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Sample records for 800-mev proton thermal

  1. Gadolinium-148 production cross section measurements for 600-and 800-MEV protons.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Mashnik, S. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, {sup 148}Gd production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 {mu}m thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 {mu}m thin Al activation foils. Gadolinium spallation yields were determined from these foils using alpha spectroscopy and compared with the LANL codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. When heavy metal targets, such as tungsten, are bombarded with protons greater than a few hundred MeV many different nuclides are produced. These nuclides are both stable and radioactive and are created by spallation, proton activation, or secondary reactions with neutrons and other nuclear particles made in the target. These products are distributed somewhat heterogeneously throughout a thick target because of the energy dependence of the cross sections and energy loss of the proton beam within the target. From this standpoint, it is difficult to measure nuclide production cross sections for a given energy proton in a thick target. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility and 1L target at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. DOE requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on radionuclide inventories in the target as a means of determining the 'nuclear facility' category level. Presently, WNR's Target 4 is a non-nuclear facility while the Lujan 1L target is classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten and other heavy elements. Allowable isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of {sup 148}Gd is generally low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total inhalation dose burden in an accident

  2. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN LOW ACTIVATION MARTENSITIC STEELS F82H AND OPTIMAX AFTER 800 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Y. DAI; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    Low-activation martensitic steels, F82H (mod.) and Optimax-A, have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons up to 5.9 dpa. The tensile properties and microstructure have been studied. The results show that radiation hardening increases continuously with irradiation dose. F82H has lesser irradiation hardening as compared to Optimax-A in the present work and DIN1.4926 from a previous study. The irradiation embrittlement effects are evident in the materials since the uniform elongation is reduced sharply to less than 2%. However, all the irradiated samples ruptured in a ductile-fracture mode. Defect clusters have been observed. The size and the density of defect clusters increase with the irradiation dose. Precipitates are amorphous after irradiation.

  3. Proton Radiography of a Thermal Explosion in PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilowitz, Laura; Henson, Bryan; Romero, Jerry; Asay, Blaine; Sandstrom, Mary

    2007-06-01

    The understanding of thermal explosions and burn propagation lags that of detonations and shock propagation. Diagnostics such as high energy radiography have been used to image shocks, but have been previously precluded from use in thermal explosions due to their stringent timing requirements: shock propagation can be synchronized to an external diagnostic while thermal explosion can not. This issue is solved by following the evolution of the ignition volume in a thermal explosion and using a laser pulse to provide a temperature jump in that central volume during the final thermal runaway leading to ignition. Details of the laser heating which minimize the perturbation of the thermal explosion will be discussed with comparisons between auto-ignited and laser ignited tests. Thermal explosion experiments have been conducted at the Los Alamos Proton Radiography facility and have yielded images of the evolution of ignition, post-ignition burn propagation, and case failure in a radially confined cylinder of PBX 9501.

  4. Acceleration of Thermal Protons by Generic Phenomenological Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé; Kang, Byungwoo

    2015-11-01

    We investigate heating and acceleration of protons from a thermal gas with a generic diffusion and acceleration model, and subject to Coulomb scattering and energy loss, as was done by Petrosian & East for electrons. As protons gain energy their loss to electrons becomes important. Thus, we need to solve the coupled proton-electron kinetic equation. We numerically solve the coupled Fokker-Planck equations and compute the time evolution of the spectra of both particles. We show that this can lead to a quasi-thermal component plus a high-energy nonthermal tail. We determine the evolution of the nonthermal tail and the quasi-thermal component. The results may be used to explore the possibility of inverse bremsstrahlung radiation as a source of hard X-ray emissions from hot sources such as solar flares, accretion disk coronas, and the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. We find that the emergence of nonthermal protons is accompanied by excessive heating of the entire plasma, unless the turbulence needed for scattering and acceleration is steeper than Kolmogorov and the acceleration parameters, the duration of the acceleration, and/or the initial distributions are significantly fine-tuned. These results severely constrain the feasibility of the nonthermal inverse bremsstrahlung process producing hard X-ray emissions. However, the nonthermal tail may be the seed particles for further re-acceleration to relativistic energies, say by a shock. In the Appendix we present some tests of the integrity of the algorithm used and present a new formula for the energy loss rate due to inelastic proton-proton interactions.

  5. Thermally excited proton spin-flip laser emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    Based on statistical thermodynamic fluctuation arguments, it is shown here for the first time that thermally excited spin-flip laser emission from the fusion product protons can occur in large tokamak devices that are entering the reactor regime of operation. Existing experimental data from TFTR supports this conjecture, in the sense that these measurements are in complete agreement with the predictions of the quasilinear theory of the spin-flip laser.

  6. Thermally excited proton spin-flip laser emission in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    Based on statistical thermodynamic fluctuation arguments, it is shown here for the first time that thermally excited spin-flip laser emission from the fusion product protons can occur in large tokamak devices that are entering the reactor regime of operation. Existing experimental data from TFTR supports this conjecture, in the sense that these measurements are in complete agreement with the predictions of the quasilinear theory of the spin-flip laser.

  7. ACCELERATION OF THERMAL PROTONS BY GENERIC PHENOMENOLOGICAL MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosian, Vahé; Kang, Byungwoo E-mail: redcrux8@stanford.edu

    2015-11-01

    We investigate heating and acceleration of protons from a thermal gas with a generic diffusion and acceleration model, and subject to Coulomb scattering and energy loss, as was done by Petrosian and East for electrons. As protons gain energy their loss to electrons becomes important. Thus, we need to solve the coupled proton–electron kinetic equation. We numerically solve the coupled Fokker–Planck equations and compute the time evolution of the spectra of both particles. We show that this can lead to a quasi-thermal component plus a high-energy nonthermal tail. We determine the evolution of the nonthermal tail and the quasi-thermal component. The results may be used to explore the possibility of inverse bremsstrahlung radiation as a source of hard X-ray emissions from hot sources such as solar flares, accretion disk coronas, and the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. We find that the emergence of nonthermal protons is accompanied by excessive heating of the entire plasma, unless the turbulence needed for scattering and acceleration is steeper than Kolmogorov and the acceleration parameters, the duration of the acceleration, and/or the initial distributions are significantly fine-tuned. These results severely constrain the feasibility of the nonthermal inverse bremsstrahlung process producing hard X-ray emissions. However, the nonthermal tail may be the seed particles for further re-acceleration to relativistic energies, say by a shock. In the Appendix we present some tests of the integrity of the algorithm used and present a new formula for the energy loss rate due to inelastic proton–proton interactions.

  8. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Hua, R.; Kim, J.; King, J.; Sio, H.; McGuffey, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Beg, F. N.; Shepherd, R.; Ping, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility to measure the thermal conductivity of proton-heated warm dense matter. In the experiment, proton beams generated via target normal sheath acceleration were used to heat bi-layer targets with high-Z front layers and lower-Z back layers. The stopping power of a material is approximately proportional to Z2 so a sharp temperature gradient is established between the two materials. The subsequent thermal conduction from the higher-Z material to the lower-Z was measured with time resolved streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) and Fourier domain interferometry (FDI) of the rear surface. Results will be used to compare predictions from the thermal conduction equation and the Wiedemann-Franz Law in the warm dense matter regime. Data from the time resolved diagnostics for Au/Al and Au/C Targets of 20-200 nm thickness will be presented.

  9. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    McKelvey, A.; Kemp, G. E.; Sterne, P. A.; ...

    2017-08-01

    Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution, and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. In the warm dense matter regime, experimental data are very scarce so that many theoretical models remain untested. Here we present the first thermal conductivity measurements of aluminum at 0.5–2.7 g/cc and 2–10 eV, using a recently developed platform of differential heating. A temperature gradient is induced in a Au/Al dual-layer target by proton heating, and subsequent heat flow from the hotter Au to the Al rearmore » surface is detected by two simultaneous time-resolved diagnostics. A systematic data set allows for constraining both thermal conductivity and equation-of-state models. Simulations using Purgatorio model or Sesame S27314 for Al thermal conductivity and LEOS for Au/Al release equation-of-state show good agreement with data after 15 ps. Discrepancy still exists at early time 0–15 ps, likely due to non-equilibrium conditions.« less

  10. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense aluminum.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, A; Kemp, G E; Sterne, P A; Fernandez-Panella, A; Shepherd, R; Marinak, M; Link, A; Collins, G W; Sio, H; King, J; Freeman, R R; Hua, R; McGuffey, C; Kim, J; Beg, F N; Ping, Y

    2017-08-01

    Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution, and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. In the warm dense matter regime, experimental data are very scarce so that many theoretical models remain untested. Here we present the first thermal conductivity measurements of aluminum at 0.5-2.7 g/cc and 2-10 eV, using a recently developed platform of differential heating. A temperature gradient is induced in a Au/Al dual-layer target by proton heating, and subsequent heat flow from the hotter Au to the Al rear surface is detected by two simultaneous time-resolved diagnostics. A systematic data set allows for constraining both thermal conductivity and equation-of-state models. Simulations using Purgatorio model or Sesame S27314 for Al thermal conductivity and LEOS for Au/Al release equation-of-state show good agreement with data after 15 ps. Discrepancy still exists at early time 0-15 ps, likely due to non-equilibrium conditions.

  11. Thermal conductivity profile determination in proton-irradiated ZrC by spatial and frequency scanning thermal wave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Antoniow, J. S.; Pron, H.; Ban, H.

    2013-10-07

    Using complementary thermal wave methods, the irradiation damaged region of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is characterized by quantifiably profiling the thermophysical property degradation. The ZrC sample was irradiated by a 2.6 MeV proton beam at 600 °C to a dose of 1.75 displacements per atom. Spatial scanning techniques including scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), lock-in infrared thermography (lock-in IRT), and photothermal radiometry (PTR) were used to directly map the in-depth profile of thermal conductivity on a cross section of the ZrC sample. The advantages and limitations of each system are discussed and compared, finding consistent results from all techniques. SThM provides the best resolution finding a very uniform thermal conductivity envelope in the damaged region measuring ∼52 ± 2 μm deep. Frequency-based scanning PTR provides quantification of the thermal parameters of the sample using the SThM measured profile to provide validation of a heating model. Measured irradiated and virgin thermal conductivities are found to be 11.9 ± 0.5 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 26.7 ±1 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. A thermal resistance evidenced in the frequency spectra of the PTR results was calculated to be (1.58 ± 0.1) × 10{sup −6} m{sup 2} K W{sup −1}. The measured thermal conductivity values compare well with the thermal conductivity extracted from the SThM calibrated signal and the spatially scanned PTR. Combined spatial and frequency scanning techniques are shown to provide a valuable, complementary combination for thermal property characterization of proton-irradiated ZrC. Such methodology could be useful for other studies of ion-irradiated materials.

  12. Instabilities of relativistic counterstreaming proton beams in the presence of a thermal electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Yalinewich, A.; Gedalin, M.

    2010-06-15

    A linear stability analysis is performed for two counterstreaming proton beams in the presence of a thermal electron background. Growth rates and polarization properties of unstable modes are calculated for various density ratios of the proton beams. It is found that in most cases, two unstable modes grow simultaneously: an electromagnetic filamentary mode that propagates perpendicular to the beam and an electrostatic mode that propagates parallel to the beam. The growth rates of the two modes are comparable, so that one expects that the instability would result in the development of a filamentary structure with a superimposed electrostatic pattern.

  13. Proton irradiation induced defects in GaN: Rutherford backscattering and thermally stimulated current studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishikata, N.; Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2016-03-01

    The proton irradiation induced defects in GaN are studied by combining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), thermally stimulated current (TSC), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The proton irradiation (peak concentration: 1.0 × 1015 cm-2) into GaN films with a thickness of 3 μm is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The proton concentration by a TRIM simulation is maximum at 3600 nm in depth, which means that the proton beam almost passes through the GaN film. The carrier concentration decreases three orders of magnitude to 1015 cm-3 by the proton irradiation, suggesting the existence of the proton irradiation-induced defects. The ERDA measurements using the 1.5 MeV helium beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to ∼300 nm. The hydrogen concentration at ∼220 nm is ∼8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ∼1.0 × 1014 cm-2 for un-irradiated and as-irradiated samples, respectively, suggesting that electrical properties are almost not affected by hydrogen. TSC measurements show a broad spectrum at around 110 K which can be divided into three traps, P1 (ionization energy 173 meV), P2 (251 meV), and P3 (330 meV). The peak intensity of P1 is much larger than that of P2 and P3. These traps are related to the N vacancy and/or complex involving N vacancy (P1), neutral Ga vacancy (VGa) (P2), and complex involving VGa (P3). The Ga displacement concentration evaluated by RBS measurements is 1.75 × 1019 cm-3 corresponding to 1/1000 of the Ga concentration in GaN. The observed Ga displacement may be origins of P2 and P3 traps.

  14. Self-assembled two-dimensional nanofluidic proton channels with high thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiao-Jing; Raidongia, Kalyan; Koltonow, Andrew R.; Huang, Jiaxing

    2015-07-01

    Exfoliated two-dimensional (2D) sheets can readily stack to form flexible, free-standing films with lamellar microstructure. The interlayer spaces in such lamellar films form a percolated network of molecularly sized, 2D nanochannels that could be used to regulate molecular transport. Here we report self-assembled clay-based 2D nanofluidic channels with surface charge-governed proton conductivity. Proton conductivity of these 2D channels exceeds that of acid solution for concentrations up to 0.1 M, and remains stable as the reservoir concentration is varied by orders of magnitude. Proton transport occurs through a Grotthuss mechanism, with activation energy and mobility of 0.19 eV and 1.2 × 10-3 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. Vermiculite nanochannels exhibit extraordinary thermal stability, maintaining their proton conduction functions even after annealing at 500 °C in air. The ease of constructing massive arrays of stable 2D nanochannels without lithography should prove useful to the study of confined ionic transport, and will enable new ionic device designs.

  15. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  16. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE SWITCH REGION OF A COMPACT PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Caporaso, G J; Sullivan, J S

    2007-06-15

    A compact proton accelerator for medical applications is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The accelerator architecture is based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) concept. One critical area to consider is the switch region. Electric field simulations and thermal calculations of the switch area were performed to help determine the operating limits of rmed SiC switches. Different geometries were considered for the field simulation including the shape of the thin Indium solder meniscus between the electrodes and SiC. Electric field simulations were also utilized to demonstrate how the field stress could be reduced. Both transient and steady steady-state thermal simulations were analyzed to find the average power capability of the switches.

  17. Thermal conduction study of warm dense aluminum by proton differential heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Y.; Kemp, G.; McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Shepherd, R.; Collins, G.; Sio, H.; King, J.; Freeman, R.; Hua, R.; McGuffey, C.; Kim, J.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    A differential heating platform has been developed for thermal conduction study (Ping et al. PoP 2015), where a temperature gradient is induced and subsequent heat flow is probed by time-resolved diagnostics. An experiment using proton differential heating has been carried out at Titan laser for Au/Al targets. Two single-shot time-resolved diagnostics are employed, SOP (streaked optical pyrometry) for surface temperature and FDI (Fourier Domain Interferometry) for surface expansion. Hydrodynamic simulations show that after 15ps, absorption in underdense plasma needs to be taken into account to correctly interpret SOP data. Comparison between simulations with different thermal conductivity models and a set of data with varying target thickness will be presented. This work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from OFES Early Career program and LLNL LDRD program.

  18. Temperature and density structure of thermal proton flows. [in magnetosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Schunk, R. W.; Raitt, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal proton flows along magnetic field lines are an important feature of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In this paper we report the results of a theoretical study of the thermal structure of such flows. The adopted steady state model is based upon O+, H+, and electrons with self-consistent solutions for the separate O+, H+, and electron temperatures, the O+ and H+ densities and the H+ drift velocity. Through investigation of a number of parameters affecting the model, it is shown that Joule heating arising from the flow of H+ through O+ preferentially heats H+, so that the H+ temperature is substantially greater than the O+ temperature. Low O+ densities characteristic of the trough region appear to give high H+/O+ temperature ratios. Typical O+ densities characteristic of polar wind flow regions give moderate H+/O3 temperature ratios. The Mach number of H+ outflow is substantially reduced in the present models in comparison with the older fixed temperature calculations.

  19. Thermal stability of proton conducting acid doped polybenzimidazole in simulated fuel cell environments

    SciTech Connect

    Samms, S.R.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, polybenzimidazole membrane doped with phosphoric acid (PBI) was found to have promising properties for use as a polymer electrolyte in a high temperature (ca. 150 to 200 C) proton exchange membrane direct methanol fuel cell. However, operation at 200 C in strongly reducing and oxidizing environments introduces concerns of the thermal stability of the polymer electrolyte. To simulate the conditions in a high temperature fuel cell, PBI samples were loaded with fuel cell grade platinum black, doped with ca. 480 mole percent phosphoric acid (i.e., 4.8 H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} molecules per PBI repeat unit) and heated under atmospheres of either nitrogen, 5% hydrogen, or air in a thermal gravimetric analyzer. The products of decomposition were taken directly into a mass spectrometer for identification. In all cases weight loss below 400 C was found to be due to loss of water. Judging from the results of these tests, the thermal stability of PBI is more than adequate for use as a polymer electrolyte in a high temperature fuel cell.

  20. Highly Efficient Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence from an Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials have shown great potential for highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). While the current molecular design of TADF materials primarily focuses on combining donor and acceptor units, we present a novel system based on the use of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) to achieve efficient TADF without relying on the well-established donor–acceptor scheme. In an appropriately designed acridone-based compound with intramolecular hydrogen bonding, ESIPT leads to separation of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, resulting in TADF emission with a photoluminescence quantum yield of nearly 60%. High external electroluminescence quantum efficiencies of up to 14% in OLEDs using this emitter prove that efficient triplet harvesting is possible with ESIPT-based TADF materials. This work will expand and accelerate the development of a wide variety of TADF materials for high performance OLEDs. PMID:28776019

  1. Interfacial interactions in aprotic ionic liquid based protonic membrane and its correlation with high temperature conductivity and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Mayur K; Subianto, Surya; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Dutta, Naba K

    2009-08-18

    Novel supported liquid membranes (SLMs) have been developed by impregnating Nafion and Hyflon membranes with ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMI-BTSI). These supported liquid membranes were characterized in terms of their ionic liquid uptake behavior, leaching of ionic liquid by water, thermal stability, mechanical properties, glass transition temperature, ion exchange capacity, and proton conductivity. In general, modified membranes are more flexible than unmodified samples due to the plasticization effects of the ionic liquid. However, these supported liquid membranes exhibit a significant increase in their operational stability and proton conductivity over unmodified membranes. We also demonstrate that proton conductivity of these supported liquid membranes allows conduction of protons in anhydrous conditions with conductivity increasing with temperature. Conductivity of up to 3.58 mS cm(-1) has been achieved at 160 degrees C in dry conditions, making these materials promising for various electrochemical applications.

  2. Near-exact enthalpy-entropy compensation governs the thermal unfolding of protonation states of oxidized cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Jonathan B; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports the first quantitative analysis of the thermal transitions of all protonation states of oxidized horse heart cytochrome c at low anion concentration. Changes of secondary and tertiary structure were probed by ultraviolet (UV) as well as visible circular dichroism and absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The temperature dependence of spectra were recorded at pH values assignable to a set of different protonation states which encompass the canonical Theorell-Åkesson states and the recently discovered III* state. Our experimental data suggest a two-step process of thermal unfolding for all protonation states. The respective thermodynamic parameters were obtained from a global analysis of the temperature dependence of corresponding visible circular dichroism (CD) and absorption spectra. The results of this analysis revealed a statistically significant enthalpy-entropy compensation with different apparent compensation temperatures for the two consecutive thermal transitions (319 and 357 K). This reflects the narrow distribution of the respective folding temperatures. UVCD spectra suggest that even the thermal transitions of protonation states occupied at acidic and alkaline pH cause only a very modest unfolding of the protein's helical structure. Our data indicate the protonation-induced unfolding at room temperatures predominantly affects the Ω-loops of the protein. The two thermal transitions involve changes of two foldons, i.e. the unfolding of two short β-strand segments (associated with the yellow foldon) followed by the unfolding of the 60' helix (green foldon) that connects the two Ω-loops of the protein. Apparently, intra-backbone hydrogen bonding is strong enough to mostly protect the terminal N- and C-helices from unfolding even at rather extreme conditions.

  3. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-01-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy. PMID:22191937

  4. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A.; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy.

  5. Assessment of thermal effects of interstitial laser phototherapy on mammary tumors using proton resonance frequency method.

    PubMed

    Le, Kelvin; Li, Xiaosong; Figueroa, Daniel; Towner, Rheal A; Garteiser, Philippe; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E; Chen, Wei R

    2011-12-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) uses a synergistic approach to treat cancer systemically through local laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. Currently, LIT utilizes dye-assisted noninvasive laser irradiation to achieve selective photothermal interaction. However, LIT faces difficulties treating deeper tumors or tumors with heavily pigmented overlying skin. To circumvent these barriers, we use interstitial laser irradiation to induce the desired photothermal effects. The purpose of this study is to analyze the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using proton resonance frequency (PRF). An 805-nm near-infrared laser with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors. Different power settings (1.0, 1.25, and 1.5 W) were applied with an irradiation duration of 10 min. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7 T magnetic resonance imager using PRF. We found that temperature distributions in tissue depended on both laser power and time settings, and that variance in tissue composition has a major influence in temperature elevation. The temperature elevations measured during interstitial laser irradiation by PRF and thermocouple were consistent, with some variations due to tissue composition and the positioning of the thermocouple's needle probes. Our results indicated that, for a tissue irradiation of 10 min, the elevation of rat tumor temperature ranged from 8 to 11°C for 1 W and 8 to 15°C for 1.5 W. This is the first time a 7 T magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. Our work provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside a tumor using interstitial laser treatment. Our work may lead to an optimal protocol for future cancer treatment using interstitial phototherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy.

  6. Dynamic Strain on Thin Diaphragms of a Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    1999-11-13

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometric fiber optic sensors were used to measure dynamic strains on thin diaphragms of a liquid mercury target, which was subjected to intense 800-MeV proton thermal shock tests. The mercury target is engineered with very thin end plates or diaphragms (either 0.6 mm or 1.9 mm) for studying large strain effects. During thermal shock tests, the mercury in the target interacted with an intense pulsed beam of 2.4x10{sup 13 protons}. The resulting pressure waves lead to large strains exceeding 250 microstrains on a 0.6-mm diaphragm. Significant factors relative to the accuracy of strain measurements are emphasized, such as the sensor air gap, alignment of sensors, and frequency response of the strain instrument. In this paper, dynamic strains measured on thin diaphragms are described and discussed.

  7. Ion-to-Neutral Ratios and Thermal Proton Transfer in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, I.-Chung; Chu, Kuan Yu; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Shang-Yun; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Chen, Jien-Lian; Gray-Weale, Angus; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    The ion-to-neutral ratios of four commonly used solid matrices, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), sinapinic acid (SA), and ferulic acid (FA) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) at 355 nm are reported. Ions are measured using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with a time-sliced ion imaging detector. Neutrals are measured using a rotatable quadrupole mass spectrometer. The ion-to-neutral ratios of CHCA are three orders of magnitude larger than those of the other matrices at the same laser fluence. The ion-to-neutral ratios predicted using the thermal proton transfer model are similar to the experimental measurements, indicating that thermal proton transfer reactions play a major role in generating ions in ultraviolet-MALDI.

  8. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.; Marr-Lyon, M.

    2012-05-01

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 μs temporal resolution and approximately 100 μm spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  9. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    SciTech Connect

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.; and others

    2012-05-15

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  10. Characterisation of Dissolved Organic Carbon by Thermal Desorption - Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materić, Dušan; Peacock, Mike; Kent, Matthew; Cook, Sarah; Gauci, Vincent; Röckmann, Thomas; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an integral component of the global carbon cycle. DOC represents an important terrestrial carbon loss as it is broken down both biologically and photochemically, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. The magnitude of this carbon loss can be affected by land management (e.g. drainage). Furthermore, DOC affects autotrophic and heterotrophic processes in aquatic ecosystems, and, when chlorinated during water treatment, can lead to the release of harmful trihalomethanes. Numerous methods have been used to characterise DOC. The most accessible of these use absorbance and fluorescence properties to make inferences about chemical composition, whilst high-performance size exclusion chromatography can be used to determine apparent molecular weight. XAD fractionation has been extensively used to separate out hydrophilic and hydrophobic components. Thermochemolysis or pyrolysis Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) give information on molecular properties of DOC, and 13C NMR spectroscopy can provide an insight into the degree of aromaticity. Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a sensitive, soft ionisation method suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic vapours. So far, PTR-MS has been used in various environmental applications such as real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources, chemical composition measurements of aerosols etc. However, as the method is not compatible with water, it has not been used for analysis of organic traces present in natural water samples. The aim of this work was to develop a method based on thermal desorption PTR-MS to analyse water samples in order to characterise chemical composition of dissolved organic carbon. We developed a clean low-pressure evaporation/sublimation system to remove water from samples and thermal desorption system to introduce

  11. Measurement of the thermal noise of a proton beam in the NAP-M storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Dement'ev, E.M.; Dikanskii, N.S.; Medvedko, A.S.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements of the spectra and power of the noise of uncooled and cooled proton beams in the NAP-M storage ring are reported. Features of the noise of the cooled beam due to particle interaction are analyzed.

  12. Highly proton-conductive thermally rearranged polybenzoxazole for medium-temperature and low-humidity polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Lee, Young Moo

    2014-02-01

    Here a new membrane design concept to improve proton conductivity and to maintain a constant acid doping level for an extended period of time for medium-temperature and low-humidity polymer electrolyte fuel cells (MT/LH-PEFC) is presented. A polymer electrolyte membrane is prepared via thermal rearrangement of hydroxyl-containing polyimide (HPI) precursor membranes over 350 °C, followed by subsequent acid-impregnation. The thermal treatment for 1 h converts HPI into a thermally rearranged polybenzoxazole (TR-PBO) membrane with high surface area, similar to zeolites. The microporous structure and the basic sites (-Cdbnd N-) in benzoxazole moieties contribute to the stable impregnation of small acidic molecules (e.g., HCl, HNO3, H3PO4, and HPF6) in large quantities within the polymer matrix. The acid-doping level decreases with the increasing size of acidic dopants. TR-PBO impregnated using HCl with the smallest radius has a much higher doping level and excellent proton conductivity (1.60 × 10-1 S cm-1 at 130 °C and RH 28%) when compared with PBI (6.59 × 10-2 S cm-1 at the same conditions). Different from a common acid-doped PBI system, the acid-doped TR-PBO membranes do not exhibit a severe acid leaching even in repeated heating and cooling cycles between 90 and 130 °C.

