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Sample records for 80-km 50-mi radius

  1. Development of prediction models for radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Kinase, Sakae; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Sato, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Saito, Kimiaki

    2014-08-01

    Preliminary prediction models have been studied for the radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The models were represented by exponential functions using ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in the environment. The ecological half-lives were derived from the changes in ambient dose equivalent rates through vehicle-borne surveys. It was found that the ecological half-lives of radioactive caesium were not constant within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in forest areas was found to be much larger than that in urban and water areas.

  2. Antioxidant supplementation and subsequent oxidative stress of horses during an 80-km endurance race.

    PubMed

    Williams, C A; Kronfeldt, D S; Hess, T M; Saker, K E; Waldron, J N; Crandell, K M; Hoffman, R M; Harris, P A

    2004-02-01

    This study tested the development of oxidative stress and the effects of antioxidant supplementation in an 80-km ride. A precompetition survey revealed that no competitor would participate without vitamin E supplementation; therefore, 46 horses were paired for past performances and randomly assigned to two groups of 23 each for 3 wk of supplementation before the ride. One group (E) was orally supplemented with 5,000 IU of vitamin E per day; the other group (E+C) received that dose of vitamin E plus 7 g/d of vitamin C. Blood samples, temperature, and heart rate were taken the day before the race, at 21 and 56 km during the ride, at completion, and after 20 min of recovery. Plasma was assayed for lipid hydroperoxides, alpha-tocopherol, total ascorbate, albumin, creatine kinase (CK), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Total glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity were determined in red blood cells and white blood cells. Thirty-four horses completed the race, 12 horses (six in E and six in E+C) did not finish for reasons including lameness, metabolic problems, and rider option. Plasma ascorbate was higher (P = 0.045) in the E+C group than in the E group. Other than ascorbate, neither antioxidant status nor CK and AST activities were affected by supplementation with E+C vs. E. Red blood cell glutathione peroxidase, white blood cell total glutathione, lipid hydroperoxides, CK, and AST increased, and red blood cell total glutathione and white blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity decreased with distance (P < 0.001). Positive correlations were found for plasma lipid hydroperoxides on CK (r = 0.25; P = 0.001) and AST (r = 0.33; P < 0.001). These results establish an association between muscle leakage and a cumulative index of oxidative stress.

  3. Feasibility study for rocket ozone measurements in the 50 to 80 km region using a chemiluminescent technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, P.

    1973-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the feasibility of increasing sensitivity for ozone detection. The detection technique employed is the chemiluminescent reaction of ozone with a rhodamine-B impregnated disk. Previously achieved sensitivities are required to be increased by a factor of about 20 to permit measurements at altitudes of 80 km. Sensitivity was increased by using a more sensitive photomultiplier tube, by increasing the gas velocity past the disk, by different disk preparation techniques, and by using reflective coatings in the disk chamber and on the uncoated side of the glass disk. Reflective coatings provided the largest sensitivity increase. The sum of all these changes was a sensitivity increased by an estimated factor of 70, more than sufficient to permit measurement of ambient ozone concentrations at altitudes of 80 km.

  4. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  5. The Depth of 60-80 km as the Boundary of External Factor Influence on the Earth's Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasorova, E. V.; Levin, B. W.

    2007-05-01

    The results of statistical analysis of worldwide seismic catalogs (ISC and NEIC), which was carried out in frame of two projects are presented. In both cases we extracted the evens occurred in the Pacific region from 1964 to 2004 with Mb>=4.0. The aftershocks were canceled from the list. All events were divided into following magnitude levels: 4<=Mb<4.5; 4.5<=Mb<5; 5<=Mb<5.5; 5.5<=Mb<6.0; 6<=Mb. The events in each magnitude level were subdivided into two groups: shallow events (H<=Htr) and deep events (H>Htr), where Htr is threshold value of the EQ source depth. In frame of the first project statistical verification of hypothesis about within-year variability existence for the events of various energy levels was carried out for the Pacific region (PO). The whole PO was subdivided into 31 subregions (Japan, Kuril Islands, Kamchatka, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, California, and so on along the perimeter of the Pacific). Then we were checking if the distributions of the events during the year period are uniform or these distributions are non- uniform. We were testing it separately for each region, for every magnitude level and for every depth level (total number of the samples under study was 310). It was disproved the null hypothesis about uniform EQ distributions in the course of year for shallow events (with less than 2% significance level), and it was confirmed the null hypothesis for deep earthquakes. It was shown that the main maximum of the seismic activity take place in November-March (minimum of the Earth-Sun distance) for both Hemispheres and the minimum - in April. It was found by using special software procedure that the Htr boundary between the shallow and the deep events was arranged in deep 60-80 km. Thus the EQ with sources located above this boundary are affected by external (astronomical) factors, which may trigger the process of EQ generation. While the external factors don't influence on the EQ sources located below this boundary. In frame of the

  6. The credibility of speed limits on 80 km/h rural roads: The effects of road and person(ality) characteristics.

    PubMed

    Goldenbeld, Charles; van Schagen, Ingrid

    2007-11-01

    The present study aimed to operationalise the concept of credible speed limits and to make a first step to elaborate it in such a way that road authorities can put the concept into practice. The study focused on the credibility of an 80 km/h limit for different rural roads and assessed the effects of characteristics of the road and its environment as well as the effects of person and personality characteristics. Almost 600 Dutch car drivers were asked to judge 27 photographs of (different) rural roads with a posted speed limit of 80 km/h. To determine the degree of credibility, for each road scene the subjects filled in the preferred speed and the speed limit they considered to be safe. The results show large differences in both preferred speed and the safe speed limit between the road scenes, both below and above the limit of 80 km/h. These differences were related to a number of characteristics of the road and the road environment, such as the presence or absence of a curve and characteristics concerning the field of view (sight distance, clarity of situation). There were also large differences between subjects and these were related to age, the degree of sensation seeking, the number of speeding tickets in the last 3 years and the part of the country they lived in. Subjects were influenced by more or less the same road features.

  7. Temperature characteristics at altitudes of 5-80 km with a self-calibrated Rayleigh-rotational Raman lidar: A summer case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yajuan; Lin, Xin; Yang, Yong; Xia, Yuan; Xiong, Jun; Song, Shalei; Liu, Linmei; Chen, Zhenwei; Cheng, Xuewu; Li, Faquan

    2017-02-01

    Temperature profiles at altitudes of 5-80 km are obtained with a self-calibrated Rayleigh-rotational Raman lidar over Wuhan, China (30.5°N, 114.5°E). By using the synchronous Rayleigh lidar temperature, rotational Raman temperature in the lower atmosphere could be calibrated and retrieved, which is free of other instruments (like local radiosondes). The results are comparable to the radiosonde calibration method. Based on the self-calibration approach, one-night (August 4-5, 2014) lidar temperature profiles are presented with radiosondes, NRLMSISE-00 model and TIMED/SABER data. Some interesting temperature characteristics have been present for studies of waves propagating from near ground level into the mesosphere. Temperature perturbations are found to increase exponentially with a scale height of 10 km. The wavy structure shows minimal perturbations ('nodes') at some altitudes of 39, 52, 64 and 73 km. Dominant wavelengths and temperature variations are also analyzed at different time and altitudes. By comparison of the temperature and associate perturbations from the tropopause up to the stratopause, different amplitudes, phase fronts and vertical wavelengths are discovered as well. These discoveries indicate that some waves may originate in the lower atmosphere and propagate upward with decreasing static stability.

  8. Temperature minima in the average thermal structure of the middle mesosphere (70 - 80 km) from analysis of 40- to 92-km SME global temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. Todd; Rusch, David W.; Callan, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    Global temperatures have been derived for the upper stratosphere and mesosphere from analysis of Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) limb radiance profiles. The SME temperature represent fixed local time observations at 1400 - 1500 LT, with partial zonal coverage of 3 - 5 longitudes per day over the 1982-1986 period. These new SME temperatures are compared to the COSPAR International Ionosphere Reference Atmosphere 86 (CIRA 86) climatology (Fleming et al., 1990) as well as stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS); Barnett and Corney, 1984), National Meteorological Center (NMC); (Gelman et al., 1986), and individual lidar and rocket observations. Significant areas of disagreement between the SME and CIRA 86 mesospheric temperatures are 10 K warmer SME temperatures at altitudes above 80 km. The 1981-1982 SAMS temperatures are in much closer agreement with the SME temperatures between 40 and 75 km. Although much of the SME-CIRA 86 disagreement probably stems from the poor vertical resolution of the observations comprising the CIRA 86 modelm, some portion of the differences may reflect 5- to 10-year temporal variations in mesospheric temperatures. The CIRA 86 climatology is based on 1973-1978 measurements. Relatively large (1 K/yr) 5- to 10-year trends in temperatures as functions of longitude, latitude, and altitude have been observed for both the upper stratosphere (Clancy and Rusch, 1989a) and mesosphere (Clancy and Rusch, 1989b; Hauchecorne et al., 1991). The SME temperatures also exhibit enhanced amplitudes for the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of upper mesospheric temperatures at low latitudes, which are not evident in the CIRA 86 climatology. The so-called mesospheric `temperature inversions' at wintertime midlatitudes, which have been observed by ground-based lidar (Hauschecorne et al., 1987) and rocket in situ measurements (Schmidlin, 1976), are shown to be a climatological aspect of the mesosphere, based on the SME observations.

  9. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  10. Effective Cleaning Radius Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, B.V.

    2001-10-15

    This report discusses results of testing done in the Savannah River Laboratory half tank and full tank mockup facilities using kaolin clay slurries and the relationship between cleaning radius and pump and slurry characteristics.

  11. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  12. Variable Radius Nacelle Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the active shape control for a variable radius nacelle leading edge program is presented. The current technical plan and schedule will be discussed. Results from the structural shape change of curved plates demonstration will be presented, as well as the NASA LaRC concept for a variable radius nacelle leading edge. Results of a Boeing systems integration study of this concept will be discussed briefly. The status of the sensors, actuators, and computational design tools tasks will also be presented.

  13. Detonation Shock Radius Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, David; Debes, Joshua; Stewart, Scott; Yoo, Sunhee

    2007-06-01

    A previous passover experiment [1] was designed to create a complex detonation transient used in validating a reduced, asymptotically derived description of detonation shock dynamics (DSD). An underlying question remained on determining the location of the initial detonation shock radius to start the DSD simulation with respect to the dynamical response of the initiation system coupling's to the main charge. This paper concentrates on determining the initial shock radius required of such DSD governed problems. `Cut-back' experiments of PBX-9501 were conducted using an initiation system that sought to optimize the transferred detonation to the desired constant radius, hemispherical shape. Streak camera techniques captured the breakout on three of the prism's surfaces for time-of-arrival data. The paper includes comparisons to simulations using constant volume explosion and high pressure hot spots. The results of the experiments and simulation efforts provide fundamental design considerations for actual explosive systems and verify necessary conditions from which the asymptotic theory of DSD may apply. [1] Lambert, D., Stewart, D. Scott and Yoo, S. and Wescott, B., ``Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives. J. of Fluid Mechs., Vol. 546, pp.227-253 (2006).

  14. Antiproton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  15. [Fractures of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Rueger, J M; Hartel, M J; Ruecker, A H; Hoffmann, M

    2014-11-01

    The most prevalent fractures managed by trauma surgeons are those involving the distal radius. The injury occurs in two peaks of prevalence: the first peak around the age of 10 years and the second peak around the age of 60 years. Distal radius fracture management requires sensitive diagnostics and classification. The objectives of treatment are the reconstruction of a pain-free unlimited durable functioning of the wrist and avoidance of typical fracture complications. Non-operative conservative management is generally employed for stable non-displaced fractures of the distal radius with the expectation of a good functional outcome. Unstable comminuted fractures with intra-articular and extra-articular fragment zones are initially set in a closed operation and finally by osteosynthesis. An armament of surgical implants is available for instable fractures requiring fixation. Palmar locked plate osteosynthesis has been established in recent years as the gold standard for operative management of distal radius fractures. Complex Working Group on Osteosynthesis (AO) classification type 3 fractures require extensive preoperative diagnostics to identify and treat typical associated injuries around the wrist.

  16. Rights and wrongs of the temporal solar radius variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozelot, J. P.; Damiani, C.

    2012-10-01

    From time immemorial men have strived to measure the size of celestial bodies. Among them, the diameter of the Sun was a source of curiosity and study. Tackled by Greek astronomers from a geometric point of view, an estimate, although incorrect, has been first determined, not truly called into question for several centuries. One must wait up to the XVIIth century to get the first precise determinations made by the French school of astronomy. Gradually, as the techniques were more and more sophisticated, many other solar diameter measurements were carried out, notably in England, Germany, Italy and US. However, even with instruments at the cutting edge of progress, no absolute value of the solar diameter has been provided yet, even if the community has adopted a canonical radius of 959''&dotbelow;63, given in all ephemeris since the end of the XIXth century. One of the major difficulties is to define a correct solar diameter. Another issue is the possible temporal variability of the size of the Sun, as first advocated at the end of the XIXth century by the Italian school. Today, this question is just on the way to being solved in spite of considerable efforts developed on ground-based facilities or on board space experiments. We will here give a review of some of the most remarkable techniques used in the past, emphasising how incorrect measurements have driven new ideas, leading to develop new statements for the underlying physics. On such new grounds, it can be speculated that the roundness of the Sun is not perfect, but developing a thin "cantaloupe skin" in periods of higher activity, with departures from sphericity being inevitably bounded by a few kilometers (around 80 km or 10 to 15 mas).

  17. [Distal radius fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Otayek, S; Ramanoudjame, M; Fitoussi, F

    2016-12-01

    Metaphyseal and physeal fractures of the distal radius are common in children. Most cases are best treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. Long-term outcomes of these injuries are excellent when specific treatment principles of reduction and casting are followed. Surgical indications are limited and include open fractures, intra-articular fractures, non-reducible fractures, unstable fractures, and the presence of associated nerve injury. Closed reduction and percutaneous pin fixation is the most commonly used surgical option. The clinician should be aware of delayed complications such as growth disturbance of the distal radius, and understand how to manage these problems to ensure successful long-term outcomes. Epiphysiodesis is uncommon but growth plate injuries need to be followed for one year.

  18. Measurement of solar radius changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J.; Howard, R.

    1981-01-01

    Results of daily photometric measurements of the solar radius from Mt. Wilson over the past seven years are reported. Reduction of the full disk magnetograms yields a formal error of 0.1 arcsec in the boustrophedonic scans in the 5250.2 A FeI line. 150 scan lines comprise each observation; 1,412 observations were made from 1974-1981. Measurement procedures, determination of the scattered light of the optics and the atmosphere, and error calculations are described, noting that days of poor atmospheric visibility are omitted from the data. The horizontal diameter of the sun remains visually fixed while the vertical component changes due to atmospheric diffraction; error accounting for thermal effects, telescope aberrations, and instrument calibration are discussed, and results, within instrument accuracy, indicate no change in the solar radius over the last seven years.

  19. Radius of curvature controlled mirror

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Rathke, John Wickham; Schultheiss, Thomas John; Shinn, Michelle D.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-17

    A controlled radius of curvature mirror assembly comprising: a distortable mirror having a reflective surface and a rear surface; and in descending order from the rear surface; a counter-distortion plate; a flow diverter having a flow diverter aperture at the center thereof; a flow return plate having a flow return aperture at the center thereof; a thermal isolation plate having a thermal isolation plate aperture at the center thereof and a flexible heater having a rear surface and a flexible heater aperture at the center thereof; a double walled tube defining a coolant feed chamber and a coolant return chamber; said coolant feed chamber extending to and through the flow diverter aperture and terminating at the counter-distortion plate and the coolant return chamber extending to and through the thermal isolation backplate and terminating at the flow diverter; and a coolant feed and a coolant return exit at the rear of said flexible heater.

  20. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  1. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-22

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  2. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today's nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  3. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer. PMID:24082758

  4. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer.

  5. Management of Complications of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Mathews, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Treating a fracture of the distal radius may require the surgeon to make a difficult decision between surgical treatment and nonsurgical management. The use of surgical fixation has recently increased owing to complications associated with conservative treatment. However, conservative action may be necessary depending on certain patient factors. The treating surgeon must be aware of the possible complications associated with distal radius fracture treatments to prevent their occurrence. Prevention can be achieved with a proper understanding of the mechanism of these complications. This article discusses the most recent evidence on how to manage and prevent complications following a fracture of the distal radius. PMID:25934197

  6. Mass-radius relationships in icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupo, M. J.; Lewis, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Using published laboratory data for H2O ice, a modeling technique was developed by which the bulk density, density and temperature profile, rotational moment of inertia, central pressure, and location of the rock-ice interface can all be obtained as a function of the radius, the heliocentric distance, and the silicate composition. Models of the interiors of Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, Rhea, and Titan are given, consistent with present mass and radius data. The radius and mass of spheres of ice under self-gravitation for two different temperature classes are given (103 and 77 deg K). Measurements of mass, radius and I/MR2 by spacecraft can be interpreted by this model to yield substantial information about the internal structure and the ice/rock ratio of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

  7. Perturbed Radius of Geosynchronous-Satellite Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    We analyze theoretically how the radius of geosynchronous orbits would vary owing to the perturbations due to the sun/moon gravity, solar radiation pressure, and the oblate earth. The analysis is simple, as it uses a diagrammatic method to solve near-circular orbital motions. Results are obtained in seven terms of corrections to the radius of non-perturbed ideal orbits. Each correction term is derived, with clear physical meaning, from each component of the perturbing forces.

  8. How to resolve the proton radius puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Gil

    2016-09-01

    In 2010 the first measurement of the proton charge radius from spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen was found to be five standard deviations away from the regular hydrogen value. Six years later, this ``proton radius puzzle'' is still unresolved. One of the most promising avenues to test the muonic hydrogen result is a new muon-proton scattering experiment called MUSE. We describe how effective field theory methods will allow to directly connect muonic hydrogen spectroscopy to muon-proton scattering.

  9. Operative treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Vasenius, J

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of distal radius fractures is increasing together with the average age of population. Intra-articular incongruity is the most probable cause of unsatisfactory outcome of distal radius fractures in younger and more active patients. Thus, the main goal in the treatment of distal radius fractures should be restoration of articular congruence. A computed tomography (CT) is recommended to help surgeon in preoperative planning in the treatment of comminuted intra-articular fractures. New implants have been designed to provide stable enough fixation for early mobilisation after surgery and to lower rather high complication rates related to conventional fixation methods such as external fixation and dorsal plating. The most common complications related to volar fixed angle plating such as flexor and extensor tendon problems, median nerve neuropathy, and screw diplacement into the radiocarpal joint are surgeon related and are avoidable with proper education. More randomized prospective studies are needed to prove superiority of any fixation method to another.

  10. Mass and radius of cosmic balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yun

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic balloons are spherical domain walls with relativistic particles trapped inside. We derive the exact mass and radius relations for a static cosmic balloon using Gauss-Codazzi equations. The cosmic balloon mass as a function of its radius, M(R), is found to have a functional form similar to that of fermion soliton stars, with a fixed point at 2GM(R)/R approximately or equal to 0.486 which corresponds to the limit of infinite central density. We derive a simple analytical approximation for the mass density of a spherically symmetric relativistic gas star. When applied to the computation of the mass and radius of a cosmic balloon, the analytical approximation yields fairly good agreement with the exact numerical solutions.

  11. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    PubMed

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  12. Topographic matching of distal radius and proximal fibula articular surface for distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Chen, S; Wang, Z; Guo, Y; Liu, B; Tong, D

    2016-07-01

    During osteoarticular reconstruction of the distal radius with the proximal fibula, congruity between the two articular surfaces is an important factor in determining the quality of the outcome. In this study, a three-dimensional model and a coordinate transformation algorithm were developed on computed tomography scanning. Articular surface matching was performed and parameters for the optimal position were determined quantitatively. The mean radii of best-fit spheres of the articular surfaces of the distal radius and proximal fibula were compared quantitatively. The radial inclination and volar tilt following reconstruction by an ipsilateral fibula graft, rather than the contralateral, best resembles the values of the native distal radius. Additionally, the ipsilateral fibula graft reconstructed a larger proportion of the distal radius articular surface than did the contralateral. The ipsilateral proximal fibula graft provides a better match for the reconstruction of the distal radius articular surface than the contralateral, and the optimal position for graft placement is quantitatively determined.

  13. Mass and Radius of Neutron Stars Constrained by Photospheric Radius Expansion X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Kim, Myungkuk; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    Simultaneous measurement of mass and radius of a neutron star is important because it provides strong constraint on the equation of state for nuclear matter inside a neutron star. Type I X-ray Bursts (XRBs) that have been observed in low-mass X-ray binaries sometimes show photospheric radius expansion (PRE). By combining observed fluxes, X-ray spectra, and distances of PRE XRBs and using a statistical analysis, it is possible to simultaneously constrain the mass and radius of a neutron star. However, the mass and radius of a neutron star estimated in this method depends on the opacity of accreted material. We investigate the effect of the opacity on the mass and radius estimation by taking into account the cases that the hydrogen mass fraction of accreted material has narrowly-distributed values. We present preliminary results that are investigated with three different values of hydrogen mass fraction and compare our results with previous studies.

  14. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2016-05-01

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon, and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Padé (N =M =1 ) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2) =(1+Q2/0.66 GeV2) -2 . Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extremely-low-Q2 data or by use of the Padé approximant for extrapolation using a larger

  15. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2016-05-01

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon, and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Padé (N=M=1) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2)=(1+Q2/0.66GeV2)−2. Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extremely-low-Q2 data or by use of the Padé approximant for extrapolation using a larger range of

  16. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D. C.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Hamel, S.; Caspersen, K.; Schwegler, E.; Collins, G. W.; Nettelmann, N.; Ackland, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    For planets other than Earth, particularly exoplanets, interpretation of the composition and structure depends largely on comparing the mass and radius with the composition expected given their distance from the parent star. The composition implies a mass-radius relation which relies heavily on equations of state calculated from electronic structure theory and measured experimentally on Earth. We lay out a method for deriving and testing equations of state, and deduce mass-radius and mass-pressure relations for key, relevant materials whose equation of state (EOS) is reasonably well established, and for differentiated Fe/rock. We find that variations in the EOS, such as may arise when extrapolating from low-pressure data, can have significant effects on predicted mass-radius relations and on planetary pressure profiles. The relations are compared with the observed masses and radii of planets and exoplanets, broadly supporting recent inferences about exoplanet structures. Kepler-10b is apparently 'Earth-like', likely with a proportionately larger core than Earth's, nominally 2/3 of the mass of the planet. CoRoT-7b is consistent with a rocky mantle over an Fe-based core which is likely to be proportionately smaller than Earth's. GJ 1214b lies between the mass-radius curves for H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}, suggesting an 'icy' composition with a relatively large core or a relatively large proportion of H{sub 2}O. CoRoT-2b is less dense than the hydrogen relation, which could be explained by an anomalously high degree of heating or by higher than assumed atmospheric opacity. HAT-P-2b is slightly denser than the mass-radius relation for hydrogen, suggesting the presence of a significant amount of matter of higher atomic number. CoRoT-3b lies close to the hydrogen relation. The pressure at the center of Kepler-10b is 1.5{sup +1.2}{sub -1.0} TPa. The central pressure in CoRoT-7b is probably close to 0.8 TPa, though may be up to 2 TPa. These pressures are accessible by planar

  17. The radius and albedo of Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    A measurement of the 20-micron thermal flux from Hyperion is reported, and the radius and surface geometric albedo of this outer satellite of Saturn are computed by the photometric/radiometric method. A corrected and normalized 20-micron thermal flux of 0.033 + or - 0.012 Jy is determined. A radius of 112 + or - 15 km and a surface geometric albedo of 0.47 + or - 0.11 are obtained by assuming values of unity for the phase integral, emissivity, and bolometric/visual geometric-albedo ratio. The sensitivity of the photometric/radiometric method to the assumed values of the parameters involved is discussed, and the results are compared with similar studies of Triton. It is concluded that neither Hyperion nor Triton appears to have a geometric albedo in the lower end of the distribution of small bodies in the solar system.

  18. Fractures of Distal Radius: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Pankaj; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar; Dawar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed. PMID:25657938

  19. Solar radius change between 1925 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J. B.; Fiala, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    From an analysis of numerous reports from different locations on the duration of totality of the solar eclipses on January 24, 1925, and February 26, 1979, it is found that the solar radius at the earlier date was 0.5 arcsec (or 375 km) larger than at the later date. The correction to the standard solar radius found for each eclipse is different when different subsets of the observations are used (for example, edge of path of totality timings compared with central timings). This is seen as suggesting the existence of systematic inaccuracies in our knowledge of the lunar figure. The differences between the corrections for both eclipses, however, are very similar for all subsets considered, indicating that changes of the solar size may be reliably inferred despite the existence of the lunar figure errors so long as there is proper consideration of the distribution of the observations. These results are regarded as strong evidence in support of the occurrence of solar radius changes on shorter than evolutionary time scales.

  20. Electrode radius predicts lesion radius during radiofrequency energy heating. Validation of a proposed thermodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, D.E.; Watson, D.D.; Verow, A.F. )

    1990-07-01

    Myocardial heating by transcatheter delivery of radiofrequency (RF) energy has been proposed as an effective means of arrhythmia ablation. A thermodynamic model describing the radial temperature gradient at steady state during RF-induced heating is proposed. If one assumes that RF power output is adjusted to maintain a constant electrode-tissue interface temperature at all times, then this thermodynamic model predicts that the radius of the RF-induced lesion will be directly proportional to the electrode radius. A total of 76 RF-induced lesions were created in a model of isolated canine right ventricular free wall perfused and superfused with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Electrode radius was varied between 0.75 and 2.25 mm. RF energy (500 kHz) was delivered for 90 seconds, and the power output was adjusted to maintain a constant electrode-tissue interface temperature of 60 degrees C. A strong linear correlation was observed between electrode radius and lesion radius in two dimensions: transverse (p = 0.0001, r = 0.85) and transmural (p = 0.0001, r = 0.89). With these data, the temperature correlation with irreversible myocardial injury in this model was calculated at 46.6-48.8 degrees C. Therefore, the proposed thermodynamic model closely predicts the observed relation between electrode radius and lesion size during RF myocardial heating.

  1. Spring Changeover of the Middle Atmosphere Circulation Compared with Rocket Wind Data up to 80 Km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entzian, G.; Tarasenko, D. A.; Lauter, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    The middle atmosphere circulation is governed by two seasonal basic states in winter and summer, twice a year separated by relatively shortlived reversal periods. These seasonal basic states of circulation and the spring changeover period between them are investigated.

  2. Microphysical Model of the Venus clouds between 40km and 80km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGouldrick, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    I am continuing to adapt the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to successfully simulate the multi-layered clouds of Venus. The present version of the one-dimensional model now includes a simple parameterization of the photochemicial production of sulfuric acid around altitudes of 62km, and its thermochemical destruction below cloud base. Photochemical production in the model is limited by the availability of water vapor and insolation. Upper cloud particles are introduced into the model via binary homogeneous nucleation, while the lower and middle cloud particles are created via activation of involatile cloud condensation nuclei. Growth by condensation and coagulation and coalescence are also treated. Mass loadings and particle sizes compare favorably with the in situ observations by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe Particle Size Spectrometer, and mixing ratios of volatiles compare favorably with remotely sensed observations of water vapor and sulfuric acid vapor. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program, grant number NNX11AD79G.

  3. Taking Exomoons to the (Radius) Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Moons around extrasolar planets are the next up-and-coming objects to be not only observed, but characterized for possible habitability. As with planets orbiting stars, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they are gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. At a particular distance, they may also become tidally locked and therefore be in a synchronous rotation with the host-planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets μ Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on an exomoon at it's furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in distance. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity and time spent within the habitable zone on the flux on the moon. From stellar contributions alone, we find moons with host-planets fully within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. In other words, a planet might not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be potentially habitable. In this way our findings separate exomoons and exoplanets, but it broadens the scope of worlds that may occupy a habitable zone.

  4. [Vascularized iliac crest and distal radius reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Pic Gomis, L; Gomis, R

    2010-12-01

    The authors relate their experience concerning the vascularized iliac crest flap. In the first chapter, they detail the anatomic vascularized osteocutaneous iliac crest. Blood supply arises from the deep and superficial circonflexe iliac artery. Many anastomoses connect the two systems. In the second chapter, they detail the operative technique of free and pedicule hone iliac crest flap. Composite cutaneous bone flaps are also detailed. In the third chapter, they detail informations about treatment of distal radius bone defects with associated skeen flap if necessary.

  5. Triplane fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Serafín; Hidalgo-Ovejero, Angel

    2006-07-01

    A case of triplane fracture of the distal radius is reported in a 13-year-old boy. This exceptional fracture showed displacement, and was healed by closed reduction and 6 weeks of external immobilization. Eighteen months later, the patient showed complete physeal arrest of the distal radius, with radio-ulnar length discrepancy but without any repercussion on wrist mobility. The patient was declared asymptomatic 3 years after the injury. Prompt, physiological physeal arrest reduces the potential of growth deformity. These fractures must be treated conservatively by closed reduction (if displacement exists) and external immobilization, just like a normal one-plane fracture. We may suppose that final radio-ulnar discrepancy could lead to a painful and symptomatic ulno-carpal conflict in adult life. The following characteristics can be associated with this rare fracture: (1) occurrence close to the end of the growth period, as in other types of triplane fractures; (2) evolution towards partial or complete growth arrest of the physis, not requiring treatment and (3) stability of the fracture after closed reduction. In the present case, as in the other reported cases, it may also be added that orthopaedic treatment has been the rule, in contrast with triplane fractures occurring in the distal tibia, in which surgical treatment is indicated.

  6. Distal radius fracture after proximal row carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Igeta, Yuka; Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a patient with distal radius fracture (DRF) after proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The mechanism of the DRF after PRC is discussed in this report. Presentation of case The patient was a 73-year-old female who had undergone PRC due to Kienböck disease before. The wrist range of motion was: 45° on dorsiflexion and 20° on flexion. DRF has occurred at 3 years after PRC. The fracture type was extra-articular fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed using a volar locking plate. No postoperative complication developed, the Mayo score was excellent at 6 months after surgery, and the daily living activity level recovered to that before injury. Discussion Since the wrist range of motion decreased and the lunate fitted into the joint surface after PRC, making the forearm join with the hand like a single structure, pressure may have been loaded on the weak distal end of the radius from the dorsal side, causing volar displacement and fracture. Conclusion The pressure distribution and range of motion of the radiocarpal joint after PRC are different from those of a normal joint, and the mechanism of fracture also changes due to PRC. PMID:25623755

  7. An Exoplanet Radius and Transit Timing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Jonald; Sada, Pedro

    2010-02-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A continuing explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 45 hot Jupiters transiting planets brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (~ 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. Moreover, the discovery photometry for these systems usually provides only relatively coarse photometric precision, but larger-aperture follow-up can determine the giant planet radius to a precision limited only by knowledge of the stellar mass, and thereby reveal the diversity of giant exoplanet structure, such as the presence of heavy element cores. The relatively large sample now available means that a radius- and transit timing-survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose continued observations to perform transit photometry using FLAMINGOS on the 2.1-meter in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has excellent sensitivity to planetary radii and shifts in transit time.

  8. An Exoplanet Radius and Transit Timing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Jonald; Sada, Pedro

    2009-08-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A recent explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 37 hot Jupiters transiting planets brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (~ 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. Moreover, the discovery photometry for these systems usually provides only relatively coarse photometric precision, but larger-aperture follow-up can determine the giant planet radius to a precision limited only by knowledge of the stellar mass, and thereby reveal the diversity of giant exoplanet structure, such as the presence of heavy element cores. The relatively large sample now available means that a radius- and transit timing-survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose continued observations to perform transit photometry using FLAMINGOS on the 2.1-meter in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has excellent sensitivity to planetary radii and shifts in transit time.

  9. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  10. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to...

  11. Understanding the mass-radius relation for sub-Neptunes: radius as a proxy for composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-09-01

    Transiting planet surveys like Kepler have provided a wealth of information on the distribution of planetary radii, particularly for the new populations of super-Earth- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. In order to aid in the physical interpretation of these radii, we compute model radii for low-mass rocky planets with hydrogen-helium envelopes. We provide model radii for planets 1-20 M {sub ⊕}, with envelope fractions 0.01%-20%, levels of irradiation 0.1-1000 times Earth's, and ages from 100 Myr to 10 Gyr. In addition we provide simple analytic fits that summarize how radius depends on each of these parameters. Most importantly, we show that at fixed H/He envelope fraction, radii show little dependence on mass for planets with more than ∼1% of their mass in their envelope. Consequently, planetary radius is to a first order a proxy for planetary composition, i.e., H/He envelope fraction, for Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. We recast the observed mass-radius relationship as a mass-composition relationship and discuss it in light of traditional core accretion theory. We discuss the transition from rocky super-Earths to sub-Neptune planets with large volatile envelopes. We suggest ∼1.75 R {sub ⊕} as a physically motivated dividing line between these two populations of planets. Finally, we discuss these results in light of the observed radius occurrence distribution found by Kepler.

  12. Physeal arrest of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Little, Kevin; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common pediatric fractures. Although most of these fractures heal without complication, some result in partial or complete physeal arrest. The risk of physeal arrest can be reduced by avoiding known risk factors during fracture management, including multiple attempts at fracture reduction. Athletes may place substantial compressive and shear forces across the distal radial physes, making them prone to growth arrest. Timely recognition of physeal arrest can allow for more predictable procedures to be performed, such as distal ulnar epiphysiodesis. In cases of partial arrest, physeal bar excision with interposition grafting can be performed. Once ulnar abutment is present, more invasive procedures may be required, including ulnar shortening osteotomy or radial lengthening.

  13. [Loco typico radius fractures--personal experience].

    PubMed

    Darabos, Nikica; Cesarec, Marijan

    2003-01-01

    Fractura radii loco typico (FRLT) is the fracture of the distal radius. That is the one of the most frequent fractures of locomotor system with the widest range of treatment in traumatology. Therapy depends on the stability of the fracture: nonoperative or operative. We analysed the five-year experience of our Department of Traumatology where more than 1500 patients with FRLT have been treated in the urgent surgery clinic and 126 of them were hospitalized. In our study we evaluated the results of the operative treatment and postoperative functional status of a treated wrist. According to the A-O classification, we hospitalized 36 patients with A type, 28 patients with B type, and 62 patients with C type of FRLT. We operated 80 patients. The postoperative functional status of a treated wrist was excellent or good in 64 patients and good in 16 patients. The treatment of FRLT depends on the type and the complications of the fracture and the age of the patients. Operative therapy is indicated in the unstable FRLT or after an inadequate nonoperative treatment.

  14. Fragmentation of a jet with small radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Kim, Chul; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the fragmentation of a parton into a jet with small jet radius R . Perturbatively, logarithms of R can appear, which for narrow jets can lead to large corrections. Using soft-collinear effective theory, we introduce the fragmentation function to a jet (FFJ), which describes the fragmentation of a parton into a jet. We discuss how these objects are related to the standard jet functions. Calculating the FFJ to next-to-leading order, we show that these objects satisfy the standard Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations, with a natural scale that depends upon R . By using the standard renormalization group evolution, we can therefore resum logarithms of R . We further use the soft-collinear effective theory to prove a factorization theorem where the FFJs naturally appear, for the fragmentation of a hadron within a jet with small R . Finally, we also show how this formalism can be used to resum the ratio of jet radii for a subjet to be emitted from within a fat jet.

  15. On Galaxy Mass-Radius Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindoni, D.; Secco, L.; Contini, E.; Caimmi, R.

    In the Clausius' virial maximum theory (TCV) [Secco and Bindoni, NewA 14, 567 (2009)] to explain the galaxy Fundamental Plane (FP) a natural explanation follows about the observed relationship between stellar mass and effective radius, M ∗ - r e , for early type galaxies (ETGs). The key of this correlation lies in the deep link which has to exist between cosmology and the existence of the FP. The general strategy consists in using the two-component tensor virial theorem to describe the virial configuration of the baryonic component of mass M B ≃ M ∗ embedded in a dark matter (DM) halo of mass M D at the end of relaxation phase. In a ΛCDM flat cosmology, starting from variance at equivalence epoch, we derive some preliminary theoretical relationships, M ∗ - r e , which are functions of mass ratio m = M D / M B . They appear to be in agreement with the trends extracted from the data of galaxy sample used by [Tortora et al., MNRAS 396, 1132 (2009)].

  16. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  17. New Physics and the Proton Radius Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Carl E. Carlson, Benjamin C. Rislow

    2012-08-01

    Background: The recent disagreement between the proton charge radius extracted from Lamb shift measurements of muonic and electronic hydrogen invites speculation that new physics may be to blame. Several proposals have been made for new particles that account for both the Lamb shift and the muon anomalous moment discrepancies. Purpose: We explore the possibility that new particles' couplings to the muon can be fine-tuned to account for all experimental constraints. Method: We consider two fine-tuned models, the first involving new particles with scalar and pseudoscalar couplings, and the second involving new particles with vector and axial couplings. The couplings are constrained by the Lamb shift and muon magnetic moments measurements while mass constraints are obtained by kaon decay rate data. Results: For the scalar-pseudoscalar model, masses between 100 to 200 MeV are not allowed. For the vector model, masses below about 200 MeV are not allowed. The strength of the couplings for both models approach that of electrodynamics for particle masses of about 2 GeV. Conclusions: New physics with fine tuned couplings may be entertained as a possible explanation for the Lamb shift discrepancy.

  18. Tidal radius estimates for three open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. M.; Loktin, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    A new method is developed for estimating tidal radii and masses of open star clusters (OCL) based on the sky-plane coordinates and proper motions and/or radial velocities of cluster member stars. To this end, we perform the correlation and spectral analysis of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components relative to the cluster mass center along three coordinate planes and along each coordinate axis in five OCL models. Mutual correlation functions for fluctuations of absolute values of velocity field components are computed. The spatial Fourier transform of the mutual correlation functions in the case of zero time offset is used to compute wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components. The oscillation spectra of these quantities contain series of local maxima at equidistant wavenumber k values. The ratio of the tidal radius of the cluster to the wavenumber difference Δ k of adjacent local maxima in the oscillation spectra of absolute values of velocity field components is found to be the same for all five OCL models. This ratio is used to estimate the tidal radii and masses of the Pleiades, Praesepe, and M67 based on the proper motions and sky-plane coordinates of the member stars of these clusters. The radial dependences of the absolute values of the tangential and radial projections of cluster star velocities computed using the proper motions relative to the cluster center are determined, along with the corresponding autocorrelation functions and wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of velocity field components. The Pleiades virial mass is estimated assuming that the cluster is either isolated or non-isolated. Also derived are the estimates of the Pleiades dynamical mass assuming that it is non-stationary and non-isolated. The inferred Pleiades tidal radii corresponding to these masses are reported.

  19. New concepts in the treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Taras, John S; Ladd, Amy L; Kalainov, David M; Ruch, David S; Ring, David C

    2010-01-01

    Fracture of the distal radius is the type of fracture most commonly seen in emergency departments. The understanding of nonsurgical and surgical care of distal radius fractures is evolving with recently developed methods of fixation. It is worthwhile to review some new methods of treatment, the role of bone grafting and synthetic substitutes, the principles of complex fracture management, and the treatment of common complications of distal radius fractures.

  20. The Origin of the Ionic-Radius Ratio Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a reader query, this article traces the origins of the ionic-radius ratio rules and their incorrect attribution to Linus Pauling in the chemical literature and to Victor Goldschmidt in the geochemical literature. In actual fact, the ionic-radius ratio rules were first proposed within the context of the coordination chemistry…

  1. bamr: Bayesian analysis of mass and radius observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2014-08-01

    bamr is an MPI implementation of a Bayesian analysis of neutron star mass and radius data that determines the mass versus radius curve and the equation of state of dense matter. Written in C++, bamr provides some EOS models. This code requires O2scl (ascl:1408.019) be installed before compilation.

  2. Modeling the interferometric radius measurement using Gaussian beam propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Medicus, Katherine M.; Snyder, James J.; Davies, Angela

    2006-12-01

    We model the interferometric radius measurement using Gaussian beam propagation to identify biases in the measurement due to using a simple geometric ray-trace model instead of the more complex Gaussian model. The radius measurement is based on using an interferometer to identify the test part's position when it is at two null locations, and the distance between the positions is an estimate of the part's radius. The null condition is observed when there is no difference in curvature between the reflected reference and the test wavefronts, and a Gaussian model will provide a first-order estimate of curvature changes due to wave propagation and therefore changes to the radius measurement. We show that the geometric ray assumption leads to radius biases (errors) that are a strong function of the test part radius and increase as the radius of the part decreases. We tested for a bias for both microscaled(<1 mm) and macroscaled parts. The bias is of the order of parts in 105 for micro-optics with radii a small fraction of a millimeter and much smaller for macroscaled optics. The amount of bias depends on the interferometer configuration (numerical aperture, etc.), the nominal radius of the test part, and the distances in the interferometer.

  3. ON THE VARIATION OF SOLAR RADIUS IN ROTATION CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2015-01-10

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation period of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.

  4. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius.

    PubMed

    Castaño, D; Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  5. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, D.; Navarro, M. C.; Herrero, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  6. An Asian Perspective on the Management of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis There is little data with regards to the epidemiology, pathology, or management of distal radius fractures from centers in Asia. Asia includes five advanced economies, namely Hong Kong SAR, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and a number of emerging economies prominent among which are China, India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article examines the available epidemiological data from Asia, and compares the management of distal radius fractures in the advanced and emerging Asian economies and how they match up to the current management in the west. It concludes by offering solutions for improving outcomes of distal radius fractures in both the advanced and emerging economies of Asia. PMID:22554658

  7. Split radius-form blocks for tube benders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, D. R.; Seiple, C. W.

    1970-01-01

    Two-piece, radius-form block permits accurate forming and removing of parts with more than a 180 degree bend. Tube bender can shape flexible metal tubing in applications dealing with plumbing, heating, and pressure transmission lines.

  8. Applying Occam's Razor To The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    Over the past five decades, ever more complex mathematical functions have been used to extract the radius of the proton from electron scattering data. For example, in 1963 the proton radius was extracted with linear and quadratic fits of low Q2 data (< 3 fm-2) and by 2014 a non-linear regression of two tenth order power series functions with thirty-one normalization parameters and data out to 25 fm-2 was used. But for electron scattering, the radius of the proton is determined by extracting the slope of the charge form factor at a Q2 of zero. By using higher precision data than was available in 1963 and focusing on the low Q2 data from 1974 to today, we find extrapolating functions consistently produce a proton radius of around 0.84 fm. A result that is in agreement with modern Lamb shift measurements.

  9. Radius of Curvature of Off-Axis Paraboloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brian; Reardon, Patrick; Hadaway, James; Geary, Joseph; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present several methods for measuring the vertex radius of curvature of off-axis paraboloidal mirrors. One is based on least-squares fitting of interferometer output, one on comparison of sagittal and tangential radii of curvature, and another on measurement of displacement of the nulled test article from the ideal reference wave. Each method defines radius of curvature differently and, as a consequence, produces its own sort of errors.

  10. Isolated Diaphyseal Fractures of the Radius in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Thierry G.; Van Dijk, Niek C.; Raaymakers, Ernst L.

    2009-01-01

    Diaphyseal radius fractures without associated ulna fracture or radioulnar dislocation (isolated fracture of the radius) are recognized in adults but are rarely described in skeletally immature patients. A search of our database (1974–2002) identified 17 pediatric patients that had an isolated fracture of the radius. Among the 13 patients with at least 1 year follow-up, ten were treated with manipulative reduction and immobilization in an above elbow cast and three had initial operative treatment with plate and screw fixation. These 13 patients were evaluated for an average of 18 months (range, 12 to 45 months) after injury using the system of Price and colleagues. The incidence of isolated diaphyseal radius fractures in skeletally immature patients was 0.56 per year in our database and represented 27% of the 63 patients with a diaphyseal forearm fracture. All 13 patients, with at least 1 year follow-up, regained full elbow flexion and extension and full forearm rotation. According to the classification system of Price, all 13 patients (100%) had an excellent result. As in adults, isolated radius fractures seem to occur in children more frequently than previously appreciated. Treatment of isolated radius fractures in skeletally immature patients has a low complication rate, and excellent functional outcomes are the rule. PMID:19859772

  11. Predicting the failure load of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Muller, Monique E; Webber, Colin E; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2003-06-01

    The distal radius is an important site for the early detection of patients at risk for fracture. Since measuring bone strength in vivo is not possible, we evaluated which bone assessment method of the forearm would best predict failure load of the distal radius and computed a factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist). Thirty-eight cadaveric forearm specimens were measured by five different techniques to assess bone density, bone mineral content, geometry and trabecular structure at the distal forearm. The bone assessment techniques included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the radius, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) of the 4% and 20% distal sites of the radius, DXA of the phalanges, digital X-ray radiogrammetry of the forearm (DXR-BMD), and quantitative ultrasound of the radius. The failure load of each excised radius was determined by simulating a fall on an outstretched hand. The pQCT measurements of polar stress-strain index and cortical content explained the greatest portion of variance in failure load (r2=0.82-0.85). Bone mineral content measures were generally better predictors of failure load (r2=0.53-0.85) than the corresponding volumetric or areal bone mineral density values (r2=0.22-0.69) measured by either pQCT or DXA. Multiple regression analysis showed that the addition of a bone geometry measure improved the ability of a bone density measure alone to predict failure load. There was high variability in the ability of different techniques and different variables within a given technique to predict failure load. Estimates of the factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist) revealed that the women in this study would have been likely to fracture their distal radius upon falling from a standing height (Phi wrist= 1.04), whereas the men would have likely withstood the impact without fracturing their wrist (Phi wrist= 0.79).

  12. Distal Radius Radiographic Indices and Perilunate Fracture Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Jafari, Davod; Keihan Shokouh, Hassan; Motavallian, Ebrahim; Najd Mazhar, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal radius radiographic indices may play a role as risk factors in pathogenesis of Kienbock’s disease, scaphoid fracture and nonunion. Perilunate fracture dislocations are devastating wrist injuries, and their relationship and distal radius indices have not been addressed in the literature. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role of distal radius radiographic indices including radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt as risk factors in the perilunate fracture dislocation injury of the wrist. Patients and Methods We studied distal radius radiographic indices including radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt in 43 patients with perilunate fracture dislocations and compared them with 44 wrists in the control group. Results The mean values of the radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt were 12.74 (5 - 18), 24.20 (7 - 35), -0.73 (-5 - 4) and 12.28 (2 - 20) in the patient group. These values were 12.68 (9 - 22), 23.22 (17 - 30), -0.11 (-4 - 3) and 11.05 (-3 - 20), respectively in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions This study did not show that distal radius anatomical indices including the radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt influence perilunate fracture dislocation as risk factors. PMID:27626004

  13. Accuracy of distal radius positioning using an anatomical plate.

    PubMed

    Vroemen, Joy C; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Sierevelt, Inger N; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, several anatomical plates have been introduced to improve the result of open reduction and internal fixation of the distal radius. Using 3-dimensional imaging techniques, the authors studied the accuracy and reproducibility of distal radius positioning using anatomical plates.Distal radius fractures and the correction of these fractures were simulated with plastic bone models of radii. The authors simulated a defect by removing an arbitrary wedge shape from the artificial radii. Two surgeons corrected these fractures by placing 2 anatomical plate types according to the plate manufacturers' instructions. The residual positioning errors of the distal segment in relation to the unaffected radii were determined using 3-dimensional imaging and were compared with naturally occurring bilateral radius differences in healthy individuals. In many cases, positioning does not agree with differences based on bilateral asymmetry in healthy patients.This study indicated the accuracy of anatomical plates. Positioning an anatomical plate may lead to considerable residual errors in individual patients. Volar distal radius plate shapes differ among plate manufacturers. Therefore, one plate may perform better than another in an individual.

  14. The radius distribution of planets around cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Swift, Jonathan

    2014-08-10

    We calculate an empirical, non-parametric estimate of the shape of the period-marginalized radius distribution of planets with periods less than 150 days using the small yet well-characterized sample of cool (T{sub eff} < 4000 K) dwarf stars in the Kepler catalog. In particular, we present and validate a new procedure, based on weighted kernel density estimation, to reconstruct the shape of the planet radius function down to radii smaller than the completeness limit of the survey at the longest periods. Under the assumption that the period distribution of planets does not change dramatically with planet radius, we show that the occurrence of planets around these stars continues to increase to below 1 R{sub ⊕}, and that there is no strong evidence for a turnover in the planet radius function. In fact, we demonstrate using many iterations of simulated data that a spurious turnover may be inferred from data even when the true distribution continues to rise toward smaller radii. Finally, the sharp rise in the radius distribution below ∼3 R{sub ⊕} implies that a large number of planets await discovery around cool dwarfs as the sensitivities of ground-based transit surveys increase.

  15. Optimal network modification for spectral radius dependent phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Yonatan; Kirsch, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of contact processes on networks is often determined by the spectral radius of the networks adjacency matrices. A decrease of the spectral radius can prevent the outbreak of an epidemic, or impact the synchronization among systems of coupled oscillators. The spectral radius is thus tightly linked to network dynamics and function. As such, finding the minimal change in network structure necessary to reach the intended spectral radius is important theoretically and practically. Given contemporary big data resources such as large scale communication or social networks, this problem should be solved with a low runtime complexity. We introduce a novel method for the minimal decrease in weights of edges required to reach a given spectral radius. The problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, where a global optimum is guaranteed. The method can be easily adjusted to an efficient discrete removal of edges. We introduce a variant of the method which finds optimal decrease with a focus on weights of vertices. The proposed algorithm is exceptionally scalable, solving the problem for real networks of tens of millions of edges in a short time.

  16. Cam radius of curvature modification for improved manufacturability

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, S.

    1995-12-31

    The design of IC engine cams using the popular polynomial design techniques often results in very high accelerations (and associated high contact forces) as the follower approaches the base circle. In those same parts of the cam action, the cam radius of curvature is likely to change signs, going from convex to concave, and this leads to manufacturing difficulties. When the cam is concave, the radius of the grinding wheel that can be used in manufacture is controlled by the minimum concave radius of curvature of the cam, and this is often much smaller than the wheel size that would result in most economic production. Further, the arc of contact is extended, resulting in loss of coolant flow and rapid loss of wheel dress. A solution is presented, based on substituting a convex circular arc to replace a segment of the cam profile including the concavity. The ramifications of such a modification with regard to the follower motion is also presented.

  17. Correlation between radius and asphericity in surfaces fitted by conics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escudero, Alfonso; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Marcos, Susana

    2010-07-01

    The optical surfaces of the eye are often described in terms of their radius and asphericity. The variations caused by experimental noise in repeated measurements of radius and asphericity of the same surface are strongly correlated. We show this correlation in experimental corneal elevation data from videokeratoscopy and Scheimpflug topography, in non-contact profilometry data of artificial lenses, and in simulations. The effect is a characteristic of the fits to conic curves, and not restricted to any experimental device or fitting procedure. A separate analysis of radius and asphericity may estimate incorrectly the statistical significance of the changes in the ocular surfaces. We propose a MANOVA-based statistical analysis that increases sensitivity by a factor of 4.

  18. Attractor radius, a new determination criterion of predictability limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deqiang; Ding, Ruiqiang; Li, Jianping; Feng, Jie

    2014-05-01

    Firstly, the definition of the attractor radius was given and then the property of that the attractor radius (AR) in a given n-dimensional attractor A is a constant was proved in theory. Secondly, the SV of the square of the RMS difference was separated into two components - the systematic error and the attractor radius, and it was proved that the observed global climatological RMS (OCR) difference is not equal to 71% of the SV of the RMS difference when the systematic error is existed, however, it is always equal to 71% of the AR. Then the physical understanding of the AR and also the predictability limit determinated by it were discussed. Finally, the spatial distributions of the predictability limit calculated from CFSv2 data by different criterions were compared.

  19. Closed reduction of radius refracture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohammad; Yeo, Mildrid; Smibert, John Graham

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Refractures of the radius and ulna in the paediatric patient with flexible intramedullary nails in situ are known to occur. There are no formal guidelines currently in the literature to guide the management of such fractures. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 10-year-old Caucasian girl, sustained a closed refracture of the radius at the same level, with the flexible intramedullary nails in situ to treat her recent ulna and radius fractures. DISCUSSION We proposed a new non-invasive way of reducing and maintaining such fractures without removal of the bent nail completely. CONCLUSION This method does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength of the nail, as we do not advocate applying an external lateral force, which would compromise nail mechanical strength and eventually lead to breakage of the nail in situ. PMID:22096752

  20. Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.; Gao, H.

    2016-03-01

    The puzzle of proton charge radius was recently raised by the measurement of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), whose results were seven standard deviations smaller than the CODATA recommended value. To investigate this discrepancy, the PRad experiment was proposed and approved at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The experiment will extract the proton charge radius with a sub-percent accuracy by measuring the cross-sections of unpolarized electronproton elastic scattering in an unprecedented low Q2 region (2×10-4 GeV2/c2).

  1. Radius Constants for Analytic Functions with Fixed Second Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Nargesi, Mahnaz M.; Ali, Rosihan M.; Ravichandran, V.

    2014-01-01

    Let f(z) = z + ∑n=2∞anzn be analytic in the unit disk with the second coefficient a2 satisfying |a2 | = 2b, 0 ≤ b ≤ 1. Sharp radius of Janowski starlikeness is obtained for functions f whose nth coefficient satisfies |an | ≤ cn + d  (c, d ≥ 0) or |an | ≤ c/n  (c > 0  and  n ≥ 3). Other radius constants are also obtained for these functions, and connections with earlier results are made. PMID:25101327

  2. A Unified Approach to Outcomes Assessment for Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Waljee, Jennifer F; Ladd, Amy; MacDermid, Joy C; Rozental, Tamara D; Wolfe, Scott W

    2016-04-01

    Distal radius fractures are one of the most common upper extremity injuries. Currently, outcome assessment after treatment of these injuries varies widely with respect to the measures that are used, timing of assessment, and the end points that are considered. A more consistent approach to outcomes assessment would provide a standard by which to assess treatment options and best practices. In this summary, we review the consensus regarding outcomes assessment after distal radius fractures and propose a systematic approach that integrates performance, patient-reported outcomes, pain, complications, and radiographs.

