the rms horizontal and vertical beam sizes, divergences, emittances, Twiss parameters and energy spread of a relativistic electron beam. The beam is externally focused to a waist at the first bend and the OSR generated there can be used to measure the rms beam size. Subsequent pairs of bends produce far field OSR interferences (OSRI) whose visibility depends on the beam energy spread and the angular divergence. Under proper conditions, one of these two effects will dominate the OSRI visibility from a particular pair of bends and can be used to diagnose the dominant effect. The properties of different configuration of bends in the chicane have been analyzed to provide an optimum diagnostic design for a given set of beam parameters to: (1) provide a sufficient number of OSR interferences to allow a measurement of the fringe visibility; (2) minimize the effect of coherent synchrotron radiation and space charge forces on the particles motion; and (3) minimize the effect of compression on the bunch length as the beam passes through the chicane. A design for the chicane has been produced for application to the FERMI free electron laser facility and by extension to similar high brightness linear accelerators. Such a diagnostic promises to greatly improve control of the electron beam optics with a noninvasive measurement of beam parameters and allow on-line optics matching and feedback.

  18. Glandular dose in breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettivier, G.; Fedon, C.; Di Lillo, F.; Longo, R.; Sarno, A.; Tromba, G.; Russo, P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide an evaluation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for breast computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation in an axial scanning configuration with a partial or total organ volume irradiation, for the in vivo program of breast CT ongoing at the ELETTRA facility (Trieste, Italy). A Geant4 Monte Carlo code was implemented, simulating the photon irradiation from a synchrotron radiation source in the energetic range from 8 to 50 keV with 1 keV intervals, to evaluate the MGD. The code was validated with literature data, in terms of mammographic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) and with ad hoc experimental data, in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI). Simulated cylindrical phantoms of different sizes (diameter at phantom base 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 cm, axial length 1.5 times the radius) and glandular fraction by weight (0%, 14.3%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were implemented into the code. The validation of the code shows an excellent agreement both with previously published work and in terms of DgN and CDTI measurements. The implemented simulations show a dependence of the glandular dose estimate on the vertical dimension of the irradiated zone when a partial organ irradiation was implemented. Specific normalized coefficients for calculating the MGD to the whole breast or to the single irradiated slice were reported.

  19. Glandular dose in breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Di Lillo, F; Longo, R; Sarno, A; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-21

    The purpose of this work is to provide an evaluation of the mean glandular dose (MGD) for breast computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation in an axial scanning configuration with a partial or total organ volume irradiation, for the in vivo program of breast CT ongoing at the ELETTRA facility (Trieste, Italy). A Geant4 Monte Carlo code was implemented, simulating the photon irradiation from a synchrotron radiation source in the energetic range from 8 to 50 keV with 1 keV intervals, to evaluate the MGD. The code was validated with literature data, in terms of mammographic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) and with ad hoc experimental data, in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDI). Simulated cylindrical phantoms of different sizes (diameter at phantom base 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16 cm, axial length 1.5 times the radius) and glandular fraction by weight (0%, 14.3%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) were implemented into the code. The validation of the code shows an excellent agreement both with previously published work and in terms of DgN and CDTI measurements. The implemented simulations show a dependence of the glandular dose estimate on the vertical dimension of the irradiated zone when a partial organ irradiation was implemented. Specific normalized coefficients for calculating the MGD to the whole breast or to the single irradiated slice were reported. PMID:26683710

  20. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OF SELF-COLLIMATING RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Vaidya, Bhargav; Meliani, Zakaria E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-08-10

    The goal of this paper is to derive signatures of synchrotron radiation from state-of-the-art simulation models of collimating relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets featuring a large-scale helical magnetic field. We perform axisymmetric special relativistic MHD simulations of the jet acceleration region using the PLUTO code. The computational domain extends from the slow-magnetosonic launching surface of the disk up to 6000{sup 2} Schwarzschild radii allowing jets to reach highly relativistic Lorentz factors. The Poynting-dominated disk wind develops into a jet with Lorentz factors of {Gamma} {approx_equal} 8 and is collimated to 1{sup 0}. In addition to the disk jet, we evolve a thermally driven spine jet emanating from a hypothetical black hole corona. Solving the linearly polarized synchrotron radiation transport within the jet, we derive very long baseline interferometry radio and (sub-) millimeter diagnostics such as core shift, polarization structure, intensity maps, spectra, and Faraday rotation measure (RM) directly from the Stokes parameters. We also investigate depolarization and the detectability of a {lambda}{sup 2}-law RM depending on beam resolution and observing frequency. We find non-monotonic intrinsic RM profiles that could be detected at a resolution of 100 Schwarzschild radii. In our collimating jet geometry, the strict bimodality in the polarization direction (as predicted by Pariev et al.) can be circumvented. Due to relativistic aberration, asymmetries in the polarization vectors across the jet can hint at the spin direction of the central engine.

  1. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  2. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  3. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Liu

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefly introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10875142, 11079040, and 11075175). The 4W2 beamline of BSRF was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-SW-N20, KJCX2-SW-N03, and SYGNS04).

  4. Trace element analysis with synchrotron radiation at SRS daresbury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prins, M.; Dries, W.; Lenglet, W.; Davies, S. T.; Bowen, K.

    1985-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation can be used as an excitation source for TEA (Trace Element Analysis) with X-ray fluorescence (Syn-XRF). For routine measurements a TEA stage with very low spectral background has been developed for analysis of samples of 1 mg/cm 2. As a monochromator a graphite crystal is used to select the incoming X-ray energy in the range of 5 to 17 keV. An energy dispersive solid state detector is used for multi element analysis. For the calculation of the weight fraction of the trace elements the mass of the sample material in the irradiated area can be calculated from the scattered radiation peak in the spectrum. Furthermore, a wavelength dispersive detector has been tested.

  5. Application of Synchrotron Radiation in the Geological and Environmental Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    A survey of some of the different ways that synchrotrons x-ray beams can be used to study geological materials is presented here. This field developed over a period of about 30 years, and it is clear that the geological community has made major use of the many synchrotrons facilities operating around the world during this time period. This was a time of rapid change in the operational performance of the synchrotrons facilities and this in itself has made it possible for geologists to develop new and more refined types of experiments that have yielded many important results. The advance in experimental techniques has proceeded in parallel with a revolution in computing techniques that has made it possible to cope with the great amount of data accumulated in the experiments. It is reasonable, although risky, to speculate about what might be expected to develop in the field during the next five- to ten-year period. It does seem plausible that the rate of change in the performance of what might now be called conventional x-ray storage rings will slow. There are no new facilities that are superior to the ESRF, ALS, APS, or SPring8 facilities under construction or about to come into operation. Thus, performance increments in the characteristics of the x-ray sources may come through the introduction of specialized devices in existing storage rings. The free electron laser is one example of a developing new technology that should take us into new regions of performance for radiation sources and stimulate new types of experimental applications. It is also likely that major advances will come through the introduction of more sophisticated experimental devices developed for use with the very recently operational undulator or wiggler sources at the newer rings. Improved x-ray optics and x-ray detectors and more powerful computation and high-speed data transmission can bring about more refined experiments and make the synchrotrons facilities more widely available to the

  6. From synchrotron radiation to I-V measurements of GaAs schottky barrier formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, W. E.; Cao, R.; Miyano, K.; Kendelewicz, T.; Lindau, I.; Weber, E.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Newman, N.

    1990-01-01

    Through the use of synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and related techniques, we have gained detailed knowledge of Fermi level pinning, interfacial chemistry and disruption of GaAs for coverages up to several monolayers (ML). A link has been made between these data and that in the thick layer regime (hundreds of ML), which characterizes practical Schottky diodes. PES results for thin layers deposited at room temperature (RT) and low temperatures of about 80 K (LT) as well as thick films deposited at RT and annealed to higher temperatures are considered. At LT where GaAs disruption is minimized for thin films, metal-induced gap states seem to dominate the Fermi level pinning process except where GaAs metal reactions are strong. For RT thin and thick films, the effects of defects must be considered, and the advanced unified defect model (AUDM) is applied. In the AUDM the key defects are identified as the AsGa (double donor with levels at 0.75 and 0.5 eV above the valence band maximum) and the GaAs antisite (double acceptor) with the AsGa normally dominating due to the excess As which characterizes LEC GaAs crystals. The literature is reviewed and a number of phenomena are explained in terms of this model including the Fermi level position on MBE grown GaAs observed by Svensson et al. and the anomolously high Schottky barrier height (SBH) of thick Ga on n-GaAs observed by several groups. By performing electrical, TEM, and chemical studies of thick diodes and by evaluating the changes upon thermal annealing of diodes it is found that the AUDM successfully predicts the increase or decrease of barrier height on annealing.

  7. From synchrotron radiation to I-V measurements of GaAs schottky barrier formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, W. E.; Cao, R.; Miyano, K.; Kendelewicz, T.; Lindau, I.; Weber, E.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Newman, N.

    1989-11-01

    Through the use of synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and related techniques, we have gained detailed knowledge of Fermi level pinning, interfacial chemistry and disruption of GaAs for coverages up to several monolayers (ML). A link has been made between these data and that in the thick layer regime (hundreds of ML), which characterizes practical Schottky diodes. PES results for thin layers deposited at room temperature (RT) and low temperatures of about 80 K (LT) as well as thick films deposited at RT and annealed to higher temperatures are considered. At LT where GaAs disruption is minimized for thin films, metal-induced gap states seem to dominate the Fermi level pinning process except where GaAs metal reactions are strong. For RT thin and thick films, the effects of defects must be considered, and the advanced unified defect model (AUDM) is applied. In the AUDM the key defects are identified as the As Ga (double donor with levels at 0.75 and 0.5 eV above the valence band maximum) and the Ga As antisite (double acceptor) with the As Ga normally dominating due to the excess As which characterizes LEC GaAs crystals. The literature is reviewed and a number of phenomena are explained in terms of this model including the Fermi level position on MBE grown GaAs observed by Svensson et al. and the anomolously high Schottky barrier height (SBH) of thick Ga on n-GaAs observed by several groups. By performing electrical, TEM, and chemical studies of thick diodes and by evaluating the changes upon thermal annealing of diodes it is found that the AUDM successfully predicts the increase or decrease of barrier height on annealing.

  8. Synchrotron radiation sources for photobiology and ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J C

    1980-01-01

    The advantages of synchrotron radiation in several types of spectroscopy, microscopy and diffraction studies are clear. The availability of synchrotron radiation will expand rapidly in the early 1980's as experimental programs start at the new generation of dedicated storage rings.

  9. Theory of electromagnetic insertion devices and the corresponding synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumail, Muhammad; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-07-01

    Permanent magnet insertion devices (IDs), which are the main radiation generating devices in synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers, use a time-invariant but space-periodic magnetic field to wiggle relativistic electrons for short-wavelength radiation generation. Recently, a high power microwave based undulator has also been successfully demonstrated at SLAC which promises the advantage of dynamic tunability of radiation spectrum and polarization. Such IDs employ transverse elecromagnetic fields which are periodic in both space and time to undulate the electrons. In this paper we develop a detailed theory of the principle of electromagnetic IDs from first principles for both linear and circular polarization modes. The electromagnetic equivalent definitions of undulator period (λu) and undulator deflection parameter (K ) are derived. In the inertial frame where the average momentum of the electron is zero, we obtain the figure-8-like trajectory for the linear polarization mode and the circular trajectory for the circular polarization mode. The corresponding radiation spectra and the intensity of harmonics is also calculated.

  10. (abstract) Short Time Period Variations in Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Klein, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Foster, R.; Heiles, C.; Pater, I. de

    1994-01-01

    The long term time variability of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation on yearly time scales has been established for some time. For many years, theorists have speculated about the effects variations in the solar wind, solar flux, Io, the Io torus, and Jupiter's magnetic field have on the ultra-relativistic electron population responsible for the emission. Early observational results suggested the additional possibility of a short term time variability, on timescales of days to weeks. In 1989 a program designed to investigate the existence of short term time variability using the 85 foot Hat Creek radio telescope operating at 1400 MHz was initiated. The availability of a dedicated telescope provided the opportunity, for the first time, to obtain numerous observations over the full Jupiter rotation period. These and future observations will enable two important studies, characterization and confirmation of possible short term variations, and the investigation of the stability of Jupiter's synchrotron emission beaming curve. Analysis of Hat Creek observations and early results from the Maryland Point Naval research Laboratory will be presented.

  11. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.; de Jesus, E. F. O.; Oliveira, L. F.

    2001-09-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtained diffraction patterns form the basis of a selective tomography technique. Preliminary images are presented.

  12. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes; Belev, George; Dallin, Les; de Jong, Mark; Chapman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam’s position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam’s position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered in position and angle at the source point. The results are comparable with other methods of beam position measurement and indicate that such a system is feasible in situations where part of the synchrotron beam can be used for the phase-space measurement. PMID:26134798

  13. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, S; Pirali, O; Roy, P; Lampin, J-F; Ducournau, G; Cuisset, A; Hindle, F; Mouret, G

    2015-07-20

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10(-10) and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile.

  14. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, S.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Lampin, J.-F.; Ducournau, G.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10−10 and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile. PMID:26190043

  15. Synchrotron radiation microdiffraction of ballistic molten wax microdrops

    SciTech Connect

    Graceffa, R.; Burghammer, M.; Davies, R. J.; Riekel, C.

    2008-08-15

    Using stroboscopic techniques, diffraction patterns of ballistic paraffin wax microdrops have been observed. The microdrops, generated by a high-temperature ink-jet system, travel through the 1 {mu}m synchrotron radiation beam with a speed of about 1.4 m/s. Diffraction patterns were recorded in flight by a charge couple device with a microchannel plate image intensifier stage, which was activated with the microdrop generation frequency of 1000 Hz during 2 {mu}s. The data show liquid microdrops with a constant temperature up to 8 mm from the ink-jet system capillary exit. The general technique could be adapted for studying fast structural processes, such as protein conformational changes in aqueous microdrops.

  16. Neutron and synchrotron radiation scattering by nonpolar magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Avdeev, M. V.; Shulenina, A. V.; Zubavichus, Y. V.; Veligzhanin, A. A.; Rosta, L.; Garamus, V. M.; Vekas, L.

    2011-09-01

    The complex approach (which comprises different physical methods, including neutron and synchrotron radiation scattering) is justified in the structural analysis of magnetic fluids (MFs). Investigations of MFs based on nonpolar organic solvents with magnetite nanoparticles (2-20 nm in size) coated by various monocarboxylic acids have been performed. It is shown that the use of saturated linear acids with various alkyl chain (C12-C18) lengths instead of unsaturated oleic acid (alkyl chain C18 with a kink in the middle due to the double bond in the cis-configuration) in the classical stabilization procedure for the given type of magnetic fluids leads to a decrease in the mean size and polydispersity of nanoparticles in the final systems.

  17. Intelligent mirror monitor and controller for synchrotron radiation beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.L.; Yang, J.

    1983-01-01

    A microprocessor-based, stand-alone mirror monitor and control system has been developed for synchrotron radiation beam lines. The operational requirements for mirror position and tilt angle, including the parameters for controlling the number of steps, direction, speed and acceleration of the driving motors, may be programmed into EPROMS. The instruction sequence to carry out critical motions will be stored in a program buffer. A manual control knob is also provided to fine tune the mirror position if desired. A synchronization scheme for the height and tilt motions maintains a fixed mirror angle during insertion. Absolute height and tilt angle are displayed. Electronic (or programmable) tilt angle limits are provided to protect against damage from misalignment of high power beams such as focussed wiggler beams. A description of mirror drives with a schematic diagram is presented. Although the controller is made for mirror movers, it can be used in other applications where multiple stepping motors perform complex synchronized motions.

  18. Probing Magnetic Materials Using Synchrotron Radiation and Phase Retarding Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool in the study of magnetic materials. The utility of x-ray measurements arises from the fact that the resonant and polarization properties observed near core-level resonances probe the valence-electron spin and orbital properties in an element specific manner. Critical to enabling such studies, however, has been the ability to easily manipulate the polarization of the x-ray beam. Circularly polarized x-rays pay a particularly important role, due to their coupling to the net ferromagnetic moment in a material. This talk will focus on how phase retarding optical elements can be used to tailor the focus on how phase retarding optical elements can be used to tailor the x-ray beam polarization in order to enable various types of magnetic measurements. Examples of magnetic spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging measurements employing such optics will be presented.

  19. Synchrotron radiation determination of elemental concentrations in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Martys, N.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Thompson, C.L.; Hanson, A.L.; Kraner, H.W.; Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Mills, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The variations with depth of the elemental concentrations in vitrinites in a series of vitrites have been determined using radiation from the Cornell high energy synchrotron source. All of the vitrites were selected from a single drill core sample of coal from the Emery coalfield, Utah. The results are compared with similar determinations using the Heidelberg proton microprobe. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are discussed. Results are reported for S, Ca, Ti, Fe, Zn, Br, and Sr. For example, it is found that Fe increases from top to bottom of the coal bed in contrast to S, which decreases from top to bottom of the bed. Other features of the two data sets are also described. ?? 1984.

  20. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques.

  1. VUV photochemistry simulation of planetary upper atmosphere using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Giuliani, Alexandre; Correia, Jean Jacques; Cernogora, Guy

    2013-07-01

    The coupling of a gas reactor, named APSIS, with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility, for a photochemistry study of gas mixtures, is reported. The reactor may be irradiated windowless with gas pressures up to hundreds of millibar, and thus allows the effect of energetic photons below 100 nm wavelength to be studied on possibly dense media. This set-up is perfectly suited to atmospheric photochemistry investigations, as illustrated by a preliminary report of a simulation of the upper atmospheric photochemistry of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn. Titan's atmosphere is mainly composed of molecular nitrogen and methane. Solar VUV irradiation with wavelengths no longer than 100 nm on the top of the atmosphere enables the dissociation and ionization of nitrogen, involving a nitrogen chemistry specific to nitrogen-rich upper atmospheres.

  2. Application of silicon carbide to synchrotron-radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Hursman, T.L.; Williams, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Damage to conventional mirror materials exposed to the harsh synchrotron radiation (SR) environment has prompted the SR user community to search for more suitable materials. Next-generation insertion devices, with their attendant flux increases, will make the problem of mirror design even more difficult. A parallel effort in searching for better materials has been underway within the laser community for several years. The technology for dealing with high thermal loads is highly developed among laser manufacturers. Performance requirements for laser heat exchangers are remarkably similar to SR mirror requirements. We report on the application of laser heat exchanger technology to the solution of typical SR mirror design problems. The superior performance of silicon carbide for laser applications is illustrated by various material trades studies, and its superior performance for SR applications is illustrated by means of model calculations.

  3. Experimental setup for high energy photoemission using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Torelli, P.; Sacchi, M.; Cautero, G.; Cautero, M.; Krastanov, B.; Lacovig, P.; Pittana, P.; Sergo, R.; Tommasini, R.; Fondacaro, A.; Offi, F.; Paolicelli, G.; Stefani, G.; Grioni, M.; Verbeni, R.; Monaco, G.; Panaccione, G.

    2005-02-01

    The instrument VOLPE (volume photoemission from solids) is an experimental setup dedicated to high energy photoemission (PE) experiments. The instrument is equipped with an electrostatic hemispherical spectrometer especially designed to analyze high energy electrons (up to 10 keV) with high resolving power. In order to attain an energy resolution of a few tens of millielectron volts, we designed and constructed a dedicated input lens system, high stability power supplies, and a low dark-count detector and readout electronics. The system has been tested and is now operational on the ID16 beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, where an optical layout has been developed to perform high energy, high resolution PE experiments. First results show an overall energy resolution (electron + photon) of 71{+-}7 meV at 5934 eV. The effective attenuation length of the photoelectrons is estimated to be 5{+-}0.5 nm at a kinetic energy of 5 keV.

  4. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  5. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation time structure.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; Silly, M G; Krizmancic, D; Chauvet, C; Guzzo, M; Ricaud, J P; Izquierdo, M; Stebel, L; Pittana, P; Sergo, R; Cautero, G; Dufour, G; Rochet, F; Sirotti, F

    2011-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation time structure is becoming a common tool for studying dynamic properties of materials. The main limitation is often the wide time domain the user would like to access with pump-probe experiments. In order to perform photoelectron spectroscopy experiments over time scales from milliseconds to picoseconds it is mandatory to measure the time at which each measured photoelectron was created. For this reason the usual CCD camera-based two-dimensional detection of electron energy analyzers has been replaced by a new delay-line detector adapted to the time structure of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source. The new two-dimensional delay-line detector has a time resolution of 5 ns and was installed on a Scienta SES 2002 electron energy analyzer. The first application has been to characterize the time of flight of the photoemitted electrons as a function of their kinetic energy and the selected pass energy. By repeating the experiment as a function of the available pass energy and of the kinetic energy, a complete characterization of the analyzer behaviour in the time domain has been obtained. Even for kinetic energies as low as 10 eV at 2 eV pass energy, the time spread of the detected electrons is lower than 140 ns. These results and the time structure of the SOLEIL filling modes assure the possibility of performing pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy experiments with the time resolution given by the SOLEIL pulse width, the best performance of the beamline and of the experimental station. PMID:21335912

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  8. Efficient computation of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, Robert L.; Bizzozero, David A.

    2016-09-01

    We study coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a perfectly conducting vacuum chamber of rectangular cross section, in a formalism allowing an arbitrary sequence of bends and straight sections. We apply the paraxial method in the frequency domain, with a Fourier development in the vertical coordinate but with no other mode expansions. A line charge source is handled numerically by a new method that rids the equations of singularities through a change of dependent variable. The resulting algorithm is fast compared to earlier methods, works for short bunches with complicated structure, and yields all six field components at any space-time point. As an example we compute the tangential magnetic field at the walls. From that one can make a perturbative treatment of the Poynting flux to estimate the energy deposited in resistive walls. The calculation was motivated by a design issue for LCLS-II, the question of how much wall heating from CSR occurs in the last bend of a bunch compressor and the following straight section. Working with a realistic longitudinal bunch form of r.m.s. length 10.4 μ m and a charge of 100 pC we conclude that the radiated power is quite small (28 W at a 1 MHz repetition rate), and all radiated energy is absorbed in the walls within 7 m along the straight section.

  9. The radiation measurement applied to beam lifetime study on the synchrotron radiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuxiong; Li, Juexin; Liu, Zuping; Cui, Yonggang; Gong, Guanghua; Shao, Beibei

    2003-06-01

    To collect beam loss information from an accelerator radiation field is helpful to machine study and operation. For a synchrotron radiation storage ring, shower electrons give a distinct clue to loss location and a BLM-XS model detector is suitable to detect them. Recently, we set up a new beam loss monitoring system by this method for National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) storage ring. It does not interfere with the vacuum chamber and machine operation. Different from other systems, the detectors are used in pairs, fixed on opposite sides of the chamber separately. Some interesting phenomena about beam lifetime were observed. We located exactly where an excessive beam loss took place during ramping process and solved the problem. It was proved that gas accumulated at the front ends of photo-beam lines strongly impacted the electron beam and led to beam lifetime decreases. The cause of beam lifetime decrease because of superconducting wiggler is discussed.

  10. Estimation of the lead thickness required to shield scattered radiation from synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In the enclosure of synchrotron radiation experiments using a monochromatic beam, secondary radiation arises from two effects, namely fluorescence and scattering. While fluorescence can be regarded as isotropic, the angular dependence of Compton scattering has to be taken into account if the shielding shall not become unreasonably thick. The scope of this paper is to clarify how the different factors starting from the spectral properties of the source and the attenuation coefficient of the shielding, over the spectral and angular distribution of the scattered radiation and the geometry of the experiment influence the thickness of lead required to keep the dose rate outside the enclosure below the desired threshold.

  11. Synchrotron X-Radiation Studies of C-Reactive Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Dean Aubrey Albert

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. C-reactive proteins (CRP) constitute a ubiquitous and highly conserved family of calcium binding, pentameric plasma proteins. Although the precise biological function of CRP is uncertain, known properties suggest a role in host defence. The structure determination aims to elucidate key structural aspects of the interaction of CRP with specific biological ligands, leading towards the ultimate determination of the biological function. The initial and often rate limiting step in biological crystallography is the reproducible growth of well ordered crystals. Human CRP has been crystallised in two tetragonal forms (P4_122 (form I) and P4 _222 (form II)) with closely similar unit cells, often twinned together. Heterogeneity due to dissociation of the oligomer is identified as a major factor limiting reproducible crystal growth. Other problems, of the large unit cell (>300A), weak diffraction and extreme sensitivity to X-rays, have been overcome using the intense Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at the S.E.R.C. Daresbury Laboratory. X-ray data sets to 3.1A and 3.75A resolution have been collected from the form I and form II crystals, respectively. Rotation function studies identify a pentamer in almost identical orientations in both crystal forms, and an artefactual 52 molecular pseudo-symmetry at low resolution. Despite extensive screening, structure determination has been delayed by the lack of suitable heavy atom derivatives. The analogous CRP from the invertebrate Limulus polyphemus has been crystallised in six polymorphic forms, two of which are suitable for structure analysis. Synchrotron X-ray data extending to 3.1A have been collected from small crystals (~0.1mm) of one form. Rotation function analyses corroborate the 222 molecular point group symmetry prescribe by the crystal packing.

  12. Femtosecond electron beam generation and measurement for laser synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Watanabe, Takahiro; Ueda, Toru; Yoshii, Koji; Harano, Hideki; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Ogata, Atsushi; Sakai, Fumio; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Dewa, Hideki; Kondo, Shuji; Shibata, Yukio; Ishi, Kimihiro; Ikezawa, Mikio

    1998-02-01

    One of the S-band twin linacs (18L linac) of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of University of Tokyo is modified in order to produce femtosecond electron single bunch for femtosecond X-ray generation via Thomson backward scattering, namely laser synchrotron radiation. Laser photocathode RF gun and chicane-type magnetic pulse compressor are installed at the S-band linac. 10 ps (FWHM) laser pulse generates 5 MeV, 10 ps (FWHM), 1 nC electron single bunch, which is accelerated up to 20 MeV in the S-band accelerating tube and compressed to 200 fs (FWHM) by the chicane. Design study has been performed by using the code of PARMELA and the installation has been finished. For precise and reliable measurement of the compressed pulse length, the comparison of measurement between the femtosecond streak camera and coherent transition radiation interferometry was carried out. Good agreement between them for 1-10 ps (FWHM) pulses was achieved. A new Michelson interferometer for the 200 fs pulse is now under construction.

  13. Contemporary X-ray electron-density studies using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo B.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has many compelling advantages over conventional radiation sources in the measurement of accurate Bragg diffraction data. The variable photon energy and much higher flux may help to minimize critical systematic effects such as absorption, extinction and anomalous scattering. Based on a survey of selected published results from the last decade, the benefits of using synchrotron radiation in the determination of X-ray electron densities are discussed, and possible future directions of this field are examined. PMID:25295169

  14. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: Methodological developments in quantitative brain perfusion imaging and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Jean-Francois

    2005-04-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumors in adults. Unfortunately, the management of glioblastomas is still mainly palliative and remains a difficult challenge, despite advances in brain tumor molecular biology and in some emerging therapies. Synchrotron radiation opens fields for medical imaging and radiation therapy by using monochromatic intense x-ray beams. It is now well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the tumor growth process and that brain perfusion is representative of the tumor mitotic activity. Synchrotron radiation quantitative computed tomography (SRCT) is one of the most accurate techniques for measuring in vivo contrast agent concentration and thus computing precise and accurate absolute values of the brain perfusion key parameters. The methodological developments of SRCT absolute brain perfusion measurements as well as their preclinical validation are detailed in this thesis. In particular, absolute cerebral volume and blood brain barrier permeability high-resolution (pixel size <50x50 {mu}m{sup 2}) parametric maps were reported. In conventional radiotherapy, the treatment of these tumors remains a delicate challenge, because the damages to the surrounding normal brain tissue limit the amount of radiation that can be delivered. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to infuse an iodinated contrast agent to the patient during the irradiation. The contrast agent accumulates in the tumor, through the broken blood brain barrier, and the irradiation is performed with kilovoltage x rays, in tomography mode, the tumor being located at the center of rotation and the beam size adjusted to the tumor dimensions. The dose enhancement results from the photoelectric effect on the heavy element and from the irradiation geometry. Synchrotron beams, providing high intensity, tunable monochromatic x rays, are ideal for this treatment. The beam properties allow the selection of monochromatic irradiation, at the optimal

  15. New developments in the application of synchrotron radiation to material science.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S. K.

    1999-04-21

    Recent developments in the application of synchrotrons radiation to materials science are discussed, using techniques which exploit the high brilliance of the newer synchrotrons sources, such as microbeam techniques and correlation spectroscopy. These include studies of environmental systems, residual stress, slow dynamics of condensed matter systems and studies of liquid surfaces and thin magnetic films.

  16. Image quality evaluation of breast tomosynthesis with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Malliori, A.; Bliznakova, K.; Speller, R. D.; Horrocks, J. A.; Rigon, L.; Tromba, G.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the image quality of tomosynthesis slices obtained from several acquisition sets with synchrotron radiation using a breast phantom incorporating details that mimic various breast lesions, in a heterogeneous background. Methods: A complex Breast phantom (MAMMAX) with a heterogeneous background and thickness that corresponds to 4.5 cm compressed breast with an average composition of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue was assembled using two commercial phantoms. Projection images using acquisition arcs of 24 Degree-Sign , 32 Degree-Sign , 40 Degree-Sign , 48 Degree-Sign , and 56 Degree-Sign at incident energy of 17 keV were obtained from the phantom with the synchrotron radiation for medical physics beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory. The total mean glandular dose was set equal to 2.5 mGy. Tomograms were reconstructed with simple multiple projection algorithm (MPA) and filtered MPA. In the latter case, a median filter, a sinc filter, and a combination of those two filters were applied on the experimental data prior to MPA reconstruction. Visual inspection, contrast to noise ratio, contrast, and artifact spread function were the figures of merit used in the evaluation of the visualisation and detection of low- and high-contrast breast features, as a function of the reconstruction algorithm and acquisition arc. To study the benefits of using monochromatic beams, single projection images at incident energies ranging from 14 to 27 keV were acquired with the same phantom and weighted to synthesize polychromatic images at a typical incident x-ray spectrum with W target. Results: Filters were optimised to reconstruct features with different attenuation characteristics and dimensions. In the case of 6 mm low-contrast details, improved visual appearance as well as higher contrast to noise ratio and contrast values were observed for the two filtered MPA algorithms that exploit the sinc filter. These features are better visualized

  17. Cancellation of coherent synchrotron radiation kicks with optics balance.

    PubMed

    Di Mitri, S; Cornacchia, M; Spampinati, S

    2013-01-01

    Minimizing transverse emittance is essential in linear accelerators designed to deliver very high brightness electron beams. Emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), as a contributing factor to emittance degradation, is an important phenomenon to this respect. A manner in which to cancel this perturbation by imposing certain symmetric conditions on the electron transport system has been suggested.We first expand on this idea by quantitatively relating the beam Courant-Snyder parameters to the emittance growth and by providing a general scheme of CSR suppression with asymmetric optics, provided it is properly balanced along the line. We present the first experimental evidence of this cancellation with the resultant optics balance of multiple CSR kicks: the transverse emittance of a 500 pC, sub-picosecond, high brightness electron beam is being preserved after the passage through the achromatic transfer line of the FERMI@Elettra free electron laser, and emittance growth is observed when the optics balance is intentionally broken. We finally show the agreement between the theoretical model and the experimental results. This study holds the promise of compact dispersive lines with relatively large bending angles, thus reducing costs for future electron facilities.

  18. Nanofocusing optics for synchrotron radiation made from polycrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Fox, O J L; Alianelli, L; Malik, A M; Pape, I; May, P W; Sawhney, K J S

    2014-04-01

    Diamond possesses many extreme properties that make it an ideal material for fabricating nanofocusing x-ray optics. Refractive lenses made from diamond are able to focus x-ray radiation with high efficiency but without compromising the brilliance of the beam. Electron-beam lithography and deep reactive-ion etching of silicon substrates have been used in a transfer-molding technique to fabricate diamond optics with vertical and smooth sidewalls. Latest generation compound refractive lenses have seen an improvement in the quality and uniformity of the optical structures, resulting in an increase in their focusing ability. Synchrotron beamline tests of two recent lens arrays, corresponding to two different diamond morphologies, are described. Focal line-widths down to 210 nm, using a nanocrystalline diamond lens array and a beam energy of E = 11 keV, and 230 nm, using a microcrystalline diamond lens at E = 15 keV, have been measured using the Diamond Light Source Ltd. B16 beamline. This focusing prowess is combined with relatively high transmission through the lenses compared with silicon refractive designs and other diffractive optics. PMID:24718141

  19. Quantitative analysis of biomedical samples using synchrotron radiation microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ektessabi, Ali; Shikine, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Sohei

    2001-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using a synchrotron radiation (SR) microbeam was applied to investigate distributions and concentrations of elements in single neurons of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper we introduce a computer code that has been developed to quantify the trace elements and matrix elements at the single cell level. This computer code has been used in studies of several important neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC), as well as in basic biological experiments to determine the elemental changes in cells due to incorporation of foreign metal elements. The substantial nigra (SN) tissue obtained from the autopsy specimens of patients with Guamanian parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) and control cases were examined. Quantitative XRF analysis showed that neuromelanin granules of Parkinsonian SN contained higher levels of Fe than those of the control. The concentrations were in the ranges of 2300-3100 ppm and 2000-2400 ppm respectively. On the contrary, Zn and Ni in neuromelanin granules of SN tissue from the PDC case were lower than those of the control. Especially Zn was less than 40 ppm in SN tissue from the PDC case while it was 560-810 ppm in the control. These changes are considered to be closely related to the neuro-degeneration and cell death.

  20. Test of atomic theory by photoelectron spectrometry with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, M.O.

    1984-01-01

    The successful combination of synchrotron radiation with electron spectrometry, accomplished at Daresbury, England and Orsay, France, made it possible to investigate sigma/sub x/ and ..beta../sub x/ continuously over the very soft x-ray or the uv range of photon energies. The detailed and highly differentiated data resulting from this advanced experimentation put theory to a stringent test. In the interplay between theory and experiment, sophisticated Hartree Fock (HF) based models were developed which included both relativistic and many-electron effects. These theoretical models have provided us with a better insight than previously possible into the physics of the photon-atom interaction and the electronic structure and dynamics of atoms. However, critical experiments continue to be important for further improvements of theory. A number of such experiments are discussed in this presentation. The dynamic properties determined in these studies include in addition to sigma/sub x/ and ..beta../sub x/ the spin polarization parameters. As a result the comparison between theory and experiment becomes rigorous, detailed and comprehensive. 46 references, 6 figures.

  1. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, John R.; Mitchell, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR) in macromolecular crystallography (MX) instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development. PMID:25866664

  2. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, John R; Mitchell, Edward P

    2015-03-01

    A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR) in macromolecular crystallography (MX) instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development.

  3. Towards breast tomography with synchrotron radiation at Elettra: first images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Bottigli, U.; Brez, A.; Brun, F.; Brunetti, A.; Delogu, P.; Di Lillo, F.; Dreossi, D.; Fanti, V.; Fedon, C.; Golosio, B.; Lanconelli, N.; Mettivier, G.; Minuti, M.; Oliva, P.; Pinchera, M.; Rigon, L.; Russo, P.; Sarno, A.; Spandre, G.; Tromba, G.; Zanconati, F.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the SYRMA-CT collaboration is to set-up the first clinical trial of phase-contrast breast CT with synchrotron radiation (SR). In order to combine high image quality and low delivered dose a number of innovative elements are merged: a CdTe single photon counting detector, state-of-the-art CT reconstruction and phase retrieval algorithms. To facilitate an accurate exam optimization, a Monte Carlo model was developed for dose calculation using GEANT4. In this study, high isotropic spatial resolution (120 μm)3 CT scans of objects with dimensions and attenuation similar to a human breast were acquired, delivering mean glandular doses in the range of those delivered in clinical breast CT (5-25 mGy). Due to the spatial coherence of the SR beam and the long distance between sample and detector, the images contain, not only absorption, but also phase information from the samples. The application of a phase-retrieval procedure increases the contrast-to-noise ratio of the tomographic images, while the contrast remains almost constant. After applying the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to low-dose phase-retrieved data sets (about 5 mGy) with a reduced number of projections, the spatial resolution was found to be equal to filtered back projection utilizing a four fold higher dose, while the contrast-to-noise ratio was reduced by 30%. These first results indicate the feasibility of clinical breast CT with SR.

  4. Quantitative study of osteoporosis model based on synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wangyang; Xu, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the changes of different periods of primary osteoporosis, we made quantitative analysis of osteoporosis using synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT), together with histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis (FEA). Tibias, femurs and lumbar vertebras were dissected from sham-ovariectomy rats and ovariectomized rats suffering from osteoporosis at certain time points. The samples were scanned by SRCT and then FEA was applied based on reconstructed slices. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of some trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased, for femurs, the bone volume fraction (BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μm to 97.09μm) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm(-1) to 5.97mm(-1)). Simulation of various mechanical tests indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness decreased from 1770.96 Fμm(-1) to 697.41 Fμm(-1), and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that the combination of both analysis could quantitatively analyze the bone strength in good accuracy. PMID:26737752

  5. GaAs clean up studied with synchrotron radiation photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Adelmann, Christoph; Delabie, Annelies; van Elshocht, Sven; Caymax, Matty; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2012-12-01

    In this contribution we describe the chemical changes at the surface of GaAs upon adsorption of tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA). TMA is used to grow Al2O3 with atomic layer deposition (ALD) usually using H2O as oxygen source. Recently, it was pointed out that the adsorption of TMA on various III-V surfaces reduces the native oxide, allowing the growth of an abrupt III-V/High-K interface with reduced density of defects. Synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) is a powerful method to characterize surfaces and interfaces of many materials, as it is capable to determine their chemical composition as well as the electronic properties. We performed in-situ SR-PES measurements after exposing a GaAs surface to TMA pulses at about 250°C. Upon using the possibility of tuning the incident photon energy we compared the Ga3d spectra at 41 eV, 71 eV, 91 eV and 121 eV, as well as the As3d at 71 eV and 91 eV. Finally, we show that using SR-PES allows a further understanding of the surface composition, which is usually not accessible with other techniques.