  13. Thermal-Conductivity Characterization of Gas Diffusion Layer in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers Under Mechanical Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamour, M.; Garnier, J. P.; Grandidier, J. C.; Ouibrahim, A.; Martemianov, S.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate information on the temperature field and associated heat transfer rates is particularly important for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and PEM electrolyzers. An important parameter in fuel cell and electrolyzer performance analysis is the effective thermal conductivity of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) which is a solid porous medium. Usually, this parameter is introduced in modeling and performance analysis without taking into account the dependence of the GDL thermal conductivity λ (in W · m-1 · K-1) on mechanical compression. Nevertheless, mechanical stresses arising in an operating system can change significantly the thermal conductivity and heat exchange. Metrology allowing the characterization of the GDL thermal conductivity as a function of the applied mechanical compression has been developed in this study using the transient hot-wire technique (THW). This method is the best for obtaining standard reference data in fluids, but it is rarely used for thermal-conductivity measurements in solids. The experiments provided with Quintech carbon cloth indicate a strong dependence (up to 300%) of the thermal conductivity λ on the applied mechanical load. The experiments have been provided in the pressure range 0 < p < 8 MPa which corresponds to stresses arising in fuel cells. All obtained experimental results have been fitted by the equation λ = 0.9log(12 p + 17)(1 - 0.4e-50 p ) with 9% uncertainty. The obtained experimental dependence can be used for correct modeling of coupled thermo/electro-mechanical phenomena in fuel cells and electrolyzers. Special attention has been devoted to justification of the main hypotheses of the THW method and for estimation of the possible influence of the contact resistances. For this purpose, measurements with a different number of carbon cloth layers have been provided. The conducted experiments indicate the independence of the measured thermal conductivity on the number of GDL layers and, thus, justify the

  14. Thermal and electrochemical durability of carbonaceous composites used as a bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinumoto, Taro; Nagano, Keita; Tsumura, Tomoki; Toyoda, Masahiro

    Thermal and electrochemical durability of carbonaceous composite plates, which are made from graphite powders and a resin for use as bipolar plates of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell), were investigated. The thermal durability was investigated by TG (thermal gravimetry) coupled with DTA (differential thermal analysis) technique under air up to 600 °C. A weight loss was significant over 300 °C, but the hydrophobicity was decreased after heated at 80 °C for 192 h. The electrochemical durability was investigated in 10 μmol dm -3 of hydrochloric acid solution under nitrogen or oxygen atmosphere by means of potential holding test from 0.8 to 1.5 V against RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) at 80 °C. During the potential holding tests, CO 2 production due to the corrosion was quantified by a GC (gas-chromatography) and the production was detectable above 1.3 V irrespective with atmosphere; on the other hand, it was clarified from the contact angle measurements that the hydrophobicity was changed below 1.3 V. The results of this study showed that the carbonaceous composite plates were electrochemically degraded under PEMFC condition and were seriously degraded in URFC (unitized regenerative fuel cell) condition.

  15. Thermally activated electron capture by mobile protons in SiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vanheusden, K.; Karna, S.P.; Pugh, R.D.; Warren, W.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Devine, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The annihilation of mobile protons in thin SiO{sub 2} films by capture of ultraviolet-excited electrons has been analyzed for temperatures between 77 and 500 K. We observe a strong increase in proton annihilation with increasing temperature, and derive an activation energy for electron capture of about 0.2 eV. Based on quantum chemical [(OH){sub 3}Si]{sub 2}{endash}O{endash}H{sup +} cluster calculations, we suggest photoexcitation of electrons from excited vibrational states of the ground electronic (valence band) state to a nearby excited electronic (SiO{sub 2} gap) state. It is argued that the latter excitation can result in H{sup 0} formation at elevated temperatures. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Distributions and thermalization of protons and alpha particles at collisionless quasi-parallel shocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Scholer, M.

    1993-09-01

    The dissipation processes of protons and a minor ion component, alpha particles, at quasi-parallel supercritical collisionless shocks are investigated by one-dimensional hybrid simulations. For both ion components the dissipation at these shocks is due to two different mechanisms: Heating is either caused by the nonadiabatic transition of the ions through the shock ramp where ions move through the region of the sharp jump in the magnetic field magnitude and direction, or by a mechanism which involves the occurrence of specularly reflected ions and subsequent shock reformation. In the latter case, reflected ions form a counterstreaming beam and lead to re-formation of the shock at the leading edge of the reflected ion beam. The region between the re-formed and the old shock, where the initial solar wind and the reflected beam have not completely merged, exhibits a sharp increase of the total pressure. The authors have also investigated the dependence of the downstream alpha particle to proton temperature ratio as a function of the upstream density, the plasma beta and the Alfvén Mach number of the shock. Quasi-parallel collisionless shock heating of alpha particles is more efficient than heating of protons. The downstream temperature ratio is higher than the upstream solar wind temperature ratio.

  17. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Ghose, S.; Kirk, H. G.; Trung, L.-P.; McDonald, K. T.; Kotsina, Z.; Nocera, P.; Assmann, R.; Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Quaranta, E.; Rossi, A.; Zwaska, R.; Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Mokhov, N.

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5 ×1020 p /cm2 . The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF) selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (˜5 ×1018 p cm-2 ). In addition, the

  18. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Ghose, S.; ...

    2016-11-16

    Here, a comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have beenmore » studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×1020 p/cm2. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF) selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (~5×1018 p cm-2). In addition

  19. Effects of grain boundary misorientation on solute segregation in thermally sensitized and proton-irradiated 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duh, T. S.; Kai, J. J.; Chen, F. R.

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the grain boundary misorientation on the radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in 304 stainless steels. There were four test conditions for the specimens: (1) as-received (AR) with enriched Cr at grain boundary, (2) AR + 1 dpa proton irradiation at 450°C, (3) thermally sensitized (SEN), and (4) SEN + 1 dpa proton irradiation at 450°C. The Cr/Ni-concentration profiles were measured by using FEGTEM/EDS and the grain boundary misorientation was determined with the aid of simulated Kikuchi patterns. A delayed Cr depletion compared to no pre-enrichment condition was found at grain boundaries in AR + 1 dpa specimens. The Cr-concentration profile gets narrower and deeper in SEN + 1 dpa specimens. The degree of grain boundary segregation was observed to be higher at random boundaries than special boundaries. The segregation cusps were measured at grain boundaries of Σ3,Σ9 and Σ15 in SEN + 1 dpa 304 stainless steel specimens. From the fitted segregation cusps, it seems that the Cr segregation level at special boundaries in irradiated sensitized 304 stainless steels increases with Σ for values up to Σ=15.

  20. On the non-thermal electron-to-proton ratio at cosmic ray acceleration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Lukas; Becker Tjus, Julia; Eichmann, Björn; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The luminosity ratio of electrons to protons as it is produced in stochastic acceleration processes in cosmic ray sources is an important quantity relevant for several aspects of the modeling of the sources themselves. It is usually assumed to be around 1: 100 in the case of Galactic sources, while a value of 1: 10 is typically assumed when describing extragalactic sources. It is supported by observations that the average ratios should be close to these values. At this point, however, there is no possibility to investigate how each individual source behaves. When looking at the physics aspects, a 1: 100 ratio is well supported in theory when making the following assumptions: (1) the total number of electrons and protons that is accelerated are the same; (2) the spectral index of both populations after acceleration is αe =αp ≈ 2.2 . In this paper, we reinvestigate these assumptions. In particular, assumption (2) is not supported by observational data of the sources and PIC simulation yield different spectral indices as well. We present the detailed calculation of the electron-to-proton ratio, dropping the assumption of equal spectral indices. We distinguish between the ratio of luminosities and the ratio of the differential spectral behavior, which becomes necessary for cases where the spectral indices of the two particle populations are not the same. We discuss the possible range of values when allowing for different spectral indices concerning the spectral behavior of electrons and protons. Additionally, it is shown that the minimum energy of the accelerated population can have a large influence on the results. We find, in the case of the classical minimum energy of T0 , e =T0 , p = 10 keV, that when allowing for a difference in the spectral indices of up to 0.1 with absolute spectral indices varying between 2.0 < α < 2.3, the luminosity ratio varies between 0.008 < Kep < 0.12. The differential particle number ratio is in the range 0.008

  1. Measurement of Dynamic Strain on a Mercury Target Vessel During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.

    2001-01-11

    A mercury target vessel, designed to simulate some aspects of the eventual target design for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be built in Oak Ridge by the Department of Energy, was used in a test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to study the strain induced from thermal shock of bombarding protons. In the SNS, intense thermal shock loads are expected to cause an enormous rate of temperature rise ({approximately}10{sup 7} K/s), with resulting pressure waves in the mercury that may lead to large stresses on the thin walls of the mercury target. To guide the mercury target design and to benchmark the computer design codes, transient strain was measured using fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensors. Twenty strain sensors were attached in various axial and transverse orientations to a cylindrical stainless steel target vessel containing mercury. The vessel was 10 cm in diameter, about 15 cm long, and with a 5-cm radius hemispherical shell welded to the forward end. The test was done at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) beam facility on 30-31 January 1999. The sensors were attached with gauge lengths of about two centimeters, and were located in pairs in most areas, for redundancy and facilitation of data analysis. The 800-MeV proton deposition of 0.5--2.3 x 10{sup 13} over a full-width at half maximum beam size of {approximately}25 mm, produced axial strains peaking at a few microstrains, with transverse (hoop) strains more than an order of magnitude higher. We describe the experiments, including the sensors and measurement configuration, and discuss the strain data analysis.

  2. Structural, thermal, morphological and biological studies of proton-transfer complexes formed from 4-aminoantipyrine with quinol and picric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2013-03-01

    4-Aminoantipyrine (4AAP) is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, biochemical experiments and environmental monitoring. However, residual amounts of 4AAP in the environment may pose a threat to human health. To provide basic data that can be used to extract or eliminate 4AAP from the environment, the proton-transfer complexes of 4AAP with quinol (QL) and picric acid (PA) were synthesized and spectroscopically investigated. The interactions afforded two new proton-transfer salts named 1,5-dimethyl-3-oxo-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-aminium-4-hydroxyphenolate and 1,5-dimethyl-3-oxo-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-aminium-2,4,6-trinitrophenolate for QL and PA, respectively, via a 1:1 stoichiometry. Elemental analysis (CHN), electronic absorption, spectrophotometric titration, IR, Raman, 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the new products. The thermal stability of the synthesized CT complexes was investigated using thermogravimetric (TG) analyses, and the morphology and particle size of these complexes were obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that PA and 4AAP immediately formed a yellow precipitate with a remarkable sponge-like morphology and good thermal stability up to 180 °C. Finally, the biological activities of the newly synthesized CT complexes were tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The results indicated that the [(4AAP)(QL)] complex exhibited strong antimicrobial activities against various bacterial and fungal strains compared with standard drugs.

  3. Hyphenation of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry with Thermal Analysis (TG/PTR-MS) for Monitoring the Thermal Degradation of Retinyl Acetate.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Irene; Mason, Marco; Biasioli, Franco; Scampicchio, Matteo

    2017-09-14

    The processing of retinyl acetate, a vitamin and biomarker, at high temperatures causes significant decomposition of the compound and thus loss of its activity. The rate of mass loss can be conveniently studied by thermogravimetry (TG). However, this technique generally fails to reveal which compounds have been evolved from the compound. In this work we propose a new hyphenation approach to continuously monitor the thermal decomposition of retinyl acetate and follow the evolution of specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Thermal degradation of retinyl acetate was followed by TG coupled to a direct injection mass spectrometer based on proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to follow continuously the thermal decomposition of retinyl acetate. The results were also compared with those obtained by a second evolved gas analysis system based on the coupling of TG with FTIR. The TG results showed two main mass losses, at 180°C and 350°C. When the PTR-MS instrument was connected to the outlet of the TG instrument, specific fragment ions (m/z 43, 61, 75, 85 and 97) showed characteristic evolution profiles. The first mass loss was mainly associated with the release of acetic acid (m/z 43 and 61), whereas the second mass loss was connected with the degradation of the molecule backbone (m/z 43, 61, 75, 85 and 97). These results were substantially correlated with those achieved by TG coupled with FTIR, although PTR-MS showed superior performance in terms of the qualitative identification of specific fragments and better sensitivity toward complex organic VOCs. The proposed TG-PTR-MS technique shows a great potential for following in real time the thermal degradation of ingredients such as retinyl acetate and identifying compounds evolved at specific temperatures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic Pressure of Liquid Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl. D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    2000-02-01

    Described here are efforts to diagnose transient pressures generated by a short-pulse (about 0.5 microseconds) high intensity proton ({approximately} 2 * 10 14 per pulse) beam. Proton energy is 800-MeV. The tests were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR). Such capability is required for understanding target interaction for the Spallation Neutron Source project as described previously at this conference.1-4 The main approach to effect the pressure measurements utilized the deflection of a diaphragm in intimate contact with the mercury. There are a wide variety of diaphragm-deflection methods used in scientific and industrial applications. Many deflection-sensing approaches are typically used, including, for instance, capacitive and optical fiber techniques. It was found, however, that conventional pressure measurement using commercial pressure gages with electrical leads was not possible due to the intense nuclear radiation enviro nment. Earlier work with a fiber optic strain gauge demonstrated the viability of using fiber optics for this environment.

  5. Linkage of proton binding to the thermal dissociation of triple helix complex.

    PubMed

    Petraccone, Luigi; Erra, Eva; Mattia, Carlo Andrea; Fedullo, Vito; Barone, Guido; Giancola, Concetta

    2004-07-01

    The effects of cytosine protonation on the thermodynamic properties of parallel pyrimidine motif DNA triplex were investigated and characterized by different techniques, such as circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A thermodynamic model was developed which, by linking the cytosine ionization equilibrium to the dissociation process of the triplex, is able to rationalize the experimental data and to reproduce the pH dependence of the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the triplex formation. The results are useful to systematically introduce the effect of pH in a more general model able to predict the stability of DNA triplexes on the basis of the sequence alone.

  6. Computing Wigner distributions and time correlation functions using the quantum thermal bath method: application to proton transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Basire, Marie; Borgis, Daniel; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2013-08-14

    Langevin dynamics coupled to a quantum thermal bath (QTB) allows for the inclusion of vibrational quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations at virtually no additional computer cost. We investigate here the ability of the QTB method to reproduce the quantum Wigner distribution of a variety of model potentials, designed to assess the performances and limits of the method. We further compute the infrared spectrum of a multidimensional model of proton transfer in the gas phase and in solution, using classical trajectories sampled initially from the Wigner distribution. It is shown that for this type of system involving large anharmonicities and strong nonlinear coupling to the environment, the quantum thermal bath is able to sample the Wigner distribution satisfactorily and to account for both zero point energy and tunneling effects. It leads to quantum time correlation functions having the correct short-time behavior, and the correct associated spectral frequencies, but that are slightly too overdamped. This is attributed to the classical propagation approximation rather than the generation of the quantized initial conditions themselves.

  7. Comprehensive interpretation of thermal dileptons measured at the CERN super proton synchrotron.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Hendrik; Rapp, Ralf

    2006-09-08

    Employing thermal dilepton rates based on a medium-modified electromagnetic correlation function we show that recent dimuon spectra of the NA60 Collaboration in central In-In collisions at the CERN-SPS can be understood in terms of radiation from a hot and dense hadronic medium. Earlier calculated in-medium rho-meson spectral functions provide an accurate description of the data up to dimuon invariant masses of about M approximately or equal to 0.9 GeV, with good sensitivity to the predicted rho-meson line shape, identifying baryon-induced modifications as the prevalent ones. A reliable evaluation of the contribution enables the study of further medium effects: at masses M>0.9 GeV, 4-pion type annihilation accounts for the experimentally observed excess (possibly augmented by effects of "chiral mixing"), while predictions for thermal emission from in-medium omega and phi mesons may be tested in the future.

  8. Irreversible change in the T1 temperature dependence with thermal dose using the proton resonance frequency-T1 technique.

    PubMed

    Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Denaturation of macromolecules within the tissues is believed to be the major factor contributing to the damage of tissues upon hyperthermia. As a result, the value of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the tissue water, which is related to the translational and rotational rates of water, represents an intrinsic probe for investigating structural changes in tissues at high temperature. Therefore, the goal of this work is to investigate whether the simultaneous measurement of temperature and T1 using a hybrid proton resonance frequency (PRF)-T1 measurement technique can be used to detect irreversible changes in T1 that might be indicative of tissue damage. A new hybrid PRF-T1 sequence was implemented based on the variable flip angle driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation (DESPOT)1 method from a standard three dimensional segmented echo-planar imaging sequence by alternating two flip angles from measurement to measurement. The structural changes of the heated tissue volumes were analyzed based on the derived T1 values and the corresponding PRF temperatures. Using the hybrid PRF-T1 technique, we demonstrate that the change of spin lattice relaxation time T1 is reversible with temperature for low thermal dose (thermal dose ≤ 240 cumulative equivalent minutes [CEM] 43°C) and irreversible with temperature after significant accumulation of thermal dose in ex vivo chicken breast tissue. These results suggest that the hybrid PRF-T1 method may be a potentially powerful tool to investigate the extent and mechanism of heat damage of biological tissues.

  9. Crystal structure, spectroscopy, DFT studies and thermal characterization of Cobalt(II) complex with 2-protonated aminopyridinium cation as ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhadhbi, Noureddine; Saïd, Salem; Elleuch, Slim; Naïli, Houcine

    2016-03-01

    Single crystals of a new organic-inorganic hybrid compound (2-HAMP)2[CoBr4], (2-HAMP = 2-protonated aminopyridinium cation) was synthesized and characterized by X-Ray diffraction at room temperature, DTA-TG measurement, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies and optical absorption. Its crystal structure is a packing of alternated organic and inorganic layers parallel to (a, b) plane. The different components are connected by a network of N/C-H⋯Br hydrogen bonds and halogen⋯halogen interactions. These hydrogen bonds give notable vibrational effects. Theoretical calculations were performed using density functional theory (DFT) for studying the molecular structure, vibrational spectra and optical properties of the investigated molecule in the ground state. The optimized geometrical parameters obtained by DFT calculations are in good agreement with single crystal XRD data. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincide with the experimental UV-Visible spectrum. The results show good consistent with the experiment and confirm the contribution of metal orbital to the HOMO-LUMO boundary. Thermal analysis studies indicate the presence of three phase transitions at 68, 125 and 172 °C, which are confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction as a function of temperature.

  10. THERMAL SHOCK INDUCED BY A 24 GEV PROTON BEAM IN THE TEST WINDOWS OF THE MUON COLLIDER EXPERIMENT E951 - TEST RESULTS AND THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; KIRK,H.; FINFROCK,C.; PRIGL,R.; BROWN,K.; KAHN,S.; LUDEWIG,H.; MCDONALDK.; CATES,M.; TSAI,J.; BESHEARS,D.; RIEMER,B.

    2001-11-11

    The need for intense muon beams for muon colliders and neutrino factories has lead to a concept of a high performance target station in which a 1-4 MW proton beam of 6-24 GeV impinges on a target inside a high field solenoid channel. While novel technical issues exist regarding the survivability of the target itself, the need to pass the tightly focused proton beam through beam windows poses additional concerns. In this paper, issues associated with the interaction of a proton beam with window structures designed for the muon targetry experiment E951 at BNL are explored. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam up to 16 x 10{sup 12} per pulse and a pulse length of approximately 100 ns is expected to be tightly focused (to 0.5 mm rms one sigma radius) on an experimental target. Such beam will induce very high thermal, quasi-static and shock stresses in the window structure that exceed the strength of most common materials. In this effort, a detailed assessment of the thermal/shock response of beam windows is attempted with a goal of identifying the best window material candidate. Further, experimental strain results and comparison with the predicted values are presented and discussed.

  11. Luminosity from thermal neutron counting with MPX detectors and relation to ATLAS reference luminosity at √s= 8 TeV proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopczak, A.; Ali, B.; Asbah, N.; Bergmann, B.; Bekhouche, K.; Caforio, D.; Campbell, M.; Heijne, E.; Leroy, C.; Lipniacka, A.; Nessi, M.; Pospíšil, S.; Seifert, F.; Şolc, J.; Soueid, P.; Suk, M.; Tureček, D.; Vykydal, Z.

    2017-09-01

    A luminosity determination based on thermal neutron counting with six MPX silicon pixel devices installed in the ATLAS cavern is presented. Recently, the ATLAS Collaboration published final √s=8 TeV luminosity results. This made possible to perform a detailed comparison and verify the potential of the thermal neutron counting as a novel method for luminosity measurements to supplement the well-established presently used procedures. This measurement is unique to the MPX network and has the advantage that the neutrons, which pass the MPX devices, cannot result from activation processes of material nearby. Good agreement is found between the MPX neutron counting results and the ATLAS reference luminosity. The differences between the ATLAS and MPX luminosity measurements are described by a Gaussian distribution with width of 1.5%.

  12. Correlated analysis of 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals using photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yaxu; Jie, Wanqi; Rong, Caicai; Wang, Yuhan; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong; Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao; Du, Guanghua; Fu, Xu; Guo, Na; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV protons in CdZnTe crystals has been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques. A notable quenching of PL intensity is observed in the regions irradiated with a fluence of 6 × 1013 p/cm2, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. Moreover, the intensity of emission peak Dcomplex centered at 1.48 eV dominates in the PL spectrum obtained from irradiated regions, ascribed to the increase of interstitial dislocation loops and A centers. The intensity of TSC spectra in irradiated regions decreases compared to the virgin regions, resulting from the charge collection inefficiency caused by proton-induced recombination centers. By comparing the intensity of identified traps obtained from numerical fitting using simultaneous multiple peak analysis (SIMPA) method, it suggests that proton irradiation under such dose can introduce high density of dislocation and A-centers in CdZnTe crystals, consistent with PL results.

  13. A study of the solar wind angular momentum including proton thermal anisotropy. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of Am., 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solution to the steady state magnetohydrodynamic equations governing the supersonic expansion of the solar corona into interplanetary space is obtained for various assumptions regarding the form in which proton thermal energy is carried away from the sun. The one-fluid, inviscid, formulation of the MHD equations is considered assuming that thermal energy is carried away by conduction from a heat source located at the base of the corona. Angular motion of the solar wind led to the existence of three critical points through which the numerical solutions must pass to extend from the sun's surface to large heliocentric distances. The results show that the amount of magnetic field energy converted into kinetic energy in the solar wind is only a small fraction of the total expansion energy flux and has little effect upon the final radial expansion velocity.

  14. Structural and thermal studies of H{sub 2}La{sub 2/3}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}, a protonated layered perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Le Berre, F.; Crosnier-Lopez, M.P.; Fourquet, J.L.

    2006-04-13

    We have synthesised the new protonated layered perovskite H{sub 2}La{sub 2/3}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} which is related to the Ruddlesden-Popper family. This compound is obtained by ionic exchange starting from Li{sub 2}La{sub 2/3}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} maintained in dilute HNO{sub 3} at 60 deg. C. Thermal X-ray diffraction and DTA/TGA revealed interesting dehydration properties with formation of a layered anhydrous phase leading at higher temperature (1550 deg. C) to La{sub 1/3}TaO{sub 3}. This latter compound exhibits the original lanthanum ordering expected similarly to that of the Li form, while at 900 deg. C a metastable form, presenting a disordered La distribution, is observed.

  15. The role of the salt concentration, proton, and phosphate binding on the thermal stability of wild and cloned DNA-binding protein Sso7d from Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Roumiana; Atanasov, Boris

    2004-04-01

    The acidic pH (1.5-7.0) and ionic strength (0.005-0.2M) dependence of thermodynamic functions of protein Sso7d from Sulfolobus solfataricus, cloned (c-Sso7d) and N-heptapeptide deleted [c-des(1-7)Sso7d] in glycine, and phosphate buffers was studied by means of adiabatic scanning calorimetry. The difference of proton binding was estimated from deltaHcal(pH), Td(pH), and (deltaTd/deltapH). It was found that a single group non-co-operative ionization with apparent pKa = 3.25 for both cloned and deleted proteins govern the thermal unfolding of two different (protonated and unprotonated) forms. deltaH degrees is found to be pH-independent and the changes in stability (deltaG degrees ) originate from changes in entropy terms. The apparent pKa measured at high salt concentrations decreases with 0.5 pH units from glycine to phosphate and the free energy of transfer at high ionic strength is 0.7 kcal/mol. The ionic strength dependence for the pH-dependent D-states is very different at pH 6.0 and 1.5. This is consistent with the property of denatured state to be more compacted or "closed" (Dc) at neutral or weak acidic pH and more random or "open" (Do) at acidic pH. From the Bjerrum's relation was found the number of screened charges important for the unfolding process. The main conclusions are: (1) the thermal stability of Sso7d has prominently entropic nature; (2) a single non-co-operative ionization controls the conformations in the D-state; and (3) pH-dependent conformational equilibrium could be functionally important in Sso7d-DNA recognition. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Simulation of Thermal Responses of 125TeO2 Solid Target to Energetic Proton Bombardment from Cyclotron When Fabricating 124I Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peir, Jinn-Jer; Liang, Jenq-Horng; Duh, Ting-Shieh

    With nuclear medicine receiving greater attention due to its unique characteristics in both diagnostics and therapeutics during recent decades, finding a highly controllable fabrication method becomes more urgent. The radioisotope 124I (T1/2=4.18d Eβ+=2.13MeV Iβ+=25%) has gained plentiful interests in the medical usages such as functioning imaging of cell proliferation in brain tumors using [124I]iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), imaging of immunoreactions in tumors using 124I-labelled monoclonal antibodies, the in-vivo imaging of 124I-labelled tyrosine derivatives, and the classical imaging of thyroid diseases with 124I, among others. Furthermore, it is because that thermal response of target during the fabrication process may affect the production of 124I to some extent and needs thorough investigations. Hence, the compact cyclotron located in the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research was employed in this study to generate 20MeV protons to irradiate TeO2 solid targets in which the radioisotopes 124I were produced through the 125Te(p, 2n)124I nuclear reaction. In addition, the widely-used ANSYS computer code was adopted to theoretically analyze thermal responses of TeO2 to irradiation cases with variations in ion beam current and its thermal conductivity. The results indicate that TeO2 temperature is strongly dependent on its thermal conductivity and ion beam current. In particular, TeO2 surface temperature is extremely sensitive to the air-gap size between TeO2 and target holder. Thus the target holder is suggested to be re-designed in order to prevent TeO2 from melting and a high efficiency production of radioisotopes 124I for nuclear medical diagnostics can be successfully achieved.

  17. Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Farzana, E.; Sun, W. Y.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.

    2015-10-21

    The impact of annealing of proton irradiation-induced defects in n-type GaN devices has been systematically investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Moderate temperature annealing (>200–250 °C) causes significant reduction in the concentration of nearly all irradiation-induced traps. While the decreased concentration of previously identified N and Ga vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.13 eV, 0.16 eV, and 2.50 eV generally followed a first-order reaction model with activation energies matching theoretical values for N{sub I} and V{sub Ga} diffusion, irradiation-induced traps at E{sub C} − 0.72 eV, 1.25 eV, and 3.28 eV all decrease in concentration in a gradual manner, suggesting a more complex reduction mechanism. Slight increases in concentration are observed for the N-vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.20 eV and 0.25 eV, which may be due to the reconfiguration of other N-vacancy related defects. Finally, the observed reduction in concentrations of the states at E{sub C} − 1.25 and E{sub C} − 3.28 eV as a function of annealing temperature closely tracks the detailed recovery behavior of the background carrier concentration as a function of annealing temperature. As a result, it is suggested that these two levels are likely to be responsible for the underlying carrier compensation effect that causes the observation of carrier removal in proton-irradiated n-GaN.

  18. MoS2 /WS2 -Graphene Composites through Thermal Decomposition of Tetrathiomolybdate/Tetrathiotungstate for Proton/Oxygen Electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Luxa, Jan; Fawdon, Jack; Sofer, Zdeněk; Mazánek, Vlastimil; Pumera, Martin

    2016-09-19

    MoS2 and WS2 have been prepared on a conductive graphene support by thermal reduction of tetrathiotungstate/tetrathiomolybdate and graphite oxide. Whereas the catalytic properties towards hydrogen evolution are strongly influenced by the Magnéli phases formed as a byproduct during the synthesis, the catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction of these composite materials is not affected by this phenomenon and these materials exhibit high catalytic activity towards this industrially important reaction.