  3. Future treatment and research directions in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Jesse

    2012-05-01

    Whether or not they will have their lives dramatically extended in the next few decades, it is clear that people are living longer, healthier, and more active lives. The two peak incidences of distal radius fractures will remain within the pediatric and geriatric age groups, with the latter experiencing a substantial increase in the coming years. This article attempts to project future developments with regard to epidemiology, risk and prevention, fracture assessment, and treatment of distal radius fractures, and the ever increasing concern for the economic impact of this prevalent injury.

  4. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section 886.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... chapter, subject to the limitations in § 886.9, only when the device does not include computer software...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section 886.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... chapter, subject to the limitations in § 886.9, only when the device does not include computer software...

  6. About the horizontal variability of effective radius in stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaritz-Ronen, L.; Khain, A.; Pinsky, M.

    2016-08-01

    The role of turbulent mixing in formation of low horizontal variability of effective radius near the top of nondrizzling stratocumulus clouds is investigated in simulations of clouds observed during the Second Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus field experiment. The clouds are simulated using a spectral bin microphysics Lagrangian-Eulerian model consisting of ~2000 adjacent parcels moving in a turbulence-like field with observed correlation properties. The parcels interact through drop sedimentation and turbulent mixing. It was found that the effective radius variability in the horizontal direction near cloud top does not exceed ~10% of the averaged value. Three different types of cloud parcels are revealed to be differently influenced by mixing: ascending slightly diluted parcels, cloudy parcels experiencing intense mixing with parcels from inversion, and initially dry parcels. The evolution of droplet size distributions in parcels belonging to these types is investigated. It is shown that in parcels of the first two types the values of effective radii do not change or change only slightly remaining close to the adiabatic value. In initially droplet-free parcels effective radius rapidly reaches a value close to the adiabatic value, while liquid water content remains low. Therefore, turbulent mixing leads to establishing vertical profiles of effective radius, which are close to the adiabatic profile.

  7. Computational Analysis of Dual Radius Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Vatsa, V. N.; Rumsey, C. L.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the work is to use multiple codes and multiple configurations to provide an assessment of the capability of RANS solvers to predict circulation control dual radius airfoil performance and also to identify key issues associated with the computational predictions of these configurations that can result in discrepancies in the predicted solutions. Solutions were obtained for the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) dual radius circulation control airfoil and the General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) dual radius airfoil. For the GTRI-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the experimental trend in sectional lift variation with blowing coefficient very well. Good code to code comparisons between the chordwise surface pressure coefficients and the solution streamtraces also indicated that the detailed flow characteristics were matched between the computations. For the GACC-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the sectional lift and chordwise pressure distributions accurately at the no blowing condition. However at a moderate blowing coefficient, although the code to code variation was small, the differences between the computations and experiment were significant. Computations were made to investigate the sensitivity of the sectional lift and pressure distributions to some of the experimental and computational parameters, but none of these could entirely account for the differences in the experimental and computational results. Thus, CFD may indeed be adequate as a prediction tool for dual radius CC flows, but limited and difficult to obtain two-dimensional experimental data prevents a confident assessment at this time.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Manouchehrifar, Mohammad; Asadi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fractures are a common traumatic injury, particularly in the elderly population. In the present study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound guidance in the reduction of distal radius fractures in adult patients presenting to emergency department (ED). Methods: In this prospective case control study, eligible patients were adults older than 18 years who presented to the ED with distal radius fractures. 130 consecutive patient consisted of two group of Sixty-Five patients were prospectively enrolled for around 1 years. The first group underwent ultrasound-guided reduction and the second (control group) underwent blind reduction. All procedures were performed by two trained emergency residents under supervision of senior emergency physicians. Results: Baseline characteristics between two groups were similar. The rate of repeat reduction was reduced in the ultrasound group (9.2% vs 24.6%; P = .019). The post reduction radiographic indices were similar between the two groups, although the ultrasound group had improved volar tilt (mean, 7.6° vs 3.7°; P = .000). The operative rate was reduced in the ultrasound groups (10.8% vs 27.7%; P = .014). Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance is effective and recommended for routine use in the reduction of distal radius fractures. PMID:27299141

  9. Nonlinear buckling analyses of a small-radius carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Yong-Gang; Li, Min; Jia, Jiao

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered by Sumio Iijima. It has aroused extensive attentions of scholars from all over the world. Over the past two decades, we have acquired a lot of methods to synthesize carbon nanotubes and learn their many incredible mechanical properties such as experimental methods, theoretical analyses, and computer simulations. However, the studies of experiments need lots of financial, material, and labor resources. The calculations will become difficult and time-consuming, and the calculations may be even beyond the realm of possibility when the scale of simulations is large, as for computer simulations. Therefore, it is necessary for us to explore a reasonable continuum model, which can be applied into nano-scale. This paper attempts to develop a mathematical model of a small-radius carbon nanotube based on continuum theory. An Isotropic circular cross-section, Timoshenko beam model is used as a simplified mechanical model for the small-radius carbon nanotube. Theoretical part is mainly based on modified couple stress theory to obtain the numerical solutions of buckling deformation. Meanwhile, the buckling behavior of the small radius carbon nanotube is simulated by Molecular Dynamics method. By comparing with the numerical results based on modified couple stress theory, the dependence of the small-radius carbon nanotube mechanical behaviors on its elasticity constants, small-size effect, geometric nonlinearity, and shear effect is further studied, and an estimation of the small-scale parameter of a CNT (5, 5) is obtained.

  10. Finite Larmor radius flute mode theory with end loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Berk, H.L.

    1993-08-01

    The theory of flute mode stability is developed for a two-energy- component plasma partially terminated by a conducting limiter. The formalism is developed as a preliminary study of the effect of end-loss in open-ended mirror machines where large Larmor radius effects are important.

  11. Intrafocal pinning for distal radius metaphyseal fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Shital N; Jain, Viral V; Youngquist, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case control study was to evaluate the results of intrafocal pinning for distal radius metaphyseal fractures in children and to compare these results with conventional pinning. Data were collected from medical records and radiographs from patients who underwent closed reduction and percutaneous pinning for distal radius fracture in a Level I trauma center at the authors' institution between 2008 and 2010. Inclusion criteria included a dorsally angulated metaphyseal fracture without physeal involvement, an open distal radius physis, and a follow-up to radiographic union. A total of 10 patients with intrafocal pinning were compared to 26 patients with conventional pinning. Preoperatively, angulation was greater in patients who received intrafocal pinning than conventional pinning based on anteroposterior radiographs. Postoperatively, the 2 groups did not differ in angulation on either anteroposterior or lateral radiographs. One malunion and 2 pin-related complications occurred in the conventional pinning group, and 1 pin-related complication occurred in the intrafocal pinning group. The 2 groups did not differ by age, sex, side of injury, days to surgery, or initial shortening. This study affirms that the intrafocal pinning technique is an alternative to the conventional pinning technique for the stabilization of displaced metaphyseal distal radius fractures in children. Intrafocal pinning can also be used as a reduction tool for fractures that cannot be reduced by closed manipulation. The complications are comparable between the 2 techniques.

  12. Static and Dynamic Postural Changes after a Mountain Ultra-Marathon of 80 km and 5500 D+

    PubMed Central

    Marcolin, Giuseppe; Grainer, Alessandro; Reggiani, Carlo; Bisiacchi, Patrizia; Cona, Giorgia; Petrone, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue on static and dynamic postural stability after completing a mountain ultra-marathon. Twelve male athletes participated in the study. Postural stability was assessed before and immediately after the race. Static postural stability was evaluated on a dynamometric platform with eyes opened (OE) and closed (CE). Dynamic postural stability was assessed with OE on an instrumented plate which allowed medio-lateral oscillations. Stabilometric data were affected by fatigue in the OE condition, concerning sway path velocity (p = 0.0006), sway area velocity (p = 0.0006), area of the confidence ellipse (p = 0.0016), maximal anterior-posterior (AP) (p = 0.0017) and medio-lateral (ML) (p = 0.0039) oscillations. In the CE condition the sway path velocity (p = 0.0334), the maximal ML oscillations (p = 0.0161) and the area of the confident ellipse (p = 0.0180) were also negatively influenced. Stabilogram diffusion analysis showed in the OE condition an increase of short-term diffusion coefficients considering the anterior-posterior direction (Dfys; p = 0.0023) and the combination of the two (Dfr2s; p = 0.0032). Equally, long term diffusion coefficients increased considering the anterior-posterior direction (Dfyl; p = 0.0093) and the combination of the two (Dfr2l; p = 0.0086). In CE condition greater values were detected for medio-lateral direction (Dfxl; p = 0.033), anterior-posterior direction (Dfyl; p = 0.0459) and the combination of the two (Dfr2l; p = 0.0048). The dynamic postural stability test showed an increase of the time spent with the edges of the plate on the floor (p = 0.0152). Our results showed that mountain ultra-marathon altered static stability more than dynamic stability. An involvement of cognitive resources to monitor postural stability after fatiguing could be the explanation of the worsening in the automatic task (quiet standing) and of the positive compensation in the less automatic task (dynamic standing on the instrumented plate). PMID:27159563

  13. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE DEGENERATE MASS-RADIUS RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J. B.; Oswalt, T. D.; Barstow, M. A. E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu

    2012-03-15

    The white dwarf mass-radius relationship is fundamental to modern astrophysics. It is central to routine estimation of DA white dwarf masses derived from spectroscopic temperatures and gravities. It is also the basis for observational determinations of the white dwarf initial-final-mass relation. Nevertheless, definitive and detailed observational confirmations of the mass-radius relation (MRR) remain elusive owing to a lack of sufficiently accurate white dwarf masses and radii. Current best estimates of masses and radii allow only broad conclusions about the expected inverse relation between masses and radii in degenerate stars. In this paper, we examine a restricted set of 12 DA white dwarf binary systems for which accurate (1) trigonometric parallaxes, (2) spectroscopic effective temperatures and gravities, and (3) gravitational redshifts are available. We consider these three independent constraints on mass and radius in comparison with an appropriate evolved MRR for each star. For the best-determined systems it is found that the DA white dwarfs conform to evolve theoretical MRRs at the 1{sigma} to 2{sigma} level. For the white dwarf 40 Eri B (WD 0413-077) we find strong evidence for the existence of a 'thin' hydrogen envelope. For other stars improved parallaxes will be necessary before meaningful comparisons are possible. For several systems current parallaxes approach the precision required for the state-of-the-art mass and radius determinations that will be obtained routinely from the Gaia mission. It is demonstrated here how these anticipated results can be used to firmly constrain details of theoretical mass-radius determinations.

  14. Unstable Distal Radius Fractures Treated by Volar Locking Anatomical Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Anto; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Babu, Abey Thomas; Rengasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fracture of the distal end of radius represents the most common fracture of the upper extremity accounting for 16-20% of all fractures. Plating is now emerging as the gold standard for management of distal radius fractures due to increased rate of complications such as malunion, subluxation/dislocation of distal radio-ulnar joint or late collapse of fracture. Procedures such as closed reduction and cast immobilization, ligamentotaxis with external fixator and percutaneous pin fixation are no longer acceptable. Aim The purpose of the study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of unstable distal radius fractures treated with the volar locking plate. Materials and Methods We reviewed 53 patients from January 2011 to December 2015, treated for unstable distal radius fractures using a volar locking compression plate. Standard radiographic and clinical assessment after 12 months (range 12-16 months) were measured and final functional and radiological outcome were assessed using the Modified Mayo wrist scoring system and Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria respectively. Results There were 42 males and 11 females with an average age of 39.12±31.78 years (18-71 years). At the end of 12 months, 36 patients had an excellent radiological outcome and 10 patients had good radiological outcome as per Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria. Eleven patients had an excellent functional outcome and 26 patients had a good functional outcome as per modified Mayo wrist scoring system. There was one case of superficial wound infection which subsided with intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion The volar locking plate fixation helps in early mobilization of the wrist, restores anatomy, allows early return to function, prevents secondary loss of reduction and hence is an effective treatment for unstable fractures of the distal radius. PMID:28274009

  15. Variable radius cartography - History and perspectives of a new discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    The map that Toscanelli sent to Columbus was an unconscious application of cartography at a smaller radius than the real. The first really conscious attempts to represent the geography of Earth on globes of radius less than the current one occurred after the formulation of the concept of expanding Earth through geological time. The American chemist and geologist Richard Owen (1810-1890) in his book Key to the geology of the globe (1857) described the principles of what he himself called Anatomical Geology, with the Earth growing as a biological organism. The book contained a global paleogeographic map of the Earth that would have had a radius of about 4000 kilometers. In 1928 J.A.H. Kerkhoff (under the pseudonym Aero-dilettant) published a series of paleogeographic globes on which the modern oceans disappeared. With the same artisan methods of transfer continental outlines from a sphere to a smaller one, in 1933 O.C. Hilgenberg represented three different geological epochs, and, later, for the first time mapped paleopoles with their site-pole segments of meridian. Even today the traditional method of Hilgenberg is followed by senior researchers (Klaus Vogel, 2003) and younger geologists (James Maxlow). In England Hugh Owen applied the methods of traditional cartography to the variable radius one. His Atlas of Continental Displacement was in the 70s and 80s, for this discipline, a real milestone. While in the field of constant radius paleogeography the adherents to plate tectonics created many computer codes of automatic mapping (Bullard et al., 1965; Smith & Hallam, 1970; Scotese et al., 1979; and many others), in the variable radius field few tried to reach the same task. In 1972 in United States a first very simple attempt (but was not further developed) came from a private, R.B. Perry, followed by the still not-computerized Atlas of Owen, and both them constituted inspiration for the construction of a FORTRAN variable radius mapping code at INGV, with which it

  16. Link between diurnal stem radius changes and tree water relations.

    PubMed

    Zweifel, R; Item, H; Häsler, R

    2001-08-01

    Internal water reserves are depleted and replenished daily, not only in succulent plants, but also in trees. The significance of these changes in tissue water storage for tree water relations was investigated by monitoring diurnal fluctuations in stem radius. In 6-year-old potted Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees, whole-tree transpiration rate (T), sap flow at the stem base and fluctuations in stem radius were measured at 10-min intervals over eight successive weeks. The dynamics of diurnal water storage in relation to the daily course of water movement was simulated and the contribution of stored water to T quantified. The finding that, in P. abies, the course of bark water content is linearly coupled to stem radius fluctuations provided the basis for linking stem radius changes to a functional flow and storage model for tree water relations. This model, which consists of physical functions only and is driven by a single input variable (T), accurately simulates the diurnal course of changes in stem radius and water storage of the tree crown and stem. It was concluded that fluctuations were mainly determined by the course of transpiration. The availability of soil water and the degree to which storage tissues were saturated were also factors affecting the diurnal course of stem radius changes. Internally stored water contributed to daily transpiration even in well-watered trees, indicating that stored water plays an important role not only during periods of drought, but whenever water transport occurs within the tree. Needle and bark water reserves were most heavily depleted during transpiration. Together they supplied approximately 10% of daily T on sunny days, and up to 65% on cloudy days. On a daily basis, the crown (mainly needles) contributed approximately eight times more water to T than the stem (mainly bark). The depletion of the two storage pools and the water movements observed in the trees always occurred in the same sequence. In the morning

  17. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device is an AC-powered device that is a microscope and dial gauge intended to measure the radius of a...

  18. Error analysis for a laser differential confocal radius measurement system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Zhongyu

    2015-02-10

    In order to further improve the measurement accuracy of the laser differential confocal radius measurement system (DCRMS) developed previously, a DCRMS error compensation model is established for the error sources, including laser source offset, test sphere position adjustment offset, test sphere figure, and motion error, based on analyzing the influences of these errors on the measurement accuracy of radius of curvature. Theoretical analyses and experiments indicate that the expanded uncertainty of the DCRMS is reduced to U=0.13  μm+0.9  ppm·R (k=2) through the error compensation model. The error analysis and compensation model established in this study can provide the theoretical foundation for improving the measurement accuracy of the DCRMS.

  19. [Distal radius fractures: new concepts as basis for surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Rikli, D A; Babst, R; Jupiter, J B

    2007-02-01

    New advances in the biomechanics and pathomechanics of distal radius fractures as well as new generations of plates and improved surgical approaches now make possible the stable management and early functional rehabilitation not only of simple but also of complicated distal radius fractures according to the principles for articular and juxta-articular fractures. Especially for complex articular fractures, the fracture patterns are so heterogeneous that an individual surgical treatment strategy must be developed for each case. The preoperative clarification of articular fractures with computed tomography is particularly useful for planning surgery. Mental exposition with the three-column model and pathomechanics is an important prerequisite for understanding this type of injury and the appropriate choice of operative technique. A decisive factor for success is the subtle surgical procedure in approaching and handling the fine plates.

  20. Predicting jet radius in electrospinning by superpositioning exponential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widartiningsih, P. M.; Iskandar, F.; Munir, M. M.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the correlation between viscosity and fiber diameter in electrospinning. Control over fiber diameter in electrospinning process was important since it will determine the performance of resulting nanofiber. Theoretically, fiber diameter was determined by surface tension, solution concentration, flow rate, and electric current. But experimentally it had been proven that significantly viscosity had an influence to fiber diameter. Jet radius equation in electrospinning process was divided into three areas: near the nozzle, far from the nozzle, and at jet terminal. There was no correlation between these equations. Superposition of exponential series model provides the equations combined into one, thus the entire of working parameters on electrospinning take a contribution to fiber diameter. This method yields the value of solution viscosity has a linear relation to jet radius. However, this method works only for low viscosity.

  1. Flute waves at the ion Larmor radius scales

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.

    2010-12-14

    The theory of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is discussed. Modified linear kinetic theory allows us to investigate RTI and flute waves with arbitrary perpendicular spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius. It is shown that in the linear limit a Fourier transform of these equations yields the dispersion relation which in the so-called Pade approximation corresponds to results of the kinetic theory. This analysis represents an extension of the previous study of the magnetic RTI obtained in the large wave scale approximation. It is shown that incorporation of the effects associated with wave scales of the order of the ion Larmor radius leads to a broader wave number range of the magnetic RTI.

  2. Core Deuterium Fusion and Radius Inflation in Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Rachid Ouyed

    2016-06-01

    Several laboratory-based studies have shown that the Deuterium fusion cross-section is enhanced in a solid deuterated target as compared to a gas target, attributable to enhanced mobility of deuterons in a metal lattice. As an application, we propose that, for core temperatures and compositions characterizing hot Jupiters, screened Deuterium fusion can occur deep in the interior, and show that the amount of radius inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core. The mechanism of screened Deuterium fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature. We also explore the trend with planetary mass using a simple analytic model.

  3. Medical management of fragility fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Emily N; Crawford, David A; Scully, William F; Noce, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    Fragility fractures of the distal radius represent an opportunity to diagnose and treat osteoporosis before further fractures occur. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of prescriptions for calcium/vitamin D supplementation and the prevalence of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans in patients who sustained fragility fractures of the distal radius. A further goal was to determine the prevalence of patients who received prescriptions for the treatment of osteoporosis after DEXA scans. The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients 50 years and older who sustained a fragility fracture of the distal radius and were treated by the orthopedic surgery service at the authors' institution from 2004 to 2010. After a fragility fracture of the distal radius, fewer than 25% of previously unidentified at-risk patients received a prescription for vitamin supplementation and underwent a DEXA scan. Women were 7 times more likely than men to receive calcium/vitamin D supplementation, 14 times more likely to undergo a DEXA scan for the evaluation of osteoporosis, and 25 times more likely to receive a prescription for bisphosphonates. Patients who underwent a DEXA scan were 9 times more likely to receive pharmacologic treatment than those who did not undergo this scan. More than half of patients did not receive a prescription for calcium/vitamin D supplementation and did not undergo DEXA scanning as recommended by current National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines. Most patients who received prescriptions or underwent DEXA scans did so before rather than after fracture, indicating poor compliance with National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines.

  4. Radius fracture from an electrical injury involving an electric guitar.

    PubMed

    Pappano, Dante

    2010-03-01

    Electrical injury ranges widely from simple shock and mild burns to more extensive superficial injury, internal injury, and mortality. Bony fracture from electrically-induced tetanic muscle contraction is a rare but recognized injury. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who suffered a minor burn and radius fracture related to an electrical injury involving his electric guitar. An interesting pattern is emerging from available case reports of similar injuries.

  5. Simulation for Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Li; PRad Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The ``Proton Charge Radius Puzzle'' refers to 7 σ discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements and that from the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and e-p elastic scattering measurements. In order to get a better understanding of this puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was proposed and recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor and the charge radius of proton by simultaneously measuring the e - p elastic scattering cross section and the Møller cross section at very low Q2(2 × 10-4 10-1(GeV / c) 2) region, with sub-percent precision. A windowless hydrogen gas flow target was used to better control the background. A high-efficiency and high-resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and a pair of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers were used in the experiment. This talk will focus on comparing the detailed simulation of PRad experiment and its background with preliminary spectra from the data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contacts No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Mississippi State University and PRad collaboration.

  6. Complications of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures.

    PubMed

    Chia, Benjamin; Kozin, Scott H; Herman, Martin J; Safier, Shannon; Abzug, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Distal radius and forearm fractures represent a large percentage of pediatric fractures. The most common mechanism of injury is a fall onto an outstretched arm, which can lead to substantial rotational displacement. If this rotational displacement is not adequately addressed, there will be resultant loss of forearm motion and subsequent limitations in performing the activities of daily living. Good initial reductions and proper casting techniques are necessary when treating distal radius and forearm fractures nonsurgically; however, maintaining an acceptable reduction is not always possible. Atraumatic reduction of a displaced physeal fracture should occur within 7 days of the injury. If an impending malunion presents at 2 weeks or later after injury, observation is warranted because of concerns about physeal arrest with repeated attempts at manipulation, and it should be followed by a later assessment of functional limitations. Pediatric patients and their parents have higher expectations for recovery, which has contributed to an increase in the surgical management of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures. In addition, surgical interventions, such as intramedullary nailing, have their own associated complications.

  7. Optimizing interconnections to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huashan; Zhao, Xiuyan; Liu, Feng; Xu, Shouhuai; Lu, Wenlian

    2017-03-01

    The spectral radius (i.e., the largest eigenvalue) of the adjacency matrices of complex networks is an important quantity that governs the behavior of many dynamic processes on the networks, such as synchronization and epidemics. Studies in the literature focused on bounding this quantity. In this paper, we investigate how to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks by optimally linking k internetwork connections (or interconnections for short). We derive formulas for the estimation of the spectral radius of interdependent networks and employ these results to develop a suite of algorithms that are applicable to different parameter regimes. In particular, a simple algorithm is to link the k nodes with the largest k eigenvector centralities in one network to the node in the other network with a certain property related to both networks. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithms via extensive simulations. We discuss the physical implications of the results, including how the optimal interconnections can more effectively decrease the threshold of epidemic spreading in the susceptible-infected-susceptible model and the threshold of synchronization of coupled Kuramoto oscillators.

  8. Scaling Relations of Mass, Velocity, and Radius for Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Earl

    2017-02-01

    I demonstrate four tight correlations of total baryonic mass, velocity, and radius for a set of nearby disk galaxies: the mass–velocity relation {M}{{t}}\\propto {V}4; the mass–radius relation {M}{{t}}\\propto {R}2; the radius–velocity relation R\\propto {V}2; and the mass–radius–velocity relation {M}{{t}}\\propto {{RV}}2. The mass–velocity relation is the familiar Baryonic Tully–Fisher relation, and versions of the other three relations, using magnitude rather than baryonic mass, are also well known. These four observed correlations follow from a pair of more fundamental relations. First, the centripetal acceleration at the edge of the stellar disk is proportional to the acceleration predicted by Newtonian physics, and second, this acceleration is a constant that is related to Milgrom’s constant. The two primary relations can be manipulated algebraically to generate the four observed correlations and allow little room for dark matter inside the radius of the stellar disk. The primary relations do not explain the velocity of the outer gaseous disks of spiral galaxies, which do not trace the Newtonian gravitational field of the observed matter.

  9. Stokes radius determination of radioiodinated polypeptide hormones by gel filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Ribela, M.T.; Bartolini, P.

    1988-11-01

    A simple technique for determination of the molecular (Stokes) radius of radioiodinated proteins was developed using the same column and chromatographic conditions employed in routine radioimmunoassay tracer purification. The calibration curve for five radioiodinated standard proteins presented a highly significant correlation (r = -0.996; P less than 0.001) and allowed precise molecular radius determination for labeled human growth hormone (hGH), luteotropin (hLH), follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH), thyrotropin (hTSH), prolactin (hPRL), and corticotropin (hACTH), enabling detection of differences of the order of +/- 3%. The validity of the method was verified by determining the molecular radius of hGH in both ''cold'' (unlabeled standards and unknowns) and ''hot'' (radioiodinated standards and unknowns) systems. The technique can be applied in a very simple manner, requiring just one simple additional calibration run before Sephadex G-100 tracer purification. Furthermore, it can be applied to any protein, even when only extremely limited amounts are available. Since the standards and unknowns are labeled and chromatographed under identical conditions, potential common alterations of the molecule due to oxidation, iodine incorporation, tracer-carrier interactions, etc., are automatically corrected for.

  10. Neutron charge radius and the neutron electric form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, T. R.; Crawford, C. B.

    2011-05-15

    For nearly forty years, the Galster parametrization has been employed to fit existing data for the neutron electric form factor, G{sub E}{sup n}, vs the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}. Typically this parametrization is constrained to be consistent with experimental data for the neutron charge radius. However, we find that the Galster form does not have sufficient freedom to accommodate reasonable values of the radius without constraining or compromising the fit. In addition, the G{sub E}{sup n} data are now at sufficient precision to motivate a two-parameter fit (or three parameters if we include thermal neutron data). Here we present a modified form of a two-dipole parametrization that allows this freedom and fits both G{sub E}{sup n} (including recent data at both low and high four-momentum transfer) and the charge radius well with simple, well-defined parameters. Analysis reveals that the Galster form is essentially a two-parameter approximation to the two-dipole form but becomes degenerate if we try to extend it naturally to three parameters.

  11. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  12. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints Using Evolutionary Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. L.; Fiege, J. D.; Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT, NICER, or a mission similar to LOFT. In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ˜1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.

  13. Habitability of Exomoons at the Hill or Tidal Locking Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2013-09-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets μ Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on a moon at its furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar contributions, we find that moons around planets that are totally within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. This means that a planet does not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be habitable. Because the applied systems comprise giant planets around bright stars, we believe that the transit detection method is most likely to yield an exomoon discovery.

  14. Radiographic Outcomes of Volar Locked Plating for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Megan E.; Byram, Ian R.; Wolfe, Carmen C.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koehler, Elizabeth A.; Block, John J.; Jordanov, Martin I.; Watson, Jeffry T.; Weikert, Douglas R.; Lee, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of volar locked plating to achieve and maintain normal radiographic parameters for articular stepoff, volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, and radial height in distal radius fractures. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 185 distal radius fractures that underwent volar locked plating with a single plate design over a 5-year period. We reviewed radiographs and recorded measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, radial height, and articular stepoff. We used logistic regression to determine the association between return to radiographic standard norms and fracture type. Results At the first and final postoperative follow-up visits, we observed articular congruence less than 2 mm in 92% of fractures at both times. Normal volar tilt (11°) was restored in 46% at the first follow-up and 48% at the final one. Radial inclination (22°) was achieved in 44% at the first follow-up and 43% at the final one, and ulnar variance (01 ± 2 mm) was achieved in 53% at the first follow-up and 53% at the final one. In addition, radial height (14 ± 1mm) was restored in 14% at the first follow-up and 12% at the final one. More complex, intra-articular fractures (AO class B and C and Frykman types 3, 4, 7, and 8) were less likely to be restored to normal radiographic parameters. However, because of the small sample size for some fracture types, it was difficult to discover significant associations between fracture type and radiographic outcome. Conclusions Volar locked plating for distal radius fractures achieved articular stepoff less than 2 mm in most fractures but only restored and maintained normal radiographic measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, and ulnar variance in 50% of fractures. The ability of volar locked plating to restore and maintain ulnar variance and volar tilt decreased with more complex intra-articular fracture types. PMID:23218558

  15. Measurement of Capillary Radius and Contact Angle within Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Saitej; Dharmarajan, Ramanathan; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The pore radius (i.e., capillary radius) and contact angle determine the capillary pressure generated in a porous medium. The most common method to determine these two parameters is through measurement of the capillary pressure generated by a reference liquid (i.e., a liquid with near-zero contact angle) and a test liquid. The rate of rise technique, commonly used to determine the capillary pressure, results in significant uncertainties. In this study, we utilize a recently developed technique for independently measuring the capillary pressure and permeability to determine the equivalent minimum capillary radii and contact angle of water within micropillar wick structures. In this method, the experimentally measured dryout threshold of a wick structure at different wicking lengths is fit to Darcy's law to extract the maximum capillary pressure generated by the test liquid. The equivalent minimum capillary radii of different wick geometries are determined by measuring the maximum capillary pressures generated using n-hexane as the working fluid. It is found that the equivalent minimum capillary radius is dependent on the diameter of pillars and the spacing between pillars. The equivalent capillary radii of micropillar wicks determined using the new method are found to be up to 7 times greater than the current geometry-based first-order estimates. The contact angle subtended by water at the walls of the micropillars is determined by measuring the capillary pressure generated by water within the arrays and the measured capillary radii for the different geometries. This mean contact angle of water is determined to be 54.7°.

  16. HABITABILITY OF EXOMOONS AT THE HILL OR TIDAL LOCKING RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2013-09-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets {mu} Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on a moon at its furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar contributions, we find that moons around planets that are totally within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. This means that a planet does not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be habitable. Because the applied systems comprise giant planets around bright stars, we believe that the transit detection method is most likely to yield an exomoon discovery.

  17. Fractal analysis of bone architecture at distal radius.

    PubMed

    Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Mimura, Hiroaki; Murase, Kenya; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2005-12-20

    Bone strength depends on bone quality (architecture, turnover, damage accumulation, and mineralization) as well as bone mass. In this study, human bone architecture was analyzed using fractal image analysis, and the clinical relevance of this method was evaluated. The subjects were 12 healthy female controls and 16 female patients suspected of having osteoporosis (age range, 22-70 years; mean age, 49.1 years). High-resolution CT images of the distal radius were acquired and analyzed using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) system. On the same day, bone mineral densities of the lumbar spine (L-BMD), proximal femur (F-BMD), and distal radius (R-BMD) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We examined the correlation between the fractal dimension and six bone mass indices. Subjects diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis were divided into two groups (with and without vertebral fracture), and we compared measured values between these two groups. The fractal dimension correlated most closely with L-BMD (r=0.744). The coefficient of correlation between the fractal dimension and L-BMD was very similar to the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and F-BMD (r=0.783) and the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and R-BMD (r=0.742). The fractal dimension was the only measured value that differed significantly between both the osteopenic and the osteoporotic subjects with and without vertebral fracture. The present results suggest that the fractal dimension of the distal radius can be reliably used as a bone strength index that reflects bone architecture as well as bone mass.

  18. Method and apparatus for logging short radius horizontal drainholes

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.E.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes an apparatus for use in logging a short radius horizontal drainhole. It comprises: a tubing string having a low portion; the lower portion of the tubing string including sensor support means therein; the lower portion of the tubing string containing openings communicating with the interior thereof in the vicinity of the sensor support means to thereby exposed the interior to the pressure and temperature conditions of the horizontal drainhole; and the lower portion of the tubing string including an end portion extending transversely of the tubing sting.

  19. Primary Combined Replacements for Treatment of Distal Radius Physeal Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 59-year-old female patient with a posttraumatic growth arrest of the distal radius, leading to radioscaphoid osteoarthritis, carpal instability, and a symptomatic ulnocarpal impaction syndrome that was successfully treated with combined total wrist arthroplasty and ulnar head implant. One year postoperatively, there was no change in position without any signs of loosening of both implants. Both subjectively and functionally, all clinical parameters—Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), visual analog scale (VAS), grip strength—had improved. Level of Evidence: IV PMID:25097815

  20. Radius of gyration and intrinsic viscosity of polyelectrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Milas, M.; Borsali, R.; Rinaudo, M.

    1993-12-31

    Relatively low molecular weights polyelectrolytes (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6}) behave as worm-like chain when electrostatic repulsions are assumed to govern the excluded volume parameter. Under such conditions, predictions of chain expansion and effect of polyelectrolyte concentrations are made assuming that unperturbed dimensions could be obtained at infinite salt content. Experimental studies of an ionic polysaccharide, namely the Na-hyaluronate, were done and the values obtained for the radius of gyration as well as the intrinsic viscosity at different charge densities are in good agreement with the predictions.

  1. Stabilisation of distal radius fractures: Lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Horst, Taylor A; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of the diagnosis and management of distal radius fractures has been a long developed over centuries. There has been a shift in treatment of these very common injuries from closed reduction and casting to internal fixation. The answer to the best method of treatment has yet to be found. Today, we have a multitude of treatment options available with varying degrees of evidence to support their use. This review helps to illustrate the lessons we have learned and future directions for treatment.

  2. Trajectory Calculator for Finite-Radius Cutter on a Lathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    A computer program calculates the two-dimensional trajectory (radial vs. axial position) of a finite-radius-of-curvature cutting tool on a lathe so as to cut a workpiece to a piecewise-continuous, analytically defined surface of revolution. (In the original intended application, the tool is a diamond cutter, and the workpiece is made of a crystalline material and is to be formed into an optical resonator disk.) The program also calculates an optimum cutting speed as F/L, where F is a material-dependent empirical factor and L is the effective instantaneous length of the cutting edge.

  3. GEM Detectors of Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xinzhan; PRad Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was designed to measure the proton charge radius with high precision, through the elastic electron proton scattering process, using a non-magnetic-spectrometer method. PRad experiment reached very small ep scattering angles and thus it can see an unprecedented small four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 from 2 ×10-4 to 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 . This experiment measures the proton charge radius by extracting the electric form factor of proton with a sub-percent precision. A pair of world's largest GEM detectors, and a high resolution calorimeter(HyCal) were utilized in the experiment. In this talk, we will present the performance of GEM detectors achieved in the experiment, such as efficiency and other characteristics, and preliminary analysis results of the experimental data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, University of Virginia under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41240 and Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory.

  4. The New Proton Radius Experiment (PRad) at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparian, Ashot; PRad collaboration at JLab Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The proton charge radius (Rp) is one of the most fundamental quantities in physics. Precise knowledge of its value is critically important for both nuclear and atomic physics - especially for the spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Recent high precision measurements of Rp using the muonic hydrogen atom demonstrated up to eight standard deviations smaller value than the accepted average from all previous experiments performed with different methods. This fact triggered the well known ``proton charge radius puzzle'' in hadronic physics. The PRad collaboration at Jefferson Lab for the last four years developed a novel magnetic-spectrometer-free electron-proton scattering experiment to address this puzzle. The PRad experiment successfully performed in May and June of this year at Jefferson Lab collecting a large statistical and high quality experimental data set. The specifics of the method, the experimental characteristics of the setup together with the first preliminary results from the current data analysis process will be presented in this talk. This project is supported in part by the US NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, and US DOE awards: DE-FG02-03ER41240, DE-FG0203ER41231.

  5. The New Proton Radius Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparian, Ashot H.

    The proton charge radius (rp) is one of the most fundamental quantities in physics. Precise knowledge of its value is critically important for both nuclear and atomic physics-especially for the spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Recent high precision measurements of (rp) using the muonic hydrogen atom demonstrated up to eight standard deviations smaller value than the accepted average from all previous experiments performed with different methods. This fact triggered the well-known "proton charge radius puzzle" in hadronic physics. The PRad collaboration at Jefferson Lab for the last five years developed a novel magnetic-spectrometer-free e-p scattering experiment to address this "puzzle". The PRad experiment was successfully performed in May and June of 2016 at Jefferson Lab in which a large statistical and high quality experimental data set was collected. The specifics of the method, the experimental characteristics of the setup together with the first preliminary results from the current initial data analysis process are presented in this talk.

  6. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.; Hecht, H.; Lyne, L. E.; Sienko, K. H.; Cheung, C. C.; Kavelaars, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects of pitch and yaw head movements in participants placed supine on a rotating bed with their head at the center of rotation, feet at the rim. The vast majority of participants experienced motion sickness, inappropriate vertical nystagmus and illusory tilt and roll as predicted by a semicircular canal model. However, a small but significant number of the 28 participants experienced tilt in the predicted plane but in the opposite direction. Heart rate was elevated following one-second duration head turns. Significant adaptation occurred following a series of head turns in the light. Vertical nystagmus, motion sickness and illusory tilt all decreased with adaptation. Consequences for artificial gravity produced by short-radius centrifuges as a countermeasure are discussed. Grant numbers: NCC 9-58. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Corrective osteotomies of the radius: Grafting or not?

    PubMed Central

    Mugnai, Raffaele; Tarallo, Luigi; Lancellotti, Enrico; Zambianchi, Francesco; Di Giovine, Ettore; Catani, Fabio; Adani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the current literature regarding corrective osteotomies to provide the best evidence of the rule of bone grafting. METHODS: Our MEDLINE literature search included 280 studies using the following key words “Malunited distal radius fracture” and 150 studies using key words “Corrective osteotomy of the distal radius”. Inclusion criteria were: Malunited distal radial, extra articular fracture, volar locking plate, use of iliac bone graft (cancellous or corticocancellous), non-use of bone graft. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Seven of the 12 studies considered, described the use of a graft; the remaining five studies didn’t use any graft. Type of malunion was dorsal in most of the studies. The healing time was comparable using the graft or not (mean 12.5 wk), ranging from 7.5 to 16 wk. The mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand score improvement was 23 points both in the studies that used the graft and in those not using the graft. CONCLUSION: This review demonstrated that corrective osteotomy of extra-articular malunited fractures of the distal radius treated by volar locking plate does not necessarily require bone graft. PMID:26925385

  8. Automated bone age assessment of older children using the radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Zhang, Aifeng; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, Han K.

    2008-03-01

    The Digital Hand Atlas in Assessment of Skeletal Development is a large-scale Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) project for automating the process of grading Skeletal Development of children from 0-18 years of age. It includes a complete collection of 1,400 normal hand X-rays of children between the ages of 0-18 years of age. Bone Age Assessment is used as an index of skeletal development for detection of growth pathologies that can be related to endocrine, malnutrition and other disease types. Previous work at the Image Processing and Informatics Lab (IPILab) allowed the bone age CAD algorithm to accurately assess bone age of children from 1 to 16 (male) or 14 (female) years of age using the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones. At the older ages (16(male) or 14(female) -19 years of age) the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones are fully developed and do not provide well-defined features for accurate bone age assessment. Therefore integration of the Radius Bone as a region of interest (ROI) is greatly needed and will significantly improve the ability to accurately assess the bone age of older children. Preliminary studies show that an integrated Bone Age CAD that utilizes the Phalanges, Carpal Bones and Radius forms a robust method for automatic bone age assessment throughout the entire age range (1-19 years of age).

  9. Pion loop contribution to the electromagnetic pion charge radius

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Bender, A.; Alkofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    There is a widely held misconception, based on a misrepresentation of the application of chiral perturbation theory, that the electromagnetic structure of the pion is dominated by the pion`s own pion-cloud. To clarify this the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the electromagnetic charge radius of the pion. In this calculation the contributions from the quark core and pion loop were identified and compared. It was shown explicitly that the divergence of the charge radius in the chiral limit is due solely to the pion loop and that, at the physical value of the pion mass, this loop contributes less than 15% {l_angle}r{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle}; i.e. the quark core is the dominant determining characteristic for the pion. This suggests that quark-based models that fail to reproduce the m{sub {pi}} divergence of {l_angle}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle} nevertheless incorporate the dominant characteristic of the pion: its quark core. The result`s studylend further support to the contention that, away from resonances, the dominant determining characteristic of kinematic and dynamical properties of hadrons is their quark core. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication.

  10. Radius of Curvature Measurements: An Independent Look at Accuracy Using Novel Optical Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bryon; Kahan, Mark; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program mirror specifications include the ability to manufacture the mirror to a radius of curvature of 10 m +/- 1 mm and to control its radius at 30K to the same specification. Therefore, it is necessary for the Government Team to be able to measure mirror radius of curvature to an accuracy of better than 0.5 mm. This presentation discusses a novel optical metrology system for measuring radius of curvature.

  11. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Akito; Yajima, Hiroshi; Kisanuki, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the carpal lunate after a fracture of the distal radius has, to our knowledge, not been reported previously. We treated the patient with vascularised bone graft from the distal radius, with a satisfactory result.

  12. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  13. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  14. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  15. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  16. Radius and limb darkening of Titan from speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisenson, P.; Apt, J.; Horowitz, P.; Goody, R.

    1981-11-01

    The radius R of Titan is determined from ground-based, visible light observations using a two-dimensional speckle imaging technique. The value of R is found to depend on the limb-darkening exponent alpha, which is used in modeling the observed disk, and it is determined that the probable range extends from R values of 2680 + or - 100 km for alpha of 0.6 to 2900 + or - 100 km for alpha of 1.3. This range is in agreement with Voyager 1 and Pioneer Saturn observations. It is suggested that spatial resolution may be doubled by using a grid of 256 x 256 pixels at the time the image is digitized, and that further improvements are possible with speckle-reduction techniques under development.

  17. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Rajan, Sunil; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones) along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a "signature pattern injury" caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile.

  18. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Rajan, Sunil; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones) along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a “signature pattern injury” caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile. PMID:27053813

  19. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siria, Alessandro; Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-11-01

    Nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. Recent reports indicate that carbon nanotubes exhibit exceptional water transport properties due to nearly frictionless interfaces and this has stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for desalination, nano-filtration, and energy harvesting. However, the fundamental mechanisms of water transport inside nanotubes and at water-carbon interfaces remain controversial, as existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited experimental results. We report a study of water jets emerging from single nanotubes made of carbon and boron-nitride materials. Our experiments reveal extensive and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT). In stark contrast, boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT), which are crystallographically similar to CNTs but electronically different, exhibit no slippage. This shows that slippage originates in subtle atomic-scale details of the solid-liquid interface. ERC StG - NanoSOFT.

  20. EFFECTIVE INNER RADIUS OF TILTED BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Fragile, P. Chris

    2009-12-01

    One of the primary means of determining the spin a of an astrophysical black hole is by actually measuring the inner radius r {sub in} of a surrounding accretion disk and using that to infer a. By comparing a number of different estimates of r {sub in} from simulations of tilted accretion disks with differing black hole spins, we show that such a procedure can give quite wrong answers. Over the range 0 <= a/M <= 0.9, we find that, for moderately thick disks (H/r approx 0.2) with modest tilt (15 deg.), r {sub in} is nearly independent of spin. This result is likely dependent on tilt, such that for larger tilts, it may even be that r {sub in} would increase with increasing spin. In the opposite limit, we confirm through numerical simulations of untilted disks that, in the limit of zero tilt, r {sub in} recovers approximately the expected dependence on a.

  1. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  2. Biomechanics and biology of plate fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Alan E; Luber, Kurre T

    2005-08-01

    The fracture management principles of anatomic or near anatomic reduction, fracture stabilization, minimal operative trauma, and early joint motion are paramount in man-aging unstable distal radial fractures. The operative approach and plate selection should correlate with the fracture configuration. Plates have the advantages of providing secure fixation throughout the entire healing process without protruding wires or pins and allowing early and intensive forearm, wrist, and digital exercises. Disadvantages include additional operative trauma, including fragment devascularization; some additional risk of wrist stiffness; occasional tendon rupture; and at times, the need for plate removal. New developments in plate and screw design and operative strategies, fragment specific fixation, and plate strength have improved results with plate fixation. Fixed angle blades and locking screws and pegs enhance overall plate stability, support the articular surface of the distal radius, and are effective in fractures occurring in osteopenic bone.

  3. Titanium elastic nailing radius and ulna fractures in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley; O'Donnell, June C; Schoenecker, Perry L; Keeler, Kathryn A; Dobbs, Matthew B; Luhmann, Scott J; Gordon, J Eric

    2012-09-01

    Over the last 40 years, anatomic reduction with plate stabilization has become the standard in adult patients with diaphyseal fractures of the radius and ulna. When operative fixation has been indicated in skeletally immature patients with these fractures, a variety of techniques have been reported, with intramedullary fixation becoming increasingly accepted. There is currently significant variability in the treatment of adolescents with forearm fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and radiographic outcomes in the adolescent population after intramedullary fixation of both bone forearm fractures. A retrospective review identified 32 patients 12-18 years of age who had undergone intramedullary fixation of both forearm bones in the past 20 years at our institution. Galeazzi, Monteggia, radial head, and distal metaphyseal fractures were excluded. Radiographic evaluation was performed to determine union and postoperative radial bow. Clinical follow-up was carried out for postoperative complications and range of motion of the wrist, forearm, and elbow. The mean age of the patients was 14.1 years. A total of 19 fractures were closed injuries, nine were grade 1, three were grade 2, and one fracture was a grade 3b. Of the patients, 15.6% had limited postoperative range of motion. All patients in the older age group, 15-18 years of age, had a normal range of motion. A decrease in radial bow was not associated with limitation in motion. There was a 98% union rate, and all unions occurred by 7.5 months. Only three major complications occurred, two refractures and one ulnar hardware migration, and subsequent radius nonunion occurred in the one grade 3b injury. Flexible intramedullary nailing of both bone forearm fractures provides reliable bony union and excellent postoperative clinical results in adolescents. Level of evidence, IV.

  4. Maximum wind radius estimated by the 50 kt radius: improvement of storm surge forecasting over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    Even though the maximum wind radius (Rmax) is an important parameter in determining the intensity and size of tropical cyclones, it has been overlooked in previous storm surge studies. This study reviews the existing estimation methods for Rmax based on central pressure or maximum wind speed. These over- or underestimate Rmax because of substantial variations in the data, although an average radius can be estimated with moderate accuracy. As an alternative, we propose an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 kt wind (R50). Data obtained by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago during the passage of strong typhoons, together with the JMA typhoon best track data for 1990-2013, enabled us to derive the following simple equation, Rmax = 0.23 R50. Application to a recent strong typhoon, the 2015 Typhoon Goni, confirms that the equation provides a good estimation of Rmax, particularly when the central pressure became considerably low. Although this new method substantially improves the estimation of Rmax compared to the existing models, estimation errors are unavoidable because of fundamental uncertainties regarding the typhoon's structure or insufficient number of available typhoon data. In fact, a numerical simulation for the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan as well as 2015 Typhoon Goni demonstrates a substantial difference in the storm surge height for different Rmax. Therefore, the variability of Rmax should be taken into account in storm surge simulations (e.g., Rmax = 0.15 R50-0.35 R50), independently of the model used, to minimize the risk of over- or underestimating storm surges. The proposed method is expected to increase the predictability of major storm surges and to contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the western North Pacific, including countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

  5. Measurement of ulnar variance and radial inclination on X-rays of healed distal radius fractures. With the axis of the distal radius or ulna?

    PubMed

    Thuysbaert, Gilles; Ringburg, Akkie; Petronilia, Steven; Vanden Berghe, Alex; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    Ulnar variance and radial inclination are radiological parameters frequently used to evaluate displacement of distal radius fractures. In most studies measurements are based on the long central axis of the distal radius, although the axis of the distal ulna can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine which axis is more reliable. Four observers performed measurements on standard anteroposterior digital wrist X-rays of 20 patients taken 1 and 2 months after sustaining an extra-articular distal radius fracture. Intraobserver reliability was similar with both methods. No difference was found in interobserver reliability between both methods for ulnar variance, but for radial inclination it was better with the axis through the radius. Measurements on two X-rays of the same wrist taken at a different moment were similar with both methods. It can be concluded that the central axis of the distal radius can remain the basis to determine ulnar variance and radial inclination.

  6. Radius of lunar core estimated by GRAIL results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, F.; Iwata, T.; Hanada, H.; Ishihara, Y.; Kamata, S.; Sasaki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Internal structure and composition of the Moon provide important clue and constraints on theories for how the Moon formed and evolved. The Apollo seismic network has contributed to the internal structure modeling. Efforts have been made to detect the lunar core from the noisy Apollo data (e.g., [1], [2]), but there is scant information about the structure below the deepest moonquakes at about 1000 km depth. On the other hand, there have been geodetic studies to infer the deep structure of the Moon. For example, LLR (Lunar Laser Ranging) data analyses detected a displacement of the lunar pole of rotation, indicating that dissipation is acting on the rotation arising from a fluid core [3]. Bayesian inversion using geodetic data (such as mass, moments of inertia, tidal Love numbers k2 and h2, and quality factor Q) also suggests a fluid core and partial melt in the lower mantle region [4]. Recent analyses of GRAIL data have achieved the improved k2 accuracy; JPL solution is 0.02405 × 0.00018 [5], and GSFC solution is 0.02427 × 0.00026 [6]. The two solutions are consistent with each other within their error bounds, and the accuracy of k2 is now about 1 %. Such an accurately-determined Love number will contribute to constrain the structure of the lunar deep interior, such as the radius of the possible liquid core. We used geodetic data of the mass, the mean moment of inertia, the Love numbers h2 and k2 to infer the size of liquid core. It is difficult to tightly constrain the internal structure from the geodetic data only because there are trade-offs among the structures of crust, mantle, and core. In our preliminary analysis we used a 5-layer model and the mantle structure was constrained by VPREMOON [2] with 5 % error for density and 10 % error for shear and bulk moduli being assumed. An inversion using Markov chain Monte Carlo method indicates that the core radius is 480 × 50 km, but the density values were sampled around the assumed lower limit of 3600 kg/m3. When

  7. What Is the Largest Einstein Radius in the Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Blandford, Roger D.

    2008-08-05

    The Einstein radius plays a central role in lens studies as it characterizes the strength of gravitational lensing. In particular, the distribution of Einstein radii near the upper cutoff should probe the probability distribution of the largest mass concentrations in the universe. Adopting a triaxial halo model, we compute expected distributions of large Einstein radii. To assess the cosmic variance, we generate a number of Monte-Carlo realizations of all-sky catalogues of massive clusters. We find that the expected largest Einstein radius in the universe is sensitive to parameters characterizing the cosmological model, especially {sigma}{sub s}: for a source redshift of unity, they are 42{sub -7}{sup +9}, 35{sub -6}{sup +8}, and 54{sub -7}{sup +12} arcseconds (errors denote 1{sigma} cosmic variance), assuming best-fit cosmological parameters of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year (WMAP5), three-year (WMAP3) and one-year (WMAP1) data, respectively. These values are broadly consistent with current observations given their incompleteness. The mass of the largest lens cluster can be as small as {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}. For the same source redshift, we expect in all-sky {approx} 35 (WMAP5), {approx} 15 (WMAP3), and {approx} 150 (WMAP1) clusters that have Einstein radii larger than 2000. For a larger source redshift of 7, the largest Einstein radii grow approximately twice as large. While the values of the largest Einstein radii are almost unaffected by the level of the primordial non-Gaussianity currently of interest, the measurement of the abundance of moderately large lens clusters should probe non-Gaussianity competitively with cosmic microwave background experiments, but only if other cosmological parameters are well-measured. These semi-analytic predictions are based on a rather simple representation of clusters, and hence calibrating them with N-body simulations will help to improve the accuracy. We also find that these 'superlens

  8. The Relation Between Radius, Mass, and Incident Flux of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, G. W.; Rowe, J.; Isaacson, H. T.; Howard, A.; Fortney, J. J.; Miller, N.; Demory, B.; Fischer, D.; Adams, E. A.; Dupree, A. K.; Howell, S. B.; Horch, E.; Everett, M. E.; Seager, S.; Fabrycky, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    We measure the mass of a modestly irradiated giant or "warm Jupiter," KOI-94d, in order to calculate its density. We wish to determine whether this planet, which is in a 22 day orbit and receives 107 times as much incident flux as the Earth, is bloated like "hot Jupiters" or as dense as our own Jupiter. In addition to its warm Jupiter, KOI-94 hosts at least 3 smaller planets, all of which were detected through transits by the Kepler Mission. This presents the opportunity to characterize a multi-planet system and to test dynamic stability and formation theory through observations of the masses and orbital elements of these planets. With 26 radial velocity measurements of KOI-94 from the W. M. Keck Observatory/HIRES, we measure the mass of the giant planet and upper limits to the masses of the three smaller planets. Transit timing variations will allow us to hone the mass measurements of the three smaller planets. Using the KOI-94 system and all other planets with published values for both mass and radius, we establish two fundamental planes for exoplanets that relate their mass, incident flux, and radius from a few Earth masses up to ten Jupiter masses: log(Rp/RE) = 0.007 + 0.53 log(M/ME) - 0.001 log(F/[erg/s/cm^2]) for Mp < 150ME; log(Rp/RE) = 0.67 - 0.036 log(M/ME) + 0.06 log(F/[erg/s/cm^2]) for Mp > 150ME. We also solve these planes in density-mass-flux space: log(ρp/[g/cm^3]) = 0.69 - 0.57 log(M/ME) + 0.02 log(F/[erg/s/cm^2]) for Mp < 150ME; log(ρp/[g/cm^3]) = -1.23 + 1.10 log(M/ME) - 0.18 log(F/[erg/s/cm^2]) for Mp > 150ME.