  6. Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation by 187Os

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessas, D.; Sergueev, I.; Merkel, D. G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.; Jafari, A.; Kishimoto, S.; Wolny, J. A.; Schünemann, V.; Needham, R. J.; Sadler, P. J.; Hermann, R. P.

    2015-06-01

    We performed nuclear forward and inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation by elemental Os utilizing the nuclear excited state of 187Os which is otherwise inaccessible using any practical radioactive decay process. The lifetime of the excited state, 3.06 (8 )ns , and the energy of the transition, 9.778 (3 )keV , are refined. The nuclear quadrupole moment of the excited state, Q3 /2=1.46 (10 ) b , is determined. The density of phonon states for elemental Os, which is herein experimentally determined, suggests that the Os lattice is a model for the lattice dynamics of hcp-Fe. The combination of the low energy of the nuclear transition and the large nuclear mass leads to a high recoil free fraction, fL M=0.95 (1 ) , at room temperature, a large value that strongly supports the viability of nuclear resonance scattering as a reliable method to study electronic, magnetic, and elastic properties of Os compounds, including Os organometallics.

  7. Deposition of carbon on gold using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Mancini, Derrick C.

    1990-05-01

    Carbon contamination on the surfaces of optical components in beamlines is known to cause severe loss of flux, particularly for photon energies above the C K edge (˜ 280 eV). In order to gain insight into the mechanisms by which carbon deposition occurs we have used focussed, broadband synchrotron radiation (SR) to deposit carbon on gold under controlled conditions. Carbon was deposited by photolysis of various gases at pressures in the range of 10 -8 to 10 -6 Torr. Deposition was found to be localized to the area where the SR was incident on the surface. The relative concentration of carbon was monitored using Auger electron spectroscopy. The rate of deposition was found to be proportional to pressure and inversely proportional to substrate temperature. Effects of gas composition were also studied. Of the seven gases examined, acetone and methyl methacrylate had the highest deposition rate, while ethylene had the lowest. The ramifications of these findings on carbon contamination of beamline optical components are discussed.

  8. Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hintermüller, C; Marone, F; Isenegger, A; Stampanoni, M

    2010-07-01

    With synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy, three-dimensional structures down to the micrometer level can be visualized. Tomographic data sets typically consist of 1000 to 1500 projections of 1024 x 1024 to 2048 x 2048 pixels and are acquired in 5-15 min. A processing pipeline has been developed to handle this large amount of data efficiently and to reconstruct the tomographic volume within a few minutes after the end of a scan. Just a few seconds after the raw data have been acquired, a selection of reconstructed slices is accessible through a web interface for preview and to fine tune the reconstruction parameters. The same interface allows initiation and control of the reconstruction process on the computer cluster. By integrating all programs and tools, required for tomographic reconstruction into the pipeline, the necessary user interaction is reduced to a minimum. The modularity of the pipeline allows functionality for new scan protocols to be added, such as an extended field of view, or new physical signals such as phase-contrast or dark-field imaging etc.

  9. Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hintermüller, C; Marone, F; Isenegger, A; Stampanoni, M

    2010-07-01

    With synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy, three-dimensional structures down to the micrometer level can be visualized. Tomographic data sets typically consist of 1000 to 1500 projections of 1024 x 1024 to 2048 x 2048 pixels and are acquired in 5-15 min. A processing pipeline has been developed to handle this large amount of data efficiently and to reconstruct the tomographic volume within a few minutes after the end of a scan. Just a few seconds after the raw data have been acquired, a selection of reconstructed slices is accessible through a web interface for preview and to fine tune the reconstruction parameters. The same interface allows initiation and control of the reconstruction process on the computer cluster. By integrating all programs and tools, required for tomographic reconstruction into the pipeline, the necessary user interaction is reduced to a minimum. The modularity of the pipeline allows functionality for new scan protocols to be added, such as an extended field of view, or new physical signals such as phase-contrast or dark-field imaging etc. PMID:20567088

  10. Thermal performance of various multilayer insulation systems below 80K

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Schoo, C.J.

    1992-04-01

    The SSC collider dipole cryostat consists of a vacuum shell operating at room temperature, two thermal shields operating near 80K and 20K respectively, and the superconducting magnet assembly operating near 4K. The cryostat design incorporates multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets to limit radiant heat transfer into the 80K and 20K thermal shields. Also, an MLI blanket is used to impede heat transfer through residual gas conduction into the 4K superconducting magnet assembly. A measurement facility at Fermilab has been used to experimentally optimize the thermal insulation system for the dipole cryostat. Previous thermal measurements have been used to define the 80K MLI system configuration and verify system performance. With the 80K MLI system defined, the current effort has focused on experimentally defining the optimum insulation scheme for the 20K thermal shield. The SSC design specification requires that radiant heat transfer be limited to 0.093 W/m[sup 2] at an insulating vacuum of 10[sup [minus]6]torr.

  11. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10 ??m with minimum detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. ?? 1990.

  12. The uses of synchrotron radiation sources for elemental and chemical microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Back, J.M.; Jones, K.W.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1989-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources offer important features for the analysis of a material. Among these features is the ability to determine both the elemental composition of the material and the chemical state of its elements. For microscopic analysis synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes now offer spatial resolutions of 10{mu}m with minimum detection limits in the 1--10 ppM range depending on the nature of the sample and the synchrotron source used. This paper describes the properties of synchrotron radiation and their importance for elemental analysis, existing synchrotron facilities and those under construction that are optimum for SXRF microanalysis, and a number of applications including the high energy excitation of the K lines of heavy elements, microtomography, and XANES and EXAFS spectroscopies. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of synchrotron radiation on the advanced-fueled field-reversed mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of synchrotron radiation on the energy balance of advanced fuels in the field-reversed mirror (FRM) fusion device. The FRM configuration is simulated by the Hill's vortex model. The synchrotron radiant energy loss can be computed by adding the blackbody contribution (O < ..omega.. < ..omega..*) and the transparent contribution (..omega..* < ..omega.. < infinity), where ..omega.. is the radiation frequency and ..cap omega..* is the cutoff frequency.

  14. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-01-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  15. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-10-01

    The overriding features of the synchrotron beams which make them applicable to medical research are their extremely high intensity and broadband energy spectrum. Several orders of magnitude separate the smooth, continuous spectrum of the synchrotron from the sharply peaked characteristic emission spectrum of a conventional source. Basically, the high intensity and tunability allow monochromatic beams to be generated at virtually any energy. The standard problem of beam hardening in both medical imaging and therapy is eliminated by the monochromatic beams since the energy spectrum does not change with passage through tissue. The tunable spectrum allows enhancement of images and therapeutic dose by selection of the most effective energy for a given procedure.

  16. THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION THROUGH A COMPRESSED RANDOM MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cawthorne, T. V.; Hughes, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the radiative transfer of synchrotron radiation in the presence of a magnetic field configuration resulting from the compression of a highly disordered magnetic field. It is shown that, provided Faraday rotation and circular polarization can be neglected, the radiative transfer equations for synchrotron radiation separate for this configuration, and the intensities and polarization values for sources that are uniform on large scales can be found straightforwardly in the case where opacity is significant. Although the emission and absorption coefficients must, in general, be obtained numerically, the process is much simpler than a full numerical solution to the transfer equations. Some illustrative results are given and an interesting effect, whereby the polarization increases while the magnetic field distribution becomes less strongly confined to the plane of compression, is discussed. The results are of importance for the interpretation of polarization near the edges of lobes in radio galaxies and of bright features in the parsec-scale jets of active galactic nuclei, where such magnetic field configurations are believed to exist.

  17. Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-11-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region.

  18. Observation of Wakefields and Resonances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.; Warnock, R.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wave number intervals of 0.074 cm-1 , and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well-defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less regular than in the toroidal model, and depends on the point of observation, but is accounted for in a simulation of fields in the fluted chamber. Attention is paid to polarization of the observed fields, and possible coherence of fields produced in adjacent bending magnets. Low frequency wakefield production appears to be mainly local in a single bend, but multibend effects cannot be excluded entirely, and could play a role in high frequency resonances. New simulation techniques have been developed, which should be invaluable in further work.

  19. Electronic Structure of Germanium Nanocrystal Films Probed with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bostedt, C

    2002-05-01

    The fundamental structure--property relationship of semiconductor quantum dots has been investigated. For deposited germanium nanocrystals strong quantum confinement effects have been determined with synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption and photoemission techniques. The nanocrystals are condensed out of the gas phase with a narrow size distribution and subsequently deposited in situ onto various substrates. The particles are crystalline in the cubic phase with a structurally disordered surface shell and the resulting film morphology depends strongly on the substrate material and condition. The disordered surface region has an impact on the overall electronic structure of the particles. In a size-dependent study, the conduction and valence band edge of germanium nanocrystals have been measured for the first time and compared to the bulk crystal. The band edges move to higher energies as the particle size is decreased, consistent with quantum confinement theory. To obtain a more accurate analysis of confinement effects in the empty states, a novel analysis method utilizing an effective particle size for the x-ray absorption experiment, which allows a deconvolution of absorption edge broadening effects, has been introduced. Comparison of the present study to earlier studies on silicon reveals that germanium exhibits stronger quantum confinement effects than silicon. Below a critical particle size of 2.3 {+-} 0.7 nm, the band gap of germanium becomes larger than that of silicon--even if it is the opposite for bulk materials. This result agrees phenomenologically with effective mass and tight binding theories but contradicts the findings of recent pseudopotential calculations. The discrepancy between theory and experiments is attributed to the differences in the theoretical models and experimental systems. The experimentally observed structural disorder of the particle surface has to be included in the theoretical models.

  20. PEP as a synchrotron radiation source: Status and review

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    The electron-positron collider, PEP, is a 15 GeV storage ring built and operated for high energy physics. As a synchrotron radiation source, it has some unique characteristics which give it extraordinary capabilities which are now beginning to be exploited. Two insertion device beam lines are operational, each illuminated by 2-m-long, 77-mm period undulator magnets. In parasitic operation on high energy physics runs, they provide photons above 10 KeV, with a peak brightness of 10/sup 16/ photons/(s-mm/sup 2//minus/mrad/sup 2/) within a 0.1% band width. This record brightness in this spectral range has already opened up exciting new areas of research. In tests of a low emittance mode of operation at 7.1 GeV, horizontal emittances of about 5 mm-rad were measured, which is about the same as that planned for the new third generation x-ray sources. At a current of 15 mA at 7.1 GeV, the present undulators deliver photon beams from 2.7 to 14 KeV with a peak brightness of about 10/sup 17/. Higher performance can be achieved with longer insertion devices optimized for these energies. Future operation in both parasitic mode and dedicated low emittance mode is planned; this will not only provide new physics opportunities, but the ability to advance the technology of beamline components and instrumentation will be required for the high power, high brightness beams from the third generation x-ray sources. Further performance upgrades are being studied and planned. These will be discussed in this paper along with a description of the present status and a review of PEP's capabilities and limitations. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. On the implementation of computed laminography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Helfen, L.; Pernot, P.; Elyyan, M.; Myagotin, A.; Mikulik, P.; Voropaev, A.; Di Michiel, M.; Baruchel, J.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-06-15

    Hard x rays from a synchrotron source are used in this implementation of computed laminography for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of flat, laterally extended objects. Due to outstanding properties of synchrotron light, high spatial resolution down to the micrometer scale can be attained, even for specimens having lateral dimensions of several decimeters. Operating either with a monochromatic or with a white synchrotron beam, the method can be optimized to attain high sensitivity or considerable inspection throughput in synchrotron user and small-batch industrial experiments. The article describes the details of experimental setups, alignment procedures, and the underlying reconstruction principles. Imaging of interconnections in flip-chip and wire-bonded devices illustrates the peculiarities of the method compared to its alternatives and demonstrates the wide application potential for the 3D inspection and quality assessment in microsystem technology.

  2. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of breast imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fitousi, N. T.; Delis, H.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron radiation (SR), being the brightest artificial source of x-rays with a very promising geometry, has raised the scientific expectations that it could be used for breast imaging with optimized results. The ''in situ'' evaluation of this technique is difficult to perform, mostly due to the limited available SR facilities worldwide. In this study, a simulation model for SR breast imaging was developed, based on Monte Carlo simulation techniques, and validated using data acquired in the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra facility in Trieste, Italy. Furthermore, primary results concerning the performance of SR were derived. Methods: The developed model includes the exact setup of the SR beamline, considering that the x-ray source is located at almost 23 m from the slit, while the photon energy was considered to originate from a very narrow Gaussian spectrum. Breast phantoms, made of Perspex and filled with air cavities, were irradiated with energies in the range of 16-28 keV. The model included a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S detector with the same characteristics as the one available in the SYRMEP beamline. Following the development and validation of the model, experiments were performed in order to evaluate the contrast resolution of SR. A phantom made of adipose tissue and filled with inhomogeneities of several compositions and sizes was designed and utilized to simulate the irradiation under conventional mammography and SR conditions. Results: The validation results of the model showed an excellent agreement with the experimental data, with the correlation for contrast being 0.996. Significant differences only appeared at the edges of the phantom, where phase effects occur. The initial evaluation experiments revealed that SR shows very good performance in terms of the image quality indices utilized, namely subject contrast and contrast to noise ratio. The response of subject contrast to energy is monotonic; however, this does not stand for contrast to noise

  4. The Discrete Nature of the Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammaro, Stefano; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, P.; Lampin, Jean François; Ducourneau, Gaël; Cuisset, Arnaud; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël

    2015-06-01

    Frequency Combs (FC) have radically changed the landscape of frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy investigations extending tremendously the achievable resolution while increasing signal to noise ratio. Initially developed in the visible and near-IR spectral regions, the use of FC has been expanded to mid-IR, extreme ultra-violet and X-ray. Significant effort is presently dedicated to the generation of FC at THz frequencies. One solution based on converting a stabilized optical frequency comb using a photoconductive terahertz emitter, remains hampered by the low available THz power. Another approach is based on active mode locked THz quantum-cascade-lasers providing intense FC over a relatively limited spectral extension. Alternatively, we show that dense powerful THz FC is generated over one decade of frequency by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). In this mode, the entire ring behaves in a similar fashion to a THz resonator wherein electron bunches emit powerful THz pulses quasi-synchronously. The observed FC has been fully characterized and is demonstrated to be offset free. Based on these recorded specifications and a complete review of existing THz frequency comb, a special attention will be paid onto similarities and differences between them. Udem, Th., Holzwarth, H., Hänsch, T. W., Optical frequency metrology. Nature 416, 233-237 (2002) Schliesser, A., Picqué, N., Hänsch, T. W., Mid-infrared frequency combs. Nature Photon. 6, 440 (2012) Zinkstok, R. Th., Witte, S., Ubachs, W., Hogervorst, W., Eikema, K. S. E., Frequency comb laser spectroscopy in the vacuum-ultraviolet region. Physical Review A 73, 061801 (2006) Cavaletto, S. M. et al. Broadband high-resolution X-ray frequency combs. Nature Photon. 8, 520-523 (2014) Tani, M., Matsuura, S., Sakai, K., Nakashima, S. I., Emission characteristics of photoconductive antennas based on low-temperature-grown GaAs and semi-insulating GaAs. Applied Optics 36, 7853-7859 (1997) Burghoff, D. et al

  5. Unexpected methyl migrations of ethanol dimer under synchrotron VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Weizhan; Hu, Yongjun E-mail: lssheng@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Weixing; Guan, Jiwen; Liu, Fuyi; Shan, Xiaobin; Sheng, Liusi E-mail: lssheng@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-14

    While methyl transfer is well known to occur in the enzyme- and metal-catalyzed reactions, the methyl transfer in the metal-free organic molecules induced by the photon ionization has been less concerned. Herein, vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization and dissociation of ethanol dimer are investigated with synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectroscopy and theoretical methods. Besides the protonated clusters cation (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) ⋅ H{sup +} (m/z = 47) and the β-carbon-carbon bond cleavage fragment CH{sub 2}O ⋅ (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH)H{sup +} (m/z = 77), the measured mass spectra revealed that a new fragment (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) ⋅ (CH{sub 3}){sup +} (m/z = 61) appeared at the photon energy of 12.1 and 15.0 eV, where the neutral dimer could be vertically ionized to higher ionic state. Thereafter, the generated carbonium ions are followed by a Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement and then dissociate to produce this new fragment, which is considered to generate after surmounting a few barriers including intra- and inter-molecular methyl migrations by the aid of theoretical calculations. The appearance energy of this new fragment is measured as 11.55 ± 0.05 eV by scanning photoionization efficiency curve. While the signal intensity of fragment m/z = 61 starts to increase, the fragments m/z = 47 and 77 tend to slowly incline around 11.55 eV photon energy. This suggests that the additional fragment channels other than (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) ⋅ H{sup +} and CH{sub 2}O ⋅ (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH)H{sup +} have also been opened, which consume some dimer cations. The present report provides a clear description of the photoionization and dissociation processes of the ethanol dimer in the range of the photon energy 12-15 eV.

  6. Resonant electron diffusion as a saturation process of the synchrotron maser instability. [of auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of resonant electron diffusion as an effective saturation process of the auroral kilometric radiation has been formulated. The auroral kilometric radiation is assumed to be amplified by the synchrotron maser instability that is driven by an electron distribution of the loss-cone type. The calculated intensity of the saturated radiation is found to have a significantly lower value in comparison with that caused by the quasi-linear diffusion process as an alternative saturation process. This indicates that resonant electron diffusion dominates over quasi-linear diffusion in saturating the synchrotron maser instability.

  7. The personnel protection system for a Synchrotron Radiation Accelerator Facility: Radiation safety perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    The Personnel Protection System (PPS) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is summarized and reviewed from the radiation safety point of view. The PPS, which is designed to protect people from radiation exposure to beam operation, consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Beam Containment System (BCS), The ACS prevents people from being exposed to the very high radiation level inside the shielding housing (also called a PPS area). The ACS for a PPS area consists of the shielding housing and a standard entry module at every entrance. The BCS prevents people from being exposed to the radiation outside a PPS area due to normal and abnormal beam losses. The BCS consists of the shielding (shielding housing and metal shielding in local areas), beam stoppers, active current limiting devices, and an active radiation monitor system. The system elements for the ACS and BCS and the associated interlock network are described. The policies and practices in setting up the PPS are compared with some requirements in the US Department of Energy draft Order of Safety of Accelerator Facilities.

  8. Network-based real-time radiation monitoring system in Synchrotron Radiation Research Center.

    PubMed

    Sheu, R J; Wang, J P; Chen, C R; Liu, J; Chang, F D; Jiang, S H

    2003-10-01

    The real-time radiation monitoring system (RMS) in the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC) has been upgraded significantly during the past years. The new framework of the RMS is built on the popular network technology, including Ethernet hardware connections and Web-based software interfaces. It features virtually no distance limitations, flexible and scalable equipment connections, faster response time, remote diagnosis, easy maintenance, as well as many graphic user interface software tools. This paper briefly describes the radiation environment in SRRC and presents the system configuration, basic functions, and some operational results of this real-time RMS. Besides the control of radiation exposures, it has been demonstrated that a variety of valuable information or correlations could be extracted from the measured radiation levels delivered by the RMS, including the changes of operating conditions, beam loss pattern, radiation skyshine, and so on. The real-time RMS can be conveniently accessed either using the dedicated client program or World Wide Web interface. The address of the Web site is http:// www-rms.srrc.gov.tw.

  9. An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held.

  10. Radiation reaction and pitch-angle changes for a charge undergoing synchrotron losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    In the derivation of synchrotron radiation formulae, it has been assumed that the pitch angle of a charge remains constant during the radiation process. However, from the radiation reaction formula, while the component of the velocity vector perpendicular to the magnetic field reduces in magnitude due to radiative losses, the parallel component does not undergo any change during radiation. Therefore, there is a change in the ratio of the two components, implying a change in the pitch angle. We derive the exact formula for the change in energy of radiating electrons by taking into account the change of the pitch angle due to radiative losses. From this, we derive the characteristic decay time of synchrotron electrons over which they turn from highly relativistic into mildly relativistic ones.

  11. Assessment and Implications of Scattered Microbeam and Broadbeam Synchrotron Radiation for Bystander Effect Studies.

    PubMed

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Ivashkevich, Alesia; Forrester, Helen B; Stevenson, Andrew W; Hall, Chris J; Sprung, Carl N; Martin, Olga A

    2015-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation is an excellent tool for investigating bystander effects in cell and animal models because of the well-defined and controllable configuration of the beam. Although synchrotron radiation has many advantages for such studies compared to conventional radiation, the contribution of dose exposure from scattered radiation nevertheless remains a source of concern. Therefore, the influence of scattered radiation on the detection of bystander effects induced by synchrotron radiation in biological in vitro models was evaluated. Radiochromic XRQA2 film-based dosimetry was employed to measure the absorbed dose of scattered radiation in cultured cells at various distances from a field exposed to microbeam radiotherapy and broadbeam X-ray radiation. The level of scattered radiation was dependent on the distance, dose in the target zone and beam mode. The number of γ-H2AX foci in cells positioned at the same target distances was measured and used as a biodosimeter to evaluate the absorbed dose. A correlation of absorbed dose values measured by the physical and biological methods was identified. The γ-H2AX assay successfully quantitated the scattered radiation in the range starting from 10 mGy and its contribution to the observed radiation-induced bystander effect. PMID:26632855

  12. Irradiation of EUV multilayer optics with synchrotron radiation of a different time structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Roman; Scholze, Frank; Thornagel, R.; Tummler, Johannes; Wedowski, M.; Jansen, R.; Mertens, B.; van de Runstraat, A.; Ulm, Gerhard

    2002-12-01

    Extensive investigations on the lifetime of EUVL optics using synchrotron radiation [1, 2, 3] have been performed at the radiometry laboratory [4] of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in the past. Nevertheless, synchrotron radiation shows a very different time structure as compared to the radiation of EUVL sources to be used in lithography tools. To assess the question, whether the different time structure of the radiation has an impact on the contamination behavior of EUVL optics, an irradiation experiment was performed using synchrotron radiation of different time structure available at the BESSY II electron storage ring: Keeping all other parameters constant, radiation from the normal operation mode of BESSY II, which resembles quasi-cw- illumination, and the special single bunch operation mode, which gives pulsed synchrotron radiation with 1.25 MHz repetition rate were used to irradiate samples in a defined residual gas environment. The reflectance of the samples were measured before and after the illumination to determine the loss in reflectance due to irradiation. Although the time structure of the single bunch mode still differs considerably from those of potential EUVL sources, trends in the contamination behavior could possibly be observed.

  13. Finite element analysis of the distortion of a crystal monochromator from synchrotron radiation thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.R.; Hoyer, E.H.; Thompson, A.C.

    1985-10-01

    The first crystal of the Brown-Hower x-ray monochromator of the LBL-EXXON 54 pole wiggler beamline at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is subjected to intense synchrotron radiation. To provide an accurate thermal/structural analysis of the existing monochromator design, a finite element analysis (FEA) was performed. A very high and extremely localized heat flux is incident on the Si (220) crystal. The crystal, which possesses pronouncedly temperature-dependent orthotropic properties, in combination with the localized heat load, make the analysis ideally suited for finite element techniques. Characterization of the incident synchrotron radiation is discussed, followed by a review of the techniques employed in modeling the monochromator and its thermal/structural boundary conditions. The results of the finite element analysis, three-dimensional temperature distributions, surface displacements and slopes, and stresses, in the area of interest, are presented. Lastly, the effects these results have on monochromator output flux and resolution are examined.

  14. Installation of a Synchrotron Radiation Beamline Facility at the J. Bennett Johnston Center. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gooden, R.

    2000-03-21

    The Johnston Center presents a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers at southern institutions to initiate and carry out original research using synchrotron radiation ranging from visible light to hard x-rays. The Science and Engineering Alliance proposes to carry out a comprehensive new synchrotron radiation research initiative at CAMD in carefully phased steps of increasing risks. (1) materials research on existing CAMD beam lines and end stations; (2) design, construction and installation of end stations on existing CAMD beam lines, and research with this new instrumentation; (3) design, construction and operation of dedicated synchrotron radiation beam lines that covers the full spectral range of the CAMD storage ring and expanded research in the new facility.

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  16. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Study on the characteristics of linac based THz light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiong-Wei; Wang, Shu-Hong; Chen, Sen-Yu

    2009-10-01

    There are many methods based on linac for THz radiation production. As one of the options for the Beijing Advanced Light, an ERL test facility is proposed for THz radiation. In this test facility, there are 4 kinds of methods to produce THz radiation: coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), synchrotron radiation (SR), low gain FEL oscillator, and high gain SASE FEL. In this paper, we study the characteristics of the 4 kinds of THz light sources.

  17. Effect of synchrotron radiation on the advanced fueled field-reversed mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of synchrotron radiation on the energy balance or advanced fuels in the field-reversed mirror (FRM) fusion device. The FRM configuration is simulated by the Hill's vortex model. The synchrotron radiant energy loss can be computed by adding the blackbody contribution (0 < omega < omega*) and the transsparent contribution (omega* < omega < infinity), where omega is the radiation frequency and omega* is the cutoff frequency. The cutoff frequency is defined by the frequency at which the plasma's optical depth ..cap alpha..(omega)L is unity, where ..cap alpha.. is the absorption coefficient and L is the plasma dimension. The transparent synchrotron radiation at the higher frequencies is not negligible since it is relatively unaffected by proposed reflectors. Wall reflectivity of 0.9 is assumed. The transport equation is traced along a ray across the plasma using the Runge-Kutta techniques. The power loss is obtained by an angular integral of the result with appropriate geometrical factors. Using the FRM reactor design parameter from C. Baker et al. with electron temperature of 70 keV in the Cat-D burn cycle, the cut-off frequency is located at about nine times the cyclotron fundamental frequency. The transparent portion of the synchrotron radiation is about 0.6 of the blackbody counterpart. The net synchrotron radiation power loss is evaluated to be 0.1 MW whereas the fusion power is found to be 2.3 MW, so the synchrotron radiation power loss only accounts for less than 5% of the total fusion power. Similar results are obtained for the D-He/sup 3/ cycle.

  18. Current advances in synchrotron radiation instrumentation for MX experiments.

    PubMed

    Owen, Robin L; Juanhuix, Jordi; Fuchs, Martin

    2016-07-15

    Following pioneering work 40 years ago, synchrotron beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) have improved in almost every aspect as instrumentation has evolved. Beam sizes and crystal dimensions are now on the single micron scale while data can be collected from proteins with molecular weights over 10 MDa and from crystals with unit cell dimensions over 1000 Å. Furthermore it is possible to collect a complete data set in seconds, and obtain the resulting structure in minutes. The impact of MX synchrotron beamlines and their evolution is reflected in their scientific output, and MX is now the method of choice for a variety of aims from ligand binding to structure determination of membrane proteins, viruses and ribosomes, resulting in a much deeper understanding of the machinery of life. A main driving force of beamline evolution have been advances in almost every aspect of the instrumentation comprising a synchrotron beamline. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the current status of instrumentation at modern MX experiments. The most critical optical components are discussed, as are aspects of endstation design, sample delivery, visualisation and positioning, the sample environment, beam shaping, detectors and data acquisition and processing. PMID:27046341

  19. Inner-shell photoemission from atoms and molecules using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, D.W.

    1983-12-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with synchrotron radiation, has been used to study inner-shell photoemission from atoms and molecules. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation permits the measurements of time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of Auger and photoelectrons, thereby increasing the electron collection efficiency. The double-angle TOF method yielded angle-resolved photoelectron intensities, which were used to determine photoionization cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions in several cases. Comparison to theoretical calculations has been made where possible to help explain observed phenomena in terms of the electronic structure and photoionization dynamics of the systems studied. 154 references, 23 figures, 7 tables.

  20. Study on combustion of gasoline/MTBE in laminar flame with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunde; Li, Jing; Li, Qi; Huang, Chaoqun; Wei, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Tian, Zhenyu; Li, Yuyang; Qi, Fei

    2007-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation offers important advantages with the use of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lasers for molecular beam sampling mass spectrometry (MBMS). These advantages include superior signal-to-noise, soft ionization, and access to photon energies outside the limited tuning ranges of current VUV laser sources. Combining MBMS with tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization, two similar types of fuels, gasoline/oxygen and gasoline/MTBE/oxygen in low-pressure premixed laminar flame were investigated. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) measurements were used to identify the intermediates isomers within flame. The two combustion processes are discussed by comparing the intermediates and their spatial profiles within the two kinds of flame mentioned above.

  1. Radial diffusion models of energetic electrons and Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. I - Steady state solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a computer code modeling of the radial diffusion of equatorially confined energetic electrons in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere are compared with spacecraft as well as ground-based radio (synchrotron radiation) data. It is found that the synchrotron radiation spectrum cannot be reproduced without a significant hardening of the electron spectrum between L = 3 and L = 1.5. This hardening may be due to energy degradation by Jupiter's ring particles. The calculations also suggest that there may be larger-sized material outside Jupiter's ring up to L of about 4 or Io's orbit.

  2. Microstructure analysis of the pulmonary acinus by a synchrotron radiation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, K.; Maeda, K.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Umetani, K.; Nakano, Y.; Sakai, H.; Ohmatsu, H.; Itoh, H.

    2016-04-01

    Conversion of images at micro level of the normal lung and those with very early stage lung disease, and the quantitative analysis of morphology on the images can contribute to the thoracic image diagnosis of the next generation. The collection of every minute CT images is necessary in using high luminance synchrotron radiation CT for converting the images. The purpose of this study is to analyze the structure of secondary pulmonary lobules. We also show the structure of the secondary pulmonary lobule by means of extending our vision to a wider field through the image reconfiguration from the projection image of the synchrotron radiation CT.

  3. Transverse beam size measurement system using visible synchrotron radiation at HLS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Sun, Bao-Gen; Yang, Yong-Liang; Lu, Ping; Tang, Lei-Lei; Wu, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Chao-Cai; Zheng, Jia-Jun; Li, Hao

    2016-09-01

    An interferometer system and an imaging system using visible synchrotron radiation (SR) have been installed in the Hefei Light Source (HLS) II storage ring. Simulations of these two systems are given using Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) code. With these two systems, the beam energy spread and the beam emittance can be measured. A detailed description of these two systems and the measurement method is given in this paper. The measurement results of beam size, emittance and energy spread are given at the end. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105141, 11175173) and Upgrade Project of Hefei Light Source

  4. Analysis of cortical bone porosity using synchrotron radiation microtomography to evaluate the effects of chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, R.; Nogueira, L. P.; Salata, C.; Mantuano, A.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; de Almeida, C. E.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    Microporosities play important biologic and mechanical roles on health. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to cortical bone changes. In the present work, the femur diaphysis of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D morphometric parameters using synchrotron radiation microtomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur diaphysis of rats.

  5. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  6. Microprobe analysis of teeth by synchrotron radiation: environmental contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Carvalho, M. L.; Casaca, C.; Barreiros, M. A.; Cunha, A. S.; Chevallier, P.

    1999-10-01

    An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, installed at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation du Rayonnement Électromagnétique (LURE) synchrotron (France) was used for elemental determination in teeth. To evaluate the influence of living habits in dental elemental composition nine teeth collected post-mortem were analysed, five from a miner and four from a fisherman. All teeth from the fisherman were healthy. From the miner some teeth were carious and one of them was filled with metallic amalgam. Teeth were sliced under the vertical plane and each slice was scanned from the root to the enamel for elemental profile determination. The synchrotron microprobe resolution was of 100 μm and incident photons of 18 keV energy were used. The elemental concentration values found suggest heterogeneity of the teeth material. Moreover, the distinct profiles for Mn, Sr, Br and Pb were found when teeth from the miner and from the fisherman are compared which can be associated with dietary habits and environmental influence. Higher concentrations of Mn and Sr were found for the fisherman teeth. In addition, Br was only observed in this group of teeth. Pb levels are higher for the miner teeth in particular for dentine regions. The influence of amalgam, such as, increase of Zn and Hg contents in the teeth material, is only noticed for the immediate surroundings of the treated cavity.

  7. Study of Synchrotron Radiation for the Electron Beam Polarimeter for the MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.

    2015-08-06

    This is a look at the synchrotron radiation coming from the chicane in the electron beam line for the MEIC design. The power density on the beam pipe as well as transmission through the beam pipe is studied. The optics design is version 12.

  8. Determination of Arsenic Poisoning and Metabolism in Hair by Synchrotron Radiation: The Case of Phar Lap

    SciTech Connect

    Kempson, Ivan M.; Henry, Dermot A.

    2010-08-26

    Fresh physical evidence about the demise of the racehorse Phar Lap (see photograph) has been gathered from the study of mane hair samples by synchrotron radiation analysis with high resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses. The results are indicative of arsenic ingestion and metabolism, and show that the racing champion died from arsenic poisoning.

  9. Plastique: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Savoia, A.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-06-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and dynamics of molecules. We describe the beamline and some initial data.

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy with a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer plus array detector using coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolay I. Agladz, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Albert J. Sievers

    2010-06-01

    By use of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation, we experimentally tested a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to an array detector to determine its viability as a spectral device. Somewhat surprisingly, the overall performance strongly depends on the absorptivity of the birefringent lithium tantalate pixels in the array detector.

  11. Time Resolved Detection of Infrared Synchrotron Radiation at DAΦNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocci, A.; Marcelli, A.; Pace, E.; Drago, A.; Piccinini, M.; Guidi, M. Cestelli; Sali, D.; Morini, P.; Piotrowski, J.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is characterized by a very wide spectral emission from IR to X-ray wavelengths and a pulsed structure that is a function of the source time structure. In a storage ring, the typical temporal distance between two bunches, whose duration is a few hundreds of picoseconds, is on the nanosecond scale. Therefore, synchrotron radiation sources are a very powerful tools to perform time-resolved experiments that however need extremely fast detectors. Uncooled IR devices optimized for the mid-IR range with sub-nanosecond response time, are now available and can be used for fast detection of intense IR sources such as synchrotron radiation storage rings. We present here different measurements of the pulsed synchrotron radiation emission at DAΦNE (Double Annular Φ-factory for Nice Experiments), the collider of the Laboratori Nazionali of Frascati (LNF) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), performed with very fast uncooled infrared detectors with a time resolution of a few hundreds of picoseconds. We resolved the emission time structure of the electron bunches of the DAΦNE collider when it works in a normal condition for high energy physics experiments with both photovoltaic and photoconductive detectors. Such a technology should pave the way to new diagnostic methods in storage rings, monitoring also source instabilities and bunch dynamics.

  12. 6th international conference on biophysics and synchrotron radiation. Program/Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Pittroff, Connie; Strasser, Susan Barr

    1999-08-03

    This STI product consists of the Program/Abstracts book that was prepared for the participants in the Sixth International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation that was held August 4-8, 1998, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. This book contains the full conference program and abstracts of the scientific presentations.

  13. Synchrotron radiation X-ray imaging of cavitation bubbles in Al-Cu alloy melt.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haijun; Shu, Da; Fu, Yanan; Wang, Jun; Sun, Baode

    2014-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles in Al-10 wt.%Cu melt has been investigated by adopting synchrotron radiation X-ray imaging technology. In-situ observation reveals that most of bubbles concentrate within an intense cavitation zone nearby the radiation face. The measured near-maximum bubble radii obey a similar truncated Gaussian distribution as in water but increase by nearly the magnitude of one order due to higher ultrasonic intensity applied in aluminum melt.

  14. Preliminary observations of breast tumor collagen using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Robert A.; Rogers, Keith D.; Hall, Christopher J.; Towns-Andrews, Elizabeth; Slawson, Susan; Evans, Andrew; Pinder, Sarah E.; Ellis, Ian O.; Boggis, Caroline R. M.; Hufton, Alan P.; Dance, David R.

    1999-10-01

    The most frequently occurring cancer in women is that of the breast where it accounts for almost 20% of all cancer deaths. The U.K. has the world's highest mortality rate from breast cancer with an increasing incidence of 25000 per annum. Characterizing the complex physiological and tissue changes that form the natural history of breast cancer is clearly important for understanding associated biological mechanisms and for diagnosis. We report the initial findings of a diffraction study of breast tissue collagen that we believe may be due to tumor genesis. Small angle, synchrotron X-ray scattering has enabled us to examine `core cut' biopsy specimens and characterize their collagen architecture. We present data that demonstrates possible structural differences between tumor and normal tissue. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of using molecular structure characteristics as new and novel markers of disease progression.

  15. Survey of surface roughness properties of synchrotron radiation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Colbert, J.; Church, E.L.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements of surface roughness were made on a large number of grazing incidence mirrors delivered for use at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The measurements were made with a WYKO optical profiler using a 2.5X and a 10X objective and analyzed with our PROFILE code to generate an average periodogram representation for each surface. The data is presented in the form of representative profiles with all of the periodogram curves arranged according to figure type. Analysis of the periodograms allows one to compute bandwidth-limited values for RMS roughness and slope, to provide valuable feedback information to manufacturers regarding compliance with specifications, and to predict the performance of the optic at x-ray wavelengths.