  19. Gamma and proton irradiation effects and thermal stability of electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-silicon capacitors with atomic layer deposited Al2O3 dielectric

    DOE PAGES

    J. M. Rafi; Lynn, D.; Pellegrini, G.; ...

    2015-12-11

    The radiation hardness and thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 layers to be used as passivation films for silicon radiation detectors with slim edges are investigated. To directly measure the interface charge and to evaluate its change with the ionizing dose, metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors implementing differently processed Al2O3 layers were fabricated on p-type silicon substrates. Qualitatively similar results are obtained for degradation of capacitance–voltage and current–voltage characteristics under gamma and proton irradiations up to equivalent doses of 30 Mrad and 21.07 Mrad, respectively. While similar negative charge densities are initially extracted for all non-irradiated capacitors,more » superior radiation hardness is obtained for MOS structures with alumina layers grown with H2O instead of O3 as oxidant precursor. Competing effects between radiation-induced positive charge trapping and hydrogen release from the H2O-grown Al2O3 layers may explain their higher radiation resistance. Finally, irradiated and non-irradiated MOS capacitors with differently processed Al2O3 layers have been subjected to thermal treatments in air at temperatures ranging between 100 °C and 200 °C and the thermal stability of their electrical characteristics has been evaluated. Partial recovery of the gamma-induced degradation has been noticed for O3-grown MOS structures. Lastly, this can be explained by a trapped holes emission process, for which an activation energy of 1.38 ± 0.15 eV has been extracted.« less

  20. Gamma and proton irradiation effects and thermal stability of electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-silicon capacitors with atomic layer deposited Al2O3 dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafí, J. M.; Pellegrini, G.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Christophersen, M.; Phlips, B. F.; Lynn, D.; Kierstead, J.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Gorelov, I.; Palni, P.; Wang, R.; Seidel, S.

    2016-02-01

    The radiation hardness and thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 layers to be used as passivation films for silicon radiation detectors with slim edges are investigated. To directly measure the interface charge and to evaluate its change with the ionizing dose, metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors implementing differently processed Al2O3 layers were fabricated on p-type silicon substrates. Qualitatively similar results are obtained for degradation of capacitance-voltage and current-voltage characteristics under gamma and proton irradiations up to equivalent doses of 30 Mrad and 21.07 Mrad, respectively. While similar negative charge densities are initially extracted for all non-irradiated capacitors, superior radiation hardness is obtained for MOS structures with alumina layers grown with H2O instead of O3 as oxidant precursor. Competing effects between radiation-induced positive charge trapping and hydrogen release from the H2O-grown Al2O3 layers may explain their higher radiation resistance. Finally, irradiated and non-irradiated MOS capacitors with differently processed Al2O3 layers have been subjected to thermal treatments in air at temperatures ranging between 100 °C and 200 °C and the thermal stability of their electrical characteristics has been evaluated. Partial recovery of the gamma-induced degradation has been noticed for O3-grown MOS structures. This can be explained by a trapped holes emission process, for which an activation energy of 1.38 ± 0.15 eV has been extracted.

  1. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ... Proton Therapy Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side ...

  2. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  3. Experimental neutron scattering evidence for proton polaron in hydrated metal oxide proton conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Artur; Chen, Qianli

    2017-06-01

    Hydration of oxygen-deficient metal oxides causes filling of oxygen vacancies and formation of hydroxyl groups with interstitial structural protons, rotating around the oxygen in localized motion. Thermal activation from 500 to 800 K triggers delocalization of the protons by jumping to adjacent oxygen ions, constituting proton conductivity. We report quantitative analyses of proton and lattice dynamics by neutron-scattering data, which reveal the interaction of protons with the crystal lattice and proton-phonon coupling. The motion for the proton trapped in the elastic crystal field yields Eigen frequencies and coupling constants, which satisfy Holstein's polaron model for electrons and thus constitutes first experimental evidence for a proton polaron at high temperature. Proton jump rates follow a polaron model for cerium-oxygen and hydroxyl stretching modes, which are thus vehicles for proton conductivity. This confirms that the polaron mechanism is not restricted to electrons, but a universal charge carrier transport process.

  4. Diagnostics of non-thermal processes in chromospheric flares. II. HOC and Call K line profiles for an atmosphere bombarded by 100 keV-1 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henoux, J. C.; Fang, C.; Gan, W. Q.

    1993-07-01

    The effects on the Hα line profile of non-thermal excitation and ionization of hydrogen by a 100 KeV- 1 MeV proton beam have been investigated. Non-LTE Hα line profiles have been calculated for the temperature distributions of semi- empirical flares models F1 and F2 (Machado et al. 1980). For reasonable values of the beam energy flux and power index, the hydrogen lines are greatly strengthened. However, contrary to the case of an electron bombarded atmosphere, the line is not broadened, and no central reversal appears. These effects, alone or in conjunction with linear polarization measurements or Lyα red wing observations, can be used to diagnose proton beam bombardment.

  5. Effects of thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and I-V characteristics of 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.; Schoenfeld, D. W.; Chiu, T. T.; Loo, R. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed characterization of deep-level defects and analysis of dark I-V data in 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells have been carried out for several proton fluences (5 x 10 to the 11th, 10 to the 12th, and 10 to the 13th P/sq cm), using DLTS, C-V, and I-V measurement techniques. To study the effect of low temperature thermal annealing on the deep-level defect properties, these irradiated samples were annealed in vacuum at 300 C for one hour. Comparison was then made on the measured defect parameters (i.e., defect energy levels and densities) and the dark I-V characteristics for both the annealed and unannealed samples.

  6. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  7. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of the treatment. top of page What equipment is used? Proton beam therapy uses special machines, ... tumor cells. top of page Who operates the equipment? With backgrounds in mechanical, electrical, software, hardware and ...

  8. Stable transport in proton driven fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2009-09-15

    Proton beam transport in the context of proton driven fast ignition is usually assumed to be stable due to proton high inertia, but an analytical analysis of the process is still lacking. The stability of a charge and current neutralized proton beam passing through a plasma is therefore conducted here, for typical proton driven fast ignition parameters. In the cold regime, two fast growing modes are found, with an inverse growth rate much smaller than the beam time of flight to the target core. The stability issue is thus not so obvious, and kinetic effects are investigated. One unstable mode is found stabilized by the background plasma proton and electron temperatures. The second mode is also damped, providing the proton beam thermal spread is larger than {approx}10 keV. In fusion conditions, the beam propagation should therefore be stable.

  9. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Breast Esophagus Rectum Skull base sarcomas Pediatric brain tumors Head and neck - see the Head and Neck Cancer page Eye ... Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer ... related to Proton Therapy Videos related ...

  10. Proton geriatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kephart, Thomas W.; Nakagawa, Norio

    1984-07-01

    An SO(10) model with particle spectrum and low energy gauge group identical to that of minimal SU (5) below MX but with a nonstandard charge assignment is shown to agree with the experimental best value of sin2θw(Mw) and the lower bound on the proton lifetime.

  11. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Proton Relays in Electrochemical Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Benjamin; Fernandez, Laura; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-01

    The coupling of long-range electron transfer to proton transport over multiple sites plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. Recently a molecule with a hydrogen-bond relay inserted between the proton donor and acceptor sites in a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) system was studied electrochemically. The standard rate constants and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured experimentally for this system and a related single proton transfer system. In the present paper, these systems are studied theoretically using vibronically nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for electrochemical PCET. Application of this approach to proton relays requires the calculation of multidimensional proton vibrational wavefunctions and incorporation of multiple proton donor-acceptor motions. The calculated KIEs and relative standard rate constants for the single and double proton transfer systems are in agreement with the experimental data. The calculations indicate that the standard rate constant is lower for the double proton transfer system because of the smaller overlap integral between the ground state reduced and oxidized proton vibrational wavefunctions for this system, resulting in greater contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states with higher free energy barriers. The decrease in proton donor-acceptor distances due to thermal fluctuations and the contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states play important roles in proton relay systems. The theory suggests that the PCET rate constant may be increased by decreasing the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distances or modifying the thermal motions of the molecule to facilitate the concurrent decrease of these distances. The submission of this journal article in ERIA is a requirement of the EFRC subcontract with Pennsylvania State University collaborators to get publications to OSTI.

  13. Proton maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensley, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    New calculations are reported which confirm the ability of an a priori random, initial-phase proton beam to drive a simple, single-stage microwave cavity maser or transit-time oscillator (TTO) to saturation conversion efficiencies of about 11 percent. The required initial TE(011) mode field can be provided from beam ramp-up bandwidth of excitation to a low level from an external source. A saturation field of 45 tesla and output power of 0.2 TW are calculated using an electron insulation field of 10 tesla and a 3 MeV, 400 Ka/sq cm beam. Results are compared to those for an electron beam of the same energy and geometry, and it is shown that proton beams potentially can provide a three order of magnitude increase in overall microwave power production density over that obtainable from electron beam TTOs.

  14. Large crystal growth by thermal control allows combined X-ray and neutron crystallographic studies to elucidate the protonation states in Aspergillus flavus urate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Oksanen, E.; Blakeley, M. P.; Bonneté, F.; Dauvergne, M. T.; Dauvergne, F.; Budayova-Spano, M.

    2009-01-01

    Urate oxidase (Uox) catalyses the oxidation of urate to allantoin and is used to reduce toxic urate accumulation during chemotherapy. X-ray structures of Uox with various inhibitors have been determined and yet the detailed catalytic mechanism remains unclear. Neutron crystallography can provide complementary information to that from X-ray studies and allows direct determination of the protonation states of the active-site residues and substrate analogues, provided that large, well-ordered deuterated crystals can be grown. Here, we describe a method and apparatus used to grow large crystals of Uox (Aspergillus flavus) with its substrate analogues 8-azaxanthine and 9-methyl urate, and with the natural substrate urate, in the presence and absence of cyanide. High-resolution X-ray (1.05–1.20 Å) and neutron diffraction data (1.9–2.5 Å) have been collected for the Uox complexes at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and the Institut Laue-Langevin, respectively. In addition, room temperature X-ray data were also collected in preparation for joint X-ray and neutron refinement. Preliminary results indicate no major structural differences between crystals grown in H2O and D2O even though the crystallization process is affected. Moreover, initial nuclear scattering density maps reveal the proton positions clearly, eventually providing important information towards unravelling the mechanism of catalysis. PMID:19586953

  15. Dissociative recombination of protonated dimer ions H+·(HCOH)2 and H+·(CH3COH)2 with electrons at near thermal energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosík, J.; Plasil, R.; Zakouril, P.; Poterya, V.

    2001-07-01

    Formation of the protonated formaldehyde and acetaldehyde dimer ions, H+·(HCOH)2 and H+·(CH3COH)2, respectively, and their subsequent dissociative recombination with electrons was studied in a high-pressure flowing afterglow (HPFA) using the axially movable Langmuir probe. The obtained recombination rate coefficients are (3.3±1)×10-6 cm3 s-1 for H+·(HCOH)2 and (1.4±0.5)×10-6 cm3 s-1 for H+·(CH3COH)2, at 450 and 500 K, respectively. The evolution of the electron energy distribution function and the electron temperature in the recombination-dominated flowing afterglow plasma were also measured.

  16. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  17. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  18. Gamma and proton irradiation effects and thermal stability of electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-silicon capacitors with atomic layer deposited Al2O3 dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Rafi; Lynn, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Christophersen, M.; Philips, B. F.; Kierstead, J.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Gorelov, I.; Palni, P.; Wang, R.; Seidel, S.

    2015-12-11

    The radiation hardness and thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 layers to be used as passivation films for silicon radiation detectors with slim edges are investigated. To directly measure the interface charge and to evaluate its change with the ionizing dose, metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors implementing differently processed Al2O3 layers were fabricated on p-type silicon substrates. Qualitatively similar results are obtained for degradation of capacitance–voltage and current–voltage characteristics under gamma and proton irradiations up to equivalent doses of 30 Mrad and 21.07 Mrad, respectively. While similar negative charge densities are initially extracted for all non-irradiated capacitors, superior radiation hardness is obtained for MOS structures with alumina layers grown with H2O instead of O3 as oxidant precursor. Competing effects between radiation-induced positive charge trapping and hydrogen release from the H2O-grown Al2O3 layers may explain their higher radiation resistance. Finally, irradiated and non-irradiated MOS capacitors with differently processed Al2O3 layers have been subjected to thermal treatments in air at temperatures ranging between 100 °C and 200 °C and the thermal stability of their electrical characteristics has been evaluated. Partial recovery of the gamma-induced degradation has been noticed for O3-grown MOS structures. Lastly, this can be explained by a trapped holes emission process, for which an activation energy of 1.38 ± 0.15 eV has been extracted.

  19. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  20. Proton decay theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

  1. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  2. Analysis of the Thermal Degradation of the Individual Anthocyanin Compounds of Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.): A New Approach Using High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulou, Ioanna; Thaeron, Delphine; Baker, Ashley; Jones, Anita; Robertson, Neil

    2015-08-12

    The black carrot dye is a mixture of cyanidin molecules, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of which shows a highly overlapped aromatic region. In this study, the (1)H NMR (800 MHz) aromatic chemical shifts of the mixture were fully assigned by overlaying them with the characterized (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the separated compounds. The latter were isolated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and their chemical shifts were identified using (1)H and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy (COSY) NMR spectroscopy. The stability of the black carrot mixture to heat exposure was investigated at pH 3.6, 6.8, and 8.0 by heat-treating aqueous solutions at 100 °C and the powdered material at 180 °C. From integration of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra, it was possible to follow the relative degradation of each compound, offering advantages over the commonly used ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) and HPLC approaches. UV/vis spectroscopy and CIE color measurements were used to determine thermally induced color changes, under normal cooking conditions.

  3. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  4. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  5. Proton-Conducting Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Jamie; Simmons, Jason; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-03-01

    Vehicles powered by polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are an exciting alternative to current fossil fuel technology. The membranes in these cells serve as both charge transporter, ferrying protons from the anode to the cathode, and gas diffusion barrier, preventing the backflow of oxygen to the anode. Currently, hydrated sulfonated polymers are the preferred material for these membranes. The presence of water, however, limits the operating temperature to 100 C, reducing the electrode kinetics and CO tolerance of the entire system. In an effort to increase the efficiency and operating temperature of these fuel cells, we are investigating the proton conductivity of new host/guest materials based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) loaded with imidazole. These thermally stable frameworks provide well-defined pores that accommodate imidazole networks and form proton-conducting pathways. Here, we will present the structure and proton dynamics of these materials as elucidated by elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements.

  6. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  7. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  8. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  9. Channeling of protons through BN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study the angular and spatial distributions of protons channeled through boron-nitride (BN) nanotubes. The BN nanotubes have very similar structures like carbon nanotubes, but they are more thermally and chemically stable, and they also present good candidates for future channeling experiments. We present the angular and spatial distributions of MeV energy protons through the straight short (10, 10) single-wall BN nanotubes (SWBNNs). They were generated by a computer simulation method Borka et al. (2011, 2012a,b). Also, the effect of focusing of channeled protons is observed. A possible application of the obtained results for characterization of BN nanotubes is discussed. Analysis of angular and spatial distributions could be used to provide detailed information on the projectile-target interaction potentials inside BN nanotubes. We also varied the proton incident angle and energy and demonstrate that we can get a significant rearrangement of the propagating protons within the BN nanotube. This investigation may be used for proton beam guiding, to locate atomic impurities in nanotubes as well as for creating nanosized proton beams to be used in materials science, biology and medicine.

  10. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  11. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  12. Interstellar protonated molecular species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Arunan, Elangannan

    2017-08-01

    Majority of the known interstellar cations are protonated species believed to be the natural precursors for their corresponding neutral analogues formed via the dissociative recombination process. The protonation of a neutral species can occur in more than one position on the molecular structure thus resulting in more than one proton binding energy value and different protonated species for the same neutral species. In the present work, ab initio quantum calculations are employed to calculate accurate proton binding energies for over 100 neutral interstellar molecules of which majority of the neutral molecules are protonated in more than one position. From the results, protonated species resulting from a high proton binding energy prefers to remain protonated rather than transferring a proton and returning to its neutral form as compared to its analogue that gives rise to a lower proton binding energy (PBE) from the same neutral species. For two protonated species resulting from the same neutral molecule, the one that results in a higher PBE is more stable as compared to its counterpart that is responsible for the lower PBE for the same neutral species. Here, the most stable species are highlighted for all the systems considered.

  13. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  14. Energy Production Demonstrator for Megawatt Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, Vitaly S.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Novitski, Igor; Tyutyunnikov, Sergey I.

    2014-07-16

    A preliminary study of the Energy Production Demonstrator (EPD) concept - a solid heavy metal target irradiated by GeV-range intense proton beams and producing more energy than consuming - is carried out. Neutron production, fission, energy deposition, energy gain, testing volume and helium production are simulated with the MARS15 code for tungsten, thorium, and natural uranium targets in the proton energy range 0.5 to 120 GeV. This study shows that the proton energy range of 2 to 4 GeV is optimal for both a natU EPD and the tungsten-based testing station that would be the most suitable for proton accelerator facilities. Conservative estimates, not including breeding and fission of plutonium, based on the simulations suggest that the proton beam current of 1 mA will be sufficient to produce 1 GW of thermal output power with the natU EPD while supplying < 8% of that power to operate the accelerator. The thermal analysis shows that the concept considered has a problem due to a possible core meltdown; however, a number of approaches (a beam rastering, in first place) are suggested to mitigate the issue. The efficiency of the considered EPD as a Materials Test Station (MTS) is also evaluated in this study.

  15. Proton Remains Puzzling

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haiyan; Liu, Tianbo; Peng, Chao; Ye, Zhihong; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    Nucleons are building blocks of visible matter, and are responsible for more than 99% of the visible mass in the universe despite the fact that the discovery of the Higgs boson is almost irrelevant to the origin of the proton mass. While major progress has been made in the last two decades in understanding the proton spin puzzle discovered in the late 1980s by the European Muon Collaboration, a new proton puzzle emerged in the last several years concerning the proton charge radius, which is the charge weighted size of the proton. In this paper we will review the latest situation concerning the proton charge radius, mass and spin, and discuss upcoming new experiments addressing these puzzles, as well as implications for new physics.

  16. Proton Conductivity of Proton Exchange Membrane Synergistically Promoted by Different Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Rao, Zhuang; Tang, Beibei; Wu, Peiyi

    2017-07-12

    In this study, two functionalized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), UiO-66-SO3H and UiO-66-NH2, were synthesized. Then, different composite proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared by single doping and codoping of these two MOFs, respectively. It was found that codoping of these two MOFs with suitable sizes was more conducive to the proton conductivity enhancement of the composite PEM. A synergistic effect between these two MOFs led to the the formation of more consecutive hydration channels in the composite PEM. It further greatly promoted the proton conductivity of the composite PEM. The proton conductivity of the codoped PEM reached up to 0.256 S/cm under 90 °C, 95% RH, which was ∼1.17 times higher than that of the recast Nafion (0.118 S/cm). Besides, the methanol permeability of the codoped PEM was prominently decreased owing to the methanol trapping effect of the pores of these two MOFs. Meanwhile, the high water and thermal stabilities of these two MOFs were beneficial to the high proton conductivity stability of the codoped PEM under high humidity and high temperature. The proton conductivity of the codoped PEM was almost unchanged throughout 3000 min of testing under 90 °C, 95% RH. This work provides a valuable reference for designing different functionalized MOFs to synergistically promote the proton conductivities of PEMs.

  17. Neutrino mixing in accelerated proton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Dharam Vir; Labun, Lance; Torrieri, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the inverse β-decay of accelerated protons in the context of neutrino flavor superpositions (mixings) in mass eigenstates. The process p→ n ℓ+ ν_{ℓ} is kinematically allowed because the accelerating field provides the rest energy difference between initial and final states. The rate of p→ n conversions can be evaluated in either the laboratory frame (where the proton is accelerating) or the co-moving frame (where the proton is at rest and interacts with an effective thermal bath of ℓ and ν_{ℓ} due to the Unruh effect). By explicit calculation, we show that the rates in the two frames disagree when taking into account neutrino mixings, because the weak interaction couples to charge eigenstates whereas gravity couples to neutrino mass eigenstates (D.V. Ahluwalia et al., arXiv:1505.04082 [hep-ph]). The contradiction could be resolved experimentally, potentially yielding new information on the origins of neutrino masses.

  18. The Schwarzschild Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Haramein, Nassim

    2010-11-24

    We review our model of a proton that obeys the Schwarzschild condition. We find that only a very small percentage ({approx}10{sup -39}%) of the vacuum fluctuations available within a proton volume need be cohered and converted to mass-energy in order for the proton to meet the Schwarzschild condition. This proportion is equivalent to that between gravitation and the strong force where gravitation is thought to be {approx}10{sup -38} to 10{sup -40} weaker than the strong force. Gravitational attraction between two contiguous Schwarzschild protons can accommodate both nucleon and quark confinement. We calculate that two contiguous Schwarzschild protons would rotate at c and have a period of 10{sup -23} s and a frequency of 10{sup 22} Hz which is characteristic of the strong force interaction time and a close approximation of the gamma emission typically associated with nuclear decay. We include a scaling law and find that the Schwarzschild proton data point lies near the least squares trend line for organized matter. Using a semi-classical model, we find that a proton charge orbiting at a proton radius at c generates a good approximation to the measured anomalous magnetic moment.

  19. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando–IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd–CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics.

  20. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  1. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando–IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd–CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics. PMID:27905505

  2. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  3. Proton therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Furukawa, S.; Kawachi, K.; Kanai, T.; Ohara, H.; Kitagawa, T.; Inada, T.

    1985-01-01

    There are two facilities for clinical trials with protons in Japan: the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, and the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center (PARMS), University of Tsukuba. At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, patient treatment with the 70 MeV proton beam began in November 1979, and 29 patients were treated through December 1984. Of 11 patients who received protons only, 9 have had local control of the tumor. Two of the 9 patients, suffering from recurrent tumor after radical photon beam irradiation, developed complications after proton treatment. In the patients treated with photons or neutrons followed by proton boost, tumors were controlled in 12 of 18 patients (66.6%), and no complications were observed in this series. Malignant melanoma could not be controlled with the proton beam. A spot-beam-scanning system for protons has been effectively used in the clinical trials to minimize the dose to the normal tissues and to concentrate the dose in the target volume. At the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center, University of Tsukuba, treatment with a vertical 250 MeV proton beam was begun in April 1983, and 22 patients were treated through February 1984. Local control of the tumor was observed in 14 of 22 patients (63.6%), whereas there was no local control in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. There have been no severe complications in patients treated at PARMS. The results suggest that local control of tumors will be better with proton beams than with photon beams, whereas additional modalities are required to manage radioresistant tumors.

  4. Hydrogen analysis for granite using proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, T; Sasa, K; Ohshima, H; Kimura, H; Tajima, Y; Takahashi, T; Ishii, S; Yamato, Y; Kurosawa, M

    2008-07-01

    In an effort to develop DS02, a new radiation dosimetry system for the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, measurements of neutron-induced activities have provided valuable information to reconstruct the radiation situation at the time of the bombings. In Hiroshima, the depth profile of (152)Eu activity measured in a granite pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge (128 m from the hypocenter) was compared with that calculated using the DS02 methodology. For calculation of the (152)Eu production due to the thermal-neutron activation reaction, (151)Eu(n,gamma)(152)Eu, information on the hydrogen content in granite is important because the transport and slowing-down process of neutrons penetrating into the pillar is strongly affected by collisions with the protons of hydrogen. In this study, proton-proton elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry has been used to deduce the proton density in the Motoyasu pillar granite. Slices of granite samples were irradiated by a 20 MeV proton beam, and the energies of scattered and recoil protons were measured with a coincidence method. The water concentration in the pillar granite was evaluated to be 0.30 +/- 0.07%wt. This result is consistent with earlier data on adsorptive water (II) and bound water obtained by the Karl Fisher method.

  5. The Proton launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, A.; Parfitt, J.

    1985-08-01

    The capabilities, design features and missions for the Soviet Proton booster are described. The Proton, outfitted with six strap-on boosters, launched the Vega 1 and 2 Venus/Halley dual mission spacecraft. RD-253 engines burn N2O4 and UDMH fuels, possibly through a preburner before the combustion chamber. A vacuum thrust of 450,000 lb is projected for the engine. Analyses are presented to set the launch weight at 1,600,000 lb, implying that the vehicle is based on an ICBM design. It is suggested that the Proton has sufficiently high noise and vibration levels to prohibit it from being man-rated.

  6. Are protons nonidentical fermions?

    SciTech Connect

    Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We briefly review the progress of our investigation on the electric (charge) radius of the proton. In order to explain the recently measured proton radius, which is significantly smaller than the standard CODATA value, we assume that the real protons radii are not identical, they are randomly distributed in a certain range. To obtain the measured radius we average the radii and fit both the mean radius and the range. By using an averaged dipole form factor we obtain the charge radius r{sub E} = 0.8333 fm, in accordance with the recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen.

  7. Stochastic resonance in a proton pumping Complex I of mitochondria membranes.

    PubMed

    Kaur, D; Filonenko, I; Mourokh, L; Fendler, C; Blick, R H

    2017-09-29

    We make use of the physical mechanism of proton pumping in the so-called Complex I within mitochondria membranes. Our model is based on sequential charge transfer assisted by conformational changes which facilitate the indirect electron-proton coupling. The equations of motion for the proton operators are derived and solved numerically in combination with the phenomenological Langevin equation describing the periodic conformational changes. We show that with an appropriate set of parameters, protons can be transferred against an applied voltage. In addition, we demonstrate that only the joint action of the periodic energy modulation and thermal noise leads to efficient uphill proton transfer, being a manifestation of stochastic resonance.

  8. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  9. THEORY OF PROTON EMITTERS

    SciTech Connect

    P. TALOU

    2000-08-01

    Modern theoretical methods used to interpret recent experimental data on ground-state proton emission near the proton drip line are reviewed. Most of them are stationary and are aimed to compute proton decay widths {Gamma}{sub p} only. Comparison is made between these approaches before being compared to experimental data. Our time-dependent approach based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for initial quasi-stationary single-proton states is then introduced. It is shown that much deeper insights into the physics of this clean multidimensional quantum tunneling effect can be accessed, and that in addition to {Gamma}{sub p}, other physical quantities could be tested experimentally, offering new stringent tests on nuclear physics models away from the valley of {beta}-stability. Finally, the necessity of using the TDSE approach in more complex, dynamical, problems is demonstrated.

  10. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  11. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  12. Lorentz contracted proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya Fierro, D.; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2015-09-01

    The proton charge and magnetization density distributions can be related to the well known Sachs electromagnetic form factors G E, M ( q 2) through Fourier transforms, only in the Breit frame. The Breit frame however moves with relativistic velocities in the Lab and a Lorentz boost must be applied before extracting the static properties of the proton from the corresponding densities. Apart from this, the Fourier transform relating the densities and form factors is inherently a non-relativistic expression. We show that the relativistic corrections to it can be obtained by extending the standard Breit equation to higher orders in its 1 /c 2 expansion. We find that the inclusion of the above corrections reduces the size of the proton as determined from electron proton scattering data by about 4%.