  9. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-01-01

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a₀ to 3:3a₀ have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a₀ by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  10. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    DOE PAGES

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-01-01

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a₀ to 3:3a₀ have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomicmore » level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a₀ by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.« less

  11. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-26

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in irradiated materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1.0a0 to 3.3a0 have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a0 by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  12. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome: a clinical genetic study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, K; Howell, R; Bottani, A; Ancliff, P; Brunner, H; Verschuuren-Bemel..., C; Vernon, E; Brown, K; Newbury-Ecob, R

    2002-01-01

    The thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterised by bilateral absence of the radii and a thrombocytopenia. The lower limbs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and other systems may also be involved. Shaw and Oliver in 1959 were the first to describe this condition, but it was Hall et al in 1969 who reported the first major series of patients. Since then most reports have been based on single or small numbers of cases. We report the results of a clinical study looking at the phenotype of 34 patients with TAR syndrome. All cases had a documented thrombocytopenia and bilateral radial aplasia, 47% had lower limb anomalies, 47% cow's milk intolerance, 23% renal anomalies, and 15% cardiac anomalies. Congenital anomalies not previously described in association with TAR syndrome included facial capillary haemangiomata, intracranial vascular malformation, sensorineural hearing loss, and scoliosis. Karyotype analysis, chromosome breakage studies including premature centromeric separation and fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies looking for a deletion of chromosome 22q11 were undertaken. Two abnormal karyotypes were identified. PMID:12471199

  13. Mass and Radius Constraints Using Magnetar Giant Flare Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Alex T.; Steiner, A. W.; Brown, E. F.

    2013-04-01

    We extend the study of oscillating neutron stars to include observed magnetic field strengths. The strong magnetic field will alter the equilibrium composition of the outer neutron star crust. We construct a new neutron star crust model which predicts nuclear masses with an accuracy very close to that of the Finite Range Droplet Model. The mass model for equilibrium nuclei also includes recent developments in the nuclear physics, in particular, shell corrections and an updated neutron-drip line. We perturb our crust model to predict axial crust modes and assign them to observed giant flare quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies from SGR 1806-20. The QPOs associated with the fundamental and harmonic crust modes can be used to constrain magnetar masses and radii. We use these modes and the phenomenological equations of state from Steiner et al. to find a magnetar crust which reproduces observations of SGR 1806-20. We find magnetar crusts which match observations for various magnetic field strengths and values of entrainment of the free neutron gas in the inner crust. For a crust without a magnetic field we obtain the approximate values of M = 1.35 Msun and R = 11.85 km. For a magnetized crust with the surface dipole field of SGR 1806-20 we obtain the approximate values of M = 1.25 Msun and R = 12.41 km. If there is less entrainment of the free neutron gas the magnetar requires a larger mass and radius to reproduce observations.

  14. Pediatric distal radius fractures and triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2006-02-01

    Management of distal radius fractures is guided by the pattern and location of injury, degree of deformity, and expectations of bony remodeling based on the amount of remaining skeletal growth.Indications for surgical treatment include unstable or irreducible fractures, open fractures, floating elbow injuries, and neurovascular or soft-tissue compromise precluding cast immobilization. Patients and families should be counseled regarding the potential for post-traumatic distal radial growth arrest following physeal fractures. In these cases, epiphysiodeses, ulnar shortening osteotomies, or corrective radial osteotomies may be performed, depending on the pattern of arrest,degree of deformity, and remaining skeletal growth.TFCC tears may be the source of ulnar-sided wrist pain in children and adolescents, though symptoms and physical examination findings maybe subtle. Patients who have persistent pain and functional limitations despite activity modification and therapy are candidates for surgical treatment. Appropriate repair of peripheral TFCC tears with correction of concomitant wrist pathology restores normal wrist anatomy, alleviates pain, and allows for return to functional activities.

  15. Biomechanical analysis of distal radius fractures using intramedullary Kirschner wires.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chi; Lin, Shang-Chih; Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chao, Ching-Kong; Liu, Hwa-Chang

    2009-03-01

    Colles's fracture is the most common type of distal radius fracture. Surgically, it remains a challenge to restore radial height and volar tilt in order to regain optimal wrist function. Ulson's procedure provides a dynamic effect on fixing fractured fragments and restoring joint function using two wires. However, the biomechanical influences of bone and wire remain critical issues for fracture reduction and bone union in Ulson's procedure. Based on elastic beam and foundation theory, this study formulated a closed-form mathematical model to investigate the effects of bone and wire parameters on wire deflection and bony reaction. The wire deflection and bony reaction were chosen as the indices of wrist stability and reduction within the post-operative period. The predicted results showed that greater bone strength, higher wire stiffness, and longer wire contact length provide a more stable wire-bone construct, thus facilitating fracture reduction and bone union. The wire stiffness had a much more significant effect on the construct stability compared with bone quality and contact length. In terms of entry point and insertion angle, surgical planning for the contact length was more important than bony quality for stabilizing the whole wire-bone construct.

  16. Mass-Radius Relation of Strongly Magnetized White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, P.; Bhattacharya, D.

    2017-03-01

    We study the strongly magnetized white dwarf configurations in a self-consistent manner as a progenitor of the over-luminous type-Ia supernovae. We compute static equilibria of white dwarf stars containing a strong magnetic field and present the modification of the white dwarf mass-radius relation caused by the magnetic field. From a static equilibrium study, we find that a maximum white dwarf mass of about 1.9 M⊙ may be supported if the interior poloidal field is as strong as approximately 1010 T. On the other hand if the field is purely toroidal the maximum mass can be more than 5 M⊙. All these modifications are mainly from the presence of the Lorenz force. The effects of i) modification of the equation of state due to Landau quantization, ii) electrostatic interaction due to ions, iii) general relativistic calculation on the stellar structure and, iv) field geometry are also considered. These strongly magnetised configurations are sensitive to magnetic instabilities where the perturbations grow at the corresponding Alfven time scales.

  17. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-01-01

    Simulations and measurements have established that water moves through carbon nanotubes with exceptionally high rates due to nearly frictionless interfaces1–4. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications that range from desalination to nano-filtration and energy harvesting5–10, yet the exact water transport mechanisms inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be controversially discussed11,12 because existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited number of experimental results available to date13. This is because even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes8,9,14–7, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube11. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate across individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT), and no slippage in boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT) that are crystallographically similar to CNTs but differ electronically. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, strikingly illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. PMID:27604947

  18. PHOTOSPHERIC RADIUS EXPANSION IN SUPERBURST PRECURSORS FROM NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.

    2012-09-10

    Thermonuclear runaway burning of carbon is in rare cases observed from accreting neutron stars as day-long X-ray flares called superbursts. In the few cases where the onset is observed, superbursts exhibit a short precursor burst at the start. In each instance, however, the data are of insufficient quality for spectral analysis of the precursor. Using data from the propane anti-coincidence detector of the Proportional Counter Array instrument on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, we perform the first detailed time-resolved spectroscopy of precursors. For a superburst from 4U 1820-30 we demonstrate the presence of photospheric radius expansion. We find the precursor to be 1.4-2 times more energetic than other short bursts from this source, indicating that the burning of accreted helium is insufficient to explain the full precursor. Shock heating would be able to account for the shortfall in energy. We argue that this precursor is a strong indication that the superburst starts as a detonation, and that a shock induces the precursor. Furthermore, we employ our technique to study the superexpansion phase of the same superburst in greater detail.

  19. System Estimates Radius of Curvature of a Segmented Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John

    2008-01-01

    A system that estimates the global radius of curvature (GRoC) of a segmented telescope mirror has been developed for use as one of the subsystems of a larger system that exerts precise control over the displacements of the mirror segments. This GRoC-estimating system, when integrated into the overall control system along with a mirror-segment- actuation subsystem and edge sensors (sensors that measure displacements at selected points on the edges of the segments), makes it possible to control the GROC mirror-deformation mode, to which mode contemporary edge sensors are insufficiently sensitive. This system thus makes it possible to control the GRoC of the mirror with sufficient precision to obtain the best possible image quality and/or to impose a required wavefront correction on incoming or outgoing light. In its mathematical aspect, the system utilizes all the information available from the edge-sensor subsystem in a unique manner that yields estimates of all the states of the segmented mirror. The system does this by exploiting a special set of mirror boundary conditions and mirror influence functions in such a way as to sense displacements in degrees of freedom that would otherwise be unobservable by means of an edge-sensor subsystem, all without need to augment the edge-sensor system with additional metrological hardware. Moreover, the accuracy of the estimates increases with the number of mirror segments.

  20. Closing capacity of segmental radius defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bodde, Esther W H; Spauwen, Paul H M; Mikos, Antonios G; Jansen, John A

    2008-04-01

    In the research of synthetic bone graft substitutes, the relevance for bone regeneration can be confirmed in a critical-sized model. In this study the rabbit radial defect was investigated as an ingenious model of critical size, due to its defect immobilizing intact ulna. In addition, the influence of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) on bone regeneration was determined. Sixteen, 4-month-old rabbits received bilateral segmental radial defects of 15 or 20 mm. The osteotomy ends were marked with small titanium pins. Half of the group received injected PLGA microparticle/carboxymethylcellulose implants. Implantation time was 12 weeks. Evaluation consisted of radiographs after surgery and sacrifice, microcomputed tomography and histology. The radiographs revealed that the created defects were significantly smaller after sacrifice. Further a number of radii showed fibrocartilaginous interposition. Both findings indicated instability of the created defect. All evaluation techniques revealed that 15 and 20 mm were not of critical size, as most defects were more or less regenerated. PLGA microparticles did not influence bone regeneration significantly. In conclusion, 15- and 20-mm radius defects in 4-month-old rabbits were not a suitable model for bone regeneration as these defects were neither critical size nor stable. PLGA-microparticle degradation did not influence bone regeneration.

  1. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  2. Photogrammetric analysis of the articular surface of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ege, A; Seker, D Z; Tuncay, I; Duran, Z

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional measurements made using photogrammetry have recently gained popularity with the development of real-time detection facilities and up-to-date equipment. The modelling of human bones presents a particular challenge as the measurements required are difficult to obtain, especially from uneven surfaces. In this study, the articular surfaces of 12 radius bones were evaluated using photogrammetry to obtain three-dimensional coordinates of certain points. Morphometric characteristics of the digital topography of the articular surface were analysed using three-dimensional data from more than 200 points for each specimen. The coronal plane curve, from the tip of the styloid process to the centre of the distal radioulnar articular notch, was found to be similar to the fourth degree polynomial function. A mathematical expression representing the sagittal curve passing through scapholunate border could not be found. Close-range photogrammetry is a safe and precise technique that can provide reliable, reproducible and accurate data for evaluating complex morphological surfaces.

  3. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR VERY LOW MASS GASEOUS PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Stevenson, David J.

    2013-05-20

    Recently, the Kepler spacecraft has detected a sizable aggregate of objects, characterized by giant-planet-like radii and modest levels of stellar irradiation. With the exception of a handful of objects, the physical nature, and specifically the average densities, of these bodies remain unknown. Here, we propose that the detected giant planet radii may partially belong to planets somewhat less massive than Uranus and Neptune. Accordingly, in this work, we seek to identify a physically sound upper limit to planetary radii at low masses and moderate equilibrium temperatures. As a guiding example, we analyze the interior structure of the Neptune-mass planet Kepler-30d and show that it is acutely deficient in heavy elements, especially compared with its solar system counterparts. Subsequently, we perform numerical simulations of planetary thermal evolution and in agreement with previous studies, show that generally, 10-20 M{sub Circled-Plus }, multi-billion year old planets, composed of high density cores and extended H/He envelopes can have radii that firmly reside in the giant planet range. We subject our results to stability criteria based on extreme ultraviolet radiation, as well as Roche-lobe overflow driven mass-loss and construct mass-radius relationships for the considered objects. We conclude by discussing observational avenues that may be used to confirm or repudiate the existence of putative low mass, gas-dominated planets.

  4. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-01

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  5. Complex radius shaft malunion: osteotomy with computer-assisted planning.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Andreas; Fürnstahl, Philipp; Harders, Matthias; Székely, Gábor; Nagy, Ladislav

    2010-06-01

    We report about two cases with a combined axial and angular malunion of the radius shaft with functional loss of pro-supination. For the preoperative planning, a computer simulation was developed that allows the quantification of the malunion by comparing the 3-d surface model of the impaired bone with the contralateral anatomy. The proximal parts of the left and right radii are superimposed, while the different positions of the distal parts are used to quantify the malunion. This task is performed fully automatically which reduces the overall planning time. The osteotomies were performed according to the results of the computer-aided planning. The first case showed 1 year postoperatively an increase of pronation from 40° to 70° at expense of supination from 95° to 90°. The patient was practically pain-free and reported functional improvement. The second case showed 6 months postoperatively an improvement of supination from 15° to 40° and of pronation from 50° to 60°. The computer-assisted operation planning facilitated the quantification of combined axial and angular malunions which were difficult to detect on plain radiographs.

  6. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-08

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  7. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Jonas J.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures.

  8. Mass-radius relation of strongly magnetized white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Prasanta; Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    We study the strongly magnetized white dwarf configurations in a self-consistent manner as a progenitor of the over-luminous type-Ia supernovae. We compute static equilibria of white dwarf stars containing a strong magnetic field and present the modification of white dwarf mass-radius relation caused by the magnetic field. From a static equilibrium study, we find that a maximum white dwarf mass of about 1.9 M_{⊙} may be supported if the interior poloidal field is as strong as approximately 10^{10} T. On the other hand, if the field is purely toroidal the maximum mass can be more than 5 M_⊙. All these modifications are mainly from the presence of Lorenz force. The effects of i) modification of equation of state due to Landau quantization ii) electrostatic interaction due to ions, ii) general relativistic calculation on the stellar structure and, iii) field geometry are also considered. These strongly magnetised configurations are sensitive to magnetic instabilities where the perturbations grow at the corresponding Alfven time scales.

  9. Mass-Radius Relation for Rocky Planets Based on PREM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-03-01

    Several small dense exoplanets are now known, inviting comparisons to Earth and Venus. Such comparisons require translating their masses and sizes to composition models of evolved multi-layer interior planets. Such theoretical models rely on our understanding of the Earth’s interior, as well as independently derived equations of state, but so far have not involved direct extrapolations from Earth’s seismic model: the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). To facilitate more detailed compositional comparisons between small exoplanets and the Earth, we derive here a semi-empirical mass-radius relation for two-layer rocky planets based on PREM, \\frac{R}{{R}\\oplus }=(1.07-0.21\\cdot {CMF})\\cdot {≤ft(\\frac{M}{{M}\\oplus }\\right)}1/3.7, where CMF stands for core mass fraction. It is applicable to 1 ˜ 8 M⊕ and a CMF of 0.0 ˜ 0.4. Applying this formula to Earth and Venus and several known small exoplanets with radii and masses measured to better than ˜30% precision gives a CMF fit of 0.26 ± 0.07.

  10. AO Distal Radius Fracture Classification: Global Perspective on Observer Agreement.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Teunis, Teun; Giménez, Beatriz Bravo; Verstreken, Frederik; Di Mascio, Livio; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2017-02-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to test interobserver reliability when classifying fractures by consensus by AO types and groups among a large international group of surgeons. Secondarily, we assessed the difference in inter- and intraobserver agreement of the AO classification in relation to geographical location, level of training, and subspecialty. Methods A randomized set of radiographic and computed tomographic images from a consecutive series of 96 distal radius fractures (DRFs), treated between October 2010 and April 2013, was classified using an electronic web-based portal by an invited group of participants on two occasions. Results Interobserver reliability was substantial when classifying AO type A fractures but fair and moderate for type B and C fractures, respectively. No difference was observed by location, except for an apparent difference between participants from India and Australia classifying type B fractures. No statistically significant associations were observed comparing interobserver agreement by level of training and no differences were shown comparing subspecialties. Intra-rater reproducibility was "substantial" for fracture types and "fair" for fracture groups with no difference accounting for location, training level, or specialty. Conclusion Improved definition of reliability and reproducibility of this classification may be achieved using large international groups of raters, empowering decision making on which system to utilize. Level of Evidence Level III.

  11. Collective Behavior of Interacting Particles: Radius-Dependent Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarras, I.; Moussa, N.; Mazroui, M.; Boughaleb, Y.; Hajjaji, A.

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to study and discuss the effect of three zones (repulsion zone, orientation zone and attraction zone) on the phase transition in 2D-collective moving particles. Our main motivation is to better understand the complex behavior of non-equilibrium multi-agent system by extending the earlier and original model proposed by Viscek et al. [T. Viscek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.75 (1995) 1226] for one zone. The analysis is performed over different situations by using a numerical simulation method. It is found that the radius R2 of orientation zone plays an important role in the system. In effect, by varying the parameter R2 a phase transition can be achieved from disordered moving of individuals to a group to highly aligned collective motion. The results also show that, the critical value of R2 at which the transition emerges depends strongly on the size of the repulsion zone but not on the size of attraction one.

  12. The mass-radius relationship of massive compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Partha Roy

    2015-02-24

    The properties of pure hadronic and hybrid compact stars are reviewed using nuclear equation of state (EoS) for β-equilibrated neutron star (NS) matter obtained using a density-dependent M3Y (DDM3Y) effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. Depending on the model, the energy density of quark matter can be lower than that of this nuclear EoS at higher densities, implying the possibility of transition to quark matter inside the core and the transition density depends on the particular quark matter model used. The recent observations of the binary millisecond pulsar J1614–2230 by P.B. Demorest et al. [1] and PSR J0348+0432 by J. Antoniadis et al. [2] suggest that the masses lie within 1.97 ± 0.04 M{sub ⊙} and 2.01 ± 0.04 M{sub ⊙}, respectively, where M{sub ⊙} is the solar mass. In conformity with recent observations, a pure nucleonic EoS determines that the maximum mass of NS rotating with frequency ν∼ 667 Hz below r-mode instability is ∼ 1.95 M{sub ⊙} with radius ∼ 10 km. Compact stars with quark cores rotating with same frequency have the maximum mass of ∼ 1.72 M{sub ⊙} turns out to be lower than the observed masses.

  13. Volar morphology of the distal radius in axial planes: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Oura, Keiichiro; Oka, Kunihiro; Kawanishi, Yohei; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Murase, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the cause of rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) after volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures, previous studies have examined the shape of the distal radius in the sagittal plane or in the lateral view. However, there are no reports on the anatomical shape of the volar surface concavity of the distal radius in the axial plane. We hypothesized that this concavity might contribute to the mismatch between the plate and the surface of the radius. To test this hypothesis, we constructed three-dimensional models of the radius and FPL based on computed tomography scans of 70 normal forearms. We analyzed axial cross-sectional views with 2 mm intervals. In all cases, the volar surface of the distal radius was concave in the axial plane. The concavity depth was maximum at 6 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa and progressively decreased toward the proximal radius. FPL was closest to the radius at 2 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa. The volar surface of the distal radius was externally rotated from proximal to distal. These results may help to develop new implants which fit better to the radius and decrease tendon irritation.

  14. A biomechanical approach to distal radius fractures for the emergency radiologist.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M; Sheehan, Scott E; Dyer, George S; Sodickson, Aaron; Khurana, Bharti

    2016-04-01

    Distal radius fractures are the most common upper extremity fracture and account for approximately one sixth of all fractures treated in US emergency departments. These fractures are associated with significant morbidity and have a major economic impact. Radiographic evaluation of distal radius fractures is frequently performed in the emergency department setting, has a profound impact on initial management, and is essential to assessing the quality and relative success of the initial reduction. While the most appropriate definitive management of distal radius fractures remains controversial, overarching treatment principles reflect distal radius injury mechanisms and biomechanics. An intuitive understanding of the biomechanics of the distal radius and of common mechanisms of injury informs and improves the emergency radiologist's ability to identify key imaging findings with important management implications and to communicate the critical information that emergency physicians and orthopedic surgeons need to best manage distal radius fractures.

  15. Contact Radius and the Insulator-Metal Transition in Films Comprised of Touching Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, Deanna; Thimsen, Elijah

    2016-07-26

    Nanocrystal assemblies are being explored for a number of optoelectronic applications such as transparent conductors, photovoltaic solar cells, and electrochromic windows. Majority carrier transport is important for these applications, yet it remains relatively poorly understood in films comprised of touching nanocrystals. Specifically, the underlying structural parameters expected to determine the transport mechanism have not been fully elucidated. In this report, we demonstrate experimentally that the contact radius, between touching heavily doped ZnO nanocrystals, controls the electron transport mechanism. Spherical nanocrystals are considered, which are connected by a circular area. The radius of this circular area is the contact radius. For nanocrystals that have local majority carrier concentration above the Mott transition, there is a critical contact radius. If the contact radius between nanocrystals is less than the critical value, then the transport mechanism is variable range hopping. If the contact radius is greater than the critical value, the films display behavior consistent with metallic electron transport.

  16. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. Evans; D. Roush; R. W. Brooks; D. B. Martin

    1998-08-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1997 indicated that radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operations could generally not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEEL. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during INEEL operations, concentrations in the offsite environment and doses to the surrounding population were far less than state of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines. The maximum potential population dose from submersion, ingestion, inhalation, and deposition to the approximately 121,500 people residing within an 80-km (50-mi) radius from the geographical center of the INEEL was estimated to be 0.2 person-rem (2 x 10-3 person-Sv) using the MDIFF air dispersion model. This population dose is less than 0.0005% of the estimated 43,700 person-rem (437 person-Sv) population dose from background radioactivity.

  17. Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Weizhi; Peng, Chao; Prad Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam on a windowless H2 gas flow target in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to investigate the proton radius puzzle by extracting the electric form factor of proton in an unprecedented low four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 = 2 ×10-4 - 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 , with a sub-percent precision. The PRad experiment utilizes a non-magnetic and calorimetric method with a high efficiency and high resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and two Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers. Its systematics are well controlled by two main advantages of this experiment: (1) The scattered electrons from M øller and e - p elastic scattering are measured simultaneously, and the e - p cross section will be normalized to the well-known M øller process; (2) The windowless gas flow target has no cell windows at both up- and downstream, which was one of the primary background sources in the previous e - p elastic scattering experiments. Thus the PRad experiment has systematic uncertainties totally different from the previous magnetic spectrometric e - p elastic scattering experiments. In this talk, we will present the details of the experimental method and preliminary analysis of the data. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41231, NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and Duke University.

  18. A Large Radius Human Centrifuge: The Human Hypergravity Havitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2008-06-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, but how would plants and animals have evolved on a larger planet, i.e. larger than Earth? We are able to address this question simply by studies using centrifuges. In the past decades numerous experiments have been performed on cells, plants and animals grown for longer durations, even multi generations, under hypergravity conditions. Based on these studies we have gained interesting insights in the physiological process of these systems when exposed to artificial gravity. Animals and plants adapt themselves to this new high-g environment. Information of adaptation to hyper-g in mammals is interesting, or maybe even proof vital, for future human space flight programs especially in light of long duration missions to Moon and Mars. We know from long duration animal studies that numerous physiological processes and structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardiovascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Human studies are mostly in the order of hours at most. Current work on human centrifuges is all focused on short arm systems to apply artificial gravity in long duration space missions. In this paper we want to address the possible usefulness of a large radius human centrifuge on Earth, or even on Moon or Mars, for both basic research and possible applications. In such a centrifuge a group of humans may be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time.

  19. VARIATION OF INNER RADIUS OF DUST TORUS IN NGC4151

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Shintaro; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Minezaki, Takeo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Suganuma, Masahiro; Enya, Keigo; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A.

    2009-08-01

    Long-term optical and near-infrared monitoring observations for a type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 4151 were carried out for six years from 2001 to 2006 by using the MAGNUM telescope, and delayed response of flux variations in the K(2.2 {mu}m) band to those in the V(0.55 {mu}m) band was clearly detected. Based on cross-correlation analysis, we precisely measured a lag time {delta}t for eight separate periods and we found that {delta}t is not constant, changing between 30 and 70 d during the monitoring period. Since {delta}t is the light travel time from the central energy source out to the surrounding dust torus, this is the first convincing evidence that the inner radius of the dust torus did change in an individual AGN. In order to relate such a change of {delta}t with a change of AGN luminosity L, we present a method of taking an average of the observed V-band fluxes that corresponds to the measured value of {delta}t, and we find that the time-changing track of NGC 4151 in the {delta}t versus L diagram during the monitoring period deviates from the relation {delta}t {proportional_to} L {sup 0.5} expected from dust reverberation. This result, combined with the elapsed time from period to period for which {delta}t was measured, indicates that the timescale of dust formation is about one year, which should be taken into account as a new constraint in future studies of dust evolution in AGNs.

  20. Minimum required capture radius in a coplanar model of the aerial combat problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. V.; Merz, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    Coplanar aerial combat is modeled with constant speeds and specified turn rates. The minimum capture radius which will always permit capture, regardless of the initial conditions, is calculated. This 'critical' capture radius is also the maximum range which the evader can guarantee indefinitely if the initial range, for example, is large. A composite barrier is constructed which gives the boundary, at any heading, of relative positions for which the capture radius is less than critical.

  1. A comparison of stability and clinical outcomes in single-radius versus multi-radius femoral design for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jo, Ah-Reum; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Lee, Keun-Bae; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Seon, Jong-Keun

    2014-12-01

    We compared the intraoperative varus-valgus stability from 0° to 90° of flexion and postoperative clinical outcomes in patients receiving TKA via either a single-radius femoral design (50 TKA, SR group) or multi-radius femoral design (50 TKA, MR group). We measured stabilities at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° of flexion using a navigation system. The clinical outcomes including HSS scores, WOMAC scores and VAS score during stair climbing were compared after a minimum of 2-year follow-up. The single-radius femoral designs in TKA showed better intra-operative stability at 30° of flexion (7.6 vs. 8.3) compared with the multi-radius femoral design, but not at other angles. However, the clinical outcomes revealed no other significant differences in terms of HSS scores, WOMAC scores and VAS score between two groups.

  2. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis number larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.

  3. Effect of isospin dependence of radius on transverse flow and fragmentation in isobaric pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sakshi

    2013-11-01

    We study the role of nuclear structure effects through radius in reaction dynamics via transverse flow and multifragmentation of isobaric colliding pairs. Our study reveals that isospin-dependent radius [proposed by Royer and Rousseau [Eur. Phys. J. A10.1140/epja/i2008-10745-8 42, 541 (2009)] has significant effect towards isospin effects. The collective flow behavior and fragmentation pattern of neutron-rich system with respect to neutron-deficient system is found to get reversed with isospin-dependent radius compared to that with liquid drop radius.

  4. Evaluation of the Proton Charge Radius from Electron–Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John; Sick, Ingo

    2015-09-15

    In light of the proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between measurements of the proton charge radius from muonic hydrogen and those from electronic hydrogen and electron–proton (e–p) scattering measurements, we re-examine the charge radius extractions from electron scattering measurements. We provide a recommended value for the proton root-mean-square charge radius, r{sub E} = 0.879 ± 0.011 fm, based on a global examination of elastic e–p scattering data. The uncertainties include contributions to account for tension between different data sets and inconsistencies between radii using different extraction procedures.

  5. Estimation of weapon-radius versus maneuverability trade-off for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1977-01-01

    A chase in a horizontal plane between a pursuer with a large capture radius and a more maneuverable evading vehicle is examined with constant-speed vehicle models. An approximation to the 'sidestepping' maneuver of the Homicidal Chauffeur Game is modified to account for the effect of evader turning rate, and an estimate of capture radius required is so obtained which agrees remarkably well with Cockayne's point-capture result. The maneuver assumes central importance for barrier surfaces appearing in the Game of Two Cars. Results are given for required weapon capture-radius in terms of the maneuverability of the two vehicles. Some calculations of capture radius are presented.

  6. The Unstable Distal Radius Fracture—How Do We Define It? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Walenkamp, Monique M. J.; Vos, Lara M.; Strackee, Simon D.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unstable distal radius fractures are a popular research subject. However, to appreciate the findings of studies that enrolled patients with unstable distal radius fractures, it should be clear how the authors defined an unstable distal radius fracture. Questions In what percentage of studies involving patients with unstable distal radius fractures did the authors define unstable distal radius fracture? What are the most common descriptions of an unstable distal radius fracture? And is there one preferred evidence-based definition for future authors? Methods A systematic search of literature was performed to identify any type of study with the term unstable distal radius fracture. We assessed whether a definition was provided and determined the level of evidence for the most common definitions. Results The search yielded 2,489 citations, of which 479 were included. In 149 studies, it was explicitly stated that patients with unstable distal radius fractures were enrolled. In 54% (81/149) of these studies, the authors defined an unstable distal radius fracture. Overall, we found 143 different definitions. The seven most common definitions were: displacement following adequate reduction; Lafontaine's definition; irreducibility; an AO type C2 fracture; a volarly displaced fracture; Poigenfürst's criteria; and Cooney's criteria. Only Lafontaine's definition originated from a clinical study (level IIIb). Conclusion In only half of the studies involving patients with an unstable distal radius fracture did the authors defined what they considered an unstable distal radius fracture. None of the definitions stood out as the preferred choice. A general consensus definition could help to standardize future research. PMID:26649263

  7. Active space of pheromone plume and its relationship to effective attraction radius in applied models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Any lure’s semiochemical release rate that is attractive to flying insects has a specific effective attraction radius (EAR) that corresponds to the lure’s orientation response strength. The EAR was defined as the radius of a passive sphere that would intercept the same number of insects as a semioch...

  8. Determining the waist radius of a focused Gaussian laser beam using a millimeter-scale ruler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pao-Keng; Liu, Jian-You

    2017-03-01

    We present a simple and inexpensive method for determining the waist radius of a focused Gaussian laser beam. This method is motivated by the fact that if you focus the laser beam using a lens, the distance from the lens to the waist will vary slightly as the lens is moved along the beam-propagating direction. We show how the waist radius can be calculated from four large longitudinal lengths, measurable using a conventional millimeter-scale ruler. Analyzing the dependence of the calculated waist radius on these four measured lengths numerically shows that the accuracy of the calculated waist radius is mainly affected by the error in the relative shift in the distance from the lens to the waist position. The calculated waist radius for a real HeNe laser is close to the one measured directly using a commercial beam profiler with an error within 7%.

  9. The Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI and the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The unexplained large discrepancy of the proton charge radius measurements with muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and determinations from elastic electron scattering and Lamb shift in regular hydrogen of seven standard deviations is known as the proton radius puzzle. Suggested solutions of the puzzle range from possible errors in the experiments through unexpectedly large hadronic physics effects to new physics beyond the Standard Model. A new approach to verify the radius discrepancy in a systematic manner will be pursued with the Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI. The experiment aims to compare elastic cross sections, the proton elastic form factors, and the extracted proton charge radius with scattering of electrons and muons of either charge and under identical conditions. The difference in the observed radius will be probed with a high precision to verify the discrepancy. An overview of the experiment and the current status will be presented.

  10. COUPLED EVOLUTION WITH TIDES OF THE RADIUS AND ORBIT OF TRANSITING GIANT PLANETS: GENERAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ibgui, Laurent; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-08-01

    Some transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) have measured radii larger than predicted by the standard theory. In this paper, we explore the possibility that an earlier episode of tidal heating can explain such radius anomalies and apply the formalism we develop to HD 209458b as an example. We find that for strong enough tides the planet's radius can undergo a transient phase of inflation that temporarily interrupts canonical, monotonic shrinking due to radiative losses. Importantly, an earlier episode of tidal heating can result in a planet with an inflated radius, even though its orbit has nearly circularized. Moreover, we confirm that at late times, and under some circumstances, by raising tides on the star itself a planet can spiral into its host. We note that a 3x to 10x solar planet atmospheric opacity with no tidal heating is sufficient to explain the observed radius of HD 209458b. However, our model demonstrates that with an earlier phase of episodic tidal heating, we can fit the observed radius of HD 209458b even with lower (solar) atmospheric opacities. This work demonstrates that, if a planet is left with an appreciable eccentricity after early inward migration and/or dynamical interaction, coupling radius and orbit evolution in a consistent fashion that includes tidal heating, stellar irradiation, and detailed model atmospheres might offer a generic solution to the inflated radius puzzle for transiting EGPs such as WASP-12b, TrES-4, and WASP-6b.

  11. Replicating a Colles fracture in an excised radius: revisiting testing protocols.

    PubMed

    Wagner, David W; Lindsey, Derek P; Beaupre, Gary S

    2012-04-05

    A distal radius fracture in middle-age and older adults is often considered a sentinel indicator of osteoporosis. Mechanical testing of cadaveric specimens is often used to quantify bone strength and develop insight for relating in-vivo measures to fracture force. Mechanical testing protocols using an intact forearm have been successful at replicating a Colles fracture, however, excised isolated radius protocols based on the intact forearm testing protocol have not been as successful. One protocol originally designed to replicate the physiological condition of a fall on an outstretched hand was reproduced in our laboratory, yet surprisingly the produced distal radius fracture patterns were not consistent among specimens nor was dorsal angulation of the distal fragment that is characteristic of a Colles fracture observed. The purpose of this study was to perform a mechanics-based analysis of the excised radius loading protocol in order to quantify the imposed and internal forces on the radius. An idealized beam model of the excised radius revealed that in the area of the distal radius where Colles fractures occur, 99.99% of the maximum strain on the bone outer surface was the result of pure compressive loading. This loading condition is in direct contrast to the accepted mechanics of a Colles fracture, which is characterized as a metaphyseal bending fracture with the volar cortex failing due to tensile stresses and the dorsal cortex exhibiting compression and comminution. The results suggest that additional research, particularly related to overcoming the difficulties of reliably supporting and applying a force to the distal end of the radius, is necessary for clinical fracture patterns to be reliably reproduced with an excised radius mechanical testing protocol.

  12. Outcomes Following Operative Treatment of open Fractures of the Distal Radius: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Brendan J; Montero, Nicole; Paksima, Nader; Egol, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report radiographic, clinical, and patient-based functional outcomes following contemporary operative treatment of patients who sustained an open distal radius fracture and compare them to a similar group of patients treated operatively for closed distal radius fractures. Methods Over five years, 601 patients with a distal radius fracture presented to our academic medical center, including one Level 1 trauma hospital, and were prospectively enrolled in an upper extremity trauma database. Patients with open distal radius fractures underwent irrigation, debridement, and operative fixation within 24 hours of presentation. Closed distal radius fractures requiring operative fixation were treated electively. Retrospective review of the database identified eighteen open fractures of the distal radius (11 type I, 6 type II, 1 type IIIa). The open fracture patients were individually matched with eighteen closed distal radius fracture patients who underwent surgical fixation based on age, sex, injury to dominant extremity, fracture pattern, and method of fracture fixation. Clinical, radiographic, patient- based functional outcomes, and complications were recorded at routine postoperative intervals. Results Follow-up was greater than 77% in both groups at all time points. The open and closed groups were similar in regards to age, gender, BMI, race, tobacco use, income, employment status, hand dominance, injury to dominant extremity, mechanism of injury, fracture classification, method of fracture fixation, and presence of concomitant injury. Postoperative complications and reoperation rates were similar between the open and closed groups. Union rates and radiographic alignment one year postoperatively were similar between the open and closed fracture groups. At final follow-up, range of motion parameters, grip strengths, DASH indices, and subjective pain scores were similar between both groups. Discussion Open distal radius fractures treated with early debridement

  13. Direct deflection radius measurement of flexible PET substrates by using an optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jiong-Shiun; Li, Po-Wei

    2015-06-10

    The deflection radius is essential in determining residual stress estimations in flexible electronics. However, the literature provides only indirect methods for obtaining a deflection radius. In this study, we present a measurement methodology for directly measuring the deflection radius of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate (a popular substrate of flexible electronics) by using an optical interferometer. A Twyman-Green optical interferometer was established and phase-shifting technology was used to increase the measurement resolution. Five PET substrates with known deflection radii were prepared to verify the measurement precision of the proposed measurement methodology. The results revealed that the error variance of our proposed measurement methodology is smaller than 3.5%.

  14. Radius of the sun from observations of the total solar eclipse of July 31, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, L. A.; Belkina, I. L.; Dyatel, N. P.; Marchenko, G. P.

    1993-06-01

    Moments of the local contacts at 24 points on E and W solar limbs are determined from the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse cinematographic observations in the continuum. The r.m.s. value of the solar radius, averaged over limb regions with different activity, is rs = 959.97 +/- 0.04 arcsec. The solar radius estimates made separately for limb active regions and for undisturbed ones demonstrated the significance of the active region effects on the measured solar radius (up to 0.14 arcsec).

  15. Radius of the Sun from observations of the total solar eclipse of 31 July 1981.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, L. A.; Belkina, I. L.; Dyatel, N. P.; Marchenko, G. P.

    The moments of local contacts of 24 points on the east and west solar limbs are determined from the cinematographic solar continuum observations during the 31 July 1981 eclipse. The value of the solar radius averaged over limb regions with different activity was found by the least-squares method - rs = 959.97±0.04″ The solar radius estimates made separately for active and quiet limb regions reveal that the effect of active regions on the measured radius value is significant and may be as much as 0.14″

  16. The Effect of Osteoporosis on Healing of Distal Radius Fragility Fractures.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, Jacob; Jones, Christopher M; Ilyas, Asif M

    2015-10-01

    Although the decision for operative versus nonoperative treatment of distal radius fractures remains subjective and is performed on a case-by-case basis, evaluation and treatment of patients with concomitant osteoporosis requires understanding of the behavior of this injury as a distinct subset of distal radius fractures. Age, infirmity, and osteoporosis affect every aspect of the fracture. Understanding what makes these fractures unique assists surgeons in more effective and efficient treatment. The authors present the current understanding of osteoporotic fragility fractures of the distal radius, focusing on epidemiology, biomechanics of bone healing, and its implication on strategies for management.

  17. Finite Larmor radius stabilization of diffuse profile high-beta stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael J.; Miller, Guthrie

    1981-12-01

    Finite Larmor radius effects are incorporated into near theta pinch magnetohydrodynamic theory following the method of Pearlstein and Freidberg. By a straightforward solution of the eigenvalue problem with finite Larmor radius effects included, the stability of various diffuse profile configurations has been investigated. The results differ qualitatively, as well as quantitatively, from sharp boundary theory, and it is not true, in general, that the stabilizing effect is absent for m = 1. It is found that fat plasmas can be completely stabilized by finite Larmor radius effects.

  18. Mass-Radius Relationships for Low-Mass Planets: From Iron Planets to Water Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Transit observations, and radial velocity measurements, have begun to populate the mass radius diagram for extrasolar planets; fubture astrometric measurements and direct images promise more mass and radius information. Clearly, the bulk density of a planet indicates something about a planet s composition--but what? I will attempt to answer this question in general for low-mass planets (radius relationship: an expansion whose first term is M approx. R(sup 3).

  19. Effect of microstructure and notch root radius on fracture toughness of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results on the effects of matrix aging condition (matrix temper) and notch root radius on the measured fracture toughness of a SiC particulate reinforced aluminum alloy are reviewed. Stress intensity factors at catastrophic fracture were obtained for both underaged and overaged composites reveal. The linear relation found between apparent fracture toughness and the square root of the notch root radius implies a linear dependence of the crack opening displacement on the notch root radius. The results suggest a strain controlled fracture process, and indicate that there are differences in the fracture micromechanisms of the two aging conditions.

  20. Use of High-Speed X ray and Video to Analyze Distal Radius Fracture Pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina; Darvish, Kurosh; Liss, Frederic E; Ilyas, Asif M; Jones, Christopher M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the failure sequence of the distal radius during a simulated fall onto an outstretched hand using cadaver forearms and high-speed X ray and video systems. This apparatus records the beginning and propagation of bony failure, ultimately resulting in distal radius or forearm fracture. The effects of 3 different wrist guard designs are investigated using this system. Serving as a proof-of-concept analysis, this study supports this imaging technique to be used in larger studies of orthopedic trauma and protective devices and specifically for distal radius fractures.

  1. Physeal growth arrest of the distal radius treated by the Ilizarov technique. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Aston, J W; Henley, M B

    1989-07-01

    Growth arrest of the distal radius may follow a severe injury to the growth plate. When the growth of the distal radius ceases in the child, continuing ulnar growth results in radial deviation of the hand and dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint. Treatment options in such a limb-length discrepancy are resection of the physeal bony bridge, lengthening of the shaft of the radius with bone graft using the principle of the Wagner technique, resection or epiphysiodesis of the distal ulna, and lengthening through a metaphyseal corticotomy without the use of bone graft. We report a case of metaphyseal lengthening of the radius employing the Ilizarov external fixator for controlled distraction osteogenesis.

  2. Infrequent physeal wrist injury of the ulna and radius: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Eloisa Felíu; Vicente-Franqueira, Javier Roca; Trigueros, Antonio Perez

    2008-01-01

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old patient with a left wrist physeal fracture of the ulna and radius. X-Ray showed a Salter–Harris type II injury of the radius, and CT and MRI identified the following: type II epiphysiolysis of the radius with a metaphyseal wedge and type IV fracture of the ulna, with interposition in the focus of the fracture of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as a tear in the central area of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. All these injuries were checked intraoperatively during open reduction. We believe that this clinical case illustrates the importance of carefully assessing physeal wrist injuries when they occur, especially in those cases involving the ulna and the radius. Diagnostic methods such as CT and MRI scans are indispensable for through evaluation and treatment of the injury. PMID:19034390

  3. Reynolds Number Effects on Leading Edge Radius Variations of a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M. B.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    A computational study focused on leading-edge radius effects and associated Reynolds number sensitivity for a High Speed Civil Transport configuration at transonic conditions was conducted as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes were to assess the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics to predict Reynolds number effects for a range of leading-edge radius distributions on a second-generation supersonic transport configuration, and to evaluate the potential performance benefits of each at the transonic cruise condition. Five leading-edge radius distributions are described, and the potential performance benefit including the Reynolds number sensitivity for each is presented. Computational results for two leading-edge radius distributions are compared with experimental results acquired in the National Transonic Facility over a broad Reynolds number range.

  4. Radius construction and structure in the orb-web of Zilla diodia (Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Zschokke, S

    2000-10-01

    In orb-webs, the tension of the sticky spiral produces a centripetal force on the radii, resulting in an increase in tension along each radius from the centre of the web to the periphery. Zilla diodia (Walckenaer, 1802) atypical of araneids, was found to adapt the structure of its radii to this tension gradient by building radii that are double stranded at the periphery of the web and single stranded near the centre. Furthermore, the proportion of each radius that is doubled was found to be larger in the upper part of the web - where the overall tensions in the radii are known to be higher than in the lower part of the web. suggesting that the spider adjusts the proportion of each radius that is doubled to the overall tension in the radius.

  5. Method for Determining the Radius Vector for a Planet from Two Observations of Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainer, Michael Kizinski

    1977-01-01

    Presents a method for determining the approximate radius vector of a planet or asteroid from two closely separated observation positions, using mathematics suitable for lower division college students. (MLH)

  6. [Early corrective osteotomy after secondary displaced distal radius fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Boeckers, P; Gehrmann, S V; Wild, M; Schädel-Höpfner, M; Windolf, J

    2014-02-01

    Secondary fracture displacement before osseous consolidation of distal radius fractures in children occasionally leads to restricted forearm rotation. So far, there is no consistent treatment recommendation to correct this complication. We report on 5 children with an age of 8-13 years (mean age 12.3 years, 4 boys, 1 girl) with secondary displaced distal radius fractures and high functional deficits in forearm rotation (mean ROM for pro-/supination 70-0-30°) after osseous consolidation. We performed corrective osteotomies of the distal radius using a palmar approach after a mean of 38 days. Stabilisation was achieved with a fixed-angle plate system. At the final follow-up examination (mean 9 months) the forearm rotation was normal. No complications were observed. We consider corrective osteotomies of the distal radius in children with deficits of forearm rotation to be a possible strategy. Early corrective osteotomies can lead to a predictable increase of function through reestablishing normal articulation.

  7. Volar Locking Plate Breakage after Nonunion of a Distal Radius Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Alabau, Sergi; Soldado, Francisco; Mir, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old male with a nonunion followed by plate breakage after volar plating of a distal radius osteotomy. Volar locking plates have added a new approach to the treatment of distal radius malunions, due to a lower morbidity of the surgical approach and the strength of the final construction, allowing early mobilization and return to function. Conclusion. Plate breakage is an uncommon complication of volar locking plate fixation. To our knowledge, few cases have been described after a distal radius fracture and no case has been described after a distal radius corrective osteotomy. In the present case, plate breakage appears to have occurred as a result of a combination of multiple factors as the large corrective lengthening osteotomy, the use of demineralized bone matrix instead of bone graft, and the inappropriate fixation technique as an unfilled screw on the osteotomy site, rather than the choice of plate. PMID:28003828

  8. Open-grown crown radius of eleven bottomland hardwood species: Prediction and use in assessing stocking

    SciTech Connect

    Goelz, J.C.G.

    1996-08-01

    Equations were prepared to predict crown radius for eleven species of open-grown bottomland hardwood trees. Crown radius was predicted as a function of diameter at breast height (dbh) and as a function of dbh, total height, and crown ratio. Equations were prepared for individual species and species groups. Pecan has the largest crowns over a broad range of dbh. Eastern cottonwood has the smallest crowns for most levels of dbh. Sweetgum has relatively small crowns for trees of small dbh, but crown radius is comparable to most species at the largest dbh. The crown radius predictions may be used to calculate crown competition factor. B-lines of stocking may be calculated that represent a stand of one species as well as a mixed-species stand of any particular species proportion.

  9. Secondary displacement of distal radius fractures treated by bridging external fixation.

    PubMed

    Farah, N; Nassar, L; Farah, Z; Schuind, F

    2014-05-01

    Loss of reduction remains an important problem after treatment of distal radius fractures, whatever the type of bone fixation. We assessed retrospectively the rate of secondary displacement after external fixation of distal radius fractures in order to identify possible risk factors for instability. We reviewed the pre-operative and serial post-operative radiographs of a retrospective series of 35 distal radius fractures treated by bridging external fixation. When classified according to the Société Française d'Orthopédie et Traumatologie (SOFCOT) criteria, the rate of secondary displacement was 48.5%. At final follow up, the reduction was anatomical in 12% and acceptable in 83%. There was malunion in 5%. The loss of reduction concerned primarily the distal radius palmar tilt and was moderate. No correlation was found with age, gender, type of fracture, degree of initial displacement, associated ulnar fracture, or seniority of the treating surgeon.

  10. Reverberation measurements of the inner radius of the dust torus in 17 Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Shintaro; Minezaki, Takeo; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Suganuma, Masahiro; Enya, Keigo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A. E-mail: minezaki@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-06-20

    We present the results of a dust reverberation survey for 17 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies, which provides the largest homogeneous data collection for the radius of the innermost dust torus. A delayed response of the K-band light curve after the V-band light curve was found for all targets, and 49 measurements of lag times between the flux variation of the dust emission in the K band and that of the optical continuum emission in the V band were obtained by the cross-correlation function analysis and also by an alternative method for estimating the maximum likelihood lag. The lag times strongly correlated with the optical luminosity in the luminosity range of M{sub V} = –16 to –22 mag, and the regression analysis was performed to obtain the correlation log Δt (days) = –2.11 – 0.2 M{sub V} assuming Δt∝L {sup 0.5}, which was theoretically expected. We discuss the possible origins of the intrinsic scatter of the dust lag-luminosity correlation, which was estimated to be approximately 0.13 dex, and we find that the difference of internal extinction and delayed response of changes in lag times to the flux variations could have partly contributed to intrinsic scatter. However, we could not detect any systematic change of the correlation with the subclass of the Seyfert type or the Eddington ratio. Finally, we compare the dust reverberation radius with the near-infrared interferometric radius of the dust torus and the reverberation radius of broad Balmer emission lines. The interferometric radius in the K band was found to be systematically larger than the dust reverberation radius in the same band by the about a factor of two, which could be interpreted by the difference between the flux-weighted radius and response-weighted radius of the innermost dust torus. The reverberation radius of the broad Balmer emission lines was found to be systematically smaller than the dust reverberation radius by about a factor of four to five, which strongly supports the unified

  11. Experimental determination of the radius of curvature of an isotropic Gaussian Schell-model beam.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijun; Chen, Yahong; Cai, Yangjian

    2013-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the radius of curvature of an isotropic Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam by measuring the transverse beam widths and the transverse coherence widths at two different planes. Furthermore, we carry out experimental determination of the radius of curvature of a GSM beam. Using the measured beam parameters, we carry out a comparative study of the propagation properties of a GSM beam both theoretically and experimentally. Our experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions.

  12. Distal radius fracture after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure in a rheumatoid arthritis patient.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Matsumura, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsukazu; Takei, Terue; Yabe, Hiroki

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of distal radius fracture after a Sauvé-Kapandji procedure combined with synovectomy and tendon transfer in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. This case shared several unusual features that were also seen in a previously reported case. Based on these features, we discuss favorable surgical treatment for the rheumatoid wrist with extensor tendon rupture, and also the optimal treatment for distal radius fracture after such procedures.

  13. Radius surgical system and conventional laparoscopic instruments in abdominal surgery: application, learning curve and ergonomy.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, N; Camperchioli, I; Gaspari, A L

    2007-12-01

    We illustrate our experience with a new class of instruments, the mechanical manipulators (MM), whose main features are an improved mobility, and ergonomy and a modular structure. A specific MM, the Radius Surgical System (RADIUS), has been used both for educational purposes as well as in clinical studies, demonstrating that it can represent an efficient tool to support surgeons performing surgical complex procedures, with a short learning curve for the postural attitude.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope secondary mirror vertex radius/conic constant test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope backup secondary mirror was tested to determine the vertex radius and conic constant. Three completely independent tests (to the same procedure) were performed. Similar measurements in the three tests were highly consistent. The values obtained for the vertex radius and conic constant were the nominal design values within the error bars associated with the tests. Visual examination of the interferometric data did not show any measurable zonal figure error in the secondary mirror.

  15. Measurement of super large radius optics in the detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Han, Sen; Wu, Quanying; Liang, Binming; Hou, Changlun

    2015-10-01

    The existence of Gravitational Wave (GW) is one of the greatest predictions of Einstein's relative theory. It has played an important part in the radiation theory, black hole theory, space explore and so on. The GW detection has been an important aspect of modern physics. With the research proceeding further, there are still a lot of challenges existing in the interferometer which is the key instrument in GW detection especially the measurement of the super large radius optics. To solve this problem, one solution , Fizeau interference, for measuring the super large radius has been presented. We change the tradition that curved surface must be measured with a standard curved surface. We use a flat mirror as a reference flat and it can lower both the cost and the test requirement a lot. We select a concave mirror with the radius of 1600mm as a sample. After the precision measurement and analysis, the experimental results show that the relative error of radius is better than 3%, and it can fully meet the requirements of the measurement of super large radius optics. When calculating each pixel with standard cylinder, the edges are not sharp because of diffraction or some other reasons, we detect the edge and calculate the diameter of the cylinder automatically, and it can improve the precision a lot. In general, this method is simple, fast, non-traumatic, and highly precision, it can also provide us a new though in the measurement of super large radius optics.

  16. The Effect of Pulse Length and Ejector Radius on Unsteady Ejector Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack

    2005-01-01

    The thrust augmentation of a set of ejectors driven by a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube has been measured at four different frequencies. Each frequency corresponded to a different length to diameter ratio of the pulse of air leaving the driver shroud. Two of the frequencies had length to diameter ratios below the formation number, and two above. The formation number is the value of length to diameter ratio below which the pulse converts to a vortex ring only, and above which the pulse becomes a vortex ring plus a trailing jet. A three level, three parameter Box-Behnken statistical design of experiment scheme was performed at each frequency, measuring the thrust augmentation generated by the appropriate ejectors from the set. The three parameters were ejector length, radius, and inlet radius. The results showed that there is an optimum ejector radius and length at each frequency. Using a polynomial fit to the data, the results were interpolated to different ejector radii and pulse length to diameter ratios. This showed that a peak in thrust augmentation occurs when the pulse length to diameter ratio equals the formation number, and that the optimum ejector radius is 0.87 times the sum of the vortex ring radius and the core radius.

  17. Corrective distal radius osteotomy: including bilateral differences in 3-D planning.

    PubMed

    Dobbe, J G G; Vroemen, J C; Strackee, S D; Streekstra, G J

    2013-07-01

    After a fracture of the distal radius, the bone segments may heal in a suboptimal position. This condition may lead to a reduced hand function, pain and finally osteoarthritis, sometimes requiring corrective surgery. Recent studies report computer-assisted 3-D planning techniques in which the mirrored contralateral unaffected radius serves as reference for planning the position of the distal radius before corrective osteotomy surgery. Bilateral asymmetry, however, may introduce length errors into this type of preoperative planning that can be compensated for by taking into account the concomitant ulnae asymmetry. This article investigates a method for planning a correction osteotomy of the distal radius, while compensating for bilateral length differences using a linear regression model that describes the relationship between radii and ulnae asymmetry. The method is evaluated quantitatively using CT scans of 20 healthy individuals, and qualitatively using CT scans of patients suffering from a malunion of the distal radius. The improved planning method reduces absolute length deviations by a factor of two and markedly reduces positioning variation, from 2.9 ± 2.1 to 1.5 ± 0.6 mm. We expect the method to be of great value for future 3-D planning of a corrective distal radius osteotomy.

  18. Prediction of Colles' fracture load in human radius using cohesive finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani

    2009-01-05

    Osteoporotic and age-related fractures are a significant public health problem. One of the most common osteoporotic fracture sites in the aging population is distal radius. There is evidence in the literature that distal radius fractures (Colles' fracture) are an indicative of increased risk of future spine and hip fractures. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element method is applied to human radius to assess its fracture load as a function of cortical bone geometry and material properties. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling which explicitly represents the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The fracture loads found in the simulations (731-6793 N) were in the range of experimental values reported in the literature. The fracture loads predicted by the simulations decreased by 4-5% per decade based only on material level changes and by 6-20% per decade when geometrical changes were also included. Cortical polar moment of inertia at 15% distal radius showed the highest correlation to fracture load (r(2)=0.97). These findings demonstrate the strength of fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling and show that combining geometrical and material properties provides a better assessment of fracture risk in human radius.