  16. Lipidic cubic phase serial millisecond crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; White, Thomas A.; Zatsepin, Nadia; Shilova, Anastasya; Nelson, Garrett; Liu, Haiguang; Johansson, Linda; Heymann, Michael; Jaeger, Kathrin; Metz, Markus; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Wu, Wenting; Båth, Petra; Berntsen, Peter; Oberthuer, Dominik; Panneels, Valerie; Cherezov, Vadim; Chapman, Henry; Schertler, Gebhard; Neutze, Richard; Spence, John; Moraes, Isabel; Burghammer, Manfred; Standfuss, Joerg; Weierstall, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Lipidic cubic phases (LCPs) have emerged as successful matrixes for the crystallization of membrane proteins. Moreover, the viscous LCP also provides a highly effective delivery medium for serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Here, the adaptation of this technology to perform serial millisecond crystallography (SMX) at more widely available synchrotron microfocus beamlines is described. Compared with conventional microcrystallography, LCP-SMX eliminates the need for difficult handling of individual crystals and allows for data collection at room temperature. The technology is demonstrated by solving a structure of the light-driven proton-pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at a resolution of 2.4 Å. The room-temperature structure of bR is very similar to previous cryogenic structures but shows small yet distinct differences in the retinal ligand and proton-transfer pathway. PMID:25866654

  17. Experiments in atomic and applied physics using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    A diverse program in atomic and applied physics using x rays produced at the X-26 beam line at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source is in progress. The atomic physics program studies the properties of multiply-ionized atoms using the x rays for photo-excitation and ionization of neutral atoms and ion beams. The applied physics program builds on the techniques and results of the atomic physics work to develop new analytical techniques for elemental and chemical characterization of materials. The results are then used for a general experimental program in biomedical sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, and materials sciences. The present status of the program is illustrated by describing selected experiments. Prospects for development of new experimental capabilities are discussed in terms of a heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics experiments and the feasibility of photoelectron microscopy for high spatial resolution analytical work. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Theory of Microwave Instability and Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Electron Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    Bursting of coherent synchrotron radiation has been observed and in fact used to generate THz radiation in many electron storage rings. In order to understand and control the bursting, we return to the study of the microwave instability. In this paper, we will report on the theoretical understanding, including recent developments, of the microwave instability in electron storage rings. The historical progress of the theories will be surveyed, starting from the dispersion relation of coasting beams, to the work of Sacherer on a bunched beam, and ending with the Oide and Yokoya method of discretization. This theoretical survey will be supplemented with key experimental results over the years. Finally, we will describe the recent theoretical development of utilizing the Laguerre polynomials in the presence of potential-well distortion. This self-consistent method will be applied to study the microwave instability driven the impedances due to the coherent synchrotron radiation. Over the past quarter century, there has been steady progress toward smaller transverse emittances in electron storage rings used for synchrotron light sources, from tens of nm decades ago to the nm range recently. In contrast, there is not much progress made in the longitudinal plane. For an electron bunch in a typical ring, its relative energy spread {sigma}{sub {delta}} remains about 10{sup -3} and its length {sigma}{sub z} is still in between 5 mm to 10 mm. Now the longitudinal emittance ({sigma}{sub {delta}}{sigma}{sub z}) becomes a factor of thousand larger than those in the transverse dimensions. In this paper, we will address questions of: How short a bunch can be? What is the fundamental limit? If there is a limit, is there any mitigation method? Since the synchrotron radiation is so fundamental in electron storage rings, let us start with the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR).

  19. Loop-voltage tomography in tokamaks using transient synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H. . Plasma Physics Lab.; Hunter Coll., New York, NY . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-07-01

    The loop voltage in tokamaks is particularly difficult to measure anywhere but at the plasma periphery. A brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons, however, produces a transient radiation response that is sensitive to this voltage. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose the loop voltage. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  20. POLARIZATION STUDIES OF CdZnTe DETECTORS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-07-01

    New results on the effects of small-scale defects on the charge-carrier transport in single-crystal CdZnTe (CZT) material were produced. We conducted detailed studies of the role of Te inclusions in CZT by employing a highly collimated synchrotron x-ray radiation source available at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We were able to induce polarization effects by irradiating specific areas with the detector. These measurements allowed the first quantitative comparison between areas that are free of Te inclusions and those with a relatively high concentration of inclusions. The results of these polaration studies will be reported.

  1. The Biological Effects on Cancer Cells by Synchrotron Radiation Generated from MIRRORCLE-6X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.; Teshima, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Kawaguchi, A.; Suzumoto, Y.; Hasegawa, D.; Mochizuki-Oda, N.; Yamada, H.; Matsuura, N.

    2004-08-01

    MIRRORCLE-6X, the unique portable synchrotrons, generates brilliant hard X-rays. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biological effects of synchrotron radiation on cancer cells to identify its effectiveness. A549 human lung adenocarcinoma and DU145 human prostate adenocarcinoma cells were used. We examined biological effects on cancer cells by colony formation assay, micronucleus assay, WST-1 method, and apoptosis detection of flow cytometry. Results of these assay revealed that the biological effects of X-ray generated from MIRRORCLE-6X on cancer cells are similar to those of 4 MV X-ray from linear accelerator (linac).

  2. National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Radiation Facilities for Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gabrielle G.; Allen, Andrew J.; Black, David R.; Burdette, Harold E.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Spal, Richard D.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, supported by the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, include beam stations at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The emphasis is on materials characterization at the microstructural and at the atomic and molecular levels, where NIST scientists, and researchers from industry, universities and government laboratories perform state-of-the-art x-ray measurements on a broad range of materials. PMID:27500070

  3. Design and Operation of the RHIC 80-K Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoletti, A.; Reuter, A.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Talty, P.; Quimby, E.

    2004-06-23

    A stand-alone cryogenic system designed to maintain the magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at between 80 and 100 K during accelerator shutdown periods has been conceived and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and built by PHPK Technologies of Columbus, Ohio. Since most thermal contraction occurs above this temperature, this unit, referred to as the 80-K Cooler, will eliminate the stresses associated with thermal cycling. The cooling system will provide the necessary refrigeration by circulating cooled helium gas at approximately 1500 kPA through the RHIC heat shields and magnets. This helium is cooled by heat exchange with liquid nitrogen and circulated via three cold centrifugal pumps. The nominal delivered cooling capacity required to maintain the magnets at temperature is approximately 36 kW, primarily intercepted at the heat shield. The system also has separate heat exchangers for use as a pre-cooler from room temperature to 82 K. Selection of sextant or sextants for pre-cooling is designed into the RHIC cryogenic distribution system. Topics covered include Cooler design decisions, details of the Cooler as built, integration into the existing RHIC cryogenic system and initial operating experience.

  4. DESIGN AND OPERATON OF THE RHIC 80K COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    NICOLETTI,A.REUTER,A.SIDI-YEKHLEF,A.TALTY,P.QUIMBY,E.

    2003-09-22

    A stand alone cryogenic system designed to maintain the magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at between 80 and 100 K during accelerator shutdown periods has been conceived and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and built by PHPK Technologies of Columbus, Ohio. Since most thermal contraction occurs above this temperature, this unit, referred to as the 80 K Cooler, will eliminate the stresses associated with thermal cycling. The cooling system will provide the necessary refrigeration by circulating cooled Helium gas at approximately 15 atmospheres through the RHIC heat shields and magnets. This Helium is cooled by heat exchange with liquid nitrogen and circulated via three cold centrifugal pumps. The nominal delivered cooling capacity required to maintain the magnets at temperature is approximately 36 kW, primarily intercepted at the heat shield. The system also has separate heat exchangers for use as a pre-Cooler from room temperature to 82 K. Selection of sextant or sextants for pre-cooling is designed into the RHIC cryogenic distribution system. Topics covered include Cooler design decisions, details of the Cooler as built, integration into the existing RHIC cryogenic system and initial operating experience.

  5. Design and Operation of the RHIC 80-K Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoletti, A.; Reuter, A.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Talty, P.; Quimby, E.

    2004-06-01

    A stand-alone cryogenic system designed to maintain the magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at between 80 and 100 K during accelerator shutdown periods has been conceived and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and built by PHPK Technologies of Columbus, Ohio. Since most thermal contraction occurs above this temperature, this unit, referred to as the 80-K Cooler, will eliminate the stresses associated with thermal cycling. The cooling system will provide the necessary refrigeration by circulating cooled helium gas at approximately 1500 kPA through the RHIC heat shields and magnets. This helium is cooled by heat exchange with liquid nitrogen and circulated via three cold centrifugal pumps. The nominal delivered cooling capacity required to maintain the magnets at temperature is approximately 36 kW, primarily intercepted at the heat shield. The system also has separate heat exchangers for use as a pre-cooler from room temperature to 82 K. Selection of sextant or sextants for pre-cooling is designed into the RHIC cryogenic distribution system. Topics covered include Cooler design decisions, details of the Cooler as built, integration into the existing RHIC cryogenic system and initial operating experience.

  6. Beaming of Particles and Synchrotron Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic reconnection has been invoked as a mechanism for particle acceleration in numerous astrophysical systems. According to idealized analytical models, reconnection produces a bulk relativistic outflow emerging from the reconnection sites (X-points). The resulting radiation is therefore highly beamed. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate particle and radiation beaming, finding a very different picture. Instead of having a relativistic average bulk motion with an isotropic electron velocity distribution in its rest frame, we find that the bulk motion of the particles in X-points is similar to their Lorentz factor γ, and the particles are beamed within ˜ 5/γ . On the way from the X-point to the magnetic islands, particles turn in the magnetic field, forming a fan confined to the current sheet. Once they reach the islands they isotropize after completing a full Larmor gyration and their radiation is no longer strongly beamed. The radiation pattern at a given frequency depends on where the corresponding emitting electrons radiate their energy. Lower-energy particles that cool slowly spend most of their time in the islands and their radiation is not highly beamed. Only particles that quickly cool at the edge of the X-points generate a highly beamed fan-like radiation pattern. The radiation emerging from these fast cooling particles is above the burn-off limit (˜100 MeV in the overall rest frame of the reconnecting plasma). This has significant implications for models of gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei that invoke beaming in that frame at much lower energies.

  7. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  8. Field transients of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation accessed via time-resolving and correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, A.; Semenov, A.; Hübers, H.-W.; Hoehl, A.; Ries, M.; Wüstefeld, G.; Ulm, G.; Ilin, K.; Thoma, P.; Siegel, M.

    2016-03-01

    Decaying oscillations of the electric field in repetitive pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation in the terahertz frequency range was evaluated by means of time-resolving and correlation techniques. Comparative analysis of real-time voltage transients of the electrical response and interferograms, which were obtained with an ultrafast zero-bias Schottky diode detector and a Martin-Puplett interferometer, delivers close values of the pulse duration. Consistent results were obtained via the correlation technique with a pair of Golay Cell detectors and a pair of resonant polarisation-sensitive superconducting detectors integrated on one chip. The duration of terahertz synchrotron pulses does not closely correlate with the duration of single-cycle electric field expected for the varying size of electron bunches. We largely attribute the difference to the charge density oscillations in electron bunches and to the low-frequency spectral cut-off imposed by both the synchrotron beamline and the coupling optics of our detectors.

  9. THE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MECHANISM IN THE RECENTLY DETECTED VERY HIGH ENERGY RADIATION FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    George, Machabeli; Zaza, Osmanov E-mail: z.osmanov@astro-ge.org

    2009-08-01

    Interpretation of the recently discovered very high energy (VHE) pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar is presented. By taking into account the fact that Crab pulsar's radiation for the optical and VHE spectrum peak at the same phases, we argue that the source of this broadband emission is spatially localized. It is shown that the only mechanism providing the results of the MAGIC Cherenkov telescope should be synchrotron radiation. We find that in the magnetospheric electron-positron plasma, due to the cyclotron instability, the pitch angle becomes non-vanishing, which leads to an efficient synchrotron mechanism, intensifying on the light cylinder length scales. We also estimate the VHE radiation spectral index to be equal to -1/2.

  10. High-Resolution Synchrotron Radiation Imaging of Trace Metal Elemental Concentrations in Porites Coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirino, M.; Dunbar, R. B.; Tangri, N.; Mehta, A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the use of synchrotron radiation for elemental imaging within the skeleton of a Porites coral from American Samoa to explore the fine-scale structure of strontium to calcium (Sr/Ca) variability. The use of a synchrotron for coral paleoclimate analysis is relatively new. The method provides a high resolution, two-dimensional elemental map of a coral surface. The aragonitic skeleton of Porites sp. colonies has been widely used for paleoclimate reconstruction as the oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O) signal varies with both sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS). Sr/Ca has been used in previous studies in conjunction with δ18O to deconvolve SST from SSS, as Sr/Ca in the coral skeleton varies with SST, but not SSS. However, recent studies suggest that in some cases Sr/Ca variability in coral does not reliably reflect changes in SST. We sought to address this puzzle by investigating Sr/Ca variability in Porites corals at a very fine spatial scale while also demonstrating the suitability of the synchrotron as a coral analysis tool. We also considered Sr/Ca variability as it pertains to the coral's structural elements. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center synchrotron station generates collimated x-rays in the energy range of 4500-45000 eV with beam diameters as small as 20 μm. Synchrotron imaging allows faster and higher-resolution Sr/Ca analysis than does inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It also is capable of mapping spatial distributions of many elements, which aids in the development of a multiproxy approach to paleoclimate reconstruction. Imaging and analysis of the Porites coral using synchrotron radiation revealed an intricate sub-seasonal Sr/Ca signal, possibly correlating to a sub-monthly resolution. This signal, which seems unrelated to SST, dominates the annual signal.

  11. X-ray microscopy using collimated and focussed synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Thompson, A.C.; Underwood, J.H.; Giauque, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray microscopy is a field that has developed rapidly in recent years. Two different approaches have been used. Zone plates have been employed to produce focused beams with sizes as low as 0.07 ..mu..m for x-ray energies below 1 keV. Images of biological materials and elemental maps for major and minor low Z have been produced using above and below absorption edge differences. At higher energies collimators and focusing mirrors have been used to make small diameter beams for excitation of characteristic K- or L-x rays of all elements in the periodic table. The practicality of a single instrument combining all the features of these two approaches is unclear. The use of high-energy x rays for x-ray microscopy has intrinsic value for characterization of thick samples and determination of trace amounts of most elements. A summary of work done on the X-26 beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) with collimated and focused x rays with energies above 4 keV is given here. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Comparison of Design and Practices for Radiation Safety among Five Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Asano, Yoshihiro; Casey, William R.; Donahue, Richard J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-06-29

    There are more and more third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities in the world that utilize low emittance electron (or positron) beam circulating in a storage ring to generate synchrotron light for various types of experiments. A storage ring based SR facility consists of an injector, a storage ring, and many SR beamlines. When compared to other types of accelerator facilities, the design and practices for radiation safety of storage ring and SR beamlines are unique to SR facilities. Unlike many other accelerator facilities, the storage ring and beamlines of a SR facility are generally above ground with users and workers occupying the experimental floor frequently. The users are generally non-radiation workers and do not wear dosimeters, though basic facility safety training is required. Thus, the shielding design typically aims for an annual dose limit of 100 mrem over 2000 h without the need for administrative control for radiation hazards. On the other hand, for operational and cost considerations, the concrete ring wall (both lateral and ratchet walls) is often desired to be no more than a few feet thick (with an even thinner roof). Most SR facilities have similar operation modes and beam parameters (both injection and stored) for storage ring and SR beamlines. The facility typically operates almost full year with one-month start-up period, 10-month science program for experiments (with short accelerator physics studies and routine maintenance during the period of science program), and a month-long shutdown period. A typical operational mode for science program consists of long periods of circulating stored beam (which decays with a lifetime in tens of hours), interposed with short injection events (in minutes) to fill the stored current. The stored beam energy ranges from a few hundreds MeV to 10 GeV with a low injection beam power (generally less than 10 watts). The injection beam energy can be the same as, or lower than, the stored beam energy

  13. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinaro, G.; Accardo, A.; Benseny-Cases, N.; Burghammer, M.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Cotte, M.; Dante, S.; De Angelis, F.; Di Cola, E.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments.

  14. Making good use of synchrotron radiation, The role of CHESS at Cornell and as a national facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batterman, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    Atom smashers is what the New York Times calls them when it publishes a piece about particle accelerators. Historically, particle accelerators were in fact used to break apart atoms, but modern machines do more exotic things. One of them is a spin-off of acceleration - the production of high-energy synchrotron radiation. Once considered a nuisance, this radiation has become valuable in almost every field of science and engineering. It is the basis of a national facility, the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), that operates in conjunction with the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). CHESS provides the highest-energy synchrotron radiation available in the United States.

  15. Time-resolved experiments in the frequency domain using synchrotron radiation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Giusti, A. M.; Parasassi, T.; Ravagnan, G.; Sapora, O.

    1992-01-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beam line in the world that performs time-resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and the dynamics of molecules. This technique measures fluorescence lifetimes with picosecond resolution in the near UV spectral range. Such accurate measurements are rendered possible by taking phase and modulation data, and by the advantages of the cross-correlation technique. A successful experiment demonstrated the radiation damage induced by low doses of radiation on rabbit blood cell membranes.

  16. Atomic physics and synchrotron radiation: The production and accumulation of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Meron, M.; Agagu, A.; Jones, K. W.

    1987-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation can be used to produce highly-charged ions, and to study photoexcitation and photoionization for ions of virtually any element in the periodic table. To date, with few exceptions, atomic physics studies have been limited to rare gases and a few metal vapors, and to photoexcitation energies in the VUV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. These limitations can now be overcome using photons produced by high-brightness synchrotron storage rings, such as the X-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven. Furthermore, calculations indicate that irradiation of an ion trap with an intense energetic photon beam will result in a viable source of highly-charged ions that can be given the name PHOBIS: the photon beam ion source. Promising results, which encourage the wider systematic use of synchrotron radiation in atomic physics research, have been obtained in recent experiments on VUV photoemission and the production and storage of multiply-charged ions. An overview of the field, current plans, and future possibilities will be presented.

  17. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G.; Edouard, M.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Requardt, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, JF.; Elleaume, H.; Bravin, A.

    2009-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  18. From the Cover: Specific chemical and structural damage to proteins produced by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weik, Martin; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Kryger, Gitay; McSweeney, Sean; Raves, Maria L.; Harel, Michal; Gros, Piet; Silman, Israel; Kroon, Jan; Sussman, Joel L.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation damage is an inherent problem in x-ray crystallography. It usually is presumed to be nonspecific and manifested as a gradual decay in the overall quality of data obtained for a given crystal as data collection proceeds. Based on third-generation synchrotron x-ray data, collected at cryogenic temperatures, we show for the enzymes Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase and hen egg white lysozyme that synchrotron radiation also can cause highly specific damage. Disulfide bridges break, and carboxyl groups of acidic residues lose their definition. Highly exposed carboxyls, and those in the active site of both enzymes, appear particularly susceptible. The catalytic triad residue, His-440, in acetylcholinesterase, also appears to be much more sensitive to radiation damage than other histidine residues. Our findings have direct practical implications for routine x-ray data collection at high-energy synchrotron sources. Furthermore, they provide a direct approach for studying the radiation chemistry of proteins and nucleic acids at a detailed, structural level and also may yield information concerning putative "weak links" in a given biological macromolecule, which may be of structural and functional significance.

  19. Synchrotron-based Scattered Radiation from Phantom Materials used in X-ray CT

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.; Swapna, M; Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Akatsuka, T; Yuasa, T; Takeda, T; Gigante, G

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron-based scattered radiation form low-contrast phantom materials prepared from polyethylene, polystyrene, nylon, and Plexiglas is used as test objects in X-ray CT was examined with 8, 10 and 12 keV X-rays. These phantom materials of medical interest will contains varying proportions of low atomic number elements. The assessment will allowed us to estimate the fluorescence to total scattered radiation. Detected the fluorescence spectra and the associated scattered radiation from calcium hydroxyapatite phantom with 8, 10 and 12 keV synchrotron X-rays. Samples with Bonefil (60% and 70% of calcium hydroxyapatite) and Bone cream (35-45% of calcium hydroxyapatite), were used. Utilized the X-ray micro-spectroscopy beamline facility, X27A, available at NSLS, BNL, USA. The primary beam with a spot size of the order of {approx}10 {micro}m, has been used for focusing. With this spatial resolution and high flux throuput, the synchrotron-based scattered radiation from the phantom materials were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector.

  20. Multilayer-based soft X-ray polarimeter at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li-Juan; Cui, Ming-Qi; Zhu, Jie; Zhao, Yi-Dong; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Zhan-Shan; Zhu, Jing-Tao

    2013-07-01

    A compact high precision eight-axis automatism and two-axis manual soft-ray polarimeter with a multilayer has been designed, constructed, and installed in 3W1B at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). Four operational modes in the same device, which are double-reflection, double-transmission, front-reflection-behind-transmission and front-transmission-behind-reflection, have been realized. It can be used for the polarization analysis of synchrotron radiation. It also can be used to characterize the polarization properties of the optical elements in the soft X-ray energy range. Some experiments with Mo/Si and Cr/C multilayers have been performed by using this polarimeter with good results obtained.

  1. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  2. Evaluation and optimization of the structural parameter of diesel nozzle basing on synchrotron radiation imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, H.; Li, L.

    2016-04-01

    Lacking of efficient methods, industry currently uses one only parameter—fuel flow rate—to evaluate the nozzle quality, which is far from satisfying the current emission regulations worldwide. By utilizing synchrotron radiation high energy X-ray in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), together with the imaging techniques, the 3D models of two nozzles with the same design dimensions were established, and the influence of parameters fluctuation in the azimuthal direction were analyzed in detail. Results indicate that, due to the orifice misalignment, even with the same design dimension, the inlet rounding radius of orifices differs greatly, and its fluctuation in azimuthal direction is also large. This difference will cause variation in the flow characteristics at orifice outlet and then further affect the spray characteristics. The study also indicates that, more precise investigation and insight into the evaluation and optimization of diesel nozzle structural parameter are needed.

  3. Structural studies of the lipid membranes at the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.; Ermakova, E. V.; Ryabova, N. Yu.; Nayda, O. V.; Zabelin, A. V.; Pogorely, D. K.; Korneev, V. N.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Lipid membranes are a subject of contemporary interdisciplinary studies at the junction of biology, biophysics, pharmacology, and bionanotechnology. The results of the structural studies of several types of lipid membranes by the lamellar and lateral diffraction of X-ray synchrotron radiation are presented. The experiments were performed at the Mediana and DICSI stations of the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source at the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute. The data obtained are compared with the results of studying lipid membranes at the small-angle scattering beamlines D22 and D24 at LURE (France) and at the A2 beamline at DESY (Germany). The parameters of the DICSI station are shown to meet the basic requirements for the structural study of lipid systems, which are of fundamental and applied interest.

  4. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N{sub 2} and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and CH{sub 3}Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  5. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  6. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Space Charge for a 1-D Bunch on an Arbitrary Planar Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, R.L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-08

    Realistic modeling of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and the space charge force in single-pass systems and rings usually requires at least a two-dimensional (2-D) description of the charge/current density of the bunch. Since that leads to costly computations, one often resorts to a 1-D model of the bunch for first explorations. This paper provides several improvements to previous 1-D theories, eliminating unnecessary approximations and physical restrictions.

  7. Characteristics and development of the coherent synchrotron radiation sources for THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, J.; Evain, C.; Roussel, E.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Couprie, M.-E.; Bielawski, S.; Szwaj, C.; Labat, M.; Roy, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the characteristics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) as a source for spectroscopy. The optimization of the source and the resulting figures of merits in terms of flux, signal to noise, spatial distribution and spectral and temporal distribution are presented together with a spectroscopic application. The emission of THz during the slicing operation is also described. The conclusion opens up perspectives made possible by the availability of this intense and stable THz source.

  8. New Setup To Study Trapped Nano-Particles Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, M.; Langer, B.; Schlemmer, S.; Lischke, T.; Becker, U.; Widdra, W.; Gerlich, D.; Ruehl, E.

    2004-05-12

    A novel setup is presented that is suitable to investigate the change of the properties of a single trapped nanoparticle by charging it with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The particles are stored for long time periods that reach up to days without any contact to a substrate in the center of a three dimensional electrodynamic quadrupole trap. The accurate Q/M value is derived from the oscillatory motion of the particle in the trap recorded via scattering of visible light.

  9. XRD Study of NiTi Endodontic Files Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz Fernandes, Francisco Manuel; Oliveira, J. P.; Machado, A.; Schell, Norbert

    2014-07-01

    Two types of endodontic files (ProFile and Mtwo) were studied in order to analyze the effect of geometry on the stress-induced martensitic (SIM) transformation during bending. The use of a fine beam spot of synchrotron radiation allowed a detailed structural characterization with a fine spatial resolution. Experimental evidence of the effect of the cross-section geometry on the stress localization giving rise to different degrees of SIM transformation is presented for the first time in the published literature.

  10. UV-VUV synchrotron radiation spectroscopy of NiWO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, A.; Pankratov, V.; Kalinko, A.; Kotlov, A.; Shirmane, L.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Photoluminescence and excitation spectra of microcrystalline and nanocrystalline nickel tungstate (NiWO4) were measured using UV-VUV synchrotron radiation source. The origin of the bands is interpreted using comparative analysis with isostructural ZnWO4 tungstate and based on the results of recent first-principles band structure calculations. The influence of the local atomic structure relaxation and of Ni2+ intra-ion d-d transitions on the photoluminescence band intensity are discussed.

  11. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, A; Hertzog, D; Baumgartel, P; Lengefeld, J; Horsley, D; Schuler, B; Bakajin, O

    2006-03-20

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and optimize microfluidic mixers to investigate the kinetics of protein secondary structure formation with Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The mixers are designed to rapidly initiate protein folding reaction through the dilution of denaturant. The devices are fabricated out of fused silica, so that they are transparent in the UV. We present characterization of mixing in the fabricated devices, as well as the initial SRCD data on proteins inside the mixers.

  12. Reduction of energy chirp by the wake of coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, R. A.

    2010-11-01

    When an energy-chirped bunch is undercompressed in a magnetic chicane, the compressed bunch also has an energy chirp. The chirp may be decreased by sending the bunch through bending magnets, since the largest energy loss from the wake of coherent synchrotron radiation occurs in the tail of a typical bunch. We obtain formulas for the dechirping of a rectangular bunch by short magnets, and apply this dechirping technique in a design for a free-electron laser.

  13. Multipurpose furnace for in situ studies of polycrystalline materials using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hemant; Wattjes, Alix C; Amirthalingam, Murugaiyan; Zuidwijk, Thim; Geerlofs, Nico; Offerman, S Erik

    2009-12-01

    We report a multipurpose furnace designed for studies using synchrotron radiation on polycrystalline materials, namely, metals, ceramics, and (semi)crystalline polymers. The furnace has been designed to carry out three-dimensional (3D) x-ray diffraction measurements but can also be used for other types of synchrotron radiation research. The furnace has a very low thermal gradient across the specimen (<0.2 degrees C/mm). Accurate determination of the temperature can be carried out by welding a thermocouple to the specimen. The furnace can be rotated over an angle of 90 degrees in order to determine the crystallographic orientation of each individual grain. It is possible to follow growth kinetics of all grains in the illuminated volume of the specimen. The specimen environment can be controlled varying from vacuum (up to 10(-5) mbar) to gas or air filled. The maximum temperature of operation is 1500 degrees C, with the possibility of achieving high heating (up to 20 degrees C/s) and cooling rates (up to 30 degrees C/s without quenching gas). 3D maps of the microstructure of the specimen can be generated at elevated temperatures by bringing the high-resolution detector close to the specimen. We show an example of a simulation of the heat affected zone during the thermal cycle of a weld in a transformation-induced plasticity steel carried out using the furnace. The unique characteristics of the furnace open possibility of new fields in materials research using synchrotron radiation.

  14. Inhomogeneous vasodilatory responses of rat tail arteries to heat stress: evaluation by synchrotron radiation microangiography.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Eriko; Furuyama, Fujiya; Ito, Kunihisa; Tanaka, Etsuro; Hattan, Naoichiro; Fujikura, Hisanori; Kimura, Koji; Goto, Takako; Hayashi, Takashi; Taira, Hiroyuki; Shinozaki, Yoshiro; Umetani, Keiji; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Mochizuki, Ryo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Koide, Shirosaku; Mori, Hidezo

    2002-10-01

    Tail blood flow is crucial for dissipating body heat in rats. Angiographies are convenient tools to evaluate tail circulation. However, conventional angiographies do not have sufficient sensitivity or spatial resolution for small vessels. Recently, we developed a novel microangiographic system using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a high-definition video camera system. Here, we report an evaluation of rat tail circulation under heat stress using the synchrotron radiation microangiographic system. We performed an experiment using the microangiography of the caudal artery before and after heating up WKAH/HkmSlc rats to rectal temperature of 39 degrees C. The images were digitized and temporal subtraction was performed, and the diameters of caudal arteries were evaluated. After heating, the medial caudal artery was markedly dilated (320 +/- 53 to 853 +/- 243 micro m in diameter, p<0.001), while no significant change was observed in the lateral caudal arteries (139 +/- 42 to 167 +/- 73 micro m) and segmental anastomosing vessels. The heat stress allowed for visualization of the superficial caudal arteries with a diameter of approximately 60 micro m, not visible prior to heating. Thus, synchrotron radiation microangiography demonstrated that the rat tail possessed dual sets of arteries; one set was highly sensitive to heat-induced vasodilation (medial caudal artery and superficial caudal arteries) and the other set was less sensitive (lateral caudal arteries and segmental anastomosing vessels).

  15. Microscopic x-ray imaging system for biomedical applications using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kobatake, Makito; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Takenori; Imai, Shigeki

    2007-02-01

    An X-ray direct-conversion type detector with a spatial resolution of 10-11 μm was developed for real-time biomedical imaging. The detector incorporates the X-ray SATICON pickup tube with a photoconductive target layer of amorphous selenium. For high-resolution imaging, the X-ray image is directly converted into an electric signal in the photoconductive layer without image blur. Microangiography experiments were carried out for depicting angiogenic vessels in a rabbit model of cancer using the direct-conversion detector and a third generation synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. In synchrotron radiation radiography, a long source-to-object distance and a small source spot can produce high-resolution images. After transplantation of cancer cells into the rabbit auricle, small tumor blood vessels with diameters of 20-30 μm in an immature vascular network produced by angiogenesis were visualized by contrast material injection into the auricular artery at a monochromatic X-ray energy of 33.2 keV just above the iodine K-edge energy. The synchrotron radiation system is a useful tool to evaluate the micro-angioarchitecture of malignant tumors in animal models of cancer for in vivo preclinical studies.

  16. MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS LONG TRACE PROFILER (LTP-MF) FOR NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY OF CHINA.

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN, S.; WANG, Q.; HONG, Y.; TAKACS, P.

    2005-07-31

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a useful optical metrology instrument for measuring the figure and slope error of cylindrical aspheres commonly used as synchrotron radiation (SR) optics. It is used extensively at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. In order to improve SR beam line quality and resolution, the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) of China is developing a versatile LTP that can be used to measure both SR optics and more conventional ''normal'' optical surfaces. The optical metrology laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NSRL are collaborating in developing a multiple functions LTP (LTP-MF). Characteristics of the LTP-MF are: a very compact and lightweight optical head, a large angular test range ({+-} 16 mad) and high accuracy. The LTP-MF can be used in various configurations: as a laboratory-based LTP, an in-situ LTP or penta-prism LTP, as an angle monitor, a portable LTP, and a small radius of curvature test instrument. The schematic design of the compact optical head and a new compact slide are introduced. Analysis of different measurements modes and systematic error correction methods are introduced.

  17. Application of partially coherent wavefront propagation calculations for design of coherence-preserving synchrotron radiation beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Oleg; Chu, Yong S.; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Yan, Hanfei

    2011-09-01

    Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, such as NSLS-II and MAX-IV, will offer excellent opportunities for further development of experimental techniques exploiting X-ray coherence. However, even in these new SR sources, the radiation produced by relativistic electrons (in undulators, wigglers and bending magnets) will remain only partially coherent in the X-ray spectral range. "Extraction" of "coherent portion" of the radiation flux and its transport to sample without loss of coherence must be performed by dedicated SR beamlines, optimized for particular types of experiments. Detailed quantitative prediction of partially coherent X-ray beam properties at propagation through optical elements, which is required for the optimization of such beamlines, can only be obtained from accurate and efficient physical-optics based numerical simulations. Examples of such simulations, made for NSLS-II beamlines, using "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) computer code, are presented. Special attention is paid to the numerical analysis of the basic properties of partially coherent undulator radiation beam and its distinctions from the Gaussian beam. Performance characteristics of importance for particular beamlines, such as radiation spot size and flux at sample vs size of secondary source aperture for high-resolution microscopy beamlines, are predicted by the simulations.

  18. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakov, Gennady; Zhou, Demin

    2016-04-01

    We develop a general model of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) impedance with shielding provided by two parallel conducting plates. This model allows us to easily reproduce all previously known analytical CSR wakes and to expand the analysis to situations not explored before. It reduces calculations of the impedance to taking integrals along the trajectory of the beam. New analytical results are derived for the radiation impedance with shielding for the following orbits: a kink, a bending magnet, a wiggler of finite length, and an infinitely long wiggler. All our formulas are benchmarked against numerical simulations with the CSRZ computer code.

  19. A fast method for computing 1-D wakefields due to coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Chad E.; Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2013-07-01

    A method for computing the free-space longitudinal wakefield due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a one-dimensional model is developed using a fast integrated Green function approach. This approach accurately captures the short-range behavior of the CSR interaction and does not require the numerical differentiation of a noisy longitudinal charge density. The transient wakefields that occur near bend entry and exit are included. This method can also be generalized to include the effect of upstream radiation that propagates through multiple lattice elements before interacting with the bunch.

  20. Common characteristics of synchrotron radiation and light leaking from a bent optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, X.; Ray, C.

    2016-07-01

    Light leaking from a bent optical fiber shares many properties with synchrotron radiation : in ray optics, both lights are emitted tangentially to a light cylinder; in wave optics, the emission mechanism involves a tunnel effect. The angular distributions of these two radiations are studied in parallel and found to be similar. The same is done for the impact parameter distributions. The latter show interference fringes of the Airy function type. The far field escaped from the fiber is calculated with the Volume Current Method. An optical system observing the impact parameter profile is proposed.

  1. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Edwards, H.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.E.-; Church, M.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2010-08-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchanger to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at A0 photoinjector.

  2. Windowless transition between atmospheric pressure and high vacuum via differential pumping for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Gog, T; Casa, D M; Kuzmenko, I; Krakora, R J; Bolin, T B

    2007-07-01

    A differential pump assembly is introduced which can provide a windowless transition between the full atmospheric pressure of an in-air sample environment and the high-vacuum region of a synchrotron radiation beamline, while providing a clear aperture of approximately 1 mm to pass through the X-ray beam from a modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source. This novel pump assembly is meant to be used as a substitute for an exit vacuum window on synchrotron beamlines, where the existence of such a window would negatively impact the coherent nature of the X-ray beam or would introduce parasitic scattering, distorting weak scattering signals from samples under study. It is found that the length of beam pipe necessary to reduce atmospheric pressure to below 10 mbar is only about 130 mm, making the expected photon transmission for hard X-rays through this pipe competitive with that of a regular Be beamline window. This result is due to turbulent flow dominating the first pumping stage, providing a mechanism of strong gas conductance limitation, which is further enhanced by introducing artificial surface roughness in the pipe. Successive reduction of pressure through the transitional flow regime into the high-vacuum region is accomplished over a length of several meters, using beam pipes of increasing diameter. While the pump assembly has not been tested with X-rays, possible applications are discussed in the context of coherent and small-angle scattering. PMID:17587659

  3. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    PubMed

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.

  4. A Far-infrared Undulator for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser at Tohoku University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Hiroyuki; Hinode, Fujio; Kawai, Masayuki; Nanbu, Kenichi; Miyahara, Fusashi; Yasuda, Mafuyu

    2010-06-01

    In order to develop an intense far-infrared radiation source, a high quality electron beam has been studied at Tohoku University, Sendai. The bunch length of the beam expected is very much shorter than terahertz (THz) wavelength, so that coherent spontaneous emission of synchrotron radiation will be a promising high brilliant far-infrared source. An undulator consisting of permanent magnets has been designed in which optional free electron laser (FEL) will be operated in free space mode. Consequently the minimum gap of the undulator is decided to be 54 mm for 0.36 mm radiation to avoid diffraction loss, and then the period length of 10 cm is employed. The undulator may cover a wavelength range from 0.18 to 0.36 mm with the beam energy of 17 MeV. Property of coherent THz radiation from the undulator and possibility of novel pre-bunched THz FEL is discussed.

  5. Application of synchrotron radiation computed microtomography for quantification of bone microstructure in human and rat bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Liebert Parreiras; Barroso, Regina Cély; de Almeida, André Pereira; Braz, Delson; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; de Andrade, Cherley Borba; Tromba, Giuliana

    2012-05-01

    This work aims to evaluate histomorphometric quantification by synchrotron radiation computed microto-mography in bones of human and rat specimens. Bones specimens are classified as normal and pathological (for human samples) and irradiated and non-irradiated samples (for rat ones). Human bones are specimens which were affected by some injury, or not. Rat bones are specimens which were irradiated, simulating radiotherapy procedures, or not. Images were obtained on SYRMEP beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. The system generated 14 μm tomographic images. The quantification of bone structures were performed directly by the 3D rendered images using a home-made software. Resolution yielded was excellent what facilitate quantification of bone microstructures.

  6. A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Naday, S.; Gruner, S.; Siddons, P.; Arthur, J.; Wehlitz, R.; Padmore, H.

    2001-07-14

    There is a clear gulf between the capabilities of modern synchrotrons to deliver high photon fluxes, and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals. While a huge investment has been made in storage ring technology, there has not to date been a commensurate investment in detector systems. With appropriate detector technology, gains in data rates could be 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in some cases. The US community working in detector technology is under-funded and fragmented and works without the long term funding commitment required for development of the most advanced detector systems. It is becoming apparent that the US is falling behind its international competitors in provision of state-of-the-art detector technology for cutting edge synchrotron radiation based experiments.

  7. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-01-01

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the National Synchrotron Light Source) and the effects of these figure errors on two classes of soft x-ray beamlines are presented.

  8. Application of synchrotron radiation computed microtomography for quantification of bone microstructure in human and rat bones

    SciTech Connect

    Parreiras Nogueira, Liebert; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Borba de Andrade, Cherley; Tromba, Giuliana

    2012-05-17

    This work aims to evaluate histomorphometric quantification by synchrotron radiation computed microto-mography in bones of human and rat specimens. Bones specimens are classified as normal and pathological (for human samples) and irradiated and non-irradiated samples (for rat ones). Human bones are specimens which were affected by some injury, or not. Rat bones are specimens which were irradiated, simulating radiotherapy procedures, or not. Images were obtained on SYRMEP beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. The system generated 14 {mu}m tomographic images. The quantification of bone structures were performed directly by the 3D rendered images using a home-made software. Resolution yielded was excellent what facilitate quantification of bone microstructures.

  9. Synchrotron Radiation from Outer Space and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    The universe provides numerous extremely interesting astrophysical sources of synchrotron X radiation. The Chandra X-ray Observatory and other X-ray missions provide powerful probes of these and other cosmic X-ray sources. Chandra is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program which also includes the Hubble Space telescope, the Spitzer Infrared Telescope Facility, and the now defunct Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory provides the best angular resolution (sub-arcsecond) of any previous, current, or planned (for the foreseeable near future) space-based X-ray instrumentation. We present here a brief overview of the technical capability of this X-Ray observatory and some of the remarkable discoveries involving cosmic synchrotron sources.