  13. Uncertainty estimates for proton-proton fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bijaya

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the proton-proton fusion cross section using chiral effective field theory (χEFT) and perform a rigorous analysis of the associated uncertainties. The statistical errors in the low-energy constants, which are fitted too scattering and bound-state observables in the pion-nucleon, nucleon-nucleon, and few-nucleon sectors, are propagated to the calculated cross section. We also investigate the sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the high-momentum cutoff of the χEFT. We extract a value for the zero-energy S-factor using a polynomial extrapolant and analyze the errors associated with this procedure. Our result is compared to that of another χEFT calculation in which the wave functions were represented in a truncated Hilbert space with discrete basis states. Supported by the NSF under Grant Nos. PHY-1516077 and PHY- 1555030.

  14. Proton irradiation on materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Ken

    1993-01-01

    A computer code is developed by utilizing a radiation transport code developed at NASA Langley Research Center to study the proton radiation effects on materials which have potential application in NASA's future space missions. The code covers the proton energy from 0.01 Mev to 100 Gev and is sufficient for energetic protons encountered in both low earth and geosynchronous orbits. With some modification, the code can be extended for particles heavier than proton as the radiation source. The code is capable of calculating the range, stopping power, exit energy, energy deposition coefficients, dose, and cumulative dose along the path of the proton in a target material. The target material can be any combination of the elements with atomic number ranging from 1 to 92, or any compound with known chemical composition. The generated cross section for a material is stored and is reused in future to save computer time. This information can be utilized to calculate the proton dose a material would receive in an orbit when the radiation environment is known. It can also be used to determine, in the laboratory, the parameters such as beam current of proton and irradiation time to attain the desired dosage for accelerated ground testing of any material. It is hoped that the present work be extended to include polymeric and composite materials which are prime candidates for use as coating, electronic components, and structure building. It is also desirable to determine, for ground testing these materials, the laboratory parameters in order to simulate the dose they would receive in space environments. A sample print-out for water subject to 1.5 Mev proton is included as a reference.

  15. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Proton irradiation on materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. Ken

    1993-12-01

    A computer code is developed by utilizing a radiation transport code developed at NASA Langley Research Center to study the proton radiation effects on materials which have potential application in NASA's future space missions. The code covers the proton energy from 0.01 Mev to 100 Gev and is sufficient for energetic protons encountered in both low earth and geosynchronous orbits. With some modification, the code can be extended for particles heavier than proton as the radiation source. The code is capable of calculating the range, stopping power, exit energy, energy deposition coefficients, dose, and cumulative dose along the path of the proton in a target material. The target material can be any combination of the elements with atomic number ranging from 1 to 92, or any compound with known chemical composition. The generated cross section for a material is stored and is reused in future to save computer time. This information can be utilized to calculate the proton dose a material would receive in an orbit when the radiation environment is known. It can also be used to determine, in the laboratory, the parameters such as beam current of proton and irradiation time to attain the desired dosage for accelerated ground testing of any material. It is hoped that the present work be extended to include polymeric and composite materials which are prime candidates for use as coating, electronic components, and structure building. It is also desirable to determine, for ground testing these materials, the laboratory parameters in order to simulate the dose they would receive in space environments. A sample print-out for water subject to 1.5 Mev proton is included as a reference.

  17. Proton transport by halorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Varo, G.; Brown, L.S.; Needleman, R.

    1996-05-28

    In halorhodopsin from Natronobacterium pharaonis, a light-driven chloride pump, the chloride binding site also binds azide. When azide is bound at this location the retinal Schiff base transiently deprotonates after photoexcitation with light >530 nm, like in the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. As in the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin, pyranine detects the release of protons to the bulk. The subsequent reprotonation of the Schiff base is also dependent on azide, but with different kinetics that suggest a shuttling of protons from the surface as described earlier for halorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarium. The azide-dependent, bacteriorhodopsin-like photocycle results in active electrogenic proton transport in the cytoplasmic to extracellular direction, detected in cell envelope vesicle suspensions both with a potential-sensitive electrode and by measuring light-dependent pH change. We conclude that in halorhodopsin an azide bound to the extracellular side of the Schiff base, and another azide shuttling between the Schiff base and the cytoplasmic surface, fulfill the functions of Asp-85 and Asp-96, respectively, in bacteriorhodopsin. Thus, although halorhodopsin is normally a chloride ion pump, it evidently contains all structural requirements, except an internal proton acceptor and a donor, of a proton pump. This observation complements our earlier finding that when a chloride binding site was created in bacteriorhodopsin through replacement of Asp-85 with a threonine, that protein became a chloride ion pump. 52 refs., 9 figs.

  18. PROTON MICROSCOPY AT FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, F. E.; Mariam, F. G.; Golubev, A. A.; Turtikov, V. I.; Varentsov, D.

    2009-12-28

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and a facility has been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international effort has investigated a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR(PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. It is also proposed to install the PRIOR system at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung before installation at FAIR for dynamic experiments with different drivers including high explosives, pulsed power and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  19. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Camino, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This study focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  20. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium - A macroscopic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Camino, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  1. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; ...

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting itsmore » lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This study focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.« less

  2. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Camino, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This study focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  3. WE-EF-303-09: Proton-Acoustic Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M; Xing, L; Xiang, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We investigated proton-acoustic signals detection for range verification with current ultrasound instruments in typical clinical scenarios. Using simulations that included a realistic noise model, we determined the theoretical minimum dose required to generate detectable proton-acoustic signals. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distributions and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. The acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were modeled by the general 3D pressure wave equation and convolved with Gaussian kernels to simulate various proton pulse widths (0.1 – 10 ms). A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth band-pass filter, and ii) randomly generated noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons and dose required per pulse. The maximum spatial resolution was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer center frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons were on the order of 0.6–6 million per pulse, leading to 3–110 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak, depending on the spot size. The acoustic signal consisted of lower frequencies for wider pulses, leading to lower noise levels, but also worse spatial resolution. The resolution was 1-mm for a 0.1-µs pulse width, but increased to 5-mm for a 10-µs pulse width. Conclusion: We have established minimum dose detection limits for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a large detector with no losses and only detector thermal noise. Feasible proton-acoustic range detection will require at least 10{sup 7} protons per pulse and pulse widths ≤ 1-µs.

  4. Thermal evolution of the crystal structure of proton conducting BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-δ from high-resolution neutron diffraction in dry and humid atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Eriksson Andersson, Annika K; Selbach, Sverre M; Grande, Tor; Knee, Christopher S

    2015-06-21

    The crystal structure of the proton conducting perovskite BaCe(0.8)Y(0.2)O(3-δ) (BCY20) has been studied via high-resolution in situ neutron diffraction performed in controlled dry and humid (heavy water) oxygen flow. Two phase transitions, cubic Pm3[combining macron]m→R3[combining macron]c (775 °C)→Imma (250 °C) were observed on cooling from 1000 °C in dry O(2). A significant shift of the phase stability fields was observed on cooling in wet oxygen (pD(2)O ≈ 0.2 atm) with the R3[combining macron]c structure stabilised at 900 °C, and the R3[combining macron]c→Imma transition occurring at 675 °C. On cooling below 400 °C a monoclinic, I2/m, phase started to appear. The structural dependence on hydration level is primarily due to the de-stabilisation of the correlated, octahedra tilts as a consequence of structural relaxation around the oxygen vacancies present in the non-hydrated phase. The tendency of hydrated BaCe(0.8)Y(0.2)O(3-δ) to show octahedral tilting is also found to be enhanced, indicating that the deuteronic (protonic) defects influence the crystal structure, possibly via hydrogen bonding. Stabilisation of the monoclinic I2/m phase is attributed to the structural effect of deuterons that is inferred to increase on cooling as deuterons localise to a greater extent. Changing from wet oxidising (O(2) + D2O(g)) to wet reducing (5% H2 in Ar + D2O(g)) atmosphere did not influence the structure or the phase stability, indicating that Ce(4+) was not reduced under the present conditions. Based on the observed cell volume expansion protonic defects are present in the material at 900 °C at a D(2)O partial pressure of ∼0.2 atm. The origin of the chemical expansion is explained by the effective size of the oxygen vacancy being significantly smaller than the [OD] defect. Rietveld analysis has been used to locate possible sites for the deuterons in the high temperature, R3[combining macron]c and Imma, phases that are most relevant for proton transport.

  5. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  6. Proton dynamics in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology. PMID:20550689

  7. Proton charge extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, Jesse R.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how corrections to S -state energy levels En S in hydrogenic atoms due to the finite proton size are affected by moments of the proton charge distribution. The corrections to En S are computed moment by moment. The results demonstrate that the next-to-leading order term in the expansion is of order rp/aB times the size of the leading order term. Our analysis thus dispels any concern that the larger relative size of this term for muonic hydrogen versus electronic hydrogen might account for the current discrepancy of proton radius measurements extracted from the two systems. Furthermore, the next-to-leading order term in powers of rp/aB that we derive from a dipole proton form factor is proportional to , rather than , as would be expected from the scalar nature of the form factor. The dependence of the finite-size correction on and higher odd-power moments is shown to be a general result for any spherically symmetric proton charge distribution. A method for computing the moment expansion of the finite-size correction to arbitrary order is introduced and the results are tabulated for principal quantum numbers up to n =7 .

  8. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  9. A high temperature study on thermodynamic, thermal expansion and electrical properties of BaCe0.4Zr0.4Y0.2O3-δ proton conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basbus, J. F.; Arce, M. D.; Prado, F. D.; Caneiro, A.; Mogni, L. V.

    2016-10-01

    BaCe0.4Zr0.4Y0.2O3-δ (BCZY) was synthesized by solid state reaction, calcined and sintered at 1600 °C for 12 h. Crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Morphology and porosity were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crystalline structure, oxygen non-stoichiometry, linear expansion and electrical conductivity were characterized under oxidizing and reducing atmosphere by high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD), thermogravimetry (TG), dilatometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. Chemical stability under CO2-rich atmosphere was evaluated by TG. BCZY electrical conductivity was studied by EIS under O2-containing atmosphere with water vapor (2% H2O) and heavy water vapor (2% D2O) in order to evaluate protonic conductivity. Throughout these techniques, interstitial proton incorporation/loss was observed under oxidizing and reducing atmosphere, between 300 and 500 °C. The conductivity presents two contributions. The bulk conductivity at high frequencies takes the same value regardless wet oxidizing or reducing atmosphere, decreasing its value in presence of D2O vapor supporting H-conductivity. On the other hand, the grain boundary conductivity was strongly dependent on the nature of wet atmosphere.

  10. The physics of proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-21

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  11. The physics of proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy. PMID:25803097

  12. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  13. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE SOLAR WIND INCLUDING PICKUP PROTONS AND TURBULENCE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-07-20

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons. We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 Degree-Sign -90 Degree-Sign and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  14. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  15. Irradiation response of mobile protons in buried SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Vanheusden, K.; Karna, S.P.; Pugh, R.D.

    1997-03-01

    Trapping of mobile protons is observed in various SOI materials, but only upon irradiating under a positive top Si bias. Thermal detrapping shows that the proton traps are shallow and located near the substrate Si/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  16. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references.

  17. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  18. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  19. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  20. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    PubMed Central

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  1. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  2. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  3. Three new defined proton affinities for polybasic molecules in the gas-phase: Proton microaffinity, proton macroaffinity and proton overallaffinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Bayat, Mehdi

    2006-08-01

    A theoretical study on complete protonation of a series of tetrabasic molecules with general formula N[(CH 2) nNH 2][(CH 2) mNH 2][(CH 2) pNH 2] (tren, pee, ppe, tpt, epb and ppb) is reported. For first time, three kinds of gas-phase proton affinities for each polybasic molecule are defined as: 'proton microaffinity (PA n, i)', 'proton macroaffinity (PA)' and 'proton overall affinity ( PA)'. The variations of calculated logPA in the series of these molecules is very similar to that of their measured log Kn. There is also a good correlation between the calculated gas-phase proton macroaffinities and proton overallaffinities with corresponding equilibrium macroconstants and overall protonation constants in solution.

  4. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  5. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  6. The biophysical and molecular basis of TRPV1 proton gating

    PubMed Central

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Cao, Lishuang; Papakosta, Marianthi; Stevens, Edward B; Phillips, Stephen; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential family of non-selective cation channels is a polymodal nociceptor. Noxious thermal stimuli, protons, and the alkaloid irritant capsaicin open the channel. The mechanisms of heat and capsaicin activation have been linked to voltage-dependent gating in TRPV1. However, until now it was unclear whether proton activation or potentiation or both are linked to a similar voltage-dependent mechanism and which molecular determinants underlie the proton gating. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we show that protons activate and potentiate TRPV1 by shifting the voltage dependence of the activation curves towards more physiological membrane potentials. We further identified a key residue within the pore region of TRPV1, F660, to be critical for voltage-dependent proton activation and potentiation. We conclude that proton activation and potentiation of TRPV1 are both voltage dependent and that amino acid 660 is essential for proton-mediated gating of TRPV1. PMID:21285946

  7. Remarks on the heating of solar-wind protons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J.-K.; D'Angelo, N.

    1972-01-01

    The heating of solar-wind protons cannot be explained by the thermalization of those protons arising from the ionization of neutral hydrogen atoms traveling in the general direction of the sun. By requiring the heating to satisfy the experimental results of the T sub p versus V sub sw correlation, an efficiency function of thermalization of these incoming protons is obtained, and a value of the 'hot component' of the hydrogen population is about 0.05 per cu cm near 1 AU. This hot component hydrogen density is too high compared to recent estimates by satellite experiments of Lyman alpha radiation and other experiments, and therefore the suggested solar-wind heating mechanism is unimportant in explaining the T sub p versus V sub sw correlation.

  8. Proton bunch compression strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The paper discusses main limitations on the beam power and other machine parameters for a 4 MW proton driver for muon collider. The strongest limitation comes from a longitudinal microwave instability limiting the beam power to about 1 MW for an 8 GeV compressor ring.

  9. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  10. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  11. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  12. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

    2010-01-01

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  13. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  14. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-09-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues.

  15. The HERA Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Shiraz

    2014-04-01

    The almost 1 fb-1 of ep data collected by the H1 and ZEUS collider experiments at HERA allows for a precise determination of the proton's parton distribution functions (PDFs). Measurements used to constrain the PDFs—inclusive and jet cross sections, charm contribution to the F2 proton structure function, F_2cbar c — are presented herein. The measurement process itself includes cataloguing the sensitivity of the cross sections to the various sources of correlated systematic uncertainties. In the jet measurement, correlations of a statistical nature are also quantified and catalogued. These correlations provide a basis to combine measurements of the same physical observable across different time periods, experiments and measurement methodology. The subsequent PDF fitting procedure also takes into account such correlations. The resulting HERAPDF1.5 set based on inclusive data as well as PDF sets derived from inclusive plus charm data are presented togeteher with their predictions for pp cross sections at the LHC.

  16. Measurement of the Proton + Proton Going to Proton + Proton + Neutral Pion Cross-Section Near Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. Alan

    1991-02-01

    The first nuclear physics experiment at the IUCF Cooler is a measurement of the p+ptop+p+ pi^0 cross section near threshold. The Cooler, together with a thin internal H_2 gas jet target, allows for a precise cross section measurement by providing well-defined interaction energies and by eliminating background from p-nucleus pion production which has a much lower threshold. A cylindrically symmetric detector system has been installed in one of the straight sections of the ring and is used to detect the coincident protons in the exit channel with good energy and angular resolution. The mass of the unobserved is then deduced. Elastically scattered protons were detected at the same time and by the same detector as pion production events. Elastic scattering was used for normalization to obtain an absolute p+p top+p+pi^0 cross section.

  17. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  18. Proton precession magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stager, R.

    1986-03-01

    The downhole proton precession magnetometer (DPPM) is designed to make total intensity magnetic field measurements in small bore exploratory wells. This manual describes the measurement procedure and discusses maintenance issues. The step-by-step description of the measurement procedure is suitable for use by an operator of the system, while the section on maintenance procedures and theory of operation is intended for use by someone with some experience in electronics. 7 figs.

  19. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  20. Proton computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  1. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    ScienceCinema

    Marc-André Pleier

    2016-07-12

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world’s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC’s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  2. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  3. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  4. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  5. Ionospherically reflected proton whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, D. I.; Shklyar, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present experimental observations and detailed investigation of the variety of proton whistlers that includes transequatorial and ionospherically reflected proton whistlers. The latter have previously been indicated from numerical modeling of spectrograms. The study is based on six-component ELF wave data from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite which permits to obtain not only spectrograms displaying the power spectral density but also such wave properties as the polarization, wave normal angle, wave refractive index, and normalized parallel component of the Poynting vector. The explanation of various types of proton whistlers is based on the properties of ion cyclotron wave propagation in a multicomponent magnetoplasma, with special consideration of the effect of ion hybrid resonance reflection. Analysis of experimental data is supplemented by numerical modeling of spectrograms that reproduces the main features of experimental ones. As a self-contained result, we provide conclusive experimental evidences that the region illuminated by a lightning stroke in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide may spread over a distance of 4000 km in both hemispheres.

  6. HEATING RATE SCALING OF TURBULENCE IN THE PROTON KINETIC REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2015-06-10

    Three-dimensional numerical hybrid simulations with particle protons and quasi-neutralizing, fluid electrons are conducted for a freely decaying turbulence. The main results are obtained from a series of runs as a function of the initial total rms fluctuation amplitude. In the turbulent phase and at a corresponding nonlinear time dependent on the amplitude, the scaling of the proton perpendicular heating rate is examined as a function of the spectral value of the electron bulk perpendicular speed integrated in wavenumbers about the inverse thermal proton gyroradius. The perpendicular direction is relative to the background magnetic field. The obtained spectral value is normalized to the proton thermal speed and ranges from 0.06 to 0.16. The scaling of the perpendicular heating rate with this spectral value is fitted with a power law, which has an index of −3.3 ± 0.2. The fit is consistent with the scaling of the total heating rate as a function of total rms amplitude, which has an index of −3.06 ± 0.12. The power-law index is near the turbulent hydrodynamic-like prediction for the energy cascade rate as a function of amplitude. The heating rate, then, obeys a power law with amplitude or spectral value regardless of whether that quantity is evaluated at large scales or at the proton gyroradius scales.

  7. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton radioactivity of 94Ag.

    PubMed

    Mukha, Ivan; Roeckl, Ernst; Batist, Leonid; Blazhev, Andrey; Döring, Joachim; Grawe, Hubert; Grigorenko, Leonid; Huyse, Mark; Janas, Zenon; Kirchner, Reinhard; La Commara, Marco; Mazzocchi, Chiara; Tabor, Sam L; Van Duppen, Piet

    2006-01-19

    The stability and spontaneous decay of naturally occurring atomic nuclei have been much studied ever since Becquerel discovered natural radioactivity in 1896. In 1960, proton-rich nuclei with an odd or an even atomic number Z were predicted to decay through one- and two-proton radioactivity, respectively. The experimental observation of one-proton radioactivity was first reported in 1982, and two-proton radioactivity has now also been detected by experimentally studying the decay properties of 45Fe (refs 3, 4) and 54Zn (ref. 5). Here we report proton-proton correlations observed during the radioactive decay of a spinning long-lived state of the lightest known isotope of silver, 94Ag, which is known to undergo one-proton decay. We infer from these correlations that the long-lived state must also decay through simultaneous two-proton emission, making 94Ag the first nucleus to exhibit one- as well as two-proton radioactivity. We attribute the two-proton emission behaviour and the unexpectedly large probability for this decay mechanism to a very large deformation of the parent nucleus into a prolate (cigar-like) shape, which facilitates emission of protons either from the same or from opposite ends of the 'cigar'.

  8. Proton tautomerism for strong polarization switching

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Ishibashi, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Ferroelectrics based on proton tautomerism are promising in low-field and above-room-temperature operations. Here seven organic ferroelectric crystals are examined to search for efficient switching of strong spontaneous polarization on proton tautomerism. Solution-grown crystals exhibit strong pinning of ferroelectric domain walls, but excellent switching performance is awakened by depinning domain walls under thermal annealing and/or repetitive bipolar pulses with a high voltage. Compared with ferroelectric polymers such as polyvinylidefluoride, the optimized polarizations are comparable or stronger in magnitude whereas the coercive fields are two orders of magnitude weaker. The polarization of croconic acid, in particular, breaks its own record for organic systems in increasing from 21 to 30 μC cm−2 and now exceeds those of some commercial ferroelectric materials such as SrBi2Ta2O9 and BaTiO3. Optimization reduces the discrepancy of the spontaneous polarization with the results of the first-principles calculations to less than 15%. The cooperative roles of proton transfer and π-bond switching are discussed by employing the point-charge model and hydrogen-bond geometry. PMID:28205550

  9. Proton tautomerism for strong polarization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Sachio; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kumai, Reiji; Ishibashi, Shoji

    2017-02-01

    Ferroelectrics based on proton tautomerism are promising in low-field and above-room-temperature operations. Here seven organic ferroelectric crystals are examined to search for efficient switching of strong spontaneous polarization on proton tautomerism. Solution-grown crystals exhibit strong pinning of ferroelectric domain walls, but excellent switching performance is awakened by depinning domain walls under thermal annealing and/or repetitive bipolar pulses with a high voltage. Compared with ferroelectric polymers such as polyvinylidefluoride, the optimized polarizations are comparable or stronger in magnitude whereas the coercive fields are two orders of magnitude weaker. The polarization of croconic acid, in particular, breaks its own record for organic systems in increasing from 21 to 30 μC cm-2 and now exceeds those of some commercial ferroelectric materials such as SrBi2Ta2O9 and BaTiO3. Optimization reduces the discrepancy of the spontaneous polarization with the results of the first-principles calculations to less than 15%. The cooperative roles of proton transfer and π-bond switching are discussed by employing the point-charge model and hydrogen-bond geometry.

  10. Morphology and Proton Transport in Sulfonated Block Copolymer and Mesoporous Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Wong, David; Beers, Keith; Balsara, Nitash

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to understand the fundamentals of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), we have developed a series of poly(styrene-b-ethylene-b-styrene) (SES) membranes. The SES membranes were subsequently sulfonated to yield proton conducting S-SES membranes. We examine the effects of sulfonation level, temperature and thermal history on the morphology of S-SES membranes in both dry and hydrated states. The effects of these parameters on water uptake and proton transport characteristics of the membranes are also examined. Furthermore, building upon the strategy we deployed in sulfonating the SES membranes, we fabricated mesoporous S-SES membranes, with pores lined up with the proton conducting channels. These membranes have three distinct phases: structural block, proton-conducting block, and void. We examine the effects of pore size, domain structure and sulfonation level on water uptake and proton conductivity of the mesoporous PEMs at different temperatures. This work is funded by Department of Energy.

  11. Release from ISOLDE molten metal targets under pulsed proton beam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Catherall, R.; Cyvoct, G.; Evensen, A. H. M.; Lindroos, M.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kugler, E.; Schindl, K.; Ravn, H.; Wildner, E.; Drumm, P.; Obert, J.; Putaux, J. C.; Sauvage, J.

    1996-04-01

    By moving the ISOLDE mass separators from the 600 MeV Synchrocyclotron (SC) to the 1 GeV Proton-Synchrotron-Booster (PS) the instantaneous energy density of the proton beam went up by 3 orders of magnitude. The developments of the molten metal target units and the optimization of the PS proton beam to cope with the effects of the thermal shocks induced by the proton beam are described. The energy density of the PS proton beam was reduced by spatial defocusing and time staggered extraction of the four PS-accelerators. The release from lanthanum, lead and tin targets is discussed for different settings of the proton beam and compared to the release observed at ISOLDE-SC. The yields of Hg isotopes are presented.

  12. PROTON AND ANTI-PROTON DISTRIBUTIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK,F.FOR THE BRAHMS COLLABORATION

    2003-02-08

    Properties of transverse momentum spectra and rapidity dependence of protons and anti-protons in Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV are discussed. The net-proton yields are approximately constant at |y| < 1 and increases towards y {approx} 3. The mean rapidity loss is estimated to be in the range of 1.9 < {delta}y < 2.4.

  13. Charging and Discharging Characteristic on PI Films Irradiated by Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Ryo; Miyake, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Takada, Tatuo

    We evaluate the dielectric characteristic of polymeric materials for MLI (Multi Layer Insulator, a kind of thermal insulation material) for spacecraft under high energy proton irradiation using results of space charge distribution. Spacecrafts have a serious damage due to the electro-static discharge accident. The electric charges are accumulated in the polymeric materials due to radioactive rays, especially electrons and protons. The charge accumulation is the origin of aging and discharging phenomena, furthermore those become trigger for spacecraft operation anomaly. Therefore, we need to obtain the space charge distribution in the bulks. In this study, we especially focused polyimide films for MLI irradiated by high energy proton. We measured the space charge distribution in the bulks during and after proton beam irradiation. From the results, it is found that positive charges accumulate in the bulk at the position of proton penetration depth. We also obtained same tendency from the results of conductivity measurement treated by ASTM method. From the above reason, we have studied the dielectric characteristics of MLI materials irradiated by radioactive rays, especially we focused the condition of proton irradiation. In this paper, we discuss the dielectric phenomena and the relationship between conductivity and charge accumulation in bulks.

  14. Lattice-assisted proton hopping in oxides at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samgin, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Stimulated diffusion of protons in oxides such as ABO3 crystals and rutile TiO2 is discussed in the context of quantum Brownian motion. A self-consistent lattice-assisted proton hopping (LAPH) model is developed by going from white noise (characteristic of the standard stochastic theory of superionic conduction) to colored noise in the Markovian limit. This model differs from the commonly used ion jump models in that the hydrogen diffusion rate prefactor is identified as a quantity proportional to the frequency of phonon assistance. Application of the quantum fluctuation-dissipation theorem suggests that the dynamic activation energy for diffusion is a function of a bath-mode frequency. The LAPH model can predict enhanced rates of barrier jumping at room temperature compared to thermally activated proton diffusion. This indicates that low-temperature solid oxide devices are potential candidates for use in hydrogen energy research. The LAPH model offers a valid explanation for the mechanism of high protonic mobility recently observed for TiO2 in a picosecond transient pump-probe experiment. This unexpected dominant lattice relaxation channel must be considered as a new classical-like (but low-temperature) proton transfer mechanism. For vibration-assisted protonic jumps to occur at low temperature, the phonon assistance must be classified as a low-frequency vibration specific to each lattice.

  15. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  16. Charge transport studies of proton and ion conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versek, Craig Wm

    The development of a high-throughput impedance spectroscopy instrumentation platform for conductivity characterization of ion transport materials is outlined. Collaborative studies using this system are summarized. Charge conduction mechanisms and conductivity data for small molecule proton conducting liquids, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and select mixtures of these compounds are documented. Furthermore, proton diffusivity measurements using a Pulse Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) technique for imidazole and 1,2,3-triazole binary mixtures are compared. Studies of azole functionalized discotic and linear mesogens with conductivity, structural, and thermal characterizations are detailed.