  19. Measurement of the radius of Mercury by radio occultation during the MESSENGER flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Mark E.; Kahan, Daniel S.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Srinivasan, Dipak K.; Oberst, Jürgen; Asmar, Sami W.

    2011-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009. During the first and third of those flybys, MESSENGER passed behind the planet from the perspective of Earth, occulting the radio-frequency (RF) transmissions. The occultation start and end times, recovered with 0.1 s accuracy or better by fitting edge-diffraction patterns to the RF power history, are used to estimate Mercury's radius at the tangent point of the RF path. To relate the measured radius to the planet shape, we evaluate local topography using images to identify the high-elevation feature that defines the RF path or using altimeter data to quantify surface roughness. Radius measurements are accurate to 150 m, and uncertainty in the average radius of the surrounding terrain, after adjustments are made from the local high at the tangent point of the RF path, is 350 m. The results are consistent with Mercury's equatorial shape as inferred from observations by the Mercury Laser Altimeter and ground-based radar. The three independent estimates of radius from occultation events collectively yield a mean radius for Mercury of 2439.2±0.5 km.

  20. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; ...

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.« less

  1. Atomic radii for atoms with the 6s shell outermost: The effective atomic radius and the van der Waals radius from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Hatano, Yasuyo; Noro, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2015-06-15

    We consider, for atoms from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg, the effective atomic radius (r{sub ear}), which is defined as the distance from the nucleus at which the magnitude of the electric field is equal to that in He at one half of the equilibrium bond length of He{sub 2}. The values of r{sub ear} are about 50% larger than the mean radius of the outermost occupied orbital of 6s, . The value of r{sub ear} decreases from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 56}Ba and undergoes increases and decreases with rising nuclear charge from {sub 57}La to {sub 70}Y b. In fact r{sub ear} is understood as comprising two interlaced sequences; one consists of {sub 57}La, {sub 58}Ce, and {sub 64}Gd, which have electronic configuration (4f{sup n−1})(5d{sup 1})(6s{sup 2}), and the remaining atoms have configuration (4f{sup n})(6s{sup 2}). The sphere defined by r{sub ear} contains 85%–90% of the 6s electrons. From {sub 71}Lu to {sub 80}Hg the radius r{sub ear} also involves two sequences, corresponding to the two configurations 5d{sup n+1}6s{sup 1} and 5d{sup n}6s{sup 2}. The radius r{sub ear} according to the present methodology is considerably larger than r{sub vdW} obtained by other investigators, some of who have found values of r{sub vdW} close to .

  2. Measuring the Solar Radius from Space during the 2012 Venus Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, M.; Couvidat, S.; Bush, R. I.; Kuhn, J. R.; Scholl, I. F.

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work the determination of the solar radius from observations by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory during the 2012 June Venus transit of the Sun. Two different methods were utilized to determine the solar radius using images of Sun taken by the HMI instrument. The first technique fit the measured trajectory of Venus in front of the Sun for seven wavelengths across the Fe I absorption line at 6173 Å. The solar radius determined from this method varies with the measurement wavelength, reflecting the variation in the height of line formation. The second method measured the area of the Sun obscured by Venus to determine the transit duration from which the solar radius was derived. This analysis focused on measurements taken in the continuum wing of the line, and applied a correction for the instrumental point spread function (PSF) of the HMI images. Measurements taken in the continuum wing of the 6173 Å line, resulted in a derived solar radius at 1 AU of 959.''57 ± 0.''02 (695, 946 ± 15 km). The AIA instrument observed the Venus transit at ultraviolet wavelengths. Using the solar disk obscuration technique, similar to that applied to the HMI images, analysis of the AIA data resulted in values of R ⊙ = 963.''04 ± 0.''03 at 1600 Å and R ⊙ = 961.''76 ± 0.''03 at 1700 Å.

  3. MEASURING THE SOLAR RADIUS FROM SPACE DURING THE 2012 VENUS TRANSIT

    SciTech Connect

    Emilio, M.; Couvidat, S.; Bush, R. I.; Kuhn, J. R.; Scholl, I. F. E-mail: kuhn@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: couvidat@stanford.edu

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work the determination of the solar radius from observations by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory during the 2012 June Venus transit of the Sun. Two different methods were utilized to determine the solar radius using images of Sun taken by the HMI instrument. The first technique fit the measured trajectory of Venus in front of the Sun for seven wavelengths across the Fe I absorption line at 6173 Å. The solar radius determined from this method varies with the measurement wavelength, reflecting the variation in the height of line formation. The second method measured the area of the Sun obscured by Venus to determine the transit duration from which the solar radius was derived. This analysis focused on measurements taken in the continuum wing of the line, and applied a correction for the instrumental point spread function (PSF) of the HMI images. Measurements taken in the continuum wing of the 6173 Å line, resulted in a derived solar radius at 1 AU of 959.''57 ± 0.''02 (695, 946 ± 15 km). The AIA instrument observed the Venus transit at ultraviolet wavelengths. Using the solar disk obscuration technique, similar to that applied to the HMI images, analysis of the AIA data resulted in values of R {sub ☉} = 963.''04 ± 0.''03 at 1600 Å and R {sub ☉} = 961.''76 ± 0.''03 at 1700 Å.

  4. The inner disc radius in the propeller phase and accretion-propeller transition of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertan, Ünal

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the critical conditions required for a steady propeller effect for magnetized neutron stars with optically thick, geometrically thin accretion discs. We have shown through simple analytical calculations that a steady-state propeller mechanism cannot be sustained at an inner disc radius where the viscous and magnetic stresses are balanced. The radius calculated by equating these stresses is usually found to be close to the conventional Alfvén radius for spherical accretion, rA. Our results show that: (1) a steady propeller phase can be established with a maximum inner disc radius that is at least ∼15 times smaller than rA depending on the mass-flow rate of the disc, rotational period and strength of the magnetic dipole field of the star, (2) the critical accretion rate corresponding to the accretion-propeller transition is orders of magnitude lower than the rate estimated by equating rA to the co-rotation radius. Our results are consistent with the properties of the transitional millisecond pulsars that show transitions between the accretion powered X-ray pulsar and the rotational powered radio-pulsar states.

  5. Image-guided distal radius osteotomy using patient-specific instrument guides.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manuela; Ma, Burton; Rudan, John F; Ellis, Randy E; Pichora, David R

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we describe a method for computer-assisted distal radius osteotomies in which computer-generated, patient-specific plastic guides are used for intraoperative guidance. Before surgery, the correction and plate location are planned using computed tomography scans for both radii and ulnae, and the planned locations of the distal and proximal drill holes for the plate are saved. A plastic, patient-specific instrument guide is created using a rapid prototyping machine into which a mirror image of intraoperative, accessible bone structure of the distal radius is integrated. This allows for unique positioning of the guide during surgery. For each planned drill location, a guidance hole is incorporated into the guide. During surgery, a conventional incision is made, and the guide is positioned on the radius. The surgeon drills the holes for the plate screws into the intact radius and performs the osteotomy using the conventional technique. Using the predrilled holes, the surgeon affixes the plate to the radius fragments. The guides are easy to integrate into the surgical workflow and minimize the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy for guidance of the procedure.

  6. Three-dimensional in vivo kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint in malunited distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Moore, Douglas C; Hogan, Kathleen A; Crisco, Joseph J; Akelman, Edward; Dasilva, Manuel F; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2002-03-01

    How malunion of the distal radius affects the kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint in vivo was evaluated. A novel computed tomography image-based technique was used to quantify radioulnar motion in both wrists of 9 patients who had unilateral malunited distal radius fractures. In the injured wrists dorsal angulation averaged 21 degrees +/- 6 degrees, radial inclination averaged 18 degrees +/- 5 degrees, and radial shortening averaged 21 +/- 3 mm. Clinically, the average range of motion of the injured wrists was 75 degrees +/- 25 degrees pronation and 73 degrees +/- 23 degrees supination. Kinematics of the radius during pronation and supination in the malunited forearms was indistinguishable from that in the uninjured forearms. In both the axis of rotation of the radius passed through the center of the ulnar head, although it shifted slightly ulnar and volar in supination and radial and dorsal during pronation. In contrast to previous in vitro biomechanical findings, there was no dorsovolar radial translation at the extremes of pronation or supination and no translation of the radius along the rotation axis. Soft tissues may play a larger role in limiting function than previously appreciated, and treatment may require correction of altered soft tissue structures as well as any abnormal bone anatomy.

  7. Study of the critical radius influence on the cloud drops formation in the seeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, R.. C.

    2010-09-01

    In the seeding operations in order to mitigate the climatic changes or to intervene on the atmospherics process of the precipitations in order to can beneficent enhancement it; it is very important the roll that play the critical radius of the cloud formation drops. In the seeding operations is fundamental to determinate the critical radius in order to make more efficient its results; because if the size of the cloud drop formation nuclei in the heterogeneous nucleation is smaller than critical radius, then it is very possible that the precipitation amount decrease when the seeding take a place, and viceversa. So, we must take in account the critical radius that the boundary conditions determine, and with this data, it must to be established the seeding nuclei size to use, in order to get the results whit the wished efficiency. We had worked is in this way, searching and developed a methodology in order to get to calculate the critical radius to boundary atmospherics conditions, and with this data to can estimate the seeding nuclei size necessary. We had obtained approximate values that are enough to ours goals.

  8. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  9. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi; Collaboration: PRad Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 ± 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7σ smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these 'electronic' determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup −4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  10. Bounds of the spectral radius and the Nordhaus-Gaddum type of the graphs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfei; Jia, Liping; Sun, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The Laplacian spectra are the eigenvalues of Laplacian matrix L(G) = D(G) - A(G), where D(G) and A(G) are the diagonal matrix of vertex degrees and the adjacency matrix of a graph G, respectively, and the spectral radius of a graph G is the largest eigenvalue of A(G). The spectra of the graph and corresponding eigenvalues are closely linked to the molecular stability and related chemical properties. In quantum chemistry, spectral radius of a graph is the maximum energy level of molecules. Therefore, good upper bounds for the spectral radius are conducive to evaluate the energy of molecules. In this paper, we first give several sharp upper bounds on the adjacency spectral radius in terms of some invariants of graphs, such as the vertex degree, the average 2-degree, and the number of the triangles. Then, we give some numerical examples which indicate that the results are better than the mentioned upper bounds in some sense. Finally, an upper bound of the Nordhaus-Gaddum type is obtained for the sum of Laplacian spectral radius of a connected graph and its complement. Moreover, some examples are applied to illustrate that our result is valuable.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of Spin Geometric Phase: Radius Dependence of Time-Reversal Aharonov-Casher Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Fumiya; Takagi, Jun; Kunihashi, Yoji; Kohda, Makoto; Nitta, Junsaku

    2012-02-01

    A geometric phase of electron spin is studied in arrays of InAlAs/InGaAs two-dimensional electron gas rings. By increasing the radius of the rings, the time-reversal symmetric Aharonov-Casher oscillations of the electrical resistance are shifted towards weaker spin-orbit interaction regions with their shortened period. We conclude that the shift is due to a modulation of the spin geometric phase, the maximum modulation of which is approximately 1.5 rad. We further show that the Aharonov-Casher oscillations in various radius arrays collapse onto a universal curve if the radius and the strength of Rashba spin-orbit interaction are taken into account. The result is interpreted as the observation of the effective spin-dependent flux through a ring.

  12. Self-regulated radius of spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Kaganer, Vladimir M; Sabelfeld, Karl K; Gotschke, Tobias; Grandal, Javier; Calleja, Enrique; Geelhaar, Lutz; Brandt, Oliver

    2013-07-10

    We investigate the axial and radial growth of GaN nanowires upon a variation of the Ga flux during molecular beam epitaxial growth. An increase in the Ga flux promotes radial growth without affecting the axial growth rate. In contrast, a decrease in the Ga flux reduces the axial growth rate without any change in the radius. These results are explained by a kinetic growth model that accounts for both the diffusion of Ga adatoms along the side facets toward the nanowire tip and the finite amount of active N available for the growth. The model explains the formation of a new equilibrium nanowire radius after increasing the Ga flux and provides an explanation for two well-known but so far not understood experimental facts: the necessity of effectively N-rich conditions for the spontaneous growth of GaN nanowires and the increase in nanowire radius with increasing III/V flux ratio.

  13. Effects of Spot Size on Neutron-Star Radius Measurements from Pulse Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauböck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the effects of spot size on pulse profiles of moderately rotating neutron stars. Specifically, we quantify the bias introduced in radius measurements from the common assumption that spots are infinitesimally small. We find that this assumption is reasonable for spots smaller than 10°-18° and leads to errors that are ≤10% in the radius measurement, depending on the location of the spot and the inclination of the observer. We consider the implications of our results for neutron star radius measurements with the upcoming and planned X-ray missions NICER and LOFT. We calculate the expected spot size for different classes of sources and investigate the circumstances under which the assumption of a small spot is justified.

  14. The effects of thermal field in interferometric measurements of radius of curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jie; Hou, Xi; Wu, Fan

    2014-09-01

    The radius of curvature is one of the most important parameters to determine the properties of spherical surfaces. Based on the interferometric method, the importance of thermal analysis of spherical optical elements is stated in the paper. And then using different material, such as K9 and fused silica, the change of the curvature radius of spherical elements in different static temperature field is calculated and analyzed theoretically in the change of sag and surface. Finally, the theoretic results and simulated results by ANSYS have been compared. It is found that the radius of curvature of spherical optical elements is not only connected with the magnitude and direction of the temperature gradient, but also directly connected with material and structural parameters.

  15. Finite ion Larmor radius stabilization of m = 1 modes of a high-beta screw pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayton, T. E.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1981-07-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of finite ion gyroradii upon ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities of straight, cylindrically symmetric, radially diffuse screw pinch equilibria, using the finite ion Larmor radius model of Pearlstein and Freidberg (1978). The results demonstrate that a combination of finite ion Larmor radius effects and wall effects can eliminate all ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including m = 1 modes. A stability criterion involving the ion gyroradius and the wall radius is presented. It is pointed out that although m = 1 stabilization is possible, the maximum allowable currents are quite small implying that any experimental verification of this effect would require a very large aspect ratio device because of the small toroidal restoring force.

  16. The occultation of Mariner 10 by Mercury. [planetary radius and atmospheric radio measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjeldbo, G.; Kliore, A.; Sweetnam, D.; Esposito, P.; Seidel, B.; Howard, T.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of Mariner 10 dual-frequency radio-occultation recordings has yielded new information on the radius and atmosphere of Mercury. The ingress measurements, which were conducted near 1.1 deg north latitude and 67.4 deg east longitude on the night side of the planet, gave a value for the radius of 2439.5 + or - 1 km. Egress near 67.6 deg north latitude and 258.4 deg east longitude on the sunlit side yielded a radius of 2439.0 + or - 1 km. The atmospheric measurements showed the electron density to be less than 1000 per cu cm on both sides of the planet. From the latter result one may infer an upper limit to the dayside surface gas density of 1 million molecules per cu cm.

  17. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the Electron Beam Radius

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Wu, J.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.W.; Fawley, W.M.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Pellegrini, C.; Reiche, S.; /PSI, Villigen

    2012-02-15

    Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL) can be increased when the undulator is tapered after the FEL saturation. By use of ray equation approximation to combine the one-dimensional FEL theory and optical guiding approach, an explicit physical model is built to provide insight to the mechanism of the electron-radiation coherent interaction with variable undulator parameters as well as electron beam radius. The contribution of variation in electron beam radius and related transverse effects are studied based on the presented model and numerical simulation. Taking a recent studied terawatt, 120 m long tapered FEL as an example, we demonstrate that a reasonably varied, instead of a constant, electron beam radius along the undulator helps to improve the optical guiding and thus the radiation output.

  18. The relationship between displacement and clinical outcome after distal radius (Colles') fracture.

    PubMed

    Finsen, V; Rod, O; Rød, K; Rajabi, B; Alm-Paulsen, P S; Russwurm, H

    2013-02-01

    We reviewed 260 patients who had been treated non-operatively for a dorsally displaced distal radius fracture a mean 6.3 (range 2.5-12.7) years earlier, in an attempt to find the limits of displacement compatible with a good clinical outcome. We excluded patients with previous or later injuries to the same limb. Bivariate analysis revealed a highly statistically significant relationship between radiographic displacement at review and clinical outcome scores. Correlation coefficients varied between 0.14 and 0.30. However, multiple linear regression analysis using most factors commonly thought to be of importance in determining the clinical outcome as independent variables explained only 23% of the variability of the clinical outcome. Dorsal angulation, ulnar variance, and radial inclination together accounted for only 11% of the variability. We conclude that the final alignment of the distal radius as shown radiologically has only a minor influence on the clinical outcome of Colles' type distal radius fractures.

  19. Spiral patterns beyond the optical radius: numerical simulations and synthetic HI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    The outer parts of many galaxy disks exhibit extended spiral arms far beyond the optical radius. To understand the nature and the origin of such outer spiral structure, we investigate the propagation in the outer gaseous regions of large-scale spiral density waves excited in the bright optical disk. By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, we show that spiral density waves, penetrating in the gas through the outer Lindblad resonance, can indeed give rise to relatively regular patterns outside the bright optical stellar disk. The amplitude of spiral structure increases rapidly with radius. Beyond the optical radius, spirals become nonlinear and develop small-scale features related to shear-induced instabilities. We also construct the synthetic 21-cm data cubes extracted from simulated gaseous disks. Our synthetic HI observations point to the existence of specific kinematical features related to the presence of spiral pattern perturbations that should be found in deep HI observations.

  20. Reconstruction of the Distal Radius following Tumour Resection Using an Osteoarticular Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Pirker-Frühauf, Ulrike; Lovse, Thomas; Leithner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of the distal radius following tumour resection is challenging and various techniques are recorded. We retrospectively analysed the outcome of five patients (one male and four females) after reconstruction of the distal radius with osteoarticular allograft, following tumour resection. Mean followup was 32 months (range, 4–121). In three of the five patients the dominant limb was affected. Mean bone resection length was 6.5 centimetres (range, 5–11.5). Two grafts developed nonunion, both successfully treated with autologous bone grafting. No infection, graft fracture, or failure occurred. Mean flexion/extension was 38/60 degrees and mean pronation/supination was 77/77 degrees. The mean Mayo wrist score was 84 and the mean DASH score was 8, both representing a good functional result. Therefore we state the notion that osteoarticular allograft reconstruction of distal radius provides good to excellent functional results. PMID:23690732

  1. Surface Tension of Methanol as a Function of cut-off Radius and Temperature Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Abdalla; Jaradat, Adnan; Hamdan, Bushra

    Molecular dynamics is used to calculate the surface tension of van Leeuwen methanol. The van Leeuwen model of methanol is chosen over other models of methanol, since this model is widely used to study nucleation at low temperature. Usually, scientists use the cut-off radius to be three order of magnitude of segment diameter. In this study, we varied the cut-off radius to estimate the best cut-off at which the surface tension reaches its plateau. After deciding the best cut-off radius for van der Waals and Coulomb interactions (CUT-OFF and PME were used for Coulomb interaction), we varied the temperature controller (van-Housen, Berendsen, and v-rescale) to decide the best temperature controller to be used to study methanol. In all simulations, Gromacs is used at T =200-300K with periodic boundary conditions in all dimensions. JUST.

  2. Treatment of distal radius fractures with intrafocal (kapandji) pinning and supplemental skeletal stabilization.

    PubMed

    Weil, Wayne M; Trumble, Thomas E

    2005-08-01

    The technique of intrafocal pinning was originally described by Kapandji. This technique, along with the addition of supplemental external or internal bridging fixation, can be performed quickly with minimal soft tissue damage. This technique is indicated for the treatment of unstable extra-articular or minimally displaced intra-articular fractures of the distal radius. Studies demonstrate that young patients with displaced extra-articular distal radius fractures and minimal comminution can be treated by percutaneous intrafocal pin fixation alone, whereas, patients over 55 years of age and younger patients with comminution involving two or more surfaces of the radial metaphysis (or > 50% of the metaphyseal diameter) require bridging fixation besides percutaneous pin fixation. The use of this technique achieves the goal of surgical treatment of distal radius fractures: restoration of hand and wrist function through the restoration of alignment and articular surface congruity.

  3. Radius and chirality dependent conformation of polymer molecule at nanotube interface.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chenyu

    2006-08-01

    Temperature-dependent conformations of linear polymer molecules adsorbed at carbon nanotube (CNT) interfaces are investigated through molecule dynamics simulations. Model polyethylene (PE) molecules are shown to have selective conformations on the CNT surface, controlled by atomic structures of the CNT lattice and geometric coiling energy. PE molecules form entropy driven assembly domains, and their preferred wrapping angles around large radius CNT (40, 40) reflect the molecule configurations with energy minimums on a graphite plane. While PE molecules prefer 0 degrees wrapping on small radius armchair CNT (5, 5) predominantly at low temperatures, their configurations are shifted to larger wrapping angle ones on a similar radius zigzag CNT (10, 0). A nematic transformation around 280 K is identified through the Landau-de Gennes theory, with molecule aligning along tube axis in extended conformations.

  4. EFFECTS OF SPOT SIZE ON NEUTRON-STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS FROM PULSE PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Bauböck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the effects of spot size on pulse profiles of moderately rotating neutron stars. Specifically, we quantify the bias introduced in radius measurements from the common assumption that spots are infinitesimally small. We find that this assumption is reasonable for spots smaller than 10°–18° and leads to errors that are ≤10% in the radius measurement, depending on the location of the spot and the inclination of the observer. We consider the implications of our results for neutron star radius measurements with the upcoming and planned X-ray missions NICER and LOFT. We calculate the expected spot size for different classes of sources and investigate the circumstances under which the assumption of a small spot is justified.

  5. En bloc joystick reduction of a comminuted intra-articular distal radius fracture: a technical trick.

    PubMed

    Siegall, Evan; Ziran, Bruce

    2014-08-01

    A patient with a 1-month-old intra-articular distal radius fracture (treated closed in a splint) presented with an unacceptable degree of pain and stiffness caused by shortening and dorsal angulation of the distal radius. The fracture was comminuted with 4 or 5 distinct fragments, several involving the articular surface. Surgical correction was attempted. During the procedure, it was noted that, though the distal radius was shortened and angulated, there was actually acceptable congruity of the articular surface itself, despite the intra-articular nature of the fracture. Bone quality was poor and healing incomplete. Thus, we were concerned the currently congruous articular surface would fall apart with manipulation. Given this situation, we used a unique scaffolding technique with Kirschner wires placed in perpendicular fashion to both hold the articular surface intact and manipulate it en bloc. This technique is a simple way to turn a complex fracture into an easily reduced 2-part fracture.

  6. EFFECT OF FINITE LARMOR RADIUS ON COSMIC-RAY PENETRATION INTO AN INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Yuki; Shimazu, Hironori

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a mechanism for cosmic-ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope, particularly the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities. First, we derive analytical solutions for cosmic-ray behavior inside a magnetic flux rope, on the basis of the Newton-Lorentz equation of a particle, to investigate how cosmic rays penetrate magnetic flux ropes under an assumption of there being no scattering by small-scale magnetic field irregularities. The results show that the behavior of a particle is determined by only one parameter f{sub 0}, that is, the ratio of the Larmor radius at the flux rope axis to the flux rope radius. The analytical solutions show that cosmic rays cannot penetrate into the inner region of a flux rope by only gyration and gradient-curvature drift in the case of small f{sub 0}. Next, we perform a numerical simulation of a cosmic-ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope by adding small-scale magnetic field irregularities. The results show that cosmic rays can penetrate into a magnetic flux rope even in the case of small f{sub 0} because of the effect of small-scale magnetic field irregularities. This simulation also shows that a cosmic-ray density distribution is greatly different from that deduced from a guiding center approximation because of the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities for the case of a moderate to large Larmor radius compared to the flux rope radius.

  7. Load/Strain Distribution between Ulna and Radius in the Mouse Forearm Compression Loading Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunkai; Thiagarajan, Ganesh; Nicolella, Daniel P.; Johnson, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) of the mouse forearm compression loading model is used to relate strain distributions with downstream changes in bone formation and responses of bone cells. The objective of this study was to develop two FEA models – the first one with the traditional ulna only and the second one in which both the ulna and radius are included, in order to examine the effect of the inclusion of the radius on the strain distributions in the ulna. The entire mouse forearm was scanned using microCT and images were converted into FEA tetrahedral meshes using a suite of software programs. The performance of both linear and quadratic tetrahedral elements and coarse and fine meshes were studied. A load of 2 N was applied to the ulna/radius model and a 1.3 N load (based on previous investigations of load sharing between the ulna and radius in rats) was applied to the ulna only model for subsequent simulations. The results showed differences in the cross sectional strain distributions and magnitude within the ulna for the combined ulna/radius model versus the ulna only model. The maximal strain in the combined model occurred about 4 mm towards the distal end from the ulna mid-shaft in both models. Results from the FEA model simulations were also compared to experimentally determined strain values. We conclude that inclusion of the radius in FE models to predict strains during in vivo forearm loading increases the magnitude of the estimated ulna strains compared to those predicted from a model of the ulna alone but the distribution was similar. This has important ramifications for future studies to understand strain thresholds needed to activate bone cell responses to mechanical loading. PMID:21903442

  8. Clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius. A case report.

    PubMed

    Malo-Urriés, Miguel; Hidalgo-García, César; Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Estébanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Lucha-López, Orosia; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel

    2014-06-01

    Positional faults are considered a possible underlying mechanism mimicking the symptoms of a joint sprain. Despite numerous clinical studies indicating the presence of positional faults, there is limited evidence of imaging studies confirming positional faults. This case report is a preliminary study that offers clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius, treated successfully with manual therapy techniques. Three weeks after a bike fall on the outstretched hand, the patient in this study presented with right wrist pain and a lack of progress with conventional conservative treatment (NSAIDs, rest and immobilization). Clinical findings indicating a proximal positional fault of the radius included pain during active pronation increased by associating a passive movement of the radius in a proximal direction and it was reduced by associating a passive movement of the radius in a distal direction. Ultrasonographic (US) images showed a reduction of radio-capitellar distance on the right side (11.4 mm) compared to the left side (13.3 mm). A positive response with a distal mobilization of the radius supported the proximal positional fault of the radius. After two manual therapy sessions, the patient had recovered normal asymptomatic function. The outcomes used to assess function and pain were active pronation range of motion, the Spanish version of the DASH questionnaire and a 0-10 numeric pain rating scale. Each measure was conducted prior and after each treatment session and one week post treatment. The patient was re-examined at 6 months follow-up, during which US images, demonstrated a normalization of the right radio-capitellar distance.

  9. Computer-assisted 3D planned corrective osteotomies in eight malunited radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Walenkamp, M M J; de Muinck Keizer, R J O; Dobbe, J G G; Streekstra, G J; Goslings, J C; Kloen, P; Strackee, S D; Schep, N W L

    2015-08-01

    In corrective osteotomy of the radius, detailed preoperative planning is essential to optimising functional outcome. However, complex malunions are not completely addressed with conventional preoperative planning. Computer-assisted preoperative planning may optimise the results of corrective osteotomy of the radius. We analysed the pre- and postoperative radiological result of computer-assisted 3D planned corrective osteotomy in a series of patients with a malunited radius and assessed postoperative function. We included eight patients aged 13-64 who underwent a computer-assisted 3D planned corrective osteotomy of the radius for the treatment of a symptomatic radius malunion. We evaluated pre- and postoperative residual malpositioning on 3D reconstructions as expressed in six positioning parameters (three displacements along and three rotations about the axes of a 3D anatomical coordinate system) and assessed postoperative wrist range of motion. In this small case series, dorsopalmar tilt was significantly improved (p = 0.05). Ulnoradial shift, however, increased by the correction osteotomy (6 of 8 cases, 75 %). Postoperative 3D evaluation revealed improved positioning parameters for patients in axial rotational alignment (62.5 %), radial inclination (75 %), proximodistal shift (83 %) and volodorsal shift (88 %), although the cohort was not large enough to confirm this by statistical significance. All but one patient experienced improved range of motion (88 %). Computer-assisted 3D planning ameliorates alignment of radial malunions and improves functional results in patients with a symptomatic malunion of the radius. Further development is required to improve transfer of the planned position to the intra-operative bone. Level of evidence IV.

  10. OSTEOTOMY OF THE DISTAL RADIUS USING A FIXED-ANGLE VOLAR PLATE

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ricardo Kaempf; Binz, Mário Arthur Rockenbach; Ferreira, Marco Tonding; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Serrano, Pedro Delgado; Praetzel, Rafael Pêgas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Skewed consolidation of the distal radius, due to sequelae of fractures, may cause functional incapacity, thus leading such patients to present pain, loss of strength and diminished mobility. Based on the excellent results obtained from surgical treatment of unstable fractures of the distal radius through a volar approach and use of rigid fixation with a fixed-angle volar plate, we started to use the same method for osteotomy of the distal radius. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted, and 20 patients treated between February 2002 and October 2009 were found. The mean length of follow-up was 43.9 months (range: 12 to 96 months). The surgical indications were persistent pain, deformity and functional limitation subsequent to a dorsally displaced fracture. Results: The mean preoperative deformity was 27° of dorsal tilt of the distal radius, 87° of ulnar tilt, and 7.3 mm of shortening of the radius. All the osteotomies consolidated and the final mean volar tilt was 6.2°, with ulnar tilt of 69.3° and shortening of 1 mm. The mean mobility of the wrist increased by 19.9° (flexion) and by 24° (extension). Mean forearm supination increased by 23.5° and pronation by 21.7°. Grip strength increased from 13.4 to 34.5 pounds. Conclusion: Use of a fixed-angle volar plate for a volar approach towards osteotomy of the distal radius enables satisfactory correction of the deformities and eliminates the need for removal of the synthesis material caused by tendon complications PMID:27042618

  11. Preferential distal radius fracture in right-handed individuals presenting to an ED.

    PubMed

    Pesola, Gene R; Feinberg, Gary A; Ahsan, Habibul

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a lateralizing predisposition toward injury in right hand-dominant (RHD) individuals. The distal radius fracture was used as the injury for evaluation because it is easily defined and can be objectively documented by roentgenography. A prospective case-series design was used to include consecutive RHD patients with a distal radius fracture. There were 86 women with an average age of 63.1 +/- 17.9 years and 41 men with an average age of 44.0 +/- 17.6 years with a significant difference between ages (P <.01). Overall, there were 50 right and 77 left distal radius fractures, which was significantly different than a 50:50 split (P <.025). Stratification and logistic regression analysis revealed that age (dichotomized into age greater than 57 or other) and not gender was a significant factor in the determination of left versus right distal radius fracture. No interaction between age and gender was found. After adjustment for gender, the odds of developing a left compared with right distal radius fracture was 2.3-fold greater for the older compared with the younger age group (95% confidence interval, 1.0-5.2). Preliminary evidence suggests a lateralizing predisposition for left distal radius fractures in older compared with younger individuals who are RHD. If this data holds up, finding the etiology/mechanism of this predisposition might help in designing environments to minimize the impact of this injury pattern in the slightly older individual.

  12. On the ππ continuum in the nucleon form factors and the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.; Ruiz de Elvira, J.; Hammer, H.-W.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2016-11-01

    We present an improved determination of the ππ continuum contribution to the isovector spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. Our analysis includes the most up-to-date results for the ππ→bar{N} N partial waves extracted from Roy-Steiner equations, consistent input for the pion vector form factor, and a thorough discussion of isospin-violating effects and uncertainty estimates. As an application, we consider the ππ contribution to the isovector electric and magnetic radii by means of sum rules, which, in combination with the accurately known neutron electric radius, are found to slightly prefer a small proton charge radius.

  13. Acute Ulnar Shortening for Delayed Presentation of Distal Radius Growth Arrest in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Ellanti, Prasad; Harrington, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius physeal fractures are common in children and adolescents. However, posttraumatic growth arrest is uncommon. The management of posttraumatic growth arrest is dependent on the severity of the deformity and the remaining growth potential of the patient. Various treatment options exist. We present a 17-year-old male with distal radius growth arrest who presented four years after the initial injury. He had a symptomatic 15 mm positive ulnar variance managed with an ulnar shortening osteotomy with the use of the AO mini distractor intraoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, an acute ulnar shortening of 15 mm is the largest reported. PMID:23227397

  14. Acute ulnar shortening for delayed presentation of distal radius growth arrest in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, Prasad; Harrington, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius physeal fractures are common in children and adolescents. However, posttraumatic growth arrest is uncommon. The management of posttraumatic growth arrest is dependent on the severity of the deformity and the remaining growth potential of the patient. Various treatment options exist. We present a 17-year-old male with distal radius growth arrest who presented four years after the initial injury. He had a symptomatic 15 mm positive ulnar variance managed with an ulnar shortening osteotomy with the use of the AO mini distractor intraoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, an acute ulnar shortening of 15 mm is the largest reported.

  15. Mass-Radius Spirals for Steady State Families of the Vlasov-Poisson System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramming, Tobias; Rein, Gerhard

    2017-02-01

    We consider spherically symmetric steady states of the Vlasov-Poisson system, which describe equilibrium configurations of galaxies or globular clusters. If the microscopic equation of state, i.e., the dependence of the steady state on the particle energy (and angular momentum) is fixed, a one-parameter family of such states is obtained. In the polytropic case the mass of the state along such a one-parameter family is a monotone function of its radius. We prove that for the King, Woolley-Dickens, and related models this mass-radius relation takes the form of a spiral.

  16. Longitudinal afterbody grooves and shoulder radiusing for low-speed bluff body drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, F. G.; Quass, B. F.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    A new low-speed drag reduction approach is proposed which employs longitudinal surface V-shaped grooves cutting through the afterbody shoulder region. The test Reynolds number range was from 20,000 to 200,000 based on undisturbed free-stream flow and a body diameter of 6.08 cm. The V-grooves are shown to be most effective in reducing drag when the afterbody shoulder radius is zero. Reductions in drag of up to 33% have been measured for this condition. For large shoulder radius, the grooves are only effective at the lower Reynolds numbers of the test.

  17. Thickness-radius relationship and spring constants of cholesterol helical ribbons.

    PubMed

    Khaykovich, Boris; Kozlova, Natalia; Choi, Wonshik; Lomakin, Aleksey; Hossain, Chintan; Sung, Yongjin; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Benedek, George B

    2009-09-15

    Using quantitative phase microscopy, we have discovered a quadratic relationship between the radius R and the thickness t of helical ribbons that form spontaneously in multicomponent cholesterol-surfactant mixtures. These helical ribbons may serve as mesoscopic springs to measure or to exert forces on nanoscale biological objects. The spring constants of these helices depend on their submicroscopic thickness. The quadratic relationship (R proportional to t(2)) between radius and thickness is a consequence of the crystal structure of the ribbons and enables a determination of the spring constant of any of our helices solely in terms of its observable geometrical dimensions.

  18. Effect of tip radius on the incipient plasticity of chromium studied by nanoindentation

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Dong; Morris, James R.; Nieh, T. G.

    2014-10-01

    The onset of plasticity in Cr was investigated by nanoindentation using indenters with tip radii ranging from 60 to 759 nm. The stress for incipient plasticity was found to increase with decreasing tip radius. We find that the cumulative pop-in probability on load could be described successfully by a combined model over the full range of tip radius, indicating that the incipient plasticity might be triggered either by the homogeneous nucleation of dislocation or by the activation of existing dislocations underneath the indenter.

  19. Korean Type Distal Radius Anatomical Volar Plate System: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jihyeung; Kim, Min Bom; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is the most common fracture of the upper extremity, and approximately 60,000 distal radius fractures occur annually in Korea. Internal fixation with an anatomical volar locking plate is widely used in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. However, most of the currently used distal radius anatomical plate systems were designed based on the anatomical characteristics of Western populations. Recently, the Korean-type distal radius anatomical volar plate (K-DRAVP) system was designed and developed based on the anatomical characteristics of the distal radius of Koreans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of the new K-DRAVP system, and to compare its radiologic and functional results with those of the other systems. Methods From March 2012 to October 2012, 46 patients with acute distal radius fractures who were treated with the K-DRAVP system at three hospitals were enrolled in this study. Standard posteroanterior and lateral radiographs were obtained to assess fracture healing, and three radiographic parameters (volar tilt, radial inclination, and radial length) were assessed to evaluate radiographic outcomes. The range of motion and grip strength, the Gartland and Werley scoring system, and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaire were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. Results All radiologic parameters were restored to normal values, and maintained without any loosening or collapse until the time of final follow-up. Grip strength was restored to 84% of the value for the unaffected side. The mean range of motion of the wrist at final follow-up was restored to 77%-95% of the value for the unaffected side. According to the Gartland and Werley scoring system, there were 16 excellent, 26 good, and 4 fair results. The mean DASH score was 8.4 points. There were no complications after surgery. Conclusions The newly developed K-DRAVP system could be used to

  20. An Examination of Proton Charge Radius Extractions from e–p Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John

    2015-09-15

    A detailed examination of issues associated with proton radius extractions from elastic electron–proton scattering experiments is presented. Sources of systematic uncertainty and model dependence in the extractions are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may impact the proton charge and magnetic radii. A comparison of recent Mainz data to previous world data is presented, highlighting the difference in treatment of systematic uncertainties as well as tension between different data sets. We find several issues that suggest that larger uncertainties than previously quoted may be appropriate, but do not find any corrections which would resolve the proton radius puzzle.

  1. Should muffin tin radius vary in different structures of a material?: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Vikas; Banger, Suman; Verma, U. P.

    2014-04-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory and a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been used to study the structural properties of YbN. Its predicted unit cell lattice parameter in NaCl (B1) structure is 4.7810Å and in CsCl (B2) structure it is 2.8685Å. In the determination of lattice parameter the muffin tin radius (RMT) of constituent atoms play important role. In both the structures the muffin tin radius for Yb and N converges to 2.3 and 1.4 a.u., respectively.

  2. Should muffin tin radius vary in different structures of a material?: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Vikas Banger, Suman Verma, U. P.

    2014-04-24

    Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory and a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been used to study the structural properties of YbN. Its predicted unit cell lattice parameter in NaCl (B1) structure is 4.7810Å and in CsCl (B2) structure it is 2.8685Å. In the determination of lattice parameter the muffin tin radius (R{sub MT}) of constituent atoms play important role. In both the structures the muffin tin radius for Yb and N converges to 2.3 and 1.4 a.u., respectively.

  3. Chiral structure of the Lamb shift and the definition of the proton radius

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, Antonio

    2005-06-01

    The standard definition of the electromagnetic radius of a charged particle (in particular the proton) is ambiguous once electromagnetic corrections are considered. We argue that a natural definition can be given within an effective field theory framework in terms of a matching coefficient. The definition of the neutron radius is also discussed. We elaborate on the effective field theory relevant for hydrogen and muonic hydrogen, especially for the latter. We compute the hadronic corrections to the Lamb shift (for the polarizability effects only with logarithmic accuracy) within heavy-baryon effective theory. We find that they diverge in the inverse of the pion mass in the chiral limit.

  4. How to Measure the Radius of the Earth on Your Beach Vacation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Zachary H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a method for determining the distance to the horizon which leads to determining the radius of the Earth. The article answers two interesting science questions: (1) Can you see the state of Kansas from Pike's Peak in Colorado? and (2) Can you see two sunsets in one day on the Keys of Florida? (MVL)

  5. Remodeling of Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Houshian, Shirzad; Holst, Anette Koch; Larsen, Morten S; Torfing, Trine

    2004-01-01

    The authors studied the relation between residual angulation at the time of healing and final orientation of the distal radius as well as the clinical outcome in patients after Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury of the distal radius. Eighty-five patients were reviewed with a median follow-up of 8.5 years. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were taken at follow-up. The mobility of both wrists and forearms was examined, together with grip strength. Pain with activities and sports was evaluated. At follow-up, 73 patients (86%) were anatomically normal on radiographs; the remaining 12 patients had an incomplete remodeling of the volar and/or radial inclination of the distal radius. Premature closure of the growth plate in the distal radius or ulna did not occur in any of these children. Complete remodeling was seen in children aged up to 10 years in all but one patient. Remodeling after Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury occurs in all age groups, but the potential is greater in children up to 10 years of age. The incomplete remodeling does not seem to have any substantial long-term negative effect on mobility of the wrist and grip strength.

  6. Management of Giant Cell Tumour Radius in a Three Year old Child with an Improvised Technique

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay; Gulia, Ashish; Sharma, Seema; Verma, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumours of immature skeleton have a very low incidence and epi-metaphyseal location. We are presenting giant cell tumour distal radius in a skeletally immature patient; an uncontained defect with a large soft tissue component which was managed by wide excision and reconstruction with an improvised technique. PMID:25654002

  7. Characteristics of distal radius speed of sound data in Chinese mainland men and women.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ligang; Pan, Jiafei; Jin, Hongting; Xiao, Luwei; Tao, Jing; Tong, Peijian

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment of bone health status, as a reliable method, is rapidly gaining popularity. Speed of sound (SOS) is one parameter of skeletal status provided by QUS assessment. The objective of the present study was first to determine the normative distal radius SOS data on healthy Chinese mainland men and women and second to investigate the effects of sex, age, and body size on this parameter. A study cohort consisting of 19,980 healthy Chinese women and 8722 men aged 20-89 yr participated in this investigation. They answered a detailed questionnaire on their healthy condition, and their anthropometric measurements were taken. Their distal radius SOS values were evaluated using the Sunlight ultrasound systems. The distal radius SOS values exhibited a characteristic rise-then-fall pattern with increasing age in both sexes. The peak SOS value occurred at the age of 40-49 both in males and females. Age-related differences were both pronounced among males and females. Pearson correlation and regression analysis showed that age was a major determinant of SOS in both sexes. In females, SOS values had a much stronger correlation with age than male subjects. Body weight was also correlated with SOS but not as well as age. The SOS values of distal radius at present study may be used as normal reference data for Chinese mainland population and will be useful for comparing the results of individual studies and determining diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis by QUS.

  8. A Spitzer Infrared Radius for the Transiting Extrasolar Planet HD 209458 b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, L. Jeremy; Harrington, Joseph; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the infrared transit of the extrasolar planet HD 209458 b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. We observed two primary eclipse events (one partial and one complete transit) using the 24 micrometer array of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We analyzed a total of 2392 individual images (10-second integrations) of the planetary system, recorded before, during, and after transit. We perform optimal photometry on the images and use the local zodiacal light as a short-term flux reference. At this long wavelength, the transit curve has a simple box-like shape, allowing robust solutions for the stellar and planetary radii independent of stellar limb darkening, which is negligible at 24 micrometers. We derive a stellar radius of R(sub *) = 1.06 plus or minus 0.07 solar radius, a planetary radius of R(sub p) = 1.26 plus or minus 0.08 R(sub J), and a stellar mass of 1.17 solar mass. Within the errors, our results agree with the measurements at visible wavelengths. The 24 micrometer radius of the planet therefore does not differ significantly compared to the visible result. We point out the potential for deriving extrasolar transiting planet radii to high accuracy using transit photometry at slightly shorter IR wavelengths where greater photometric precision is possible.

  9. The persistence of epiphyseal scars in the distal radius in adult individuals.

    PubMed

    Davies, Catriona; Hackman, Lucina; Black, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The use of radiographic imaging in the estimation of chronological age facilitates the analysis of structures not visible on gross morphological inspection. Following the completion of epiphyseal fusion, a thin radio-opaque band, the epiphyseal scar, may be observed at the locus of the former growth plate. The obliteration of this feature has previously been interpreted as the final stage of skeletal maturation and consequently has been included as a criterion in several methods of age estimation, particularly from the distal radius. Due to the recommendations relating to age estimation in living individuals, accurate assessment of age from the distal radius is of great importance in human identification; however, the validity of the interpretation of the obliteration of the epiphyseal scar as an age-related process has not been tested. A study was undertaken to assess the persistence of epiphyseal scars in adults between 20 and 50 years of age through the assessment of 616 radiographs of left and right distal radii from a cross-sectional population. This study found that 86% of females and 78% of males retained some remnant of the epiphyseal scar in the distal radius. The relationships between chronological age, biological sex and the persistence of the epiphyseal scar were not statistically significant. The findings of this study indicate that the epiphyseal scars may persist in adult individuals until at least 50 years of age. No maximum age should therefore be applied to the persistence of an epiphyseal scar in the distal radius.

  10. How Many Times Does a Radius Square Fit into the Circle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Alfinio; Regis, Troy P.

    2003-01-01

    Illustrates a way in which students can estimate the ratio of an area of a circle using the radius square. Discusses why the same value of pi appears in both the formulas for the circumference and the area of the circle. (YDS)

  11. Pole-strength of the earth from Magsat and magnetic determination of the core radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, G. V.; Benton, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A model based on two days of Magsat data is used to numerically evaluate the unsigned magnetic flux linking the earth's surface, and a comparison of the 16.054 GWb value calculated with values from earlier geomagnetic field models reveals a smooth, monotonic, and recently-accelerating decrease in the earth's pole strength at a 50-year average rate of 8.3 MWb, or 0.052%/year. Hide's (1978) magnetic technique for determining the radius of the earth's electrically-conducting core is tested by (1) extrapolating main field models for 1960 and 1965 downward through the nearly-insulating mantle, and then separately comparing them to equivalent, extrapolated models of Magsat data. The two unsigned fluxes are found to equal the Magsat values at a radius which is within 2% of the core radius; and (2) the 1960 main field and secular variation and acceleration coefficients are used to derive models of 1930, 1940 and 1950. The same core magnetic radius value, within 2% of the seismic value, is obtained. It is concluded that the mantle is a nearly-perfect insulator, while the core is a perfect conductor, on the decade time scale.

  12. Dependence of the wave-front aberration on the radius of the reference sphere.

    PubMed

    Miks, Antonín

    2002-06-01

    Wave-front aberration is a basic characteristic of the imaging properties of optical systems. The value of the wave-front aberration is obtained by calculating the difference between the optical path lengths of the real wave front and the reference sphere. The general relations for calculated dependence of the wave-front aberration on the radius of the reference sphere are given.

  13. Estimating the Radius of the Convective Core of Main-sequence Stars from Observed Oscillation Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-10-01

    The determination of the size of the convective core of main-sequence stars is usually dependent on the construction of models of stars. Here we introduce a method to estimate the radius of the convective core of main-sequence stars with masses between about 1.1 and 1.5 M ⊙ from observed frequencies of low-degree p-modes. A formula is proposed to achieve the estimation. The values of the radius of the convective core of four known stars are successfully estimated by the formula. The radius of the convective core of KIC 9812850 estimated by the formula is 0.140 ± 0.028 R ⊙. In order to confirm this prediction, a grid of evolutionary models was computed. The value of the convective-core radius of the best-fit model of KIC 9812850 is 0.149 R ⊙, which is in good agreement with that estimated by the formula from observed frequencies. The formula aids in understanding the interior structure of stars directly from observed frequencies. The understanding is not dependent on the construction of models.

  14. Review of experimental and theoretical status of the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard J.

    2017-03-01

    The discrepancy between the measured Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and expectations from electron-proton scattering and regular hydrogen spectroscopy has become known as the proton radius puzzle, whose most "mundane" resolution requires a > 5σ shift in the value of the fundamental Rydberg constant. I briefly review the status of spectroscopic and scattering measurements, recent theoretical developments, and implications for fundamental physics.

  15. ROTATIONAL CORRECTIONS TO NEUTRON-STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS FROM THERMAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bauböck, Michi; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2015-01-20

    We calculate the rotational broadening in the observed thermal spectra of neutron stars spinning at moderate rates in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. These calculations accurately account for the effects of the second-order Doppler boosts as well as for the oblate shapes and the quadrupole moments of the neutron stars. We find that fitting the spectra and inferring the bolometric fluxes under the assumption that a star is not rotating causes an underestimate of the inferred fluxes and, thus, radii. The correction depends on the stellar spin, mass, radius, and the observer's inclination. For a 10 km, 1.4 M {sub ☉} neutron star spinning at 600 Hz, the rotational correction to the flux is ∼1%-4%, while for a 15 km neutron star with the same spin period, the correction ranges from 2% for pole-on sources to 12% for edge-on sources. We calculate the inclination-averaged corrections to inferred radii as a function of the neutron-star radius and mass and provide an empirical formula for the corrections. For realistic neutron-star parameters (1.4 M {sub ☉}, 12 km, 600 Hz), the stellar radius is on the order of 4% larger than the radius inferred under the assumption that the star is not spinning.

  16. RADIUS: Research Archive on Disability in the United States. [CD-ROMs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This Research Archive on Disability in the United States (RADIUS), a database on CD-ROM, contains 19 data sets on the prevalence, incidence, correlates, and consequences of disability in the United States. The 19 data sets are: (1) 1991 National Maternal and Infant Health Follow-Up Survey; (2) National Pediatric Trauma Registry, 1988-1994; (3)…

  17. Biomechanical Performance of Variable and Fixed Angle Locked Volar Plates for the Dorsally Comminuted Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, D; Shorez, J; Beran, C; Dass, A G; Atkinson, P

    2014-01-01

    Background The ideal treatment strategy for the dorsally comminuted distal radius fracture continues to evolve. Newer plate designs allow for variable axis screw placement while maintaining the advantages of locked technology. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of one variable axis plate with two traditional locked constructs. Methods Simulated fractures were created via a distal 1 cm dorsal wedge osteotomy in radius bone analogs. The analogs were of low stiffness and rigidity to create a worst-case strength condition for the subject radius plates. This fracture-gap model was fixated using one of three different locked volar distal radius plates: a variable axis plate (Stryker VariAx) or fixed axis (DePuy DVR, Smith & Nephew Peri-Loc) designs. The constructs were then tested at physiologic loading levels in axial compression and bending (dorsal and volar) modes. Construct stiffness was assessed by fracture gap motion during the different loading conditions. As a within-study control, intact bone analogs were similarly tested. Results All plated constructs were significantly less stiff than the intact control bone models in all loading modes (p<0.040). Amongst the plated constructs, the VariAx was stiffest axially (p=0.032) and the Peri-Loc was stiffest in bending (p<0.024). Conclusion In this analog bone fracture gap model, the variable axis locking technology was stiffer in axial compression than other plates, though less stiff in bending. PMID:25328471

  18. Stability radius as a method for comparing the dynamics of neuromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Jeffrey T; Ting, Lena H

    2013-09-01

    Robust motor behaviors emerge from neuromechanical interactions that are nonlinear, have delays, and contain redundant neural and biomechanical components. For example, in standing balance a subject's muscle activity (neural control) decreases as stance width (biomechanics) increases when responding to a lateral perturbation, yet the center-of-mass motion (behavior) is nearly identical regardless of stance width. We present stability radius, a technique from robust control theory, to overcome the limitations of classical stability analysis tools, such as gain margin, which are insufficient for predicting how concurrent changes in both biomechanics (plant) and neural control (controller) affect system behavior. We first present the theory and then an application to a neuromechanical model of frontal-plane standing balance with delayed feedback. We show that stability radius can quantify differences in the sensitivity of system behavior to parameter changes, and predict that narrowing stance width increases system robustness. We further demonstrate that selecting combinations of stance width (biomechanics) and feedback gains (neural control) that have the same stability radius produce similar center-of-mass behavior in simulation. Therefore, stability radius may provide a useful tool for understanding neuromechanical interactions in movement and could aid in the design of devices and therapies for improving motor function.

  19. Stability Radius as a Method for Comparing the Dynamics of Neuromechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Jeffrey T.; Ting, Lena H.

    2015-01-01

    Robust motor behaviors emerge from neuromechanical interactions that are nonlinear, have delays, and contain redundant neural and biomechanical components. For example, in standing balance a subject’s muscle activity (neural control) decreases as stance width (biomechanics) increases when responding to a lateral perturbation, yet the center-of-mass motion (behavior) is nearly identical regardless of stance width. We present stability radius, a technique from robust control theory, to overcome the limitations of classical stability analysis tools, such as gain margin, which are insufficient for predicting how concurrent changes in both biomechanics (plant) and neural control (controller) affect system behavior. We first present the theory and then an application to a neuromechanical model of frontal-plane standing balance with delayed feedback. We show that stability radius can quantify differences in the sensitivity of system behavior to parameter changes, and predict that narrowing stance width increases system robustness. We further demonstrate that selecting combinations of stance width (biomechanics) and feedback gains (neural control) that have the same stability radius produce similar center-of-mass behavior in simulation. Therefore, stability radius may provide a useful tool for understanding neuromechanical interactions in movement and could aid in the design of devices and therapies for improving motor function. PMID:23744699

  20. [Concomitant fractures of the radius and scaphoid with an elbow dislocation].

    PubMed

    El Andaloussi, Y; Bendriss, A; Bennouna, D; Ouarab, M

    2008-09-01

    A variety of associated injuries of the upper limb have been described in the literature. The authors report a case of bifocal fracture of the radius and a scaphoid fracture together with elbow dislocation. In our knowledge, this association of lesions has never previously been described.

  1. Predictions of Crystal Structure Based on Radius Ratio: How Reliable Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Lawrence C.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of crystalline solids in undergraduate curricula often includes the use of radius ratio rules as a method for predicting which type of crystal structure is likely to be adopted by a given ionic compound. Examines this topic, establishing more definitive guidelines for the use and reliability of the rules. (JN)

  2. Turnaround radius in an accelerated universe with quasi-local mass

    SciTech Connect

    Faraoni, Valerio; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne; Prain, Angus E-mail: mlapierre12@ubishops.ca

    2015-10-01

    We apply the Hawking-Hayward quasi-local energy construct to obtain in a rigorous way the turnaround radius of cosmic structures in General Relativity. A splitting of this quasi-local mass into local and cosmological parts describes the interplay between local attraction and cosmological expansion.