  10. Nuclear Bragg scattering studies in [sup 57]Fe with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haustein, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of nuclear Bragg x-ray scattering of synchrotron radiation, using crystals of [alpha]-[sup 57]Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3], have been carried out at the NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Cornell University CHESS facility. These studies have demonstrated that nuclear resonance states can be used to produce filtered x-ray beams which have extremely narrow bandwidth, small angular divergence and unique polarization and temporal properties. this combination of characteristics, unobtainable with radioactive sources, makes synchrotron-based Moessbauer spectroscopy feasible and is an important complement to existing methods. A review of the experimental methodology is presented. As well as come suggestions for fuller exploitation of this new technique.

  11. Nuclear Bragg scattering studies in {sup 57}Fe with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haustein, P.E.

    1993-03-01

    Studies of nuclear Bragg x-ray scattering of synchrotron radiation, using crystals of {alpha}-{sup 57}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, have been carried out at the NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Cornell University CHESS facility. These studies have demonstrated that nuclear resonance states can be used to produce filtered x-ray beams which have extremely narrow bandwidth, small angular divergence and unique polarization and temporal properties. this combination of characteristics, unobtainable with radioactive sources, makes synchrotron-based Moessbauer spectroscopy feasible and is an important complement to existing methods. A review of the experimental methodology is presented. As well as come suggestions for fuller exploitation of this new technique.

  12. Applications of infrared synchrotron radiation to microanalysis of advanced composite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meilunas, R.; Carr, G.L.; Tobin, A.

    1995-12-31

    The utility of characterizing both polymer and ceramic matrix composites, using the enhanced sensitivity provided by an infrared microscope integrated with a synchrotron light source, is investigated. It is shown that by substitution of the conventional infrared globar source in the microscope with high brightness IR synchrotron radiation, an increase in spectral sensitivity for both microtransmission and microreflectance can be obtained over significantly reduced sampling (aperture) areas. The improved microreflectance capability is found to considerably simplify the characterization of structural composites by eliminating the difficult microtome sectioning typically required for IR microanalysis over small (< 10 x 10 micron) sample areas. Application of the technique to thermo-oxidative stability studies of polyimide / carbon fiber composite and silicon carboxide glass (Blackglas) / Nextel fiber ceramic matrix composite systems is presented.

  13. Orbit correction using an eigenvector method with constraints for synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Kentaro; Obina, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Nakamura, Norio; Takaki, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    An eigenvector method with constraints (EVC) is proposed as a new orbit correction scheme for synchrotron light sources. EVC efficiently corrects the global orbit in a storage ring, and can simultaneously perform exact correction of local orbits without deterioration of the global orbit. To demonstrate the advantages of EVC over the ordinary eigenvector method (EV), we carried out experimental studies at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF-ring) and the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The performance of EVC was systematically examined at PF-ring and PF-AR. The experimental results agreed well with the simulated ones. Consequently, we confirmed that EVC easily realized orbit correction for both global and local orbits, and that it was very effective for the beam stabilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources.

  14. Multielemental analysis of samples from patients with dermatological pathologies using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. C. A. C. R.; Canellas, C. G. L.; Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.

    2014-02-01

    Using synchrotron radiation total X-ray fluorescence (SRTXRF) technique, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in four skin lesions: seborrheic keratosis, fibroepithelial polyp, cherry angioma and dermatosis papulosa nigra. The concentrations of P, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb were evaluated in 62 pairs of lesions and healthy samples, each one having been collected from the same patient. The results revealed significant differences of P, Ca, K, Fe and Cu levels as well as a common trend in their variations between lesion and control samples among the skin diseases. This study revealed a powerful tool that can be useful for skin disorders research. The measurements were conducted at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS).

  15. Synthesis of metallic nanoparticles through X-ray radiolysis using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Okada, Ikuo; Fukuoka, Takao; Sakurai, Ikuya; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    The potential to fabricate metallic nanoparticles directly on silicon substrates from liquid solutions is ideal for three-dimensional lithography systems, drug delivery materials, and sensing applications. Here, we report the successful synthesis of Au, Cu, and Fe nanoparticles from the corresponding liquid solutions [gold(I) trisodium disulphite, copper(II) sulfate, and potassium ferricyanide] by synchrotron (SR) X-ray irradiation. The deposition of gold nanoparticles in the gold(I) trisodium disulphite solution was performed by monochromatic X-ray exposure from synchrotron radiation. The use of ethanol as an additive enabled the nucleation and growth of Cu particles, while no Cu particles were produced in the copper sulfate solution without ethanol with polychromatic SR X-ray irradiation. Fe particles were generated by direct polychromatic SR X-ray irradiation. These results demonstrate the behavior of three-dimensional printers, enabling us to build composite material structures with metallic and plastic materials.

  16. Synchrotron radiation and diffusive shock acceleration - A short review and GRB perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Karlica, Mile

    2015-12-17

    In this talk we present the sponge” model and its possible implications on the GRB afterglow light curves. “Sponge” model describes source of GRB afterglow radiation as fragmented GRB ejecta where bubbles move through the rarefied medium. In the first part of the talk a short introduction to synchrotron radiation and Fermi acceleration was presented. In the assumption that X-ray luminosity of GRB afterglow phase comes from the kinetic energy losses of clouds in ejecta medium radiated as synchrotron radiation we solved currently very simple equation of motion to find which combination of cloud and medium regime describes the afterglow light curve the best. We proposed for the first step to watch simple combinations of expansion regimes for both bubbles and surrounding medium. The closest case to the numerical fit of GRB 150403A with time power law index k = 1.38 is the combination of constant bubbles and Sedov like expanding medium with time power law index k = 1.25. Of course the question of possible mixture of variuos regime combinations is still open within this model.

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing

    SciTech Connect

    Laderman, S; Pianetta, P

    1993-03-01

    Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

  18. Influence of the synchrotron radiation on particle dynamics in a rectangular undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho

    1989-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the synchrotron radiation from an undulating electron beam in a rectangular waveguide. It is shown analytically and numerically that the radiated energy spectrum may differ significantly from the free space result when the undulator length divided by the Lorentz factor of the electron beam is larger than the transverse size of the waveguide. The undulator radiation is identified with the awake field in beam instabilities. The concepts of wake function and impedance are introduced to formulate the present problem in the same manner as the beam instability problem. It is shown that the obtained impedances satisfy the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem and other properties inevitable for wake fields. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Multipurpose furnace for in situ studies of polycrystalline materials using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Hemant; Zuidwijk, Thim; Geerlofs, Nico; Offerman, S. Erik; Wattjes, Alix C.; Amirthalingam, Murugaiyan

    2009-12-15

    We report a multipurpose furnace designed for studies using synchrotron radiation on polycrystalline materials, namely, metals, ceramics, and (semi)crystalline polymers. The furnace has been designed to carry out three-dimensional (3D) x-ray diffraction measurements but can also be used for other types of synchrotron radiation research. The furnace has a very low thermal gradient across the specimen (<0.2 degree sign C/mm). Accurate determination of the temperature can be carried out by welding a thermocouple to the specimen. The furnace can be rotated over an angle of 90 degree sign in order to determine the crystallographic orientation of each individual grain. It is possible to follow growth kinetics of all grains in the illuminated volume of the specimen. The specimen environment can be controlled varying from vacuum (up to 10{sup -5} mbar) to gas or air filled. The maximum temperature of operation is 1500 degree sign C, with the possibility of achieving high heating (up to 20 deg. C/s) and cooling rates (up to 30 deg. C/s without quenching gas). 3D maps of the microstructure of the specimen can be generated at elevated temperatures by bringing the high-resolution detector close to the specimen. We show an example of a simulation of the heat affected zone during the thermal cycle of a weld in a transformation-induced plasticity steel carried out using the furnace. The unique characteristics of the furnace open possibility of new fields in materials research using synchrotron radiation.

  20. X-Tream quality assurance in synchrotron X-ray microbeam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pauline; Cornelius, Iwan; Donzelli, Mattia; Requardt, Herwig; Nemoz, Christian; Petasecca, Marco; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Lerch, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a novel irradiation technique for brain tumours treatment currently under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The technique is based on the spatial fractionation of a highly brilliant synchrotron X-ray beam into an array of microbeams using a multi-slit collimator (MSC). After promising pre-clinical results, veterinary trials have recently commenced requiring the need for dedicated quality assurance (QA) procedures. The quality of MRT treatment demands reproducible and precise spatial fractionation of the incoming synchrotron beam. The intensity profile of the microbeams must also be quickly and quantitatively characterized prior to each treatment for comparison with that used for input to the dose-planning calculations. The Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (University of Wollongong, Australia) has developed an X-ray treatment monitoring system (X-Tream) which incorporates a high-spatial-resolution silicon strip detector (SSD) specifically designed for MRT. In-air measurements of the horizontal profile of the intrinsic microbeam X-ray field in order to determine the relative intensity of each microbeam are presented, and the alignment of the MSC is also assessed. The results show that the SSD is able to resolve individual microbeams which therefore provides invaluable QA of the horizontal field size and microbeam number and shape. They also demonstrate that the SSD used in the X-Tream system is very sensitive to any small misalignment of the MSC. In order to allow as rapid QA as possible, a fast alignment procedure of the SSD based on X-ray imaging with a low-intensity low-energy beam has been developed and is presented in this publication. PMID:27577773

  1. Minimally Invasive Coronary Angiography with Monochromatic X-Rays Developmental Studies Utilizing Synchrotron Radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, John Noel

    Iodine-containing compounds are used as contrast agents in obtaining X-ray images of blood vessels for medical diagnosis. If the X-ray contrast produced by iodine can be enhanced sufficiently relative to that produced by the intervening body tissues, it becomes possible to obtain images of arteries by introducing the contrast agent into the venous circulation rather than through an arterial catheter directly into the vessel under examination. This prospect is attractive because invasion of the arterial system is the chief cause of the medical complications that are encountered in the application of current angiographic procedures. An imaging system that shows promise of accomplishing this goal for examination of the coronary arteries has been developed for operation in an X-ray beam at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Iodine-selective contrast enhancement is achieved by logarithmic subtraction of two images of the same field. One of these images is formed by monochromatic X-rays of energy just above the characteristic iodine K-absorption edge at 33.17 keV, the other by X-rays of energy just below the edge. The computer-controlled imaging system acquires digitized images line by line while scanning the subject through a stationary X-ray beam of linear profile. At present, only synchrotron radiation can provide monochromatic X-ray beams of intensity sufficient to image the small and rapidly moving coronary arteries. Preliminary studies of static phantoms and in vivo studies of dogs establish the feasibility of using synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source for iodine-selective imaging with sensitivity and speed adequate for providing sharp images of coronary arteries after intravenous introduction of contrast agent. Application of the method to human subjects began with imaging studies of three patients in May, 1986.

  2. The application of a synchrotron radiation microprobe to trace element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is light emitted by electrons when accelerated in a circular orbit. Properties of synchrotron radiation important to trace element analysis by x-ray fluorescence analysis include a broad, continuous and tunable energy spectrum for K- and L-shell excitation of all elements; a linearly polarized source reducing the scattered radiation backgrounds; low energy deposition in the target; and an appreciable flux in narrow energy bandwidths for chemical speciation. Experiments to date have generally used ''white'' continuous spectra with a low energy absorber and no focussing, but future runs will use focussing mirrors which increase intensities by a factor of more than 1000. Monochromators will be used to select the energy and bandwidths appropriate to the experiment. Detection limits for thin biomedical samples using a solid-state detector, a 0.5 mm beam and a 5 min counting interval were in the range of 30 ppB for calcium to 50 ppB for zinc. A prototype wet cell was designed, constructed and tested using cat cardiac myocytes with the result that major trace elements such as iron could be quantitated in single myocytes. The x-ray microprobe was used to localize gallium in fetal rat bone explants after being cultured in BGJ media containing 25 ..mu..M Ga(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. The high brightness of x rays from a synchrotron source makes possible the development of computerized tomography on a micrometer scale. A tomogram of a freeze-dried caterpillar head was produced in a 50 min scan. The pixel size was 30 ..mu..m using a 20-..mu..m beam. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Analysis and calibration of stage axial vibration for synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography (SR nano-CT) is a powerful analysis tool and can be used to perform chemical identification, mapping, or speciation of carbon and other elements together with X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. In practical applications, there are often challenges for SR nano-CT due to the misaligned geometry caused by the sample stage axial vibration. It occurs quite frequently because of experimental constraints from the mechanical error of manufacturing and assembly and the thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. The axial vibration will lead to the structure overlap among neighboring layers and degrade imaging results by imposing artifacts into the nano-CT images. It becomes worse for samples with complicated axial structure. In this work, we analyze the influence of axial vibration on nano-CT image by partial derivative. Then, an axial vibration calibration method for SR nano-CT is developed and investigated. It is based on the cross correlation of plane integral curves of the sample at different view angles. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission X-ray microscope nano-CT setup at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results demonstrate that the presented method can handle the stage axial vibration. It can work for random axial vibration and needs neither calibration phantom nor additional calibration scanning. It will be helpful for the development and application of synchrotron radiation nano-CT systems.

  4. Analysis and calibration of stage axial vibration for synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography (SR nano-CT) is a powerful analysis tool and can be used to perform chemical identification, mapping, or speciation of carbon and other elements together with X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. In practical applications, there are often challenges for SR nano-CT due to the misaligned geometry caused by the sample stage axial vibration. It occurs quite frequently because of experimental constraints from the mechanical error of manufacturing and assembly and the thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. The axial vibration will lead to the structure overlap among neighboring layers and degrade imaging results by imposing artifacts into the nano-CT images. It becomes worse for samples with complicated axial structure. In this work, we analyze the influence of axial vibration on nano-CT image by partial derivative. Then, an axial vibration calibration method for SR nano-CT is developed and investigated. It is based on the cross correlation of plane integral curves of the sample at different view angles. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission X-ray microscope nano-CT setup at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results demonstrate that the presented method can handle the stage axial vibration. It can work for random axial vibration and needs neither calibration phantom nor additional calibration scanning. It will be helpful for the development and application of synchrotron radiation nano-CT systems. PMID:26265032

  5. Synchrotron Radiation Sheds Fresh Light on Plant Research: The Use of Powerful Techniques to Probe Structure and Composition of Plants.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Permual; Willick, Ian R; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Tanino, Karen K

    2015-07-01

    While synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool in material and biomedical sciences, it is still underutilized in plant research. This mini review attempts to introduce the potential of synchrotron-based spectroscopic and imaging methods and their applications to plant sciences. Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray absorption and fluorescence techniques, and two- and three-dimensional imaging techniques are examined. We also discuss the limitations of synchrotron-based research in plant sciences, specifically the types of plant samples that can be used. Despite limitations, the unique features of synchrotron radiation such as high brightness, polarization and pulse properties offer great advantages over conventional spectroscopic and imaging tools and enable the correlation of the structure and chemical composition of plants with biochemical function. Modern detector technologies and experimental methodologies are thus enabling plant scientists to investigate aspects of plant sciences such as ultrafast kinetics of biochemical reactions, mineral uptake, transport and accumulation, and dynamics of cell wall structure and composition during environmental stress in unprecedented ways using synchrotron beamlines. The potential for the automation of some of these synchrotron technologies and their application to plant phenotyping is also discussed.

  6. Experimental comparison between speckle and grating-based imaging technique using synchrotron radiation X-rays.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-08-01

    X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging techniques provide important and complementary information that is inaccessible to the conventional absorption contrast imaging. Both grating-based imaging (GBI) and speckle-based imaging (SBI) are able to retrieve multi-modal images using synchrotron as well as lab-based sources. However, no systematic comparison has been made between the two techniques so far. We present an experimental comparison between GBI and SBI techniques with synchrotron radiation X-ray source. Apart from the simple experimental setup, we find SBI does not suffer from the issue of phase unwrapping, which can often be problematic for GBI. In addition, SBI is also superior to GBI since two orthogonal differential phase gradients can be simultaneously extracted by one dimensional scan. The GBI has less stringent requirements for detector pixel size and transverse coherence length when a second or third grating can be used. This study provides the reference for choosing the most suitable technique for diverse imaging applications at synchrotron facility.

  7. Perfect crystal propagator for physical optics simulations with Synchrotron Radiation Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, John P.; Chubar, Oleg; Suvorov, Alexey

    2014-09-01

    Until now, a treatment of dynamical diffraction from perfect crystals has been missing in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) wavefront propagation computer code despite the widespread use of crystals on X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Now a special "Propagator" module for calculating dynamical diffraction from a perfect crystal in the Bragg case has been written in C++, integrated into the SRW C/C++ library and made available for simulations using the Python interface of SRW. The propagator performs local processing of the frequency-domain electric field in the angular representation. A 2-D Fast Fourier Transform is used for changing the field representation from/to the coordinate representation before and after applying the crystal propagator. This ensures seamless integration of the new propagator with the existing functionalities of the SRW package, allows compatibility with existing propagators for other optical elements, and enables the simulation of complex beamlines transporting partially coherent X-rays. The code has been benchmarked by comparison with predictions made by plane-wave and spherical-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Test simulations for a selection of X-ray synchrotron beamlines are also shown.

  8. Fast response amplitude scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyev, E. N.; Sheromov, M. A.; Sokolov, A. S.

    1986-05-01

    The present paper describes a scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation. This detector has been created on the basis of a scintillator and a photoelectron multiplier (FEU-130) and its construction allows one to use the specific features of the time characteristics of synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring. In a given range of amplitudes, the detector electronics makes a 64-channel amplitude analysis of the FEU-130 signal strobed by the revolution frequency of an electron bunch in the storage ring ( f0 = 818 kHz). There is the possibility of operating the detector at high intensities of the monochromatic radiation incident on the scintillator. Such a possibility is directly provided by the time structure of SR and is not realizable with the use of other X-ray sources. The detector will find wide application in studies on X-ray structural analysis, transmission and fluorescent EXAFS- and XANES-spectroscopy, transmission scanning microscopy and microtomography, calibration of X-ray detectors and as a monitor on SR beams from the storage ring VEPP-4.

  9. Complementarity of real-time neutron and synchrotron radiation structural investigations in molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, V. L.; Kiselev, M. A.

    2010-12-15

    General problems of the complementarity of different physical methods and specific features of the interaction between neutron and matter and neutron diffraction with respect to the time of flight are discussed. The results of studying the kinetics of structural changes in lipid membranes under hydration and self-assembly of the lipid bilayer in the presence of a detergent are reported. The possibilities of the complementarity of neutron diffraction and X-ray synchrotron radiation and developing a free-electron laser are noted.

  10. Biological X-ray spectroscopy on 3rd generation synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Corie Y.; Chen, Jie; Peng, Gang; George, Simon J.; van Elp, Jan; Cramer, Stephen P.

    1995-02-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory deliver 1-2 orders of magnitude more monochromatic flux (and many orders of magnitude higher brightness) than previously available. This paper describes the ring and existing beamlines of the advanced light source, and plans for crystallography and elliptical wiggler stations are discussed. Using nickel metalloprotein spectra recorded at NSLS and SSRL as examples, this paper describes how the higher monochromatic flux available from the ALS will be used for biological soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  11. The Advanced Light Source: A third-generation Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2002-08-14

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the University of California is a ''third-generation'' synchrotron radiation source optimized for highest brightness at ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energies. It also provides world-class performance at hard x-ray photon energies. Berkeley Lab operates the ALS for the United States Department of Energy as a national user facility that is available 24 hours/day around the year for research by scientists from industrial, academic, and government laboratories primarily from the United States but also from abroad.

  12. Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of our Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Stephen R.

    2006-04-05

    Sample-return missions and natural collection processes have provided us with a surprisingly extensive collection of matter from Solar System bodies other than the Earth. These collections include samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, interplanetary dust, and, recently, from the Sun (solar wind) and a comet. This presentation will describe some of these materials, how they were collected, and what we have learned from them. Synchrotron radiation analyses of these materials are playing an increasingly valuable role in unraveling the histories and properities of the parent Solar System bodies.

  13. Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of Our Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Stephen R.

    2009-04-05

    Sample-return missions and natural collection processes have provided us with a surprisingly extensive collection of matter from Solar System bodies other than the Earth. These collections include samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, interplanetary dust, and, recently, from the Sun (solar wind) and a comet. This presentation will describe some of these materials, how they were collected, and what we have learned from them. Synchrotron radiation analyses of these materials are playing an increasingly valuable role in unraveling the histories and properities of the parent Solar System bodies.

  14. The recent development of an X-ray grating interferometer at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haohua; Kou Bingquan; Xi Yan; Qi Juncheng; Sun Jianqi; Mohr, Juergen; Boerner, Martin; Zhao Jun; Xu, Lisa X.; Xiao Tiqiao; Wang Yujie

    2012-07-31

    An X-ray grating interferometer has been installed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). Three sets of phase gratings were designed to cover the wide X-ray energy range needed for biological and soft material imaging capabilities. The performance of the grating interferometer has been evaluated by a tomography study of a PMMA particle packing and a new born mouse chest. In the mouse chest study, the carotid artery and carotid vein inside the mouse can be identified in situ without contrast agents.

  15. A photoelectron velocity map imaging spectrometer for experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Avaldi, L.; Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Cautero, G.; Stebel, L.; Sergo, R.; Pravica, L.; Ovcharenko, Y.

    2011-03-15

    A velocity map imaging/ion time-of-flight spectrometer designed specifically for pump-probe experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations is described. The in-house built delay line detector can be used in two modes: the high spatial resolution mode and the coincidence mode. In the high spatial resolution mode a kinetic energy resolution of 6% has been achieved. The coincidence mode can be used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the pump-probe experiments either by using a gate to count electrons only when the laser is present or by recording coincidences with the ion formed in the ionization process.

  16. A magnetizing system for dichroism measurements in soft x-ray emission excited by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dallera, C.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    1996-02-01

    We present the design and performance of a magnetic circuit suitable for magnetizing solid samples in the measurements of soft x-ray emission dichroism excited by synchrotron radiation. The system allows a variety of samples to be magnetized and satisfies the rather stringent geometrical constraints due to the need for minimizing the effect of photon self-absorption by the sample. The magnetic circuit is ultrahigh vacuum compatible, can reach about 2800 G, and allows fine adjustment of sample position. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Extraterrestrial Materials: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation Analyses in the Study of Our Solar System

    ScienceCinema

    Sutton, Stephen R. [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2016-07-12

    Sample-return missions and natural collection processes have provided us with a surprisingly extensive collection of matter from Solar System bodies other than the Earth. These collections include samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, interplanetary dust, and, recently, from the Sun (solar wind) and a comet. This presentation will describe some of these materials, how they were collected, and what we have learned from them. Synchrotron radiation analyses of these materials are playing an increasingly valuable role in unraveling the histories and properities of the parent Solar System bodies.

  18. Strong coupling between adenine nucleobases in DNA single strands revealed by circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhane, Umesh; Holm, Anne I. S.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2008-02-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) experiments on DNA single strands (dAn) at the ASTRID synchrotron radiation facility reveal that eight adenine (A) bases electronically couple upon 190nm excitation. After n=8 , the CD signal increases linearly with n with a slope equal to the sum of the coupling terms. Nearest neighbor interactions account for only 24% of the CD signal whereas electronic communication is limited to nearest neighbors for two other exciton bands observed at 218 and 251nm (i.e., dimer excited states). Electronic coupling between bases in DNA is important for nonradiative deexcitation of electronically excited states since the hazardous energy is spread over a larger spatial region.

  19. Time Resolved Studies of ZnO(Eu) Nanostructure Luminescence Using Short Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Heigl, F.; Jurgensen, A.; Zhou, X.-T.; Murphy, M.; Ko, J.Y.P.; Lam, S.; Sham, T.K.; Regier, T.; Blyth, R.I.R.; Coulthard, I.; Zuin, L.; Hu, Y.-F.; Armelao, L.; Gordon, R.A.; Brewe, D.

    2008-10-06

    X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) is a well established technique to study nano structured light emitting materials. XEOL bares the essential features necessary for the study of advanced nano structured materials like element specifity, good quantum efficiency, and easy approach for time resolution. Being sensitive to the geometry of the material on a nano-scale, luminescence gives insight into the phenomenologic correlation of structural, optical, and electronic properties. Besides structural aspects we study the time behavior of nanostructured ZnO (Eu) in a pump-probe like experiment, using the time structure of synchrotron radiation.

  20. Using of Synchrotron radiation for study of multielement composition of the small mammals diet and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezel, V. S.; Koutzenogii, K. P.; Mukhacheva, S. V.; Chankina, O. V.; Savchenko, T. I.

    2007-05-01

    The Synchrotron radiation X-ray Fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) was used for estimation of "geochemical selection" of elements by small mammals, which belong to different trophic groups and inhabit polluted and background areas (the Middle Ural). The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Cd, Pb in the diet and into hepar of a herbivorous ( bank vole) and carnivorous ( Laxmann's shrew) small mammals were compared. Herbivores play a particular role in chemical elements translocation between trophic levels, limiting element transition to consumers of the consequent levels. Whereas, insectivores concentrate most elements in their tissues under the same conditions.

  1. An x-ray fluorescence study of lake sediments from ancient Turkey using synchrotron radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Alatas, A.; Alp, E. E.; Friedman, E. S.; Jennings, G.; Johnson, C. E.; Lai, B.; Mini, S. M.; Sato, Y.; Wilkinson, T. J.; Yener, K. A.

    1999-03-10

    Sediments from relic Lake Golbasi were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence with synchrotrons radiation to determine changes in element concentrations over time with selected elements serving as proxies for environmental change. Increases in Ca and Sr suggest soil formation during a dry period, from ca. 4500 BC to ca. 200 AD at which point K, Rb, Zr, Ti, and Y increase, indicating the return of a wet environment. Soil erosion, represented by Cr and Ni, increases ca. 7000 BC, probably as a consequence of environmental change, prior to suggested exploitation of natural resources by the newly urbanized society of the third millennium BC.

  2. High-Resolution Measurements of Photoionization of Ions Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A.; Covington, A.M.; Emmons, E.D.; Gharaibeh, M.F.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Hinojosa, G.; Dominguez, I.; Ackerman, G.; Bozek, J.D.; Canton, S.; Rude, B.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Schlachter, A. S.; Folkmann, F.

    2003-08-26

    Measurement of absolute cross sections for photoionization of ions has become feasible by merging a well-collimated ion beam with a monochromatic beam of synchrotron radiation. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source permits such measurements to be extended to multiply charged ions, and makes possible systematic studies along isoelectronic sequences. The evolution of atomic spectra along such sequences is commonly studied theoretically, but the predictive ability of the theoretical methods remains largely untested. Absolute cross-section measurements are presented for the first three ionic members of the isoelectronic sequence of nitrogen (O+, F2+ and Ne3+)

  3. Interfacial electronic structure of Na deposited on rubrene thin film studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ching-Hsuan; Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Lin, Hong-Cheu; Pi, Tun-Wen

    2015-12-01

    The electronic structure of rubrene doped with various concentrations of Na was studied by synchrotron-radiation photoemission. Three stages of development were found with increasing Na concentration; Na penetrating deep into the organic film, followed by development of gap states, and ended with a metallic Na film. The charge transfer from Na to rubrene resulted in a vacuum-level shift. By doping Na into rubrene, we could control the IP of the organic molecule, which is favorable for application in organic semiconductor devices.

  4. Electric field detection of coherent synchrotron radiation in a storage ring generated using laser bunch slicing

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, I.; Shimosato, H.; Bito, M.; Furusawa, K.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Kimura, S.; Katoh, M.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Ashida, M.

    2012-03-12

    The electric field of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by laser bunch slicing in a storage ring has been detected by an electro-optic sampling method. The gate pulses for sampling are sent through a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fiber. The observed electric field profile of the CSR is in good agreement with the spectrum of the CSR observed using Fourier transform far-infrared spectrometry, indicating good phase stability in the CSR. The longitudinal density profiles of electrons modulated by laser pulses were evaluated from the electric field profile.

  5. Radio images of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation at 6, 20, and 90 cm

    SciTech Connect

    De pater, I. )

    1991-08-01

    VLA observations of Jupiter's nonthermal radiation at wavelengths of 6, 20, and 90 cm are presented and compared. The spatial resolution in all images is 0.25 R(J) (R/J/ = Jovian radius). The brightness distribution of Jupiter is very similar at each of the three wavelengths, although the radiation peaks at 6 cm are at a slightly larger distance from Jupiter than those at the longer wavelengths. This is due to the higher rate of synchrotron radiation losses at the shorter wavelengths. Radial profiles through the images clearly show the presence of a 'shoulder' or flattening in the intensity at about 2.5 R(J) due to absorption effects by the satellite Amalthea. In addition, the so-called 'hot region' in Jupiter's radiation belts is clearly present at all three wavelengths: images of the planet at a cml (central meridian longitude) of about 30-40 deg show the radiation peak to the right of Jupiter to be much brighter than the peak at the left, while images at a cml of about 210-220 deg show the opposite. The difference in brightness between the two radiation peaks is similar at all three wavelengths. 21 refs.

  6. Investigation of the coherent synchrotron radiation spectrum as a probe of charge dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, A.J.; Tigner, M.

    1993-02-01

    Coherent synchrotron, Cherenkov and transition radiation have generated and measured in the far infrared spectral region. This work represents the first identification and separation of the Cherenkov and transition radiation components with transition radiation producing the strongest signal. High-intensity picosecond pulses of radiation are observed for all three sources. The angular dependence in the mm wave region is not the same as that given by high-frequency radiation expressions since the wavelength and the beam radiator size are comparable; hence diffraction effects are important. A prototype polarizing Michelson interferometer has been designed, constructed and is now being tested. The diffraction-limited design meets the demands of the rigorous space and experimental conditions in the linac area. The instrument is of rugged constructed using retroreflectors and thus is optically stable for long periods of time. It contains both reference and interferogram detectors to minimize the influence of linac drifts on the data analysis. To eliminate the intensity loss at low frequencies due to diffraction and waveguide effects the next generation of interferometer and detector will have 2x larger apertures.

  7. Investigation of the coherent synchrotron radiation spectrum as a probe of charge dynamics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, A.J.; Tigner, M.

    1993-02-01

    Coherent synchrotron, Cherenkov and transition radiation have generated and measured in the far infrared spectral region. This work represents the first identification and separation of the Cherenkov and transition radiation components with transition radiation producing the strongest signal. High-intensity picosecond pulses of radiation are observed for all three sources. The angular dependence in the mm wave region is not the same as that given by high-frequency radiation expressions since the wavelength and the beam radiator size are comparable; hence diffraction effects are important. A prototype polarizing Michelson interferometer has been designed, constructed and is now being tested. The diffraction-limited design meets the demands of the rigorous space and experimental conditions in the linac area. The instrument is of rugged constructed using retroreflectors and thus is optically stable for long periods of time. It contains both reference and interferogram detectors to minimize the influence of linac drifts on the data analysis. To eliminate the intensity loss at low frequencies due to diffraction and waveguide effects the next generation of interferometer and detector will have 2x larger apertures.

  8. PREFACE: 17th Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    These proceedings are a collection of the articles presented at the seventeenth Pan-American Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Conference SRI2013, held on the campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States of America, 19-21 June, 2013. SRI2013 was jointly hosted by the Cornell University Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), and the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) at NIST. This meeting's focus was clearly on instrumentation, thus fulfilling the intent of this SRI meeting series, which was initiated at NIST, then the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), in 1979. SRI2013 hosted more than 150 delegates, despite the new US governmental travel restrictions. This proceedings series aims to be an essential reference work for practitioners in the field. It primarily documents the evolution and development of techniques, but also recent scientific advances, that were presented during the two and a half days of the conference. We are extremely thankful to all the authors who contributed to making these proceedings a volume of reference as well as to the reviewers for their careful reading and constructive recommendations for improving the articles. Great thanks go to Robert Dragoset at NIST, for creating and maintaining the conference website and generating the conference logo. We are also thankful for the excellent support we received from the Conference Program at NIST, especially Kathy Kilmer and Angela Ellis. And we would like to dedicate these proceedings to the memory of Kathy Kilmer, who passed away on 15 October, 2013. NIST will not be the same without her. The Co-Editors: Uwe Arp (SURF/NIST) Peter Reversz (CHESS) Gwyn P Williams (Jefferson Lab)

  9. Atomic and Molecular Photoelectron and Auger Electron SpectroscopyStudies Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were a 130 measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra o f the ejected electrons. The ''a double-angle-TOF'' method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collect ion efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. Several results were obtained for Xe using photon energies in the range hv {approx_equal} 60-190 eV, where excitation and ionization of the inner-subshell 4d electrons dominates. The 4d asymmetry parameter {beta} exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. As predicted, the 5p asymmetry parameter was observed to deviate strongly from that calculated using the independent-electron model, due to intershell correlation with the 4d electrons.

  10. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong Ki; Youn, Hwa Shik

    2007-01-19

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a x 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation.

  11. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong Ki; Youn, Hwa Shik

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a × 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation.

  12. Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) Coatings for Vacuum Systems in Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, Paolo; Conte, Andrea; Raimondi, Stefano; Bonucci, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Non evaporable Getter (NEG) films, sputter deposited onto the internal surfaces of vacuum chambers, have been proposed by CERN to substantially reduce the gas pressure in UHV-XHV systems. The NEG film acts as a conductance-free distributed pump inside a chamber. Being a barrier for gases it also reduces thermal out-gassing, thus allowing the achievement of very demanding pressure conditions. These features are ideal for very narrow, conductance limited chambers, like Insertion Devices, which cannot be always efficiently pumped by ordinary means. Recent investigations have also shown that NEG coatings do present additional interesting features, like low secondary electron yield and low gas de-sorption rates under ions, electrons and photons bombardment, compared to traditional technical surfaces. Experimental tests, carried out in several high energy machines and synchrotron radiations facilities have so far confirmed the benefits of NEG films in term of better vacuum, longer beam life time and stability, simplified machine design, reduced conditioning time and overall improved machine performances. For these reasons, NEG coating technology is now gaining increasing attention and it is seriously considered for upgrades in a number of machines and for future projects. In the present paper, we report SAES getters experience on NEG coating of chambers of different geometries, materials and sizes for a variety of projects related to synchrotron radiation facilities. Examples of applications in various machines, as well as typical issues related to chambers preparation, film deposition, quality control and characterization, are given.

  13. Structural anomalies in undoped Gallium Arsenide observed in high resolution diffraction imaging with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, B.; Kuriyama, M.; Dobbyn, R. C.; Laor, U.; Larson, D.; Brown, M.

    1988-01-01

    Novel, streak-like disruption features restricted to the plane of diffraction have recently been observed in images obtained by synchrotron radiation diffraction from undoped, semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals. These features were identified as ensembles of very thin platelets or interfaces lying in (110) planes, and a structural model consisting of antiphase domain boundaries was proposed. We report here the other principal features observed in high resolution monochromatic synchrotron radiation diffraction images: (quasi) cellular structure; linear, very low-angle subgrain boundaries in (110) directions, and surface stripes in a (110) direction. In addition, we report systematic differences in the acceptance angle for images involving various diffraction vectors. When these observations are considered together, a unifying picture emerges. The presence of ensembles of thin (110) antiphase platelet regions or boundaries is generally consistent not only with the streak-like diffraction features but with the other features reported here as well. For the formation of such regions we propose two mechanisms, operating in parallel, that appear to be consistent with the various defect features observed by a variety of techniques.

  14. Image reconstruction from sparse data in synchrotron-radiation-based microtomography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, D.; Xiao, X.; Bian, J.; Han, X.; Sidky, E. Y.; De Carlo, F.; Pan, X.

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based microcomputed-tomography (SR-μCT) is a powerful tool for yielding 3D structural information of high spatial and contrast resolution about a specimen preserved in its natural state. A large number of projection views are required currently for yielding SR-μCT images by use of existing algorithms without significant artifacts. When a wet biological specimen is imaged, synchrotron x-ray radiation from a large number of projection views can result in significant structural deformation within the specimen. A possible approach to reducing imaging time and specimen deformation is to decrease the number of projection views. In the work, using reconstruction algorithms developed recently for medical computed tomography (CT), we investigate and demonstrate image reconstruction from sparse-view data acquired in SR-μCT. Numerical results of our study suggest that images of practical value can be obtained from data acquired at a number of projection views significantly lower than those used currently in a typical SR-μCT imaging experiment. PMID:21529012

  15. Application of a One-Dimensional Position Sensitive Chamber on Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huirong; Liu, Mei

    2014-02-01

    In the last few years, wire chambers have been frequently used for X-ray detection because of their low cost, large area and reliability. X-ray diffraction is an irreplaceable method for powder crystal lattice measurements. A one-dimensional single-wire chamber has been developed in our lab to provide high position resolution for powder diffraction experiments using synchrotron radiation. There are 200 readout strips of 0.5 mm width with a pitch of 1.0 mm in the X direction, and the working gas is a mixture of Ar and CO2 (90/10). The one-dimensional position of the original ionization point is determined by the adjacent strip's distribution information using the center of gravity method. Recently, a study of the detector's performance and diffraction image was completed at the 1W1B laboratory of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) using a sample of SiO2. Most of the relative errors between the measured values of diffraction angles and existing data were less than 1%. The best position resolution achieved for the detector in the test was 71 μm (σ value) with a 20 μm slit collimator. Finally, by changing the detector height in incremental distances from the center of the sample, the one-dimensional detector achieved a two-dimensional diffraction imaging function, and the results are in good agreement with standard data.

  16. Photostimulated phosphor based image plate detection system for HRVUV beamline at Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Sunanda, K.; Babita, K.; Rao, S. V. N. Bhaskara; Ahmad, Shabbir; Tauheed, A.

    2014-12-01

    A high resolution vacuum ultraviolet (HRVUV) beamline based on a 6.65 m off-plane Eagle spectrometer is in operation at the Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source, RRCAT, Indore, India. To facilitate position sensitive detection and fast spectral recording, a new BaFBr:Eu2+ phosphor based image plate (IP) detection system interchangeable with the existing photomultiplier (PMT) scanning system has been installed on this beamline. VUV photoabsorption studies on Xe, O2, N2O and SO2 are carried out to evaluate the performance of the IP detection system. An FWHM of ~0.5 Å is achieved for the Xe atomic line at 1469.6 Å. Reproducibility of spectra is found to be within the experimental resolution. Compared to the PMT scanning system, the IP shows several advantages in terms of sensitivity, recording time and S/N ratio, which are highlighted in the paper. This is the first report of incorporation of an IP detection system in a VUV beamline using synchrotron radiation. Commissioning of the new detection system is expected to greatly enhance the utilization of the HRVUV beamline as a number of spectroscopic experiments which require fast recording times combined with a good signal to noise ratio are now feasible.