  17. Physics controversies in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Engelsman, Martijn; Schwarz, Marco; Dong, Lei

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of proton beams are appealing for cancer therapy. The rapid increase in operational and planned proton therapy facilities may suggest that this technology is a "plug-and-play" valuable addition to the arsenal of the radiation oncologist and medical physicist. In reality, the technology is still evolving, so planning and delivery of proton therapy in patients face many practical challenges. This review article discusses the current status of proton therapy treatment planning and delivery techniques, indicates current limitations in dealing with range uncertainties, and proposes possible developments for proton therapy and supplementary technology to try to realize the actual potential of proton therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrical Mobility of Protons and Proton-Holes in Pure Water Characterized by Physics-Based Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Binbin; Sah, Chihtang

    Pure water has been characterized empirically for nearly a century, as dissociation into hydronium (H3O)1+ and hydroxide (HO)1- ions. Last March, we reported that the ~40 year experimental industrial standard of chemical equilibrium reaction constant, the ion product, can be accounted for by a statistical-physics-based concentration product of two electrical charge carriers, the positively charged protons, p+, and the negatively charged proton holes or prohols, p-, with a thermal activation energy or proton trapping well depth of Ep + / p - = 576 meV, in the 0-100OC pure liquid water. We now report that the empirically fitted industrial standard experimental data (1985, 1987, 2005) of the two dc ion mobilities in liquid water, can also be accounted for by trapping-limited drift of protons and prohols through proton channels of lower proton electrical potential valleys, Ep+/0 <= Ep-/0 <(Ep + / p -/3), in the tetrahedrally-directed electron-pair-bonded oxygen ions, O2-, in hexagonal lattice based on the 1935 Pauling statistical model using the 1933 Bernal-Fowler water rule.

  19. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, M.

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  20. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Iris

    2014-05-01

    The "proton structure" is a wide field. Discussed are predominantly the precision measurements of the proton structure functions at HERA and some of their implications for the LHC measurements. In addition, a discussion of what a proton structure function represents is provided. Finally, a connection to nuclear physics is attempted. This contribution is an updated reprint of a contribution to "Deep Inelastic Scattering 2012".1

  1. Thermal and suprathermal plasma densities in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    Using the low-frequency cutoff of electromagnetic noise trapped in the magnetosphere at frequencies above the local plasma frequency, it is now possible to make very accurate, + or - 1%, electron density measurements in the low density region between the magnetopause and plasmapause. This technique for measuring the total plasma density was used, together with measurements of the suprathermal proton intensities with the LEPEDEA instrumentation on the IMP-6 spacecraft, to determine the thermal proton densities in the region between the plasmapause and magnetopause. Although the thermal protons usually account for a significant fraction, approximately 50%, of the total proton density in this region, in some cases, particularly at the larger radial distances the density of the thermal protons sometimes drops to a very small fraction, 5%, of the total density and nearly all of the plasma consists of suprathermal particles.

  2. Proton Size Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Vernon; Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Keung, Wai-Yee; Marfatia, Danny

    2011-04-15

    A measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen yields a charge radius of the proton that is smaller than the CODATA value by about 5 standard deviations. We explore the possibility that new scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and tensor flavor-conserving nonuniversal interactions may be responsible for the discrepancy. We consider exotic particles that, among leptons, couple preferentially to muons and mediate an attractive nucleon-muon interaction. We find that the many constraints from low energy data disfavor new spin-0, spin-1, and spin-2 particles as an explanation.

  3. Spin of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1996-12-01

    The author argues that their response to the spin crisis should not be to abandon the naive quark model baby, but rather to allow it to mature. In particular, he advocates dressing the baby in qq pairs, first showing that this can be done without compromising the naive quark model's success with either spectroscopy or the OZI rule. Finally, he shows that despite their near invisibility elsewhere, pairs do play an important role in the proton's spin structure by creating an antipolarized qq sea. In the context of an explicit calculation he demonstrates that it is plausible that the entire ''spin crisis'' arises from this effect.

  4. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers.

  5. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  6. A prognosis for the proton.

    PubMed

    Ne'man, Y

    1982-01-01

    Two different hypotheses in modern physics according to which protons might disappear are discussed: Gravitational collapse of matter into black holes, and proton decay according to Unified Gauge Theories. The latter might soon be observed in experiments in which sensitive detectors are placed in a mass of 1000 tons of matter (10(33) protons) in a deep tunnel or mine. One hundred observed decays per year would correspond to an "expected lifetime" of 10(31) years for an individual proton, as predicted by these theories.

  7. Thermalization of the world's smallest fluids: Recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-08-01

    The late Gerry Brown was not shy to tackle complex scientific problems that took time to play out but yielded in the end a deeper understanding of many-body phenomena. In this note, prepared for a memorial volume in his honor, we provide a perspective on a couple of outstanding scientific puzzles that have their origin in our understanding of the thermalization of matter in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, and possibly, in high multiplicity proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions.

  8. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections from air shower data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the fluctuations in depth of maximum development of cosmic ray air showers, corrected for the effects of mixed primary composition and shower development fluctuations, yield values of the inelastic proton-air cross section for laboratory energies in the range 10 to the 8th power to 10 to the 10th power GeV. From these values of proton-air cross section, corresponding values of the proton-proton total cross section are derived by means of Glauber theory and geometrical scaling. The resulting values of proton-proton cross section are inconsistent with a well known 1n(2)s extrapolation of ISR data which is consistent with SPS data; they indicate a less rapid rate of increase in the interval 540 sq root of s 100000 GeV.

  9. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging.

  10. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; van Garderen, E.; Gašparić, I.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiš, M.; Löhner, H.

    2005-05-01

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed.

  11. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H.R.; Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; Garderen, E. van; Harakeh, M.N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Loehner, H.; Gasparic, I.

    2005-05-06

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed.

  12. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approach in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

  13. Proton in SRF Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John Paul

    2011-03-31

    Hydrogen is a difficult impurity to physically deal with in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium, therefore, its properties in the metals should be well understood to allow the metal's superconducting properties to be optimized for minimum loss in the construction of resonant accelerator cavities. It is known that hydrogen is a paramagnetic impurity in niobium from NMR studies. This paramagnetism and its effect on superconducting properties are important to understand. To that end analytical induction measurements aimed at isolating the magnetic properties of hydrogen in SRF niobium are introduced along with optical reflection spectroscopy which is also sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. From the variety, magnitude and rapid kinetics found in the optical and magnetic properties of niobium contaminated with hydrogen forced a search for an atomic model. This yielded quantum mechanical description that correctly generates the activation energy for diffusion of the proton and its isotopes not only in niobium but the remaining metals for which data is available. This interpretation provides a frame work for understanding the individual and collective behavior of protons in metals.

  14. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  15. Proton in SRF Niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John Paul

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen is a difficult impurity to physically deal with in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium, therefore, its properties in the metals should be well understood to allow the metal's superconducting properties to be optimized for minimum loss in the construction of resonant accelerator cavities. It is known that hydrogen is a paramagnetic impurity in niobium from NMR studies. This paramagnetism and its effect on superconducting properties are important to understand. To that end analytical induction measurements aimed at isolating the magnetic properties of hydrogen in SRF niobium are introduced along with optical reflection spectroscopy which is also sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. From the variety, magnitude and rapid kinetics found in the optical and magnetic properties of niobium contaminated with hydrogen forced a search for an atomic model. This yielded quantum mechanical description that correctly generates the activation energy for diffusion of the proton and its isotopes not only in niobium but the remaining metals for which data is available. This interpretation provides a frame work for understanding the individual and collective behavior of protons in metals.

  16. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Brittany C; Brennaman, M Kyle; Concepcion, Javier J; Paul, Jared J; Bettis, Stephanie E; Hampton, Shaun D; Miller, Stephen A; Lebedeva, Natalia V; Forbes, Malcolm D E; Moran, Andrew M; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons--electron-proton transfer (EPT)--is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H(+) is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck-Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated (+)H ─ B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  17. Thermal denaturation of a blue-copper laccase: formation of a compact denatured state with residual structure linked to pH changes in the region of histidine protonation.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Núñez, Citlali; López-Cruz, Javier I; Hernández-Arana, Andrés

    2012-06-01

    The partial (absolute) heat capacity of a laccase enzyme from Myceliophthora thermophila (MtL) was determined from calorimetric scans in the 4.5-10.0 pH range. Above pH 7.5, the heat capacity of the thermally denatured state (C(p)(D)) of this blue-copper glycoprotein is consistent with that for an unfolded, fully solvated polypeptide chain, if its carbohydrate content is taken into account. Below pH 7.5, C(p)(D) decreases and eventually levels off within the 5.5-4.5 pH region, where a compact, partially solvated denatured state is formed. In the compact state, denatured MtL is an oligomer, and exhibits considerable native-like secondary structure and a perturbed environment of its copper atoms. Analysis of the pH dependence of C(p)(D) and the content of secondary structure gives results implying that His residues play an important role in the stability of the compact denatured state.

  18. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use a recently developed model of relativistic meson-exchange currents to compute the neutron-proton and proton-proton yields in (νμ ,μ-) scattering from 12C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross sections with the relativistic Fermi gas model for different kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. In the case of charge-changing neutrino scattering the 2p-2h cross section of proton-proton emission (i.e., np in the initial state) is much larger than for neutron-proton emission (i.e., two neutrons in the initial state) by a (ω , q)-dependent factor. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the Δ isobar current. We also analyze other effects including exchange contributions and the effect of the axial and vector currents.

  19. Parameterizations of Inclusive Cross Sections for Kaon, Proton, and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2009-05-01

    Inclusive kaon, proton, and antiproton production from high-energy proton-proton collisions is studied. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant, differential cross sections, as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity, are compared with experimental data. This paper shows that the Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. The formulae for these cross sections are suitable for use in high-energy cosmic ray transport codes.

  20. Electrochemical reactivity and proton transport mechanisms in nanostructured ceria.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Strelcov, E; Kalinin, S V; Bassiri-Gharb, N

    2016-08-26

    Electrochemical reactivity and ionic transport at the nanoscale are essential in many energy applications. In this study, time-resolved Kelvin probe force microscopy (tr-KPFM) is utilized for surface potential mapping of nanostructured ceria, in both space and time domains. The fundamental mechanisms of proton injection and transport are studied as a function of environmental conditions and the presence or absence of triple phase boundaries. Finite element modeling is used to extract physical parameters from the experimental data, allowing not only quantification of the observed processes, but also decoupling of their contributions to the measured signal. The constructed phase diagrams of the parameters demonstrate a thermally activated proton injection reaction at the triple phase boundary, and two transport processes that are responsible for the low-temperature proton conductivity of nanostructured ceria.

  1. Electrochemical reactivity and proton transport mechanisms in nanostructured ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Strelcov, E.; Kalinin, S. V.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical reactivity and ionic transport at the nanoscale are essential in many energy applications. In this study, time-resolved Kelvin probe force microscopy (tr-KPFM) is utilized for surface potential mapping of nanostructured ceria, in both space and time domains. The fundamental mechanisms of proton injection and transport are studied as a function of environmental conditions and the presence or absence of triple phase boundaries. Finite element modeling is used to extract physical parameters from the experimental data, allowing not only quantification of the observed processes, but also decoupling of their contributions to the measured signal. The constructed phase diagrams of the parameters demonstrate a thermally activated proton injection reaction at the triple phase boundary, and two transport processes that are responsible for the low-temperature proton conductivity of nanostructured ceria.

  2. Proton therapy - Present and future.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David

    2017-01-15

    In principle, proton therapy offers a substantial clinical advantage over conventional photon therapy. This is because of the unique depth-dose characteristics of protons, which can be exploited to achieve significant reductions in normal tissue doses proximal and distal to the target volume. These may, in turn, allow escalation of tumor doses and greater sparing of normal tissues, thus potentially improving local control and survival while at the same time reducing toxicity and improving quality of life. Protons, accelerated to therapeutic energies ranging from 70 to 250MeV, typically with a cyclotron or a synchrotron, are transported to the treatment room where they enter the treatment head mounted on a rotating gantry. The initial thin beams of protons are spread laterally and longitudinally and shaped appropriately to deliver treatments. Spreading and shaping can be achieved by electro-mechanical means to treat the patients with "passively-scattered proton therapy" (PSPT) or using magnetic scanning of thin "beamlets" of protons of a sequence of initial energies. The latter technique can be used to treat patients with optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), the most powerful proton modality. Despite the high potential of proton therapy, the clinical evidence supporting the broad use of protons is mixed. It is generally acknowledged that proton therapy is safe, effective and recommended for many types of pediatric cancers, ocular melanomas, chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Although promising results have been and continue to be reported for many other types of cancers, they are based on small studies. Considering the high cost of establishing and operating proton therapy centers, questions have been raised about their cost effectiveness. General consensus is that there is a need to conduct randomized trials and/or collect outcomes data in multi-institutional registries to unequivocally demonstrate the advantage of protons. Treatment planning and plan

  3. Proton Collimators for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Proton collimators have been proposed for incorporation into inertial-electrostatic-confinement (IEC) fusion reactors. Such reactors have been envisioned as thrusters and sources of electric power for spacecraft and as sources of energetic protons in commercial ion-beam applications.

  4. Bioenergetics: Proton fronts on membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agmon, Noam; Gutman, Menachem

    2011-11-01

    Proton migration on membranes is a crucial step in the bioenergetics of the cell. It has typically been regarded as slow successive proton transfers between ionizable moieties within the membrane, but recent measurements suggest fast lateral diffusion in the membrane's hydration layer.

  5. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  6. Predicting Solar Protons: A Statistical Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    above the background flux of protons (Kahler and Vourlidas , 2005). These are known as solar energetic protons (SEP). Some of these groups of protons...tempsep,10, ’b+’); 79 Bibliography Aschwanden, M. Physics of the solar corona , Praxis Publishing Ltd. 2004 Balch, C. C. ―SEC proton...prediction of all models measured. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Solar Energetic Protons, Solar Flares, Protons, Solar Corona , Cosmic Radiation 16

  7. The proton (nuclear) microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, G. J. F.

    1989-04-01

    The scanning proton microprobe (SPMP) is closely related to the scanning electron microprobe (SEMP) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) with X-ray detector. Though the much greater elemental sensitivity of the SPMP is inherent in the physics, the generally inferior spatial resolution of the SPMP is not inherent and big improvements are possible, As its alternative name would imply, the SPMP is often used with heavier particle beams and with nuclear rather than atomic reactions. Its versatility and quantitative accuracy have justified greater instrumentation and computer power than that associated with other microprobes. It is fast becoming an industrially and commercially important instrument and there are few fields of scientific research in which it has not played a part. Notable contributions have been made in biology, medicine, agriculture, semiconductors, geology, mineralogy, extractive metallurgy, new materials, archaeology, forensic science, catalysis, industrial problems and reactor technology.

  8. Proton decay, 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciano, W. J.

    1982-03-01

    Employing the current world average Lambda/sub MS/ = 0.160 GeV as input, the minimal Georgi-Glashow SU(5) model predicts sq sin theta/sub W/(m/sub W/) = 0.214, m/sub b/m/sub tau/ approximately 2.8 and tau/sub p approximately (0.4 approximately 12) x 10 approximately to the 29th power yr. The first two predictions are in excellent agreement with experiment; but the implied proton life time is already somewhat below the present experimental bound. In this status report, uncertainties in tau/sub p/ are described and effects of appendages to the SU(5) model (such as new fermion generations, scalars, supersymmetry, etc.) are examined.

  9. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  10. Synthesis and investigation of proton conductivity for intercalated kaolinite with 4-amidinopyridinium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Li-Te; Li, Xiao-Pei; Liu, Jian-Lan; Ren, Xiao-Ming

    2015-12-15

    The proton-conducting materials have potential application in devices such as fuel cells. In this study, a mineral kaolinite-based proton conducting material, kaolinite-4-amidinopyridinium hydrochloride (K-4-APy–HCl), was synthesized by the intercalated compound kaolinite-4-amidinopyridine (K-4-APy) adsorbing volatilizing HCl. The thermogravimetric analysis (TG), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and IR spectrum confirmed the HCl successfully inserting into the interlayer space of kaolinite and the 4-aminopyridine being protonated. The intercalation efficiency is estimated to be ca. 85.6%. With respect to K-4-APy, the interlayer space expends by 1.53 Å. The thermal decomposition mechanism was studied by PXRD and TG techniques. The K-4-APy–HCl shows proton conductivity with σ=3.379×10{sup −8} S cm{sup −1} at 373 K and E{sub a}=1.159 eV in the anhydrous condition, which are comparable to MOFs-based proton conducting materials. - Graphical abstract: The intercalated hybrid of mineral kaolinite with 4-amidinopyridinium hydrochloride is prepared to use as proton conducting material. - Highlights: • A new strategy is proposed for preparation of kaolinite-based proton conductor. • Intercalatied hybrid was prepared by sequentially inserting 4-amidinopyridine and adsorbing HCl. • The proton conductivity of intercalated hybrid is comparable to MOFs-based proton-conductors.

  11. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented protons.

    PubMed

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H2 + protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature Te=10 eV and density n=10(23) cm(-3), and proton velocities are vp=vth, vp=2vth, and vp=3vth, where vth is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H2 + ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (vp=vth) and misaligns for faster ones (vp=2vth, vp=3vth). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H2 + ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity.

  12. Structures of protonated methanol clusters and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifen, Jean Jules; Nsangou, Mama; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Motapon, Ousmanou; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine

    2013-05-01

    The accurate evaluation of pKa's, or solvation energies of the proton in methanol at a given temperature is subject to the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated (H+(MeOH)n) and neutral ((MeOH)n) methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol at that temperature. Solvation energies of the proton in a given medium, at a given temperature may help in the determination of proton affinities and proton dissociation energies related to the deprotonation process in that medium and at that temperature. pKa's are related to numerous properties of drugs. In this work, we were interested in the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol, at a given temperature. For this aim, the M062X/6-31++G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to perform geometries optimizations and frequency calculations on various isomers of (H+(MeOH)n) in both phases. Thermal effects were retrieved using our homemade FORTRAN code. Thus, we accessed the relative populations of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters, in both phases for temperatures ranging from 0 to 400 K. As results, in the gas phase, linear structures are entropically more favorable at high temperatures, while more compact ones are energetically more favorable at lower temperatures. The trend is somewhat different when bulk effects are taken into account. At high temperatures, the linear structure only dominates the population for n ⩽ 6, while it is dominated by the cyclic structure for larger cluster sizes. At lower temperatures, compact structures still dominate the population, but with an order different from the one established in the gas phase. Hence, temperature effects dominate solvent effects in small cluster sizes (n ⩽ 6), while the reverse trend is noted for larger cluster sizes.

  13. Proton conductivity of perfluorosulfonate ionomers at high temperature and high relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Bruno R.; Goulart, Cleverson A.; Santiago, Elisabete I.; Muccillo, R.; Fonseca, Fabio C.

    2014-03-03

    The proton transport properties of Nafion membranes were studied in a wide range of temperature by using an air-tight sample holder able to maintain the sample hydrated at high relative humidity. The proton conductivity of hydrated Nafion membranes continuously increased in the temperature range of 40–180 °C with relative humidity kept at RH = 100%. In the temperature range of 40–90 °C, the proton conductivity followed the Arrhenius-like thermal dependence. The calculated apparent activation energy E{sub a} values are in good agreement with proton transport via the structural diffusion in absorbed water. However, at higher measuring temperatures an upturn of the electrical conductivity was observed to be dependent on the thermal history of the sample.

  14. Thermal expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junying; Shen, Xiangying; Jiang, Chaoran; Wu, Zuhui; Huang, Jiping

    2017-08-01

    One type of thermal device, named as thermal expander, is proposed and verified through both simulation and experiment. The thermal expander performs an efficient way to expand a heat flow of line-shape front. Moreover, the thermal expander shows an advantage in rectifying a heat flow from crooked front to line-shape front, which indicates that the thermal expander could act as an efficient point-to-line heat source convertor. We suggest that the thermal expander would be of help to energy saving and emission reduction, especially in thermal circuits and thermal management.

  15. Proton, Electron and Ion Temperatures in Fast Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Korreck, Kelly E.

    2005-08-01

    The Coulomb equilibration time scale among various particle species behind a fast collisionless shock can be much larger than the dynamical time scale in a supernova remnant or CME. Ultraviolet and optical emission line profiles can be used to measure proton, electron and ion temperatures. Particles are fairly close to thermal equilibrium behind a relatively slow (350 km/s) shock, but very far from equilibrium in faster (2000-3000 km/s) shocks.

  16. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  17. Very high energy proton-proton cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Wibig, Tadeusz

    2009-05-01

    The recent Pierre Auger Observatory result suggesting a coincidence of extensive air showers arrival directions with 'nearby' active galactic nuclei and HiRes discovery of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff indicates protons to be only or at least the strongly dominant component of primary extra galactic cosmic ray flux. However, showers initiated by these ultrahigh energy particles developed faster than predicted by the simulation calculations with conventional interaction models. This could be evidence of the substantial increase of the p-air cross section. The progress in understanding the proton-proton cross section description allows us to examine this possibility, and eventually reject it as an explanation of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray 'pure proton' controversy.

  18. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  19. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  20. Formation and recombination of protonated acetonitrile clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasil, R.; Glosík, J.; Zakouril, P.

    1999-07-01

    Formation of the protonated acetonitrile cluster ions CH3CNH+.CH3CN and their subsequent dissociative recombination with electrons was studied in a high-pressure flowing afterglow using the axially movable Langmuir probe. The first step is the binary proton transfer reaction of H3O+ with CH3CN with the rate coefficient k1 = (5.9±1.9) × 10-9 cm3 s-1. Resulting CH3CNH+ ions further associate with the neutral acetonitrile molecules at pressures 3-5 Torr with the effective binary rate coefficient k2eff = (2.1±0.7) × 10-9 cm3 s-1 forming the clusters H+.(CH3CN)2. Further reaction of these clusters with CH3CN is very slow with the effective binary rate coefficient k3eff = (1.1±0.3) × 10-12 cm3 s-1. The large difference between k2eff and k3eff facilitated the study of dissociative recombination of H+.(CH3CN)2 cluster ions with electrons at thermal energy and pressure p = 4.5-7.0 Torr. The recombination rate coefficient thus obtained is (2.8±1) × 10-6 cm3 s-1.

  1. A quantum description of the proton movement in an idealized NHN+ bridge.

    PubMed

    Lankau, Timm; Yu, Chin-Hui

    2011-07-28

    A series of model calculations was done to analyze the delocalization of the proton in the linking hydrogen bond of the (Dih)(2)H(+) cation (Dih: 4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole). Standard quantum chemical calculations (B3LYP/D95+(d,p)) predict a low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) and thereby a delocalized proton in the NHN(+) hydrogen bridge. Explicit quantum calculations on the proton indicate that the delocalization of the proton does not provide enough energy to stabilize a permanent LBHB. Additional Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations indicate further that the proton is localized at either side of the NHN(+) bridge and that a central proton position is the result of temporal averaging. The possibility of the proton to tunnel from one side to the other side of the NHN(+) bridge increases with the temperature as the trajectory of the (Dih)(2)H(+) cation runs through regions where the thermal excitation of Dih ring vibrations creates equal bonding opportunities for the proton on both sides of the bridge (vibrationally assisted proton tunneling). The quantum calculations for the proton in (Dih)(2)H(+) suggest further a broad peak for the 1 ← 0 transition with a maximum at 938 cm(-1) similar to that observed for LBHBs. Moreover, the asymmetric NHN(+) bridge in a thermally fluctuating environment is strong enough to create a significant peak at 1828 cm(-1) for the 2 ← 0 transition, while contributions from the 2 ← 1 are expected to be weak for the same reason. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  2. NMR spectra and translational diffusion of protons in crystals with hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhin, V. M.; Garmash, V. M.; Tarasov, V. P.

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of proton transport in hydrogen-bond crystals at low temperatures is currently one of important problems in the semiconductor physics. With the use of the NMR spectra of wide-band-gap hydrogen-bond crystals grown in H2O and D2O solutions, we have succeeded in finding a direct proof of the presence of protons in the mobile phase, determined their activation energy in good agreement with the spectra of thermally stimulated depolarization currents and with the infrared spectra, and, as a result, clarified the mechanism of proton transport and tunneling.

  3. Response of Cellulose detectors to different doses of 62 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, S. P.; Mishra, R.; Dwivedi, K. K.; Ghosh, S.; Fink, D.; Khathing, D. T.

    2003-08-01

    Optical and thermal responses of two cellulose detectors, Cellulose triacetate (Triafol-TN) and Cellulose acetate butyrate (Triafol-BN), to four different doses of 62 MeV protons were studied using spectroscopic, thermal and track-etching techniques. The spectroscopic analysis revealed that though the optical band-gap in the polymers was affected by proton irradiation, the polymers showed high resistance against any major structural modification by radiation. The thermal stability of the polymers was found to be affected by proton irradiation. The activation energy of etching was found to be almost constant for both the polymers even after irradiation. It is hoped that the findings in this work would be of significant relevance to material science and applications of polymers.

  4. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoupil, Dalibor; Bydžovský, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2) and hyperon (3/2) resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*'s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  5. Spectrum of solar flare protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Balabin, Yu. V.; Podgorny, A. I.; Vashenyuk, E. V.

    2010-08-01

    Most of big solar flares are accompanied by relativistic protons. The prompt component of relativistic protons moves along the interplanetary magnetic field lines and arrives at the Earth's orbit when the flare favorably located in the western solar hemisphere. The neutron monitor measurements reveal an exponential law energy spectrum. Calculations of relativistic proton acceleration in the flare current sheet with magnetic and electric fields found from 3D MHD simulations also demonstrate an exponential law spectrum. A comparison of the measured and calculated spectra permits to estimate the rate of reconnection in the Bastille flare (14 July 2000) as ˜107cm/s. The delay component of relativistic protons exhibits a power law energy spectrum.

  6. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  7. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  8. Studying the Proton Spin Puzzle with PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherity, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The proton spin puzzle remains one of the biggest mysteries in fundamental particle physics today. This talk will explore how the PHENIX Collaboration's forward W-boson program uses RHIC, the world's only polarized proton-proton collider, to probe the spin structure of the proton.

  9. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  10. Inelastic proton-solid collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echenique, P. M.; Flores, F.

    1987-05-01

    A first-principles calculation of charge states of moving protons in Al is presented. The many-body self-energy approach combined with ordinary atomic physics has been used. We find that at high velocities, V>2V0 or 3V0 (Bohr velocity), the processes are atomiclike, while at intermediate velocities, 0.7V0proton charges.

  11. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Myhrer; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  12. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  13. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  14. Recent Solar-Proton Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2005-01-01

    The event-integrated fluences of energetic solar protons up to 2004 at the Earth have been determined and compared to previous data. The current solar cycle has been very active, and very large fluxes of solar protons have been observed that have had serious effects in the solar system and will have produced many radionuclides in the surfaces of meteorites. Such huge events are not expected again until about 2008 or 2009.

  15. Proton Spectrometer Belt Research (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, David

    The National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), the Aerospace Corporation, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have jointly formed the Proton Spectrometer Belt Research (PSBR) program to meet two primary objectives: to measure the high-energy proton spectrum by placing the Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) instrument on board the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) spacecraft to measure the inner Van Allen belt protons with energies from 50 MeV to 2 GeV, and to produce the next generation radiation belt models. Presently, the intensity of trapped protons with energies beyond about 150 MeV is not well known and thought to be underestimated in existing specification models. Such protons are known to pose a number of hazards to astronauts and spacecraft; including total ionizing dose, displacement damage, single event effects, and nuclear activation. The RPS addresses a priority highly ranked by the scientific and technical community and will extend the measurement capability of the RBSP mission to a range beyond that originally planned. The PSBR program will use the RPS data, coupled with other data sets, to upgrade existing radiation belt models, significantly improving the radiation hazards specified by increasing the spectral and spatial coverage, and the time-correlated probability of occurrence statistics, quantifying the model accuracy and uncertainty.