  3. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  4. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability and flute waves at the ion Larmor radius scales

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Stenflo, L.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-02-15

    The theory of flute waves (with arbitrary spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius) driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is developed. Both the kinetic and hydrodynamic models are considered. In this way we have extended the previous analysis of RTI carried out in the long wavelength limit. It is found that complete finite ion Larmor radius stabilization is absent when the ion diamagnetic velocity attains the ion gravitation drift velocity. The hydrodynamic approach allowed us to deduce a new set of nonlinear equations for flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales. It is shown that the previously deduced equations are inadequate when the wavelength becomes of the order of the ion Larmor radius. In the linear limit a Fourier transform of these equations yields the dispersion relation which in the so-called Pade approximation corresponds to the results of the fully kinetic treatment. The development of such a theory gives us enough grounds for an adequate description of the RTI stabilization by the finite ion Larmor radius effect.

  5. Understanding the ``Proton Radius Puzzle'': Nuclear Polarizability Correction in μD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Oscar J.; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of the proton radius was improved ten-fold by new spectroscopic measurements in muonic hydrogen but it differs by 7 σ from hydrogen determinations. This discrepancy, has been coined the ``proton radius puzzle''. The results of new high-precision experiments on muonic deuterium indicate a new deuterium radius puzzle. The accuracy of the nuclear charge radius determination from these measurements is limited by the uncertainty in the nuclear structure effects. We have calculated this correction in Ref. including the first estimate of the nuclear-model dependence. Due to the importance of constraining the uncertainty, we will determine the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the χEFT potentials by determining the co-variance matrices of our predictions. I will also discuss an alternate method that may reduce the theoretical uncertainty. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work was supported in parts by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (Grant Number SAPIN-2015-00031).

  6. Measuring the Radius of the Earth from a Mountain Top Overlooking the Ocean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangadharan, Dhevan

    2009-01-01

    A clear view of the ocean may be used to measure the radius of the Earth. To an observer looking out at the ocean, the horizon will always form some angle [theta] with the local horizontal plane. As the observer's elevation "h" increases, so does the angle [theta]. From measurements of the elevation "h" and the angle [theta],…

  7. Failure characteristics of the isolated distal radius in response to dynamic impact loading.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2012-06-01

    We examined the mechanical response of the distal radius pre-fracture and at fracture under dynamic impact loads. The distal third of eight human cadaveric radii were potted and placed in a custom designed pneumatic impact system. The distal intra-articular surface of the radius rested against a model scaphoid and lunate, simulating 45° of wrist extension. The scaphoid and lunate were attached to a load cell that in turn was attached to an impact plate. Impulsive impacts were applied at increasing energy levels, in 10 J increments, until fracture occurred. Three 45° stacked strain gauge rosettes were affixed along the length of the radius quantifying the bone strains. The mean (SD) fracture energy was 45.5 (16) J. The mean (SD) resultant impact reaction force (IRFr) at failure was 2,142 (1,229) N, resulting in high compressive strains at the distal (2,718 (1,698) µε) and proximal radius (3,664 (1,890) µε). We successfully reproduced consistent fracture patterns in response to dynamic loads. The fracture energy and forces reported here are lower and the strains are higher than those previously reported and can likely be attributed to the controlled, incremental, dynamic nature of the applied loads.

  8. AGN-halo Mass Assembly Connection in Galaxy Clusters: Investigation Using the Splashback Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Missy; More, Surhud; Silverman, John D.

    2017-01-01

    The splashback radius (also known as the last density caustic or the second turnaround radius) is a sharp dark matter halo edge that corresponds to the location of the first orbital apocenter of satellite galaxies after their infall. This definition of a halo boundary is more physical compared to the traditional definitions of halo boundaries which tend to be quite arbitrary. The splashback radius responds to the mass assembly history of clusters. For dark matter halos of the same mass, a large mass accretion rate results in a smaller splashback radius, since its deeper halo potential well has a closer apocenter. Using two cluster samples which had the same mass, but different splashback radii, we set out to check if the incidences of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the member galaxies of these clusters are affected by their mass assembly history. Using SDSS spectroscopic data, we determined metallicity of galaxies and constructed a BPT diagram to classify each galaxy member in each cluster (Seyfert, Liner, Composite, etc.) and determined if an AGN was likely to be present. We compared the samples and determined that the rapidly assembling sample did have a larger AGN presence.

  9. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Nevo Dinur, Nir; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  10. ACS imaging of star clusters in M 51. I. Identification and radius distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheepmaker, R. A.; Haas, M. R.; Gieles, M.; Bastian, N.; Larsen, S. S.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    2007-07-01

    Context: Size measurements of young star clusters are valuable tools to put constraints on the formation and early dynamical evolution of star clusters. Aims: We use HST/ACS observations of the spiral galaxy M 51 in F435W, F555W and F814W to select a large sample of star clusters with accurate effective radius measurements in an area covering the complete disc of M 51. We present the dataset and study the radius distribution and relations between radius, colour, arm/interarm region, galactocentric distance, mass and age. Methods: We select a sample of 7698 (F435W), 6846 (F555W) and 5024 (F814W) slightly resolved clusters and derive their effective radii (R_eff) by fitting the spatial profiles with analytical models convolved with the point spread function. The radii of 1284 clusters are studied in detail. Results: We find cluster radii between 0.5 and ~10 pc, and one exceptionally large cluster candidate with R_eff = 21.6 pc. The median R_eff is 2.1 pc. We find 70 clusters in our sample which have colours consistent with being old GC candidates and we find 6 new “faint fuzzy” clusters in, or projected onto, the disc of M 51. The radius distribution can not be fitted with a power law similar to the one for star-forming clouds. We find an increase in R_eff with colour as well as a higher fraction of clusters with B-V ⪆ 0.05 in the interarm regions. We find a correlation between R_eff and galactocentric distance (RG) of the form R_eff∝ RG0.12±0.02, which is considerably weaker than the observed correlation for old Milky Way GCs. We find weak relations between cluster luminosity and radius: R_eff∝ L0.15±0.02 for the interarm regions and R_eff∝ L-0.11±0.01 for the spiral arm regions, but we do not observe a correlation between cluster mass and radius. Conclusions: The observed radius distribution indicates that shortly after the formation of the clusters from a fractal gas, the radii of the clusters have changed in a non-uniform way. We find tentative

  11. Mercury's radius change estimates revisited using high incidence angle MESSENGER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Achille, G.; Popa, C.; Massironi, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Palumbo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Estimates of Mercury's radius decrease obtained using the amount of strain recorded by tectonics on the planet range from 0.5 km to 2 km. These latter figures appear too low with respect to the radius contraction (up to 5-6 km) predicted by the most accredited studies based on thermo-mechanical evolution models. For this reason, it has been suggested that there may be hidden strain accommodated by features yet unseen on Mercury. Indeed, as it has been already cautioned by previous studies, the identification of tectonic features on Mercury might be largely biased by the lighting geometry of the used basemaps. This limitation might have affected the results of the extrapolations for estimating the radius change. In this study, we mapped tectonic features at the terminator thus using images acquired at high sun incidence angle (>50°) that represents the optimal condition for their observation. In fact, images with long shadows enhance the topography and texture of the surface and are ideal to detect tectonic structures. This favorable illumination conditions allowed us to infer reliable measurements of spatial distribution (i.e. frequency, orientation, and areal density) of tectonic features which can be used to estimate the average contractional strain and planetary radius decrease. We digitized tectonic structures within a region extending for an area of about 12 million sq. km (~16% of planet's surface). More than 1300 tectonic lineaments were identified and interpreted to be compressional features (i.e. lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges, and high relief ridges) with a total length of more than 12300 km. Assuming that the extensional strain is negligible within the area, the average contractional strain calculated for the survey area is ~0.21-0.28% (~0.24% for θ=30°). This strain, extrapolated to the entire surface, corresponds to a contraction in radius of about 2.5-3.4 km (~2.9 km for θ=30°). Interestingly, the values of contractional strain and radius decrease

  12. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for giant cell tumor of distal radius

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Kabul C; Borgohain, Munin; Bhuyan, Sanjeev K; Goswami, Sanjiv; Bora, Anjan; Ahmed, Firoz

    2010-01-01

    Background: Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the distal radius poses problems for reconstruction after resection. Several reconstructive procedures like vascularized and non-vascularized fibular graft, osteo-articular allograft, ceramic prosthesis and megaprosthesis are in use for substitution of the defect in the distal radius following resection. Most authors advocate wrist arthrodesis following resection of distal radius and non vascularized fibular graft. Here we have analyzed the results of aggressive benign GCTs of the distal radius treated by resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized fibular graft. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four cases of giant cell tumor of the distal radius (mean age 32 years, mean follow-up 6.6 years) treated by en-bloc resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized ipsilateral fibular graft with a minimum followup of two years have been included in this retrospective study. Nineteen cases were of Campanacci grade III and five were of Grade II recurrence. The mean resected length of the radius was 9.5 (8-12) cm. Routine radiographs and clinical assessments regarding pain, instability, recurrence, hand grip strength and functional status were done at regular intervals and functional results were assessed using (musculoskeletal tumor society) MSTS-87 scoring. Results: Early radiological union at host-graft junction was achieved at mean 12.5 weeks, (range 12-14 weeks) and solid incorporation with callus formation was observed in mean 29 weeks (range 28-32 weeks) in all the cases. Satisfactory range of motion (mean 63%, range 52-78%) of the wrist was achieved in 18 cases. Grip strength compared to the contralateral hand was found to be 67% (range 58-74%). Functional results were excellent in six cases (25%), good in 14 cases (58.3%) and four (16.7%) cases had fair results. Soft tissue recurrence was seen in one patient. The most commonly encountered complication was fibulo

  13. Adaptive evolution of a derived radius morphology in manakins (Aves, Pipridae) to support acrobatic display behavior.

    PubMed

    Friscia, Anthony; Sanin, Gloria D; Lindsay, Willow R; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A; Tan, Josh; Fuxjager, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    The morphology of the avian skeleton is often studied in the context of adaptations for powered flight. The effects of other evolutionary forces, such as sexual selection, on avian skeletal design are unclear, even though birds produce diverse behaviors that undoubtedly require a variety of osteological modifications. Here, we investigate this issue in a family of passerine birds called manakins (Pipridae), which have evolved physically unusual and elaborate courtship displays. We report that, in species within the genus Manacus, the shaft of the radius is heavily flattened and shows substantial solidification. Past work anecdotally notes this morphology and attributes it to the species' ability to hit their wings together above their heads to produce loud mechanical sonations. Our results show that this feature is unique to Manacus compared to the other species in our study, including a variety of taxa that produce other sonations through alternate wing mechanisms. At the same time, our data reveal striking similarities across species in total radius volume and solidification. Together, this suggests that supposedly adaptive alterations in radial morphology occur within a conserved framework of a set radius volume and solidness, which in turn is likely determined by natural selection. Further allometric analyses imply that the radius is less constrained by body size and the structural demands that underlie powered flight, compared to other forelimb bones that are mostly unmodified across taxa. These results are consistent with the idea that the radius is more susceptible to selective modification by sexual selection. Overall, this study provides some of the first insight into the osteological evolution of passerine birds, as well as the way in which opposing selective forces can shape skeletal design in these species. J. Morphol. 277:766-775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Multivariate injury risk criteria and injury probability scores for fractures to the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a multivariate distal radius injury risk prediction model that incorporates dynamic loading variables in multiple directions, and interpret the distal radius failure data in order to establish injury probability thresholds. Repeated impacts with increasing intensity were applied to the distal third of eight human cadaveric radius specimens (mean (SD) age=61.9 (9.7)) until injury occurred. Crack (non-propagating damage) and fracture (specimen separated into at least two fragments) injury events were recorded. Best subsets analysis was performed to find the best multivariate injury risk model. Force-only risk models were also determined for comparison. Cumulative distribution functions were developed from the parameters of a Weibull analysis and the forces and risk scores (i.e., values calculated from the injury risk models) from 10% to 90% probability were calculated. According to the adjusted R(2), variance inflation factor and p-values, the model that best predicted the crack event included medial/lateral impulse, Fz load rate, impact velocity and the natural logarithm of Fz (Adj. R(2)=0.698), while the best predictive model of the fracture event included medial/lateral impulse, impact velocity and peak Fz (Adj. R(2)=0.845). The multivariate models predicted injury risk better than both the Fz-only crack (Adj. R(2)=0.551) and fracture (Adj. R(2)=0.293) models. Risk scores of 0.5 and 0.6 corresponded to 10% failure probability for the crack and fracture events, respectively. The inclusion of medial/lateral impulse and impact velocity in both crack and fracture models, and Fz load rate in the crack model, underscores the dynamic nature of these events. This study presents a method capable of developing a set of distal radius fracture prediction models that can be used in the assessment and development of distal radius injury prevention interventions.

  15. Three-dimensional tool radius compensation for multi-axis peripheral milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youdong; Wang, Tianmiao

    2013-05-01

    Few function about 3D tool radius compensation is applied to generating executable motion control commands in the existing computer numerical control (CNC) systems. Once the tool radius is changed, especially in the case of tool size changing with tool wear in machining, a new NC program has to be recreated. A generic 3D tool radius compensation method for multi-axis peripheral milling in CNC systems is presented. The offset path is calculated by offsetting the tool path along the direction of the offset vector with a given distance. The offset vector is perpendicular to both the tangent vector of the tool path and the orientation vector of the tool axis relative to the workpiece. The orientation vector equations of the tool axis relative to the workpiece are obtained through homogeneous coordinate transformation matrix and forward kinematics of generalized kinematics model of multi-axis machine tools. To avoid cutting into the corner formed by the two adjacent tool paths, the coordinates of offset path at the intersection point have been calculated according to the transition type that is determined by the angle between the two tool path tangent vectors at the corner. Through the verification by the solid cutting simulation software VERICUT® with different tool radiuses on a table-tilting type five-axis machine tool, and by the real machining experiment of machining a soup spoon on a five-axis machine tool with the developed CNC system, the effectiveness of the proposed 3D tool radius compensation method is confirmed. The proposed compensation method can be suitable for all kinds of three- to five-axis machine tools as a general form.

  16. Improved precision on the radius of the nearby super-Earth 55 Cnc e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, M.; Demory, B.-O.; Benneke, B.; Valencia, D.; Deming, D.; Seager, S.; Lovis, Ch.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.

    2012-03-01

    We report on new transit photometry for the super-Earth 55 Cnc e obtained with Warm Spitzer/IRAC at 4.5 μm. An individual analysis of these new data leads to a planet radius of 2.21-0.16+0.15 R⊕, which agrees well with the values previously derived from the MOST and Spitzer transit discovery data. A global analysis of both Spitzer transit time-series improves the precision on the radius of the planet at 4.5 μm to 2.20 ± 0.12 R⊕. We also performed an independent analysis of the MOST data, paying particular attention to the influence of the systematic effects of instrumental origin on the derived parameters and errors by including them in a global model instead of performing a preliminary detrending-filtering processing. We deduce an optical planet radius of 2.04 ± 0.15 R⊕ from this reanalysis of MOST data, which is consistent with the previous MOST result and with our Spitzer infrared radius. Assuming the achromaticity of the transit depth, we performed a global analysis combining Spitzer and MOST data that results in a planet radius of 2.17 ± 0.10 R⊕ (13 820 ± 620 km). These results point to 55 Cnc e having a gaseous envelope overlying a rocky nucleus, in agreement with previous works. A plausible composition for the envelope is water which would be in super-critical form given the equilibrium temperature of the planet. The photometric time series used in this work are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/539/A28

  17. PICARD SOL mission, a ground-based facility for long-term solar radius measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Corbard, T.; Morand, F.; Thuillier, G.; Hauchecorne, A.; Ikhlef, R.; Rouze, M.; Renaud, C.; Djafer, D.; Abbaki, S.; Assus, P.; Chauvineau, B.; Cissé, E. M.; Dalaudier, F.; D'Almeida, Eric; Fodil, M.; Laclare, F.; Lesueur, P.; Lin, M.; Marcovici, J. P.; Poiet, G.

    2012-09-01

    For the last thirty years, ground time series of the solar radius have shown different variations according to different instruments. The origin of these variations may be found in the observer, the instrument, the atmosphere and the Sun. These time series show inconsistencies and conflicting results, which likely originate from instrumental effects and/or atmospheric effects. A survey of the solar radius was initiated in 1975 by F. Laclare, at the Calern site of the Observatoire de la Cˆote d'Azur (OCA). PICARD is an investigation dedicated to the simultaneous measurements of the absolute total and spectral solar irradiance, the solar radius and solar shape, and to the Sun's interior probing by the helioseismology method. The PICARD mission aims to the study of the origin of the solar variability and to the study of the relations between the Sun and the Earth's climate by using modeling. These studies will be based on measurements carried out from orbit and from the ground. PICARD SOL is the ground segment of the PICARD mission to allow a comparison of the solar radius measured in space and on ground. PICARD SOL will enable to understand the influence of the atmosphere on the measured solar radius. The PICARD Sol instrumentation consists of: SODISM II, a replica of SODISM (SOlar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper), a high resolution imaging telescope, and MISOLFA (Moniteur d'Images SOLaires Franco-Alǵerien), a seeing monitor. Additional instrumentation consists in a Sun photometer, which measures atmospheric aerosol properties, a pyranometer to measure the solar irradiance, a visible camera, and a weather station. PICARD SOL is operating since March 2011. First results from the PICARD SOL mission are briefly reported in this paper.

  18. A Comprehensive Study of Internal Distraction Plating, an Alternative Method for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mavani, Kinjal J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of highly comminuted distal radius fractures still remains a major treatment challenge. Articular comminution and compromised bone quality are the culprits. One novel approach is the technique of Internal Distraction Plating which involves “bridging” the fracture with the use of a standard 3.5mm plate applied dorsally in distraction from the radius, proximal to the fracture, to the long finger metacarpal distally, bypassing the comminuted segment. The plate is removed once fracture union has been achieved. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the role of internal dorsal distraction plating as an alternative method in the treatment of fracture distal radius in terms of special indications, technique and outcome. Materials and Methods This study was a prospective longitudinal study on 20 patients (mean age 62 years) treated with internal distraction plating for comminuted distal radius fractures with specific indications. Regular follow-ups with standard radiographs and analysis were done upto 24 months. Functional outcome were assessed by DASH Score and the Gartland and Werley demerit score. Results At final follow-up, all fractures had united and X-rays showed mean palmar tilt of 7°, positive ulnar variance of 0.5mm, radial inclination of 18° and average loss of 2mm of radial height. Mean range of motion values for wrist flexion 46°, extension 50°, pronation 79° and supination 77° At final follow-up, the mean DASH score was 32. 85% patient had excellent to good result as per Gartland and Werley demerit score. This construct has yield satisfactory clinical and radiographic results with these very challenging injuries. Conclusion The purpose of this study was to report the radiographic and the functional outcomes of treatment with this technique. External fixator and volar plating in communited distal end radius fractures are not always satisfactory in old age with osteoporotic bone because of

  19. The effect of perturbations of convective energy transport on the luminosity and radius of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Twigg, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The response of solar models to perturbations of the efficiency of convective energy transport is studied for a number of cases. Such perturbations primarily effect the shallow superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope (at depth of approx. 1000 km below the photosphere). Independent of the details of the perturbation scheme, the resulting change in the solar radius is always very small compared to the change in luminosity. This appears to be true for any physical mechanism of solar variability which operates in the outer layers of the convection zone. Changes of the solar radius have been inferred from historical observations of solar eclipses. Considering the constraints on concurrent luminosity changes, this type of solar variability must be indicative of changes in the solar structure at substantial depths below the superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope.

  20. Reduction of radiation loss at small-radius bend using spoof surface plasmon polariton transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wen Xuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Liu, Jun Feng; Xu, Jie; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) has been realized at low frequencies through corrugated metallic structures. As two-dimensional application, the ultrathin SPP transmission lines (TLs) have been proposed with great potentials for microwave compact circuits due to the strong field confinement and enhancement, as well as controllable dispersive properties. In this paper, we examine the radiation loss at small-radius bend, which may cause severe crosstalk in highly-integrated circuits or systems, for the SPP TLs. We theoretically analyze that the SPP TL has essential merit of low radiation loss, and show better performance of SPP TL than the conventional microstrip line through numerical simulations and experiments. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate that the new type of transmission line can efficiently suppress the radiation loss at small-radius bend, and hence reduce the crosstalk in circuits and systems.

  1. Triplane fracture of distal radius treated surgically: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mingo-Robinet, Juan; Torres-Torres, Miguel; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Only four cases of triplane distal radius fracture have been described in the literature. We report the first that has been treated with open reduction and internal fixation. A 15-year-old boy sustained a triplane fracture of the distal radius. After an unsuccessful attempt at closed reduction, open reduction and internal fixation were performed. Six months after injury, the patient is asymptomatic, but radiographs show a partial growth arrest. The goal of treatment is to achieve anatomic reduction of the articular surface. In this case interposed periosteum prevented anatomic reduction, requiring open reduction and internal fixation. Because of the patient's advanced age the partial physeal arrest should advance to complete arrest before length impairment or occurrence of angular deformity.

  2. HST Spectra of White Dwarfs and the Mass-Radius Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, S. R. G.; Barstow, M. A.; Casewell, S. L.; Holberg, J. B.; Bond, H. E.

    2017-03-01

    We present HST spectra of the white dwarf HR1358b which is one of a number of white dwarfs we are studying in Sirius-like binaries. These binaries give us the best chance yet to test the mass-radius relation through observations of the Balmer lines of white dwarfs. These observations can be used to measure the white dwarf mass using both the spectroscopic method and the gravitational red-shift method. One of the major challenges for this type of observation is scattered light from the main sequence star contaminating the white dwarf spectrum. We will discuss methods that have been developed to correct for scattered light in the spectrum of HR1358b and the effect this correction can have on the mass-radius measurements.

  3. Retardation of fracture healing by cerclage wire near the elbow in radius fracture models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangning; Li, Bin; Wang, Haiyu; Han, Qinghe; Shao, Guoxi; Gao, Yingjie; Xie, Guanghong

    2016-02-01

    Cerclage wire is widely used in the treatment of fracture internal fixation and is shown effective in clinic. But a report by S.L. has pointed that the wire loop delayed the growth of bone. We have established a radius fracture model to study the possible detrimental effects of cerclage wire on fracture healing and the potential mechanism. By high-resolution CT analysis cerclage wire is found to delay fracture healing, by histological assessment cerclage wire is found to extended the time of hematoma and the marrow cavity appearing, by confocal microscopy cerclage wire decreased the content of calcium and the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and by RT-PCR analysis cerclage wire decreased the mRNA levels of bone sialoprotein and ALP. These results suggest that the cerclage wire near the elbow delayed the fracture healing in radius fracture models.

  4. Consideration of Zener drag effect by introducing a limiting radius for neighbourhood in grain growth simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maazi, N.; Rouag, N.

    2002-08-01

    A model for grain growth simulation, in the presence of preferential particle distribution, is presented. The model predicts two grain size limits due to second-phase particles. Less than the maximal critical radius the grains will shrink. Greater than the minimal critical radius the grains will grow. Between the two limiting radii no grain growth takes place. These critical radii permit us to introduce the effect of the precipitates directly in the simulation procedure, without their assigning sites in the base matrix. In this case, all sites of the matrix are only occupied by grains. The conditions necessary for the development of secondary recrystallization in textured materials such as Fe-3%Si are, first, the stagnation of normal grain growth, second, the presence of special boundaries around the secondary grains. The grain growth simulation is performed until the grain structure was pinned, i.e. when boundaries become pinned.

  5. Reduction of radiation loss at small-radius bend using spoof surface plasmon polariton transmission line

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen Xuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Liu, Jun Feng; Xu, Jie; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) has been realized at low frequencies through corrugated metallic structures. As two-dimensional application, the ultrathin SPP transmission lines (TLs) have been proposed with great potentials for microwave compact circuits due to the strong field confinement and enhancement, as well as controllable dispersive properties. In this paper, we examine the radiation loss at small-radius bend, which may cause severe crosstalk in highly-integrated circuits or systems, for the SPP TLs. We theoretically analyze that the SPP TL has essential merit of low radiation loss, and show better performance of SPP TL than the conventional microstrip line through numerical simulations and experiments. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate that the new type of transmission line can efficiently suppress the radiation loss at small-radius bend, and hence reduce the crosstalk in circuits and systems. PMID:28112238

  6. Effective radius of ground- and excited-state positronium in collisions with hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R.; Prigent, Q.; Swann, A. R.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2017-03-01

    We determine effective collisional radii of positronium (Ps) by considering Ps states in hard-wall spherical cavities. B -spline basis sets of electron and positron states inside the cavity are used to construct the states of Ps. Accurate Ps energy eigenvalues are obtained by extrapolation with respect to the numbers of partial waves and radial states included in the bases. Comparison of the extrapolated energies with those of a point-like particle provides values of the effective radius ρn l of Ps(n l ) in collisions with a hard wall. We show that, for 1 s , 2 s , and 2 p states of Ps, the effective radius decreases with the increasing Ps center-of-mass momentum and find ρ1 s=1.65 a.u., ρ2 s=7.00 a.u., and ρ2 p=5.35 a.u. in the zero-momentum limit.

  7. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  8. Finite grid radius and thickness effects on retarding potential analyzer measured suprathermal electron density and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of finite grid radius and thickness on the electron current measured by planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) is analyzed numerically. Depending on the plasma environment, the current is significantly reduced below that which is calculated using a theoretical equation derived for an idealized RPA having grids with infinite radius and vanishingly small thickness. A correction factor to the idealized theoretical equation is derived for the Pioneer Venus (PV) orbiter RPA (ORPA) for electron gasses consisting of one or more components obeying Maxwell statistics. The error in density and temperature of Maxwellian electron distributions previously derived from ORPA data using the theoretical expression for the idealized ORPA is evaluated by comparing the densities and temperatures derived from a sample of PV ORPA data using the theoretical expression with and without the correction factor.

  9. Radius of Curvature Measurement of Large Optics Using Interferometry and Laser Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Connelly, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The determination of radius of curvature (ROC) of optics typically uses either a phase measuring interferometer on an adjustable stage to determine the position of the ROC and the optics surface under test. Alternatively, a spherometer or a profilometer are used for this measurement. The difficulty of this approach is that for large optics, translation of the interferometer or optic under test is problematic because of the distance of translation required and the mass of the optic. Profilometry and spherometry are alternative techniques that can work, but require a profilometer or a measurement of subapertures of the optic. The proposed approach allows a measurement of the optic figure simultaneous with the full aperture radius of curvature.

  10. The Small Exoplanet Mass-Radius Relation: Quantifying the Astrophysical Scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Rogers, Leslie A.; Ford, Eric B.

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of planets with radii <4 R ⊕, paving the way for the first statistical studies of super-Earth dynamics, formation, and evolution. These calculations often require planetary masses, and yet the vast majority of Kepler planet candidates do not have theirs measured. A key concern is therefore how to map the measured radii to mass estimates in a size range that lacks Solar System analogs. While previous works have derived one-to-one relationships between radius and mass, a realistic mass-radius (M-R) relation should account for the range of compositions that we expect within the population. This compositional diversity creates astrophysical scatter in the relation, which we quantify here.

  11. Radius graft pedicled on the anterior interosseous artery for recurrent ulnar nonunion.

    PubMed

    Andro, C; Richou, J; Schiele, P; Hu, W; Le Nen, D

    2011-06-01

    Recurrent ulnar nonunion challenges the functional prognosis and raises major problems concerning the best therapeutic strategy to follow. The case of a female patient presenting recurrent nonunion of the ulnar diaphysis despite successive treatments is reported. The radius graft pedicled on the anterior interosseous artery from a retrograde approach obtained bone union in 3 months with no functional sequelae. For the first time, we propose a therapeutic alternative calling on a proximally pedicled anterior interosseous flap. This technique can be performed under locoregional anesthesia and does not sacrifice the main artery of the forearm. However, the size of the graft does not entirely compensate for segmentary bone loss. The radius graft pedicled on the anterior interosseus artery is an inventive technique that can solve the problem of difficult ulna nonunions without the disadvantages of vascularized fibula harvesting.

  12. Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity

    SciTech Connect

    Zobnin, A. V. Usachev, A. D.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    The low-pressure (40 and 90 Pa) low-current (4 and 10 mA) direct current discharge in a tube with a sharp change of its radius is studied both numerically and experimentally. A fully self-consistent hybrid numerical model of a two-dimensional non-uniform positive column in neon is developed using a nonlocal approach. The model combines kinetic simulation of the electrons (under two-terms approach) and fluid description of the neon ions and permits to calculate the distribution of all plasma parameters in the direct current discharges in the cameras with cylindrical geometry and radius discontinuity. The simulation results are compared with the measured 585.3 nm neon spectral line absolute intensities and excited 1s{sub 3} metastable neon atom number densities. Non-local electron kinetics in the transition region and formation of standing strata are discussed.

  13. Deuteron charge radius and Rydberg constant from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J.; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2017-04-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment (LSA) of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius {{r}\\text{d}} from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the measurements that lead to the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10. The improvement is due to the use of a value for the 1S\\to 2S transition in atomic deuterium which can be inferred from published data or found in a PhD thesis.

  14. Defect association mediated ionic conductivity of rare earth doped nanoceria: Dependency on ionic radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anirban, Sk.; Sinha, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Dutta, A.

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth doped nanoceria Ce0.9RE0.1O1.95 (RE = Pr, Nd, Eu and Gd) were prepared through citrate auto-ignition method. The single phase cubic fluorite structure with space group Fm3 ¯m of the compositions were confirmed from Rietveld analysis of XRD data. The particle size of the compositions were in the range 49.77 nm to 66.20 nm. An ionic radius dependent lattice parameter variation was found. The DC conductivity of each composition was evaluated using Random Barrier Model. The conductivity decreased and activation energy increased with increasing ionic radius from Gd to Pr doping due to the size mismatch with host ions and formation of stable defect associate. The formation of different defect associates and their correlation with ionic conductivity has been discussed.

  15. Reduction of radiation loss at small-radius bend using spoof surface plasmon polariton transmission line.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen Xuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Liu, Jun Feng; Xu, Jie; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-23

    Spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) has been realized at low frequencies through corrugated metallic structures. As two-dimensional application, the ultrathin SPP transmission lines (TLs) have been proposed with great potentials for microwave compact circuits due to the strong field confinement and enhancement, as well as controllable dispersive properties. In this paper, we examine the radiation loss at small-radius bend, which may cause severe crosstalk in highly-integrated circuits or systems, for the SPP TLs. We theoretically analyze that the SPP TL has essential merit of low radiation loss, and show better performance of SPP TL than the conventional microstrip line through numerical simulations and experiments. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate that the new type of transmission line can efficiently suppress the radiation loss at small-radius bend, and hence reduce the crosstalk in circuits and systems.

  16. Superficial radial neuropathy and brachioradial motor nerve palsy associated with proximal radius osteochondroma.

    PubMed

    Oz, Oğuzhan; Yücel, Mehmet; Ulaş, Umit; Eroğlu, Erdal; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The cutaneous branch of the radial nerve (superficial radial nerve, SRN) might be compressed or injured at various anatomical sites along its course in the forearm. Compression of the SRN occurring at the proximal third of the forearm is unusual. A 22-year-old man was admitted with pain and paraesthesia over the lateral aspect of his right wrist and thumb and pain at the elbow for six months. In electrodiagnostic testing, a sensory nerve action potential from the right SRN could not be recorded, while it was normal on the left. In a needle electromyography study, denervation potentials have been seen in the right brachioradial muscle and a decrease in interference pattern signals was also found. An exophytic lesion of the proximal radius was observed in radiographs. Computed tomography evaluation revealed an osteochondroma of the proximal radius. Neuropathies of the SRN and the brachioradial motor branch of the radial nerve are thought to be associated with proximal radial osteochondroma.

  17. Mercury: results on mass, radius, ionosphere, and atmosphere from mariner 10 dual-frequency radio signals.

    PubMed

    Howard, H T; Tyler, G L; Esposito, P B; Anderson, J D; Reasenberg, R D; Shapiro, I I; Fjeldbo, G; Kliore, A J; Levy, G S; Brunn, D L; Dickinson, R; Edelson, R E; Martin, W L; Postal, R B; Seidel, B; Sesplaukis, T T; Shirley, D L; Stelzried, C T; Sweetnam, D N; Wood, G E; Zygielbaum, A I

    1974-07-12

    Analysis of the radio-tracking data from Mariner 10 yields 6,023,600 +/- 600 for the ratio of the mass of the sun to that of Mercury, in very good agreement with values determined earlier from radar data alone. Occultation measurements yielded values for the radius of Mercury of 2440 +/- 2 and 2438 +/- 2 kilometers at laditudes of 2 degrees N and 68 degrees N, respectively, again in close agreement with the average equatorial radius of 2439 +/- 1 kilometers determined from radar data. The mean density of 5.44 grams per cubic centimeter deduced for Mercury from Mariner 10 data thus virtually coincides with the prior determination. No evidence of either an ionosphere or an atmosphere was found, with the data yielding upper bounds on the electron density of about 1500 and 4000 electrons per cubic centimeter on the dayside and nightside, respectively, and an inferred upper bound on the surface pressure of 10(-8) millibar.

  18. The Kapandji technique for fixation of distal radius fractures--a biomechanical comparison of primary stability.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, W; Braun, C; Schäfer, R

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare Kapandji-K-wiring and established K-wiring techniques of the distal radius fracture for primary stability in a biomechanical model: dorsal K-wiring according to Kapandji using different angles of the K-wire, parallel and diagonal alignment of the K-wires. A new testing system which uses a synthetic material enabled us to carry out the cantilever bending test. By application of a lower load, the Kapandji procedure shows a higher reactive torque and stiffness. A higher reaction force of the other techniques, especially of the parallel wiring, are only observable under high-grade bending stress. Application of the Kapandji procedure with K-wires at a smaller angle to the axis of the radius results in the highest primary stability of the procedures investigated in the essential range of initial deformation.

  19. The primary Sauve-Kapandji procedure--for treatment of comminuted distal radius and ulnar fractures.

    PubMed

    Horii, E; Ohmachi, T; Nakamura, R

    2005-02-01

    We have performed primary Sauve-Kapandji procedures on four patients with severe open comminuted fractures of both the distal radius and ulna. The fragmented distal ulna was fixed to the sigmoid notch in order to stabilize the ulnar side of the carpus, and a proximal pseudoarthrosis was maintained for forearm rotation. All the distal radial fractures united without major complications. The mean wrist flexion/extension arc was 76 degrees , the mean pronation/supination arc was 135 degrees, and grip strength was 64% of the contralateral side. All patients returned to their work or daily activities within short time period without any additional surgical treatment, except for removal of implants in three patients. The primary Sauve-Kapandji procedure is effective for the reconstruction of severely combined distal radius and ulnar fractures.

  20. Slow axis collimation lens with variable curvature radius for semiconductor laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ling-Ling; Cai, Lei; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Pu; Nie, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Xing-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Based on Snell's law and the constant phase in the front of optical field, a design method of the slow axis collimation lens with variable curvature radius is proposed for semiconductor laser bars. Variable radius of the collimator is designed by the transmission angle, and it is demonstrated that the collimator has good beam collimation ability by material with low refractive index. Resorting to the design thought of finite element method, the surface of the collimator has been divided, and it is feasible to be fabricated. This method is applied as an example in collimation of a 976 nm semiconductor laser bar. 6 mrad divergence angle of collimated beam at slow axis is realized by the designed collimation lens with refraction index of 1.51.

  1. Analytical study of striated nozzle flow with small radius of curvature ratio throats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, D. J.; White, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical method was developed which is capable of estimating the chamber and throat conditions in a nozzle with a low radius of curvature throat. The method was programmed using standard FORTRAN 4 language and includes chemical equilibrium calculation subprograms (modified NASA Lewis program CEC71) as an integral part. The method determines detailed and gross rocket characteristics in the presence of striated flows and gives detailed results for the motor chamber and throat plane with as many as 20 discrete zones. The method employs a simultaneous solution of the mass, momentum, and energy equations and allows propellant types, 0/F ratios, propellant distribution, nozzle geometry, and injection schemes to be varied so to predict spatial velocity, density, pressure, and other thermodynamic variable distributions in the chamber as well as the throat. Results for small radius of curvature have shown good comparison to experimental results. Both gaseous and liquid injection may be considered with frozen or equilibrium flow calculations.

  2. The core mass-radius relation for giants - A new test of stellar evolution theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.; Rappaport, S.; Lewis, W.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that the measurable properties of systems containing degenerate dwarfs can be used as a direct test of the core mass-radius relation for moderate-mass giants if the final stages of the loss of the envelope of the progenitor giant occurred via stable critical lobe overflow. This relation directly probes the internal structure of stars at a relatively advanced evolutionary state and is only modestly influenced by adjustable parameters. The measured properties of six binary systems, including such diverse systems as Sirius and Procyon and two millisecond pulsars, are utilized to derive constraints on the empirical core mass-radius relation, and the constraints are compared to the theoretical relation. The possibility that the final stages of envelope ejection of the giant progenitor of Sirius B occurred via critical lobe overflow in historical times is considered.

  3. The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and the proton radius from effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    We comprehensively analyse the theoretical prediction for the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, and the associated determination of the proton radius. We use effective field theories. This allows us to relate the proton radius with well-defined objects in quantum field theory, eliminating unnecessary model dependence. The use of effective field theories also helps us to organize the computation so that we can clearly state the parametric accuracy of the result. In this paper we review all (and check several of) the contributions to the energy shift of order α5, as well as those that scale like α6 × logarithms in the context of non-relativistic effective field theories of QED.

  4. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sukhonos, D.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb-1 have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of "new physics" processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43 ṡ10-16 cm.

  5. METAL-MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS OF THE PERSEUS CLUSTER OUT TO THE VIRIAL RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, K.; Sakuma, E.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, K.; Simionescu, A.

    2013-02-20

    We analyzed XMM-Newton data of the Perseus cluster out to {approx}1 Mpc, or approximately half the virial radius. Using the flux ratios of Ly{alpha} lines of H-like Si and S to K{alpha} line of He-like Fe, the abundance ratios of Si/Fe and S/Fe of the intracluster medium (ICM) were derived using the APEC plasma code v2.0.1. The temperature dependence of the line ratio limits the systematic uncertainty in the derived abundance ratio. The Si/Fe and S/Fe in the ICM of the Perseus cluster show no radial gradient. The emission-weighted averages of the Si/Fe and S/Fe ratios outside the cool core are 0.91 {+-} 0.08 and 0.93 {+-} 0.10, respectively, in solar units according to the solar abundance table of Lodders. These ratios indicate that most Fe was synthesized by supernovae Ia. We collected K-band luminosities of galaxies and calculated the ratio of Fe and Si mass in the ICM to K-band luminosity, iron-mass-to-light ratio (IMLR), and silicon-mass-to-light ratio (SMLR). Within {approx}1 Mpc, the cumulative IMLR and SMLR increase with radius. Using Suzaku data for the northwest and east directions, we also calculated the IMLR out to {approx}1.8 Mpc, or about the virial radius. We constrained the SMLR out to this radius and discussed the slope of the initial mass function of stars in the cluster. Using the cumulative IMLR profile, we discuss the past supernova Ia rate.

  6. DISCOVERY AND ATMOSPHERIC CHARACTERIZATION OF GIANT PLANET KEPLER-12b: AN INFLATED RADIUS OUTLIER

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Nutzman, Philip; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Desert, Jean-Michel; Buchhave, Lars A.; Charbonneau, David; Fressin, Francois; Rowe, Jason; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Ciardi, David; Gautier, Thomas N.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark; and others

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of planet Kepler-12b (KOI-20), which at 1.695 {+-} 0.030 R{sub J} is among the handful of planets with super-inflated radii above 1.65 R{sub J}. Orbiting its slightly evolved G0 host with a 4.438 day period, this 0.431 {+-} 0.041 M{sub J} planet is the least irradiated within this largest-planet-radius group, which has important implications for planetary physics. The planet's inflated radius and low mass lead to a very low density of 0.111 {+-} 0.010 g cm{sup -3}. We detect the occultation of the planet at a significance of 3.7{sigma} in the Kepler bandpass. This yields a geometric albedo of 0.14 {+-} 0.04; the planetary flux is due to a combination of scattered light and emitted thermal flux. We use multiple observations with Warm Spitzer to detect the occultation at 7{sigma} and 4{sigma} in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bandpasses, respectively. The occultation photometry timing is consistent with a circular orbit at e < 0.01 (1{sigma}) and e < 0.09 (3{sigma}). The occultation detections across the three bands favor an atmospheric model with no dayside temperature inversion. The Kepler occultation detection provides significant leverage, but conclusions regarding temperature structure are preliminary, given our ignorance of opacity sources at optical wavelengths in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If Kepler-12b and HD 209458b, which intercept similar incident stellar fluxes, have the same heavy-element masses, the interior energy source needed to explain the large radius of Kepler-12b is three times larger than that of HD 209458b. This may suggest that more than one radius-inflation mechanism is at work for Kepler-12b or that it is less heavy-element rich than other transiting planets.

  7. Analytical description of extension, torque and supercoiling radius of a stretched twisted DNA

    PubMed Central

    Neukirch, Sébastien; Marko, John F.

    2011-01-01

    We study the mixture of extended and supercoiled DNA that occurs in a twisted DNA molecule under tension. Closed-form asymptotic solutions for the supercoiling radius, extension and torque of the molecule are obtained in the high-force limit where electrostatic and elastic effects dominate. We demonstrate that experimental data obey the extension and torque scaling laws apparent in our formulae, in the regime where thermal fluctuation effects are quenched by applied force. PMID:21517425

  8. Bone density of the radius, spine, and proximal femur in osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.; Barden, H.; Ettinger, M.; Schultz, E.

    1988-02-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 140 normal young women (aged 20 to 39 years) and in 423 consecutive women over age 40 referred for evaluation of osteoporosis. Lumbar spine and proximal femur BMD was measured using dual-photon absorptiometry (/sup 153/Gd), whereas the radius shaft measurement used single-photon absorptiometry (/sup 125/I). There were 324 older women with no fractures, of which 278 aged 60 to 80 years served as age-matched controls. There were 99 women with fractures including 32 with vertebral and 22 with hip fractures. Subsequently, another 25 women with hip fractures had BMD measured in another laboratory; their mean BMD was within 2% of that of the original series. The mean age in both the nonfracture and fracture groups was 70 +/- 5 years. The BMD in the age-matched controls was 20% to 25% below that of normal young women for the radius, spine, and femur, but the Ward's triangle region of the femur showed even greater loss (35%). The mean BMD at all sites in the crush fracture cases was about 10% to 15% below that of age-matched controls. Spinal abnormality was best discriminated by spine and femoral measurements (Z score about 0.9). In women with hip fractures, the BMD was 10% below that of age-matched controls for the radius and the spine, and the BMD for the femoral sites was about 25% to 30% below that of age-matched control (Z score about 1.6). Femoral densities gave the best discrimination of hip fracture cases and even reflected spinal osteopenia. In contrast, neither the spine nor the radius reflected the full extent of femoral osteopenia in hip fracture.

  9. Classification of Distal Radius Physeal Fractures Not Included in the Salter-Harris System

    PubMed Central

    Sferopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : The most commonly used classification for pediatric physeal fractures has been proposed by Salter and Harris. Among the most suitable classification schemes are those proposed by Ogden and Peterson who added several new types of injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the value of both schemes to classify all different types of physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and to test a new nomenclature to classify and guide treatment for the whole spectrum of these injuries. Methods : A total of 292 children who were admitted for a physeal fracture of the distal radius that could not be classified according to the Salter-Harris system were identified from the hospital database. All radiographs were carefully examined and classified according to the existing classifications of Ogden and Peterson and a modified classification scheme. The results of the treatment were also evaluated. Results : Ninety-six physeal injuries could not be classified using the classification schemes of Ogden and Peterson. All injuries could be classified in five types using the new, modified nomenclature. Growth abnormalities of the distal radius were evaluated after an average follow-up time of 11 years. Growth arrest due to a physeal bar was detected only in one patient. Discussion : The proposed modified scheme is practical, incorporates all previous classification systems, allows classification of all physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and may assist comparison of treatment outcomes. PMID:25132871

  10. Analysis of Publication Bias in the literature for Distal Radius Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sando, Ian C; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Distal radius fractures are the most commonly treated fracture, and their management remains complex. We aim to evaluate the presence of publication bias in the literature on distal radius fracture management and identify specific study variables that may influence the reporting of positive outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic review on all available journal articles to find primary articles reporting on the management of distal radius fractures. Data collected included the direction of study outcome (positive, neutral, and negative) and various study characteristics including sample size, geographic origin of the study, clinical setting, study design, type of treatment, analysis for statistical significance, evaluation of wrist function, presence of subjective outcome measures, mean follow-up time, adequacy of reduction, complications, mean patient age, and the presence of any extramural funding. Results We reviewed 215 journal articles and found that 70% of articles reported positive outcomes, 25% reported neutral outcomes, and 5% reported negative outcomes. Funnel plot analysis suggested the presence of publication bias due to the asymmetric distribution of studies. In addition, we found statistically significant differences between study outcomes with respects to treatment type, presence of external funding, reduction adequacy, hand/wrist functional assessment, and patient questionnaires for subjective assessment. Conclusions Publication bias likely exists in the literature for distal radius fracture management. Several study characteristics influence the reporting of positive outcomes, but whether or not the presence of these characteristics portends a greater chance of publication remains unclear. A standardized approach to measure and track results may improve evidence-based outcomes. PMID:23566720

  11. Vascularised bone graft and osteotomy of the radius in Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Manuel; Carrasco-Becerra, Carmen; Carpintero, Pedro

    2005-04-01

    Treatment of stage IIIA and III B avascular necrosis of the lunate bone remains controversial. We present a series of 5 cases in young patients treated with a vascularised bone graft from the second metacarpal, combined with a lateral shortening and closing wedge osteotomy of the radius. Good clinical and radiographic results were obtained and disease progression was halted with the combination of these two surgical procedures.

  12. Bone turnover predicts change in volumetric bone density and bone geometry at the radius in men.

    PubMed

    Pye, S R; Ward, K A; Cook, M J; Laurent, M R; Gielen, E; Borghs, H; Adams, J E; Boonen, S; Vanderschueren, D; Wu, F C; O'Neill, T W

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the distal and midshaft radius were performed in 514 European men aged 40-79 years at baseline and a median of 4.3 years later. Age-related changes in volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and bone geometry were greater in men with higher biochemical markers of bone turnover at baseline.

  13. The Splashback Radius as a Physical Halo Boundary and the Growth of Halo Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Surhud; Diemer, Benedikt; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2015-09-01

    The boundaries of cold dark matter halos are commonly defined to enclose a density contrast Δ relative to a reference (mean or critical) density. We argue that a more physical halo boundary choice is the radius at which accreted matter reaches its first orbital apocenter after turnaround. This splashback radius, {R}{sp}, manifests itself as a sharp density drop in the halo outskirts, at a location that depends upon the mass accretion rate. We present calibrations of {R}{sp} and the enclosed mass, {M}{sp}, as a function of mass accretion rate and peak height. We find that {R}{sp} is in the range ≈ 0.8-1{R}200{{m}} for rapidly accreting halos and is ≈ 1.5{R}200{{m}} for slowly accreting halos. Thus, halos and their environmental effects can extend well beyond the conventionally defined “virial” radius. We show that {M}{sp} and {R}{sp} evolve relatively strongly compared to other commonly used definitions. In particular, {M}{sp} evolves significantly even for the smallest dwarf-sized halos at z = 0. We also contrast {M}{sp} with the mass enclosed within four scale radii of the halo density profile, {M}\\lt 4{r{{s}}}, which characterizes the inner halo. During the early stages of halo assembly, {M}{sp} and {M}\\lt 4{r{{s}}} evolve similarly, but in the late stages {M}\\lt 4{r{{s}}} stops increasing while {M}{sp} continues to grow significantly. This illustrates that halos at low z can have “quiet” interiors while continuing to accrete mass in their outskirts. We discuss potential observational estimates of the splashback radius and show that it may already have been detected in galaxy clusters.

  14. Prediction of endotracheal tube size for pediatric patients from the epiphysis diameter of radius

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Ji Hyun; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Background Using a too big or a too small size of an endotracheal tube in pediatric patients would result in tracheal injury or insufficient ventilation. Determining the appropriate endotracheal tube size is important because using an inappropriate size can cause complications. This study was performed to predict the appropriate endotracheal tube size by measuring the transverse diameter of the epiphysis of the distal radius under the assumption that the growth rates of cartilages in the entire body are close to each other. Methods Fifty-eight children aged 3 to 10 years who required general anesthesia were intubated with an uncuffed endotracheal tube. The tube size was considered to be appropriate when leaks occurred at inspiratory peak pressures between 10 to 25 mmHg. The transverse diameters of the epiphysis were measured with an ultra-sonogram at the distal radius and the proximal phalanx of the third finger and the fifth finger. Correlations and prediction probabilities of measurements were evaluated. The number needed to harm (NNH), which indicates the number of patients who need to be intubated for one patient who needs tube exchange, was investigated. Results The Spearman's correlation coefficient between the endotracheal tube size and the epiphysis of the distal radius was 0.814, which was the biggest coefficient. For epiphysis of the proximal phalanx of the third finger and the fifth finger, the correlation coefficient was 0.704 and 0.701, respectively. If the Cole's formula was applied for selection of the tube size, the NNH would be 7. Conclusions The appropriate endotracheal tube size could be predicted by means of the epiphyseal transverse diameter of the distal radius rather than the circumference measurements of the phalanx. PMID:28184267

  15. Primary hyperparathyroidism associated with a giant cell tumor: One case in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ouzaa, M R; Bennis, A; Iken, M; Abouzzahir, A; Boussouga, M; Jaafar, A

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism can present itself as brown tumors (or osteolytic expansive lesions) that usually disappear after normalization of calcium and phosphate levels. It rarely occurs simultaneously with a giant cell tumor. The authors report one case of a localized form at the distal radius in a patient being followed for primary hyperparathyroidism. The diagnostic challenges related to the clinical and radiological similarities of these two pathological entities are discussed, as they can lead to delays in therapeutic management.

  16. Unitarity limits on the mass and radius of dark matter particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griest, Kim; Kamionkowski, Marc

    1989-01-01

    Using partial wave unitarity and the observed density of the Universe, it is show that a stable elementary particle which was once in thermal equilibrium cannot have a mass greater than 340 TeV. An extended object which was once in thermal equilibrium cannot have a radius less than 7.5 x 10(exp -7) fm. A lower limit to the relic abundance of such particles is also found.

  17. Unitarity limits on the mass and radius of dark-matter particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griest, Kim; Kamionkowski, Marc

    1990-01-01

    Using partial wave unitarity and the observed density of the Universe, it is shown that a stable elementary particle which was once in thermal equilibrium cannot have a mass greater than 340 TeV. An extended object which was once in thermal equlibrium cannot have a radius less than 7.5 x 10(exp -7) fm. A lower limit to the relic abundance of such particles is also found.

  18. [Fracture of the diaphyseal radius during Cyr wheel practice - an uncommon injury of wheel gymnastics].

    PubMed

    Kauther, M D; Rummel, S; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Nast-Kolb, D; Wedemeyer, C

    2011-12-01

    The cyr wheel is a modified gymnastic wheel with only one ring that can lead to extreme forces on the gymnast. We report on a distal radius shaft fracture (AO 22 A 2.1) and a fracture of the styloid process of the ulna that occurred after holding on to a slipping Cyr wheel and exposition to high pressure on the lower arm. The fracture was fixed by screws and a plate.

  19. Discovery and Atmospheric Characterization of Giant Planet Kepler-12b: An Inflated Radius Outlier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Désert, Jean-Michel; Rowe, Jason; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David; Gautier, Thomas N.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Nutzman, Philip; Jenkins, Jon M.; Howard, Andrew; Charbonneau, David; Knutson, Heather A.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark; Fressin, François; Deming, Drake; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Miller, Neil; Seager, Sara; Fischer, Debra A.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Haas, Michael R.; Still, Martin; Lucas, Philip; Gillon, Michael; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Geary, John C.

    2011-11-01

    We report the discovery of planet Kepler-12b (KOI-20), which at 1.695 ± 0.030 R J is among the handful of planets with super-inflated radii above 1.65 R J. Orbiting its slightly evolved G0 host with a 4.438 day period, this 0.431 ± 0.041 M J planet is the least irradiated within this largest-planet-radius group, which has important implications for planetary physics. The planet's inflated radius and low mass lead to a very low density of 0.111 ± 0.010 g cm-3. We detect the occultation of the planet at a significance of 3.7σ in the Kepler bandpass. This yields a geometric albedo of 0.14 ± 0.04; the planetary flux is due to a combination of scattered light and emitted thermal flux. We use multiple observations with Warm Spitzer to detect the occultation at 7σ and 4σ in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bandpasses, respectively. The occultation photometry timing is consistent with a circular orbit at e < 0.01 (1σ) and e < 0.09 (3σ). The occultation detections across the three bands favor an atmospheric model with no dayside temperature inversion. The Kepler occultation detection provides significant leverage, but conclusions regarding temperature structure are preliminary, given our ignorance of opacity sources at optical wavelengths in hot Jupiter atmospheres. If Kepler-12b and HD 209458b, which intercept similar incident stellar fluxes, have the same heavy-element masses, the interior energy source needed to explain the large radius of Kepler-12b is three times larger than that of HD 209458b. This may suggest that more than one radius-inflation mechanism is at work for Kepler-12b or that it is less heavy-element rich than other transiting planets.