  17. Development of polishing methods for Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, B.A.; Brown, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    Material properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) make it ideal for use in mirrors for synchrotron radiation experiments. We developed methods to grind and polish flat samples of CVD SiC down to measured surface roughness values as low as 1.1 Angstroms rms. We describe the processing details, including observations we made during trial runs with alternative processing recipes. We conclude that pitch polishing using progressively finer diamond abrasive, augmented with specific water based lubricants and additives, produces superior results. Using methods based on these results, a cylindrical and a toroidal mirror, each about 100 x 300mm, were respectively finished by Continental Optical and Frank Cooke, Incorporated. WYCO Interferometry shows these mirrors have surface roughness less than 5.7 Angstroms rms. These mirrors have been installed on the LLNL/UC X-ray Calibration and Standards Facility at the Stanford Synthrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  18. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  19. Vertical synchrotron radiation beamline for proximity X-ray lithography: Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreeva, Inna N.; Kozhevnikov, Igor V.

    1997-02-01

    The general physical principles of operation of the vertical beamline of synchrotron radiation (SR) intended for proximity X-ray lithography are considered. An optical system provides a deflection of the SR beam to the vertical plane, a cutoff of the hard X-rays, a uniform illumination of a wafer, a normal incidence of X-ray beam onto a mask, and a small enough divergency of the radiation. A vertical SR beamline makes it possible to circumvent the expensive development of vertical-plane displacement steppers and to use the conventional horizontal ones, to exclude the scanning of the SR beam across the mask and to reduce the requirements imposed on the accuracy of alignment of a gap between the mask and the wafer.

  20. Synchrotron radiation shielding design for the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Gomez, Ariel; Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Ullrich, Doug; Chapman, Dean

    2014-05-01

    At the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the plans for the construction of three beamlines under the Brockhouse Project are underway. The beamlines, to be classified under the CLS Phase III beamlines, will comprise of a wiggler and an undulator, and will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The energy range of these beamlines will be 7-22 keV (low energy wiggler beamline), 20-94 keV (high energy wiggler beamline), and 5-21 keV (undulator beamline). The beamlines will have a total of five hutches. Presented is the shielding design against target scattered white and monochromatic synchrotron radiations for these beamlines. The shielding design is based on: scatter target material-water, dose object-anthropomorphic phantom of the adult human (anteroposterior-AP geometry), and shielding thicknesses of steel and lead that will drop the radiation leakage from the hutches to below 0.5 μSv/h.

  1. Influence of synchrotron radiation on corrosion at the water—metal boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Ishimaru, Hajime

    1993-06-01

    Radiation damage due to synchrotron radiation has been studied at the boundary of cooling water and metal related to vacuum chambers: oxygen free copper (OFC). The damage was evaluated by measuring the dissolved ion concentration in water, sampled from the pure water circulating system with a sample pipe (10 mm in inner diameter and 1 mm in thickness), irradiated by synchrotron radiation with photons (40-700 keV) of the order of 10 16 photons (MeV mA s) -1 in the TRISTAN e +e - colliding ring (bending radius of 246 m and beam energy of 29 GeV). OFC with an irradiated surface area of 10 mm 2 showed a Cu ion concentration of 6 mg 1 -1 after 1.3 A h irradiation (800 h operation, 5.3 x 10 20 photons mm -2). The ion concentration showed an increasing rate of t 1/3- 1/2 before 500 h. After 500 h operation, it was roughly proportional to t. The time dependence of the concentration of the non-irradiated sample was t 1/3 before 10 3 h. The concentration increased from 0.01 before 10 3 h to 1 mg l -1 after 10 3 h. The relationship between the free energy of formation and the estimated dissolved ion concentration of OFC together with the one of aluminum alloys, a 10 μm thick silicon dioxide film inside an Al pipe, and stainless steel 316L at 10 A h (the dose of the materials ranging from 4.1 to 5.8 x 10 21 photons mm -2) gives that the higher the free energy of formation, the lower the dissolved ion concentration. Therefore, to obtain a radiation resistant surface, the stable oxide (with higher free energy of formation) should be selected.

  2. The low-energy toroidal grating monochromator beamline at the synchrotron radiation source at Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyland, M.A. ); Harrington, J.Q.; Weston, M.I. )

    1992-01-01

    The bending magnet beam line 1.2 low-energy toroidal grating monochromator of the synchrotron radiation source (SRS) at Daresbury Laboratory, was designed{sup 1} to deliver moderately high fluxes ({similar to} 5 {times} 10{sup 11} photons s{sup {minus}1}), of linearly polarized, medium resolution ({similar to}0.2 eV) radiation in the energy range 5--85 eV. The colinear optical system utilizes platinum-coated silicon-carbide mirrors to focus the broad-band radiation emergent from the SRS at the entrance slits of the three grating monochromator. A single ellipsoidal mirror is then used to doubly focus the desired narrow-band radiation at the sample position. The colinear arrangement of the optical elements ensures that the radiation at the sample point is strongly horizontally plane polarized (estimated to be of order 90%). The entire system has been the subject of detailed analyses using the raytracing program SHADOW,{sup 2} and standard optical theory. These calculations have been compared with experimental determinations of photon flux outputs and resolution measurements.

  3. X-Tream: a novel dosimetry system for Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petasecca, M.; Cullen, A.; Fuduli, I.; Espinoza, A.; Porumb, C.; Stanton, C.; Aldosari, A. H.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Requardt, H.; Bravin, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Lerch, M. L. F.

    2012-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a radiation treatment technique under development for inoperable brain tumors. MRT is based on the use of a synchrotron generated X-ray beam with an extremely high dose rate ( ~ 20 kGy/sec), striated into an array of X-ray micro-blades. In order to advance to clinical trials, a real-time dosimeter with excellent spatial resolution must be developed for absolute dosimetry. The design of a real-time dosimeter for such a radiation scenario represents a significant challenge due to the high photon flux and vertically striated radiation field, leading to very steep lateral dose gradients. This article analyses the striated radiation field in the context of the requirements for temporal dosimetric measurements and presents the architecture of a new dosimetry system based on the use of silicon detectors and fast data acquisition electronic interface. The combined system demonstrates micrometer spatial resolution and microsecond real time readout with accurate sensitivity and linearity over five orders of magnitude of input signal. The system will therefore be suitable patient treatment plan verification and may also be expanded for in-vivo beam monitoring for patient safety during the treatment.

  4. Characterization of a tungsten/gas multislit collimator for microbeam radiation therapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Zhang, L.; Siegbahn, E.; Stepanek, J.; Blattmann, H.; Slatkin, D. N.; Gebbers, J.-O.; Jasmin, M.; Laissue, J. A.

    2005-06-01

    Clinical microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) will require a multislit collimator with adjustable uniform slit widths to enable reliable Monte Carlo-based treatment planning. Such a collimator has been designed, fabricated of >99% tungsten [W] by Tecomet/Viasys (Woburn, Massachusetts, USA) and installed at the 6GeV electron-wiggler-generated hard x-ray ID17 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Its pair of 125 parallel, 8mm deep, 0.100mm wide radiolucent slits, 0.400mm on center, are perfused with nitrogen gas [N2] to dissipate heat during irradiation. Major improvements in uniformity of microbeam widths and good peak/valley dose ratios combined with a very high dose rate in targeted tissues have been achieved.

  5. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Paul; Susini, Jean

    2013-03-01

    These proceedings are a recollection of the articles presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI22012), held in Lyon (France), on 9-13 July 2012. SRI2012, co-organized by ESRF and SOLEIL, was the eleventh in a series of conferences bringing together the foremost x-ray scientists from around the world. This triennial conference is the prime forum to highlight connections between synchrotron radiation instrumentation, science, and society. SRI2012 hosted more than 1000 delegates, including 72 exhibitors. The 2012 edition has seen the emergence of new avenues in the synchrotron technique and in related research areas, and has emphasized the complementarities between synchrotron centers and new x-ray sources such as Free Electron Lasers. The program was structured around 20 topics, and each of the articles in these proceedings refers to one of these topics namely, Instrumentation for Macromolecular Crystallography, Biomedical Experiments, Insertion Device Developments, Storage Ring Performances and Limits on Beam Stability, Advances in Hard X-ray Optics, New Developments in Area Detectors, New Facilities, New Developments in Spectroscopy Detectors, Time-Resolved Applications, Magnetism, SR Experiments under Extreme Conditions, VUV Instrumentation and Applications, Advances in Materials Science Experiments, IR and THz Generation and Applications, Advances in Soft-X-ray Optics, Modelling Tools and Optical Design, Scattering Experiments, High Energy Application, X-ray Microscopy and Nanoprobes, X-ray Imaging Techniques and, Instrumentation and Enabling Technologies. This proceedings series aims to be an essential reference work for practitioners in the field. It primarily documents the evolution and development of techniques, but also recent scientific advances, that were presented during the 4 days of the conference. We are extremely thankful to all the authors who contributed to making these proceedings a volume of

  6. Estimation of effective dose caused by stray radiations of photons, electrons and positrons around a small storage ring for a synchrotron radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Y.; Oki, S.; Sugiyama, H.; Kobayakawa, H.

    2005-10-01

    The spatial distribution of the effective dose of photons, electrons and positrons caused by beam loss around a small electron storage ring in a synchrotron radiation source is calculated. We propose a simple formula applicable to calculate the effective dose for storage rings for beam energies ranging from 200 MeV to 5 GeV. The formula is derived from Monte Carlo calculations of radiation flux using the simulation code EGS4. We apply the formula to estimate the effective dose distribution in a small synchrotron radiation facility planned by the Nagoya University.

  7. Cleaning and vacuum conditioning of RF cavities, proton storage rings and synchrotron radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathewson, A. G.; Andritschky, M.; Grillot, A.; Gröbner, O.; Strubin, P.; Souchet, R.

    1990-02-01

    The optimization of a chemical cleaning method for Al alloy vacuum chambers using as criteria: surface analysis, thermal outgassing, electron, X-ray and synchrotron radiation induced neutral gas desorption, is described. The results of the vaccuum conditioning of the 128 radio-frequency (RF) accelerating cavities for the CERN LEP e+e- storage ring are presented. The gases desorbed with RF were H2, CH4, CO and CO2 and their decrease with running time recorded. Argon glow discharge cleaning of stainless-steel UHV chambers revealed that up to 77 monolayers of gas—mainly CO—could be desorbed from the surface. Measurements of the so-called roughness factor—the real surface area seen by the adsorbed gas—gave numbers as high as 15 for stainless-steel, thus only about 5 monolayers of gas are desorbed. In a dedicated beam line at the DCI storage ring at the LURE Laboratory, Orsay, France, synchrotron radiation induced neutral gas desorption from baked Al alloy and stainless-steel chambers was measured under controlled conditions. The gases desorbed were H2, CH4, CO and CO2 and with time the H2 and CO desorption descreased as D-1/2 where D is the radiation beam dose in mA hours. A model of gas diffusion from near surface layers and from the bulk to the surface which determined the desorption characteristics was proposed. This model well described the behavior of the desorption for H2. Measurements of the photoelectron currents produced at 11 mrad glancing angle of incidence and also at normal incidence, when compared with calculation, showed differences which could be explained if the photons with energies below about 1.5 keV were reflected at 11 mrad with a reflectivity approaching 1. In a special test chamber equipped with sets of photoelectron probes, it was established that, at glancing angles of incidence of 11, 20 and 40 mrad, up to 20% of the synchrotron radiation is scattered around the vacuum chamber from the point of impact.

  8. Galactic synchrotron radiation from radio to microwaves, and its relation to cosmic-ray propagation models: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Galactic synchrotron radiation observed from radio to microwaves is produced by cosmic-ray (CR) electrons propagating in magnetic fields (B-fields). The low-frequency foreground component separated maps by WMAP and Planck depend on the assumed synchrotron spectrum. The synchrotron spectrum varies for different line of sights as a result of changes on the CR spectrum due to propagation effects and source distributions. Our present knowledge of the CR spectrum at different locations in the Galaxy is not sufficient to distinguish various possibilities in the modeling. As a consequence uncertainties on synchrotron emission models complicate the foreground component separation analysis with Planck and future microwave telescopes. Hence, any advancement in synchrotron modeling is important for separating the different foreground components.The first step towards a more comprehensive understanding of degeneracy and correlation among the synchrotron model parameters is outlined in our Strong et al. 2011 and Orlando et al. 2013 papers. In the latter the conclusion was that CR spectrum, propagation models, B-fields, and foreground component separation analysis need to be studied simultaneously in order to properly obtain and interpret the synchrotron foreground. Indeed for the officially released Planck maps, we use only the best spectral model from our above paper for the component separation analysis.Here we present a collections of our latest results on synchrotron, CRs and B-fields in the context of CR propagation, showing also our recent work on B-fields within the Planck Collaboration. We underline also the importance of using the constraints on CRs that we obtain from gamma ray observations. Methods and perspectives for further studies on the synchrotron foreground will be addressed.

  9. Synchrotron radiation CT from the micro to nanoscale for the investigation of bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Francoise; Dong, Pei; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Zuluaga, Maria; Olivier, Cécile; Langer, Max; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-10-01

    During the last decade, X-ray micro Computerized Tomography (CT) has become a conventional technique for the three-dimensional (3D) investigation of trabecular bone micro-architecture. Coupling micro-CT to synchrotron sources possesses significant advantages in terms of image quality and gives access to information on bone mineralization which is an important factor of bone quality. We present an overview of the investigation of bone using Synchrotron Radiation (SR) CT from the micro to the nano scale. We introduce two synchrotron CT systems developed at the ESRF based on SR parallel-beam micro-CT and magnified phase CT respectively, achieving down to submicrometric and nanometric spatial resolution. In the latter, by using phase retrieval prior to tomographic reconstruction, the system provides maps of the 3D refractive index distribution. Parallel-beam SR micro-CT has extensively been used for the analysis of trabecular or cortical bone in human or small animals with spatial resolution in the range [3-10] μm. However, the characterization of the bone properties at the cellular scale is also of major interest. At the micrometric scale, the shape, density and morphology of osteocyte lacunae can be studied on statistically representative volumes. At the nanometric scale, unprecedented 3D displays of the canaliculi network have been obtained on fields of views including a large number of interconnected osteocyte lacunae. Finally SR magnified phase CT provides a detailed analysis of the lacuno-canalicular network and in addition information on the organization of the collagen fibers. These findings open new perspectives for three-dimensional quantitative assessment of bone tissue at the cellular scale.

  10. Fabrication of nested elliptical KB mirrors using profile coating for synchrotron radiation X-ray focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chian; Ice, Gene E; Liu, Wenjun; Assoufid, Lahsen; Qian, J; Shi, B.; Khachatryan, Ruben; Wieczorek, M.; Zschack, P.; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes fabrication methods used to demonstrate the advantages of nested or Montel optics for micro/nanofocusing of synchrotron X-ray beams. A standard Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror system uses two separated elliptical mirrors at glancing angles to the X-ray beam and sequentially arranged at 90{sup o} to each other to focus X-rays successively in the vertical and horizontal directions. A nested KB mirror system has the two mirrors positioned perpendicular and side-by-side to each other. Compared to a standard KB mirror system, Montel optics can focus a larger divergence and the mirrors can have a shorter focal length. As a result, nested mirrors can be fabricated with improved demagnification factor and ultimately smaller focal spot, than with a standard KB arrangement. The nested system is also more compact with an increased working distance, and is more stable, with reduced complexity of mirror stages. However, although Montel optics is commercially available for laboratory X-ray sources, due to technical difficulties they have not been used to microfocus synchrotron radiation X-rays, where ultra-precise mirror surfaces are essential. The main challenge in adapting nested optics for synchrotron microfocusing is to fabricate mirrors with a precise elliptical surface profile at the very edge where the two mirrors meet and where X-rays scatter. For example, in our application to achieve a sub-micron focus with high efficiency, a surface figure root-mean-square (rms) error on the order of 1 nm is required in the useable area along the X-ray footprint with a {approx} 0.1 mm-diameter cross section. In this paper we describe promising ways to fabricate precise nested KB mirrors using our profile coating technique and inexpensive flat Si substrates.

  11. Geodesic synchrotron radiation in the Kerr geometry by the method of asymptotically factorized Green's functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrzanowski, P. L.; Misner, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    The scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational geodesic-synchrotron-radiation (GSR) spectra are determined for the case of a test particle moving on a highly relativistic circular orbit about a rotating (Kerr) black hole. It is found that the spectral shape depends only weakly on the value of the angular-momentum parameter (a/M) of the black hole, but the total radiated power drops unexpectedly for a value of at least 0.95 and vanishes as the value approaches unity. A spin-dependent factor (involving the inner product of the polarization of a radiated quantum with the source) is isolated to explain the dependence of the spectral shape on the spin of the radiated field. Although the scalar wave equation is solved by separation of variables, this procedure is avoided for the vector and tensor cases by postulating a sum-over-states expansion for the Green's function similar to that found to hold in the scalar case. The terms in this sum, significant for GSR, can then be evaluated in the geometric-optics approximation without requiring the use of vector or tensor spherical harmonics.

  12. Performance of an LPD prototype detector at MHz frame rates under Synchrotron and FEL radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A.; Hart, M.; Nicholls, T.; Angelsen, C.; Coughlan, J.; French, M.; Hauf, S.; Kuster, M.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Turcato, M.; Carini, G. A.; Chollet, M.; Herrmann, S. C.; Lemke, H. T.; Nelson, S.; Song, S.; Weaver, M.; Zhu, D.; Meents, A.; Fischer, P.

    2013-11-01

    A MHz frame rate X-ray area detector (LPD — Large Pixel Detector) is under development by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for the European XFEL. The detector will have 1 million pixels and allows analogue storage of 512 images taken at 4.5 MHz in the detector front end. The LPD detector has 500 μm thick silicon sensor tiles that are bump bonded to a readout ASIC. The ASIC's preamplifier provides relatively low noise at high speed which results in a high dynamic range of 105 photons over an energy range of 5-20 keV. Small scale prototypes of 32 × 256 pixels (LPD 2-Tile detector) and 256 × 256 pixels (LPD supermodule detector) are now available for X-ray tests. The performance of prototypes of the detector is reported for first tests under synchrotron radiation (PETRA III at DESY) and Free-Electron-Laser radiation (LCLS at SLAC). The initial performance of the detector in terms of signal range and noise, radiation hardness and spatial and temporal response are reported. The main result is that the 4.5 MHz sampling detection chain is reliably working, including the analogue on-chip memory concept. The detector is at least radiation hard up to 5 MGy at 12 keV. In addition the multiple gain concept has been demonstrated over a dynamic range to 104 at 12 keV with a readout noise equivalent to < 1 photon rms in its most sensitive mode.

  13. Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy - An Enhanced Method for Examining Protein Conformations and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    B Wallace; R Janes

    2011-12-31

    CD (circular dichroism) spectroscopy is a well-established technique in structural biology. SRCD (synchrotron radiation circular dichroism) spectroscopy extends the utility and applications of conventional CD spectroscopy (using laboratory-based instruments) because the high flux of a synchrotron enables collection of data at lower wavelengths (resulting in higher information content), detection of spectra with higher signal-to-noise levels and measurements in the presence of absorbing components (buffers, salts, lipids and detergents). SRCD spectroscopy can provide important static and dynamic structural information on proteins in solution, including secondary structures of intact proteins and their domains, protein stability, the differences between wild-type and mutant proteins, the identification of natively disordered regions in proteins, and the dynamic processes of protein folding and membrane insertion and the kinetics of enzyme reactions. It has also been used to effectively study protein interactions, including protein-protein complex formation involving either induced-fit or rigid-body mechanisms, and protein-lipid complexes. A new web-based bioinformatics resource, the Protein Circular Dichroism Data Bank (PCDDB), has been created which enables archiving, access and analyses of CD and SRCD spectra and supporting metadata, now making this information publicly available. To summarize, the developing method of SRCD spectroscopy has the potential for playing an important role in new types of studies of protein conformations and their complexes.

  14. X-ray microfluorescence with synchrotron radiation applied in the analysis of pigments from ancient Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calza, C.; Anjos, M. J.; Mendonça de Souza, S. M. F.; Brancaglion, A., Jr.; Lopes, R. T.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, X-ray microfluorescence with the synchrotron radiation technique was applied in the analysis of pigments found in decorative paintings in the sarcophagus of an Egyptian mummy. This female mummy, from the Roman Period, which was embalmed with the arms and legs swathed separately is considered one of the most important pieces of the Egyptian Collection from the National Museum (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). The measurements were performed at the XRF beamline D09B of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), using the white beam and a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 165 eV at 5.9 keV. The possible pigments found in the samples were: Egyptian blue, Egyptian green frit, green earth, verdigris, malachite, ochre, realgar, chalk, gypsum, bone white, ivory black and magnetite. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the results in order to verify if the samples belong to the same period of a linen wrapping fragment, whose provenance was well established.

  15. UV-CD12: synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamline at ANKA

    PubMed Central

    Bürck, Jochen; Roth, Siegmar; Windisch, Dirk; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Moss, David; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) is a rapidly growing technique for structure analysis of proteins and other chiral biomaterials. UV-CD12 is a high-flux SRCD beamline installed at the ANKA synchrotron, to which it had been transferred after the closure of the SRS Daresbury. The beamline covers an extended vacuum-UV to near-UV spectral range and has been open for users since October 2011. The current end-station allows for temperature-controlled steady-state SRCD spectroscopy, including routine automated thermal scans of microlitre volumes of water-soluble proteins down to 170 nm. It offers an excellent signal-to-noise ratio over the whole accessible spectral range. The technique of oriented circular dichroism (OCD) was recently implemented for determining the membrane alignment of α-helical peptides and proteins in macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers as mimics of cellular membranes. It offers improved spectral quality <200 nm compared with an OCD setup adapted to a bench-top instrument, and accelerated data collection by a factor of ∼3. In addition, it permits investigations of low hydrated protein films down to 130 nm using a rotatable sample cell that avoids linear dichroism artifacts. PMID:25931105

  16. Application of synchrotron radiation for elemental microanalysis of human central nervous System tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M.; Lankosz, M.; Ostachowicz, J.; Adamek, D.; Krygowska-Wajs, A.; Tomik, B.; Szczudlik, A.; Simionovici, A.; Bohic, S.

    2003-03-01

    The pathogenesis of two neurodegenerative diseases i.e. Parkinson's Disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are still not known. It is supposed that disturbance of metal ions homeostasis may promote degeneration and atrophy of neurones. As a preliminary study. the quantitative and topographic elemental analysis of selected parts of human brain and spinal cord was performed using synchrotron microbeam-X ray fluorescence (μ-SXRF) technique. The samples were taken during the autopsy from patients with PD, ALS and from patients died due to non-neurological conditions events. X-ray fluorescence imaging showed that increased concentration of selected elements are observed in neurons perikarial parts in compare with surrounding area. Moreover, comparable analysis showed significant differences in accumulation of selected elements between the pathological and control cases. The investigations indicate that micro-beam of synchrotron radiation can be satisfactory applied for analysis of central nervous System tissue providing useful information about distribution and contents of elements at the single cell level.

  17. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Robin L.; Rothkamm, Kai; Restall, Christina M.; Cann, Leonie; Ruwanpura, Saleela; Meachem, Sarah; Yagi, Naoto; Svalbe, Imants; Lewis, Robert A.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Rogers, Peter A.W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 {mu}m-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-{mu}m peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  18. Study on the impregnation of archaeological waterlogged wood with consolidation treatments using synchrotron radiation microtomography.

    PubMed

    Bugani, S; Modugno, F; Lucejko, J J; Giachi, G; Cagno, S; Cloetens, P; Janssens, K; Morselli, L

    2009-12-01

    In favourable conditions of low temperature and low oxygen concentration, archaeological waterlogged wooden artefacts, such as shipwrecks, can survive with a good state of preservation. Nevertheless, anaerobic bacteria can considerably degrade waterlogged wooden objects with a significant loss in polysaccharidic components. Due to these decay processes, wood porosity and water content increase under ageing. In such conditions, the conservation treatments of archaeological wooden artefacts often involve the replacement of water with substances which fill the cavities and help to prevent collapse and stress during drying. The treatments are very often expensive and technically difficult, and their effectiveness very much depends on the chemical and physical characteristics of the substances used for impregnation. Also important are the degree of cavity-filling, penetration depth and distribution in the structure of the wood. In this study, the distribution in wood cavities of some mixtures based on polyethylene glycols and colophony, used for the conservation of waterlogged archaeological wood, was investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-microCT). This non-destructive imaging technique was useful for the study of the degraded waterlogged wood and enabled us to visualise the morphology of the wood and the distribution of the materials used in the wood treatments. The study has shown how deposition is strictly related to the dimension of the wooden cavities. The work is currently proceeding with the comparison of synchrotron observations with the data of the solutions viscosity and with those of the properties imparted to the wood by the treatments. PMID:19760192

  19. An ultra-fast data acquisition system for coherent synchrotron radiation with terahertz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Balzer, M.; Chilingaryan, S.; Hofherr, M.; Judin, V.; Kopmann, A.; Smale, N. J.; Thoma, P.; Wuensch, S.; Müller, A.-S.; Siegel, M.; Weber, M.

    2014-01-01

    The recording of coherent synchrotron radiation requires data acquisition systems with a temporal resolution of tens of picosecond. This paper describes a new real-time and high-accuracy data acquisition system suitable for recording individual ultra-short pulses generated by a fast terahertz (THz) detector (e.g. YBCO, NbN, Zero Biased Schottky Diode). The system consists of a fast sampling board combined with a high data throughput readout. The first board is designed for sampling the fast pulse signals with a full width half maximum (FWHM) between a few tens to one hundred picoseconds with a minimum sampling time of 3 ps. The high data throughput board consists of a PCIe-Bus Master DMA architecture used for fast data transfer up to 3 GByte/s. The full readout chain with fast THz detectors and the acquisition system has been successfully tested at the synchrotron ANKA. An overview of the electronics system and preliminary results with multi-bunch filling pattern will be presented.

  20. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography and histomorphometry for evaluation of chemotherapy effects in trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, R.; Nogueira, L. P.; Almeida, A. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Braz, D.; Andrade, C. B. V.; Salata, C.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; de Almeida, C. E.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional microtomography has the potential to examine complete bones of small laboratory animals with very high resolution in a non-invasive way. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to bone changes. In the present work, the femur heads of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D histomorphometry using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur heads of rats in both analyzed groups.

  1. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy: An emerging method in structural biology for examining protein conformations and protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, B. A.; Gekko, Kunihiko; Vrønning Hoffmann, Søren; Lin, Yi-Hung; Sutherland, John C.; Tao, Ye; Wien, Frank; Janes, Robert W.

    2011-09-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a well-established technique in structural biology. The use of synchrotron radiation as an intense light source for these measurements extends the applications possible using lab-based instruments. In recent years, there has been a major growth in synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines worldwide, including ones at the NSLS, ISA, SRS, HiSOR, BSRF, NSRRC, SOLEIL, Diamond, TERAS, BESSYII, and ANKA synchrotrons. Through the coordinated efforts of beamline scientists and users at these sites, important proof-of-principle studies have been done enabling the method to be developed for novel and productive studies on biological systems. This paper describes the characteristics of SRCD beamlines and some of the new types of applications that have been undertaken using these beamlines.

  2. A shutter design for time domain studies using synchrotron radiation at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Bowman, M.K.; Chen, L.; Tang, J.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Knapp, G.S.; Montano, P.A.

    1991-09-01

    In general a variable repetition rate of the x-ray bunches is needed to explore time domain problems using x-ray radiation. In some instances the results of several hundreds or thousands of x-ray pulses must be averaged requiring the sample to be in the same time dependent state each time the monitoring pulse strikes. In the most advanced and most detailed version of this type experiment an intense laser pulse would be used to create an excited state from a relaxed ground state. An additional ``probe-pulse`` that follows the laser ``pump-pulse`` would examine the sample. The important point is that before a second x-ray pulse hits the sample, the system must return to its initial relaxed ground state prior to another laser pulse in order to prepare the same excited state again. Otherwise the second x-ray probes a different condition of the system than the previous x-ray bunch such that any data averaging scheme would be invalid. Our system is primarily designed for the Advanced Photon source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. In the 20-bunch mode of APS an x-ray pulse will occur every 177 nanoseconds, requiring each edge of a conventional two-blade ``shutter`` to travel at least 0.25 mm in {approximately}177 nanoseconds. Our key design principle employs a subsonic, rotating mirror whose period is slaved to the synchrotron intra-pulse period. The synchrotron x-ray bunches will be reflected a distance of about two meters to a narrow 0.5 mm slit just in front of the sample. The time that the reflected synchrotron spends striking the slit is given by 1/(4{pi}rf) where r is the radius from the center of the spindle to the slit, and f is the frequency of rotation of the spindle. A mirror rotating at a low 7,500 rpm (125 Hz) is sufficient to select a single synchrotron pulse. The very precise phase stability required by this method is currently available in rotating mirror devices for laser scanning. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  3. A shutter design for time domain studies using synchrotron radiation at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Bowman, M.K.; Chen, L.; Tang, J.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Knapp, G.S.; Montano, P.A.

    1991-09-01

    In general a variable repetition rate of the x-ray bunches is needed to explore time domain problems using x-ray radiation. In some instances the results of several hundreds or thousands of x-ray pulses must be averaged requiring the sample to be in the same time dependent state each time the monitoring pulse strikes. In the most advanced and most detailed version of this type experiment an intense laser pulse would be used to create an excited state from a relaxed ground state. An additional probe-pulse'' that follows the laser pump-pulse'' would examine the sample. The important point is that before a second x-ray pulse hits the sample, the system must return to its initial relaxed ground state prior to another laser pulse in order to prepare the same excited state again. Otherwise the second x-ray probes a different condition of the system than the previous x-ray bunch such that any data averaging scheme would be invalid. Our system is primarily designed for the Advanced Photon source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. In the 20-bunch mode of APS an x-ray pulse will occur every 177 nanoseconds, requiring each edge of a conventional two-blade shutter'' to travel at least 0.25 mm in {approximately}177 nanoseconds. Our key design principle employs a subsonic, rotating mirror whose period is slaved to the synchrotron intra-pulse period. The synchrotron x-ray bunches will be reflected a distance of about two meters to a narrow 0.5 mm slit just in front of the sample. The time that the reflected synchrotron spends striking the slit is given by 1/(4{pi}rf) where r is the radius from the center of the spindle to the slit, and f is the frequency of rotation of the spindle. A mirror rotating at a low 7,500 rpm (125 Hz) is sufficient to select a single synchrotron pulse. The very precise phase stability required by this method is currently available in rotating mirror devices for laser scanning. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  4. GRBs Radiative Processes: Synchrotron and Synchrotron Self-Absorption From a Power Law Electrons Distribution with Finite Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2010-10-31

    Synchrotron emission behind relativistic magnetic internal-external shocks in gamma-ray bursts cosmological explosions is assumed to be the basic emission mechanism for prompt and afterglow emissions. Inverse Compton from relativistic electrons can also have appreciable effects by upscattering initial synchrotron or blackbody photons or other photons fields up to GeV-TeV energies. For extreme physical conditions such as high magnetic fields (e.g., B>10{sup 5} Gauss) self-absorption is not negligible and can hardly affect spectra at least for the low energy range. In this paper we present calculations of the synchrotron power, P{sub {nu}}, and their asymptotic forms, generated by a power law relativistic electron distribution of type N{sub e}({gamma}) = C{gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1}<{gamma}<{gamma}{sub 2}, especially for finite values of the higher limit {gamma}{sub 2}. For this aim we defined the dimensionless parametric function Z{sub p}(x,{eta}) with x = {nu}/{nu}{sub 1} and {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1} so that P{sub {nu}{proportional_to}Zp}({nu}/{nu}{sub 1},{eta}), with {nu}{sub 1} = (3/4{pi}){gamma}{sub 1}{sup 2}qBsin{theta}/mc({theta} being the pitch angle). Asymptotic forms of this later are derived for three different frequency ranges, i.e., x<<1, 1<>{eta}{sup 2}. These results are then used to calculate the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, and the source function, S{sub {nu}}, together with their asymptotic forms through the dimensionless parametric functions H{sub p}(x,{eta}) and Y{sub p}(x,{eta}), respectively. Further calculation details are also presented and discussed.

  5. Microstructure analysis of the pulmonary acinus using a synchrotron radiation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumoto, Y.; Minami, K.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Umetani, K.; Nakano, Y.; Sakai, H.; Ohmatsu, H.; Itoh, H.

    2015-03-01

    Conversion of images at micro level of normal and with very early stage disease of the lung and quantitative analysis of morphology on CT image can contribute to the chest image diagnosis to the next generation. Previous, anatomy and pathology analysis of pulmonary lobule have been conducted to better understand the CT image of peripheral lung tissue disease. However, it is difficult to figure out three-dimensional (3D) conformation because of analyzing at the slice image. The purpose of this study is a 3D microstructual and quantitative analyses of pulmonary acinus with spatial resolution in the range of several micrometers by using a synchrotron radiation micro CT (SRμCT). In this paper, we present a semi-automatic method for segmenting the secondary pulmonary lobule into acinus or subacinus and extracting small vessel in human acinus imaged by the SRμCT.

  6. Studies of Mn/ZnO (0001¯) Interfacial Formation and Electronic Properties with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, C. W.; Xu, P. S.; Wu, Y. Y.; Sun, B.; Xu, F. Q.; Pan, H. B.; Yuan, H. T.; Du, X. L.

    2007-01-01

    The initial growth, interfacial reaction and Fermi level movement of Mn on the O-terminated Zn (000 1¯) surface have been investigated by using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES) and X-ray photoemission (XPS). Mn is found to be grown on the surface in the layer-by-layer (Frank-van der Merwe) mode and be quite stable on the O-terminated surface at room temperature. With increasing the coverage of Mn, a downward Fermi level movement in band structure measurement of SRPES is observed and the resultant Schottky Barrier Height (SBH) is calculated to be about 1.1eV. Annealing behavior of the interface is investigated and we find that annealing at 600 °C induces a pronounced Mn-Zn atoms exchange reaction at the interface.

  7. In Vacuo Photoemission Studies of Platinum Atomic Layer Deposition Using Synchrotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Scott M; Methaapanon, Rungthiwa; Shong, Bonggeun; Pianetta, Piero A; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of platinum atomic layer deposition using (methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethylplatinum and oxygen is investigated with in vacuo photoemission spectroscopy at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. With this surface-sensitive technique, the surface species following the Pt precursor half cycle and the oxygen counter-reactant half cycle can be directly measured. We observed significant amounts of carbonaceous species following the Pt precursor pulse, consistent with dehydrogenation of the precursor ligands. Significantly more carbon is observed when deposition is carried out in the thermal decomposition temperature region. The carbonaceous layer is removed during the oxygen counter reactant pulse, and the photoemission spectrum shows that a layer of adsorbed oxygen remains on the surface as previously predicted. PMID:26291229

  8. Core level photoionization on free sub-10-nm nanoparticles using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Meinen, Jan; Leisner, Thomas; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Eritt, Markus; Antonsson, Egill; Langer, Burkhard; Ruehl, Eckart

    2010-08-15

    A novel instrument is presented, which permits studies on singly charged free nanoparticles in the diameter range from 1 to 30 nm using synchrotron radiation in the soft x-ray regime. It consists of a high pressure nanoparticle source, a high efficiency nanoparticle beam inlet, and an electron time-of-flight spectrometer suitable for probing surface and bulk properties of free, levitated nanoparticles. We show results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study near the Si L{sub 3,2}-edge on 8.2 nm SiO{sub 2} particles prepared in a nanoparticle beam. The possible use of this apparatus regarding chemical reactions on the surface of nanometer-sized particles is highlighted. This approach has the potential to be exploited for process studies on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry.

  9. Distribution of lead in the brain tissues from DNTC patients using synchrotron radiation microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Ota, Yukihide; Ishihara, Ryoko; Mizuno, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Tohru

    2005-12-01

    Diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification (DNTC) is a form of dementia with certain characteristics. Its pathology is characterized by cerebrum atrophy, calcification on globus pallidus and dentate nucleus and diffuse neurofibrillary tangles without senile plaques. In the present study brain tissues were prepared from patients with patients DNTC, calcified and non-calcified Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The brain tissues were examined non-destructively by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (SR) microbeams for trace metallic elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb. The XRF analysis showed that there were Pb concentrations in the calcified areas in the brain tissues with both DNTC and AD but there was none in those with non-calcified AD.

  10. Modular design of H/sup /minus// synchrotrons for radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    A modular synchrotron for accelerating H/sup /minus// ions, and a proton beam delivery system are being developed for radiation therapy with protons under SBIR grants from the National Cancer Institute. The advantage proposed for accelerating H/sup /minus// ions and utilizing change exchange as a slow extraction mechanism lies in enhanced control for the extracted beam current, important for beam delivery with raster scanning for 3D dose contouring of a tumor site. Under these grants prototype magnets and vacuum systems are being constructed, appropriate H/sup /minus// sources are being developed and beam experiments will be carried out to demonstrate some of the key issues of this concept. The status of this program is described along with a discussion of a relatively inexpensive beam delivery system and a proposed program for its development. 3 refs.

  11. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  12. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-10-21

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beam lines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the NSLS) and the effects of these figure errors on a class of soft x-ray beam lines are presented. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. RAPID COMMUNICATION: First human transvenous coronary angiography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elleaume, H.; Fiedler, S.; Estève, F.; Bertrand, B.; Charvet, A. M.; Berkvens, P.; Berruyer, G.; Brochard, T.; LeDuc, G.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; LeBas, J. F.

    2000-09-01

    The first operation of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) medical beamline is reported in this paper. The goal of the angiography project is to develop a reduced risk imaging technique, which can be used to follow up patients after coronary intervention. After the intravenous injection of a contrast agent (iodine) two images are produced with monochromatic beams, bracketing the iodine K-edge. The logarithmic subtraction of the two measurements results in an iodine-enhanced image, which can be precisely quantified. A research protocol has been designed to evaluate the performances of this method in comparison with the conventional technique. Patients included in the protocol have previously undergone angioplasty. If a re-stenosis is suspected, the patient is imaged both at the ESRF and at the hospital with the conventional technique, within the next few days. This paper reports the results obtained with the first patients. To date, eight patients have been imaged and excellent image quality was obtained.