  16. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Strangeness asymmetry in the proton may arise from fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from the KΛ , KΣ , K* Λ and K* Σ states. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these pairs to represent the strange meson cloud. We determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a hybrid convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented either by light-cone wave functions or meson-baryon splitting functions. For the parton distributions of the s(s) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. The momentum distributions of the s and s quarks in each Fock state differ because they are constituents of different hadrons. We present our results for proton strangeness asymmetry, and compare them to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  17. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2–10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora. PMID:24898626

  18. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-06-05

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2-10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora.

  19. Development of Proton Computed Tomography for Applications in Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Vladimir; Schulte, Reinhard; Coutrakon, George; Erdelyi, Bela; Wong, Kent; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Penfold, Scott; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; McAllister, Scott; Schubert, Keith

    2009-03-01

    Determination of the Bragg peak position in proton therapy requires accurate knowledge of the electron density and ratio of effective atomic number and mass (Z/A) of the body tissues traversed. While the Z/A ratio is fairly constant for human tissues, the density of tissues varies significantly. One possibility to obtain accurate electron density information of tissues is to use protons of sufficient energy to penetrate the patient and measure their energy loss. From these transmission measurements, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of electron densities using algebraic techniques. The interest in proton computed tomography (pCT) has considerably increased in recent years due to the more common use of proton accelerators for cancer treatment world-wide and a modern design concept based on current high-energy physics technology has been suggested. This contribution gives a status update on the pCT project carried out by the pCT Collaboration, a group of institutions sharing interest and expertise in the development of pCT. We will present updated imaging data obtained with a small pCT prototype developed in collaboration with the Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and installed on the proton research beam line at Loma Linda University Medical Center. We will discuss hardware decisions regarding the next-generation pCT scanner, which will permit scanning of head-sized objects. Progress has also been made in the formulation of the most likely path of protons through an object and parallelizable iterative reconstruction algorithms that can be implemented on general-purpose commodity graphics processing units. Finally, we will present simulation studies for utilizing pCT technology for on-line proton dose verification and tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET).

  20. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons.

  1. Heteronuclear proton assisted recoupling

    PubMed Central

    Paëpe, Gaël De; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Loquet, Antoine; Eddy, Matt; Megy, Simon; Böckmann, Anja; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a theoretical framework for understanding the heteronuclear version of the third spin assisted recoupling polarization transfer mechanism and demonstrate its potential for detecting long-distance intramolecular and intermolecular 15N–13C contacts in biomolecular systems. The pulse sequence, proton assisted insensitive nuclei cross polarization (PAIN-CP) relies on a cross term between 1H–15N and 1H–13C dipolar couplings to mediate zero- and/or double-quantum 15N–13C recoupling. In particular, using average Hamiltonian theory we derive effective Hamiltonians for PAIN-CP and show that the transfer is mediated by trilinear terms of the form N±C∓Hz (ZQ) or N±C±Hz (DQ) depending on the rf field strengths employed. We use analytical and numerical simulations to explain the structure of the PAIN-CP optimization maps and to delineate the appropriate matching conditions. We also detail the dependence of the PAIN-CP polarization transfer with respect to local molecular geometry and explain the observed reduction in dipolar truncation. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of PAIN-CP in structural studies with 15N–13C spectra of two uniformly 13C,15N labeled model microcrystalline proteins—GB1, a 56 amino acid peptide, and Crh, a 85 amino acid domain swapped dimer (MW = 2 × 10.4 kDa). The spectra acquired at high magic angle spinning frequencies (ωr/2π > 20 kHz) and magnetic fields (ω0H/2π = 700–900 MHz) using moderate rf fields, yield multiple long-distance intramonomer and intermonomer 15N–13C contacts. We use these distance restraints, in combination with the available x-ray structure as a homology model, to perform a calculation of the monomer subunit of the Crh protein. PMID:21384999

  2. Random and Block Sulfonated Polyaramides as Advanced Proton Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsinger, Corey L.; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Feilong; Yang, Yuan; Seifert, Soenke; Knauss, Daniel M.; Herring, Andrew M; Maupin, C. Mark

    2015-10-09

    We present here the experimental and computational characterization of two novel copolyaramide proton exchange membranes (PEMs) with higher conductivity than Nafion at relatively high temperatures, good mechanical properties, high thermal stability, and the capability to operate in low humidity conditions. The random and block copolyaramide PEMs are found to possess different ion exchange capacities (IEC) in addition to subtle structural and morphological differences, which impact the stability and conductivity of the membranes. SAXS patterns indicate the ionomer peak for the dry block copolymer resides at q = 0.1 Å–1, which increases in amplitude when initially hydrated to 25% relative humidity, but then decrease in amplitude with additional hydration. This pattern is hypothesized to signal the transport of water into the polymer matrix resulting in a reduced degree of phase separation. Coupled to these morphological changes, the enhanced proton transport characteristics and structural/mechanical stability for the block copolymer are hypothesized to be primarily due to the ordered structure of ionic clusters that create connected proton transport pathways while reducing swelling upon hydration. Interestingly, the random copolymer did not possess an ionomer peak at any of the hydration levels investigated, indicating a lack of any significant ionomer structure. The random copolymer also demonstrated higher proton conductivity than the block copolymer, which is opposite to the trend normally seen in polymer membranes. However, it has reduced structural/mechanical stability as compared to the block copolymer. In conclusion, this reduction in stability is due to the random morphology formed by entanglements of polymer chains and the adverse swelling characteristics upon hydration. Therefore, the block copolymer with its enhanced proton conductivity characteristics, as compared to Nafion, and favorable structural/mechanical stability, as compared to the

  3. Random and Block Sulfonated Polyaramides as Advanced Proton Exchange Membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Kinsinger, Corey L.; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Feilong; ...

    2015-10-09

    We present here the experimental and computational characterization of two novel copolyaramide proton exchange membranes (PEMs) with higher conductivity than Nafion at relatively high temperatures, good mechanical properties, high thermal stability, and the capability to operate in low humidity conditions. The random and block copolyaramide PEMs are found to possess different ion exchange capacities (IEC) in addition to subtle structural and morphological differences, which impact the stability and conductivity of the membranes. SAXS patterns indicate the ionomer peak for the dry block copolymer resides at q = 0.1 Å–1, which increases in amplitude when initially hydrated to 25% relative humidity,more » but then decrease in amplitude with additional hydration. This pattern is hypothesized to signal the transport of water into the polymer matrix resulting in a reduced degree of phase separation. Coupled to these morphological changes, the enhanced proton transport characteristics and structural/mechanical stability for the block copolymer are hypothesized to be primarily due to the ordered structure of ionic clusters that create connected proton transport pathways while reducing swelling upon hydration. Interestingly, the random copolymer did not possess an ionomer peak at any of the hydration levels investigated, indicating a lack of any significant ionomer structure. The random copolymer also demonstrated higher proton conductivity than the block copolymer, which is opposite to the trend normally seen in polymer membranes. However, it has reduced structural/mechanical stability as compared to the block copolymer. In conclusion, this reduction in stability is due to the random morphology formed by entanglements of polymer chains and the adverse swelling characteristics upon hydration. Therefore, the block copolymer with its enhanced proton conductivity characteristics, as compared to Nafion, and favorable structural/mechanical stability, as compared to the

  4. Protonic conduction domain of indium-doped calcium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Noriaki; Fukatsu, Norihiko; Ito, Kouhei; Ohashi, Teruo

    1995-05-01

    The conductivities of a protonic conductor, 10 mole percent (m/o) In2O3-doped CaZrO3, were measured in an atmosphere containing hydrogen or deuterium with the 4-wires ac impedance technique at temperatures ranging from 623 to 1673 K. In high oxygen activities, H(+)/D(+)-isotope effects were observed below about 1100 K. The ratio of conductivities of protons to deuterons increased as the temperature decreased and rose to about 1.6 at 673 K. It was made clear by this observation that at low temperatures electrical conduction is dominated by proton and at high temperatures by positive hole, respectively. On the other hand, at high hydrogen activities, the isotope effects were observed up to about 1600 K and it was concluded that proton is dominant below this temperature. Over that temperature, the isotope effects vanished and the electrical conductivities were independent of gas potentials. It was concluded that electrical conduction over 1600 K was dominated by oxide ions. As electrical carriers obey the thermally activated process, the activation energies were calculated by the least squares method. The obtained activation energies of protons, deuterons, positive holes, and oxide ion vacancies were 0.74 +/- 0.05, 0.70 +/- 0.05, 1.21 +/- 0.07, and 2.5 +/- 0.5 eV, respectively. Based on the model of defects equilibria and these experimental findings, the protonic conduction domain of the specimen was determined and is represented in temperature-potential diagrams.

  5. Proton irradiation of DNA nucleosides in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Poully, Jean-Christophe; Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Cassimi, Amine; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-03-21

    The four DNA nucleosides guanosine, adenosine, cytidine and thymidine have been produced in the gas phase by a laser thermal desorption source, and irradiated by a beam of protons with 5 keV kinetic energy. The molecular ions as well as energetic neutrals formed have been analyzed by mass spectrometry in order to shed light on the ionization and fragmentation processes triggered by proton collision. A range of 8-20 eV has been estimated for the binding energy of the electron captured by the proton. Glycosidic bond cleavage between the base and sugar has been observed with a high probability for all nucleosides, resulting in predominantly intact base ions for guanosine, adenosine, and cytidine but not for thymidine where intact sugar ions are dominant. This behavior is influenced by the ionization energies of the nucleobases (G < A < C < T), which seems to determine the localization of the charge following the initial ionization. This charge transfer process can also be inferred from the production of protonated base ions, which have a similar dependence on the base ionization potential, although the base proton affinity might also play a role. Other dissociation pathways have also been identified, including further fragmentation of the base and sugar moieties for thymidine and guanosine, respectively, and partial breakup of the sugar ring without glycosidic bond cleavage mainly for adenosine and cytidine. These results show that charge localization following ionization by proton irradiation is important in determining dissociation channels of isolated nucleosides, which could in turn influence direct radiation damage in DNA.

  6. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong; Min, Byungjun; Kwak, Jungwon; Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sungyong

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  7. Ultrafast laser-driven proton sources and dynamic proton imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Peter V.; Schnuerer, Matthias; Sokollik, Thomas; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis; Sandner, Wolfgang; Amin, Munib; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Andreev, Alexander

    2008-07-15

    Ion bursts, accelerated by an ultrafast (40 fs) laser-assisted target normal sheath acceleration mechanism, can be adjusted so as to deliver a nearly pure proton beam. Such laser-driven proton bursts have predominantly a low transverse emittance and a broad kinetic spectrum suitable for continuous probing of the temporal evolution of spatially extended electric fields that arise after laser irradiation of thin foils. Fields with a strength of up to 10{sup 10} V/m were measured with a new streaklike proton deflectometry setup. The data show the temporal and spatial evolution of electric fields that are due to target charge-up and ion-front expansion following intense laser-target interaction at intensities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Measurement of the field evolution is important to gain further insight into lateral electron-transport processes and the influence of field dynamics on ion beam properties.

  8. Very high energy proton-proton cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibig, Tadeusz

    2009-05-01

    The recent Pierre Auger Observatory result suggesting a coincidence of extensive air showers arrival directions with “nearby” active galactic nuclei and HiRes discovery of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff indicates protons to be only or at least the strongly dominant component of primary extra galactic cosmic ray flux. However, showers initiated by these ultrahigh energy particles developed faster than predicted by the simulation calculations with conventional interaction models. This could be evidence of the substantial increase of the p-air cross section. The progress in understanding the proton-proton cross section description allows us to examine this possibility, and eventually reject it as an explanation of the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray “pure proton” controversy.

  9. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  10. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  11. The Structure of the Proton

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  12. The Spin of the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony

    2008-07-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ppnp.2007.12.039
    The twenty years since the announcement of the proton spin crisis by the European Muon Collaboration has seen tremendous progress in our knowledge of the distribution of spin within the proton. The problem is reviewed, beginning with the original data and the suggestion that polarized gluons may play a crucial role in resolving the problem through the U(1) axial anomaly. The discussion continues to the present day where not only have strong limits have been placed on the amount of polarized glue in the proton but the experimental determination of the spin content has become much more precise. It is now clear that the origin of the discrepancy between experiment and the naive expectation of the fraction of spin carried by the quarks and anti-quarks in the proton lies in the non-perturabtive structure of the proton. We explain how the features expected in a modern, relativistic and chirally symmetric description of nucleon str

  13. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  14. Parity Non-Conservation in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    V.R. Brown; B.F. Gibson; J.A. Carlson; R. Schiavilla

    2002-06-01

    The parity non-conserving longitudinal asymmetry in proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering is calculated in the lab-energy range 0-350 MeV using contemporary, realistic strong-interaction potentials combined with a weak-interaction potential comprised of rho- and omega-meson exchanges as exemplified by the DDH model. Values for the rho- and omega-meson coupling constants, h{sup rho rho}{sub rho} and h{sup rho rho}{sub omega}, are determined from comparison with the measured asymmetries at 13.6 MeV, 45 MeV, and 221 MeV.

  15. Thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents the basic theory and techniques of thermal analysis. It discusses a range of applications and instrumentation from all fields of applied and basic research, and concludes with problem sets. Topics covered include: The Basics of Thermal Analysis; Thermometry; Differential Thermal Analysis; Calorimetry; Thermomechanical Analysis and Dilatometry; and Thermogravimetry.

  16. Proton therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rutenberg, Michael S; Flampouri, Stella; Hoppe, Bradford S

    2014-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma has gone from an incurable disease to one for which the majority of patients will be cured. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy achieves the best disease control rates and results in many long-term survivors. As a result, a majority of long-term Hodgkin lymphoma survivors live to experience severe late treatment-related complications, especially cardiovascular disease and second malignancies. The focus of research and treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma is to maintain the current high rates of disease control while reducing treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Efforts to reduce late treatment complications focus on improvements in both systemic therapies and radiotherapy. Herein we review the basis for the benefits of proton therapy over conventional X-ray therapy. We review outcomes of Hodgkin lymphoma treated with proton therapy, and discuss the ability of protons to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk and the impact on the most significant late complications related to the treatment.

  17. Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regimes.

    PubMed

    Geneste, Grégory; Ottochian, Alistar; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2015-07-15

    Density-functional theory calculations are performed to investigate proton transport in BaSnO3. Structural optimizations in the stable and saddle point configurations for transfer (hopping) and reorientation allow description of the high-temperature classical and semi-classical regimes, in which diffusion occurs by over-barrier motion. At lower temperature (typically below 300 K), we describe the thermally-assisted quantum regime, in which protonic motion is of quantum nature and occurs in "coincidence" configurations favored by thermal fluctuations of the surrounding atoms. Both the non-adiabatic and the adiabatic limits are examined. In the adiabatic limit, the protonic energy landscape in the coincidence configuration is very flat. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations of the proton in the coincidence potential reveal, in the transfer case, that the density of probability of H(+) has its maximum at the saddle point, because the zero-point energy exceeds the coincidence barrier. Arguments are given that support the adiabatic picture for the transfer mechanism. In the case of reorientation, the time scales for the existence of the coincidence and for protonic motion, as estimated from the time-energy uncertainty principle by using a simple one-dimensional model, are of the same order of magnitude, suggesting that the adiabatic limit is not reached. Protonic transfer and reorientation in this oxide are therefore governed by different mechanisms below room temperature.

  18. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L. R.; Newell, P. T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  19. Correlated stopping, proton clusters and higher order proton cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdak, Adam; Koch, Volker; Skokov, Vladimir

    2017-05-01

    We investigate possible effects of correlations between stopped nucleons on higher order proton cumulants at low energy heavy-ion collisions. We find that fluctuations of the number of wounded nucleons N_{part} lead to rather nontrivial dependence of the correlations on the centrality; however, this effect is too small to explain the large and positive four-proton correlations found in the preliminary data collected by the STAR collaboration at √{s}=7.7 GeV. We further demonstrate that, by taking into account additional proton clustering, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the preliminary experimental data. We speculate that this clustering may originate either from collective/multi-collision stopping which is expected to be effective at lower energies or from a possible first-order phase transition, or from (attractive) final state interactions. To test these ideas we propose to measure a mixed multi-particle correlation between stopped protons and a produced particle (e.g. pion, antiproton).

  20. Search for sphalerons in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-04-01

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future colliders. We calculate the increase of sphaleron transition rates in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 13/14/33/100 TeV for different sphaleron barrier heights, while recognising that the rates have large overall uncertainties. We use a simulation to show that LHC searches for microscopic black holes should have good efficiency for detecting sphaleron-induced final states, and discuss their experimental signatures and observability in Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. We recast the early ATLAS Run-2 search for microscopic black holes to constrain the rate of sphaleron transitions at 13 TeV, deriving a significant limit on the sphaleron transition rate for the nominal sphaleron barrier height of 9 TeV.

  1. Correlated stopping, proton clusters and higher order proton cumulants

    DOE PAGES

    Bzdak, Adam; Koch, Volker; Skokov, Vladimir

    2017-05-05

    Here, we investigate possible effects of correlations between stopped nucleons on higher order proton cumulants at low energy heavy-ion collisions. We find that fluctuations of the number of wounded nucleons Npart lead to rather nontrivial dependence of the correlations on the centrality; however, this effect is too small to explain the large and positive four-proton correlations found in the preliminary data collected by the STAR collaboration at √s = 7.7 GeV. We further demonstrate that, by taking into account additional proton clustering, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the preliminary experimental data. We speculate that this clustering may originate eithermore » from collective/multi-collision stopping which is expected to be effective at lower energies or from a possible first-order phase transition, or from (attractive) final state interactions. To test these ideas we propose to measure a mixed multi-particle correlation between stopped protons and a produced particle (e.g. pion, antiproton).« less

  2. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Valle, Z. Conesa del; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Caro, A. De; Cataldo, G. de; Cuveland, J. de; Falco, A. De; Gruttola, D. De; Marco, N. De; Pasquale, S. De; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Bari, D. Di; Mauro, A. Di; Nezza, P. Di; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Dziadus, E. Gladysz; Glässel, P.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Zamora, P. González; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Pointe, S. L. La; Rocca, P. La; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Godoy, D. A. Moreira De; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Silva, A. C. Oliveira Da; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Costa, H. Pereira Da; Filho, E. Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Pérez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Castro, X. Sanchez; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Stassinaki, M. Spyropoulou; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Toledo, A. Szanto de; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Peloni, A. Tarantola; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Maarel, J. Van Der; Hoorne, J. W. Van; Leeuwen, M. van; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B. von; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The measurement of primary , , and production at mid-rapidity ( 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/ for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/ for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/ for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  3. Recent aspects of the proton transfer reaction in H-bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, Mirosław

    1996-07-01

    Proton transfer processes cover a very wide range of situations and time scales and they are of great interest from the viewpoint of chemical reactions in solution. These processes can occur via thermally activated crossing or tunneling. This review considers various aspects of this many-faceted field. Spectroscopic, dielectric, colligative and energetic properties and structures of various species with H-bonds are examined. Proton transfer reactions in water and organic solvents, and the contribution of various H-bonded species and ions to these processes are discussed. Among other topics, this survey includes the effects of solvent, acid-base stoichiometry, concentration, temperature and impurity on proton transfer reactions in complexes of phenols and carboxylic acids with amines, pyridines and pyridine N-oxides. The contribution of the nonstoichiometric acid-base complexes and ionic species to the reversible proton transfer mechanism is discussed.

  4. Determining the mechanism of cusp proton aurora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; He, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Zhonglei

    2013-01-01

    Earth's cusp proton aurora occurs near the prenoon and is primarily produced by the precipitation of solar energetic (2–10 keV) protons. Cusp auroral precipitation provides a direct source of energy for the high-latitude dayside upper atmosphere, contributing to chemical composition change and global climate variability. Previous studies have indicated that magnetic reconnection allows solar energetic protons to cross the magnetopause and enter the cusp region, producing cusp auroral precipitation. However, energetic protons are easily trapped in the cusp region due to a minimum magnetic field existing there. Hence, the mechanism of cusp proton aurora has remained a significant challenge for tens of years. Based on the satellite data and calculations of diffusion equation, we demonstrate that EMIC waves can yield the trapped proton scattering that causes cusp proton aurora. This moves forward a step toward identifying the generation mechanism of cusp proton aurora. PMID:23575366

  5. Determining the mechanism of cusp proton aurora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; He, Zhaoguo; Wang, Yongfu; Gao, Zhonglei

    2013-01-01

    Earth's cusp proton aurora occurs near the prenoon and is primarily produced by the precipitation of solar energetic (2-10 keV) protons. Cusp auroral precipitation provides a direct source of energy for the high-latitude dayside upper atmosphere, contributing to chemical composition change and global climate variability. Previous studies have indicated that magnetic reconnection allows solar energetic protons to cross the magnetopause and enter the cusp region, producing cusp auroral precipitation. However, energetic protons are easily trapped in the cusp region due to a minimum magnetic field existing there. Hence, the mechanism of cusp proton aurora has remained a significant challenge for tens of years. Based on the satellite data and calculations of diffusion equation, we demonstrate that EMIC waves can yield the trapped proton scattering that causes cusp proton aurora. This moves forward a step toward identifying the generation mechanism of cusp proton aurora.

  6. Dynamics of the Plasma Membrane Proton Pump.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Federico; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2015-06-01

    Proton transfer over distances longer than that of a hydrogen bond often requires water molecules and protein motions. Following transfer of the proton from the donor to the acceptor, the change in the charge distribution may alter the dynamics of protein and water. To begin to understand how protonation dynamics couple to protein and water dynamics, here we explore how changes in the protonation state affect water and protein dynamics in the AHA2 proton pump. We find that the protonation state of the proton donor and acceptor groups largely affects the dynamics of internal waters and of specific hydrogen bonds, and the orientation of transmembrane helical segments that couple remote regions of the protein. The primary proton donor/acceptor group D684, can interact with water molecules from the cytoplasmic bulk and/or other protein groups.

  7. Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2005-12-01

    The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

  8. Proton conduction related electrical dipole and space charge polarization in hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nagai, A.; Katayama, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2012-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp), well known as a biomaterial, is also known as a proton conductor. Its electrical properties are related strongly to its stability and surface properties. In particular, persistent electrical polarization related to proton conductivity of hydroxyapatite has a substantial influence on hydroxyapatite surface properties. The origins of polarizations were investigated in proton-defect-induced HAp ceramics using thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) measurements. Two peaks were observed, indicating that the persistent polarization comprises polarization elements of two kinds. The TSDC response as a function of the applied electric field in polarization treatments indicated that the persistent polarization is dipole polarization and space charge polarization. The former, dipole polarization, increased continuously with increased defect concentration. The activation energies were 0.67-0.86 eV, which are comparable to proton conduction activation energy. Results show that dipole polarization consists of electrical dipoles of the defect pairs, which are formed through proton conduction. The activation energies of 1.01 ± 0.01 eV for space charge polarization are independent of the defect concentration, suggesting that these originated from protons trapped at the grain boundaries as a result of long-range proton conduction. The polarization of two different types is expected to exert different effects on the HAp surface properties.

  9. Elementary excitations in homogeneous superfluid neutron star matter: Role of the proton component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, Marcello; Ducoin, Camille

    2011-09-01

    The thermal evolution of neutron stars depends on the elementary excitations affecting the stellar matter. In particular, the low-energy excitations, whose energy is proportional to the transferred momentum, can play a major role in the emission and propagation of neutrinos. In this paper, we focus on the density modes associated with the proton component in the homogeneous matter of the outer core of neutron stars (at density between one and three times the nuclear saturation density, where the baryonic constituents are expected to be neutrons and protons). In this region, it is predicted that the protons are superconducting. We study the respective roles of the proton pairing and Coulomb interaction in determining the properties of the modes associated with the proton component. This study is performed in the framework of the random phase approximation, generalized in order to describe the response of a superfluid system. The formalism we use ensures that the generalized Ward’s identities are satisfied. An important conclusion of this work is the presence of a pseudo-Goldstone mode associated with the superconducting protons in neutron-star matter. Indeed, the Goldstone mode, which characterizes a pure superfluid, is suppressed in usual superconductors because of the long-range Coulomb interaction, which allows a plasmon mode. However, for the proton component of stellar matter, the Coulomb field is screened by the electrons and a pseudo-Goldstone mode occurs, with a velocity increased by the Coulomb interaction.

  10. Chitosan/silica coated carbon nanotubes composite proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai; Gong, Chunli; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Huanli; Cheng, Fan; Wang, Guangjin; Zheng, Genwen; Qin, Caiqin; Wen, Sheng

    2016-01-20

    Silica-coated carbon nanotubes (SCNTs), which were obtained by a simple sol-gel method, were utilized in preparation of chitosan/SCNTs (CS/SCNTs) composite membranes. The thermal and oxidative stability, morphology, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of CS/SCNTs composite membranes were investigated. The insulated and hydrophilic silica layer coated on CNTs eliminates the risk of electronic short-circuiting and enhances the interaction between SCNTs and chitosan to ensure the homogenous dispersion of SCNTs, although the water uptake of CS/SCNTs membranes is reduced owing to the decrease of the effective number of the amino functional groups of chitosan. The CS/SCNTs composite membranes are superior to the pure CS membrane in thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties and proton conductivity. The results of this study suggest that CS/SCNTs composite membranes exhibit promising potential for practical application in proton exchange membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Accelerator Science: Proton vs. Electron

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-10-19

    Particle accelerators are one of the most powerful ways to study the fundamental laws that govern the universe. However, there are many design considerations that go into selecting and building a particular accelerator. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of building an accelerator that collides pairs of protons to one that collides electrons.

  12. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony W.

    2008-10-13

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between 'chiral' and 'invariant' spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  13. Gluon polarization in the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Steven D.; Casey, Andrew; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2011-03-15

    We combine heavy-quark renormalization group arguments with our understanding of the nucleon's wave function to deduce a bound on the gluon polarization {Delta}g in the proton. The bound is consistent with the values extracted from spin experiments at COMPASS and RHIC.

  14. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  15. Electron and Proton Auroral Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Gerard, J. C.; Hubert, B.; Fuselier, S.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Gladstone, R.; Burch, J. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Wide-band Imaging Camera (WIC) sensitive to far ultraviolet auroras and from the Spectrographic Imager (SI) channel SI12, sensitive to proton precipitation induced Lyman alpha were analyzed during a high altitude orbit segment of the IMAGE spacecraft. This segment began during the expansive phase of a substorm. The aurora changed into a double oval configuration, consisting of a set of discrete pole-ward forms and a separate diffuse auroral oval equatorwards, Although IMF Bz was strongly southward considerable activity could be seen poleward of the discrete auroras in the region that was considered to be the polar cap. The SI12 Doppler shifted Lyman alpha signature of precipitating protons show that the proton aurora is on the equatorward side of the diffuse aurora. In the following several hours the IMF Bz field changed signed. Although the general character of the proton and electron aurora did not change, the dayside aurora moved equatorward when the Bz was negative and more bright aurora was seen in the central polar cap during periods of positive Bz.

  16. Resist materials for proton micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kan, J. A.; Sanchez, J. L.; Xu, B.; Osipowicz, T.; Watt, F.