  20. Proton radius from electron-proton scattering and chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbatsch, Marko; Hessels, Eric A.; Pineda, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    We determine the root-mean-square proton charge radius, Rp, from a fit to low-Q2 electron-proton elastic-scattering cross-section data with the higher moments fixed (within uncertainties) to the values predicted by chiral perturbation theory. We obtain Rp=0.855 (11 ) fm. This number falls between the value obtained from muonic hydrogen analyses and the CODATA value (based upon atomic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron-proton scattering determinations).

  1. Using a Video Camera to Measure the Radius of the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Joshua; Hughes, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A simple but accurate method for measuring the Earth's radius using a video camera is described. A video camera was used to capture a shadow rising up the wall of a tall building at sunset. A free program called ImageJ was used to measure the time it took the shadow to rise a known distance up the building. The time, distance and length of…

  2. A lower radius and mass for the transiting extrasolar planet HAT-P-8 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S.; Fortney, J. J.; Morley, C. V.; Dittmann, J. A.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Bruni, I.; Barbieri, M.; Evans, D. F.; D'Ago, G.; Nikolov, N.; Henning, Th.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The extrasolar planet HAT-P-8 b was thought to be one of the more inflated transiting hot Jupiters. Aims: By using new and existing photometric data, we computed precise estimates of the physical properties of the system. Methods: We present photometric observations comprising eleven light curves covering six transit events, obtained using five medium-class telescopes and telescope-defocussing technique. One transit was simultaneously obtained through four optical filters, and two transits were followed contemporaneously from two observatories. We modelled these and seven published datasets using the jktebop code. The physical parameters of the system were obtained from these results and from published spectroscopic measurements. In addition, we investigated the theoretically-predicted variation of the apparent planetary radius as a function of wavelength, covering the range 330-960 nm. Results: We find that HAT-P-8 b has a significantly lower radius (1.321 ± 0.037 RJup) and mass (1.275 ± 0.053 MJup) compared to previous estimates (1.50-0.06+0.08 R_{Jup} and 1.52-0.16+0.18 M_{Jup} respectively). We also detect a radius variation in the optical bands that, when compared with synthetic spectra of the planet, may indicate the presence of a strong optical absorber, perhaps TiO and VO gases, near the terminator of HAT-P-8 b. Conclusions: These new results imply that HAT-P-8 b is not significantly inflated, and that its position in the planetary mass-radius diagram is congruent with those of many other transiting extrasolar planets. Full Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A11

  3. [New minimally invasive approach for palmar plating in distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Chmielnicki, M; Prokop, A

    2015-02-01

    Distal radius fractures are among the most common fractures. Types A3 and C2 make up almost half of these. Volar fixed-angle plate fixation is the gold standard of treatment today. We wanted to minimise the approach to the distal radius through a transverse 2-3 cm incision in the wrist flexor fold, tunnelling beneath the pronator muscle. The operative technique is demonstrated here. 11 patients, averaging 70 years of age, underwent surgery for 7 A3 and 4 C2 type fractures. Average operating time was 50 minutes. Length of admission averaged 2.9 days. Using a visual analogue scale, pain decreased from 6/10 preoperatively to 3/10 on post-op day one and 2/10 on post-op day three. After 6 weeks, flexion and extension averaged 45-0-45°, and radial and ulnar deviation 20-0-20°. Pronation and supination averaged 85-0-85°. Grip strength with manometer averaged 90 % compared to the contralateral side at 6 weeks and 96 % at 3 months. As comparison, from 1 January 2008 until 31 May 2013, we treated 908 patients with distal radius fractures with volar fixed-angle plates through a conventional longitudinal incision of 5-8 cm. The average skin to skin time was 46 minutes, with an average length of admission of 5.6 days. A minimally invasive approach to treat distal radius fractures with volar plate fixation and sparing of the pronator muscle is possible. The initial patients treated with this approach experienced minimal post-operative pain, shorter hospital admissions, and rapid grip strength recovery with almost undisturbed rotational motion.

  4. The Impact of Patient Activity Level on Wrist Disability after Distal Radius Malunion in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gregory N.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Osei, Daniel A.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if high-activity older adults are adversely affected by distal radius malunion. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hand clinics at a tertiary institution. Participants 96 patients ≥60 years old at time of fracture evaluated at least 1 year following distal radius fracture. Intervention Physical Activity Scale of the Elderly (PASE) scores stratified participants into high- and low-activity groups. Malunions were defined radiographically by change of ≥20° of lateral tilt, ≥15° radial inclination, ≥4 mm of ulnar variance, or ≥4 mm intra-articular gap or step-off, compared to the uninjured wrist. Main Outcome Measure Patient-rated disability of the upper-extremity was measured by the QuickDASH and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) for pain/function. Strength and motion measurements objectively quantified wrist function. Results High-activity participants with a distal radius malunion were compared to high-activity participants with well-aligned fractures. There was no significant difference in QuickDASH scores, VAS function, strength, and wrist motion despite statistically, but not clinically relevant, increases in VAS pain scores (difference 0.5, p=0.04) between the groups. Neither PASE score (β= 0.001, 95%CI: −0.002 to 0.004) nor malunion (β=0.133, 95%CI: −0.26 to 0.52) predicted QuickDASH scores in regression modeling after accounting for age, sex, and treatment. Operative management failed to improve outcomes and resulted in decreased grip strength (p=0.05) and more frequent complications (26% vs 7%, p=0.01) when compared to nonoperatively management. Conclusion Even among highly active older adults, distal radius malunion does not impact functional outcomes. Judicious use of operative management is warranted provided heightened complication rates. PMID:25233158

  5. HZ Her: Stellar radius from X-ray eclipse observations, evolutionary state, and a new distance

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D. A.; Abdallah, M. H.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of HZ Her/Her X-1 by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) covering high state eclipses of the neutron star are analyzed here. Models of the eclipse are used to measure the radius and atmospheric scale height of HZ Her, the stellar companion to the neutron star. The radius is 2.58-3.01 × 10{sup 11} cm, depending on system inclination and mass ratio (q), with an accuracy of ∼1 part in 1000 for given inclination and q. We fit Kurucz model stellar atmosphere models to archival optical observations. The resulting effective temperature (T {sub eff}) of the unheated face of HZ Her is determined to be in the 2σ range of 7720 K-7865 K, and metallicity (log (Z/Z {sub ☉})) in the range of –0.27 to +.03. The model atmosphere surface flux and new radius yield a new distance to HZ Her/Her X-1, depending on system inclination and q: a best-fit value of 6.1 kpc with upper and lower limits of 5.7 kpc and 7.0 kpc. We calculate stellar evolution models for the range of allowed masses (from orbital parameters) and allowed metallicities (from optical spectrum fits). The stellar models agree with T {sub eff} and the radius of HZ Her for two narrow ranges of mass: 2.15-2.20 M {sub ☉} and 2.35-2.45 M {sub ☉}. This lower mass range implies a low neutron star mass (1.3 M {sub ☉}), whereas the higher mass range implies a high neutron star mass (1.5-1.7 M {sub ☉}).

  6. Mid-term functional outcome after the internal fixation of distal radius fractures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is a common injury with a variety of operative and non-operative management options. There remains debate as to the optimal treatment for a given patient and fracture. Despite the popularity of volar locking plate fixation, there are few large cohort or long term follow up studies to justify this modality. Our aim was to report the functional outcome of a large number of patients at a significant follow up time after fixation of their distal radius with a volar locking plate. Methods 180 patients with 183 fractures and a mean age of 62.4 years were followed up retrospectively at a mean of 30 months (Standard deviation = 10.4). Functional assessment was performed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and modified MAYO wrist scores. Statistical analysis was performed to identify possible variables affecting outcome and radiographs were assessed to determine time to fracture union. Results The median DASH score was 2.3 and median MAYO score was 90 for the whole group. Overall, 133 patients (74%) had a good or excellent DASH and MAYO score. Statistical analysis showed that no specific variable including gender, age, fracture type, post-operative immobilisation or surgeon grade significantly affected outcome. Complications occurred in 27 patients (15%) and in 11 patients were major (6%). Conclusion This single centre large population series demonstrates good to excellent results in the majority of patients after volar locking plate fixation of the distal radius, with complication rates comparable to other non-operative and operative treatment modalities. On this basis we recommend this mode of fixation for distal radius fractures requiting operative intervention. PMID:22280557

  7. RADIUS DETERMINATION OF SOLAR-TYPE STARS USING ASTEROSEISMOLOGY: WHAT TO EXPECT FROM THE KEPLER MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Stello, Dennis; Bruntt, Hans; Bedding, Timothy R.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne; Creevey, Orlagh L.; Jimenez-Reyes, Sebastian J.; Garcia-Hernandez, Antonio; Moya, Andres; Suarez, Juan-Carlos; Monteiro, Mario J. P. F. G.; Sousa, Sergio G.; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Arentoft, Torben; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Appourchaux, Thierry; Ballot, Jerome; Fletcher, Stephen T.; Garcia, Rafael A.

    2009-08-01

    For distant stars, as observed by the NASA Kepler satellite, parallax information is currently of fairly low quality and is not complete. This limits the precision with which the absolute sizes of the stars and their potential transiting planets can be determined by traditional methods. Asteroseismology will be used to aid the radius determination of stars observed during NASA's Kepler mission. We report on the recent asteroFLAG hare-and-hounds Exercise no. 2, where a group of 'hares' simulated data of F-K main-sequence stars that a group of 'hounds' sought to analyze, aimed at determining the stellar radii. We investigated stars in the range 9 < V < 15, both with and without parallaxes. We further test different uncertainties in T {sub eff}, and compare results with and without using asteroseismic constraints. Based on the asteroseismic large frequency spacing, obtained from simulations of 4 yr time series data from the Kepler mission, we demonstrate that the stellar radii can be correctly and precisely determined, when combined with traditional stellar parameters from the Kepler Input Catalogue. The radii found by the various methods used by each independent hound generally agree with the true values of the artificial stars to within 3%, when the large frequency spacing is used. This is 5-10 times better than the results where seismology is not applied. These results give strong confidence that radius estimation can be performed to better than 3% for solar-like stars using automatic pipeline reduction. Even when the stellar distance and luminosity are unknown we can obtain the same level of agreement. Given the uncertainties used for this exercise we find that the input log g and parallax do not help to constrain the radius, and that T {sub eff} and metallicity are the only parameters we need in addition to the large frequency spacing. It is the uncertainty in the metallicity that dominates the uncertainty in the radius.

  8. Distal radius fractures: Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis with dorsal bicolumnar locking plates fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Chou, Ying-Chao; Cheng, Chun-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background: Controversy still exists regarding the current treatment modalities for unstable distal radius fractures. There are yet few articles investigating the efficacy of bicolumnar dorsal plating technique, which is designed to minimize tissue dissection while providing sufficiently secure fixation. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) technique using a modified dorsal approach for the treatment of distal radius fractures. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with unilateral distal radius fracture who underwent bicolumnar plate fixation with a minimally invasive dorsal approach between September 2008 and December 2010 were included in this retrospective study. Twenty four patients (8 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 53 years (range 18-85 years) were available for followup of at least 1 year or more were included in final study. Herein, we report the functional radiological outcomes of the study. There were three cases of AO Type A fracture, five cases of AO Type B fracture, and 16 cases of AO Type C fracture. Results: The union was achieved in all the patients. The functional results at one-year followup, assessed using the modified Gartland and Werley scoring system, were excellent in 14 patients, good in seven patients, and fair in three patients. The average correction of deformity was 4.1 mm for radial height, 7.6° for radial inclination, and 20.7° for volar tilt. Conclusions: MIPO with a dorsal approach is a feasible option for the management of displaced distal radius fractures and can result in favorable surgical outcomes. PMID:28216757

  9. Measurements of atomic splittings in atomic hydrogen and the proton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius can be determined from precise measurements of atomic hydrogen spectroscopy. A review of the relevant measurements will be given, including an update on our measurement of the n=2 Lamb shift. The values obtained from hydrogen will be compared to those obtained from muonic hydrogen and from electron-proton elastic scattering measurements. This work is funded by NSERC, CRC and CFI.

  10. Radius Determination of Solar-type Stars Using Asteroseismology: What to Expect from the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis; Chaplin, William J.; Bruntt, Hans; Creevey, Orlagh L.; García-Hernández, Antonio; Monteiro, Mario J. P. F. G.; Moya, Andrés; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Sousa, Sergio G.; Suárez, Juan-Carlos; Appourchaux, Thierry; Arentoft, Torben; Ballot, Jerome; Bedding, Timothy R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Elsworth, Yvonne; Fletcher, Stephen T.; García, Rafael A.; Houdek, Günter; Jiménez-Reyes, Sebastian J.; Kjeldsen, Hans; New, Roger; Régulo, Clara; Salabert, David; Toutain, Thierry

    2009-08-01

    For distant stars, as observed by the NASA Kepler satellite, parallax information is currently of fairly low quality and is not complete. This limits the precision with which the absolute sizes of the stars and their potential transiting planets can be determined by traditional methods. Asteroseismology will be used to aid the radius determination of stars observed during NASA's Kepler mission. We report on the recent asteroFLAG hare-and-hounds Exercise#2, where a group of "hares" simulated data of F-K main-sequence stars that a group of "hounds" sought to analyze, aimed at determining the stellar radii. We investigated stars in the range 9 < V < 15, both with and without parallaxes. We further test different uncertainties in T eff, and compare results with and without using asteroseismic constraints. Based on the asteroseismic large frequency spacing, obtained from simulations of 4 yr time series data from the Kepler mission, we demonstrate that the stellar radii can be correctly and precisely determined, when combined with traditional stellar parameters from the Kepler Input Catalogue. The radii found by the various methods used by each independent hound generally agree with the true values of the artificial stars to within 3%, when the large frequency spacing is used. This is 5-10 times better than the results where seismology is not applied. These results give strong confidence that radius estimation can be performed to better than 3% for solar-like stars using automatic pipeline reduction. Even when the stellar distance and luminosity are unknown we can obtain the same level of agreement. Given the uncertainties used for this exercise we find that the input log g and parallax do not help to constrain the radius, and that T eff and metallicity are the only parameters we need in addition to the large frequency spacing. It is the uncertainty in the metallicity that dominates the uncertainty in the radius.

  11. Metal-mass-to-light Ratios of the Perseus Cluster Out to the Virial Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, K.; Sakuma, E.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, K.; Simionescu, A.

    2013-02-01

    We analyzed XMM-Newton data of the Perseus cluster out to ~1 Mpc, or approximately half the virial radius. Using the flux ratios of Lyα lines of H-like Si and S to Kα line of He-like Fe, the abundance ratios of Si/Fe and S/Fe of the intracluster medium (ICM) were derived using the APEC plasma code v2.0.1. The temperature dependence of the line ratio limits the systematic uncertainty in the derived abundance ratio. The Si/Fe and S/Fe in the ICM of the Perseus cluster show no radial gradient. The emission-weighted averages of the Si/Fe and S/Fe ratios outside the cool core are 0.91 ± 0.08 and 0.93 ± 0.10, respectively, in solar units according to the solar abundance table of Lodders. These ratios indicate that most Fe was synthesized by supernovae Ia. We collected K-band luminosities of galaxies and calculated the ratio of Fe and Si mass in the ICM to K-band luminosity, iron-mass-to-light ratio (IMLR), and silicon-mass-to-light ratio (SMLR). Within ~1 Mpc, the cumulative IMLR and SMLR increase with radius. Using Suzaku data for the northwest and east directions, we also calculated the IMLR out to ~1.8 Mpc, or about the virial radius. We constrained the SMLR out to this radius and discussed the slope of the initial mass function of stars in the cluster. Using the cumulative IMLR profile, we discuss the past supernova Ia rate.

  12. [Effect of age and anti-osteoporotic drugs on bone strength and structure of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Shigeharu

    2013-07-01

    The distal radius constitutes a proximal part of the wrist joint, which bears axial load from the carpal bones. Based on the biomechanical experiments, the load transmitted from the carpal bones to the distal articular surface of the radius is greater to the lunate fossa than the scaphoid fossa. The findings are consistent with the results obtained from HR-pQCT analysis of the distal radius. As ageing, bone mineral densities of the distal radius decrease, and structures of the cortical and trabecular bones also deteriorate. Such deterioration can be prevented by osteoporotic medicines such as PTH or bisphosphonate. Denosumab has been shown to increase mechanical indices of the bone structure of the distal radius. The distal radius of the individual is fractured when the load over approximately 5 times (2.5SD) of the weight is applied. It is possible to predict load of fracture in the distal radius from the results of DXA derived BMD or HR-pQCT derived bone parameters. We should not miss the opportunity of treatment for osteoporosis when the patients with fragility distal radius fracture are seen.

  13. Measure the Earth's Radius and the Speed of Light with Simple and Inexpensive Computer-Based Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    With new and inexpensive computer-based methods, measuring the speed of light and the Earth's radius--historically difficult endeavors--can be simple enough to be tackled by high school and college students working in labs that have limited budgets. In this article, the author describes two methods of estimating the Earth's radius using two…

  14. Modeling distributions of flying insects: Effective attraction radius of pheromone in two and three dimensions. Journal of Theoretical Biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effective attraction radius (EAR) of an attractive pheromone-baited trap was defined as the radius of a passive “sticky” sphere that would intercept the same number of flying insects as the attractant. The EAR for a particular attractant and insect species in nature is easily determined by a cat...

  15. Estimation of the radius of a star based on its effective temperature and surface gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Amethod for determining the radius of a star using its effective temperature and surface gravity is proposed. The method assumes that the relationship between the radius, effective temperature, and surface gravity can be approximated using models for the internal structure and evolution of the star. The method is illustrated using the Geneva-Toulouse evolutionary computations for two metal abundances—solar and one-tenth of solar. Analysis of the systematic errors shows that the accuracy of the method is better than 10% over most part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, and is about 5% for main-sequence stars. The maximum relative systematic error due to the simplifications underlying the method is about 15%. A test using eclipsing binaries confirms the viability of the proposed method for estimating stellar radii. In the region of the main sequence, systematic deviations do not exceed 2%, and the relative standard deviation is ≤4.7%. It is expected that th maximum relative error over the rest of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram will likewise be close to the systematic error, about 15-20%. The method is applied to estimate the radii of model stellar atmospheres. Such estimates can be used to synthesize the color index and luminosity of a star. The method can be used whenever accuracies of about 10% in the estimated stellar radius and luminosity are acceptable.

  16. Flory radius of polymers in a periodic field: an exact analytic theory.

    PubMed

    Chervanyov, A I; Heinrich, G

    2007-11-01

    We found an exact expression for the Flory radius R (F) of Gaussian polymers placed in an external periodic field. This solution is expressed in terms of the two parameters eta and a that describe the reduced strength of an external field and the period of the field to the polymer gyration radius ratio, respectively. R (F) is found to be a decaying function of eta for any values of a . Provided that the gyration radius is of the order of the period of an external field or less, the ground-state (GS) approximation of the exact result for R (F) is shown to give qualitatively incorrect results. In addition to the "ground-state" contribution, the exact solution for R (F) contains an additional term that is overlooked by the GS approximation. This term gives rise to the fact that R (F) as a function of eta exhibits power law behavior (rather than exponential decay obtained from the GS result) once eta exceeds the threshold value eta(con) .

  17. Laser confocal measurement system for curvature radius of lenses based on grating ruler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiwei; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Nan; Zhao, Weirui; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-02-01

    In the modern optical measurement field, the radius of curvature (ROC) is one of the fundamental parameters of optical lens. Its measurement accuracy directly affects the other optical parameters, such as focal length, aberration and so on, which significantly affect the overall performance of the optical system. To meet the demand of measurement instruments for radius of curvature (ROC) with high accuracy in the market, we develop a laser confocal radius measurement system with grating ruler. The system uses the peak point of the confocal intensity curve to precisely identify the cat-eye and confocal positions and then measure the distance between these two positions by using the grating ruler, thereby achieving the high-precision measurement for the ROC. The system has advantages of high focusing sensitivity and anti-environment disturbance ability. And the preliminary theoretical analysis and experiments show that the measuring repeatability can be up to 0.8 um, which can provide an effective way for the accurate measurement of ROC.

  18. The binary Feige 24 - The mass, radius, and gravitational redshift of the DA white dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Vennes, S.; Shipman, H.L.; Thorstensen, J.R.; Thejll, P. Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH NORDITA, Copenhagen, Denmark )

    1991-05-01

    Observations are reported which refine the binary ephemeris of the Feige 24 system, which contains a peculiar hot DA white dwarf and an M dwarf with an atmosphere illuminated by extreme ultraviolet radiation from the white dwarf. With the new ephemeris and a set of IUE high-dispersion spectra, showing phase-dependent redshifted C IV, N V, and Si IV resonance lines, the orbital velocity, and hence the mass (0.54 + or {minus} 0.20 solar masses), and the gravitational redshift of the white dwarf (14.1 + or {minus} 5.2 km/s) are determined independently. It is shown that the measured Einstein redshift is consistent with an estimated radius for the white dwarf obtained from a model atmosphere solid angle and a parallax measurement. This radius is twice the Hamada-Salpeter radius for the given mass and offers a prospect to investigate the presence of a massive hydrogen envelope in that white dwarf star. 27 refs.

  19. Determining the Co-Rotation Radius of Nearby Spiral Galaxies Using Spiral Arm Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Shields, Douglas W.; Eufrasio, Rafael; Berlanga Medina, Jazmin; Monson, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Density wave theory, originally proposed by C.C. Lin and Frank Shu (Lin & Shu 1964), views the spiral arm structures in spiral galaxies as density waves that propagates through the galactic disk. Resonances within orbits create standing wave patterns of density waves that we observe as spiral arms. The theory predicts the existence of a radius known as the co-rotation radius in which the spiral arm pattern speed matches the velocities of the stars within the disk. We introduce a novel way of determining the co-rotation radius, based on an image overlaying technique, which involves tracing the arms of spiral galaxies on images observed from different wavelengths. For the purpose of this study, 12 nearby galaxies were analyzed from four different wavelengths using pitch angle measurements from a previous study (Hamed et al. 2016). We used optical wavelength images (B-Band,440 nm), two infrared wavelength (Infrared; 3.6 µm and 8 µm) Spitzer Space Telescope images and ultraviolet images from GALEX. The results were verified by checking against results compiled from the literature.

  20. Prediction and Assessment of Reynolds Number Sensitivities Associated with Wing Leading-Edge Radius Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, Richard A.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to expand the data base showing the effects of LE radius distribution and corresponding sensitivity to Rn at subsonic and transonic conditions, and to assess the predictive capability of CFD for these effects. Several key elements led to the initiation of this project: 1) the necessity of meeting multipoint design requirements to enable a viable HSCT, 2) the demonstration that blunt supersonic leading-edges can be associated with performance gain at supersonic speeds , and 3) limited data. A test of a modified Reference H model with the TCA planform and 2 LE radius distributions was performed in the NTF, in addition to Navier-Stokes analysis for an additional 3 LE radius distributions. Results indicate that there is a tremendous potential to improve high-lift performance through the use of a blunt LE across the span given an integrated, fully optimized design, and that low Rn data alone is probably not sufficient to demonstrate the benefit.

  1. Tool holder for preparation and inspection of a radiused edge cutting tool

    DOEpatents

    Asmanes, Charles

    1979-01-01

    A tool holding fixture is provided for removably holding a radiused edge cutting tool in a tool edge lapping apparatus. The fixture allows the operator to preset the lapping radius and angle before the tool holder is placed in the fixture and the holder may be removed from the lapping apparatus to inspect the tool and simply replaced in the fixture to continue lapping in accordance with a precise alignment without realignment of the tool relative to the lap. The tool holder includes a pair of self aligning bearings in the form of precision formed steel balls connected together by a rigid shaft. The tool is held by an arm extending from the shaft and the balls set in fixed position bearing cups and the holder is oscillated back and forth about a fixed axis of rotation to lap the tool radius by means of a reversibly driven belt-pulley arrangement coupled to the shaft between the bearings. To temporarily remove the holder, the drive belt is slipped over the rearward end of the holder and the holder is lifted out of the bearing cups.

  2. Prediction and Assessment of Reynolds Number Sensitivities Associated with Wing Leading-Edge Radius Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, Richard A.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Owen, Lewis R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to expand the data base showing the effects of LE radius distribution and corresponding . sensitivity to Rn at subsonic and transonic conditions, and to assess the predictive capability of CFD for these effects. Several key elements led to the initiation of this project: 1) the necessity of meeting multipoint design requirements to enable a viable HSCT, 2) the demonstration that blunt supersonic leading-edges can be associated with performance gain at supersonic speeds , and 3) limited data. A test of a modified Reference H model with the TCA planform and 2 LE radius distributions was performed in the NTF, in addition to Navier-Stokes analysis for an additional 3 LE radius distributions. Results indicate that there is a tremendous potential to improve high-lift performance through the use of a blunt LE across the span given an integrated, fully optimized design, and that low Rn data alone is probably not sufficient to demonstrate the benefit.

  3. Clinical, haematological and radiological evaluation of fragmented autogenous cortical bone grafting of radius in dogs.

    PubMed

    Grover, R K; Sobti, V K

    1998-07-01

    In eight clinically healthy dogs, a midshaft diaphyseal defect of 2 cm was created in the right radius ulna. This gap was maintained by fixing a four hole sherman bone plate on the radius. In four dogs, the gap was filled with autogenous cancellous bone grafts (2-5 mm in diameter) harvested from the proximal end of the tibia (group 1). In the remaining 4 dogs, the fracture gap was filled with autogenous cortical bone fragments (ACBF) of 2-5 mm diameter made from the same 2 cm piece of bone removed from the radius. While comparing various clinical observations, it appeared that healing of the wounds and bearing of the weight on the grafted limb in dogs subjected to ACBF graft were similar to those given autogenous cancellous bone graft. In radiographs, taken on the 30th day in group 1, a fairly good amount of callus was found emerging from fracture ends but the whole of the bone graft area was not covered by bony density even on the 60th day. In group 2 (ACBF), 45th day radiograph revealed that the callus from the fracture end was mixing up with the cortical bone fragments, and at the 60th day, the callus was clearly found invading the cortical bone fragments grafted in the fracture gap.

  4. Argon gas-puff radius optimiaztion for Saturn operating in the long-pulse mode.

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, John P.; Jackson, S. L.; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Mosher, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    Argon gas puff experiments using the long pulse mode of Saturn (230-ns rise time) have promise to increase the coupled energy and simplify operations because the voltage is reduced in vacuum and the forward-going energy is higher for the same Marx charge. The issue addressed in this work is to determine if the 12-cm-diameter triple nozzle used in Saturn long-pulse-mode experiments to date provides maximum K-shell yield, or if a different-radius nozzle provides additional radiation. Long-pulse implosions are modeled by starting with measured density distributions from the existing 12-cm-diameter nozzle, and then varying the outer radius in an implosion-energy-conserving self-similar manner to predict the gas-puff diameter that results in the maximum K-shell yield. The snowplow-implosions and multi-zone radiation transport models used in the analysis are benchmarked against detailed measurements from the 12-cm-diameter experiments. These calculations indicate that the maximum K-shell emission is produced with very nearly the existing nozzle radius.

  5. Treatment of Distal Radius Fracture Nonunion With Posterior Interosseous Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein; Shahryar-Kamrani, Reza; Ghane, Bahareh; Yavarikia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonunion of distal radius fractures is disabling. Treatment is difficult and the results are not predictable. However, posterior interosseous bone flap (PIBF) has been successful in treating forearm nonunion. Objectives To treat distal radius fracture nonunion with PIBF as a new procedure. Patients and Methods This prospective non-randomized cohort study was performed at two hospitals in Tehran between January 2011 and September 2015. PIBFs were applied in nine patients (10 nonunions) with a mean age of 55 years. Union success rate, grip strength, wrist range of motion, and forearm rotation were then evaluated. Results Although four of the patients had a history of infection, all participants achieved fracture union at a mean time of 3.8 months. Grip strength improved by 12.4 kg. There was also 36° improvement in wrist flexion, 20° improvement in wrist extension, 60° improvement in forearm supination, and 46° improvement in forearm pronation. The range of motion and grip strength improvements were significant. Conclusions Pedicled PIBF is a new option for treating distal radius fracture nonunion. The results are predictable in achieving union and good function, and this technique can be successfully used in cases with extensive soft-tissue damage or infection. PMID:27703802

  6. Interior phase transformations and mass-radius relationships of silicon-carbon planets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2014-09-20

    Planets such as 55 Cancri e orbiting stars with a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio may consist primarily of silicon and carbon, with successive layers of carbon, silicon carbide, and iron. The behavior of silicon-carbon materials at the extreme pressures prevalent in planetary interiors, however, has not yet been sufficiently understood. In this work, we use simulations based on density functional theory to determine high-pressure phase transitions in the silicon-carbon system, including the prediction of new stable compounds with Si{sub 2}C and SiC{sub 2} stoichiometry at high pressures. We compute equations of state for these silicon-carbon compounds as a function of pressure, and hence derive interior structural models and mass-radius relationships for planets composed of silicon and carbon. Notably, we predict a substantially smaller radius for SiC planets than in previous models, and find that mass radius relationships for SiC planets are indistinguishable from those of silicate planets. We also compute a new equation of state for iron. We rederive interior models for 55 Cancri e and are able to place more stringent restrictions on its composition.

  7. Probabilistic Mass-Radius Relationship for Sub-Neptune-Sized Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Rogers, Leslie Anne; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of super-Earths, paving the way for the first statistical studies of the dynamics, formation, and evolution of these planets. Planetary masses are an important physical property that these studies consider, and yet the vast majority of Kepler planet candidates do not have theirs measured. A key concern for these studies is therefore how to map the measured radii to mass estimates, in this regime of planetary sizes where there are no Solar System analogs. Previous works have derived deterministic, one-to-one relationships between radius and mass. However, if these planets span a range of compositions as expected, then an intrinsic scatter about this relationship must exist in the population. Here we present the first probabilistic mass-radius relationship (M-R relation) evaluated within a Bayesian framework, which both quantifies this intrinsic dispersion and the uncertainties on the M-R relation parameters given the data. We analyze how the details depend on the radius range of the sample, and on the method used to provide the mass measurements. Assuming that the M-R relation can be described as a power law with a dispersion that is constant and normally distributed, we find that M/M_Earth = 2.7 (R/R_Earth)^1.2 and a scatter in mass of 1.7 M_Earth is the "best-fit" probabilistic M-R relation for the sample of RV-measured transiting sub-Neptunes.

  8. Corrective Osteotomy for Deformity of the Distal Radius Using a Volar Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brett; Gajendran, Varun

    2007-01-01

    Dorsally angulated malunions of the distal radius have historically been corrected with an opening wedge osteotomy fixed with a dorsal plate. Volar locking plates may facilitate a less morbid approach to corrective osteotomies of the wrist. Eight consecutive patients with an average age of 40 years (range, 15–52 years) underwent correction of a distal radius deformity through a volar approach. Clinical follow-up averaged 17.4 months (range, 7–41 months). Preoperative radiographs revealed an average of 24° of dorsal tilt in patients with dorsal deformity. Postoperatively, their average measurement was <3° of volar tilt. Patients were initially ulnar-positive with an average of 4 mm ulnar-positive variance (range, 2–7 mm). This corrected to less than 1 mm postoperatively. Postoperative disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH), SF-12, and Mayo Wrist scores averaged 10.8, 40.5, and 82.5, respectively. There were no nonunions, and no plates required removal. Distal radius deformity can be effectively addressed through a volar approach with the use of a locking plate. PMID:18780123

  9. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. DETAILED ABUNDANCE RATIOS AT LARGE RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Gunn, James E.; Raskutti, Sudhir; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl

    2013-10-20

    We study the radial dependence in stellar populations of 33 nearby early-type galaxies with central stellar velocity dispersions σ{sub *} ∼> 150 km s{sup –1}. We measure stellar population properties in composite spectra, and use ratios of these composites to highlight the largest spectral changes as a function of radius. Based on stellar population modeling, the typical star at 2R{sub e} is old (∼10 Gyr), relatively metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≈ –0.5), and α-enhanced ([Mg/Fe] ≈ 0.3). The stars were made rapidly at z ≈ 1.5-2 in shallow potential wells. Declining radial gradients in [C/Fe], which follow [Fe/H], also arise from rapid star formation timescales due to declining carbon yields from low-metallicity massive stars. In contrast, [N/Fe] remains high at large radius. Stars at large radius have different abundance ratio patterns from stars in the center of any present-day galaxy, but are similar to average Milky Way thick disk stars. Our observations are thus consistent with a picture in which the stellar outskirts are built up through minor mergers with disky galaxies whose star formation is truncated early (z ≈ 1.5-2)

  10. Monitoring the Solar Radius from the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy since 1773

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquero, J. M.; Gallego, M. C.; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J. J.; López-Moratalla, T.; Carrasco, V. M. S.; Aparicio, A. J. P.; González-González, F. J.; Hernández-García, E.

    2016-08-01

    The solar diameter has been monitored at the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy (today the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada: ROA) almost continuously since its creation in 1753 ( i.e. during the past 250 years). After a painstaking effort to collect data in the historical archive of this institution, we present here the data of the solar semidiameter from 1773 to 2006, making up an extensive new database for solar-radius measurements, which can be considered. We have calculated the solar semidiameter from the transit times registered by the observers (except for values of the solar radius from the modern Danjon astrolabe, which were published by ROA). These data were analysed to reveal any significant long-term trends, but no such trends were found. Therefore, the data sample confirms the constancy of the solar diameter during the past 250 years (approximately) within instrumental and methodological limits. Moreover, no relationship between solar radius and the new sunspot-number index has been found from measurements of the ROA. Finally, the mean value for the solar semidiameter (with one standard deviation) calculated from the observations made in the ROA (1773 - 2006), after applying corrections for refraction and diffraction, is equal to 958.87^''±1.77^''.

  11. Carpal Malalignment in Malunion of the Distal Radius and the Effect of Corrective Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Luc; Verhaegen, Filip; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malunions of the distal radius often induce carpal malalignment. Two different types can be distinguished: an adaptive midcarpal malalignment (so-called CIA wrist: carpal instability, adaptive) and a radiocarpal malalignment (dorsal translation of the whole carpus). The effect of distal radial osteotomy on the carpal alignment has hardly been studied. Material and Methods 31 wrists in 31 patients (mean age 44 years) with malunion of the distal radius after a Colles fracture were treated with a corrective osteotomy. The patients were divided on basis of effective radio-lunate flexion (ERLF) in the two patterns of carpal malalignment. The radiographic changes were evaluated. Results There were 20 patients with midcarpal malalignment (ERLF ≤ 25°) and 11 with radiocarpal malalignment (ERLF > 25°). There was a correction of radial tilt and ulnar variance in both groups. There was a significant improvement of the carpal alignment in the midcarpal malalignment group, up to normal parameters. Neither age nor delay between fracture and osteotomy correlated. In the radiocarpal malalignment group a significant effect on the ERLF was observed. In the patients with dorsal plating 70% of the hardware had to be removed. Conclusion Distal radial osteotomy is a reliable technique for correction of the deformity at the distal end of the radius and carpal malalignment. PMID:25097809

  12. Treatment of unstable extra-articular distal radius fractures by modified intrafocal Kapandji method.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Albertoni, Walter Manna

    2005-03-01

    The authors prospectively assess the results of surgically treated, unstable extra-articular distal radius fractures from 29 patients with good bone quality. Mean age was 49 years, ranging from 22 to 69 years; the female gender was the most frequently affected (58.6% of the cases). Surgical fixation was indicated for fractures presenting an angulation above 20 degrees , marked dorsal comminution, and radius shortening in excess of 10 mm on initial x-rays (anteroposterior and lateral views). The Kapandji technique, with intrafocal, nonthreaded Kirschner wires, was employed. Clinical data assessed anatomic aspects according to Scheck, functional aspect after Gartland and Werley, strength by Scheck's methods, and esthetic by Frykman's criteria. Functional assessment, according to Gartland and Werley, revealed 72.1% of excellent and good results at 3 months; 89.7% at 6 months; and 96.6% at 12 months. Immediate postoperative reduction was not maintained at the final follow-up at 12 months; however, that loss was not severe, and the anatomic outcome was good and excellent in 96.6% of the cases. Six patients presented complications. Four patients presented reflex sympathetic dystrophy; 1 patient had a superficial Kirschner wire infection, and another patient had radial nerve superficial branch paresthesia. The employed technique showed to be effective in the treatment of unstable, extra-articular fractures of the distal radius. It is easy to learn and to perform. The device employed has a low cost and is widely available in operation rooms.

  13. THE DISTANCE, MASS, AND RADIUS OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN 4U 1608-52

    SciTech Connect

    Guever, Tolga; Oezel, Feryal; Wroblewski, Patricia; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) that show thermonuclear bursts are ideal sources for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. The lack of independent distance measurements for most of these sources, however, prevent a systematic exploration of the masses and radii of the neutron stars, hence limiting the equation-of-state studies. We present here a measurement of the distance to the LMXB 4U 1608-52 that is based on the study of the interstellar extinction toward the source. We first model the individual absorption edges of the elements Ne and Mg in the high-resolution X-ray spectrum obtained with XMM-Newton. We then combine this information with a measurement of the run of reddening with distance using red clump stars and determine a minimum distance to the source of 3.9 kpc, with a most probable value of 5.8 kpc. Finally, we analyze time-resolved X-ray spectra of Type I X-ray bursts observed from this source to measure the mass and the radius of the neutron star. We find a mass of M = 1.74 +- 0.14 M{sub sun} and a radius of R = 9.3 +- 1.0 km, respectively. This mass and radius can be achieved by several multi-nucleon equations of state.

  14. Determination of recombination radius in Si for binary collision approximation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2015-09-11

    Displacement damage caused by ions or neutrons in microelectronic devices can have significant effect on the performance of these devices. Therefore, it is important to predict not only the displacement damage profile, but also its magnitude precisely. Analytical methods and binary collision approximation codes working with amorphous targets use the concept of displacement energy, the energy that a lattice atom has to receive to create a permanent replacement. It was found that this “displacement energy” is direction dependent; it can range from 12 to 32 eV in silicon. Obviously, this model fails in BCA codes that work with crystalline targets, such as Marlowe. Marlowe does not use displacement energy; instead, it uses lattice binding energy only and then pairs the interstitial atoms with vacancies. Then based on the configuration of the Frenkel pairs it classifies them as close, near, or distant pairs, and considers the distant pairs the permanent replacements. Unfortunately, this separation is an ad hoc assumption, and the results do not agree with molecular dynamics calculations. After irradiation, there is a prompt recombination of interstitials and vacancies if they are nearby, within a recombination radius. In order to implement this recombination radius in Marlowe, we used the comparison of MD and Marlowe calculation in a range of ion energies in single crystal silicon target. As a result, the calculations showed that a single recombination radius of ~7.4 Å in Marlowe for a range of ion energies gives an excellent agreement with MD.

  15. [Vitamin C and prevention of reflex sympathetic dystrophy following surgical management of distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Cazeneuve, J F; Leborgne, J M; Kermad, K; Hassan, Y

    2002-12-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a major complication following surgical treatment of fractures of the distal radius. Its pathogenesis is related to lipid peroxidation which damages vascular endothelial cells, increasing capillary permeability. Vitamin C is a natural antioxidant. The authors have made a comparative study of two groups of patients with isolated closed displaced fractures of the distal radius, which were reduced and stabilized by intrafocal pinning. Group 1 included 100 patients who were treated from 1995 until 1998 and who did not receive any vitamin C supplementation; group 2 included 95 patients who were treated from 1999 to 2002 and who received daily administration of one gram vitamin C orally during 45 days, starting on the day of fracture. The incidence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy was five time times lower in group 2 (2.1% versus 10%). This is in line with previous observations and lends credit to the value of vitamin C administration as a prophylactic measure to prevent the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in patients who undergo surgical treatment of a displaced fracture of the distal radius.

  16. The importance of GR for the radius of massive white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Geanderson; Marinho, Rubens; Malheiro, Manuel

    2015-12-17

    In this work we investigate the structure of WD stars using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations and compare with the Newtonian equations of gravitation in order to put in evidence the importance of the General Relativity in the study of these stars. Instead of using politropic equations of state we have solved the equations using the exact relativistic energy equation for the model of completely degenerate electron gas. We find a good fit of the TOV solution with the general EoS for the WD mass-radius diagram. We propose that our fit has to be used as relation between mass and radius for general relativistic WD instead of that Newtonian M ∼ 1/R{sup 3}, this fit is given by M = R/(a + bR + cR{sup 2} + dR{sup 3} + kR{sup 4}), where a, b, c and d are parameters and 1/k is the constant of the Newtonian mass-radius relation and it can be used in simulation study of binary systems that occurs accretion.

  17. Correction of Length Discrepancy of Radius and Ulna with Distraction Osteogenesis: Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Kenan; Akpancar, Serkan; Yıldız, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the results of patients with isolated length discrepancy between ulna and radius who underwent distraction osteogenesis with unilateral external fixator. Material and Methods. A patient with ulna shortening due to multiple enchondromatosis, a patient with ulna shortening due to ulnar club hand, and a patient with radial shortening due to radial club hand were included in the study. The patients underwent ulna and radial distraction osteogenesis with unilateral external fixator. Range of wrist and forearm motion, deformities, and length discrepancy of ulna and radius were compared at preoperative and postoperative. Results. Duration of external fixation and followup were 2.6 and 23.3 months, respectively. Mean distraction osteogenesis was 1.66 cm. No patient reached the length of normal side. Range of rotation of forearm was increased by 15°. Range of ulnar-radial deviation was increased by 21.6°. Deformity of 15° at patient with multiple enchondromatosis was corrected. Conclusion. Isolated ulna or radius shortening may reduce with distraction osteogenesis by unilateral external fixator to prevent serious deformity. PMID:26347840

  18. Finite ion Larmor radius effects and wall effects on m = 1 instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cayton, T.E.

    1980-12-01

    A set of fluid-like equations that simultaneously includes effects due to geometry and finite ion gyroradii is used to examine the stability of a straight, radially diffuse screw pinch in the regime where the poloidal magnetic field is very small compared with the axial magnetic field. It is shown that this pinch may be rendered completely stable through a combination of finite Larmor radius effects and wall effects. Many of the m = 1 modes of the diffuse pinch can be stabilized by finite ion Larmor radius effects, just as all flute modes can be stabilized. Because of the special nature of the m = 1 eigenfunctions, finite ion gyroradius effects are negligible for the kink modes of very large wavelength. This special nature of the eigenfunctions, however, makes these modes good candidates for wall stabilization. The finite Larmor radius stabilization of m = 1 modes of a diffuse pinch is contrary to the conventional wisdom that has evolved from studies of sharp-boundary, skin-current models of the pinch.

  19. A Measurement of Radius Inflation in the Pleiades and Its Relation to Rotation and Lithium Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Garrett; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2017-03-01

    Precise measurements of eclipsing binary parameters and statistical studies of young clusters have suggested that some magnetically active low-mass dwarfs possess radii inflated by ∼5%–15% relative to theoretical expectations. If true, this effect should be pronounced in young open clusters, due to the rapid rotation and strong magnetic activity of their most extreme members. We explore this possibility by determining empirical radii for 83 members of the nearby Pleiades open cluster, using spectral energy distribution fitting to establish {{ F }}{bol} with a typical accuracy of ≈3% together with color and spectro-photometric indices to determine {T}{eff}. We find several Pleiades members with radii inflated above radius-{T}{eff} models from state-of-the-art calculations, and apparent dispersions in radii for the K-dwarfs of the cluster. Moreover, we demonstrate that this putative radius inflation correlates strongly with rotation rate, consistent with inflation of young stars by magnetic activity and/or starspots. We argue that this signal is not a consequence of starspot-induced color anomalies, binarity, or depth effects in the cluster, employing Gaia DR1 distances as a check. Finally, we consider the lithium abundances of these stars, demonstrating a triple correlation between rotation rate, radius inflation, and enhanced lithium abundance. Our result—already significant to ∼99.99% confidence—provides strong support for a magnetic origin of the inflated radii and lithium dispersion observed in young, low-mass stars.

  20. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: ALTERNATE ROUTES TO A BROAD-LINE REGION RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Hood, Carol E.; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bennert, Vardha N.; Treu, Tommaso; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gates, Elinor; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2010-11-01

    It is now possible to estimate black hole (BH) masses across cosmic time, using broad emission lines in active galaxies. This technique informs our views of how galaxies and their central BHs coevolve. Unfortunately, there are many outstanding uncertainties associated with these 'virial' mass estimates. One of these comes from using the accretion luminosity to infer a size for the broad-line region (BLR). Incorporating the new sample of low-luminosity active galaxies from our recent monitoring campaign at Lick Observatory, we recalibrate the radius-luminosity relation with tracers of the accretion luminosity other than the optical continuum. We find that the radius of the BLR scales as the square root of the X-ray and H{beta} luminosities, in agreement with recent optical studies. On the other hand, the scaling appears to be marginally steeper with narrow-line luminosities. This is consistent with a previously observed decrease in the ratio of narrow-line to X-ray luminosity with increasing total luminosity. The radius of the BLR correlates most tightly with H{beta} luminosity, while the X-ray and narrow-line relations both have comparable scatter of a factor of 2. These correlations provide useful alternative virial BH masses in objects with no detectable optical/UV continuum emission, such as high-redshift galaxies with broad emission lines, radio-loud objects, or local active galaxies with galaxy-dominated continua.

  1. The intra-operative radius joystick test to diagnose complete disruption of the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, M; Ciais, G; Wassermann, V; Kalouche, I; Biau, D; Dumontier, C; Gagey, O

    2011-10-01

    Disruption of the interosseous membrane is easily missed in patients with Essex-Lopresti syndrome. None of the imaging techniques available for diagnosing disruption of the interosseous membrane are completely dependable. We undertook an investigation to identify whether a simple intra-operative test could be used to diagnose disruption of the interosseous membrane during surgery for fracture of the radial head and to see if the test was reproducible. We studied 20 cadaveric forearms after excision of the radial head, ten with and ten without disruption of the interosseous membrane. On each forearm, we performed the radius joystick test: moderate lateral traction was applied to the radial neck with the forearm in maximal pronation, to look for lateral displacement of the proximal radius indicating that the interosseous membrane had been disrupted. Each of six surgeons (three junior and three senior) performed the test on two consecutive days. Intra-observer agreement was 77% (95% confidence interval (CI) 67 to 85) and interobserver agreement was 97% (95% CI 92 to 100). Sensitivity was 100% (95% CI 97 to 100), specificity 88% (95% CI 81 to 93), positive predictive value 90% (95% CI 83 to 94), and negative predictive value 100%). This cadaveric study suggests that the radius joystick test may be useful for detecting disruption of the interosseous membrane in patients undergoing open surgery for fracture of the radial head and is reproducible. A confirmatory study in vivo is now required.

  2. Dark matter in elliptical galaxies - II. Estimating the mass within the virial radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamon, Gary A.; Łokas, Ewa L.

    2005-11-01

    Elliptical galaxies are modelled with a four-component model: Sérsic stars, Λ-cold dark matter (ΛCDM), a β-model for the hot gas and a central black hole, with the aim of establishing how accurately can one measure the total mass within their virial radii. Dark matter (DM) is negligible in the inner regions, which are dominated by stars and the central black hole. This prevents any kinematic estimate (using a Jeans analysis) of the inner slope of the DM density profile. The gas fraction rises, but the baryon fraction decreases with radius, at least out to 10 effective radii (Re). Even with line-of-sight velocity dispersion (VD) measurements at 4 or 5Re with 20 km s-1 accuracy and perfectly known velocity anisotropy, the total mass within the virial radius (rv≡r200) is uncertain by a factor of over 3. The DM distributions found in ΛCDM simulations appear inconsistent with the low VDs measured by Romanowsky et al. of planetary nebulae between 2 and 5Re. Some of Romanowsky et al.'s orbital solutions for NGC 3379 imply a dark matter content at least as large as cosmologically predicted, and the lower M/L values of most of their solutions lead to a baryonic fraction within rv that is larger than the universal value. Replacing the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) DM model by the new model of Navarro et al. decreases the VD slightly at a given radius. So, given the observed VD measured at 5Re, the inferred M/L within rv is 40 per cent larger than that predicted by the NFW model. Folding in the slight (strong) radial anisotropy found in ΛCDM (merger) simulations, which is well modelled (much better than with the Osipkov-Merritt formula) with , the inferred M/L within rv is 1.6 (2.4) times higher than for the isotropic NFW model. Thus, the DM model and radial anisotropy can partly explain the low planetary nebula VDs, but not in full. The logarithmic slope of the VD at radii of 1-5Re, which is insensitive to radius, is another measure of the DM mass within the virial

  3. [Results of Kapandji-Sauvé operation after distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Borisch, N; Haussmann, P

    1998-11-01

    Incongruity of the distal radioulnar joint represents a major problem following malunited fractures of the distal radius. A useful solution is the arthrodesis of the distal radioulnar joint with distal ulnar pseudarthrosis as described by Kapandji-Sauvé. The results of this procedure are presented and the indication compared to alternative treatment options discussed. Between 1991 and 1997, 19 patients were treated with a Kapandji-Sauvé procedure, for rheumatoid arthritis in seven and for a malunited fracture of the distal radius in twelve patients. All of the patients with a malunion of the distal radius were followed up 5 to 70 months postoperatively by clinical and X-ray examination. For evaluation the protocol by Martini for malunited fractures of the distal radius was used. All but one patient agreed that the operation had been beneficial and would choose to undergo the same procedure again necessary. Mean forearm rotation improved from 99 to 166 degrees. Preoperative pain was reduced in eleven patients. Two patients were completely pain-free and seven noticed pain during heavy load only. Grip strength improved postoperatively in three patients, remained unchanged in four and was diminished in three. In two patients preoperative measurements were not available. Evaluation by the Martini protocol gave three very good, four good, four fair, and one poor result. In one patient, regeneration of the ulna across the resected segment occurred necessitating a secondary excision. This resulted in a return of forearm rotation of 140 degree and good patient satisfaction. Arthrodesis of the distal radioulnar joint with distal ulnar pseudarthrosis reliably reduces pain and improves forearm rotation after malunited fractures of the distal radius. However, it cannot influence pain originating from the radiocarpal joint. Therefore, patients with advanced radiocarpal arthrosis are not suitable for the operation. We consider the procedure to be indicated when the distal

  4. Growth arrest of the distal radius following a metaphyseal fracture: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chris W; Kay, Robert M; Skaggs, David L

    2002-01-01

    We report a 12-year-old girl who developed growth arrest of the distal radius physis 9 months after sustaining a complete fracture of the distal radial and ulnar metaphysis with no involvement of the physis evident at time of injury. The girl sustained a fracture of the metaphysis of her right distal radius and ulna after a fall. Anterior-posterior, lateral and oblique radiographs at injury, and during subsequent healing show no evidence of the fracture involving the physis. She was treated with closed reduction and casting for 6 weeks and healed uneventfully. She returned 4 month later concerned about distal ulnar prominence. Radiographs revealed a loss of radial tilt and with suspicion of a physeal bar. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a physeal bar located in the dorsal radial region. A literature search of the Medline database was used to obtain prior case reports for review purpose. The patient underwent an epiphysiodesis of the distal radius and ulna along with an opening wedge osteotomy and bone grafting of the distal radius to restore radial height and inclination. She healed without complication and with restoration of the normal relationship of the distal radius and ulna. A review of the literature reveals five reported case of distal radial metaphyseal fractures not invloving the physis leading to growth arrest. By comparison, there are 31 reported cases of distal radius physeal arrest following fractures involving the physis. The physician should be aware that common distal radius metaphyseal fractures may rarely lead to growth arrest.