  14. New Particle-in-Cell Code for Numerical Simulation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Rui Li

    2010-05-01

    We present a first look at the new code for self-consistent, 2D simulations of beam dynamics affected by the coherent synchrotron radiation. The code is of the particle-in-cell variety: the beam bunch is sampled by point-charge particles, which are deposited on the grid; the corresponding forces on the grid are then computed using retarded potentials according to causality, and interpolated so as to advance the particles in time. The retarded potentials are evaluated by integrating over the 2D path history of the bunch, with the charge and current density at the retarded time obtained from interpolation of the particle distributions recorded at discrete timesteps. The code is benchmarked against analytical results obtained for a rigid-line bunch. We also outline the features and applications which are currently being developed.

  15. Luminescent properties of Al2O3:Ce single crystalline films under synchrotron radiation excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Zorenko, T.; Gorbenko, V.; Savchyn, V.; Voznyak, T.; Fabisiak, K.; Zhusupkalieva, G.; Fedorov, A.

    2016-09-01

    The paper is dedicated to study the luminescent and scintillation properties of the Al2O3:Ce single crystalline films (SCF) grown by LPE method onto saphire substrates from PbO based flux. The structural quality of SCF samples was investigated by XRD method. For characterization of luminescent properties of Al2O3:Ce SCFs the cathodoluminescence spectra, scintillation light yield (LY) and decay kinetics under excitation by α-particles of Pu239 source were used. We have found that the scintillation LY of Al2O3:Ce SCF samples is relatively large and can reach up to 50% of the value realized in the reference YAG:Ce SCF. Using the synchrotron radiation excitation in the 3.7-25 eV range at 10 K we have also determined the basic parameters of the Ce3+ luminescence in Al2O3 host.

  16. Feasibility study of a periodic arc compressor in the presence of coherent synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of short electron bunches in high brightness linear accelerators has raised the awareness of the accelerator community to the degradation of the beam transverse emittance by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted in magnetic bunch length compressors, transfer lines and turnaround arcs. Beam optics control has been proposed to mitigate that CSR effect. In this article, we enlarge on the existing literature by reviewing the validity of the linear optics approach in a periodic, achromatic arc compressor. We then study the dependence of the CSR-perturbed emittance to beam optics, mean energy, and bunch charge. The analytical findings are compared with particle tracking results. Practical considerations on CSR-induced energy loss and nonlinear particle dynamics are included. As a result, we identify the range of parameters that allows feasibility of an arc compressor for driving, for example, a free electron laser or a linear collider.

  17. Probing the structure of long DNA molecules in solution using synchrotron radiation linear dichroism.

    PubMed

    Rittman, Martyn; Hoffmann, Søren V; Gilroy, Emma; Hicks, Matthew R; Finkenstadt, Bärbel; Rodger, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Linear dichroism (LD), a spectroscopic method for aligned samples, has been used with a synchrotron radiation source to reveal insights into the structure and stability of DNA with increasing salt concentrations (thus stabilizing the base pairing) and increasing temperature while remaining below the melting point (thus destabilizing the base pairing). Measurements have been made from 350 nm to 182 nm, and the spectral changes observed quantified using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm, which uses statistical methods to fit to experimental data. Based on literature H-D exchange experiments, we surmise that the cause of the spectral variations is the induction of transient single stranding of tracts in the DNA polymer, particularly those with significant content of the weaker AT base pairs. More detailed analysis of the LD data will require better nucleotide transition polarization assignments.

  18. Bonding and electronic states of boron in silicon nanowires characterized by an infrared synchrotron radiation beam.

    PubMed

    Fukata, N; Jevasuwan, W; Ikemoto, Y; Moriwaki, T

    2015-04-28

    The infrared synchrotron radiation (IR-SR) beamline of SPring-8 as an IR light source was applied to characterize boron (B) atoms in silicon nanowires (SiNWs). The use of an IR-SR beam with much higher brilliance than conventional IR light sources and a wide range of wavenumbers from visible to far IR regions made it possible to detect a local vibrational mode of B in SiNWs. The use of this technique has also made it possible to detect other IR peaks related to transitions of a bound hole from the ground state of a B acceptor atom to excited states, clarifying the electronic state of B acceptors in SiNWs.

  19. Recent advances in the use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect

    Manowitz, B.

    1995-11-01

    Two major coal combustion problems are the formation and build-up of slag deposits on heat transfer surfaces and the production and control of toxic species in coal combustion emissions. The use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products can play a role in the better understanding of both these phenomena. An understanding of the chemical composition of such slags under boiler operating conditions and as a function of the mineral composition of various coals is one ultimate goal of this program. The principal constituents in the ash of many coals are the oxides of Si, Al, Fe, Ca, K, S, and Na. The analytical method required must be able to determine the functional forms of all these elements both in coal and in coal ash at elevated temperatures. One unique way of conducting these analyses is by x-ray spectroscopy.

  20. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  1. Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation Studies for Designer Materials, Sustainable Energy and Healthy Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-05-01

    Probably the most prolific use of large accelerators today is in the creation of bright beams of x-ray photons or neutrons. The number of scientific users of such sources in the US alone is approaching 10,000. I will describe the some of the major applications of synchrotron and neutron radiation and their impact on society. If you have AIDS, need a better IPOD or a more efficient car, or want to clean up a superfund site, you are benefitting from these accelerators. The design of new materials is becoming more and more dependent on structural information from these sources. I will identify the trends in applications which are demanding new sources with greater capabilities.

  2. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here.

  3. A novel non-contact profiler design for measuring synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yao; Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K.; DeBiasse, R.A. ); Wang, Run-Wen . Shanghai Inst. of Optics and Fine Mechanics)

    1990-08-01

    A novel optical profiler is described in this paper for measurement of surface profiles of synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The measurement is based on a combination of an optical heterodyne technique and a precise phase measurement procedure without a reference surface. A Zeeman two-frequency He-Ne laser is employed as the light source. The common-path optical system, which uses a birefringent lens as the beam splitter, minimizes the effects of air turbulence, sample vibration and temperature variation. A special autofocus system allows the profiler to measure the roughness and shape of a sample surface. The optical system is mounted on a large linear air-bearing slide, and is capable of scanning over distances covering the spatial period range from several microns to nearly one meter with a high measurement accuracy. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  4. IN SITU PRECISE ANGLE MONITORING ON SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MONOCHROMATOR BY USE OF PENCIL BEAM INTERFEROMETER.

    SciTech Connect

    QIAN,S.TAKACS,P.DONG,Q.HULBERT,S.

    2003-08-25

    Monochromator is a very important and precise instrument used in beam lines at synchrotron radiation facilities. We need to know if there is actual thermal distortion on gratings resulting in the degradation of the monochromator resolution. We need to know the characteristics of the grating rotation. It is possible to make a simple but precise in-situ distortion monitoring and rotation angle test of the grating by use of a precise pencil beam angle monitor. We have made preliminary measurements on a monochrometer grating of an undulator beam line X1B at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We monitored a small amount of angle variation on the grating. We detected 1.7 {micro}rad backlash (P-V) of the grating controlling system.

  5. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use.

    PubMed

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here. PMID:27370438

  6. Calculation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Impedance Using the Mode Expansion Method

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; Kotelnikov, I.A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-12-09

    We study an impedance due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by a short bunch of charged particles passing through a dipole magnet of finite length in a vacuum chamber of a given cross section. In our method we decompose the electromagnetic field of the beam over the eigenmodes of the toroidal chamber and derive a system of equations for the expansion coefficients in the series. The general method is further specialized for a toroidal vacuum chamber of a rectangular cross section where the eigenmodes can be computed analytically. We also develop a computer code that calculates the CSR impedance for a toroid of rectangular cross section. Numerical results obtained with the code are presented in the paper.

  7. High-resolution detectors for medical applications and synchrotron radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Groshev, V. R.; Leonov, V. V.; Papushev, P. A.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.; Shayakhmetov, V. R.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Ukraintsev, Yu. G.; Yurchenko, Yu. B.

    2011-02-01

    In the present report, we summarize our experience in the development of high-resolution position sensitive gas detectors for medicine and synchrotron radiation experiments at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for the last years. We have designed several versions of Multistrip Ionisation Chambers with a channel pitch varying from 0.4 down to 0.1 mm. The high quantum efficiency (>65%) of these detectors allow its application in high quality diagnostic imaging. The detector with 0.1 mm strip pitch and 20 atm pressure of Xe demonstrates the best possible DQE and spatial resolution for gaseous detectors in a wide range of X-ray energies. Additionally, the initial results of feasibility study of the detector for beam position monitoring for Heavy Ion Therapy System are presented too.

  8. Observation of intense terahertz-wave coherent synchrotron radiation at LEBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Ken; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Sakai, Takeshi; Nogami, Kyoko; Inagaki, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    We observed intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz region using an S-band linac at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application at Nihon University. The evolution of the CSR power was measured, and the CSR reflected in the vacuum chamber of the bending magnet could be extracted through the quartz window for a few tens of picoseconds. The long wave packet of the delayed CSR in the autocorrelation suggests that the delayed CSR was the non-resonant ring-down of the vacuum chamber of the bending magnet. To design a high-energy accelerator, it is necessary to decrease high-energy photons resulting from Compton backscattering with intense CSR.

  9. Synchrotron radiation imaging is a powerful tool to image brain microvasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Mengqi; Sun, Danni; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xia, Jian; Long, Hongyu; Hu, Kai; Xiao, Bo; Peng, Guanyun

    2014-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging is a powerful experimental tool for micrometer-scale imaging of microcirculation in vivo. This review discusses recent methodological advances and findings from morphological investigations of cerebral vascular networks during several neurovascular pathologies. In particular, it describes recent developments in SR microangiography for real-time assessment of the brain microvasculature under various pathological conditions in small animal models. It also covers studies that employed SR-based phase-contrast imaging to acquire 3D brain images and provide detailed maps of brain vasculature. In addition, a brief introduction of SR technology and current limitations of SR sources are described in this review. In the near future, SR imaging could transform into a common and informative imaging modality to resolve subtle details of cerebrovascular function.

  10. Structural basis for supercooled liquid fragility established by synchrotron-radiation method and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Inoue, A.; Belosludov, R.; Kawazoe, Y.; Yavari, A. R.; Georgarakis, K.; Vaughan, G.; Egami, T.

    2011-08-15

    Metallic melts above the liquidus temperature exhibit nearly Arrhenius-type temperature dependence of viscosity. On cooling below the equilibrium liquidus temperature metallic melts exhibit a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of viscosity characterized by liquid fragility phenomenon which origin is still not well understood. Structural changes and vitrification of the Pd{sub 42.5}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 7.5}P{sub 20} liquid alloy on cooling from above the equilibrium liquidus temperature are studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and compared with the results of first-principles calculations. Subsequent analysis of the atomic and electronic structure of the alloy in liquid and glassy states reveals formation of chemical short-range order in the temperature range corresponding to such a non-Arrhenius behavior. The first-principles calculations were applied to confirm the experimental findings.

  11. Drug delivery observation of hydrophobe ferrofluid and magnetite nanoparticals by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Ju, D Y; Bian, P; Kumazawa, T; Nakano, M; Matsuura, H; Umetani, K; Komdo, T; Uozumi, Y; Makino, K; Noda, N; Koide, K; Akutsu, M; Masuyama, K

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the composite magnetic nanoparticles of coated SiO nano film with about 8 nm size and high saturation magnetization value, were synthesized by liquid phase precipitation method. The magnetic nanoparticles can be dispersed in various liquid media, widely known as magnetic fluids or ferrofluids with both magnetic and liquid properties. The materials been collected great interests and more and more attentions to focus into Drug Delivery System (DDS) as a new technology in this paper. We use the composite nanoparticles to disperse H2O and inject the solutions into rat's in-vivo organs. And, in the experiments by using a strong photon beam of SPring-8 Synchrotron Radiation facility, the distribution stat and the effects of magnetic field as well as drug delivery behaviour of nanoparticles in the rat' kidney are verified by the in-vivo observations. PMID:22400252

  12. Inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens for prefocusing of synchrotron radiation x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Takano, Hidekazu; Takeda, Shingo

    2012-10-01

    An inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens made of acrylic resin has been developed for prefocusing in synchrotron radiation x-ray beamlines. By inclining the lens, the grating aspect ratio is large enough for x-ray use. As it operates in transmission mode with negligible beam deflection and offset, little additional equipment is needed to introduce it into existing beamlines. It is fabricated by sheet-press forming, enabling inexpensive mass production. The prototype was able to focus a 730-μm-wide beam to a width of 80 μm with a photon flux density gain of 5.6 at an x-ray energy of 10 keV.

  13. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; DeSantis, S.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; LaFever, R.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.; Rimmer, R.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Tanabe, J.; Wang, S.; Zholents, A.; Kairan, D.

    2001-10-26

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed.

  14. Frequency domain Fourier transform THz-EPR on single molecule magnets using coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schnegg, Alexander; Behrends, Jan; Lips, Klaus; Bittl, Robert; Holldack, Karsten

    2009-08-21

    Frequency domain Fourier transform THz electron paramagnetic resonance (FD-FT THz-EPR) based on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is presented as a novel tool to ascertain very large zero field splittings in transition metal ion complexes. A description of the FD-FT THz-EPR at the BESSY II storage ring providing CSR in a frequency range from 5 cm(-1) up to 40 cm(-1) at external magnetic fields from -10 T to +10 T is given together with first measurements on the single molecule magnet Mn(12)Ac where we studied DeltaM(S) = +/-1 spin transition energies as a function of the external magnetic field and temperature.

  15. Synchrotron radiation x-ray beam profile monitor using chemical vapor deposition diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Togo; Takahashi, Sunao; Nariyama, Nobuteru; Hirono, Toko; Tachibana, Takeshi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2006-12-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) of a Si-doped polycrystalline diamond film fabricated using the chemical vapor deposition technique was employed to measure the profile of a synchrotron radiation pink x-ray beam emitted from an in-vacuum hybrid undulator at the SPring-8 facility. The spectrum of the section of the diamond film penetrated by the emitted visible red light exhibited a peak at 739 nm and a wideband structure extending from 550 to 700 nm. The PL intensity increased with the absorbed dose of the incident beam in the diamond within a dynamic range of 10{sup 3}. A two-dimensional distribution of the PL intensity revealed the undulator beam profile.

  16. Application of a conic glass monocapillary in Beijing synchrotron radiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yude; Lin, Xiaoyan; Guo, Fei; Liu, Shigang; He, JinLong; Zhao, Weilin; Sun, Tianxi; Zheng, Lirong; Gao, Zengqiang; Chang, Guangcai

    2014-08-01

    A conic glass monocapillary was developed and used at the Biological Macromolecules Station (BMS) in Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The structure and transmission property of this optics is reported here in details. The experiments have shown that the value of full width at the half maximum (FWHM) of the X-ray beams transmitted through this optics was nearly unchanged within a short distance. This is very convenient for further measurement of samples. The power diffraction experiments of CeO2 revealed that the Debye rings are much clearer in the case of applying this optics. The ratio of error in the diffraction peak position is reduced significantly to the value as less as 0.042%.

  17. A new experiment station on beamline 4B7A at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Zhao, Y. D.; Tang, K.; Ma, C. Y.; Hong, C. H.; Han, Y.; Cui, M. Q.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new experiment station was installed on beamline 4B7A at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), making it possible to record X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectrum in three modes over an energy range from 1750 eV to 6000 eV. A 13-element Si(Li) array detector and a single-element SDD detector were used to acquire data in partial fluorescence yield (PFY) mode. Two low-pressure noble gas ion chambers were adopted for measuring XAFS in transmission mode. In total electron yield (TEY) mode the current of sample is recorded. Solid, wet and liquid samples were suitable for this experimental station. Some representative results obtained from this station were shown and discussed.

  18. Inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens for prefocusing of synchrotron radiation x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Takano, Hidekazu; Takeda, Shingo

    2012-10-15

    An inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens made of acrylic resin has been developed for prefocusing in synchrotron radiation x-ray beamlines. By inclining the lens, the grating aspect ratio is large enough for x-ray use. As it operates in transmission mode with negligible beam deflection and offset, little additional equipment is needed to introduce it into existing beamlines. It is fabricated by sheet-press forming, enabling inexpensive mass production. The prototype was able to focus a 730-{mu}m-wide beam to a width of 80 {mu}m with a photon flux density gain of 5.6 at an x-ray energy of 10 keV.

  19. Physical properties and biocompatibility of UHMWPE-derived materials modified by synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Bykova, Iu; Weinhardt, V; Kashkarova, A; Lebedev, S; Baumbach, T; Pichugin, V; Zaitsev, K; Khlusov, I

    2014-08-01

    The applications of synchrotron radiation (SR) in medical imaging have become of great use, particularly in angiography, bronchography, mammography, computed tomography, and X-ray microscopy. Thanks to recently developed phase contrast imaging techniques non-destructive preclinical testing of low absorbing materials such as polymers has become possible. The focus of the present work is characterization and examination of UHMWPE-derived materials widely used in medicine, before and after their exposure to SR during such testing. Physical properties, such as wettability, surface energy, IR-spectroscopy, roughness, optical microscopy, microhardness measurements of UHMWPE samples were studied before and after SR. The relationship between a growth of UHMWPE surface hydrophilicity after SR and surface colonization by stromal cells was studied in vitro. Obtained results demonstrate that SR may be used as prospective direction to examine bulk (porous) structure of polymer materials and/or to modify polymer surface and volume for tissue engineering.

  20. Synchrotron-Radiation Photoemission Study of Electronic Structures of a Cs-Doped Rubrene Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Lu, Meng-Han; Chu, Yu-Ya; Pi, Tun-Wen

    Using synchrotron-radiation photoemission spectroscopy, we have studied the electronic structure of a cesium-doped rubrene thin film. The addition of cesium atoms causes the movement of the valence-band spectra and the change in line shapes at different concentration that can be separated into four different stages. In the first stage, the cesium atoms continuously diffuse into the substrate, and the Fermi level moves in the energy gap as a result of an electron transferred from the cesium to the rubrene. The second stage, in which the shifts of the spectra are interrupted, is characterized by the introduction of two in-gap states. When increasing doping of cesium into the third stage, the spectra move again; whereas, the line shapes maintain at the stoichiometric ratio of one. In the fourth stage, new in-gap states appear, which are the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and HOMO+1 states of (rubrene)2- anion.

  1. Applications of Laminar Weak-Link Mechanisms for Ultraprecision Synchrotron Radiation Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.; Maser, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Shastri, S. D.; Lee, P. L.; Narayanan, S.; Long, G. G.

    2007-01-19

    Unlike traditional kinematic flexure mechanisms, laminar overconstrained weak-link mechanisms provide much higher structure stiffness and stability. Using a laminar structure configured and manufactured by chemical etching and lithography techniques, we are able to design and build linear and rotary weak-link mechanisms with ultrahigh positioning sensitivity and stability for synchrotron radiation applications. Applications of laminar rotary weak-link mechanism include: high-energy-resolution monochromators for inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray analyzers for ultra-small-angle scattering and powder-diffraction experiments. Applications of laminar linear weak-link mechanism include high-stiffness piezo-driven stages with subnanometer resolution for an x-ray microscope. In this paper, we summarize the recent designs and applications of the laminar weak-link mechanisms at the Advanced Photon Source.

  2. A novel crystal bender for x-ray synchrotron radiation monochromators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeper, Ralf; Richwin, Matthias; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Frahm, Ronald

    2002-03-01

    A new bending mechanism for an indirectly water cooled monochromator crystal has been developed. The main design goals were a lightweight construction, ease of manufacture, and control. The construction consists of a U-shaped first Si(111) crystal, which can be bent by compressed air to compensate the bowing induced by the heat load from the impinging white synchrotron radiation. The performance of the system was tested at the x-ray undulator beamline BW1 at HASYLAB (Hamburg, Germany). For heat loads between ˜100 and 400 W, rebending of the crystal significantly increases the intensity of the monochromatic beam while the rocking curve is narrowed accordingly, typical widths obtained at 8.9 keV photon energy amount to about 10 arc sec.

  3. Structural basis for supercooled liquid fragility established by synchrotron-radiation method and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri; Belosludov, R.; Yavari, Alain; Georgarakis, Konstantinos; Vaughan, Gavin; Kawazoe, Y.; Egami, Takeshi; Inoue, A.

    2011-01-01

    Metallic melts above the liquidus temperature exhibit nearly Arrhenius-type temperature dependence of viscosity. On cooling below the equilibrium liquidus temperature metallic melts exhibit a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of viscosity characterized by liquid fragility phenomenon which origin is still not well understood. Structural changes and vitrification of the Pd{sub 42.5}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 7.5}P{sub 20} liquid alloy on cooling from above the equilibrium liquidus temperature are studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and compared with the results of first-principles calculations. Subsequent analysis of the atomic and electronic structure of the alloy in liquid and glassy states reveals formation of chemical short-range order in the temperature range corresponding to such a non-Arrhenius behavior. The first-principles calculations were applied to confirm the experimental findings.

  4. XAFS beam lines at Aichi Synchrotron Radiation Center dedicated to industrial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoshikazu

    2016-05-01

    Aichi Synchrotron Radiation Center was designed for industrial use following five years of discussion among academia, industry and local government in the Aichi area. Among the six beam lines constructed, those that facilitated X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis were given first priority. In addition to the hardware, attention was given to the development of operating procedures that were quick and user-friendly. The facility entered public service in March 2013. In the year 2013, 55% of the experiments involved XAFS analysis (hard X-ray, soft X-ray and vacuum ultraviolet regions) and in 2014 it was 57%. The range of research fields is very broad, emphasizing the importance of the XAFS beam lines.

  5. Properties of cold ions produced by synchrotron radiation and by charged particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, J. C.; Biedermann, C.; Cederquist, H.; O, C.-S.; Short, R. T.; Sellin, I. A.

    1989-04-01

    Argon recoil ions produced by beams of 0.8 MeV/u Cl 5+ have been detected by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques in coincidence with the loss of from one to five projectile electrons. Recoil-ion energies have been determined to be more than an order of magnitude higher than those of highly charged ions produced by unmonochromatized synchrotron radiation. Charge-state distributions, however, show similarities, suggesting that loss of projectile electrons corresponds, in some cases, to inner-shell target ionization producing vacancy cascades. In an essential improvement to the usual multinomial description of ionization in the independent-electron-ejection model, we find the inclusion of Auger vacancy cascades significantly alters the description of the recoil ion spectra corresponding to the projectile-electron loss. These conclusions are consistent with impact parameters inferred from determination of mean recoil energy.

  6. A simplified edge illumination set-up for quantitative phase contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation at clinical doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Mariaconcetta; Rigon, Luigi; Lopez, Frances C. M.; Chen, Rongchang; Dreossi, Diego; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Longo, Renata

    2015-02-01

    This work presents the first study of x-ray phase contrast imaging based on a simple implementation of the edge illumination method (EIXPCi) in the field of mammography with synchrotron radiation. A simplified EIXPCi set-up was utilized to study a possible application in mammography at clinical doses. Moreover, through a novel algorithm capable of separating and quantifying absorption and phase perturbations of images acquired in EIXPCi modality, it is possible to extract quantitative information on breast images, allowing an accurate tissue identification. The study was carried out at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy), where a mastectomy specimen was investigated with the EIXPCi technique. The sample was exposed at three different energies suitable for mammography with synchrotron radiation in order to test the validity of the novel algorithm in extracting values of linear attenuation coefficients integrated over the sample thickness. It is demonstrated that the quantitative data are in good agreement with the theoretical values of linear attenuation coefficients calculated on the hypothesis of the breast with a given composition. The results are promising and encourage the current efforts to apply the method in mammography with synchrotron radiation.

  7. A new optical scheme for large-extraction small-aberration vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation beamlines.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Vacuum-ultraviolet radiation delivered by bending-magnet sources is used at numerous synchrotron radiation facilities worldwide. As bending-magnet radiation is inherently much less collimated compared with undulator sources, the generation of high-quality intense bending-magnet vacuum-ultraviolet photon beams is extremely demanding in terms of the optical layout due to the necessary larger collection apertures. In this article, an optimized optical layout which takes into account both the optical and electron beam properties is proposed. This layout delivers an improved beam emittance of over one order of magnitude compared with existing vacuum-ultraviolet bending-magnet beamlines that, up to now, do not take into account electron beam effects. The arrangement is made of two dedicated mirrors, a cylindrical and a cone-shaped one, that focus independently both the horizontal and the vertical emission of a bending-magnet source, respectively, and has been already successfully applied in the construction of the infrared beamline at the Brazilian synchrotron. Using this scheme, two vacuum-ultraviolet beamline designs based on a SOLEIL synchrotron bending-magnet source are proposed and analysed. They would be useful for future upgrades to the DISCO beamline at SOLEIL and could be readily implemented at other synchrotron radiation facilities.

  8. A new optical scheme for large-extraction small-aberration vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation beamlines.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Vacuum-ultraviolet radiation delivered by bending-magnet sources is used at numerous synchrotron radiation facilities worldwide. As bending-magnet radiation is inherently much less collimated compared with undulator sources, the generation of high-quality intense bending-magnet vacuum-ultraviolet photon beams is extremely demanding in terms of the optical layout due to the necessary larger collection apertures. In this article, an optimized optical layout which takes into account both the optical and electron beam properties is proposed. This layout delivers an improved beam emittance of over one order of magnitude compared with existing vacuum-ultraviolet bending-magnet beamlines that, up to now, do not take into account electron beam effects. The arrangement is made of two dedicated mirrors, a cylindrical and a cone-shaped one, that focus independently both the horizontal and the vertical emission of a bending-magnet source, respectively, and has been already successfully applied in the construction of the infrared beamline at the Brazilian synchrotron. Using this scheme, two vacuum-ultraviolet beamline designs based on a SOLEIL synchrotron bending-magnet source are proposed and analysed. They would be useful for future upgrades to the DISCO beamline at SOLEIL and could be readily implemented at other synchrotron radiation facilities. PMID:27577766

  9. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  10. High-resolution pulsed-field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy using multi-bunch synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    BL9.0.2.2 is the newly constructed experimental End Station 2 at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). It is dedicated to the high resolution photoionization study of molecules of interest to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This End Station is equipped with a high resolution scanning monochromator, which has been demonstrated to have a world record resolution of E/{delta}E=70,000. Taking the advantage of the high resolution ALS light, the authors have improved the energy resolution in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) to 0.8 meV. The TPES is a popular technique for photoionization experiments at all synchrotron radiation facilities due to its high energy resolution as compared to that of traditional photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). TPES achieves higher energy resolution by preferentially detecting near zero kinetic energy photoelectrons resulting from threshold photoionization. However, the spectra obtained from the TPES technique generally are complicated by the simultaneous detection of electrons with nonzero kinetic energy, which are not fully discriminated against. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-PES) are completely free of the contamination from kinetic electrons. The PFI-PE technique basically involves the detection of the photoelectrons from field ionization of the very high-n Rydberg states, a few cm{sup {minus}1} below the ionization energy (IE), by applying a delayed pulsed electric field. Within a delay of a few microseconds, all the prompt electrons formed from direct ionization will escape from the photoionization region and will not be collected. The authors have recently overcome problems with energy resolution of an electron time-of-flight technique, and incorporated the PFI-PE technique with multi-bunch VUV synchrotron radiation.

  11. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries Using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Intercalation compounds such as transition metal oxides or phosphates are the most commonly used electrode materials in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. During insertion or removal of alkali metal ions, the redox states of transition metals in the compounds change and structural transformations such as phase transitions and/or lattice parameter increases or decreases occur. These behaviors in turn determine important characteristics of the batteries such as the potential profiles, rate capabilities, and cycle lives. The extremely bright and tunable x-rays produced by synchrotron radiation allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution data that provide information about these processes. Transformations in the bulk materials, such as phase transitions, can be directly observed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives information about the local electronic and geometric structures (e.g. changes in redox states and bond lengths). In situ experiments carried out on operating cells are particularly useful because they allow direct correlation between the electrochemical and structural properties of the materials. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design due to the reactivity and air-sensitivity of the alkali metal anodes used in the half-cell configurations, and/or the possibility of signal interference from other cell components and hardware. For these reasons, it is appropriate to carry out ex situ experiments (e.g. on electrodes harvested from partially charged or cycled cells) in some cases. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of both ex situ and in situ samples for experiments involving synchrotron radiation and demonstrate how these experiments are done. PMID:24300777

  12. Characterization of electrode materials for lithium ion and sodium ion batteries using synchrotron radiation techniques.

    PubMed

    Doeff, Marca M; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C; Conry, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Intercalation compounds such as transition metal oxides or phosphates are the most commonly used electrode materials in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. During insertion or removal of alkali metal ions, the redox states of transition metals in the compounds change and structural transformations such as phase transitions and/or lattice parameter increases or decreases occur. These behaviors in turn determine important characteristics of the batteries such as the potential profiles, rate capabilities, and cycle lives. The extremely bright and tunable x-rays produced by synchrotron radiation allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution data that provide information about these processes. Transformations in the bulk materials, such as phase transitions, can be directly observed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives information about the local electronic and geometric structures (e.g. changes in redox states and bond lengths). In situ experiments carried out on operating cells are particularly useful because they allow direct correlation between the electrochemical and structural properties of the materials. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design due to the reactivity and air-sensitivity of the alkali metal anodes used in the half-cell configurations, and/or the possibility of signal interference from other cell components and hardware. For these reasons, it is appropriate to carry out ex situ experiments (e.g. on electrodes harvested from partially charged or cycled cells) in some cases. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of both ex situ and in situ samples for experiments involving synchrotron radiation and demonstrate how these experiments are done.

  13. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-05-09

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  14. Synchrotron radiation with radiation reaction. [relativistic electron motion in strong astrophysical magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Wasserman, Ira

    1991-01-01

    A rigorous discussion is presented of the classical motion of a relativistic electron in a magnetic field and the resulting electromagnetic radiation when radiation reaction is important. In particular, for an electron injected with initial energy gamma(0), a systematic perturbative solution to the Lorentz-Dirac equation of motion is developed for field strengths satisfying gamma(0) B much less than 6 x 10 to the 15th G. A particularly accurate solution to the electron orbital motion in this regime is found and it is demonstrated how lowest-order corrections can be calculated. It is shown that the total energy-loss rate corresponds to what would be found using the exact Larmor power formula without including radiation reaction. Provided that the particle energy and field strength satisfy the same contraint, it is explicitly demonstrated that the intuitive prescription for calculating the time-integrated radiation spectrum described above is correct.

  15. Study of the Synchrotron Radiation Emission from the NRL Modified Betatron Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tab Jay

    1990-01-01

    Incoherent synchrotron radiation from a relativistic electron beam circulating in the magnetic field configuration of the NRL modified betatron accelerator has been studied numerically and experimentally. Numerical studies show that, for relativistic electron energies up to approximately 2 MeV, the single particle spectrum of radiation is dominated by a peak in the intensity distribution at the Doppler -shifted cyclotron frequency about the toroidal field. This intensity distribution very closely approximates the distribution for a linear helical electron trajectory with relativistic velocity along the axis of the helix. The radiated electric field oscillations, however, are 'modulated' due to the curvature of the major radius. As the electrons accelerate above an energy of a few MeV, the modulation width becomes so narrow that even the fast gyro-oscillation about the toroidal field produces no significant variation in the total radiated fields. Thus, the amplitude, polarization, and frequency content in the spectrum approaches that of a purely circular orbit. Experimental studies of the radiation have been conducted by monitoring the temporal evolution of radiated power during acceleration using fixed-frequency heterodyne receivers. Radiation was measured for electron beam energies in the range of 0.5 MeV to about 10 MeV, trapped beam currents up to approximately 500 A, and for values of toroidal guide field in the range of approximately 1900 to 3500 Gauss. At electron energies less than about 2 MeV, the polarization, amplitude, scaling with trapped beam current, and the temporal evolution of measured radiation during acceleration are in very good agreement with the predicted single particle spectrum. Furthermore, there is no evidence of collective emission at least within the frequency ranges 8 to 12 GHz and 26 to 40 GHz. The only significant discrepancy between the experimental and predicted results is the apparent absence of the horizontally polarized radiation

  16. Applications of photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy with third-generation, synchrotron-radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, D.W.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Mother nature`s finest test probe; soft x-ray emission spectroscopy with high-brightness synchrotron radiation sources; anisotropy and polarization of x-ray emission from atoms and molecules; valence-hole fluorescence from molecular photoions as a probe of shape-resonance ionization: progress and prospects; structural biophysics on third-generation synchrotron sources; ultra-soft x-ray fluorescence-yield XAFS: an in situ photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy; and x-ray microprobe: an analytical tool for imaging elemental composition and microstructure.

  17. Applications of photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy with third-generation, synchrotron-radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lindle, D.W.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Mother nature's finest test probe; soft x-ray emission spectroscopy with high-brightness synchrotron radiation sources; anisotropy and polarization of x-ray emission from atoms and molecules; valence-hole fluorescence from molecular photoions as a probe of shape-resonance ionization: progress and prospects; structural biophysics on third-generation synchrotron sources; ultra-soft x-ray fluorescence-yield XAFS: an in situ photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy; and x-ray microprobe: an analytical tool for imaging elemental composition and microstructure.

  18. Elemental concentrations in skin of patients with fibroeptelial polip using synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Júlio C. A. C. R.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in acrochordon, a skin lesion also known as skin tag or fibroepithelial polyp, as well as in normal skin from the same patient. The samples were analyzed by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (SRTXRF) in the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas/São Paulo-Brazil. The collection of lesion and healthy skin samples, including papillary dermis and epidermis, has involved 17 patients. It was evaluated the presence of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in the paired samples, which were compared, and significant differences were found in some of them.

  19. Soft X-Ray Microscopy Radiation Damage On Fixed Cells Investigated With Synchrotron Radiation FTIR Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gianoncelli, A.; Vaccari, L.; Kourousias, G.; Cassese, D.; Bedolla, D. E.; Kenig, S.; Storici, P.; Lazzarino, M.; Kiskinova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage of biological samples remains a limiting factor in high resolution X-ray microscopy (XRM). Several studies have attempted to evaluate the extent and the effects of radiation damage, proposing strategies to minimise or prevent it. The present work aims to assess the impact of soft X-rays on formalin fixed cells on a systematic manner. The novelty of this approach resides on investigating the radiation damage not only with XRM, as often reported in relevant literature on the topic, but by coupling it with two additional independent non-destructive microscopy methods: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and FTIR Microscopy (FTIRM). Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were exposed to different radiation doses at 1 keV. In order to reveal possible morphological and biochemical changes, the irradiated cells were systematically analysed with AFM and FTIRM before and after. Results reveal that while cell morphology is not substantially affected, cellular biochemical profile changes significantly and progressively when increasing dose, resulting in a severe breakdown of the covalent bonding network. This information impacts most soft XRM studies on fixed cells and adds an in-depth understanding of the radiation damage for developing better prevention strategies. PMID:25974639

  20. Soft X-Ray Microscopy Radiation Damage On Fixed Cells Investigated With Synchrotron Radiation FTIR Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gianoncelli, A; Vaccari, L; Kourousias, G; Cassese, D; Bedolla, D E; Kenig, S; Storici, P; Lazzarino, M; Kiskinova, M

    2015-05-14

    Radiation damage of biological samples remains a limiting factor in high resolution X-ray microscopy (XRM). Several studies have attempted to evaluate the extent and the effects of radiation damage, proposing strategies to minimise or prevent it. The present work aims to assess the impact of soft X-rays on formalin fixed cells on a systematic manner. The novelty of this approach resides on investigating the radiation damage not only with XRM, as often reported in relevant literature on the topic, but by coupling it with two additional independent non-destructive microscopy methods: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and FTIR Microscopy (FTIRM). Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were exposed to different radiation doses at 1 keV. In order to reveal possible morphological and biochemical changes, the irradiated cells were systematically analysed with AFM and FTIRM before and after. Results reveal that while cell morphology is not substantially affected, cellular biochemical profile changes significantly and progressively when increasing dose, resulting in a severe breakdown of the covalent bonding network. This information impacts most soft XRM studies on fixed cells and adds an in-depth understanding of the radiation damage for developing better prevention strategies.

  1. Soft X-Ray Microscopy Radiation Damage On Fixed Cells Investigated With Synchrotron Radiation FTIR Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianoncelli, A.; Vaccari, L.; Kourousias, G.; Cassese, D.; Bedolla, D. E.; Kenig, S.; Storici, P.; Lazzarino, M.; Kiskinova, M.

    2015-05-01

    Radiation damage of biological samples remains a limiting factor in high resolution X-ray microscopy (XRM). Several studies have attempted to evaluate the extent and the effects of radiation damage, proposing strategies to minimise or prevent it. The present work aims to assess the impact of soft X-rays on formalin fixed cells on a systematic manner. The novelty of this approach resides on investigating the radiation damage not only with XRM, as often reported in relevant literature on the topic, but by coupling it with two additional independent non-destructive microscopy methods: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and FTIR Microscopy (FTIRM). Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were exposed to different radiation doses at 1 keV. In order to reveal possible morphological and biochemical changes, the irradiated cells were systematically analysed with AFM and FTIRM before and after. Results reveal that while cell morphology is not substantially affected, cellular biochemical profile changes significantly and progressively when increasing dose, resulting in a severe breakdown of the covalent bonding network. This information impacts most soft XRM studies on fixed cells and adds an in-depth understanding of the radiation damage for developing better prevention strategies.

  2. GeoSoilEnviroCARS: A National User Facility for Synchrotron Radiation Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Sutton, S. R.