    1999-10-01

    The production of high aspect ratio microstructures is a potential growth area. The combination of deep X-ray lithography with electroforming and micromolding (i.e. LIGA) is one of the main techniques used to produce 3D microstructures. The new technique of proton micromachining employs focused MeV protons in a direct write process which is complementary to LIGA, e.g. micromachining with 2 MeV protons results in microstructures with a height of 63 μm and lateral sub-micrometer resolution in PMMA resist. The aim of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of proton micromachining as a lithographic technique. This involves the study of different types of resists. The dose distribution of high molecular weight PMMA is compared with three other types of resist: First the positive photo resist AZ P4620 will be discussed and then PMGI SF 23, which can be used as a deep UV, e-beam or X-ray resist. Finally SU-8, a new deep UV negative type of chemically amplified resist will be discussed. All these polymers are applied using the spin coating technique at thicknesses of between 1 and 36 μm

  17. Accelerator Science: Proton vs. Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-10-11

    Particle accelerators are one of the most powerful ways to study the fundamental laws that govern the universe. However, there are many design considerations that go into selecting and building a particular accelerator. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of building an accelerator that collides pairs of protons to one that collides electrons.

  18. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors.

  19. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors. PMID:26069375

  20. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  1. How to resolve the proton radius puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Gil

    2016-09-01

    In 2010 the first measurement of the proton charge radius from spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen was found to be five standard deviations away from the regular hydrogen value. Six years later, this ``proton radius puzzle'' is still unresolved. One of the most promising avenues to test the muonic hydrogen result is a new muon-proton scattering experiment called MUSE. We describe how effective field theory methods will allow to directly connect muonic hydrogen spectroscopy to muon-proton scattering.

  2. Proton Therapy Dose Characterization and Verification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    including cone- beam CT and B. implanted radiofrequency beacons , currently used in conventional radiotherapy to proton radiotherapy. C. Develop a...determined the level of dose shadow downstream of Calypso Beacon transponders in the proton beam by measurements and simulation. The dependence of the...dose deposited by a therapeutic proton beam , (B) studies of the radiobiological effect of proton therapy, and (C) support for matching patients to

  3. Better Proton-Conducting Polymers for Fuel-Cell Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri; Reddy, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Polyoxyphenylene triazole sulfonic acid has been proposed as a basis for development of improved proton-conducting polymeric materials for solid-electrolyte membranes in hydrogen/air fuel cells. Heretofore, the proton-conducting membrane materials of choice have been exemplified by a family of perfluorosulfonic acid-based polymers (Nafion7 or equivalent). These materials are suitable for operation in the temperature of 75 to 85 C, but in order to reduce the sizes and/or increase the energy-conversion efficiencies of fuel-cell systems, it would be desirable to increase temperatures to as high as 120 C for transportation applications, and to as high as 180 C for stationary applications. However, at 120 C and at relative humidity values below 50 percent, the loss of water from perfluorosulfonic acid-based polymer membranes results in fuel-cell power densities too low to be of practical value. Therefore, membrane electrolyte materials that have usefully high proton conductivity in the temperature range of 180 C at low relative humidity and that do not rely on water for proton conduction at 180 C would be desirable. The proposed polyoxyphenylene triazole sulfonic acid-based materials have been conjectured to have these desirable properties. These materials would be free of volatile or mobile acid constituents. The generic molecular structure of these materials is intended to exploit the fact, demonstrated in previous research, that materials that contain ionizable acid and base groups covalently attached to thermally stable polymer backbones exhibit proton conduction even in the anhydrous state.

  4. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  5. Hydrocarbon rate coefficients for proton and electron impact ionization, dissociation, and recombination in a hydrogen plasma.

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Ruzic, D.N.; Wang, Z.

    1999-07-21

    We estimate cross sections and rate coefficients for proton and electron impact ionization, dissociation, and recombination of neutral and ionized hydrocarbon molecules and fragments of the form C{sub x}H{sub y}{sup k}, x = 1-3, y = 1-6, k = 0,1 in a thermalized hydrogen-electron plasma.

  6. Test report: Electron-proton spectrometer qualification test unit, qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Qualification tests of the electron-proton spectrometer test unit are presented. The tests conducted were: (1) functional, (2) thermal/vacuum, (3) electromagnetic interference, (4) acoustic, (5) shock, (6) vibration, and (7) humidity. Results of each type of test are presented in the form of data sheets.

  7. Proton Testing: Opportunities, Pitfalls and Puzzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Although proton SEE testing can place constraints on some heavy-ion SEE susceptibilities, it is important to quantify residual risk that protons may not reveal all SEE susceptibilities in a system. We examine the relative strengths and limitations of proton and heavy-ion SEE testing and how these may be affected by technology scaling and high-Z materials in the device.

  8. Solar proton fluences at GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Masahiko; Goka, Tateo; Kazama, Yoichi

    NWIP: 14N532 "Observed Proton Fluences over long duration at GEO and Guideline for selection of confidence level in statistical model of Solar Proton Fluences" was approved. 1. Background:Solar energetic protons (SEP) degrade solar panels of GEO spacecrafts. Today, mission lives of many GEO satellites are longer than 11 years. At the end of its mission, solar panel of such satellite outputs more power than estimated. This suggests that today's statistical SEP models predict SEP harsher than natural environment. 2. Purpose:To estimate "proper" proton fluences for the solar cell degradation over long duration at GEO is our goal. This project is for engineering community, and its benefits are adapted to satellite manufactures of the world. 3.Outline of estimation (1) Prepare time-series observed proton daily fluences at GEO. (2) Calculate n-year fluences by integrating daily fluences by shifting the integrating window day-by-day. (3) Select maximum of set of the integrated fluences as the estimated fluences for the n-year mission period. (4) Compare the estimated fluences with confidence level of statistical SEP models. Drs Goka and Kazama already orally presented this method, and their paper is in press. 4.Status at ISO WG4 (1) Project participants of 14N532 are France, Japan, Russia, Ukraine, USA and China. (2) WD is under study. (3) Next target date is 1/23/2009 for CD. To meet the request by world satellite manufactures, namely practical guideline for confidence level, NWIP will be registered as the TS quickly. And actual result will be accumulated then promote to IS, if beneficial.

  9. THERMAL BATTERY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THERMAL BATTERIES, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING)), DESIGN, ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES, CHLORINE, LITHIUM, ELECTRODES, GAS ANALYSIS , CALIBRATION, IMPURITIES, PRESSURE, POLARIZATION, GRAPHITE, DIFFUSION, CONTROL SYSTEMS.

  10. Protons and alpha particles in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone

    2014-05-01

    We investigate energetic consequences of ion kinetic instabilitities in the solar wind connected with beam and core protons and alpha particles drifting with respect to each other. We compare theoretical predictions, simulations and observation results. For theoretical prediction we assume drifting bi-Maxwellian ion populations and we calculate theoretical quasilinear heating rates (Hellinger et al., 2013b). The nonlinear evolution of beam-core protons, and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind we investigate using hybrid expanding box system (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2013). The expansion leads to many different kinetic instabilities. In the simulation the beam protons and alpha particles are decelerated with respect to the core protons and all the populations are cooled in the parallel direction and heated in the perpendicular one in agreement with theoretical expectations. On the macroscopic level the kinetic instabilities cause large departures of the system evolution from the double adiabatic prediction and lead to a perpendicular heating and parallel cooling rates. The simulated heating rates are comparable to the heating rates estimated from the Helios observations (Hellinger et al., 2013a); furthermore, the differential velocity between core and beam protons observed by Ulysses exhibits apparent bounds which are compatible with the theoretical constaints imposed by the linear theory for the magnetosonic instability driven by beam-core differential velocity (Matteini et al., 2013). References Hellinger, P., P. M. Travnicek, S. Stverak, L. Matteini, and M. Velli (2013a), Proton thermal energetics in the solar wind: Helios reloaded, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 1351-1365, doi:10.1002/jgra.50107. Hellinger, P., T. Passot, P.-L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2013b), Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 20, 122306. Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2013), Protons and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid

  11. Enhanced proton conductivity by the influence of modified montmorillonite on poly (vinyl alcohol) based blend composite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palani, P. Bahavan; Abidin, K. Sainul; Kannan, R.; Rajashabala, S.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-05-01

    The highest proton conductivity value of 0.0802 Scm-1 is obtained at 6wt% of protonated MMT added to the PVA/PEG blends. The polymer blend composite membranes are prepared with varied concentration of Poly vinyl alcohol (PVA), Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) and Montmorillonite (MMT) by solution casting method. The Na+ MMT was modified (protonated) to H+ MMT with ion exchange process. The prepared membranes were characterized by using TGA, FTIR, XRD, Ion Exchange Capacity, Water/Methanol uptake, swelling ratio and proton conductivity. The significant improvements in the hydrolytic stability were observed. In addition, thermal stability of the composite membranes were improved and controlled by the addition of MMT. All the prepared membranes are shown appreciable values of proton conductivity at room temperature with 100% relative humidity.

  12. Enhanced proton conductivity by the influence of modified montmorillonite on poly (vinyl alcohol) based blend composite membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Palani, P. Bahavan Abidin, K. Sainul; Kannan, R.; Rajashabala, S.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-05-23

    The highest proton conductivity value of 0.0802 Scm{sup −1} is obtained at 6 wt% of protonated MMT added to the PVA/PEG blends. The polymer blend composite membranes are prepared with varied concentration of Poly vinyl alcohol (PVA), Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) and Montmorillonite (MMT) by solution casting method. The Na{sup +} MMT was modified (protonated) to H{sup +} MMT with ion exchange process. The prepared membranes were characterized by using TGA, FTIR, XRD, Ion Exchange Capacity, Water/Methanol uptake, swelling ratio and proton conductivity. The significant improvements in the hydrolytic stability were observed. In addition, thermal stability of the composite membranes were improved and controlled by the addition of MMT. All the prepared membranes are shown appreciable values of proton conductivity at room temperature with 100% relative humidity.

  13. Calculation of Top Squark Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Linville, Andrea J.; /Washington U., St. Louis /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Though the Standard Model of particle physics is an elegant theory which has been studied extensively for decades, it leaves many fundamental questions unanswered and is thus widely believed to be incomplete. Possible extensions to the Standard Model (SM) have been postulated and are in the process of being investigated experimentally. The most promising extension is the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM) which relates every SM particle to a superpartner that differs by 1/2 unit of spin. The lightest supersymmetric quark, or squark, is expected to be the stop, and the search for this particle is an important experimental task. In this analysis, we use parton-model methods to predict the stop production cross section in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies.

  14. Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering Excitation Functions at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bisplinghoff, J.; Daniel, R.; Diehl, O.; Engelhardt, H.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P.; Gro-Hardt, R.; Heider, S.; Heine, A.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Lahr, U.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mosel, F.; Rohdje, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Ro, U.; Scheid, H.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Schwarz, V.; Trelle, H.; Wiedmann, W.; Ziegler, R.; Albers, D.; Bollmann, R.; Bueer, K.; Dohrmann, F.; Gasthuber, M.; Greiff, J.; Gro, A.; Igelbrink, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Mueller, M.; Muenstermann, M.; Schirm, N.; Scobel, W.; Wellinghausen, A.; Woller, K.; Cloth, P.; Gebel, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sterzenbach, G.

    1997-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering cross sections have been measured in narrow steps for projectile momenta p{sub p} (energies T{sub p}) from 1100 to 3300MeV/c (500 to 2500MeV) in the angular range 35{degree}{le}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{le}90{degree} with a detector providing {Delta}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{approx}1.4{degree} resolution. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the cooler synchrotron COSY with an internal CH{sub 2} fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of T{sub p}. The advantages of this experimental technique are demonstrated, and the excitation functions obtained are compared to existing cross section data. No evidence for narrow structures was found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Threshold pion production from proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.

    1995-08-01

    We showed that the threshold production of {pi}{sup 0}pp, {pi}{sup +}np, and {pi}{sup +}d from proton-proton collisions can be consistently described by a model consisting of pion s-wave rescattering and N{bar N} pair-terms of heavy-meson exchanges. The large difference between {sigma}{sup tot}(pp {yields} {pi}{sup +}d) and {sigma}{sup tot}(pp {yields} {pi}{sup +}np) is understood from the orthogonality of the deuteron and the np scattering wave functions. In a calculation using the Paris potential, we find that the data can be reproduced best by using a soft {pi}NN form factor with {Delta} = 650 MeV for a monopole form. This is consistent with our earlier studies of pion production in the A-excitation region. A paper describing this result was submitted for publication.

  16. φ-meson production in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, K.; Durso, J. W.; Haidenbauer, J.; Hanhart, C.; Speth, J.

    1999-11-01

    The production of φ mesons in proton-proton collisions is investigated within a relativistic meson-exchange model of hadronic interactions. The experimental prerequisites for extracting the NNφ coupling strength from this reaction are discussed. In the absence of a sufficient set of data, which would enable an accurate determination of the NNφ coupling strength, we perform a combined analysis, based on some reasonable assumptions, of the existing data for both ω- and φ-meson production. We find that the recent data from the DISTO Collaboration on the angular distribution of the φ meson indicate that the NNφ coupling constant is small. The analysis yields values for gNNφ that are compatible with the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule.

  17. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  18. Proton hydrates as soft ion/ion proton transfer reagents for multiply deprotonated biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Jeremiah J.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; Saad, Ola M.; Leary, Julie A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-10-01

    Ion/ion proton transfer from protonated strong gaseous bases such as pyridine and 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (i.e., the proton sponge), to multiply charged anions derived from a sulfated pentasaccharide drug, Arixtra(TM), gives rise to extensive fragmentation of the oligosaccharide. This drug serves as a model for sulfated glycosaminoglycans, an important class of polymers in glycobiology. The extent of fragmentation appears to correlate with the proton affinity of the molecule used to transfer the proton, which in turn correlates with the reaction exothermicity. Consistent with tandem mass spectrometry results, anions with sodium counter-ions are more stable with respect to fragmentation under ion/ion proton transfer conditions than ions of the same charge state with protons counter-ions. Proton hydrates were found to give rise to much less anion fragmentation and constitute the softest protonation agents thus far identified for manipulating the charge states of multiply charged biopolymer anions. The reaction exothermicities associated with proton hydrates comprised of five or more water molecules are lower than that for protonated proton sponge, which is among the softest reagents thus far examined for ion/ion proton transfer reactions. The partitioning of ion/ion reaction exothermicity among all of the degrees of freedom of the products may also differ for proton hydrates relative to protonated molecules. However, a difference in energy partitioning need not be invoked to rationalize the results reported here.

  19. Surface-coupled proton exchange of a membrane-bound proton acceptor.

    PubMed

    Sandén, Tor; Salomonsson, Lina; Brzezinski, Peter; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-03-02

    Proton-transfer reactions across and at the surface of biological membranes are central for maintaining the transmembrane proton electrochemical gradients involved in cellular energy conversion. In this study, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was used to measure the local protonation and deprotonation rates of single pH-sensitive fluorophores conjugated to liposome membranes, and the dependence of these rates on lipid composition and ion concentration. Measurements of proton exchange rates over a wide proton concentration range, using two different pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pK(a)s, revealed two distinct proton exchange regimes. At high pH (> 8), proton association increases rapidly with increasing proton concentrations, presumably because the whole membrane acts as a proton-collecting antenna for the fluorophore. In contrast, at low pH (< 7), the increase in the proton association rate is slower and comparable to that of direct protonation of the fluorophore from the bulk solution. In the latter case, the proton exchange rates of the two fluorophores are indistinguishable, indicating that their protonation rates are determined by the local membrane environment. Measurements on membranes of different surface charge and at different ion concentrations made it possible to determine surface potentials, as well as the distance between the surface and the fluorophore. The results from this study define the conditions under which biological membranes can act as proton-collecting antennae and provide fundamental information on the relation between the membrane surface charge density and the local proton exchange kinetics.

  20. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  1. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions, and approaches for data evaluation are discussed. PMID:24312147

  2. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  3. Proton radiation damage in optical filter glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillot, Patrick N.; Rosenberg, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Schott BG-39 and Hoya CM-500 blue-green filter glass were subjected to proton radiation to determine their acceptability for spaceflight. Initial testing done with 2.7 MeV protons showed negligible change in optical transmittance with doses as high as 5.2 x 10 to the 14th protons per sq cm. Irradiation with protons of energy up to 63 MeV caused a significant reduction in transmittance in the Schott samples at doses of 5.3 x 10 to the 12th protons per sq cm, while negligible change occurred in the Hoya samples.

  4. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-01

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame 1H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  5. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  6. Correlated wounded hot spots in proton-proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Petersen, Hannah; Soto-Ontoso, Alba

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of nontrivial spatial correlations between proton constituents, considered in this work to be gluonic hot spots, on the initial conditions of proton-proton collisions from ISR to Large Hadron Collider energies, i.e., √{s }=52.6 , 7000, and 13 000 GeV. The inclusion of these correlations is motivated by their fundamental role in the description of a recently observed new feature of p p scattering at √{s }=7 TeV, the hollowness effect. Our analysis relies on a Monte Carlo Glauber approach including fluctuations in the hot spot positions and their entropy deposition in the transverse plane. We explore both the energy dependence and the effect of spatial correlations on the number of wounded hot spots, their spatial distribution, and the eccentricities, ɛn, of the initial state geometry of the collision. In minimum bias collisions we find that the inclusion of short-range repulsive correlations between the hot spots reduces the value of the eccentricity (ɛ2) and the triangularity (ɛ3). In turn, upon considering only the events with the highest entropy deposition, i.e., the ultracentral ones, the probability of having larger ɛ2 ,3 increases significantly in the correlated scenario. Finally, the eccentricities show a quite mild energy dependence.

  7. Proton and non-proton activation of ASIC channels

    PubMed Central

    Gautschi, Ivan; van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Schild, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASIC) exhibit a fast desensitizing current when activated by pH values below 7.0. By contrast, non-proton ligands are able to trigger sustained ASIC currents at physiological pHs. To analyze the functional basis of the ASIC desensitizing and sustained currents, we have used ASIC1a and ASIC2a mutants with a cysteine in the pore vestibule for covalent binding of different sulfhydryl reagents. We found that ASIC1a and ASIC2a exhibit two distinct currents, a proton-induced desensitizing current and a sustained current triggered by sulfhydryl reagents. These currents differ in their pH dependency, their sensitivity to the sulfhydryl reagents, their ionic selectivity and their relative magnitude. We propose a model for ASIC1 and ASIC2 activity where the channels can function in two distinct modes, a desensitizing mode and a sustained mode depending on the activating ligands. The pore vestibule of the channel represents a functional site for binding non-proton ligands to activate ASIC1 and ASIC2 at neutral pH and to prevent channel desensitization. PMID:28384246

  8. Calibration of CR-39 with monoenergetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaojiao, Duan; Xiaofei, Lan; Zhixin, Tan; Yongsheng, Huang; Shilun, Guo; Dawei, Yang; Naiyan, Wang

    2009-10-01

    Calibration of solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 was carried out with very low-energy monoenergetic protons of 20-100 keV from a Cockcroft Walton accelerator. To reduce the beam of the proton from the accelerator, a novel method was adopted by means of a high voltage pulse generator. The irradiation time of the proton beam on each CR-39 sheet was shortened to one pulse with duration of 100 ns, so that very separated proton tracks around 104 cm-2 can be irradiated and observed and measured on the surface of the CR-39 detector after etching. The variations of track diameter with etching time as well as with proton energy response curve has been carefully calibrated for the first time in this very low energy region. The calibration shows that the optical limit for the observation of etched tracks of protons in CR-39 is about or a little lower that 20 keV, above which the proton tracks can be seen clearly and the response curve can be used to distinguish protons from the other ions and determine the energy of the protons. The extension of response curve of protons from traditionally 20 to 100 keV in CR-39 is significant in retrieving information of protons produced in the studies of nuclear physics, plasma physics, ultrahigh intensity laser physics and laser acceleration.

  9. Clinical controversies: proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mouw, Kent W; Trofimov, Alexei; Zietman, Anthony L; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-04-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of prostate cancer for several decades, and interest surrounding its use continues to grow. Proton-based treatment techniques have evolved significantly over this period, and several centers now routinely use technologies such as pencil-beam scanning. However, whether the theoretical dosimetric advantages of the proton beam translate into clinically meaningful improvements for prostate cancer patients is unknown, and outcomes from single-arm experiences using whole courses of proton beam therapy in the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer have shown mixed results when compared with contemporary intensity-modulated radiotherapy. A randomized trial comparing proton beam therapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy in early-stage disease has been launched and will be important in defining the role for proton therapy in this setting. We review the available evidence and present the current state of proton beam therapy for prostate cancer.

  10. Very energetic protons in Saturn's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.

    1980-01-01

    Very energetic protons are trapped in the inner Saturnian radiation belt. The University of California at San Diego instrument on Pioneer 11 has definitely identified protons of energy greater than 80 MeV on channel M3 and has tentatively detected protons of energy greater than 600 MeV on channel C3. The spatial distribution of the protons is distinct from that of the trapped electrons, the main difference being that the protons are strongly absorbed by the innermost moons and that the electrons are not. The source strength for injecting protons by the decay of cosmic ray albedo neutrons generated in the rings of Saturn has been estimated. The required proton lifetime is approximately 20 years.

  11. Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2007-04-13

    For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

  12. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  13. Proton emission - new results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, R. D.

    2016-09-01

    Proton emission is the radioactive decay mode that is expected to determine the limit of observable proton-rich nuclei for most elements. Considerable progress has been made in the study of proton-emitting nuclei since the first observation of direct proton emission nearly 50 years ago. This has led to improvements in our understanding of this decay process and provided invaluable nuclear structure data far from the valley of beta stability. The rapid fall in half-lives with increasing neutron deficiency when proton emission dominates makes it likely that for some elements, the lightest isotopes whose ground states can be observed in conventional experiments have already been reached. The enhanced stability against proton emission of the recently discovered high-lying isomer in 158Ta raises the possibility that proton emission from multiparticle isomers could be observed in nuclei beyond the expected boundaries of the nuclear landscape.

  14. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  15. Thermal Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    central nervous system ; exertional heat stroke Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified 6 Lisa R. Leon 508-233-4862 Reset Thermal Stress...multiorgan system failure, and death. indicates stimulatory pathway, indicates inhibitor pathway. 336 Thermal Stressstress. Cardiovascular mechanisms have...clinically characterized by elevated core temperature (typically, but not always 440 1C), hot dry flushed skin, and central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction

  16. Thermal Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, Norman

    The role that a good thermal environment plays in the educational process is discussed. Design implications arise from an analysis of the heating and ventilating principles as apply to vocational-technical facilities. The importance of integrating thermal components in the total design is emphasized. (JS)

  17. THERMAL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal remediation is being proposed by Region I for remediation of the overburden soil and groundwater at the Solvent Recovery Services New England Superfund site. This presentation at the public meeting will acquaint area residents with thermal remediation. The two types of ...

  18. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Moiz; Xiang, Liangzhong; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1-10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. The calculated noise in the transducer was 12-28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70-380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3-30 × 10(6) per pulse, with 30-800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic range verification may be feasible with approximately 5

  19. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Moiz; Xiang, Liangzhong; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 106 per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic range

  20. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton

  1. Proton spin: A topological invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2016-11-01

    Proton spin problem is given a new perspective with the proposition that spin is a topological invariant represented by a de Rham 3-period. The idea is developed generalizing Finkelstein-Rubinstein theory for Skyrmions/kinks to topological defects, and using non-Abelian de Rham theorems. Two kinds of de Rham theorems are discussed applicable to matrix-valued differential forms, and traces. Physical and mathematical interpretations of de Rham periods are presented. It is suggested that Wilson lines and loop operators probe the local properties of the topology, and spin as a topological invariant in pDIS measurements could appear with any value from 0 to ℏ 2, i.e. proton spin decomposition has no meaning in this approach.

  2. Protonated water clusters in TPC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Yunus; Kalkan, Yalçın; Veenhof, Rob

    2016-07-01

    Water vapour is added to the ALICE TPC gas to enhance its stability. These polar molecules create large protonated water clusters around a H+ core. In this context, the reactions H3O+(H2 O) n - 1 +H2 O →H3O+(H2O)n (n=1-9) were studied in the gas phase. Structures for these clusters are suggested and the most stable structures for each cluster size are shown. The thermodynamic parameters Δ Hn-1,n0, Δ Gn-1,n0, ΔSn-1,n0 and equilibrium constants K n - 1 , n for the reaction were calculated to determine the size of the water clusters. The results are close to experimental data found in the literature. Protonated water clusters at stp have a size of 6-9 which corresponds to a mass of 127.1 - 181.2 g / mole.

  3. Monitoring proton therapy with PET

    PubMed Central

    El Fakhri, G

    2015-01-01

    Protons are being used in radiation therapy because of typically better dose conformity and reduced total energy deposited in the patient as compared with photon techniques. Both aspects are related to the finite range of a proton beam. The finite range also allows advanced dose shaping. These benefits can only be fully utilized if the end of range can be predicted accurately in the patient. The prediction of the range in tissue is associated with considerable uncertainties owing to imaging, patient set-up, beam delivery, interfractional changes in patient anatomy and dose calculation. Consequently, a significant range (of the order of several millimetres) is added to the prescribed range in order to ensure tumour coverage. Thus, reducing range uncertainties would allow a reduction of the treatment volume and reduce dose to potential organs at risk. PMID:25989699

  4. Proton emission from triaxial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Delion, D.S.; Wyss, R.; Karlgren, D.; Liotta, R.J.

    2004-12-01

    Proton decay from triaxially deformed nuclei is investigated. The deformation parameters corresponding to the mother nucleus are determined microscopically and the calculated decay widths are used to probe the mean-field wave function. The proton wave function in the mother nucleus is described as a resonant state in a coupled-channel formalism. The decay width, as well as the angular distribution of the decaying particle, are evaluated and their dependence upon the triaxial deformation parameters is studied in the decay of {sup 161}Re and {sup 185}Bi. It is found that the decay width is very sensitive to the parameters defining the triaxial deformation while the angular distribution is a universal function which does not depend upon details of the nuclear structure.

  5. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, Jr, J F

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  6. Proton Decay Searches with DUNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be comprised of a beam line and near detector complex at Fermilab, Illinois as well as a massive far detector located 1300 km away at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota. To achieve its rich physics program, DUNE plans to construct a 40kt fiducial volume Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) far detector almost a mile underground. The size, location, and technology of the proposed far detector make it an attractive tool to search for proton decay, which has yet to be observed. Observation of such a rare event requires high sensitivity to the signal and high background rejection rate. A particular background of interest arises from cosmic muons interacting with rock surrounding the detector and producing a variety of particles which can enter the detector and leave signatures similar to that of proton decay. In order to keep this background to a reasonable level without sacrificing signal acceptance efficiency, precise tracking, made possible by the LArTPC technology, is required. Precise 3D localization of proton decay events relies on the detector's ability to identify the prompt emission of scintillation light from proton decay events as the t0-defining signal. Therefore, low background rate and high detection efficiency of this light are the crucial to the search. This work examines these characteristics in a detailed Monte Carlo simulation using DUNE`s far detector reference design and demonstrates a high signal efficiency while keeping the expected number of cosmogenic background events sufficiently low.