  5. Is the proton radius a player in the redefinition of the International System of Units?

    PubMed

    Nez, F; Antognini, A; Amaro, F D; Biraben, F; Cardoso, J M R; Covita, D; Dax, A; Dhawan, S; Fernandes, L; Giesen, A; Graf, T; Hänsch, T W; Indelicato, P; Julien, L; Kao, C-Y; Knowles, P E; Le Bigot, E; Liu, Y-W; Lopes, J A M; Ludhova, L; Monteiro, C M B; Mulhauser, F; Nebel, T; Rabinowitz, P; dos Santos, J M F; Schaller, L; Schuhmann, K; Schwob, C; Taqqu, D; Veloso, J F C A; Kottmann, F; Pohl, R

    2011-10-28

    It is now recognized that the International System of Units (SI units) will be redefined in terms of fundamental constants, even if the date when this will occur is still under debate. Actually, the best estimate of fundamental constant values is given by a least-squares adjustment, carried out under the auspices of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) Task Group on Fundamental Constants. This adjustment provides a significant measure of the correctness and overall consistency of the basic theories and experimental methods of physics using the values of the constants obtained from widely differing experiments. The physical theories that underlie this adjustment are assumed to be valid, such as quantum electrodynamics (QED). Testing QED, one of the most precise theories is the aim of many accurate experiments. The calculations and the corresponding experiments can be carried out either on a boundless system, such as the electron magnetic moment anomaly, or on a bound system, such as atomic hydrogen. The value of fundamental constants can be deduced from the comparison of theory and experiment. For example, using QED calculations, the value of the fine structure constant given by the CODATA is mainly inferred from the measurement of the electron magnetic moment anomaly carried out by Gabrielse's group. (Hanneke et al. 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 120801) The value of the Rydberg constant is known from two-photon spectroscopy of hydrogen combined with accurate theoretical quantities. The Rydberg constant, determined by the comparison of theory and experiment using atomic hydrogen, is known with a relative uncertainty of 6.6×10(-12). It is one of the most accurate fundamental constants to date. A careful analysis shows that knowledge of the electrical size of the proton is nowadays a limitation in this comparison. The aim of muonic hydrogen spectroscopy was to obtain an accurate value of the proton charge radius. However, the value deduced from this

  6. Evidence of radius inflation in stars approaching the slow-rotator sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, A. C.; Spada, F.; Distefano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Average stellar radii in open clusters can be estimated from rotation periods and projected rotational velocities under the assumption that the spin axis has a random orientation. These estimates are independent of distance, interstellar absorption, and models, but their validity can be limited by lacking data (truncation) or data that only represent upper or lower limits (censoring). Aims: We present a new statistical analysis method to estimate average stellar radii in the presence of censoring and truncation. Methods: We used theoretical distribution functions of the projected stellar radius Rsini to define a likelihood function in the presence of censoring and truncation. Average stellar radii in magnitude bins were then obtained by a maximum likelihood parametric estimation procedure. Results: This method is capable of recovering the average stellar radius within a few percent with as few as aboutten measurements. Here we apply this for the first time to the dataset available for the Pleiades. We find an agreement better than ≈10 percent between the observed R vs. MK relationship and current standard stellar models for 1.2 ≥ M/M⊙ ≥ 0.85 with no evident bias. Evidence of a systematic deviation at 2σ level are found for stars with 0.8 ≥ M/M⊙ ≥ 0.6 that approach the slow-rotator sequence. Fast rotators (P < 2 d) agree with standard models within 15 percent with no systematic deviations in the whole 1.2 ≳ M/M⊙ ≳ 0.5 range. Conclusions: The evidence of a possible radius inflation just below the lower mass limit of the slow-rotator sequence indicates a possible connection with the transition from the fast- to the slow-rotator sequence. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A63

  7. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  8. Biomechanical Comparison of Osteoporotic Distal Radius Fractures Fixed by Distal Locking Screws with Different Length

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiong; Wu, Wei-dong; Fang, Ya-feng; Zhang, Mei-chao; Huang, Wen-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the postoperative stability of osteoporotic distal radius fractures fixed with distal locking screws with different length. Methods A comminuted extra-articular dorsally unstable distal radius fracture, treated with volar locking plate system, was created. The 18 specimens were randomized into 3 groups based on distal locked screws with different length: Group A had unicortical screws with 50% length to the dorsal cortex. Group B had unicortical screws with 75% length to the dorsal cortex. Group C had bicortical screws. Axial compression and bending loads were imposed on the models before and after cycling testing as well as load to clinical and catastrophic failure. Results Minimum change in stiffness was observed before and after fatigue for all groups. The final stiffness to bending forces was statistically similar in all groups, but stiffness to axial compression was statistically significant different: Group A approached significance with respect to groups B and C (P = 0.017, 0.009), whereas stiffness in group B and C was statistically similar (P = 0.93). Load to clinical failure was significantly less for group A (456.54±78.59 N) compared with groups B (580.24±73.85 N) and C (591.07±38.40 N). Load to catastrophic failure was statistically similar between groups, but mean values for Group A were 18% less than means for Group C. Conclusions The volar locking plate system fixed with unicortical locking screws with at least 75% length not only produced early stability for osteoporotic distal radius fractures, but also avoided extensor tendon complications due to dorsal screw protrusion. PMID:25080094

  9. Mechanical consequences of different scenarios for simulated bone atrophy and recovery in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, W; van Rietbergen, B; Rüegsegger, P

    2003-12-01

    Metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis usually cause a decrease in bone mass and a deterioration of bone microarchitecture leading to a decline in bone strength. Methods to predict bone strength in patients are currently based on bone mass only. It has been suggested that an improved prediction of bone strength might be possible if structural changes are taken into account as well. In this study we evaluated which structural parameters (other than bone mass) are the best predictors for changes in bone mechanical properties of the human radius after different bone atrophy scenarios and whether the original strength of the affected bone can be recovered if bone loss is restored by thickening of the remaining structures. To answer these questions, a human radius was measured with a microcomputer tomography scanner to extract the full three-dimensional architecture of the distal radius at an isotropic resolution of 80 microm. Eight models with modified bone architecture were created and the mechanical variations due to these modifications were studied using microfinite element (micro-FE) simulations. In four models mass was lowered by 20%, either by reducing cortical thickness, trabecular thickness, or number of trabeculae or by overall thinning of structures. In the other four models bone mass was restored to the original value using a trabecular bone thickening procedure. The micro-FE analyses revealed that most load was carried by the cortical bone. For this reason, bone strength was affected most in the reduced cortical thickness model. For the same reason, the trabecular bone atrophy scenarios, all of which affected bone strength in a very similar way, resulted in less dramatic bone strength reduction. The restoration of bone mass did not recover the original bone strength. These findings demonstrate that the importance of different parameters for the prediction of bone strength also depends on the mechanical loading. This could explain why results of

  10. The Impact of Subsampling on MODIS Level-3 Statistics of Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros

    2004-01-01

    The MODIS Level-3 optical thickness and effective radius cloud product is a gridded l deg. x 1 deg. dataset that is derived from aggregation and subsampling at 5 km of 1 km, resolution Level-2 orbital swath data (Level-2 granules). This study examines the impact of the 5 km subsampling on the mean, standard deviation and inhomogeneity parameter statistics of optical thickness and effective radius. The methodology is simple and consists of estimating mean errors for a large collection of Terra and Aqua Level-2 granules by taking the difference of the statistics at the original and subsampled resolutions. It is shown that the Level-3 sampling does not affect the various quantities investigated to the same degree, with second order moments suffering greater subsampling errors, as expected. Mean errors drop dramatically when averages over a sufficient number of regions (e.g., monthly and/or latitudinal averages) are taken, pointing to a dominance of errors that are of random nature. When histograms built from subsampled data with the same binning rules as in the Level-3 dataset are used to reconstruct the quantities of interest, the mean errors do not deteriorate significantly. The results in this paper provide guidance to users of MODIS Level-3 optical thickness and effective radius cloud products on the range of errors due to subsampling they should expect and perhaps account for, in scientific work with this dataset. In general, subsampling errors should not be a serious concern when moderate temporal and/or spatial averaging is performed.

  11. Trabecular and cortical microstructure and fragility of the distal radius in women.

    PubMed

    Bala, Yohann; Bui, Quang Minh; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Iuliano, Sandra; Wang, Qingju; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Rozental, Tamara D; Bouxsein, Mary L; Zebaze, Roger M D; Seeman, Ego

    2015-04-01

    Fragility fractures commonly involve metaphyses. The distal radius is assembled with a thin cortex formed by fusion (corticalization) of trabeculae arising from the periphery of the growth plate. Centrally positioned trabeculae reinforce the thin cortex and transfer loads from the joint to the proximal thicker cortical bone. We hypothesized that growth- and age-related deficits in trabecular bone disrupt this frugally assembled microarchitecture, producing bone fragility. The microarchitecture of the distal radius was measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography in 135 females with distal radial fractures, including 32 girls (aged 7 to 18 years), 35 premenopausal women (aged 18 to 44 years), and 68 postmenopausal women (aged 50 to 76 years). We also studied 240 fracture-free controls of comparable age and 47 healthy fracture-free premenopausal mother-daughter pairs (aged 30 to 55 and 7 to 20 years, respectively). In fracture-free girls and pre- and postmenopausal women, fewer or thinner trabeculae were associated with a smaller and more porous cortical area (r = 0.25 to 0.71 after age, height, and weight adjustment, all p < 0.05). Fewer and thinner trabeculae in daughters were associated with higher cortical porosity in their mothers (r = 0.30 to 0.47, all p < 0.05). Girls and premenopausal and postmenopausal women with forearm fractures had 0.3 to 0.7 standard deviations (SD) fewer or thinner trabeculae and higher cortical porosity than controls in one or more compartment; one SD trait difference conferred odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for fracture ranging from 1.56 (1.01-2.44) to 4.76 (2.86-7.69). Impaired trabecular corticalization during growth, and cortical and trabecular fragmentation during aging, may contribute to the fragility of the distal radius.

  12. Distal Radius Volar Rim Fracture Fixation Using DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate

    PubMed Central

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Tarabochia, Matthew; Jupiter, Jesse B.

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the results of distal radius fractures with the involvement of the volar rim fixed with the DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate. Case Description We searched for the patients with volar rim fracture and/or volar rim fractures as part of a complex fracture fixed with a volar rim plate. Ten patients met the inclusion criteria: three patients with type 23B3, six patients with type 23C, and one patient with very distal type 23A. The mean follow-up was 14 months (range: 2–26). Fractures healed in all patients. Of the three patients with isolated volar rim fractures (type 23B3), two patients had no detectable deficits in motion. These patients had an average Gartland and Werley score of 9 (range: 2–14). Of the other seven patients (six with type 23C and one with type 23A fracture), three patients healed with full range of motion and four had some deficits in range of motion. Two patients had excellent results, three had good results, and two had fair results using the Gartland and Werley categorical rating. One patient healed with a shortened radius and ulnar impingement requiring a second surgery for ulnar head resection arthroplasty. Literature Review Results after nonoperative treatment of volar rim fractures are not satisfactory and often require subsequent corrective osteotomy. Satisfactory outcomes are achieved when the fragments are well reduced and secured regardless of the device type. Clinical Relevance Volar rim plates give an adequate buttress of the volar radius distal to volar projection of the lunate facet and do not interfere with wrist mobility. Furthermore, the dorsal fragments can be fixed securely through the volar approach eliminating the need for a secondary posterior incision. However, patients should be informed of the potential problems and the need to remove the plate if symptoms develop. PMID:26855829

  13. Devising for a distal radius fracture fixation focus on the intra-articular volar dislocated fragment

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Yoichi; Naito, Kiyohito; Obata, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Mayuko; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Distal radius fracture (DRF) accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragment is difficult to reduce. This volar fragment remains when treated with a simple buttress effect alone, and V-shaped deformity may remain on the articular surface. We attempted to improve dorsal rotational deviation of volar fragment by osteosynthesis applying the condylar stabilizing technique. We report the surgical procedure and results. Materials and methods The subjects were 10 cases of DRF accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragments surgically treated (mean age: 69 years old). The fracture type based on the AO classification was B3 in 1 case, C1 in 4, C2 in 2, and C3 in 3 cases. All cases were treated with a volar locking plate. Reduction was applied utilizing the angle stability of the volar locking plate, similarly to the condylar stabilizing technique. On the final follow-up, we evaluated clinical and radiologic evaluation. To evaluate V-shaped valley deformity of the articular surface, the depth of the lunate fossa of the radius was measured using computed tomography (CT). Results The duration of postoperative follow-up was 11 (6–24) months. Mayo wrist score was 93 (Excellent in 10 cases). No general complication associated with a volar locking plate was noted in any case. Volar tilt on radiography were 11° (4–14). The depth of the lunate fossa on CT was 3.9 ± 0.7 mm in the patients. Conclusion This procedure may be useful for osteosynthesis of distal radius fracture accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragments. PMID:27144008

  14. THE MASS-RADIUS RELATION FOR 65 EXOPLANETS SMALLER THAN 4 EARTH RADII

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-03-01

    We study the masses and radii of 65 exoplanets smaller than 4 R {sub ⊕} with orbital periods shorter than 100 days. We calculate the weighted mean densities of planets in bins of 0.5 R {sub ⊕} and identify a density maximum of 7.6  g cm{sup –3} at 1.4 R {sub ⊕}. On average, planets with radii up to R {sub P} = 1.5 R {sub ⊕} increase in density with increasing radius. Above 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, the average planet density rapidly decreases with increasing radius, indicating that these planets have a large fraction of volatiles by volume overlying a rocky core. Including the solar system terrestrial planets with the exoplanets below 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, we find ρ{sub P} = 2.43 + 3.39(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}) g cm{sup –3} for R {sub P} < 1.5 R {sub ⊕}, which is consistent with rocky compositions. For 1.5 ≤ R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕} < 4, we find M {sub P}/M {sub ⊕} = 2.69(R {sub P}/R {sub ⊕}){sup 0.93}. The rms of planet masses to the fit between 1.5 and 4 R {sub ⊕} is 4.3 M {sub ⊕} with reduced χ{sup 2} = 6.2. The large scatter indicates a diversity in planet composition at a given radius. The compositional diversity can be due to planets of a given volume (as determined by their large H/He envelopes) containing rocky cores of different masses or compositions.

  15. Probabilistic Mass-Radius Relationship for Sub-Neptune-Sized Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Angie; Rogers, Leslie A.; Ford, Eric B.

    2016-07-01

    The Kepler Mission has discovered thousands of planets with radii <4 {R}\\oplus , paving the way for the first statistical studies of the dynamics, formation, and evolution of these sub-Neptunes and super-Earths. Planetary masses are an important physical property for these studies, and yet the vast majority of Kepler planet candidates do not have theirs measured. A key concern is therefore how to map the measured radii to mass estimates in this Earth-to-Neptune size range where there are no Solar System analogs. Previous works have derived deterministic, one-to-one relationships between radius and mass. However, if these planets span a range of compositions as expected, then an intrinsic scatter about this relationship must exist in the population. Here we present the first probabilistic mass-radius relationship (M-R relation) evaluated within a Bayesian framework, which both quantifies this intrinsic dispersion and the uncertainties on the M-R relation parameters. We analyze how the results depend on the radius range of the sample, and on how the masses were measured. Assuming that the M-R relation can be described as a power law with a dispersion that is constant and normally distributed, we find that M/{M}\\oplus =2.7{(R/{R}\\oplus )}1.3, a scatter in mass of 1.9{M}\\oplus , and a mass constraint to physically plausible densities, is the “best-fit” probabilistic M-R relation for the sample of RV-measured transiting sub-Neptunes (R pl < 4 {R}\\oplus ). More broadly, this work provides a framework for further analyses of the M-R relation and its probable dependencies on period and stellar properties.

  16. Determination of recombination radius in Si for binary collision approximation codes

    DOE PAGES

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2015-09-11

    Displacement damage caused by ions or neutrons in microelectronic devices can have significant effect on the performance of these devices. Therefore, it is important to predict not only the displacement damage profile, but also its magnitude precisely. Analytical methods and binary collision approximation codes working with amorphous targets use the concept of displacement energy, the energy that a lattice atom has to receive to create a permanent replacement. It was found that this “displacement energy” is direction dependent; it can range from 12 to 32 eV in silicon. Obviously, this model fails in BCA codes that work with crystalline targets,more » such as Marlowe. Marlowe does not use displacement energy; instead, it uses lattice binding energy only and then pairs the interstitial atoms with vacancies. Then based on the configuration of the Frenkel pairs it classifies them as close, near, or distant pairs, and considers the distant pairs the permanent replacements. Unfortunately, this separation is an ad hoc assumption, and the results do not agree with molecular dynamics calculations. After irradiation, there is a prompt recombination of interstitials and vacancies if they are nearby, within a recombination radius. In order to implement this recombination radius in Marlowe, we used the comparison of MD and Marlowe calculation in a range of ion energies in single crystal silicon target. As a result, the calculations showed that a single recombination radius of ~7.4 Å in Marlowe for a range of ion energies gives an excellent agreement with MD.« less

  17. How to Constrain Your M Dwarf: Measuring Effective Temperature, Bolometric Luminosity, Mass, and Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Feiden, Gregory A.; Gaidos, Eric; Boyajian, Tabetha; von Braun, Kaspar

    2015-05-01

    Precise and accurate parameters for late-type (late K and M) dwarf stars are important for characterization of any orbiting planets, but such determinations have been hampered by these stars’ complex spectra and dissimilarity to the Sun. We exploit an empirically calibrated method to estimate spectroscopic effective temperature (Teff) and the Stefan-Boltzmann law to determine radii of 183 nearby K7-M7 single stars with a precision of 2%-5%. Our improved stellar parameters enable us to develop model-independent relations between Teff or absolute magnitude and radius, as well as between color and Teff. The derived Teff-radius relation depends strongly on [Fe/H], as predicted by theory. The relation between absolute KS magnitude and radius can predict radii accurate to ≃ 3%. We derive bolometric corrections to the V{{R}C}{{I}C}grizJH{{K}S} and Gaia passbands as a function of color, accurate to 1%-3%. We confront the reliability of predictions from Dartmouth stellar evolution models using a Markov chain Monte Carlo to find the values of unobservable model parameters (mass, age) that best reproduce the observed effective temperature and bolometric flux while satisfying constraints on distance and metallicity as Bayesian priors. With the inferred masses we derive a semi-empirical mass-absolute magnitude relation with a scatter of 2% in mass. The best-agreement models overpredict stellar Teff values by an average of 2.2% and underpredict stellar radii by 4.6%, similar to differences with values from low-mass eclipsing binaries. These differences are not correlated with metallicity, mass, or indicators of activity, suggesting issues with the underlying model assumptions, e.g., opacities or convective mixing length.

  18. Combining ergometer exercise and artificial gravity in a compact-radius centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ana; Trigg, Chris; Young, Laurence R.

    2015-08-01

    Humans experience physiological deconditioning during space missions, primarily attributable to weightlessness. Some of these adverse consequences include bone loss, muscle atrophy, sensory-motor deconditioning, and cardiovascular alteration, which may lead to orthostatic intolerance when astronauts return to Earth. Artificial gravity could provide a comprehensive countermeasure capable of challenging all the physiological systems at once, particularly if combined with exercise, thereby maintaining overall health during extended exposure to weightlessness. A new Compact Radius Centrifuge (CRC) platform was designed and built on the existing Short Radius Centrifuge (SRC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The centrifuge has been constrained to a radius of 1.4 m, the upper radial limit for a centrifuge to fit within an International Space Station (ISS) module without extensive structural alterations. In addition, a cycle ergometer has been added for exercise during centrifugation. The CRC now includes sensors of foot forces, cardiovascular parameters, and leg muscle electromyography. An initial human experiment was conducted on 12 subjects to analyze the effects of different artificial gravity levels (0 g, 1 g, and 1.4 g, measured at the feet) and ergometer exercise intensities (25 W warm-up, 50 W moderate and 100 W vigorous) on the musculoskeletal function as well as motion sickness and comfort. Foot forces were measured during the centrifuge runs, and subjective comfort and motion sickness data were gathered after each session. Preliminary results indicate that ergometer exercise on a centrifuge may be effective in improving musculoskeletal function. The combination is well tolerated and motion sickness is minimal. The MIT CRC is a novel platform for future studies of exercise combined with artificial gravity. This combination may be effective as a countermeasure to space physiological deconditioning.

  19. Aeronomical constraints to the minimum mass and maximum radius of hot low-mass planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Erkaev, N. V.; Lammer, H.; Cubillos, P. E.; Odert, P.; Juvan, I.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Lendl, M.; Kubyshkina, D.; Bauer, S. J.

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated by the discovery of a number of close-in low-density planets, we generalise the Jeans escape parameter taking hydrodynamic and Roche lobe effects into account. We furthermore define Λ as the value of the Jeans escape parameter calculated at the observed planetary radius and mass for the planet's equilibrium temperature and considering atomic hydrogen, independently of the atmospheric temperature profile. We consider 5 and 10 M⊕ planets with an equilibrium temperature of 500 and 1000 K, orbiting early G-, K-, and M-type stars. Assuming a clear atmosphere and by comparing escape rates obtained from the energy-limited formula, which only accounts for the heating induced by the absorption of the high-energy stellar radiation, and from a hydrodynamic atmosphere code, which also accounts for the bolometric heating, we find that planets whose Λ is smaller than 15-35 lie in the "boil-off" regime, where the escape is driven by the atmospheric thermal energy and low planetary gravity. We find that the atmosphere of hot (i.e. Teq ⪆ 1000 K) low-mass (Mpl ⪅ 5 M⊕) planets with Λ< 15-35 shrinks to smaller radii so that their Λ evolves to values higher than 15-35, hence out of the boil-off regime, in less than ≈500 Myr. Because of their small Roche lobe radius, we find the same result also for hot (i.e. Teq⪆ 1000 K) higher mass (Mpl ⪅ 10 M⊕) planets with Λ< 15-35, when they orbit M-dwarfs. For old, hydrogen-dominated planets in this range of parameters, Λ should therefore be ≥15-35, which provides a strong constraint on the planetary minimum mass and maximum radius and can be used to predict the presence of aerosols and/or constrain planetary masses, for example.

  20. Salmonella osteomyelitis of the distal radius in a healthy young adult patient: report of a rare case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tonogai, Ichiro; Hamada, Yoshitaka; Hibino, Naohito; Sato, Ryosuke; Henmi, Tatsuhiko; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella osteomyelitis of the radius in a healthy individual is very rare. We present such a case involving the distal radius of a healthy 23-year-old man without underlying disease or possible episode. He had right wrist pain for approximately 3 years, and osteolytic lesion was seen in the right distal radius. He underwent surgical treatment, and salmonella was isolated from pus in the lesion. Postoperative antibiotics successfully treated his infection. He had no sign of recurrence, but the point of entry for infection remains unknown.

  1. Thermal Stress of Supported Lipid Bilayer Induces Formation and Collapse of Uniform Radius Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Fygenson, Deborah

    2011-03-01

    Supported lipid bilayer (SLB) provides a model system in which to quantitatively investigate fluid bilayer transitions from planar to tubular and tubular to spherical morphologies. Following a small increase in temperature, flexible filaments extrude from a fluid SLB. Individual filaments can reach hundreds of microns in length before spontaneously collapsing into discs. We demonstrate that the filaments are tubular and report the effects of lipid composition and flow-induced tension on their properties. At high ionic strength, the sub-resolution tubules are adsorbed to the SLB, enabling the measurement of their radius to within +/- 5 nm using fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Solid variant of aneurysmal bone cist on the distal extremity of the radius in a child.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriano Jander; de Almeida Leitão, Sebastião; Rocha, Murilo Antônio; Nascimento, Valdênia das Graças; Lima, Giovanni Bessa Pereira; de Meneses, Antonio Carlos Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The solid variant of aneurismal bone cysts (ABC) is considered rare. It occurs with greater frequency in pediatric patients and in the tibia, femur, pelvis and humerus. We present a case of a metaphyseal lytic lesion on the distal extremity of the radius in a child whose radiograph was requested after low-energy trauma. The hypothesis of a pathological bone fracture secondary to an aneurysmal bone cyst was suggested. After biopsy, the child underwent intralesional excision without bone grafting and the histopathological findings were compatible with the solid variant of aneurysmal bone cyst.

  3. Distributions of supernovae of different types along the radius and in z coordinate of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuk, N. N.; Tsvetkov, D. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The distributions of supernovae of different types and subtypes along the radius and in z coordinate of galaxies have been studied. We show that among the type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in spiral galaxies, SNe Iax and Ia-norm have, respectively, the largest and smallest concentration to the center; the distributions of SNe Ia-91bg and Ia-91T are similar. A strong concentration of SNe Ib/c to the central regions has been confirmed. In spiral galaxies, the supernovae of all types strongly concentrate to the galactic plane; the slight differences in scale height correlate with the extent to which the classes of supernovae are associated with star formation.

  4. Measurement of Gaussian laser beam radius using the knife-edge technique: improvement on data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Marcos A. de; Silva, Rubens; Lima, Emerson de; Pereira, Daniel P.; Oliveira, Paulo C. de

    2009-01-10

    We revisited the well known Khosrofian and Garetz inversion algorithm [Appl. Opt.22, 3406-3410 (1983)APOPAI0003-6935] that was developed to analyze data obtained by the application of the traveling knife-edge technique. We have analyzed the approximated fitting function that was used for adjusting their experimental data and have found that it is not optimized to work with a full range of the experimentally-measured data. We have numerically calculated a new set of coefficients, which makes the approximated function suitable for a full experimental range, considerably improving the accuracy of the measurement of a radius of a focused Gaussian laser beam.

  5. Limits on the radius and a possible atmosphere of Charon from its 1980 stellar occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Young, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Walker's (1980) stellar occultation data for Charon are presently fit by a model which encompasses the possibility of differential refraction by an atmosphere, followed by a sudden occultation behind Charon's limb. The 601.5-km Charon radius lower limit thus obtained may serve as a constraint in models of the mutual event data; while the model fits considered support a Charonian atmosphere of indeterminate composition, time resolution is insufficient for certainty and the data may be interpretable as indications of either a slight extinction near Charon or an entirely unidentified and unassociated effect.

  6. Fast polarization-state tracking scheme based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanfu; Cao, Guoliang; Zhong, Kangping; Zhou, Xian; Yao, Yong; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao

    2015-07-27

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a fast polarization tracking scheme based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter. It has the advantages of fast convergence and is inherently insensitive to phase noise and frequency offset effects. The scheme is experimentally compared to conventional polarization tracking methods on the polarization rotation angular frequency. The results show that better tracking capability with more than one order of magnitude improvement is obtained in the cases of polarization multiplexed QPSK and 16QAM signals. The influences of the filter tuning parameters on tracking performance are also investigated in detail.

  7. An unusual cause of focal hand dystonia due to a retained implant of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-08

    Focal hand dystonia (FHD) is characterised clinically by a task-specific symptom and typical electromyography findings of a characteristic pattern of cocontraction of the agonist and antagonist muscles of the hand and forearm. The aetiopathogenesis of this condition is still not clear. We present a case of a patient with an unusual aetiology for this condition, in the form of retained hardware in the distal radius. This patient had complete resolution of symptoms after removal of a retained radial plate. Thorough history-taking, clinical examination and necessary investigations are the cornerstones for making a diagnosis of FHD.

  8. New relationships connecting the dipole polarizability, radius, and second ionization potential for atoms.

    PubMed

    Hohm, Uwe; Thakkar, Ajit J

    2012-01-12

    The atomic dipole polarizability α of the 101 elements from He to No is related to the second ionization potential I₂ and the Waber-Cromer radius r(WC). Our recommended model is the function α = P₁·I₂⁻⁴ + P₂·r(WC)(3) I₂(y). With the parameters P₁ = 2.26, P₂ = 3.912, and y = 0.439, it reproduces the polarizabilities of all 101 elements with a mean absolute deviation of 7.5 au.

  9. A computer technique for detailed analysis of mission radius and maneuverability characteristics of fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, W. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A computer technique to determine the mission radius and maneuverability characteristics of combat aircraft was developed. The technique was used to determine critical operational requirements and the areas in which research programs would be expected to yield the most beneficial results. In turn, the results of research efforts were evaluated in terms of aircraft performance on selected mission segments and for complete mission profiles. Extensive use of the technique in evaluation studies indicates that the calculated performance is essentially the same as that obtained by the proprietary programs in use throughout the aircraft industry.

  10. Rapid resorption of calcium sulfate and hardware failure following corrective radius osteotomy: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Jepegnanam, Thilak S; von Schroeder, Herbert P

    2012-03-01

    Bone substitutes are being increasingly used and may avert the need for autogenous bone graft in orthopedic surgery. Thus it is important to note complications that occur with them to better understand the limitations. We report on early mechanical failure of injectable calcium sulfate leading to implant failure in 2 elderly patients who had corrective osteotomies for malunited distal radius fractures. We hypothesize that these occurred because there was inadequate new bone formation to replace the resorbing bone substitute. We advise caution when using bone substitutes in patients with expected delayed fracture healing.

  11. Finite Larmor radius effects on the coupled trapped electron and ion temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Isliker, H.; Pavlenko, V. P.

    2007-09-15

    The properties of the coupled trapped electron and toroidal ion temperature gradient modes are investigated using the standard reactive fluid model and taking rigorously into account the effects attributed to the ion polarization drift and to the drifts associated with the lowest-order finite ion Larmor radius effects. In the flat density regime, where the coupling between the modes is relatively weak, the properties of the unstable modes are slightly modified through these effects. For the peak density regions, where the coupling of the modes is rather strong, these second-order drifts determine the spectra of the unstable modes near the marginal conditions.

  12. Radial osteotomy and Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for deformities of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Schroven, I; De Smet, L; Zachee, B; Steenwerckx, A; Fabry, G

    1995-01-01

    We treated 12 patients with a posttraumatic or congenital deformity of the distal radius. A radial osteotomy and a Sauvé-Kapandji procedure were carried out. In 9 patients the deformity was caused by a malunited fracture; the other 3 patients were referred to us with a Madelung deformity. We performed 6 open wedge osteotomies and 6 closing wedge osteotomies. All but one patient rated the result of the operation as good or excellent. The reason for the only failure could be carpal instability.

  13. Influence of Surface Radius Curvature on Laser Plasma Propulsion with Ablation Water Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tian; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Siqi; Tang, Weichong; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Wenfei; Gao, Lu; Gao, Hua

    2016-10-01

    The surface shape of liquid water is well controlled during nanosecond pulse laser ablation plasma propulsion. In this study, we measured the effect of the shape on the coupling coefficient and the specific impulse. We found that the coupling coefficient and specific impulse could be optimized by varying the surface convexity. Based on the analysis of the surface radius curvature, we demonstrate that the convex surface changes the laser focal positions to achieve high efficiency. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10905049) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. 53200859165, 2562010050)

  14. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation in Electron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Abrahamyan, Sergey; Albataineh, Hisham; Aniol, Konrad; ...

    2012-03-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry APV in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. APV is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (Rn). The result APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst) corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions Rn-Rp = 0.33-0.18+0.16 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  15. EXPLORATIONS INTO THE VIABILITY OF COUPLED RADIUS-ORBIT EVOLUTIONARY MODELS FOR INFLATED PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ibgui, Laurent; Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: dsp@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-02-01

    The radii of some transiting extrasolar giant planets are larger than would be expected by the standard theory. We address this puzzle with the model of coupled radius-orbit tidal evolution developed by Ibgui and Burrows. The planetary radius is evolved self-consistently with orbital parameters, under the influence of tidal torques and tidal dissipation in the interior of the planet. A general feature of this model, which we have previously demonstrated in the generic case, is that a possible transient inflation of the planetary radius can temporarily interrupt its standard monotonic shrinking and can lead to the inflated radii that we observe. Importantly, we demonstrate that the use of a constant time lag model for the orbital evolution does not improve the accuracy of the evolutionary calculations. First, though formulated in a closed form by the equations of Hut, it is not valid at large eccentricities, as for the constant phase lag model truncated at the second order in eccentricity that we adopt; ambiguities in tidal theories are perhaps the most significant source of uncertainty in evolutionary calculations. Second, we find evolutionary tracks that fit within the 1{sigma} error bars, the radius, the eccentricity, and the semimajor axis of HD 209458b in its current estimated age range, using the constant time lag model, as we find fitting tracks with the constant phase lag model. Both models show that a bloated planet with a circular orbit may still be inflated, due to thermal inertia. We have modified our constant phase lag model to include an orbital period dependence of the tidal dissipation factor in the star, Q'{sub *} {proportional_to} P{sup {gamma}}, -1 {<=} {gamma} {<=} 1. For some inflated planets (WASP-6b and WASP-15b), we find fitting tracks; for another (TrES-4), we do not; and for others (WASP-4b and WASP-12b), we find fitting tracks, but our model might imply that we are observing the planets at a special time. Finally, we stress a 2-3 order

  16. Absence of Complete Finite-Larmor-Radius Stabilization in Extended MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.; Schnack, D. D.; Ebrahimi, F.; Zweibel, E. G.; Suzuki, M.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2008-08-22

    The dominant finite-Larmour-radius (FLR) stabilization effects on interchange instability can be retained by taking into account the ion gyroviscosity or the generalized Ohm's law in an extended MHD model. However, recent simulations and theoretical calculations indicate that complete FLR stabilization of the interchange mode may not be attainable by ion gyroviscosity or the two-fluid effect alone in the framework of extended MHD. For a class of plasma equilibria in certain finite-{beta} or nonisentropic regimes, the critical wave number for complete FLR stabilization tends toward infinity.

  17. Absence of complete finite-Larmor-radius stabilization in extended MHD.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Schnack, D D; Ebrahimi, F; Zweibel, E G; Suzuki, M; Hegna, C C; Sovinec, C R

    2008-08-22

    The dominant finite-Larmour-radius (FLR) stabilization effects on interchange instability can be retained by taking into account the ion gyroviscosity or the generalized Ohm's law in an extended MHD model. However, recent simulations and theoretical calculations indicate that complete FLR stabilization of the interchange mode may not be attainable by ion gyroviscosity or the two-fluid effect alone in the framework of extended MHD. For a class of plasma equilibria in certain finite-beta or nonisentropic regimes, the critical wave number for complete FLR stabilization tends toward infinity.

  18. Surgery versus conservative treatment in patients with type A distal radius fractures, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fractures of the distal radius are common and account for an estimated 17% of all fractures diagnosed. Two-thirds of these fractures are displaced and require reduction. Although distal radius fractures, especially extra-articular fractures, are considered to be relatively harmless, inadequate treatment may result in impaired function of the wrist. Initial treatment according to Dutch guidelines consists of closed reduction and plaster immobilisation. If fracture redisplacement occurs, surgical treatment is recommended. Recently, the use of volar locking plates has become more popular. The aim of this study is to compare the functional outcome following surgical reduction and fixation with a volar locking plate with the functional outcome following closed reduction and plaster immobilisation in patients with displaced extra-articular distal radius fractures. Design This single blinded randomised controlled trial will randomise between open reduction and internal fixation with a volar locking plate (intervention group) and closed reduction followed by plaster immobilisation (control group). The study population will consist of all consecutive adult patients who are diagnosed with a displaced extra-articular distal radius fracture, which has been adequately reduced at the Emergency Department. The primary outcome (functional outcome) will be assessed by means of the Disability Arm Shoulder Hand Score (DASH). Secondary outcomes comprise the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score (PRWE), quality of life, pain, range of motion, radiological parameters, complications and cross-overs. Since the treatment allocated involves a surgical procedure, randomisation status will not be blinded. However, the researcher assessing the outcome at one year will be unaware of the treatment allocation. In total, 90 patients will be included and this trial will require an estimated time of two years to complete and will be conducted in the Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam and

  19. A case of osteoid osteoma in the distal radius epiphysis with atypical onset.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Alper; Fırat, Ahmet; Bozkurt, Murat; Hücümenoğlu, Sema

    2014-01-01

    We present a 16-year-old male patient, with a history of wrist trauma 3 months prior to admission, presented with widespread swelling, limitation of motion and pain that was unresponsive to anti-inflammatory drugs in the left wrist. A lesion compatible with osteoid osteoma in the distal epiphysis of the left radius was detected radiologically. Diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was confirmed with pathological examination of the lesion. Differential diagnosis is important as the atypical lesion occurred after trauma, making it difficult to distinguish from synovitis and infection in consideration of its location.

  20. The hadronic corrections to muonic hydrogen Lamb shift from ChPT and the proton radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peset, Clara

    2016-01-01

    We obtain a model independent expression for the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift. The leading hadronic effects are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model independent determination. We give their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis and the experimental measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: rp = 0.8412(15) fm. This number is at 6.8σ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model independent determination of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects.

  1. The hadronic corrections to muonic hydrogen Lamb shift from ChPT and the proton radius

    SciTech Connect

    Peset, Clara

    2016-01-22

    We obtain a model independent expression for the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift. The leading hadronic effects are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model independent determination. We give their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis and the experimental measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: r{sub p} = 0.8412(15) fm. This number is at 6.8σ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model independent determination of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects.

  2. Gotcha! The 1st radius expansion burst from GX 3+1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuulkers, E.; van der Klis, M.

    GX 3+1 is a rather infrequent burster. For the first time we caught a short and strong X-ray burst with RXTE. It showed a phase during which the neutron star photosphere expanded by a factor of 2 for only 1.5 sec. We derive estimates of the distance towards GX 3+1 and its persistent mass accretion rate. We discuss the implications to the mass-radius relation of the neutron star and place the results in the light of other infrequent bursters.

  3. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shweta Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  4. [The thickness/radius ratio (t/r) in patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara, J F; Valenzuela, F; Martínez Sánchez, C; Huerta, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied 17 patients with cardiomyopathy (10 hypertrophic and 7 dilated). With two-dimensional echocardiography, we obtained a short axis view at the level of papillary muscle. We calculated the ratio between thickness (h), of ventricular wall and cavity's radius (r) in diastole and systole (h/r ratio). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has a high h/r ratio in diastole (inappropriate hypertrophy), hypercontractility and low and systolic wall stress. Dilated cardiomyopathy has a low diastolic h/r ratio (inadequate hypertrophy) with low contractility and elevated end-systolic, wall stress. We discuss the mechanisms and consequences of different patterns of hypertrophy on the ventricular performance.

  5. Design-Optimization and Material Selection for a Proximal Radius Fracture-Fixation Implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Xie, X.; Arakere, G.; Grujicic, A.; Wagner, D. W.; Vallejo, A.

    2010-11-01

    The problem of optimal size, shape, and placement of a proximal radius-fracture fixation-plate is addressed computationally using a combined finite-element/design-optimization procedure. To expand the set of physiological loading conditions experienced by the implant during normal everyday activities of the patient, beyond those typically covered by the pre-clinical implant-evaluation testing procedures, the case of a wheel-chair push exertion is considered. Toward that end, a musculoskeletal multi-body inverse-dynamics analysis is carried out of a human propelling a wheelchair. The results obtained are used as input to a finite-element structural analysis for evaluation of the maximum stress and fatigue life of the parametrically defined implant design. While optimizing the design of the radius-fracture fixation-plate, realistic functional requirements pertaining to the attainment of the required level of the devise safety factor and longevity/lifecycle were considered. It is argued that the type of analyses employed in the present work should be: (a) used to complement the standard experimental pre-clinical implant-evaluation tests (the tests which normally include a limited number of daily-living physiological loading conditions and which rely on single pass/fail outcomes/decisions with respect to a set of lower-bound implant-performance criteria) and (b) integrated early in the implant design and material/manufacturing-route selection process.

  6. GEM Detectors and Preliminary Analysis of Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xinzhan; PRad Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed at Jefferson Lab in Hall B, it was designed to measure the proton charge radius through the elastic electron proton scattering process, using a non-magnetic-spectrometer method. The experiment reaches very low ep scattering angles and thus an unprecedented low four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 from 2 ×10-4 to 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 . The experiment measures the proton charge radius by extracting the electric form factor of proton with a sub-percent precision. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors have contributed to reach the experimental goal. A pair of world largest GEM detectors, and a high resolution calorimeter(HyCal) were utilized in the experiment. In this talk, we will present the performance of GEM detectors approached in the experiment, such as efficiency and other characteristics, and preliminary analysis of the experimental data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, and PRad Collaboration.

  7. Charon's radius and atmospheric constraints from observations of a stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Person, M. J.; Adams, E. R.; Babcock, B. A.; Emilio, M.; Gangestad, J. W.; Kern, S. D.; Kramer, E. A.; Osip, D. J.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Souza, S. P.; Tuvikene, T.

    2006-01-01

    The physical characteristics of Pluto and its moon, Charon, provide insight into the evolution of the outer Solar System. Although previous measurements have constrained the masses of these bodies, their radii and densities have remained uncertain. The observation of a stellar occultation by Charon in 1980 established a lower limit on its radius of 600km (ref. 3) (later refined to 601.5km ref. 4) and suggested a possible atmosphere. Subsequent, mutual event modelling yielded a range of 600-650km (ref. 5), corresponding to a density of 1.56 +/- 0.22gcm-3 (refs 2, 5). Here we report multiple-station observations of a stellar occultation by Charon. From these data, we find a mean radius of 606 +/- 8km, a bulk density of 1.72 +/- 0.15gcm-3, and rock-mass fraction 0.63 +/- 0.05. We do not detect a significant atmosphere and place 3σ upper limits on atmospheric number densities for candidate gases. These results seem to be consistent with collisional formation for the Pluto-Charon system in which the precursor objects may have been differentiated, and they leave open the possibility of atmospheric retention by the largest objects in the outer Solar System.

  8. A SCALING RELATION BETWEEN MEGAMASER DISK RADIUS AND BLACK HOLE MASS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wardle, Mark; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad E-mail: zadeh@northwestern.edu

    2012-05-10

    Several thin, Keplerian, sub-parsec megamaser disks have been discovered in the nuclei of active galaxies and used to precisely determine the mass of their host black holes. We show that there is an empirical linear correlation between the disk radius and the black hole mass. We demonstrate that such disks are naturally formed by the partial capture of molecular clouds passing through the galactic nucleus and temporarily engulfing the central supermassive black hole. Imperfect cancellation of the angular momenta of the cloud material colliding after passing on opposite sides of the hole leads to the formation of a compact disk. The radial extent of the disk is determined by the efficiency of this process and the Bondi-Hoyle capture radius of the black hole, and naturally produces the empirical linear correlation of the radial extent of the maser distribution with black hole mass. The disk has sufficient column density to allow X-ray irradiation from the central source to generate physical and chemical conditions conducive to the formation of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers. For initial cloud column densities {approx}< 10{sup 23.5} cm{sup -2} the disk is non-self-gravitating, consistent with the ordered kinematics of the edge-on megamaser disks; for higher cloud columns the disk would fragment and produce a compact stellar disk similar to that observed around Sgr A* at the galactic center.

  9. Tomographical description of tennis-loaded radius: reciprocal relation between bone size and volumetric BMD.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, N; Nonaka, K; Michikami, S; Mizuki, T; Amagai, H; Tokuyama, K; Suzuki, M

    1999-04-01

    Effects of long-term tennis loading on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and geometric properties of playing-arm radius were examined. Paired forearms of 16 tennis players (10 women) and 12 healthy controls (7 women), aged 18-24 yr, were scanned at mid and distal site by using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography. Tomographic data at midradius showed that tennis playing led to a slight decrease in cortical vBMD (-0.8% vs. nonplaying arm, P < 0. 05) and increase both in periosteal and endocoritcal bone area (+15. 2% for periosteal bone, P < 0.001; and +18.8% for endocortical bone, P < 0.001). These data suggest that, together with an increase in cortical thickness (+6.4%, P < 0.01), cortical drift toward periosteal direction resulted in improvement of mechanical characteristics of the playing-arm midradius. Enlargement of periosteal bone area was also observed at distal radius (+6.8%, P < 0.01), and the relative side-to-side difference in periosteal bone area was inversely related to that in trabecular vBMD (r = -0.53, P < 0.05). We conclude that an improvement of mechanical properties of young adult bone in response to long-term exercise is related to geometric adaptation but less to changes in vBMD.

  10. Double V-shaped cancellous osteotomy of the distal radius for Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Aly, Tarek Ahmed

    2009-03-01

    Treatments of Kienböck's disease range from conservative measures-usually immobilization during the acute phase-to such procedures as joint leveling by radial shortening or ulnar lengthening, intercarpal fusion, silastic arthroplasty, and vascularized bone grafts. Joint-leveling procedures have many complications such as nonunion, hardware problems, and pain. In this study, 34 patients with Kienböck's disease, stage 1 through 3B in Lichtman's classification, were treated with a new technique: a double V-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy of the distal radius and dorsal tilt of the distal radius. The patients were evaluated clinically regarding pain, which decreased in 88% of patients; range of motion, which improved in all patients; and grip strength, which improved by 90%. Progression of the disease was assessed radiologically by determining the carpal height ratio and the carpal ulnar distance ratio. There were no cases with nonunion of the radial osteotomy at follow-up. This procedure is an effective treatment method for Kienböck's disease in wrists that do not have degenerative changes in the adjacent carpal joints.

  11. Prevent Collapse and Salvage Failures of the Volar Rim of the Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Jorge L.; Rubio, Francisco; Vernon, Lauren L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Articular fractures of the distal radius may include a small fragment from the volar margin of the lunate fossa: volar marginal fragments (VMFs); these fragments are prone to loss of fixation and avascular necrosis, and often result in wrist subluxation. We present our experience managing acute and delayed VMFs. The first is treated using a hook plate extension to a volar locking plate and the latter using a volar opening wedge osteotomy to redistribute loads on the remaining articular surface. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients treated at our facility with a hook plate extension for a VMF and for patients treated with a volar opening wedge osteotomy. Medical charts were examined for complications and functional results. Technique A hook plate extension was used to fix the VMF when plate buttressing was insufficient. For patients who presented a collapsed and reabsorbed VMF, a volar opening wedge osteotomy was used to reorient the articular surface, restoring joint stability. Results The hook plate extension was successful in managing 19 of the 21 acute VMFs. The volar opening wedge osteotomy provided concentric reduction and improved pain and motion in all treated patients. Conclusion We demonstrated that hook plate fixation of the VMF is an effective means of fixing the acute VMF and that a volar opening wedge osteotomy can be used to salvage a distal radius fracture with a collapsed VMF. PMID:26855831

  12. Enhancement of fracture healing by electrical stimulation in the comminuted intraarticular fracture of distal radius.

    PubMed

    Kohata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Soichiro; Takeda, Shu; Kanai, Misa; Yoshioka, Taro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of an alternating electric current (AC) stimulation in prevention of bone deformity for comminuted intraarticular fracture of distal radius were verified by comparing postoperative results treated with a wrist-bridging external fixator combined with or without an AC stimulator (EF and NEF, respectively), and a palmar locking plate (LP). This study evaluated 92 cases (mean age 67.9 ± 11.4 years) of type C2 and 60 cases (mean age 69.7 ± 9.5 years) of type C3 distal radius fractures, as classified by the Association for Osteosynthesis. In total, 55 and 24 cases were treated with EF and NEF, respectively; and 73 cases were treated with LP. Callus appeared 27.5 ± 4.6 days postoperatively and the external skeletal fixation period was significantly shorter in the EF group than in the NEF group. The decrease in radial length was significantly lower in the EF group when compared to the LP group. There were no significant differences among the groups for the other radiographic and functional parameters. AC stimulation combined to the external fixation may be a promising method to prevent postoperative deformity in the severely comminuted intraarticular fractures by accelerating callus maturation and facilitating new bone bridging across the gap of fracture site.

  13. Low Velocity Impacts of Variable Tip Radius on Carbon/Epoxy Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Mac P.

    With a growing use of composite materials in aircraft structures, there is a greater need to understand the response of these materials to low velocity impacts. Low velocity impacts from tool drops or ground equipment collisions can be of varying bluntness and can leave little or no visible evidence of damage. Therefore, a need exists to investigate the initiation of internal damage and the relationship between this internal damage and the external visible damage with respect to the bluntness of the impactor. A pendulum impactor was used to impact 76.2 x 127 mm carbon/epoxy panels that were 8, 16, and 24 plies thick. The panels were impacted by hardened steel tips with radii of 12.7 to 76.2 mm. The experimental results show that the failure threshold energies for each panel thickness and tip radius combination occur at a distinct and consistent energy. This threshold increases with impactor bluntness, and this effect is greater for the 8 ply panel than it is for the 16 or 24 ply panels. To describe the visibility of impact damage, the area of delamination was compared to the depth of the dents resulting from the impacts. For the sharper impact tips, there is a clear relationship between the delamination area and the depth of the dents. However, these relationships are dependent on the radius of the impact tip, and for the blunter impact tips no strong correlation could be determined between the delamination area and the depth of the dents.

  14. Modeling the Impact of Drizzle and 3D Cloud Structure on Remote Sensing of Effective Radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Zinner, Tobias; Ackerman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing of cloud particle size with passive sensors like MODIS is an important tool for cloud microphysical studies. As a measure of the radiatively relevant droplet size, effective radius can be retrieved with different combinations of visible through shortwave infrared channels. MODIS observations sometimes show significantly larger effective radii in marine boundary layer cloud fields derived from the 1.6 and 2.1 pm channel observations than for 3.7 pm retrievals. Possible explanations range from 3D radiative transport effects and sub-pixel cloud inhomogeneity to the impact of drizzle formation on the droplet distribution. To investigate the potential influence of these factors, we use LES boundary layer cloud simulations in combination with 3D Monte Carlo simulations of MODIS observations. LES simulations of warm cloud spectral microphysics for cases of marine stratus and broken stratocumulus, each for two different values of cloud condensation nuclei density, produce cloud structures comprising droplet size distributions with and without drizzle size drops. In this study, synthetic MODIS observations generated from 3D radiative transport simulations that consider the full droplet size distribution will be generated for each scene. The operational MODIS effective radius retrievals will then be applied to the simulated reflectances and the results compared with the LES microphysics.

  15. Obtaining the Mass and Radius of Extra-Solar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Tim; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The scientific utility and feasibility of detecting transits of the 9 known extrasolar planets is explored. A transit of a solar-like star by a Jupiter mass planet produces a 1% decrease in the amount of light received from the star. Transit observation will remove the ambiguity in the measurement of the planetary mass inherent in the radial velocity method and confirm the planet's existence. The 9 known planets have a 33% chance of producing at least one observable transit. Additional extrasolar planet detections from the radial velocity surveys will increase this probability to greater than 90%. The radius of the planet can be determined by the fractional decrease in light received during transit. The mass and radius may distinguish rocky or gas giant planets from brown dwarfs. The probability of detection, the transit signal size and duration, and predictions of the transit times (including errors) are calculated for circular and elliptical orbits. Observational limits are investigated and it is shown that small telescopes and existing detectors are adequate enough to achieve the 0.1% photometry necessary to detect transits of the known extrasolar planets.

  16. Solar cycle dependence of the sun's radius at lambda = 525.0 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; Bertello, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mount Wilson (California) synoptic program of solar magnetic observations scans the solar disk between 1 and 20 times per day. As part of this program, the radius is determined as an average distance between the image center and the point where the intensity in the FeI line at lambda = 525.0 nm drops to 25 percent of its value at the disk's center. The data base of information was analyzed and corrected for effects such as scattered light and atmospheric reflection. The solar variability and the measurement techniques are described. The observation data sets, the corrections made to the data, and the observed variations, are discussed. It is stated that similar spectral lines at lambda = 525.0 nm, which are common in the solar spectrum, probably exhibit similar radius changes. All portions of the sun are weighted equally so that it is concluded that, within spectral lines, the radiating area of the sun is increased at the solar maximum.

  17. Free-jet acoustic investigation of high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Bhutiani, P. K.; Vogt, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental and analytical results of a scale model simulated flight acoustic exploratory investigation of high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles with inverted velocity and temperature profiles are summarized. Six coannular plug nozzle configurations and a baseline convergent conical nozzle were tested for simulated flight acoustic evaluation. The nozzles were tested over a range of test conditions that are typical of a Variable Cycle Engine for application to advanced high speed aircraft. It was found that in simulate flight, the high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles maintain their jet noise and shock noise reduction features previously observed in static testing. The presence of nozzle bypass struts will not significantly affect the acousticn noise reduction features of a General Electric type nozzle design. A unique coannular plug nozzle flight acoustic spectral prediction method was identified and found to predict the measured results quite well. Special laser velocimeter and acoustic measurements were performed which have given new insights into the jet and shock noise reduction mechanisms of coannular plug nozzles with regard to identifying further benificial research efforts.

  18. RADIUS CONSTRAINTS AND MINIMAL EQUIPARTITION ENERGY OF RELATIVISTICALLY MOVING SYNCHROTRON SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Piran, Tsvi; Nakar, Ehud E-mail: tsvi.piran@mail.huji.ac.il

    2013-07-20

    A measurement of the synchrotron self-absorption flux and frequency provides tight constraints on the physical size of the source and a robust lower limit on its energy. This lower limit is also a good estimate of the magnetic field and electrons' energy, if the two components are at equipartition. This well-known method was used for decades to study numerous astrophysical sources moving at non-relativistic (Newtonian) speeds. Here, we generalize the Newtonian equipartition theory to sources moving at relativistic speeds including the effect of deviation from spherical symmetry expected in such sources. As in the Newtonian case, minimization of the energy provides an excellent estimate of the emission radius and yields a useful lower limit on the energy. We find that the application of the Newtonian formalism to a relativistic source would yield a smaller emission radius, and would generally yield a larger lower limit on the energy (within the observed region). For sources where the synchrotron-self-Compton component can be identified, the minimization of the total energy is not necessary and we present an unambiguous solution for the parameters of the system.

  19. Linear vs. nonlinear acceleration in plasma turbulence. II. Hall–finite-Larmor-radius magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Parashar, Tulasi N.

    2015-04-15

    The local k-space ratio of linear and nonlinear accelerations associated with a variety of initial conditions undergoing steady relaxation is investigated for the Hall–finite-Larmor-radius magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Building on a related study (Paper I) where it was shown that discrepancies exist between describing the global and local characterizations of the pure MHD system with mean magnetic field, we find regions of the Fourier space that are consistently dominated by linear acceleration and other regions that are consistently dominated by nonlinear acceleration, independent of the overall system's description as linear, weakly nonlinear, or turbulent. In general, dynamics within a certain angular range of the mean magnetic field direction are predominantly linear, while dynamics adjacent the Hall scales along the field-parallel direction and dynamics adjacent the finite Larmor radius scales in the field-perpendicular direction can become strongly nonlinear. The nonlinear influences are particularly significant as the plasma beta increases from unity to higher values.

  20. M DWARF LUMINOSITY, RADIUS, AND α-ENRICHMENT FROM I-BAND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul

    2015-03-20

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the K{sub S}-band luminosity (M{sub K}), the observed strength of the I-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong Hα emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf M{sub K} and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the I-band sodium doublet and the nearby I-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate α-element enrichment. The use of these I-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy to provide valuable information about the potential habitability of exoplanets around M dwarfs, and surface gravity and distance for M dwarfs throughout the Galaxy. This technique has immediate applicability for both target selection and candidate planet–host system characterization for exoplanet missions such as TESS and K2.

  1. A PRECISE ASTEROSEISMIC AGE AND RADIUS FOR THE EVOLVED SUN-LIKE STAR KIC 11026764

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Thompson, M. J.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Chaplin, W. J.; Dogan, G.; Eggenberger, P.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D.; Bruntt, H.; Creevey, O. L.; Quirion, P.-O.; Bonanno, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Basu, S.; Esch, L.; Gai, N.; Di Mauro, M. P.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2010-11-10

    The primary science goal of the Kepler Mission is to provide a census of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood, including the identification and characterization of habitable Earth-like planets. The asteroseismic capabilities of the mission are being used to determine precise radii and ages for the target stars from their solar-like oscillations. Chaplin et al. published observations of three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5 days of science operations. One of these stars, the subgiant KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that it has evolved significantly. We have derived asteroseismic estimates of the properties of KIC 11026764 from Kepler photometry combined with ground-based spectroscopic data. We present the results of detailed modeling for this star, employing a variety of independent codes and analyses that attempt to match the asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints simultaneously. We determine both the radius and the age of KIC 11026764 with a precision near 1%, and an accuracy near 2% for the radius and 15% for the age. Continued observations of this star promise to reveal additional oscillation frequencies that will further improve the determination of its fundamental properties.