    2002-12-01

    GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for frontier research in the earth sciences using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides earth scientists with access to the high-brilliance hard x-rays from this third-generation synchrotron light source. Both an undulator and a bending magnet beamline are available. All principal synchrotron-based analytical techniques in demand by earth scientists are being brought to bear on earth science problems: (1) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography and spectroscopy using the diamond anvil cell; (2) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography using the large-volume press; (3) powder, single crystal and interface diffraction; (4) inelastic x-ray scattering; (5) x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy; (6) x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis; and (7) microtomography. The major instrumentation includes 250 and 1000 MN multianvil presses, a double-sided laser heating system, a large general-purpose 5-circle diffractometer, a focused microprobe, and a Raman laboratory. A proposal-based system for beamtime allocation, open to all earth scientists, has been in place since Fall, 1998. Since then, over 450 beamtime proposals have been received and more than 320 outside users have conducted experiments at GSECARS. The research conducted by these investigators has resulted in more than 170 publications. The unique capabilities of the APS and GSECARS have allowed groundbreaking experiments to be conducted. These include: (1) phase transformations in the Mg-Si-O system at mantle conditions; (2) structure of hydrated a-Al2O3 surfaces; (3) alloying properties of silicon in the Earth's core; (4) dynamics of iron-rich melt segregation from silicates during core formation; (5) electronic spin state of FeO at high pressure and temperature; (6) elastic wave velocities of mantle minerals at lower mantle conditions; (7) copper partitioning and

  3. Characterisation of Conformational and Ligand Binding Properties of Membrane Proteins Using Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD).

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to crystallise for use in X-ray crystallographic structural determination, or too complex for NMR structural studies. Circular dichroism (CD) is a fast and relatively easy spectroscopic technique to study protein conformational behaviour in solution. The advantage of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) measured with synchrotron beamlines compared to the CD from benchtop instruments is the extended spectral far-UV region that increases the accuracy of secondary structure estimations, in particular under high ionic strength conditions. Membrane proteins are often available in small quantities, and for this SRCD measured at the Diamond B23 beamline has successfully facilitated molecular recognition studies. This was done by probing the local tertiary structure of aromatic amino acid residues upon addition of chiral or non-chiral ligands using long pathlength cells (1-5 cm) of small volume capacity (70 μl-350 μl). In this chapter we describe the use of SRCD to qualitatively and quantitatively screen ligand binding interactions (exemplified by Sbma, Ace1 and FsrC proteins); to distinguish between functionally similar drugs that exhibit different mechanisms of action towards membrane proteins (exemplified by FsrC); and to identify suitable detergent conditions to observe membrane protein-ligand interactions using stabilised proteins (exemplified by inositol transporters) as well as the stability of membrane proteins (exemplified by GalP, Ace1). The importance of the in solution characterisation of the conformational behaviour and ligand binding properties of proteins in both far- andnear-UV regions and the use of high-throughput CD (HT-CD) using 96- and 384-well multiplates to study the folding effects in various protein crystallisation buffers are also discussed. PMID:27553234

  4. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Doehrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Risch, Johannes F. H.; Mannweiler, Roman; Roth, Stephan V.; Bommel, Sebastian; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2013-04-15

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibil-ities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

  5. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Bommel, Sebastian; Risch, Johannes F. H.; Mannweiler, Roman; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V.

    2013-04-01

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibil-ities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

  6. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Döhrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Bommel, Sebastian; Risch, Johannes F H; Mannweiler, Roman; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V

    2013-04-01

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibilities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users. PMID:23635203

  7. Synchrotron radiation-based far-infrared spectroscopic ellipsometer with full Mueller-matrix capability

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislavchuk, T. N.; Kang, T. D.; Rogers, P. D.; Standard, E. C.; Basistyy, R.; Nita, G.; Zhou, T.; Sirenko, A. A.; Kotelyanskii, A. M.; Carr, G. L.; Kotelyanskii, M.

    2013-02-15

    We developed far-IR spectroscopic ellipsometer at the U4IR beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory. This ellipsometer is able to measure both, rotating analyzer and full-Mueller matrix spectra using rotating retarders, and wire-grid linear polarizers. We utilize exceptional brightness of synchrotron radiation in the broad spectral range between about 20 and 4000 cm{sup -1}. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer is used for multi-wavelength data acquisition. The sample stage has temperature variation between 4.2 and 450 K, wide range of {theta}-2{theta} angular rotation, {chi} tilt angle adjustment, and X-Y-Z translation. A LabVIEW-based software controls the motors, sample temperature, and FT-IR spectrometer and also allows to run fully automated experiments with pre-programmed measurement schedules. Data analysis is based on Berreman's 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 propagation matrix formalism to calculate the Mueller matrix parameters of anisotropic samples with magnetic permeability {mu}{ne} 1. A nonlinear regression of the rotating analyzer ellipsometry and/or Mueller matrix (MM) spectra, which are usually acquired at variable angles of incidence and sample crystallographic orientations, allows extraction of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability tensors for bulk and thin-film samples. Applications of this ellipsometer setup for multiferroic and ferrimagnetic materials with {mu}{ne} 1 are illustrated with experimental results and simulations for TbMnO{sub 3} and Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystals. We demonstrate how magnetic and electric dipoles, such as magnons and phonons, can be distinguished from a single MM measurement without adducing any modeling arguments. The parameters of magnetoelectric components of electromagnon excitations are determined using MM spectra of TbMnO{sub 3}.

  8. Evaluation of the endodontic apical seal after post insertion by synchrotron radiation microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contardo, L.; De Luca, M.; Biasotto, M.; Longo, R.; Olivo, A.; Pani, S.; Di Lenarda, R.

    2005-08-01

    The commonly used methods for evaluating the endodontic apical seal, such as longitudinal and transversal section and diaphanization, show some operative difficulties and intrinsic limitation. This study suggests and describes a new method of analysis using a synchrotron radiation microtomography to analyse the root apex after post insertion, creating a three-dimensional image and analysing sections of the specimen every 5 μm. The study was performed at SYRMEP beam line at the Electra Synchrotron in Trieste using monochromatic X-rays of 32 KeV. Eleven monoradicular teeth were prepared using NiTi GT Rotary files instruments to an apical size 20 with conicity .06 and divided in four groups: in G1 ( n=4) and G2 ( n=2), the specimens were endodontically filled with guttapercha and a zinc-oxide sealer, in G3 ( n=3) and G4 ( n=2) guttapercha and a silicon-based sealer were used. An endodontic post was inserted in specimens of groups 1 and 3 following the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were analysed using monochromatic X-rays of 32 KeV. A CCD detector with pixel dimension pf 5×5 μm 2 was used for the acquisition process. Seven hundred and twenty projections were performed over 180° range using a high-resolution rotator. The projections were reconstructed using standard algorithms for tomographic reconstruction. The apical infiltration was evaluated by verifying if black spots were detectable on the images. The specimens of groups 3 and 4 showed a better apical seal than the ones of groups 1 and 2. Post insertion, when a ZOE-based sealer is used, increases the apical gap even if it does not seem to be clinically relevant and sufficient to be a cause of endodontic failure. The new method for analysis appeared to be effective to detect small defects in endodontic obturation, analysing guttapercha-sealer and sealer-dentin interfaces.

  9. Evaluation of digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithms using synchrotron radiation in standard geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bliznakova, K.; Kolitsi, Z.; Speller, R. D.; Horrocks, J. A.; Tromba, G.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: In this article, the image quality of reconstructed volumes by four algorithms for digital tomosynthesis, applied in the case of breast, is investigated using synchrotron radiation. Methods: An angular data set of 21 images of a complex phantom with heterogeneous tissue-mimicking background was obtained using the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Trieste, Italy. The irradiated part was reconstructed using the multiple projection algorithm (MPA) and the filtered backprojection with ramp followed by hamming windows (FBR-RH) and filtered backprojection with ramp (FBP-R). Additionally, an algorithm for reducing the noise in reconstructed planes based on noise mask subtraction from the planes of the originally reconstructed volume using MPA (MPA-NM) has been further developed. The reconstruction techniques were evaluated in terms of calculations and comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and artifact spread function. Results: It was found that the MPA-NM resulted in higher CNR, comparable with the CNR of FBP-RH for high contrast details. Low contrast objects are well visualized and characterized by high CNR using the simple MPA and the MPA-NM. In addition, the image quality of the reconstructed features in terms of CNR and visual appearance as a function of the initial number of projection images and the reconstruction arc was carried out. Slices reconstructed with more input projection images result in less reconstruction artifacts and higher detail CNR, while those reconstructed from projection images acquired in reduced angular range causes pronounced streak artifacts. Conclusions: Of the reconstruction algorithms implemented, the MPA-NM and MPA are a good choice for detecting low contrast objects, while the FBP-RH, FBP-R, and MPA-NM provide high CNR and well outlined edges in case of microcalcifications.

  10. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain

  11. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  12. Development of ion chambers for the measurement of low energy synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahant, A. K.; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Panyam, Vinatha S.

    2009-04-01

    Measurement of radiation fields due to low energy synchrotron radiation (SR) needs special considerations. The photoelectric interactions, which are mainly responsible for signal generation in this case, result in electron emission in a direction nearly perpendicular to the direction of incident photon. A free air ionisation chamber was designed and used for measurement of intensity of SR in the beam line and a methodology has been developed to measure SR fields away from the beam line using large volume ion chambers. Studies with spherical and cylindrical ion chambers in X-ray beams obtained at a tube potential of 15 kV (3 mm Be inherent filtration) showed that the chamber sensitivity at low energy strongly depended on curvature of the chamber wall especially in thick walled chambers. Our studies further showed that large volume thin and plane walled (0.01 mm thick aluminium wall) chambers could be used for measurement of SR fields away from the beam lines, with reasonably good accuracy (±10%) by calibrating them against the free air ion chamber through a similar chamber of smaller dimensions.

  13. Bunch Length Measurements at the JLab FEL Using Coherent Transition and Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Evtushenko; James Coleman; Kevin Jordan; J. Michael Klopf; George Neil; Gwyn Williams

    2006-05-01

    The JLab FEL is routinely operated with sub-picosecond bunches. The short bunch length is important for high gain of the FEL. Coherent transition radiation has been used for the bunch length measurements for many years [1]. This diagnostic can be used only in the pulsed beam mode. It is our goal to run the FEL with CW beam and a 74.85 MHz micropulse repetition rate, which, with the 135 pC nominal bunch charge corresponds to the beam average current of 10 mA. Hence it is very desirable to have the possibility of making bunch length measurements when running CW beam with any micropulse frequency. We use a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interferometer, which is essentially a Michelson interferometer, to measure the spectrum of the coherent synchrotron radiation generated in the last dipole of the magnetic bunch compressor upstream of the FEL wiggler. This noninvasive diagnostic provides bunch length measurements for CW beam operation at any micropulse frequency. We also compare the measurements made with the help of the FTIR interferometer with data obtained using the Martin-Puplett interferometer [1]. Results of the two diagnostics agree within 15 %. Here we present a description of the experimental setup, data evaluation procedure and results of the beam measurements.

  14. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-15

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

  15. Development of Partially-Coherent Wavefront Propagation Simulation Methods for 3rd and 4th Generation Synchrotron Radiation Sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar O.; Berman, L; Chu, Y.S.; Fluerasu, A.; Hulbert, S.; Idir, M.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Shapiro, D.; Baltser, J.

    2012-04-04

    Partially-coherent wavefront propagation calculations have proven to be feasible and very beneficial in the design of beamlines for 3rd and 4th generation Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources. These types of calculations use the framework of classical electrodynamics for the description, on the same accuracy level, of the emission by relativistic electrons moving in magnetic fields of accelerators, and the propagation of the emitted radiation wavefronts through beamline optical elements. This enables accurate prediction of performance characteristics for beamlines exploiting high SR brightness and/or high spectral flux. Detailed analysis of radiation degree of coherence, offered by the partially-coherent wavefront propagation method, is of paramount importance for modern storage-ring based SR sources, which, thanks to extremely small sub-nanometer-level electron beam emittances, produce substantial portions of coherent flux in X-ray spectral range. We describe the general approach to partially-coherent SR wavefront propagation simulations and present examples of such simulations performed using 'Synchrotron Radiation Workshop' (SRW) code for the parameters of hard X-ray undulator based beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), Brookhaven National Laboratory. These examples illustrate general characteristics of partially-coherent undulator radiation beams in low-emittance SR sources, and demonstrate advantages of applying high-accuracy physical-optics simulations to the optimization and performance prediction of X-ray optical beamlines in these new sources.

  16. High-resolution KMM radiative Auger x-ray emission spectra of calcium induced by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.-P.; Szlachetko, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Budnar, M.; Zitnik, M.; Szlachetko, J.

    2011-04-15

    The KMM radiative Auger (RA) x-ray spectra of solid Ca were induced by monochromatic synchrotron radiation and measured with a high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer. Two excitation energies were employed, one in the near K threshold region and the second well above the K absorption edge. The KMM RA spectral structure and relative intensity with respect to the diagram K{beta}{sub 1,3} (K-M{sub 3,2}) line are found to be independent of the excitation energy. The overall RA structure resembles the density of unoccupied s, p, and d states. Due to solid-state effects, however, spectral features resulting from the major discrete shake-up transitions could not be resolved. For the total KMM RA to K{beta}{sub 1,3} yield ratio, a value of 0.053(3) is obtained. The latter is compared to theoretical predictions and available experimental data obtained by various types of target excitation.

  17. Study of strong enhancement of synchrotron radiation via surface plasma waves excitation by particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, K. Q.; Zheng, C. Y. Cao, L. H.; He, X. T.; Wu, Dong; Liu, Z. J.

    2015-11-02

    Synchrotron radiation is strongly enhanced by the resonant excitation of surface plasma waves (SPWs). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that energy conversion efficiency from laser to radiation in the case of SPWs excitation is about 18.7%, which is improved by more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with that of no SPWs excitation. Besides the high energy conversion efficiency, the frequency spectrum and the angular distribution of the radiation are also improved in the case of SPWs excitation because of the quasi-static magnet field induced by surface plasma waves excitation.

  18. Individual Human Cell Responses to Low Doses of Chemicals and Radiation Studied by Synchrotron Infrared Spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael C.; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Goth-Goldstein, Regine; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2000-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy, when combined with synchrotron radiation-based (SR) microscopy, is a powerful new analytical tool with high spatial resolution for detecting biochemical changes in individual living cells. In contrast to other microscopy methods that require fixing, drying, staining or labeling, SR FTIR microscopy probes intact living cells providing a composite view of all of the molecular responses and the ability to monitor the responses over time in the same cell. Observed spectral changes include all types of lesions induced in that cell as well as cellular responses to external and internal stresses. These spectral changes combined with other analytical tools may provide a fundamental understanding of the key molecular mechanisms induced in response to stresses created by low-doses of radiation and chemicals. In this study we used high spatial-resolution SR FTIR vibrational spectromicroscopy at ALS Beamline 1.4.3 as a sensitive analytical tool to detect chemical- and radiation-induced changes in individual human cells. Our preliminary spectral measurements indicate that this technique is sensitive enough to detect changes in nucleic acids and proteins of cells treated with environmentally relevant concentrations of oxidative stresses: bleomycin, hydrogen peroxide, and X-rays. We observe spectral changes that are unique to each exogenous stressor. This technique has the potential to distinguish changes from exogenous or endogenous oxidative processes. Future development of this technique will allow rapid monitoring of cellular processes such as drug metabolism, early detection of disease, bio-compatibility of implant materials, cellular repair mechanisms, self assembly of cellular apparatus, cell differentiation and fetal development.

  19. Discriminating different scenarios to account for the cosmic e{sup {+-}} excess by synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Juan; Yuan Qiang; Bi Xiaojun; Liu Jia; Yin Pengfei; Zhu Shouhua; Liu Siming

    2009-07-15

    The excesses of the cosmic positron fraction recently measured by PAMELA and the electron spectra by ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi, and H.E.S.S. indicate the existence of primary electron and positron sources. The possible explanations include dark matter annihilation, decay, and astrophysical origin, like pulsars. In this work we show that these three scenarios can all explain the experimental results of the cosmic e{sup {+-}} excess. However, it may be difficult to discriminate these different scenarios by the local measurements of electrons and positrons. We propose possible discriminations among these scenarios through the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation of the primary electrons/positrons from the region close to the Galactic center. Taking typical configurations, we find the three scenarios predict quite different spectra and skymaps of the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation, though there are relatively large uncertainties. The most prominent differences come from the energy band 10{sup 4}{approx}10{sup 9} MHz for synchrotron emission and > or approx. 10 GeV for inverse Compton emission. It might be able to discriminate at least the annihilating dark matter scenario from the other two given the high precision synchrotron and diffuse {gamma}-ray skymaps in the future.

  20. Discriminating different scenarios to account for the cosmic e± excess by synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juan; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Jia; Liu, Si-Ming; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qiang; Zhu, Shou-Hua

    2009-07-01

    The excesses of the cosmic positron fraction recently measured by PAMELA and the electron spectra by ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi, and H.E.S.S. indicate the existence of primary electron and positron sources. The possible explanations include dark matter annihilation, decay, and astrophysical origin, like pulsars. In this work we show that these three scenarios can all explain the experimental results of the cosmic e± excess. However, it may be difficult to discriminate these different scenarios by the local measurements of electrons and positrons. We propose possible discriminations among these scenarios through the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation of the primary electrons/positrons from the region close to the Galactic center. Taking typical configurations, we find the three scenarios predict quite different spectra and skymaps of the synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation, though there are relatively large uncertainties. The most prominent differences come from the energy band 104˜109MHz for synchrotron emission and ≳10GeV for inverse Compton emission. It might be able to discriminate at least the annihilating dark matter scenario from the other two given the high precision synchrotron and diffuse γ-ray skymaps in the future.

  1. Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordgren, J.; Bray, G.; Cramm, S.; Nyholm, R.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Wassdahl, N.

    1989-07-01

    Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy is a common tool for the study of the electronic structure of molecules and solids. However, the interpretation of spectra is sometimes made difficult by overlaying lines due to satellite transitions or close-lying core holes. Also, irrelevant inner core transitions may accidentally fall in the wavelength region under study. These problems, which often arise for spectra excited with electrons or broadband photon sources can be removed by using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. In addition, one achieves other advantages as well, such as the ability to study resonant behavior. Another important aspect is the softness of this excitation agent, which allows chemically fragile compounds to be investigated. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of using monochromatized synchrotron radiation to excite soft x-ray spectra. We also show new results which have been accomplished as a result of the selectivity of the excitation. The work has been carried out using the Flipper I wiggler beamline at HASYLAB in Hamburg using a new grazing incidence instrument designed specifically for this experiment. The photon flux at the Flipper I station (typically 5×1012 photons per second on the sample with a 1% bandpass) is enough to allow soft x-ray fluorescence spectra to be recorded at relatively high resolution and within reasonable accumulation times (typically, the spectra presented in this work were recorded in 30 min). The spectrometer is based on a new concept which allows the instrument to be quite small, still covering a large wavelength range (10-250 Å). The basic idea involves the use of several fixed mounted gratings and a large two-dimensional detector. The grating arrangement provides simple mounting within a limited space and, in particular, large spectral range. The detector can be moved in a three-axis coordinate system in order to cover the different Rowland curves defined by the different gratings. The arrangement permits

  2. Synchrotron radiation from the winds of O supergiants - Tb = 10 to the 7. 6th K at 60 stellar radii

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.B.; Titus, M.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Results are presented on VLBI measurements of the nonthermal radio components around two O supergiant stars: Cyg OB2 No. 9 and HD 167971. The measurements were used to characterize the brightness temperature of the emission and to measure the size of compact 5-10 mJy components in these stars, reported by Bieging et al. (1989). The sizes found for the 5-10 mJy components are consistent with the free-free wind radii, indicating that the compact companions are not the sources of nonthermal radiation. Results suggest that there is a small fractional population (10 to the -4th to 10 to the -7th) of ultrarelativistic electrons (Teff of about 10 to the 11th K) coexisting with the stellar wind, which emit optically thin synchrotron radiation. This is in agreement with the synchrotron model of White (1985). 21 refs.

  3. Experimental observation of increased threshold electric field for runaway generation due to synchrotron radiation losses in the FTU tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Solis, Jose Ramon; Sanchez, Raul; Esposito, Basilio

    2010-01-01

    The threshold electric field for runaway generation has been investigated during runaway suppression experiments by means of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating in the flattop phase of FTU discharges. Runaway suppression has been experimentally found to occur at electric fields substantially larger than those predicted by the relativistic collisional theory of runaway generation, E{sub R} = n{sub e}e{sup 3}ln{Lambda}/4{pi}{var_epsilon}{sub 0}{sup 2}m{sub e}c{sup 2}. These experimental results are consistent with an increase of the critical electric field due to the electron synchrotron radiation losses. No runaway electrons are found in FTU experiments below the radiation threshold. These results support evidence for a new threshold electric field for runaway generation that accounts for the effect of the synchrotron losses, and which should be considered when making predictions on runaway generation and mitigation in devices such as ITER.

  4. A velocity map imaging spectrometer for electron?ion and ion?ion coincidence experiments with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Kilcoyne, Arthur L; Rolles, D.; Pesic, Z.D.; Perri, M.; Bilodeau, R.C.; Ackerman, G.D.; Rude, B.S.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2007-04-27

    We have built a velocity imaging (VMI) spectrometer optimized for angle-resolved photoionization experiments with synchrotron radiation (SR) in the VUV and soft X-tay range. The spectrometer is equiped with four electrostatic lenses that focus the charged photoionization products onto a position-sensitive multi-hit delay-line anode. The use of two additional electrostatic lens elements as compared to the standard design of Eppink and Parker [T.J.B. Eppink and D.H. Parker, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68 (1997) 3477]provides better focusing of an extended interaction region, which is crucial for most SR applications. Furthermore, the apparatus is equipped with a second micro-channel plate detector opposite to the VMI spectrometer, enabling electron-ion coincidence experiments and thereby mass-resolved ion spectroscopy independent of the time structure of the synchrotron radiation. First results for the photofragmentation of CO2 molecules are presented.

  5. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, D. J.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wright, T. E.; Harty, P. D.; Lehmann, J.; Livingstone, J.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response.

  6. Rainwater analysis by synchrotron radiation-total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, María L.; Ceppi, Sergio A.; Asar, María L.; Bürgesser, Rodrigo E.; Ávila, Eldo E.

    2015-11-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis excited with synchrotron radiation was used to quantify the elemental concentration of rainwater in Córdoba, Argentina. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for the calibration curves. Rainwater samples of 5 μl were added to an acrylic reflector, allowed to dry, and analyzed for 200 s measuring time. The elemental concentrations of As, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Sr, V, and Zn were determined. The electrical conductivity, pH, and elemental concentrations were compared to data previously reported for the soluble fraction of rainwater at different sites. A factor analysis was performed in order to determine the sources that contributed to the elemental concentration in rainwater. Anthropogenic sources were identified as traffic pollution, vehicular emissions, and metallurgical factories. The quality of rainwater was analyzed by comparing the concentrations of all the elements in rainwater samples with the WHO guideline values for drinking water. The results show the need to control the atmospheric emissions in order to preserve the quality of rainwater. SR-TXRF analysis of chemical composition of rainwater in Córdoba represents the very first contribution in the region to the knowledge of the concentration of trace metals in the soluble fraction of rainwater. These data are scarce, especially in the Southern Hemisphere.

  7. Detection of microvasculature alterations by synchrotron radiation in murine with delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Zhang, Bo; Huo, Hua; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Yuanlin; Xiao, Liang; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Using the tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata, we have previously established a delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) model, which is meaningful for clinical interventions against jellyfish stings. However, the mechanism of DJES still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to explore its potential mechanism by detecting TE-induced microvasculature alterations in vivo and ex vivo. Using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, we, for the first time, directly observed the blood vessel alterations induced by jellyfish venom in vivo and ex vivo. Firstly, microvasculature imaging of whole-body mouse in vivo indicated that the small blood vessel branches in the liver and kidney in the TE-treated group, seemed much thinner than those in the control group. Secondly, 3D imaging of kidney ex vivo showed that the kidneys in the TE-treated group had incomplete vascular trees where distal vessel branches were partly missing and disorderly disturbed. Finally, histopathological analysis found that obvious morphological changes, especially hemorrhagic effects, were also present in the TE-treated kidney. Thus, TE-induced microvasculature changes might be one of the important mechanisms of multiple organ dysfunctions in DJES. In addition, the methods we employed here will probably facilitate further studies on developing effective intervention strategies against DJES.

  8. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  9. Synchrotron-radiation photoemission study of CdS/CuInSe2 heterojunction formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Art J.; Gebhard, Steve; Rockett, Angus; Colavita, Elio; Engelhardt, Mike; Höchst, Hartmut

    1990-10-01

    Synchrotron-radiation soft-x-ray photoemission spectroscopy was used to investigate the development of the electronic structure at the CdS/CuInSe2 heterojunction interface. CdS overlayers were deposited in steps on single-crystal p- and n-type CuInSe2 at 250 °C. Results indicate that the CdS grows in registry with the substrate, initially in a two-dimensional growth mode followed by three-dimensional island growth as is corroborated by reflection high-energy electron-diffraction analysis. Photoemission measurements were acquired after each growth in order to observe changes in the valence-band electronic structure as well as changes in the In 4d, Se 3d, Cd 4d, and S 2p core lines. The results were used to correlate the interface chemistry with the electronic structure at these interfaces and to directly determine the CdS/CuInSe2 heterojunction valence-band discontinuity and the consequent heterojunction band diagram. These results show that the Katnani-Margaritondo method is unreliable in determining offsets for heterojunctions where significant Fermi-level pinning may occur and where the local structure and chemistry of the interface depends strongly on the specific heterojunction.

  10. Synchrotron Radiation {mu}-X Ray Fluorescence on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Burattini, E.; Cinque, G.; Bellisola, G.; Fracasso, G.; Colombatti, M.; Monti, F.

    2003-01-24

    Synchrotron Radiation micro X-Ray Fluorescence (SR {mu}-XRF) was applied for the first time to map the trace element content on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS), i.e. human cell clusters used as an in vitro model for testing micrometastases responses to antitumoral drugs. In particular, immunotoxin molecules composed of a carrier protein (Transferrin) bound to a powerful cytotoxin (Ricin A), were here considered as representatives of a class of therapheutic macromolecules used in cancer theraphy. Spheroids included in polyacrylamide gel and placed inside quartz capillaries were studied at the ESRF ID22 beamline using a 15 keV monochromatic photon microbeam. Elemental maps (of Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) on four groups of spheroids grown under different conditions were studied: untreated, treated only with the carrier molecule or with the toxin alone, and with the complete immunotoxin molecule (carrier+toxin). The results indicate that the distribution of Zn and, to some extent, Cu in the spheroid cells is homogeneous and independent of the treatment type. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TR-XRF) was also applied to quantify the average trace element content in the spheroids. Future developments of the technique are finally outlined on the basis of these preliminary results.

  11. Excitation and ionic fragmentation of gas-phase biomolecules using electrons and synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, G. G. B.; Coutinho, L. H.; Nunez, C.; Bernini, R.; Castilho, R. B.; Lago, A. F.

    2007-11-01

    An experimental study of the electronic excitation and ionic dissociation of two important classes of biomolecules-natural products (biogenic volatile organic compounds, VOCs, and volatile components of essential oils) and DNA and RNA constituents (aminoacids and bases) is here exemplified with recent results on the fragmentation of thymine and isoprene as induced by synchrotron radiation and fast electrons. Fragmentation of the thymine molecule was seen to dramatically increase as the photon energy increased from 21 to 300 eV and 450 eV. At the highest photon energy, simply and doubly charged N and O atoms were observed. The parent ion (m/z = 126) could be observed at all photon energies. The fragmentation pattern observed in the 1.0 keV electron impact mass spectrum of thymine resembled more closely the fragmentation observed with 21 eV photons. In isoprene, the dominant fragments observed at 21 eV and 310 eV photon energy as well as in the 1.0 keV electron impact mass spectrum were C5H7+(m/z = 67), C4H5+(m/z = 53), C3H3+(m/z = 39) and C2H3+(m/z = 27). Previously unreported fragments, namely H+, C+, CH+, CH2+, and CH3+ were observed at the high photon energies and at the electron impact mass spectrum.

  12. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Christopher D.; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  13. Chalcone JAI-51 improves efficacy of synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Audrey; Boumendjel, Ahcene; Khalil, Enam; Serduc, Raphael; Bräuer, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Laissue, Jean A; Boutonnat, Jean

    2012-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), a preclinical form of radiosurgery, uses spatially fractionated micrometre-wide synchrotron-generated X-ray beams. As MRT alone is predominantly palliative for animal tumors, the effects of the combination of MRT and a newly synthesized chemotherapeutic agent JAI-51 on 9L gliosarcomas have been evaluated. Fourteen days (D14) after implantation (D0), intracerebral 9LGS-bearing rats received either MRT, JAI-51 or both treatments. JAI-51, alone or immediately after MRT, was administered three times per week. Animals were kept up to ∼20 weeks after irradiation or sacrificed at D16 or D28 after treatment for cell cycle analysis. MRT plus JAI-51 increased significantly the lifespan compared with MRT alone (p = 0.0367). JAI-51 treatment alone had no effect on rat survival. MRT alone or associated with JAI-51 induced a cell cycle blockade in G2/M (p < 0.01) while the combined treatment also reduced the proportion of G0/G1 cells. At D28 after irradiation, MRT and MRT/JAI-51 had a smaller cell blockade effect in the G2/M phase owing to a significant increase in tumor cell death rate (<2c) and a proportional increase of endoreplicative cells (>8c). The combination of MRT and JAI-51 increases the survival of 9LGS-bearing rats by inducing endoreduplication of DNA and tumor cell death; further, it slowed the onset of tumor growth resumption two weeks after treatment.

  14. Probing polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, Dario; Portale, Giuseppe; Androsch, René

    2015-12-17

    Processing of polymeric materials to produce any kind of goods, from films to complex objects, involves application of flow fields on the polymer melt, accompanied or followed by its rapid cooling. Typically, polymers solidify at cooling rates which span over a wide range, from a few to hundreds of °C/s. A novel method to probe polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates is proposed. Using a custom-built quenching device, thin polymer films are ballistically cooled from the melt at rates between approximately 10 and 200 °C/s. Thanks to highly brilliant synchrotron radiation and to state-of-the-art X-ray detectors, the crystallization process is followed in real-time, recording about 20 wide angle X-ray diffraction patterns per second while monitoring the instantaneous sample temperature. The method is applied to a series of industrially relevant polymers, such as isotactic polypropylene, its copolymers and virgin and nucleated polyamide-6. Their crystallization behaviour during rapid cooling is discussed, with particular attention to the occurrence of polymorphism, which deeply impact material’s properties.

  15. Synchrotron Radiation XRD Analysis of Indialite in Y-82094 Ungrouped Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Sawa, N.; Kimura, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Komatsu, M.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Y-82094 is an ungrouped type 3.2 carbonaceous chondrite, with abundant chondrules making 78 vol.% of the rock. Among these chondrules, an unusual porphyritic Al-rich magnesian chondrule is reported that consists of a cordierite-like phase, Al-rich orthopyroxene, cristobalite, and spinel surrounded by an anorthitic mesostasis. The reported chemical formula of the cordierite-like phase is Na(0.19)Mg(1.95)Fe(0.02)Al(3.66)Si(5.19)O18, which is close to stoichiometric cordierite (Mg2Al3[AlSi5O18]). Although cordierite can be present in Al-rich chondrules, it has a high temperature polymorph (indialite) and it is therefore necessary to determine whether it is cordierite or indialite in order to better constrain its formation conditions. In this abstract we report on our synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) study of the cordierite-like phase in Y-82094.

  16. Ultraprecision grinding of chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, Yoshiharu

    1996-11-01

    Chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is the most important material of mirrors for high-brightness synchrotron radiation beamlines, though the material is too difficult to be machined. It takes quite a long time to polish SiC substrate to make mirrors. This paper intends to reduce the machining time to make CVD-SiC mirrors by using ultra-precision grinding technology. The CVD-SiC sample has been ground into 0.4 nm rms in surface roughness by a resinoid-bonded diamond wheel and an ultra-precision surface grinder having a glass-ceramic spindle of extremely-low thermal expansion. The surface roughness of ground samples were measured with TOPO-3D and AFM. 88.7% reflectivity has been obtained on the ground CVD-SiC flat surface, measured with X-ray of 0.834 nm in wavelength at the grazing incidence angle of 0.7 - 0.95 degree. The reflectivity depends upon the angle between the direction of incident beam and grinding marks on the sample. The relationship between the surface roughness and grinding conditions was also discussed.

  17. Synchrotron radiation photoemission study of metal overlayers on hydrogenated amorphous silicon at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, J.

    1990-09-21

    In this dissertation, metals deposited on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film at room temperature are studied. The purpose of this work is mainly understanding the electronic properties of the interface, using high-resolution synchrotron radiation photoemission techniques as a probe. Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in passivating dangling bonds of a-Si:H films, thus reducing the gap-state distribution. In addition, singly bonded hydrogen also reduces states at the top of the valence band which are now replaced by deeper Si-H bonding states. The interface is formed by evaporating metal on an a-Si:H film in successive accumulations at room temperature. Au, Ag, and Cr were chosen as the deposited metals. Undoped films were used as substrates. Since some unique features can be found in a-Si:H, such as surface enrichment of hydrogen diffused from the bulk and instability of the free surface, we do not expect the metals/a-Si:H interface to behave exactly as its crystalline counterpart. Metal deposits, at low coverages, are found to gather preferentially around regions deficient in hydrogen. As the thickness is increased, some Si atoms in those regions are likely to leave their sites to intermix with metal overlayers like Au and Cr. 129 refs., 30 figs.

  18. Beamlines at synchrotron radiation facilities: The link between the user and the machine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hulbert, S.L.; Berman, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    At this point in time the literature is full of excellent review articles which describe the operating principles of optical systems for utilizing the unique radiation provided by synchrotron storage rings. In general, the perspective provided by this body of work is that of the end user-experimenter cum optics designer. Nominal design specifications of the accelerator are usually assumed, and the impact of operation in a performance envelope which may represent either degraded or enhanced machine performance is seldom considered. In this article, we have attempted to remove ourselves from this (our own usual) perspective and look instead at the beamline as a transfer function to map from the machine to the users experiment. We open first with an introduction to the perspective of the experimentalist, and some general considerations for the interaction of beamline hardware with the machine. We then discuss phase space representations of some common components of beamlines, and then treat some important classes of crystal and geometric optics in monochromators. We then close with a discussion of some of the common features of these optical systems, and the impact of the machine on user experiments.

  19. A new miniature microchannel plate X-ray detector for synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosemeier, Ronald G.; Green, Robert E.

    A state-of-the-art microchannel plate detector has been developed which allows real time X-ray imagin of X-ray diffraction as well as a radiographic phenomenon. Advantages of the device include a 50 mm X-ray input, length less than 4″, and a weight of less than 1 lb. Since the use of synchrotron radiation is greatly facilitated by the capability of remote viewing of X-ray diffraction or radiographic images in real time, a prototype electro-optical system has been designed which couples the X-ray microchannel plate detector with a solid state television camera. Advantages of the miniature, lightweight, X-ray synchroton camera include a large 50 mm X-ray input window, an output signal that is available in both analog format for display on a television monitor and in digital format for computer processing, and a completely modular design which allows all the components to be exchanged for other components optimally suited for the desired applications.

  20. Branching patterns of intramural coronary vessels determined by microangiography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Mori, H; Tanaka, E; Mohammed, M U; Tanaka, Y; Sekka, T; Ito, K; Shinozaki, Y; Hyodo, K; Ando, M; Umetani, K; Tanioka, K; Kubota, M; Abe, S; Handa, S; Nakazawa, H

    1999-06-01

    The intramural coronary artery (IMCA) with a diameter of 50-500 micrometers is critical for blood supply to the inner layers of heart muscle. We introduced digital measurement to microangiography using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and quantified branching patterns of the IMCA, the epicardial coronary artery (EPCA), and the distal ileal artery (DIA). The pre- and postbranching diameters were measured (95-1,275 micrometers) in seven dogs. A typical arterial segment divided into two nearly equivalent branches, and a regression line of daughter-to-mother diameter plots was almost identical among the EPCA (y = 0.838x - 16.7 in micrometers), IMCA (y = 0.737x - 2.18), and DIA (y = 0.755x + 8.63). However, a considerable difference was present at a segment where a proximal IMCA branched off from an EPCA (y = 0.182x + 90.2). Moreover, a proximal IMCA diameter had no relationship to the branching order from an EPCA. The precision of this method was confirmed by the good correlation of diameter measurements between two independent observers (r = 0.999, y = 1.02x - 1.07). In conclusion, using digital microangiography we demonstrated that the self-similar branching pattern of coronary arteries was discrete at the connection between the IMCA and EPCA.

  1. Hydration induced material transfer in membranes of osmotic pump tablets measured by synchrotron radiation based FTIR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Yin, Xianzhen; Guo, Zhen; Tong, Yajun; Feng, Jing; York, Peter; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-03-10

    Osmotic pump tablets are reliable oral controlled drug delivery systems based on their semipermeable membrane coating. This research used synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets. SR-FTIR was applied to record and map the chemical information of a micro-region of the membranes, composed of cellulose acetate (CA, as the water insoluble matrix) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, as the soluble pore forming agent and plasticizing agent). The microstructure and chemical change of membranes hydrated for 0, 5, 10 and 30min were measured using SR-FTIR, combined with scanning electronic microscopy and atom force microscopy. The SR-FTIR microspectroscopy results indicated that there was a major change at the absorption range of 2700-3100cm(-1) in the membranes after different periods of hydration time. The absorption bands at 2870-2880cm(-1) and 2950-2960cm(-1) were assigned to represent CA and PEG, respectively. The chemical group signal distribution illustrated by the ratio of PEG to CA demonstrated that the trigger of drug release in the preliminary stage was due to the rapid transfer of PEG into liquid medium with a sharp decrease of PEG in the membranes. The SR-FTIR mapping results have demonstrated the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets and enabled reassessment of the drug release mechanism of membrane controlled osmotic pump systems. PMID:26802550

  2. Development of intense terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at KU-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Zen, Heishun; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    We produced intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz (THz) region using an S-band linac at the Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KU-FEL), which is a mid-infrared free-electron laser facility. The CSR beam was emitted from short-pulse electron bunches compressed by a 180° arc, and was transferred to air at a large solid angle of 0.10 rad. The measured CSR energy was 55 μJ per 7 μs macropulse, and KU-FEL was one of the most powerful CSR sources in normal conducting linear accelerator facilities. The CSR spectra were measured using an uncooled pyroelectric detector and a Michelson-type interferometer designed specifically for the KU-FEL electron beam, and had a maximum at a frequency of 0.11 THz. We found that adjusting the energy slit enhanced the CSR energy and shortened the electron beam bunch length in the CSR spectra measurements. Our results demonstrated that the efficient use of the energy slit can help improve the characteristics of CSR.