  2. Effects of streamwise convergence in radius on the laminar forced convection in axisymmetric ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.K.; Jaluria, Y.

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study has been carried out on the effects of streamwise convergence in radius on the laminar forced convection in an axisymmetric duct. This transport circumstance is relevant to many practical processes such as injection molding, glass molding, fiber drawing, and extrusion, where large variations in the radius may occur downstream and where the flow rates are generally small enough to yield a laminar flow. A fairly uncommon transformation technique was used to transform the pseudo-transient conservation equations for the stream function, vorticity, and energy, and several new numerical techniques were developed. These include a nonuniform grid scheme, a second-order-accurate vorticity condition for an arbitrary surface, and a nominally second-order-accurate vorticity condition for an arbitrary surface, and a nominally second-order-accurate approximation for the derivatives on a nonuniform grid. The three geometries studied were those of the straight, periodic, and converging ducts, where the results for the first two were obtained mainly for validation purposes. However, new results were also obtained for the periodic duct, showing the attainment of a sinusoidal steady state with the local Nusselt number varying from 1.0 to 6.0. For the converging duct, the local Nusselt number was found, for the first time, to increase with increasing convergence of the duct wall.

  3. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Read, Tyson J. G.; Segre, Paolo S.; Middleton, Kevin M.; Altshuler, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left–right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius. PMID:27030042

  4. Type IIA Monteggia Fracture Dislocation with Ipsilateral Distal Radius Fracture in Adult – A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    James, Boblee

    2016-01-01

    Monteggia fracture constitutes about 5-10% of the forearm fractures. Monteggia fracture by definition is proximal ulnar fracture with disruption of proximal radioulnar joint. Bado classified Monteggia fracture dislocation into four types and Jupiter subclassified type II Bado’s fractures into four types. The associated injury in the form of distal radial fractures and distal humerus fractures are rare though many cases of distal radial physeal injuries have been reported in paediatric population. Hereby we report a rare association of type IIA Monteggia fracture dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture in an adult patient. This case report also highlights on proper examination and full length radiographs of forearm to avoid missing injury at wrist in cases of elbow injuries. Management of such complex injuries included open reduction and internal fixation of olecronon fracture, distal radius fracture and radial head resection. Functional outcome at six months was good at wrist whereas at elbow, stiffness was a major concern with elbow range of movement from 40°-110°. PMID:27656518

  5. Influence of pairing correlations on the radius of neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Ying; Meng, Jie; Ring, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The influence of pairing correlations on the neutron root mean square (rms) radius of nuclei is investigated in the framework of self-consistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations. The continuum is treated appropriately by the Green's function techniques. As an example the nucleus 124Zr is treated for a varying strength of pairing correlations. We find that, as the pairing strength increases, the neutron rms radius first shrinks, reaches a minimum, and beyond this point it expands again. The shrinkage is due to the the so-called pairing antihalo effect, i.e., due to the decrease of the asymptotic density distribution with increasing pairing. However, in some cases, increasing pairing correlations can also lead to an expansion of the nucleus due to a growing occupation of so-called halo orbits, i.e., weakly bound states and resonances in the continuum with low-ℓ values. In this case, the neutron radii are extended just by the influence of pairing correlations, since these halo orbits cannot be occupied without pairing. The term "antihalo effect" is not justified in such cases. For a full understanding of this complicated interplay, self-consistent calculations are necessary.

  6. [Alternative surgical method in malalignment of healed distal radius fracture: Kapandji-Sauvé procedure].

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, S

    1998-11-01

    Malunion after distal radius fracture with subluxation of the distal radioulnar joint can considerably limit the function of the hand. If the malunion cannot be eliminated by the corrective osteotomy of the radius, care must be taken not to additionally impair the stability of the wrist joint and the carpus, in the event of any necessary salvage procedure. In the Kapandji-Sauvé procedure, an arthrodesis is carried out after repositioning of the distal radioulnar joint. By segment resection of the ulnar shaft, a new joint is made to permit forearm rotation. Between 1984 and 1995, a total of 96 patients were treated with this procedure in our hospital. It was possible to re-examine 87 of those patients after an average period of 4 1/2 (1 to 11) years. The average age of the patients was 59 (14 to 72) years. In 25 cases the results were very good and in 52 cases good. In nine cases the results were poor. In one case the result was unsatisfactory.

  7. MEASURING THE SOLAR RADIUS FROM SPACE DURING THE 2003 AND 2006 MERCURY TRANSITS

    SciTech Connect

    Emilio, M.; Kuhn, J. R.; Scholl, I. F.; Bush, R. I. E-mail: kuhn@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: rock@sun.stanford.edu

    2012-05-10

    The Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory observed the transits of Mercury on 2003 May 7 and 2006 November 8. Contact times between Mercury and the solar limb have been used since the seventeenth century to derive the Sun's size but this is the first time that high-quality imagery from space, above the Earth's atmosphere, has been available. Unlike other measurements, this technique is largely independent of optical distortion. The true solar radius is still a matter of debate in the literature as measured differences of several tenths of an arcsecond (i.e., about 500 km) are apparent. This is due mainly to systematic errors from different instruments and observers since the claimed uncertainties for a single instrument are typically an order of magnitude smaller. From the MDI transit data we find the solar radius to be 960.''12 {+-} 0.''09 (696, 342 {+-} 65 km). This value is consistent between the transits and consistent between different MDI focus settings after accounting for systematic effects.

  8. Measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of quantum dots by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy excluding blinking.

    PubMed

    de Thomaz, A A; Almeida, D B; Pelegati, V B; Carvalho, H F; Cesar, C L

    2015-03-19

    One of the most important properties of quantum dots (QDs) is their size. Their size will determine optical properties and in a colloidal medium their range of interaction. The most common techniques used to measure QD size are transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction. However, these techniques demand the sample to be dried and under a vacuum. This way any hydrodynamic information is excluded and the preparation process may alter even the size of the QDs. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an optical technique with single molecule sensitivity capable of extracting the hydrodynamic radius (HR) of the QDs. The main drawback of FCS is the blinking phenomenon that alters the correlation function implicating in a QD apparent size smaller than it really is. In this work, we developed a method to exclude blinking of the FCS and measured the HR of colloidal QDs. We compared our results with TEM images, and the HR obtained by FCS is higher than the radius measured by TEM. We attribute this difference to the cap layer of the QD that cannot be seen in the TEM images.

  9. Pinhole Solar Monitor to Detect 0.01”RADIUS Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Contento, Carla

    The Pinhole Solar Monitor (PSM) is a small space-device with two pinholes projecting two identical images on the focal plane. It has the advantage to be an astigmatic heliometer without optics compact without need of accurate pointing and costless. On the payload of a satellite PSM exploits the side facing the Sun and monitors the secular variations of the angular solar diameter D. Two pinholes of equal radius r are built on the same rigid platform at distance d between the centers; they project two images on the focal plane a flat screen parallel to the platform at distance f. When those images are in contact tan(D)=d/f. The contact between the two solar limbs is simulated with a raytracer and studied numerically. The focal length of contact about 1 meter can be measured with a system of encoder-actuators within 10 micron of precision. Although d and r are measurable within a micron of accuracy they introduce errors in the calculation of D which are systematic due to thermal stability in the space. With such a compact device an accuracy of 0.01 arcseconds is expected evaluating the variations of the mean angular solar radius D/2~960 arcseconds.

  10. An improved method for susceptibility and radius quantification of cylindrical objects from MRI.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ching-Yi; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Neelavalli, Jaladhar; Haacke, E Mark; Stafford, R Jason

    2015-05-01

    A new method is developed to measure the magnetic susceptibilities and radii of small cylinder-like objects at arbitrary orientations accurately. This method for most biological substances only requires a standard gradient echo sequence with one or two echo times, depending on the orientation of an object relative to the main magnetic field. For objects oriented at the magic angle, however, this method is not applicable. As a byproduct of this method, the cross-sectional area as well as signals inside and outside the object can be determined. The uncertainty of each measurement is estimated from the error propagation method. Partial volume, dephasing, and phase aliasing effects are naturally included in the equations of this method. A number of simulations, phantom, and pilot in-vivo human studies are carried out to validate the theory. When the maximal phase value at the boundary of a given cylindrical object is larger than 3 radians, and the phase inside the object is more than 1 radian, the susceptibility can be accurately quantified within 15%. The radius of the object can be determined to subpixel accuracy. This is the case when the signal-to-noise ratio inside the object is about 6:1 or higher and the radius of the object is about one pixel or larger. These conditions are realistic when considering medullary and pial veins for example.

  11. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy After Distal Radius Fracture Malunion: Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Barbaric, Katarina; Rujevcan, Gordan; Labas, Marko; Delimar, Domagoj; Bicanic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Malunion of distal radius fracture is often complicated with shortening of the radius with disturbed radio- ulnar variance, frequently associated with lesions of triangular fibrocartilage complex and instability of the distal radioulnar joint. Positive ulnar variance may result in wrist pain located in ulnar part of the joint, limited ulnar deviation and forearm rotation with development of degenerative changes due to the overloading that occurs between the ulnar head and corresponding carpus. Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) is the standard procedure for correcting positive ulnar variance. Goal of this procedure is to minimize the symptoms by restoring the neutral radio - ulnar variance. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for ulnar shorthening osteotomy, their advantages and drawbacks. Methods of ulnar shortening osteotomies are divided into intraarticular and extraarticular. Intraarticular method of ulnar shortening can be performed arthroscopically or through open approach. Extraarticular methods include subcapital osteotomy and osteotomy of ulnar diaphysis, which depending on shape can be transverse, oblique, and step cut. All of those osteotomies can be performed along wrist arthroscopy in order to dispose and treat possibly existing triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. At the end we described surgical procedures that can be done in case of ulnar shorthening osteotomy failure. PMID:26157524

  12. Application of short-radius horizontal boreholes in the naturally fractured Yates field

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.R.; Rothkopf, B.W. ); Bowzer, J.L. )

    1995-02-01

    This paper discusses the performance and simulation of short-radius horizontal boreholes being used in the Marathon-operated Yates field Unit in west Texas to minimize drawdown and therefore to reduce gas and water coning in a thin oil column. Yates is a very prolific field with extensive fracturing and high-quality reservoir rock. Superimposed on a high-density orthogonal fracture network are widely spaced regional joints with a strong directional tendency. Major questions are how these directional joints affect the horizontal-well performance and whether wells should be drilled parallel or perpendicular to the joints. Dual-permeability reservoir simulation studies were performed to study optimum orientation of the borehole with respect to the natural fracture network. Additionally, optimum well-completion elevation was studied. Forty-six vertical wells have been recompleted as short-radius horizontal boreholes since 1986. The large productivity increase of the horizontal boreholes compared with the previous vertical completions indicates that the wells are intersecting the regional joints.

  13. The Mass-Radius-Eccentricity Distribution of Near-Resonant Transiting Exoplanet Pairs Detected by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabram, Megan; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the mass-radius-eccentricity distribution of transiting planets near first-order mean motion resonances using Transit Timing Variation (TTV) observations from NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler's precise measurements of transit times (Mazeh et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2015) constrain the planet-star mass ratio, eccentricity and pericenter directions for hundreds of planets. Strongly-interacting planetary systems allow TTVs to provide precise measurements of masses and orbital eccentricities separately (e.g., Kepler-36, Carter et al. 2012). In addition to these precisely characterized planetary systems, there are several systems harboring at least two planets near a mean motion resonance (MMR) for which TTVs provide a joint constraint on planet masses, eccentricities and pericenter directions (Hadden et al. 2015). Unfortunately, a near degeneracy between these parameters leads to a posterior probability density with highly correlated uncertainties. Nevertheless, the population encodes valuable information about the distribution of planet masses, orbital eccentricities and the planet mass-radius relationship. We characterize the distribution of masses and eccentricities for near-resonant transiting planets by combining a hierarchical Bayesian model with an analytic model for the TTV signatures of near-resonant planet pairs (Lithwick & Wu 2012). By developing a rigorous statistical framework for analyzing the TTV signatures of a population of planetary systems, we significantly improve upon previous analyses. For example, our analysis includes transit timing measurements of near-resonant transiting planet pairs regardless of whether there is a significant detection of TTVs, thereby avoiding biases due to only including TTV detections.

  14. Charon's radius and atmospheric constraints from observations of a stellar occultation.

    PubMed

    Gulbis, A A S; Elliot, J L; Person, M J; Adams, E R; Babcock, B A; Emilio, M; Gangestad, J W; Kern, S D; Kramer, E A; Osip, D J; Pasachoff, J M; Souza, S P; Tuvikene, T

    2006-01-05

    The physical characteristics of Pluto and its moon, Charon, provide insight into the evolution of the outer Solar System. Although previous measurements have constrained the masses of these bodies, their radii and densities have remained uncertain. The observation of a stellar occultation by Charon in 1980 established a lower limit on its radius of 600 km (ref. 3) (later refined to 601.5 km; ref. 4) and suggested a possible atmosphere. Subsequent, mutual event modelling yielded a range of 600-650 km (ref. 5), corresponding to a density of 1.56 +/- 0.22 g cm(-3) (refs 2, 5). Here we report multiple-station observations of a stellar occultation by Charon. From these data, we find a mean radius of 606 +/- 8 km, a bulk density of 1.72 +/- 0.15 g cm(-3), and rock-mass fraction 0.63 +/- 0.05. We do not detect a significant atmosphere and place 3sigma upper limits on atmospheric number densities for candidate gases. These results seem to be consistent with collisional formation for the Pluto-Charon system in which the precursor objects may have been differentiated, and they leave open the possibility of atmospheric retention by the largest objects in the outer Solar System.

  15. Measurement Of Neutron Radius In Lead By Parity Violating Scattering Flash ADC DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Zafar

    2012-06-01

    This dissertation reports the experiment PREx, a parity violation experiment which is designed to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. PREx is performed in hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility from March 19th to June 21st. Longitudionally polarized electrons at energy 1 GeV scattered at and angle of θlab = 5.8 ° from the Lead target. Beam corrected pairty violaing counting rate asymmetry is (Acorr= 594 ± 50(stat) ± 9(syst))ppb at Q2 = 0.009068GeV 2. This dissertation also presents the details of Flash ADC Data Acquisition(FADC DAQ) system for Moller polarimetry in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The Moller polarimeter measures the beam polarization to high precision to meet the specification of the PREx(Lead radius experiment). The FADC DAQ is part of the upgrade of Moller polarimetery to reduce the systematic error for PREx. The hardware setup and the results of the FADC DAQ analysis are presented

  16. Nanoscale contact-radius determination by spectral analysis of polymer roughness images.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Armin W

    2013-11-12

    In spite of the long history of atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of soft materials such as polymers, little is known about the detailed effect of a finite tip size and applied force on the imaging performance on such materials. Here we exploit the defined scaling of roughness amplitudes on amorphous polymer films to determine the transfer function imposed by the imaging tip. The finite indentation of the nanometer-scale tip into the comparatively soft polymer surface leads to a finite contact area, which in turn effectively acts as a moving average filter for the surface roughness. In the power spectral density (PSD), this leads to an attenuation of the roughness amplitudes related to the Airy pattern known from light diffraction of a circular aperture. This transfer function is affected by the roughness-induced local modulation of the tip height and contact area, which is studied by performing simulations of the polymer roughness and the imaging process. We find that for typical polymer parameters and sharp tips the contact radius of the tip-sample contact can be recovered from the roughness spectrum. We experimentally verify and demonstrate the method by measuring the nanoscale contact radius as a function of applied load and travel distance on a highly cross-linked model polymer. The data are consistent with the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact model and verifies its applicability at the nanometer scale. Using the model, quantitative values of the elastic sample parameters can be determined.

  17. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Guang, Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H

    2012-04-01

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  18. Better bound on the exponent of the radius of the multipartite separable ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Barnum, Howard

    2005-09-01

    We show that for an m -qubit quantum system, there is a ball of radius asymptotically approaching κ 2-γm in Frobenius norm, centered at the identity matrix, of separable (unentangled) positive semidefinite matrices, for an exponent γ=0.5 (ln 3/ln 2-1) ≈0.292 481 25 much smaller in magnitude than the best previously known exponent, from our earlier work, of 1/2 . For normalized m -qubit states, we get a separable ball of radius 3m+1 / √(( 3m +3) )× 2- (1+γ) m ≡ 3m+1 / √(( 3m +3) )× 6-m/2 (note that κ=√(3) ), compared to the previous 2× 2-3m/2 . This implies that with parameters realistic for current experiments, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with standard pseudopure-state preparation techniques can access only unentangled states if 36 qubits or fewer are used (compared to 23 qubits via our earlier results). We also obtain an improved exponent for m -partite systems of fixed local dimension d0 , although approaching our earlier exponent as d0 →∞ .

  19. RADIUS-DEPENDENT ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN LOW-MASS STARS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, Ansgar; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2012-02-10

    Angular momentum evolution in low-mass stars is determined by initial conditions during star formation, stellar structure evolution, and the behavior of stellar magnetic fields. Here we show that the empirical picture of angular momentum evolution arises naturally if rotation is related to magnetic field strength instead of to magnetic flux and formulate a corrected braking law based on this. Angular momentum evolution then becomes a strong function of stellar radius, explaining the main trends observed in open clusters and field stars at a few Gyr: the steep transition in rotation at the boundary to full convection arises primarily from the large change in radius across this boundary and does not require changes in dynamo mode or field topology. Additionally, the data suggest transient core-envelope decoupling among solar-type stars and field saturation at longer periods in very low mass stars. For solar-type stars, our model is also in good agreement with the empirical Skumanich law. Finally, in further support of the theory, we show that the predicted age at which low-mass stars spin down from the saturated to unsaturated field regimes in our model corresponds remarkably well to the observed lifetime of magnetic activity in these stars.

  20. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  1. VCE early acoustic test results of General Electric's high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Bhutiani, P. K.; Majjigi, R. K.; Doyle, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of variable cycle engine (VCE) early acoustic engine and model scale tests are presented. A summary of an extensive series of far field acoustic, advanced acoustic, and exhaust plume velocity measurements with a laser velocimeter of inverted velocity and temperature profile, high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles on a YJ101 VCE static engine test vehicle are reviewed. Select model scale simulated flight acoustic measurements for an unsuppressed and a mechanical suppressed coannular plug nozzle are also discussed. The engine acoustic nozzle tests verify previous model scale noise reduction measurements. The engine measurements show 4 to 6 PNdB aft quadrant jet noise reduction and up to 7 PNdB forward quadrant shock noise reduction relative to a fully mixed conical nozzle at the same specific thrust and mixed pressure ratio. The influences of outer nozzle radius ratio, inner stream velocity ratio, and area ratio are discussed. Also, laser velocimeter measurements of mean velocity and turbulent velocity of the YJ101 engine are illustrated. Select model scale static and simulated flight acoustic measurements are shown which corroborate that coannular suppression is maintained in forward speed.

  2. Measuring the radius of PSR J0437 -4715 using NICER observations of X-ray oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Frederick; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-01-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) will launch early in 2017. Its first scientific objective is to precisely and reliably measure the radius of several neutron stars, thereby constraining the properties of cold matter at supranuclear densities. This will be done by fitting energy-dependent waveform models to the observed thermal X-ray waveforms of selected rotation-powered millisecond pulsars. A key target is the 174-Hz pulsar PSR J0437 -4715. Using synthetic waveform data and Bayesian methods, we have estimated the precisions with which its mass M and radius R can be measured by NICER. When generating the synthetic data, we assumed M = 1 . 4M⊙ and R = 13 km. When generating the data and when analyzing it, we assumed the X-ray spectrum and radiation beaming pattern given by models with cool hydrogen atmospheres and two hot spots. Assuming NICER observations lasting a total of 1.0 Msec, current knowledge of M and the distance, and knowledge of the pulsar's spin axis to within 1°, the 1 σ credible region in R extends from 11.83 to 13.73 km (7.4%) and in M, from 1.307 to 1.567 M⊙ (9.1%). Marginalizing over M, we find the 1 σ credible interval for R alone extends from 12.62 to 13.68 km (4%).

  3. Non-union in 3 of 15 osteotomies of the distal radius without bone graft

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Johan H; Adolfsson, Lars E

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Open-wedge osteotomies of the distal radius create a void that is usually filled with either iliac crest bone graft or bone substitute. Previous studies have suggested that this is unnecessary. We investigated the safety of omitting the filling procedure. Patients and methods We included 15 patients with a dorsal malunion of a distal radius fracture. A palmar approach and angle-stable plates were used. The patients were followed until there was radiographic and clinical healing. Results Non-union occurred in 3 of the 15 patients. The study, which had been planned to include 25 patients, was then discontinued. 6 osteotomies created a trapezoid void (no cortical contact); 3 of these did not unite after the index procedure (p = 0.04), but did subsequently, after autogenous bone grafting. A trapezoid void was significantly associated with non-union (p = 0.04). Interpretation When a trapezoid defect is created, one should consider bone substitute or autogenous bone graft. This has been shown to be safe in other studies. PMID:25619425

  4. The channel radius and energy of cloud-to-ground lightning discharge plasma with multiple return strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuejuan; Yuan, Ping; Cen, Jianyong; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Yajun

    2014-03-15

    Using the spectra of a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash with multiple return strokes and combining with the synchronous radiated electrical field information, the linear charge density, the channel radius, the energy per unit length, the thermal energy, and the energy of dissociation and ionization in discharge channel are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The conclusion that the initial radius of discharge channel is determined by the duration of the discharge current is confirmed. Moreover, the correlativity of several parameters has been analyzed first. The results indicate that the total intensity of spectra is positive correlated to the channel initial radius. The ionization and thermal energies have a linear relationship, and the dissociation energy is correlated positively to the ionization and thermal energies, the energy per unit length is in direct proportion to the square of initial radius in different strokes of one CG lightning.

  5. [Osteoid osteoma in the lower extremity of the radius: about a case, rare location and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Abdelhafid, Derfoufi; Moncef, Erraji; Abdessamad, Kharraji; Najib, Abdeljaouad; Hicham, Yacoubi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign but painful bone tumor whose treatment involves complete surgical resection. We report the case of a young patient with osteoid osteoma in the lower extremity of the radius.

  6. Proximity-induced minimum radius of superconducting thin rings closed by the Josephson 0 or π junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barash, Yu. S.

    2017-01-01

    Superconductivity is shown to be completely destroyed in thin mesoscopic or nanoscopic rings closed by the junction with a noticeable interfacial pair breaking and/or a Josephson coupling, if a ring's radius r is less than the minimum radius rmin. The quantity rmin depends on the phase difference χ across the junction, or on the magnetic flux that controls χ in the flux-biased ring. It also depends on the Josephson and interfacial effective coupling constants, and in particular, on whether the ring is closed by the 0 or the π junction. The current-phase relation is substantially modified when the ring's radius exceeds rmin for some of the phase difference values, or slightly goes beyond its maximum. The modified critical temperature Tc and the temperature-dependent supercurrent near Tc are identified here as functions of the ring's radius and the magnetic flux.

  7. Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G.; Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H.

    2013-07-01

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were

  8. Grout long radius flow testing to support Saltstone disposal Unit 5 design

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.; Serrato, M. G.; Brooks, T. E. II; Huff, T. H.

    2013-02-24

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as “Saltstone”. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a “mega vault” and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water

  9. A Simple 3-Dimensional Printed Aid for a Corrective Palmar Opening Wedge Osteotomy of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Honigmann, Philipp; Thieringer, Florian; Steiger, Regula; Haefeli, Mathias; Schumacher, Ralf; Henning, Julia

    2016-03-01

    The reconstruction of malunited distal radius fractures is often challenging. Virtual planning techniques and guides for drilling and resection have been used for several years to achieve anatomic reconstruction. These guides have the advantage of leading to better operative results and faster surgery. Here, we describe a technique using a simple implant independent 3-dimensional printed drill guide and template to simplify the surgical reconstruction of a malunited distal radius fracture.

  10. On the role of corotation radius in the low T/W dynamical instability of differentially rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shin'ichirou; Saijo, Motoyuki

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the nature of so-called low T/W dynamical instability in a differentially rotating star, by focusing on the role played by the corotation radius of the unstable oscillation modes. A one-dimensional model of linear perturbation, which neglects dependence of variables on the coordinate along the rotational axis of the star, is solved to obtain stable and unstable eigenmodes. A linear eigenmode having a corotation radius, at which azimuthal pattern speed of the mode coincides with the stellar angular velocity, is categorized to either a complex (growing or damping) mode or a purely real mode belonging to a continuous spectrum of frequency. We compute canonical angular momentum and its flux to study eigenmodes with corotation radius. In a dynamically unstable mode, sound wave transports its angular momentum in such a way that the absolute value of the angular momentum is increased on both sides of the corotation radius. We further evaluate growth of amplitude of reflected sound wave incident to a corotation point, and find that the overreflection of the wave and the trapping of it between the corotation radius and the surface of the star may qualitatively explain dependences of eigenfrequencies on the stellar differential rotation. The results suggest that the low T/W instability may be caused by overreflection of sound waves trapped mainly between the surface of the star and a corotation radius.

  11. Correlation between dorsovolar translation and rotation of the radius on the distal radioulnar joint during supination and pronation of forearm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Song, Young Dong; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the patterns of movements about radius and ulna in individual degrees of forearm rotation. And, we also determined the effect of forearm rotation on translation and rotation of the radius with reference to the ulna, and to measure the relationship between forearm rotation, translation and rotation of the radius. Computed tomography of multiple, individual forearm positions, from 90° pronation to 90° supination, was conducted in 26 healthy volunteers (mean age, 43.9 years) to measure dorsovolar translation and rotation of the radius in the DRUJ in each forearm position. The mean dorsovolar translations were within 1.99 mm at 90° pronation to -2.03 mm at 90° supination. The rotations of the radius were 71.20° at 90° pronation and -46.63° at 90° supination. There were strong correlations between degrees of forearm rotation and dorsovolar translation (r=0.861, p<0.001) and rotation of the radius (r=0.960, p<0.001), suggesting that the DRUJ, carpal joints, and rotatory laxity of the carpal ligament, especially in supination, contribute to forearm supination and pronation. These findings provide an understanding of wrist kinematics, are may be useful in reconstructive wrist surgery to achieve normal range of motion, and are may be helpful for the design of DRUJ reconstruction using prostheses.

  12. Computer-assisted planning and navigation for corrective distal radius osteotomy, based on pre- and intraoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Dobbe, J G G; Strackee, S D; Schreurs, A W; Jonges, R; Carelsen, B; Vroemen, J C; Grimbergen, C A; Streekstra, G J

    2011-01-01

    Malunion after a distal radius fracture is very common and if symptomatic, is treated with a so-called corrective osteotomy. In a traditional distal radius osteotomy, the radius is cut at the fracture site and a wedge is inserted in the osteotomy gap to correct the distal radius pose. The standard procedure uses two orthogonal radiographs to estimate the two inclination angles and the dimensions of the wedge to be inserted into the osteotomy gap. However, optimal correction in 3-Dspace requires restoring three angles and three displacements. This paper introduces a new technique that uses preoperative planning based on 3-D images. Intraoperative 3-D imaging is also used after inserting pins with marker tools in the proximal and distal part of the radius and before the osteotomy. Positioning tools are developed to correct the distal radius pose in six degrees of freedom by navigating the pins. The method is accurate ( d 1.2 mm, ϕ 0.9°, m TRE = 1.7 mm), highly reproducible (SE (d) < 1.0 mm, SE (ϕ) ≤ 1.4°, SE (m) (TRE) = 0.7 mm), and allows intraoperative evaluation of the end result. Small incisions for pin placement and for the osteotomy render the method minimally invasive.

  13. Wrist function in malunion: Is the distal radius designed to retain function in the face of fracture?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fractures of the distal radius are the most common fracture in humans and are the sempiternal hazard of 3.5 million years of bipedalism. Despite the antiquity of the injury, one of the most controversial topics in current orthopaedics is the management of distal radius fractures. It has been suggested that radiographic appearances rarely correlate with functional outcomes. As the success of the human species is predicated almost exclusively on its dexterity and intelligence, it is conceivable that the distal radius has evolved to preserve function even in the face of injury. We therefore hypothesise that the distal radius is designed to accommodate the possibility of fracture. Methods We conducted a review of studies comparing fracture pattern and form with function. We also explore the paleoanthropological evidence and comparative studies with other primates. Findings The evidence points to the human distal radius being highly tolerant of post-fracture deformity in terms of preservation of function. In addition, the distal radius appears to have apparently anatomically ‘redundant’ features that confer this capability. We believe these phenomena to be an evolved trait that developed with bipedalism, increasing the chances of survival for a species whose success depends upon its dexterity. PMID:27376442

  14. The Use of a Custom-made Prosthesis in the Treatment of Chondrosarcoma of Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The most common neoplasms of the distal radius are primary tumors, of which aneurysmal bone cysts and giant cell tumors are seen almost exclusively. Chondrosarcomas are most commonly located in the pelvis, ribs and proximal segments of the extremities; they rarely occur in forearm bones. Bone defects after distal radial resection can be replaced with bone grafts, both autogenous and allogenic. There is always a risk of failure of the bones to mend or slower synostosis, which necessitates the search for new treatments. Recently, custom-made prostheses have been used with increasing frequency. In early 2015, a 25-year-old male patient was admitted to the Department of Orthopedic Oncology in Brzozów on account of a tumor involving the epiphysis and metaphysis of the right distal radius. Imaging studies confirmed that the lesion was a neoplasm and a biopsy revealed a chondrosarcoma. Radical resection of the tumor was attempted and a custom-made prosthesis was inserted in the place of the bone defect. The prosthesis was designed and manufactured over 4 weeks. No complications occurred during the surgery or in the postoperative period. After the surgery, the forearm and wrist were in a plaster splint for 6 weeks and then rehabilitation was started. The treatment outcome was good. Now, three months after the surgery, the patient has good wrist mobility and efficient grip. Surgical treatment of malignant tumors of the distal radius with extensive bone resection poses the challenge of bone replacement and recovery of fair hand function. Commonly known and practised, reconstructions with autogenous or allogenic bone grafts enable partial restoration of the radiocarpal joint surface and DRUJ. The use of large bone grafts is associated with a risk of non-union and limited hand function even if the grafts are vascularized. Arthrodesis of the radiocarpal joint is currently performed less and less frequently. Custom-made prostheses appear to be a good solution. This method makes

  15. Discovery of an 86 AU Radius Debris Ring around HD 181327

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn; Silverstone, Murray D.; Hines, Dean C.; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Pinte, Christophe; Ménard, François; Krist, John; Clampin, Mark; Grady, Carol; Golimowski, David; Ardila, David; Henning, Thomas; Wolf, Sebastian; Rodmann, Jens

    2006-10-01

    HST NICMOS PSF-subtracted coronagraphic observations of HD 181327 have revealed the presence of a ringlike disk of circumstellar debris seen in 1.1 μm light scattered by the disk grains, surrounded by a diffuse outer region of lower surface brightness. The annular disk appears to be inclined by 31.7d+/-1.6d from face-on, with the disk major-axis P.A. at 107deg+/-2deg. The total 1.1 μm flux density of the light scattered by the disk (at 1.2"radius of thermal emission estimated from IRAS and Spitzer flux densities, assuming blackbody grains (~22 AU). The 1.1 μm light scattered by the ring (1) appears bilaterally symmetric, (2) exhibits directionally preferential scattering well represented by a Henyey-Greenstein scattering phase function with gHG=0.30+/-0.03, and (3) has a median SB (over all azimuth angles) at the 86.3 AU radius of peak SB of 1.00+/-0.07 mJy arcsec-2. No photocentric offset is seen in the ring relative to the position of the central star. A low SB diffuse halo is seen in the NICMOS image to a distance of ~4". Deeper 0.6 μm Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS PSF-subtracted coronagraphic observations reveal a faint (V~21.5 mag arcsec-2) outer nebulosity at 4''radius of maximum surface density, and a total maximum dust mass of collisionally replenished grains with minimum grain sizes of ~1 μm of ~4MMoon.

  16. Tibia and radius bone geometry and volumetric density in obese compared to non-obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Mary B; Zemel, Babette S; Wrotniak, Brian H; Klieger, Sarah B; Shults, Justine; Stallings, Virginia A; Stettler, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with biologic and behavioral characteristics that may impact bone mineral density (BMD) and structure. The objective was to determine the association between obesity and bone outcomes, independent of sexual and skeletal maturity, muscle area and strength, physical activity, calcium intake, biomarkers of inflammation, and vitamin D status. Tibia and radius peripheral quantitative CT scans were obtained in 91 obese (BMI>97th percentile) and 51 non-obese adolescents (BMI>5th and <85th percentiles). Results were converted to sex- and race-specific Z-scores relative to age. Cortical structure, muscle area and muscle strength (by dynamometry) Z-scores were further adjusted for bone length. Obese participants had greater height Z-scores (p<0.001), and advanced skeletal maturity (p<0.0001), compared with non-obese participants. Tibia cortical section modulus and calf muscle area Z-scores were greater in obese participants (1.07 and 1.63, respectively, both p<0.0001). Tibia and radius trabecular and cortical volumetric BMD did not differ significantly between groups. Calf muscle area and strength Z-scores, advanced skeletal maturity, and physical activity (by accelerometry) were positively associated with tibia cortical section modulus Z-scores (all p<0.01). Adjustment for muscle area Z-score attenuated differences in tibia section modulus Z-scores between obese and non-obese participants from 1.07 to 0.28. After multivariate adjustment for greater calf muscle area and strength Z-scores, advanced maturity, and less moderate to vigorous physical activity, tibia section modulus Z-scores were 0.32 (95% CI -0.18, 0.43, p=0.06) greater in obese, vs. non-obese participants. Radius cortical section modulus Z-scores were 0.45 greater (p=0.08) in obese vs. non-obese participants; this difference was attenuated to 0.14 with adjustment for advanced maturity. These findings suggest that greater tibia cortical section modulus in obese adolescents is

  17. Observational constraints on star cluster formation theory. I. The mass-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kirk, H.; Sills, A.; Urquhart, J. S.; Kauffmann, J.; Kuhn, M. A.; Bhandare, A.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Stars form predominantly in groups usually denoted as clusters or associations. The observed stellar groups display a broad spectrum of masses, sizes, and other properties, so it is often assumed that there is no underlying structure in this diversity. Aims: Here we show that the assumption of an unstructured multitude of cluster or association types might be misleading. Current data compilations of clusters in the solar neighbourhood show correlations among cluster mass, size, age, maximum stellar mass, etc. In this first paper we take a closer look at the correlation of cluster mass and radius. Methods: We use literature data to explore relations in cluster and molecular core properties in the solar neighbourhood. Results: We show that for embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood a clear correlation exists between cluster mass and half-mass radius of the form Mc = CRcγ with γ = 1.7 ± 0.2. This correlation holds for infrared K-band data, as well as for X-ray sources and clusters containing a hundred stars up to those consisting of a few tens of thousands of stars. The correlation is difficult to verify for clusters containing fewer than 30 stars owing to low-number statistics. Dense clumps of gas are the progenitors of the embedded clusters. We find almost the same slope for the mass-size relation of dense, massive clumps as for the embedded star clusters. This might point to a direct translation from gas to stellar mass: however, it is difficult to relate size measurements for clusters (stars) to those for gas profiles. Taking multiple paths for clump mass into cluster mass into account, we obtain an average star-formation efficiency of 18%+9.3-5.7 for the embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood. Conclusions: The derived mass-radius relation gives constraints for the theory of clustered star formation. Analytical models and simulations of clustered star formation have to reproduce this relation in order to be realistic.

  18. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-04

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  19. A Silicon detector system on carbon fiber support at small radius

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin E. Johnson

    2004-04-28

    The design of a silicon detector for a p{bar p} collider experiment will be described. The detector uses a carbon fiber support structure with sensors positioned at small radius with respect to the beam. A brief overview of the mechanical design is given. The emphasis is on the electrical characteristics of the detector. General principles involved in grounding systems with carbon fiber structures will be covered. The electrical characteristics of the carbon fiber support structure will be presented. Test results imply that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of interest of 10 to 100 MHz. No distinction is found between carbon fiber and copper. Performance results on noise due to pick-up through the low mass fine pitch cables carrying the analogue signals and floating metal is discussed.

  20. Surgical approach for elastic stable intramedullary nail in pediatric radius shaft fracture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Sandra L; Riber, Sara S; Danielsson, Frederik B; Pedersen, Niels W; Viberg, Bjarke

    2017-04-05

    When using elastic stable intramedullary nailing in children's distal radius shaft fractures, the surgical approach can either be lateral or dorsal. The aim of this article was to carry out a systematic review of the literature comparing the two types of approaches in terms of complications. An electronic search of databases was performed. Titles of articles were screened, and abstracts and full text were read. Data were extracted in terms of demographics and complications. The dorsal approach had a 2.6% rate of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture, whereas the lateral approach had a 2.9% rate of transient superficial radial nerve palsy and 0.3% rate of permanent damage. These complications should be considered when deciding between the two surgical approaches.

  1. Position and radius of the Sun determined by solar eclipses in combination with lunar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yoshio

    1993-12-01

    The observation data of four total solar eclipses in 1970, 1973, 1980, and 1991 were analyzed by putting all the data together to obtain accurate coordinates and semidiameter of the Sun relative to those of the Moon. With the position and figure of the Moon rectified by lunar occultation data, a constant correction to the coordinates of the Sun tabulated in the current ephemeris is found as follows: delta lambda (Sun) = -0 sec .04 +/- 0 sec .005, delta beta (Sun) = +0 sec .01 +/- 0 sec .008. Also, the following values for the semidiameter of the Sun were obtained: sigma(Sun) 70 = 959 sec .74 +/- 0 sec .008, sigma(Sun) 73 = 959 sec .84 +/- 0 sec .015, sigma(Sun) 80 959 sec .84 +/- 0 sec .012, sigma(Sun) 91 = 959 sec .88 +/- 0 sec .008 (4615 A) respectively for the 1970, 1973, 1980, and 1991 eclipses, giving an obvious evidence for the change in the solar radius.

  2. First experimentally determined thermodynamic values of francium: hydration energy, energy of partitioning, and thermodynamic radius.

    PubMed

    Delmau, Lætitia H; Moine, Jérôme; Mirzadeh, Saed; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-08-08

    The Gibbs energy of partitioning of Fr(+) ion between water and nitrobenzene has been determined to be 14.5 ± 0.6 kJ/mol at 25 °C, the first ever Gibbs energy of partitioning for francium in particular and the first ever solution thermodynamic quantity for francium in general. This value enabled the ionic radius and standard Gibbs energy of hydration for Fr(+) to be estimated as 173 pm and -251 kJ/mol, respectively, the former value being significantly smaller than previously thought. A new experimental method was established using a cesium dicarbollide as a cation-exchange agent, overcoming problems inherent to the trace-level concentrations of francium. The methodology opens the door to the study of the partitioning behavior of francium to other water-immiscible solvents and the determination of complexation constants for francium binding by receptor molecules.

  3. Radius and Orientation Measurement for Cylindrical Objects by a Light Section Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youdong; Liu, Chongxu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient method based on a light section sensor is presented for measuring cylindrical objects’ radii and orientations in a robotic application. By this method, the cylindrical objects can be measured under some special conditions, such as when the cylindrical objects are welded with others, or in the presence of interferences. Firstly, the measurement data are roughly identified and accurately screened to effectively recognize ellipses. Secondly, the data are smoothed and homogenized to eliminate the effect of laser line loss or jump and reduce the influence of the inhomogeneity of measurement data on the ellipse fitting to a minimum. Finally, the ellipse fitting is carried out to obtain the radii and orientations of the cylindrical objects. Measuring experiments and results demonstrate the effective of the proposed radius and orientation measurement method for cylindrical object. PMID:27886090

  4. Orientation illusions and heart-rate changes during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Kavelaars, J.; Cheung, C. C.; Young, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent short-radius centrifugation is a promising countermeasure against the adverse effects of prolonged weightlessness. To assess the feasibility of this countermeasure, we need to understand the disturbing sensory effects that accompany some movements carried out during rotation. We tested 20 subjects who executed yaw and pitch head movements while rotating at constant angular velocity. They were supine with their main body axis perpendicular to earth gravity. The head was placed at the centrifuge's axis of rotation. Head movements produced a transient elevation of heart-rate. All observers reported head-contingent sensations of body tilt although their bodies remained supine. Mostly, the subjective sensations conform to a model based on semicircular canal responses to angular acceleration. However, some surprising deviations from the model were found. Also, large inter-individual differences in direction, magnitude, and quality of the illusory body tilt were observed. The results have implications for subject screening and prediction of subjective tolerance for centrifugation.

  5. Nucleation and initial radius of self-catalyzed III-V nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Borie, S.; Dagnet, T.; Reynes, L.; André, Y.; Gil, E.

    2017-02-01

    We treat theoretically the initial nucleation step of self-catalyzed III-V nanowires under simultaneously deposited group III and V vapor fluxes and with surface diffusion of a group III element. Our model is capable of describing the droplet size at which the very first nanowire monolayer nucleates depending on the element fluxes and surface temperature. This size determines the initial nanowire radius in growth techniques without pre-deposition of gallium. We show that useful self-catalyzed III-V nanowires can form only under the appropriately balanced V/III flux ratios and temperatures. Such balance is required to obtain nucleation from reasonably sized droplets that are neither too small under excessive arsenic flux nor too large in the arsenic-poor conditions.

  6. Difficulty in Fixation of the Volar Lunate Facet Fragment in Distal Radius Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Hiroyuki; Futamura, Kentaro; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Tsuji, Hideki; Kurata, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports suggest the presence of a rare fracture type for which reduction and fixation cannot be achieved with volar locking plate (VLP). In particular, it is difficult to achieve reduction and fixation with volar lunate facet (VLF) fragments present on the volar ulnar aspect of the lunate facet, because of the anatomical structure and biomechanics in this region. Herein, we report two challenging cases of difficulty in fixation of the VLF fragment in distal radius fracture. For this fracture type, it is most important to identify the volar ulnar bone fragment before surgery; it may also be necessary to optimize distal placement of the VLP via a dual-window approach and to apply additional fixations, such as a small plate, anchor, and/or external fixation. PMID:28255487

  7. Salter-Harris type-IV displaced distal radius fracture in a 5-year-old.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Samuel R; Summers, Spencer H; Stricker, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Displaced Salter-Harris type-IV fractures are rare in young children and can result in articular incongruity or premature physeal arrest. We describe a 5-year-old boy who sustained a displaced left distal radial Salter-Harris type-IV fracture. The patient had normal wrist function and physeal growth at the 3-year postoperative follow-up. Our patient is by far the youngest reported child with a displaced Salter-Harris type-IV fracture of the distal radius. Prompt anatomic reduction and fixation of a displaced distal radial Salter-Harris type-IV fracture can result in excellent short-term wrist motion with maintenance of physeal function.

  8. Aerothermal Performance Constraints for Hypervelocity Small Radius Unswept Leading Edges and Nosetips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Small radius leading edges and nosetips were utilized to minimize wave drag in early hypervelocity vehicle concepts until further analysis demonstrated that extreme aerothermodynamic heating would cause severe ablation or blunting of the available thermal protection system materials. Recent studies indicate that ultrahigh temperature ceramic (UHTC) materials are shape stable at temperatures approaching 3033 K and will be available for use as sharp UHTC leading edge components in the near future. Aerothermal performance constraints for sharp components made from these materials are presented in this work to demonstrate the effects of convective blocking, surface catalycity, surface emissivity, and rarefied flow effects on steady state operation at altitudes from sea level to 90 km. These components are capable of steady state operation at velocities up to 7.9 km/s at attitudes near 90 km.

  9. Aerothermal Performance Envelopes for Hypersonic Small Radius Unswept Leading Edges and Nosetips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziej, Paul; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Small radius leading edges and nosetips were utilized to minimize wave drag in early hypersonic vehicle concepts until further analysis demonstrated that extreme aerothermodynamic heating would cause severe ablation or blunting of the available thermal protection system materials. Recent studies indicate that diboride composite materials are shape stable under extreme aerothermodynamic heating at ultra high temperatures. Aerothermal performance envelopes for sharp components made from these materials are presented in this work to demonstrate the effects of convective blocking, surface catalycity, surface emissivity, and rarefied flow effects on steady state operation at altitudes from sea level to 90 km. These components are capable of steady state operation at velocities up to 7.9 km/s at altitudes near 90 km.

  10. Response of Ambulatory Human Subjects to Artificial Gravity (Short Radius Centrifugation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Arya, Maneesh; Newby, Nathaniel; Tucker, Jon-Michael; Jarchow, Thomas; Young, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in significant adaptive changes, including cardiovascular deconditioning, muscle atrophy, bone loss, and sensorimotor reorganization, that place individuals at risk for performing physical activities after return to a gravitational environment. Planned missions to Mars include unprecedented hypogravity exposures that would likely result in unacceptable risks to crews. Artificial gravity (AG) paradigms may offer multisystem protection from the untoward effects of adaptation to the microgravity of space or the hypogravity of planetary surfaces. While the most effective AG designs would employ a rotating spacecraft, perceived issues may preclude their use. The questions of whether and how intermittent AG produced by a short radius centrifuge (SRC) could be employed have therefore sprung to the forefront of operational research. In preparing for a series of intermittent AG trials in subjects deconditioned by bed rest, we have examined the responses of several healthy, ambulatory subjects to SRC exposures.

  11. Dorsal Plating of Distal Radius Fractures Historical Context and Appropriate Use.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Omri; Paksima, Nader

    2017-01-01

    The management of distal radius fractures has evolved over time from a largely nonoperative paradigm to a more commonly performed operative procedures today. Surgical trends have similarly developed, with dorsal plating falling out of favor due to complications involving extensor tendon pathology as well as due to the ubiquity of the volar plate along with the advent of locking plate technology. However, with the improvement in design of newer generation dorsal plates, this technique should be used in the appropriate clinical situation, including dorsal comminution and angulation with concomitant carpal pathology. Outcome data supports dorsal plating and has been shown to be comparable to that of volar plating, with some unique advantages. As such, the technique of dorsal plating should have a role in surgical management of these injuries.

  12. Automated Classification of Epiphyses in the Distal Radius and Ulna using a Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-hui; Liu, Tai-ang; Wei, Hua; Wan, Lei; Ying, Chong-liang; Zhu, Guang-you

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to automatically classify epiphyses in the distal radius and ulna using a support vector machine (SVM) and to examine the accuracy of the epiphyseal growth grades generated by the support vector machine. X-ray images of distal radii and ulnae were collected from 140 Chinese teenagers aged between 11.0 and 19.0 years. Epiphyseal growth of the two elements was classified into five grades. Features of each element were extracted using a histogram of oriented gradient (HOG), and models were established using support vector classification (SVC). The prediction results and the validity of the models were evaluated with a cross-validation test and independent test for accuracy (PA ). Our findings suggest that this new technique for epiphyseal classification was successful and that an automated technique using an SVM is reliable and feasible, with a relative high accuracy for the models.

  13. Global Radius of Curvature Estimation and Control System for Segmented Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus controls positions of plural mirror segments in a segmented mirror with an edge sensor system and a controller. Current mirror segment edge sensor measurements and edge sensor reference measurements are compared with calculated edge sensor bias measurements representing a global radius of curvature. Accumulated prior actuator commands output from an edge sensor control unit are combined with an estimator matrix to form the edge sensor bias measurements. An optimal control matrix unit then accumulates the plurality of edge sensor error signals calculated by the summation unit and outputs the corresponding plurality of actuator commands. The plural mirror actuators respond to the actuator commands by moving respective positions of the mixor segments. A predetermined number of boundary conditions, corresponding to a plurality of hexagonal mirror locations, are removed to afford mathematical matrix calculation.

  14. On the optimization of the solid core radius of superficially porous particles for finite adsorption rate.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof

    2011-02-18

    Packed chromatographic columns with the superficially porous particles (porous shell particles) guarantee higher efficiency. The theoretical equation of the Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate (HETP), for columns packed with spherical superficially porous particles, was used for the analysis of the column efficiency for finite rate of adsorption-desorption process. The HETP equation was calculated by the application of the moment analysis to elution peaks evaluated with the General Rate (GR) model. The optimal solid core radius for maximum column efficiency was estimated for a wide spectrum of internal and external mass transfer resistances, adsorption kinetic rate and axial dispersion. The separation power of the shell adsorbent for two component mixture, in analytical and preparative chromatography, was discussed. The conditions of the equivalence between the solutions of the General Rate model with slow adsorption kinetic and the Lumped Kinetic Model (LKM) or the Equilibrium Dispersive (ED) model were formulated.

  15. Corrective distal radius osteotomy following fracture malunion using a fixed-angle volar locking plate.

    PubMed

    Opel, S; Konan, S; Sorene, E

    2014-05-01

    Post-traumatic distal radius deformity may cause severe morbidity, and corrective osteotomy is often necessary to realign the functional axis of the wrist to correct symptomatic malunion. The aim of this retrospective study was to review the short-term results of a single surgeon’s series of distalradius corrective osteotomies following fracture malunion using a fixed-angle volar locking plate for 20 patients(16 women) of an average age of 57 (range 19–83) years [corrected].At short-term follow up (average 14 months, range 12-15 months), no complications were noted and radiological union was confirmed in all cases at an average of 3 months. The average post-operative Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score was 13.48 (range 0-48.33) and an objective improvement was noted in movements at the wrist joint. A statistically significant improvement was achieved in ulnar variance, radial inclination, dorsal tilt, and supination.

  16. Triton charge radius to next-to-next-to-leading order in pionless effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2017-02-01

    The triton point charge radius is calculated to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in pionless effective field theory ( EFT (π / )) , yielding a prediction of 1.14 ±0.19 fm (leading order), 1.59 ±0.08 fm (next-to leading order), and 1.62 ±0.03 fm (NNLO) in agreement with the current experimental extraction of 1.5978 ±0.040 fm [Angeli and Marinova, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 99, 69 (2013)], 10.1016/j.adt.2011.12.006. The error at NNLO is due to cutoff variation (˜1 % ) within a reasonable range of calculated cutoffs and from a EFT (π / ) error estimate (˜1.5 % ). In addition new techniques are introduced to add perturbative corrections to bound- and scattering state calculations for short-range effective field theories, but with a focus on their use in EFT (π / ) .

  17. Titania's Radius and an Upper Limit on its Atmosphere from the Sep. 8, 2001 Stellar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widemann, T.; Sicardy, B.; Lellouch, E.; Arlot, J.-E.; Colas, F.; Hubbard, W.; Hill, R.

    2008-09-01

    On September 8, 2001, the largest of Uranian moons, Titania, occulted V = 7.2, K0 III Hipparcos-catalog star HIP 106829. The star's unusual brightness allowed more than a hundred stations to monitor this unique event over three continents. The main goals of the observations were to (i) determine Titania's radius and possible oblateness ; (ii) determine Titania's offset with respect to the DE405 + URA027 ephemeris ; (iii) search for an atmosphere. Our new analysis provides ground pressure upper limits for a Titania's equilibrium atmosphere at typical levels of ∼10 nbar. This value, a factor of ∼103 less than current atmospheres of Pluto or Triton, is encouraging in the context of search for atmospheric signature in a ground-based stellar occultation by a KBO.

  18. Radius constraints from high-speed photometry of 20 low-mass white dwarf binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Chote, Paul; Sullivan, D. J.; Winget, D. E.; Bell, Keaton J.; Falcon, R. E.; Winget, K. I.; Harrold, Samuel T.; Montgomery, M. H.; Mason, Paul A.

    2014-09-01

    We carry out high-speed photometry on 20 of the shortest-period, detached white dwarf binaries known and discover systems with eclipses, ellipsoidal variations (due to tidal deformations of the visible white dwarf), and Doppler beaming. All of the binaries contain low-mass white dwarfs with orbital periods of less than four hr. Our observations identify the first eight tidally distorted white dwarfs, four of which are reported for the first time here. We use these observations to place empirical constraints on the mass-radius relationship for extremely low-mass (≤0.30 M {sub ☉}) white dwarfs. We also detect Doppler beaming in several of these binaries, which confirms their high-amplitude radial-velocity variability. All of these systems are strong sources of gravitational radiation, and long-term monitoring of those that display ellipsoidal variations can be used to detect spin-up of the tidal bulge due to orbital decay.

  19. A possible correlation between planetary radius and orbital period for small planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helled, Ravit; Lozovsky, Michael; Zucker, Shay

    2016-01-01

    We suggest the existence of a correlation between the planetary radius and orbital period for planets with radii smaller than 4 R⊕. Using the Kepler data, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.5120, and suggest that the correlation is not caused solely by survey incompleteness. While the correlation coefficient could change depending on the statistical analysis, the statistical significance of the correlation is robust. Further analysis shows that the correlation originates from two contributing factors. One seems to be a power-law dependence between the two quantities for intermediate periods (3-100 d), and the other is a dearth of planets with radii larger than 2 R⊕ in short periods. This correlation may provide important constraints for small-planet formation theories and for understanding the dynamical evolution of planetary systems.

  20. Equation of state beyond the radius of convergence of the virial expansion.

    PubMed

    Ushcats, M V

    2012-07-27

    The well-known problem of the virial expansion low-density limitation is considered within Mayer's cluster expansion method. The expression for the configuration integral and the corresponding equation of state are presented based on this approach but not limited by the convergence radius of the series for density and activity. When taking into account any number of irreducible integrals at the thermodynamic limit, this equation of state demonstrates the exact coincidence with the virial one inside the domain of its convergence but specifies the condensation process directly outside that domain. Thus, the assumption of some researchers that the condensation should appear in the domain where the proof of the virial expansion is limited may now be regarded as confirmed, exclusively using the classical Gibbs statistics.