  3. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by coherent synchrotron radiation in triple-bend achromats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi-Yang; Jiao, Yi; Xu, Gang; Cui, Xiao-Hao

    2015-05-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in a bending path plays an important role in transverse emittance dilution in high-brightness light sources and linear colliders, where the electron beams are of short bunch length and high peak current. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by CSR is critical to preserve the beam quality and help improve the machine performance. It has been shown that the CSR effect in a double-bend achromat (DBA) can be analyzed with the two-dimensional point-kick analysis method. In this paper, this method is applied to analyze the CSR effect in a triple-bend achromat (TBA) with symmetric layout, which is commonly used in the optics designs of energy recovery linacs (ERLs). A condition of cancelling the CSR linear effect in such a TBA is obtained, and is verified through numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that emittance preservation can be achieved with this condition, and to a large extent, has a high tolerance to the fluctuation of the initial transverse phase space distribution of the beam. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences (2015009)

  4. Synchrotron radiation and precision mirror metrology with a long trace profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.; Takacs, P.Z.; Li, H.

    1997-08-01

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is in use at several synchrotron radiation (SR) laboratories throughout the world and by a number of manufacturers who specialize in making grazing incidence mirrors for SR customers. Recent improvements in the design and operation of the LTP system have reduced the slope profile error bar to the level of 0.3 microradians RMS over measurement lengths of 0.5 meter. This corresponds to a height error bar on the order of 20 nanometers. This level of performance allows one to measure with confidence the shape of large cylinders and spheres that have kilometer radii of curvature in the axial direction. The LTP is versatile enough to make measurements of a mirror in the face up, sideways, and face down configurations. The authors will illustrate the versatility of the current version of the instrument, the LTP II, and present results from two new versions of the instrument: the in-situ LTP (ISLTP) and the Vertical Scan LTP (VSLTP). Both of them are based on the penta-prism LTP (ppLTP) principle with a stationary optical head and moving penta-prism. The ISLTP is designed to measure the distortion of high heat load mirrors during actual operation in SR beam lines. The VSLTP is designed to measure the complete 3-dimensional shape of x-ray telescope cylinder mirrors and mandrels in a vertical configuration. Scans are done both in the axial direction and in the azimuthal direction.

  5. Hydration induced material transfer in membranes of osmotic pump tablets measured by synchrotron radiation based FTIR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Yin, Xianzhen; Guo, Zhen; Tong, Yajun; Feng, Jing; York, Peter; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-03-10

    Osmotic pump tablets are reliable oral controlled drug delivery systems based on their semipermeable membrane coating. This research used synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets. SR-FTIR was applied to record and map the chemical information of a micro-region of the membranes, composed of cellulose acetate (CA, as the water insoluble matrix) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, as the soluble pore forming agent and plasticizing agent). The microstructure and chemical change of membranes hydrated for 0, 5, 10 and 30min were measured using SR-FTIR, combined with scanning electronic microscopy and atom force microscopy. The SR-FTIR microspectroscopy results indicated that there was a major change at the absorption range of 2700-3100cm(-1) in the membranes after different periods of hydration time. The absorption bands at 2870-2880cm(-1) and 2950-2960cm(-1) were assigned to represent CA and PEG, respectively. The chemical group signal distribution illustrated by the ratio of PEG to CA demonstrated that the trigger of drug release in the preliminary stage was due to the rapid transfer of PEG into liquid medium with a sharp decrease of PEG in the membranes. The SR-FTIR mapping results have demonstrated the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets and enabled reassessment of the drug release mechanism of membrane controlled osmotic pump systems.

  6. Broadband near-field infrared spectromicroscopy using photothermal probes and synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Paul M; Kelley, Chris S; Frogley, Mark D; Filik, Jacob; Wehbe, Katia; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the use of infrared synchrotron radiation (IR-SR) as a broadband source for photothermal near-field infrared spectroscopy. We assess two methods of signal transduction; cantilever resonant thermal expansion and scanning thermal microscopy. By means of rapid mechanical chopping (50-150 kHz), we modulate the IR-SR at rates matching the contact resonance frequencies of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, allowing us to record interferograms yielding Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) photothermal absorption spectra of polystyrene and cyanoacrylate films. Complementary offline measurements using a mechanically chopped CW IR laser confirmed that the resonant thermal expansion IR-SR measurements were below the diffraction limit, with a spatial resolution better than 500 nm achieved at a wavelength of 6 μm, i.e. λ/12 for the samples studied. Despite achieving the highest signal to noise so far for a scanning thermal microscopy measurement under conditions approaching near-field (dictated by thermal diffusion), the IR-SR resonant photothermal expansion FT-IR spectra measured were significantly higher in signal to noise in comparison with the scanning thermal data.

  7. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P. ); Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R. )

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography. The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Characterisation of a PERCIVAL monolithic active pixel prototype using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, J.; Bayer, M.; Göttlicher, P.; Lange, S.; Marras, A.; Niemann, M.; Reza, S.; Shevyakov, I.; Smoljanin, S.; Tennert, M.; Xia, Q.; Viti, M.; Wunderer, C. B.; Zimmer, M.; Dipayan, D.; Guerrini, N.; Marsh, B.; Sedgwick, I.; Turchetta, R.; Cautero, G.; Giuressi, D.; Khromova, A.; Pinaroli, G.; Menk, R.; Stebel, L.; Fan, R.; Marchal, J.; Pedersen, U.; Rees, N.; Steadman, P.; Sussmuth, M.; Tartoni, N.; Yousef, H.; Hyun, H. J.; Kim, K.; Rah, S.; Graafsma, H.

    2016-02-01

    PERCIVAL ("Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile And Large") is a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) based on CMOS technology. Is being developed by DESY, RAL/STFC, Elettra, DLS, and PAL to address the various requirements of detectors at synchrotron radiation sources and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the soft X-ray regime. These requirements include high frame rates and FELs base-rate compatibility, large dynamic range, single-photon counting capability with low probability of false positives, high quantum efficiency (QE), and (multi-)megapixel arrangements with good spatial resolution. Small-scale back-side-illuminated (BSI) prototype systems are undergoing detailed testing with X-rays and optical photons, in preparation of submission of a larger sensor. A first BSI processed prototype was tested in 2014 and a preliminary result—first detection of 350eV photons with some pixel types of PERCIVAL—reported at this meeting a year ago. Subsequent more detailed analysis revealed a very low QE and pointed to contamination as a possible cause. In the past year, BSI-processed chips on two more wafers were tested and their response to soft X-ray evaluated. We report here the improved charge collection efficiency (CCE) of different PERCIVAL pixel types for 400eV soft X-rays together with Airy patterns, response to a flat field, and noise performance for such a newly BSI-processed prototype sensor.

  9. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  10. From Minor Side Phases to Bulk Samples of Lanthanum Oxonitridosilicates: An Investigation with Microfocused Synchrotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Durach, Dajana; Schultz, Peter; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Microcrystals of the oxonitridosilicate oxide La(11)Si(13)N(27.636)O(1.046):Ce(3+) were obtained by exploratory high-temperature synthesis starting from La, La(NH2)3, Si(NH)2, BaH2, and CeF3. Owing to the small size of the crystals, microfocused synchrotron radiation was used for structure investigations (space group Cmc21 (No. 36), a = 9.5074(4) Å, b = 32.0626(9) Å, c = 18.5076(8) Å, Z = 8, R1(all) = 0.0267). The crystal structure consists of an unprecedented interrupted three-dimensional network of vertex-sharing SiN(4-x)O(x) tetrahedra that form channels of siebener rings along [100]. Moreover, the structure is characterized by layers of condensed sechser rings in a boat conformation and vierer rings, which are alternatingly stacked with layers of vierer and dreier rings. Several split positions indicate two different local structure variants. Infrared spectroscopy confirms the absence of N-H bonds. Powder X-ray diffraction data show that bulk samples contain only a small amount of La(11)Si(13)N(27.636)O1.046:Ce(3+). However, once the exact composition was determined from structure analysis, it was possible to optimize the synthesis using fluorides as starting materials. Thereby, bulk samples of the homeotypic compound La(11)Si(13)N(27.376)O(0.936)F were obtained and investigated. PMID:26978044

  11. Optical imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cânjǎu, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Duma, Virgil; Mǎnescu, Adrian; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-06-01

    The efforts aimed at early diagnosis of oral cancer should be prioritized towards developing a new screening instrument, based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), to be used directly intraorally, able to perform a fast, real time, 3D and non-invasive diagnosis of oral malignancies. The first step in this direction would be to optimize the OCT image interpretation of oral tissues. Therefore we propose plastination as a tissue preparation method that better preserves three-dimensional structure for study by new optical imaging techniques. The OCT and the synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) were employed for tissue sample analyze. For validating the OCT results we used the gold standard diagnostic procedure for any suspicious lesion - histopathology. This is a preliminary study of comparing features provided by OCT and Micro-CT. In the conditions of the present study, OCT proves to be a highly promising imaging modality. The use of x-ray based topographic imaging of small biological samples has been limited by the low intrinsic x-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissue and the lack of established contrast agents. Plastination can be used to enhance optical imagies of oral soft tissue samples.

  12. Compression-induced texture change in NiMnGa-polymer composites observed by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheerbaum, Nils; Hinz, Dietrich; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Skrotzki, Werner; Schultz, Ludwig

    2007-05-01

    Composites consisting of magnetic shape memory (MSM) particles embedded in a polyester matrix were prepared. Single-crystalline MSM particles were obtained by mortar grinding of melt-extracted and subsequently annealed Ni50.9Mn27.1Ga22.0 (at. %) fibers. The crystal structure of the martensite is tetragonal (5M) with c synchrotron radiation. In the initial state, the MSM particles in the composite have a random texture, i.e., there is no preferred orientation of the c axis. After a 30% compression (height reduction), the MSM particles have a (004)-fiber texture in the direction of compression. This is unambiguous evidence for stress induced twin boundary motion within the MSM particles.

  13. Digital mammography with synchrotron radiation: characterization of a novel computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivellato, S.; Vandenbroucke, D.; Arfelli, F.; Bessem, M.; Fedon, C.; Longo, R.; Tromba, G.; Taibi, A.

    2015-08-01

    Breast X-ray imaging is a continuous research field to define dedicated equipment, with specialized X-ray sources and efficient detectors to improve image quality with an equal or even lower patient dose. The Needle Imaging Plate HM5.0, produced by Agfa, has been characterized using synchrotron radiation to assess the performance of this novel imaging chain in comparison to conventional mammographic equipment. The detection performance has been initially assessed in terms of Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and its computation showed that DQE curves are very close to the typical results for digital radiography systems. Image threshold contrast has been then evaluated using the CDMAM phantom. The analysis has been completed with a scoring of visible details in the radiographs of the TORMAM phantom. The characterization thus confirms that monochromaticity leads to an equal image quality with a lower glandular dose and phase-contrast effects lead to an increase in anatomical structure detectability. Finally, a preliminary evaluation of clinical images showed a clear improvement in image quality thanks to phase-contrast contribution and to detector performance.

  14. Synchrotron Radiation μ-X Ray Fluorescence on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burattini, E.; Cinque, G.; Bellisola, G.; Fracasso, G.; Monti, F.; Colombatti, M.

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation micro X-Ray Fluorescence (SR μ-XRF) was applied for the first time to map the trace element content on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS), i.e. human cell clusters used as an in vitro model for testing micrometastases responses to antitumoral drugs. In particular, immunotoxin molecules composed of a carrier protein (Transferrin) bound to a powerful cytotoxin (Ricin A), were here considered as representatives of a class of therapheutic macromolecules used in cancer theraphy. Spheroids included in polyacrylamide gel and placed inside quartz capillaries were studied at the ESRF ID22 beamline using a 15 keV monochromatic photon microbeam. Elemental maps (of Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) on four groups of spheroids grown under different conditions were studied: untreated, treated only with the carrier molecule or with the toxin alone, and with the complete immunotoxin molecule (carrier+toxin). The results indicate that the distribution of Zn and, to some extent, Cu in the spheroid cells is homogeneous and independent of the treatment type. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TR-XRF) was also applied to quantify the average trace element content in the spheroids. Future developments of the technique are finally outlined on the basis of these preliminary results.

  15. Reconstruction of Elemental Distribution Images from Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Fluorescence Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toque, Jay Arre; Ide-Ektessabi, Ari

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SRXRF) is a powerful technique for studying trace elements in biological samples and other materials in general. Its features including capability to perform measurements in air and water, noncontact and nondestructive assay are superior to other elemental analysis techniques. In this study, a technique for reconstructing elemental distribution mapping of trace elements from spectral data was developed. The reconstruction was made possible by using the measured fluorescent signals to obtain local differences in elemental concentrations. The proposed technique features interpolation and background subtraction using matrix transformations of the spectral data to produce an enhanced distribution images. It is achieved by employing polychromatic or monochromatic color assignments proportional to the fluorescence intensities for displaying single-element or multiple-element distributions respectively. Some typical applications (i.e., macrophage and tissue surrounding an implant) were presented and the samples were imaged using the proposed method. The distribution images of the trace elements of the selected samples were used in conjunction with other analytical techniques to draw relevant observations, which cannot be achieved using conventional techniques such as metallic uptake and corresponding cellular response. The elemental distribution images produced from this study were found to have better quality compared to images produced using other analytical techniques (e.g., SIMS, PIXE, XPS, etc).

  16. FULL ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATION OF COHERENT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION VIA THE LORENTZ-BOOSTED FRAME APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulation of some systems containing charged particles with highly relativistic directed motion can by speeded up by orders of magnitude by choice of the proper Lorentz-boosted frame. Orders of magnitude speedup has been demonstrated for simulations from first principles of laser-plasma accelerator, free electron laser, and particle beams interacting with electron clouds. Here we address the application of the Lorentz-boosted frame approach to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), which can be strongly present in bunch compressor chicanes. CSR is particularly relevant to the next generation of x-ray light sources and is simultaneously difficult to simulate in the lab frame because of the large ratio of scale lengths. It can increase both the incoherent and coherent longitudinal energy spread, effects that often lead to an increase in transverse emittance. We have adapted the WARP code to simulate CSR emission along a simple dipole bend. We present some scaling arguments for the possible computational speed up factor in the boosted frame and initial 3D simulation results.

  17. Nondestructive three-dimensional evaluation of biocompatible materials by microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Bert; Thurner, Philipp; Beckmann, Felix; Weitkamp, Timm; Rau, Christoph; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Karamuk, Erdal; Eckert, Ludwig; Brandt, J.; Buchloh, Stefan; Wintermantel, Erich; Scharnweber, Dieter; Worch, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    Microtomography based on synchrotron radiation sources is a unique technique for the 3D characterization of different materials with a spatial resolution down to about 1 micrometers . The interface between implant materials (metals, ceramics and polymers) and biological matter is nondestructively accessible, i.e. without preparation artifacts. Since the materials exhibit different x-ray absorption, it can become impossible to visualize implant material and tissue, simultaneously. Here, we show that coating of polymer implants, which are invisible in bone tissue, does not only improve the interfacial properties but also allows the imaging of the interface in detail. Titanium implants, on the other hand, absorb the x-rays stronger than bone tissue. The difference, however, is small enough to quantify the bone formation near interface. Another advantage of microtomography with respect to classical histology is the capability to examine samples in a hydrated state. We demonstrate that ceramic hollow spheres can be imaged before sintering and fibroblasts marked by OsO4 are visible on polymer textiles. Consequently, scaffolds of different materials designed for tissue engineering and implant coatings can be optimized on the basis of the tomograms.

  18. Maturation Stress Generation in Poplar Tension Wood Studied by Synchrotron Radiation Microdiffraction[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Clair, Bruno; Alméras, Tancrède; Pilate, Gilles; Jullien, Delphine; Sugiyama, Junji; Riekel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Tension wood is widespread in the organs of woody plants. During its formation, it generates a large tensile mechanical stress, called maturation stress. Maturation stress performs essential biomechanical functions such as optimizing the mechanical resistance of the stem, performing adaptive movements, and ensuring long-term stability of growing plants. Although various hypotheses have recently been proposed, the mechanism generating maturation stress is not yet fully understood. In order to discriminate between these hypotheses, we investigated structural changes in cellulose microfibrils along sequences of xylem cell differentiation in tension and normal wood of poplar (Populus deltoides × Populus trichocarpa ‘I45-51’). Synchrotron radiation microdiffraction was used to measure the evolution of the angle and lattice spacing of crystalline cellulose associated with the deposition of successive cell wall layers. Profiles of normal and tension wood were very similar in early development stages corresponding to the formation of the S1 and the outer part of the S2 layer. The microfibril angle in the S2 layer was found to be lower in its inner part than in its outer part, especially in tension wood. In tension wood only, this decrease occurred together with an increase in cellulose lattice spacing, and this happened before the G-layer was visible. The relative increase in lattice spacing was found close to the usual value of maturation strains, strongly suggesting that microfibrils of this layer are put into tension and contribute to the generation of maturation stress. PMID:20071605

  19. Timing control of an intense picosecond pulse laser to the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Hara, Toru; Kitamura, Hideo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a control system to synchronize intense picosecond laser pulses to the hard x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) pulses of SPring-8. A regeneratively amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is synchronized to 40 ps SR pulses by locking the laser to the radio frequency of the ring. The synchronization of the pulses is monitored by detecting both beams simultaneously on a gold photocathode of a streak camera. This method enabled us to make a precise measurement of the time interval between the beams, even if the trigger of the streak camera drifts. Synchronization between the laser and the SR pulses has been achieved with a precision of ±2 ps for some hours. The stable timing control ensures the possibility of making two-photon excitation and pump-probe experiments with time resolution of a few tens of ps (limited by the pulse duration of the SR). We have used this system to show that closing undulator gaps in the storage ring shifts the arrival time of the SR pulses, in accord with expectations for the increased power loss.

  20. Investigation of GEM-Micromegas detector on X-ray beam of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Lian; Qi, Hui-Rong; Hu, Bi-Tao; Fan, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Rong-Guang; Chang, Guang-Cai; Liu, Peng; Ouyang, Qun; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Yi, Fu-Ting

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the discharge of the standard bulk Micromegas and GEM detectors, a GEM-Micromegas detector was developed at the Institute of High Energy Physics. Taking into account the advantages of the two detectors, one GEM foil was set as a preamplifier on the mesh of Micromegas in the structure and the GEM preamplification decreased the working voltage of Micromegas to significantly reduce the effect of the discharge. At the same gain, the spark probability of the GEM-Micromegas detector can be reduced to a factor 0.01 compared to the standard Micromegas detector, and an even higher gain could be obtained. This paper describes the performance of the X-ray beam detector that was studied at 1W2B Laboratory of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Finally, the result of the energy resolution under various X-ray energies was given in different working gases. This indicates that the GEM-Micromegas detector has an energy response capability in an energy range from 6 keV to 20 keV and it could work better than the standard bulk-Micromegas.

  1. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  2. New high temperature furnace for structure refinement by powder diffraction in controlled atmospheres using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Margulies, L.; Kramer, M.J.; McCallum, R.W.; Kycia, S.; Haeffner, D.R.; Lang, J.C.; Goldman, A.I.

    1999-09-01

    A low thermal gradient furnace design is described which utilizes Debye{endash}Scherrer geometry for performing high temperature x-ray powder diffraction with synchrotron radiation at medium and high energies (35{endash}100 keV). The furnace has a maximum operating temperature of 1800 K with a variety of atmospheres including oxidizing, inert, and reducing. The capability for sample rotation, to ensure powder averaging, has been built into the design without compromising thermal stability or atmosphere control. The ability to perform high-resolution Rietveld refinement on data obtained at high temperatures has been demonstrated, and data collected on standard Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder is presented. Time-resolved data on the orthorhombic to rhombohedral solid state phase transformation of SrCO{sub 3} is demonstrated using image plates. Rietveld refinable spectra, collected in as little as 8 s, opens the possibility of performing time-resolved structural refinements of phase transformations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Preparation of clean InP(100) surfaces studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Machuca, Francisco; Pianetta, Piero; Spicer, William E.

    2003-01-01

    The chemical cleaning of indium phosphide (InP),(100) surfaces is studied systematically by using photoemission electron spectroscopy. In order to achieve the necessary surface sensitivity and spectral resolution, synchrotron radiation with photon energies ranging from 60 to 600 eV are used to study the indium 4d, phosphorus 2p, carbon 1s, and oxygen 1s core levels, and the valence band. Typical H2SO4:H2O2:H2O solutions used to etch GaAs(100) surfaces are applied to InP(100) surfaces. It is found that the resulting surface species are significantly different from those found on GaAs(100) surfaces and that a second chemical cleaning step using a strong acid is required to remove residual surface oxide. This two-step cleaning process leaves the surface oxide free and with approximately 0.4 ML of elemental phosphorus, which is removed by vacuum annealing. The carbon coverage is also reduced dramatically from approximately 1 to about 0.05 ML. The chemical reactions are investigated, the resulting InP surface species at different cleaning stages are determined, and the optimum cleaning procedure is presented.

  4. Use of Synchrotron Radiation-Analytical Techniques To Reveal Chemical Origin of Silver-Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Zhang, Tianlu; Li, Panyun; Huang, Wanxia; Tang, Jinglong; Wang, Pengyang; Liu, Jing; Yuan, Qingxi; Bai, Ru; Li, Bai; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying

    2015-06-23

    To predict potential medical value or toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs), it is necessary to understand the chemical transformation during intracellular processes of NPs. However, it is a grand challenge to capture a high-resolution image of metallic NPs in a single cell and the chemical information on intracellular NPs. Here, by integrating synchrotron radiation-beam transmission X-ray microscopy (SR-TXM) and SR-X-ray absorption near edge structure (SR-XANES) spectroscopy, we successfully capture the 3D distribution of silver NPs (AgNPs) inside a single human monocyte (THP-1), associated with the chemical transformation of silver. The results reveal that the cytotoxicity of AgNPs is largely due to the chemical transformation of particulate silver from elemental silver (Ag(0))n, to Ag(+) ions and Ag-O-, then Ag-S- species. These results provide direct evidence in the long-lasting debate on whether the nanoscale or the ionic form dominates the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles. Further, the present approach provides an integrated strategy capable of exploring the chemical origins of cytotoxicity in metallic nanoparticles. PMID:25994391

  5. Quantitative measurement of regional lung gas volume by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfraix, Sylvie; Bayat, Sam; Porra, Liisa; Berruyer, Gilles; Nemoz, Christian; Thomlinson, William; Suortti, Pekka; Sovijärvi, Anssi R. A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a novel respiration-gated spiral synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT) technique for direct quantification of absolute regional lung volumes, using stable xenon (Xe) gas as an inhaled indicator. Spiral SRCT with K-edge subtraction using two monochromatic x-ray beams was used to visualize and directly quantify inhaled Xe concentrations and airspace volumes in three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed lung images. Volume measurements were validated using a hollow Xe-filled phantom. Spiral images spanning 49 mm in lung height were acquired following 60 breaths of an 80% Xe-20% O2 gas mixture, in two anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits at baseline and after histamine aerosol inhalation. Volumetric images of 20 mm lung sections were obtained at functional residual capacity (FRC) and at end-inspiration. 3D images showed large patchy filling defects in peripheral airways and alveoli following histamine provocation. Local specific lung compliance was calculated based on FRC/end-inspiration images in normal lung. This study demonstrates spiral SRCT as a new technique for direct determination of regional lung volume, offering possibilities for non-invasive investigation of regional lung function and mechanics, with a uniquely high spatial resolution. An example of non-uniform volume distribution in rabbit lung following histamine inhalation is presented.

  6. Morphological switching in synchrotron-radiation-excited Ge homoepitaxy: Transition from kinetic roughening to smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Akazawa, Housei

    2005-05-15

    The surface morphology of Ge films during GeH{sub 4}-source molecular beam epitaxy on a Ge(100) substrate is dramatically changed through irradiation with synchrotron radiation (h{nu}>100 eV). At temperatures below 300 deg. C, a two-dimensionally flat film continues to grow with the surface tightly passivated by a GeH{sub x} hydride layer. At temperatures above 350 deg. C, dangling bonds are partially terminated with hydrogen atoms while Ge adatoms are highly mobile, resulting in a nonuniform nucleation that creates the islands. Small islands merge into a few-hundred-nanometer-tall islands surrounded by the (113)-face sidewalls. This kinetic roughening continues until the nucleation on the (001) plane ceases due to the buildup of the GeH{sub x} layer. Once the surface free energy is minimized by the hydrogen termination, flattening of the islands proceeds to reduce the chemical potential of the system. The valleys between the islands are preferentially filled, and the film is eventually converted into a smooth epilayer with no memory of the initial roughening.

  7. Circular dichroism and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy: tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B A; Janes, Robert W; Wallace, Bonnie A

    2003-06-01

    CD spectroscopy is an established and valuable technique for examining protein structure, dynamics and folding. Because of its ability to sensitively detect conformational changes, it has important potential for drug discovery, enabling screening for ligand and drug binding, and detection of potential candidates for new pharmaceuticals. The binding of the anti-tumour agent Taxol to the anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 [Rodi, Janes, Sanganee, Holton, Wallace and Makowski (1999) J. Mol. Biol. 285, 197-204] and the binding of the anti-epileptic drug lamotrigine to voltage-gated sodium channels [Cronin, O'Reilly, Duclohier and Wallace (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 10675-10682] are used as examples to show changes detectable by CD involving secondary structure, and are contrasted with the binding of the agonist carbamylcholine to acetylcholine receptors [Mielke and Wallace (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 8177-8182], an example where binding does not involve a secondary structural change. Synchrotron radiation CD spectroscopy offers significant enhancements with respect to conventional CD spectroscopy, which will enable its usage for high-throughput screening and as a tool in 'chemical genomics' or 'reverse chemical genetics' strategies for ligand identification. The lower wavelength data available enable more detailed, sensitive and accurate detection, the higher light intensity permits much smaller amounts of both proteins and drug candidates to be used in the screening, and future technological developments in sample handling and detection should enable automated high-throughput screening to be performed.

  8. Characterizing the decay of ancient Chinese silk fabrics by microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hermes, A C; Davies, R J; Greiff, S; Kutzke, H; Lahlil, S; Wyeth, P; Riekel, C

    2006-03-01

    Scanning synchrotron radiation microdiffraction with an approximately 1 x 1 microm(2) beam has been used as a novel method for characterizing the decay of several T'ang dynasty (618-907 AD) silk fabrics. The crystalline fraction could be visualized based on beta-sheet 210 reflection intensities, extracted by recursive peak fits from several thousand diffraction patterns recorded during mesh scans. The azimuthal width of the 210 reflection, which is related to the orientation distribution of the crystalline domains within nanofibrils and the macroscopic orientation of the fibers traversed by the beam, was found to be sensitive to the overall state of decay of the fabric. The fine structure of the histogram of azimuthal width was related to the fiber hierarchical microstructure and the fabric morphology. SAXS/WAXS analysis supports the assumption of an initial loss of the random chain network with decay. At a subsequent state of aging, decay proceeds into the nanofibrils and the silk fibers break up into even smaller fractions.

  9. Recent updates in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" code, on-going developments, simulation activities, and plans for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    Recent updates in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" physical optics computer code, including the transition to the Open Source development format, the results of the on-going collaborative development efforts in the area of X-ray optics, in particular grazing incidence mirrors, gratings and crystal monochromators, and in other areas, as well as some simulation activities for storage ring and X-ray free-electron laser sources are reported. Future development plans are discussed.

  10. Relativistic klystron driven compact high gradient accelerator as an injector to an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact high gradient accelerator driven by a relativistic klystron is utilized to inject high energy electrons into an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring. The high gradients provided by the relativistic klystron enables accelerator structure to be much shorter (typically 3 meters) than conventional injectors. This in turn enables manufacturers which utilize high energy, high intensity X-rays to produce various devices, such as computer chips, to do so on a cost effective basis.

  11. Design of a triple-bend isochronous achromat with minimum coherent-synchrotron-radiation-induced emittance growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2016-06-01

    Using a 1D steady-state free-space coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) model, we identify a special design setting for a triple-bend isochronous achromat that yields vanishing emittance growth from CSR. When a more refined CSR model with transient effects is included in the analysis, numerical simulations show that the main effect of the transients is to shift the emittance growth minimum slightly, with the minimum changing only modestly.

  12. A 50-MeV mm-wave electron linear accelerator system for production of tunable short wavelength synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Mills, F.E.; Kang, Y.W.; Matthews, P.J.; Grudzien, D.; Song, J.; Horan, D.; Feinerman, A.D.; Willke, T.L. |; Henke, H. |

    1993-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Wisconsin at Madison is developing a new millimeter wavelength, 50-MeV electron linear accelerator system for production of coherent tunable wavelength synchrotron radiation. Modern micromachining techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, LIGA (Lithografie, Galvanoformung, Abformung), capable of producing high-aspect ratio structures are being considered for the fabrication of the accelerating components.

  13. SU-E-E-08: Applications of the Quantization of Coupled Circuits in Radiation Physics (design of Klystron, Bremsstrahlung, Synchrotron)

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: During the past decade the quantization of coupled/forced electromagnetic circuits with or without Ohm’s resistance has gained the subject of some fundamental studies, since even problems of quantum electrodynamics can be solved in an elegant manner, e.g. the creation of quantized electromagnetic fields. In this communication, we shall use these principles to describe optimization procedures in the design of klystrons, synchrotron irradiation and high energy bremsstrahlung. Methods: The base is the Hamiltonian of an electromagnetic circuit and the extension to coupled circuits, which allow the study of symmetries and perturbed symmetries in a very apparent way (SU2, SU3, SU4). The introduction resistance and forced oscillators for the emission and absorption in such coupled systems provides characteristic resonance conditions, and atomic orbitals can be described by that. The extension to virtual orbitals leads to creation of bremsstrahlung, if the incident electron (velocity v nearly c) is described by a current, which is associated with its inductivitance and the virtual orbital to the charge distribution (capacitance). Coupled systems with forced oscillators can be used to amplify drastically the resonance frequencies to describe klystrons and synchrotron radiation. Results: The cross-section formula for bremsstrahlung given by the propagator method of Feynman can readily be derived. The design of klystrons and synchrotrons inclusive the radiation outcome can be described and optimized by the determination of the mutual magnetic couplings between the oscillators induced by the currents. Conclusions: The presented methods of quantization of circuits inclusive resistance provide rather a straightforward way to understand complex technical processes such as creation of bremsstrahlung or creation of radiation by klystrons and synchrotrons. They can either be used for optimization procedures and, last but not least, for pedagogical purposes with regard to

  14. Synchrotron radiation microimaging in rabbit models of cancer for preclinical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Uesugi, Kentaro; Kobatake, Makito; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Takenori; Imai, Shigeki

    2009-10-01

    Preclinical laboratory animal imaging modalities such as microangiography and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) have been developed at the SPring-8 BL20B2 bending magnet beamline. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of microangiography systems for physiological examinations of live animals and micro-CT systems for postmortem morphological examinations. Synchrotron radiation microangiography and micro-CT with contrast agents present the main advantageous capability of depicting the anatomy of small blood vessels with tens of micrometers' diameter. This paper reports two imaging instrument types and their respective applications to preclinical imaging of tumor angiogenic blood vessels in tumor-bearing rabbits, where tumor angiogenesis is characterized morphologically by an increased number of blood vessels. A microangiography system with spatial resolution around 10 μm has been used for therapeutically evaluating angiogenic vessels in a rabbit model of cancer for evaluating embolization materials in transcatheter arterial embolization and for radiation therapy. After an iodine contrast agent was injected into an artery, in vivo imaging was carried out using a high-resolution real-time detector incorporating an X-ray direct-conversion-type SATICON pickup tube. On the other hand, a micro-CT system capably performed three-dimensional visualization of tumor angiogenic blood vessels using tumor-transplanted rabbit specimens with a barium sulfate contrast agent injected into the blood vessels. For specimen imaging, a large-field high-resolution micro-CT system based on a 10-megapixel CCD camera was developed to study tumor-associated alterations in angioarchitecture. Evidence of increased vascularity by tumor angiogenesis and decreased vascularity by tumor treatments was achieved by physiological evaluation of angiogenic small blood vessels in microangiographic imaging and by morphological assessment in micro-CT imaging. These results

  15. YB66 as a new soft x-ray monochromator for synchrotron radiation (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rek, Z.; Wong, Joe; Tanaka, T.; Shimkaveg, G.; Eckart, M.

    1992-01-01

    YB66, a complex binary semiconducting compound with a cubic crystal structure and a lattice parameter of 23.44 Å, is potentially a very good candidate for monochromatization of soft x-ray synchrotron radiation. The features such as: a large interatomic spacing, lack of absorption edges by the constituent elements in the region 1-2 keV, very narrow intrinsic rocking curves for (400) and (222) reflections and good thermal and mechanical properties make the material very useful. Using the known structure factors for the (400) and (222) reflections, having 2d values of 11.76 and 13.53 Å, respectively, their rocking curves have been calculated and are shown [J. Wang, G. Shimkaveg, W. Goldstein, M. Eckart, T. Tanaka, Z. Rek, H. Tompkins, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 291, 243 (1990)] to be comparable to or better than that of beryl (101¯0). A novel indirect heating floating zone method for growing large size crystals was used by Tanaka and his coworkers in Japan [T. Tanaka, S. Otani, and Y. Ishizawa, J. Cryst. Growth 73, 31 (1985)]. Numerous modifications of this technique and double-zone passes were applied to reduce sub grain structure and lattice deformations. The crystalline perfection and absence of defects is critical to obtaining high energy resolution and good crystal reflectivity. Crystals large enough to accept 1 mrad of radiation, with growth direction [100] and [110] were grown. Rocking curve measurements, etch pit density, and x-ray white beam topography are used to characterize the quality of these crystals as a function of some critical growth parameters. Most crystals exhibit the existence of sub grain boundaries. Areas perfect enough were observed to give ˜ 0.5 eV energy resolution. Recent experiments in crystal growth, results of crystals characterization, and comparison with theoretical calculations will be discussed.

  16. First operation of SOLEIL, a third generation synchrotron radiation source in France and prospects for ARC-EN-CIEL, a LINAC based fourth generation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Filhol, J. M.; Benabderhammane, C.; Berteaud, P.; Besson, J. C.; Briquez, F.; Brunelle, P.; Bruni, C.; Chubar, O.; Denard, J. C.; Girault, M.; Godefroy, J. M.; Herbaux, C.; Lebasque, P.; Le Roux, V.; Level, M. P.; Lestrade, A.; Loulergue, A.; Marchand, P.; Marcouille, O.; Marteau, F.; Massal, M.; Nadji, A.; Nadolski, L.; Nagaoka, R.; Paulin, F.; Pottin, B.; Tordeux, M. A.; Valleau, M.; Vétéran, J.; Carré, B.; Garzella, D.; Labat, M.; Lambert, G.; Monot, P.; Jablonka, M.; Méot, F.; Mosnier, A.; Marquès, J. R.; Ortéga, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    The first results of commissioning for the French Synchrotron Radiation Facility SOLEIL at 2.75 GeV are presented. Perspectives for the fourth generation light source based on the ARC-EN-CIEL project are described.

  17. Bio-metals imaging and speciation in cells using proton and synchrotron radiation X-ray microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Richard; Devès, Guillaume; Carmona, Asunción

    2009-01-01

    The direct detection of biologically relevant metals in single cells and of their speciation is a challenging task that requires sophisticated analytical developments. The aim of this article is to present the recent achievements in the field of cellular chemical element imaging, and direct speciation analysis, using proton and synchrotron radiation X-ray micro- and nano-analysis. The recent improvements in focusing optics for MeV-accelerated particles and keV X-rays allow application to chemical element analysis in subcellular compartments. The imaging and quantification of trace elements in single cells can be obtained using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The combination of PIXE with backscattering spectrometry and scanning transmission ion microscopy provides a high accuracy in elemental quantification of cellular organelles. On the other hand, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence provides chemical element imaging with less than 100 nm spatial resolution. Moreover, synchrotron radiation offers the unique capability of spatially resolved chemical speciation using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The potential of these methods in biomedical investigations will be illustrated with examples of application in the fields of cellular toxicology, and pharmacology, bio-metals and metal-based nano-particles. PMID:19605403

  18. Visualization of 3D osteon morphology by synchrotron radiation micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D M L; Erickson, B; Peele, A G; Hannah, K; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G

    2011-01-01

    Cortical bone histology has been the subject of scientific inquiry since the advent of the earliest microscopes. Histology – literally the study of tissue – is a field nearly synonymous with 2D thin sections. That said, progressive developments in high-resolution X-ray imaging are enabling 3D visualization to reach ever smaller structures. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), employing conventional X-ray sources, has become the gold standard for 3D analysis of trabecular bone and is capable of detecting the structure of vascular (osteonal) porosity in cortical bone. To date, however, direct 3D visualization of secondary osteons has eluded micro-CT based upon absorption-derived contrast. Synchrotron radiation micro-CT, through greater image quality, resolution and alternative contrast mechanisms (e.g. phase contrast), holds great potential for non-destructive 3D visualization of secondary osteons. Our objective was to demonstrate this potential and to discuss areas of bone research that can be advanced through the application of this approach. We imaged human mid-femoral cortical bone specimens derived from a 20-year-old male (Melbourne Femur Collection) at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron (Chicago, IL, USA) using the 2BM beam line. A 60-mm distance between the target and the detector was employed to enhance visualization of internal structures through propagation phase contrast. Scan times were 1 h and images were acquired with 1.4-μm nominal isotropic resolution. Computer-aided manual segmentation and volumetric 3D rendering were employed to visualize secondary osteons and porous structures, respectively. Osteonal borders were evident via two contrast mechanisms. First, relatively new (hypomineralized) osteons were evident due to differences in X-ray attenuation relative to the surrounding bone. Second, osteon boundaries (cement lines) were delineated by phase contrast. Phase contrast also enabled the detection of soft tissue remnants within the

  19. Molecular Environmental Science: An Assessment of Research Accomplishments, Available Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, and Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G

    2004-02-05

    Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with

  20. Molecular environmental science : an assessment of research accomplishments, available synchrotron radiation facilities, and needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G. E., Jr.; Sutton, S. R.; Bargar, J. R.; Shuh, D. K.; Fenter, P. A.; Kemner, K. M.

    2004-10-20

    Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with