  7. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  8. Proton Scattering on Liquid Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabid, Ryan; LArIAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    LArIAT (Liquid Argon In A Test-beam) is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) positioned in a charged particle beamline whose primary purpose is to study the response of LArTPC's to charged particle interactions. This previously unmeasured experimental data will allow for improvement of Monte Carlo simulations and development of identification techniques, important for future planned LArTPC neutrino experiments. LArIAT's beamline is instrumented to allow for the identification of specific particles as well as measurement of those particles' incoming momenta. Among the particles present in the beamline, the analysis presented here focuses on proton-Argon interactions. This study uses particle trajectories and calorimetric information to identify proton-Argon interaction candidates. We present preliminary data results on the measurement of the proton-Argon cross-section. Liquid Argon In A Test Beam. The work is my analysis made possible through the efforts of LArIAT detector, data, and software.

  9. Solid-state proton conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewulski, J. R.; Osif, T. L.; Remick, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling, and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies are described which include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells are presented which include the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms.

  10. Proton Beams from Nanotube Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Motohiko

    2013-10-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is known to have extraordinary material and mechanical properties. Here we propose a novel ion acceleration scheme with nanometer-size CNT working at such an extreme circumstance as temperatures higher than billions of degree and durations shorter than tens of femtosecond, dubbed as nanotube accelerator, with which quasimonoenergetic and collimated MeV-order proton beams are generated. In nanotube accelerators, CNTs with fragments of a hydrogen compound embedded inside are irradiated by an ultrashort ultraintense laser. Under such laser and target conditions, low-Z materials such as hydrogen and carbon will be fully ionized. Substantial amount of electrons of the system are then blown off by the brutal laser electric field within only a few laser cycles. This leads to a new type of ion acceleration, in which the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of a gun barrel and bullets, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic proton beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic 1.5-MeV proton beams under a super-intense electrostatic field ~ 1014 V m-1.

  11. Solid-state proton conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Jewulski, J.R.; Osif, T.L.; Remick, R.J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies, to include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells including the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms. 164 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  13. Magnetic optics for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mottershead, C.T.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    High energy protons of 10 to 50 GeV can be used to radiograph dense objects. Because the transmitted beam particles undergo multiple coulomb scattering (MCS) in the object, a magnetic lens system is used to focus the particles exiting each point of the object onto a distant image plane. Without the lens, the MCS would seriously blur the radiographic image. Correlations can be introduced in the illuminating beam to cancel a major part of the chromatic and geometric aberrations in the lens, while providing locations inside the lens where the rays are sorted by MCS angle. This allows the introduction of angle cut apertures to aid material identification. The requirement for a matched multistage lens system with successively smaller angle-cut apertures leads to the use of minus-identity ({minus}I) lenses, in which the angle sorting is in the longitudinal mid plane of the lens, and the exit beam correlations are the same as the input correlations. A single stage {minus}I lens has been successfully tested at Brookhaven with 10-GeV protons and another is being used in dynamic experiments with 0.8-GeV protons at Los Alamos. The resolution achievable at higher energies is briefly surveyed.

  14. Family symmetries and proton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi |; Kaplan, D.B.

    1994-08-01

    The proton decay modes p {yields} K{sup 0}e{sup +} and p {yields} K{sup 0}{mu}{sup +} may be visible in certain supersymmetric theories, and if seen would provide evidence for new flavor physics at extremely short distances. These decay modes can arise from the dimension five operator (Q{sub 1}Q{sub 1}Q{sub 2}L{sub 1,2}), where Q{sub i} and L{sub i} are i{sup th} generation quark and lepton superfields respectively. Such an operator is not generated at observable levels due to gauge or Higgs boson exchange in a minimal GUT. However in theories that explain the fermion mass hierarchy, it may be generated at the Planck scale with a strength such that the decays p {yields} K{sup 0}{ell}{sup +} are both compatible with the proton lifetime and visible at Super-Kamiokande. Observable proton decay can even occur in theories without unification.

  15. Ex vivo tissue-type independence in proton-resonance frequency shift MR thermometry.

    PubMed

    Peters, R D; Hinks, R S; Henkelman, R M

    1998-09-01

    The temperature sensitivity of the proton-resonance frequency (PRF) has proven valuable for the monitoring of MR image-guided thermal coagulation therapy. However, there is significant inconsistency in reported values of the PRF-thermal coefficient, as measured from experiments encompassing a range of in vivo and ex vivo tissue types and experimental conditions. A method of calibrating the temperature dependence of the PRF is described and results are presented that indicate a tissue-type independence. To this end, other possible mechanisms for variations in the PRF-thermal coefficient are suggested, including physiological perturbations and volume magnetic susceptibility effects from geometry and orientation.

  16. Spallation yield of neutrons produced in thick lead target bombarded with 250 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Ma, F.; Zhanga, X. Y.; Ju, Y. Q.; Zhang, H. B.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, J. G.; Zhou, B.; Li, Y. Y.; Xu, X. W.; Luo, P.; Yang, L.; Zhang, Y. B.; Li, J. Y.; Xu, J. K.; Liang, T. J.; Wang, S. L.; Yang, Y. W.; Gu, L.

    2015-01-01

    The neutron yield from thick target of Pb irradiated with 250 MeV protons has been studied experimentally. The neutron production was measured with the water-bath gold method. The thermal neutron distributions in the water were determined according to the measured activities of Au foils. Corresponding results calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were compared with the experimental data. It was found out that the Au foils with cadmium cover significantly changed the spacial distribution of the thermal neutron field. The corrected neutron yield was deduced to be 2.23 ± 0.19 n/proton by considering the influence of the Cd cover on the thermal neutron flux.

  17. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2016-10-01

    The creation of an electrostatic shock wave and ensuing ion acceleration is studied on the OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Previous work using a 10- μm CO2 laser in a H2 gas jet shows promising results for obtaining narrow spectral features in the accelerated proton spectra. Scaling the shock-wave acceleration mechanism to the 1- μm-wavelength drive laser makes it possible to use petawatt-scale laser systems such as OMEGA-EP, but involves tailoring of the plasma profile. To accomplish the necessitated sharp rise to near-critical plasma density and a long exponential fall, an 1- μm-thick CH foil is illuminated on the back side by thermal x rays produced from an irradiated gold foil. The plasma density is measured using the fourth-harmonic probe system, the accelerating fields are probed using an orthogonal proton source, and the accelerated protons and ions are detected with a Thomson parabola. These results will be presented and compared with particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and LLNL's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program under project 15-LW-095.

  18. Proton Transfer Rate Coefficient Measurements of Selected Volatile Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, G.; Popović, S.; Vušković, L.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed an apparatus based on the selected ion flow tube (SIFT)footnote D. Smith and N.G. Adams, Ads. At. Mol. Phys. 24, 1 (1987). that allows the study of proton transfer between various positive ions and volatile organic molecules. Reactions in the flow tube occur at pressures of approximately 300 mTorr, eliminating the requirement of thermal beam production. The proton donor molecule H_3O^+ has been produced using several types of electrical discharges in water vapor, such as a capacitively coupled RF discharge and a DC hollow cathode discharge. Presently we are developing an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge using the components of a standard microwave oven that has the advantages of simple design and operation, as well as low cost. We will be presenting the results of the microwave cavity ion source to produce H_3O^+, and compare it to the other studied sources. In addition, we will be presenting a preliminary measurement of the proton transfer rate coefficient in the reaction of H_3O^+ with acetone and methanol.

  19. Direct proton decay of 0.56-s147Tm and search for this decay mode among very neutron-deficient isotopes with 53≦Z≦67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, P. O.; Batsch, T.; Kirchner, R.; Klepper, O.; Kurcewicz, W.; Roeckl, E.; Schardt, D.; Feix, W. F.; Nyman, G.; Tidemand-Petersson, P.

    1983-02-01

    The earlier preliminary assignment of a 1,055±6 keV proton line to direct proton decay of147Tm is supported by cross bombardment measurements and by a negative result from a positron-proton coincidence experiment. The half-life was remeasured to be 0.56 ±0.04s. For two types of thermal ion sources, overall efficiencies were estimated for on-line mass separation of known short-lived isotopes of promethium, europium, terbium, and holmium. Direct proton decay was searched for among very neutron-deficient isotopes of these elements, and of iodine and caesium. No evidence for direct proton decay was found. Based on estimated overall efficiencies, on calculated cross-sections, and on predictions from the gross-theory of β decay, half-life limits for direct proton decay were deduced.

  20. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Hampton, Shaun D.; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H⁺ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ⁺H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  1. Polymer Composites for High-Temperature Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiuling; Liu, Yuxiu; Zhu, Lei

    Recent advances in composite proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications at elevated temperature and low relative humidity are briefly reviewed in this chapter. Although a majority of research has focused on new sulfonated hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon polymers and their blends to directly enhance high temperature performance, we emphasize on polymer/inorganic composite membranes with the aim of improving the mechanical strength, thermal stability, and proton conductivity, which depend on water retention at elevated temperature and low relative humidity conditions. The polymer systems include perfluoronated polymers such as Nafion, sulfonated poly(arylene ether)s, polybenzimidazoles (PBI)s, and many others. The inorganic proton conductors are silica, heteropolyacids (HPA)s, layered zirconium phosphates, and liquid phosphoric acid. Direct use of sol-gel silica requires pressurization of fuel cells to maintain 100% relative humidity for high proton conductivity above 100°C. Direct incorporation of HPAs such as phosphotungstic acid (PTA) into polyelectrolyte membranes is capable of improving both proton conductivity and fuel cell performance above 100°C; however, they tend to leach out of the membrane whenever fuel cell flooding happens. To prevent HPA leaching, amine-functionalized mesoporous silica is used to immobilize PTA in Nafion membranes, whose proton conductivity and fuel cell performance are discussed. Compared with Nafion, sulfonated poly(arylene ether)s such as sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone)s are cost-effective materials with excellent thermal and electrochemical stability. Their composites with HPAs show increased proton conductivity at elevated temperatures when fully hydrated. Organic/inorganic hybrid membranes from acid-doped PBIs and other polymers are also discussed.

  2. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    PubMed Central

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, M. Kyle; Concepcion, Javier J.; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Hampton, Shaun D.; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4′-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H+ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated +H─B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state. PMID:21555541

  3. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in electron scattering induced by meson-exchange currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo, I. Ruiz; Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use a relativistic model of meson-exchange currents to compute the proton-neutron and proton-proton yields in (e ,e') scattering from 12C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross section with the relativistic Fermi gas model for a range of kinematics from intermediate- to high-momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the Δ isobar current. We also analyze the effect of the exchange contribution and show that the direct-exchange interference strongly affects the determination of the n p /p p ratio.

  4. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  5. Tuning of Nafion® by HKUST-1 as coordination network to enhance proton conductivity for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Talukdar, Krishan; Choi, Sang-June

    2016-02-01

    Metal-organic frameworks can be intentionally coordinated to achieve improved proton conductivity because they have highly ordered structures and modular nature that serve as a scaffold to anchor acidic groups and develop efficient proton transfer pathways for fuel cell application. Using the concept of a coordination network, the conductivity of Nafion® was tuned by the incorporation of HKUST-1. It has CuII-paddle wheel type nodes and 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate struts, feature accessible sites that provides an improved protonic channel depending on the water content. In spite of the fact that HKUST-1 is neutral, coordinated water molecules are contributed adequately acidic by CuII to supply protons to enhance proton conductivity. Water molecules play a vital part in transfer of proton as conducting media and serve as triggers to change proton conductivity through reforming hydrogen bonding networks by water adsorption/desorption process. Increased ion exchange capacity and proton conductivity with lower water uptake of the H3PO4-doped material, and improved thermal stability (as confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis) were achieved. The structure of HKUST-1 was confirmed via field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, while the porosity and adsorption desorption capacity were characterized by porosity analysis.

  6. On the evolution of the κ distribution of protons in the inner heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Hans-Jörg; Sylla, Adama; Fichtner, Horst; Scherer, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of the solar wind proton distribution function along the plasma flow downstream of the heliospheric termination shock is studied. Starting from a kinetic phase space transport equation valid in the bulk frame of the plasma flow that takes into account convective changes, cooling, velocity diffusion, and charge exchange-induced injection and loss, the associated moment equation for the evolution of the pressure of the total proton population consisting of thermal solar wind and suprathermal pickup protons is derived. Assuming that the local joint proton distribution can always be represented by a so-called κ distribution, an ordinary differential equation for the variation of the parameter κ along a given streamline is obtained. This way, the proton velocity distribution can be computed for the whole inner heliosheath. It is demonstrated that the accelerating effect of velocity diffusion is to be expected to overcompensate the loss effect on the proton distribution at higher velocities due to charge exchange with cold interstellar hydrogen atoms. While this corroborates a value of κ < 1.65 in the inner (upwind) heliosheath, at the same time it reveals that the assumption of a constant κ, which was commonly made in earlier studies, should be abandoned.

  7. Vibrational Relaxation of the Aqueous Proton in Acetonitrile: Ultrafast Cluster Cooling and Vibrational Predissociation.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, N; Liu, L; Bakker, H J

    2016-07-28

    We study the ultrafast O-H stretch vibrational relaxation dynamics of protonated water clusters embedded in a matrix of deuterated acetonitrile, using polarization-resolved mid-IR femtosecond spectroscopy. The clusters are produced by mixing triflic (trifluoromethanesulfonic) acid and H2O in molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, thus varying the degree of hydration of the proton. At all hydration levels the excited O-H stretch vibration of the hydrated proton shows an ultrafast vibrational relaxation with a time constant T1 < 100 fs, leading to an ultrafast local heating of the protonated water cluster. This excess thermal energy, initially highly localized to the region of the excited proton, first re-distributes over the aqueous cluster and then dissipates into the surrounding acetonitrile matrix. For clusters with a triflic acid to H2O ratio of 1:3 these processes occur with time constants of 320 ± 20 fs and 1.4 ± 0.1 ps, respectively. The cooling of the clusters reveals a long-living, underlying transient absorption change with high anisotropy. We argue that this feature stems from the vibrational predissociation of a small fraction of the proton hydration structures, directly following the ultrafast infrared excitation.

  8. Correlation Between Ceres' Water Vapor Detections and Energetic Solar Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Michaela N.; Russell, Christopher T.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Thompson, William T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.; A'Hearn, Michael; Kueppers, Michael; O'Rourke, Laurence

    2017-04-01

    Ceres was expected to be, and Dawn has confirmed, an ice-rich body. Prior to the Dawn mission, several attempts were made to detect exospheric water using terrestrial spacecraft around closest approach of Earth and Ceres. These attempts show the exosphere to be time varying. While it has been proposed that sublimation controls the presence of the exosphere, there is not a correlation between Ceres' heliocentric distance and the positive detections or the magnitude of the signal. Recently, Dawn indirectly twice sensed the presence of an exosphere through the presence of energetic electrons reflected at Ceres' bow shock surface; a shock which is created through the exosphere's interaction with the solar wind. Both these events were preceded by large solar proton events. This is important because water ice can be sputtered by these very energetic protons, the flux of which are highly variable. A solar proton event could produce a transient atmosphere that would last on the order of a week before it disappeared. We analyze the correlation between the observed production rates and the energetic proton flux preceding each observation using space-based measurements near 1 AU. We conclude that solar proton events occurred in conjunction with positive detections, and were absent during negative detections. Since Dawn has seen the same correlation and has not detected evidence for active plumes, optically or thermally, we conclude that the variability of solar energetic protons explains the transient behavior of the Ceres water exosphere.

  9. {beta}-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.-W.; Li, Z.-K.; Xie, Y.-X.; Pan, Q.-Y.; Huang, W.-X.; Wang, X.-D.; Yu, Y.; Xing, Y.-B.; Shu, N.-C.; Chen, Y.-S.; Xu, F.-R.; Wang, K.

    2005-05-01

    We briefly reviewed and summarized the experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays published by our group over the last 8 years, namely the experimental observation of {beta}-delayed proton decays of nine new nuclides in the rare-earth region near the proton drip line and five nuclides in the mass 90 region with N{approx}Z by utilizing the p-{gamma} coincidence technique in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In addition, important technical details of the experiments were provided. The experimental results were compared to the theoretical predictions of some nuclear models, resulting in the following conclusions. (1) The experimental half-lives for {sup 85}Mo, {sup 92}Rh, as well as the predicted 'waiting point' nuclei {sup 89}Ru and {sup 93}Pd were 5-10 times longer than the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions of Moeller et al. [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 66,131(1997)]. These data considerably influenced the predictions of the mass abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp process. (2) The experimental assignments of spin and parity for the drip-line nuclei {sup 142}Ho and {sup 128}Pm could not be well predicted by any of the nuclear models. Nevertheless, the configuration-constrained nuclear potential-energy surfaces calculated by means of a Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method could reproduce the assignments. (3) The ALICE code overestimated by one or two orders of magnitude the production-reaction cross sections of the nine studied rare-earth nuclei, while the HIVAP code overestimated them by approximately one order of magnitude.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  11. Medium energy proton radiation damage to (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R. Y.; Kamath, G. S.; Knechtli, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells irradiated by medium energy 2, 5, and 10 MeV protons was evaluated. The Si cells without coverglass and a number of GaAs solar cells with 12 mil coverglass were irradiated simultaneously with bare GaAs cells. The cell degradation is directly related to the penetration of depth of protons with GaAs. The influence of periodic and continuous thermal annealing on the GaAs solar cells was investigated.

  12. Equation of State Measurements of Dense Plasmas Heated by Laser Accelerated MeV Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Bernstein, Aaron; Cho, Byoung-Ick; Grigsby, Will; Dalton, Allen; Shepherd, Ronnie; Ping, Yuan; Chen, Hui; Widmann, Klaus; Ozterhoz, Jens; Ditmire, Todd

    2008-04-01

    Using a fast proton beam generated with an ultra intense laser we have generated and measured the equation of state of solid density plasma at temperatures near 20 eV, a regime in which there have been few previous experimental measurements. The laser accelerated a directional, short pulse of MeV protons, which isochorically heated a solid slab of aluminum. Using two simultaneous, temporally resolved measurements we observed the thermal emission and expansion of the heated foil with picosecond time resolution. With these data we were able to confirm, to within 10%, the SESAME equation-of-state table in this dense plasma region.

  13. Investigations of thin films on GaAs using the proton resonant scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Jaklevic, J. M.; Haller, E. E.

    1988-04-01

    We have characterized a number of thermally stable thin film/GaAs systems including thin films of refractory metal suicides and nitrides as well as dielectric films on GaAs substrates using a MeV proton scattering technique. Thin films of tungsten suicides, zirconium nitride and silicon dioxide on GaAs substrates are investigated. The enhanced proton scattering cross sections of nitrogen, silicon and oxygen at their corresponding resonant energies enable us to accurately measure the compositions of these films. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique regarding depth resolution, accessible depth, and mass resolution compared to the conventional Rutherford backscattering spectrometry for thin film analysis are discussed.

  14. Ion cooling in the plasmasphere during magnetic storm initial phase: modeling the proton temperature dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Galina; Verigin, Mikhail; Bezrukikh, Vladilen

    The effect of ion temperature decreasing at L ¡ 3 during geomagnetic storm development was recently revealed by INTERBALL 2 and MAGION 5 thermal plasma data. A model of proton drift outward from the Earth caused by magnetic field decreasing in the inner plasmasphere is considered. Conservation of the first adiabatic invariant results in proton cooling during their outward motion. It is shown that model temperatures well agree with experimental data. The work is partially supported by the RAS programs P16 and OFN 15.

  15. Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Commercially known as Solimide, Temptronics, Inc.'s thermal insulation has application in such vehicles as aircraft, spacecraft and surface transportation systems (i.e. rapid transit cars, trains, buses, and ships) as acoustical treatment for door, wall, and ceiling panels, as a means of reducing vibrations, and as thermal insulation (also useful in industrial equipment). Product originated from research conducted by Johnson Space Center on advanced flame-resistant materials for minimizing fire hazard in the Shuttle and other flight vehicles.

  16. The ATLAS Forward Proton Detector (AFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, S.; AFP Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector will identify events in which one or two protons emerge intact from the proton-proton collisions at the LHC. Tracking and timing detectors will be placed 2-3 mm from the beam, 210 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. The silicon-based tracker will provide momentum measurement, while the time of flight system is used to reduce the background from multiple proton-proton collisions. The study of soft and hard diffractive events at low luminosities (μ ≈ 1) is the core of the AFP physics program. This paper presents an overview of the project with particular emphasis on the qualification of the pixel and timing systems.

  17. High-energy proton radiation belt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The experiments and theories to explain the high-energy protons trapped in the earth's radiation belt are reviewed. The theory of cosmic ray albedo neutron decay injection of protons into the radiation belt is discussed. Radial diffusion and change in the earth's dipole moment are considered along with losses of protons by ionization and nuclear collision. It is found that the measured albedo neutron escape current is sufficient to supply trapped protons above 30 MeV. The theoretical calculations of the trapped protons are in agreement with the measurements for L less than or equal to 1.7 both on and off the equator. For L greater than or equal to 1.7, additional trapped proton differential energy measurements should be made before the theory can be adequately tested. It appears that an additional loss mechanism such as pitch angle scattering may be required.

  18. Mechanisms of proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrey, T.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium probably represents the simplest biological solar energy conversion system. Light absorbed by bacteriorhodopsin directly leads to the transport of protons across the cell membrane. The resulting chemosmotic potential can be used to make ATP. An additional feature of the purple membrane is its ability to pump protons over a wide variety of salt concentration including in extreme saline environments. This project investigates the relationship between the transport of protons across the membrane and structure and conformation of bacteriorhodospin. We have proposed experiments to study the pH dependence of proton pumping. Secondly, we are examining the role of divalent cations and the effect of the large surface potential of the purple membrane on the proton pumping function of this membrane using the photocurrents associated with the pumping process. Finally we are studying the role of proteinatable amino acids in proton transport. 16 refs.

  19. Thermal Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    All solid materials, when cooled to low temperatures experience a change in physical dimensions which called "thermal contraction" and is typically lower than 1 % in volume in the 4-300 K temperature range. Although the effect is small, it can have a heavy impact on the design of cryogenic devices. The thermal contraction of different materials may vary by as much as an order of magnitude: since cryogenic devices are constructed at room temperature with a lot of different materials, one of the major concerns is the effect of the different thermal contraction and the resulting thermal stress that may occur when two dissimilar materials are bonded together. In this chapter, theory of thermal contraction is reported in Sect. 1.2 . Section 1.3 is devoted to the phenomenon of negative thermal expansion and its applications.

  20. Novel polymer and inorganic/organic hybrid composite materials for proton exchange membrane applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiwei

    In this study, various novel proton exchange membranes (PEM) have been synthesized and investigated for high temperature PEM applications. Sulfonic acid functionalized polysilsesquioxane hybrid membranes with the empirical formula of R-Si-(O)1.5 consist of a highly cross-linked Si-O backbone and pendant organic side chain R, which is terminated in a proton conducting functional group (i.e., sulfonic acid). The membranes exhibited excellent proton conductivities (sigma) of >10-2 S/cm under low humidity conditions and a wide range of temperatures. The fuel cell (FC) performance of the membranes under low humidity conditions has been evaluated. Acid-doped linear meta-polyaniline membranes have been prepared through solution casting of m-PANI. The obtained membrane shows good proton conductivities at temperatures above 100°C, achieving 10-2.7 S/cm under 120°C and practically no humidity conditions. The effects of doping acids, doping levels and humidity on the conductivity are discussed. Polyethylenimine (PEI)/SiO2 nanocomposites membranes have been synthesized through sol-gel processes. The introduction of SiO2 clusters into high molecule weight, linear PEI greatly improved its thermal stability at high temperatures and O2 atmosphere. During the sol-gel processes, trifluoromethanesulfonimide (HTFSI) was added to dope the amine groups of PEI and form immobilized proton-conducting ionic liquids, which provide the hybrid membranes with proton-conducting behavior. The resultant membranes show good proton conductivities at high temperatures and low to zero humidity conditions. The effects of temperature, humidity and mobility of active groups on the conductivity are discussed. Various organic amine/HTFSI ionic group functionalized polysilsesquioxane hybrid membranes have been prepared. The Si-O backbone provides excellent thermal/chemical/mechanical properties and the HTFSI-doped amine end groups provide the proton conducting properties. The membranes exhibited proton

  1. Recent Development in Proton Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-12-10

    In the naive model of the proton, its 1/2 spin is carried by its quark constituents. However, experiments over the last several decades have shown that the quark spin only contribute a small portion of the proton spin. In this talk, I will present recent developments exploring this proton spin puzzle, and focus on the progress made in the last few years on the longitudinal spin physics, the generalized parton distribution physics, and the transverse spin physics.

  2. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  3. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  4. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  6. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  7. The proton's spin: A quark model perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic moments and g{sub A}/g{sub V} provide information on the correlations among quark spins and flavors in the proton. I compare this information with the deep inelastic polarized data from EMC which has been claimed to show that very little of the proton's spin is due to the quarks. The possibility that there is significant polarization of strange quarks within protons is discussed. 38 refs.

  8. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  9. Proton diffusion pathways and rates in Y-doped BaZrO3 solid oxide electrolyte from quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Merinov, Boris; Goddard, William

    2009-05-21

    We carried out quantum mechanical calculations (Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof flavor of density functional theory) on 12.5% Y-doped BaZrO(3) (BYZ) periodic structures to obtain energy barriers for intraoctahedral and interoctahedral proton transfers. We find activation energy (E(a)) values of 0.48 and 0.49 eV for the intraoctahedral proton transfers on O-O edges (2.58 and 2.59 A) of ZrO(6) and YO(6) octahedra, respectively, and E(a) = 0.41 eV for the interoctahedral proton transfer at O-O separation of 2.54 A. These results indicate that both the interoctahedral and intraoctahedral proton transfers are important in the BYZ electrolyte. Indeed, the calculated values bracket the experimental value of E(a) = 0.44 eV. Based on the results obtained, the atomic level proton diffusion mechanism and possible proton diffusion pathways have been proposed for the BYZ electrolyte. The thermal librations of BO(6) octahedra and uncorrelated thermal vibrations of the two oxygen atoms participating in the hydrogen bond lead to a somewhat chaotic fluctuation in the distances between the O atoms involved in the hydrogen bonding. Such fluctuations affect the barriers and at certain O-O distances allow the hydrogen atoms to move within the hydrogen bonds from one potential minimum to the other and between the hydrogen bonds. Concertation of these intra- and inter-H-bond motions results in continuous proton diffusion pathways. Continuity of proton diffusion pathways is an essential condition for fast proton transport.

  10. Compensation of the beam-beam effect in proton-proton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Zinchenko, A.

    1993-10-01

    Compensation of the beam-beam effect in high-energy proton-proton colliders using a low-energy electron beam is proposed. It is concluded that such compensation looks feasible. Requirements for such a device are formulated.

  11. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120-670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  12. Multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering and soft proton proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, K.

    1987-06-01

    We demonstrate how the theoretical knowledge about multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering can be incorporated into a multistring model for low p/sub t/ proton proton collisions. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  13. SNS Proton Beam Window Disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Trotter, Steven

    2017-09-01

    In order to support the disposal of the proton beam window assembly of the Spallation Neutron Source beamline to the target station, waste classification analyses are performed. The window has a limited life-time due to radiation-induced material damage. Analyses include calculation of the radionuclide inventory and shielding analyses for the transport package/container to ensure that the container is compliant with the transportation and waste management regulations. In order to automate this procedure and minimize manual work a script in Perl language was written.

  14. Proton-deuteron double scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but accurate form for the proton-deuteron elastic double scattering amplitude, which includes both projectile and target recoil motion and is applicable at all momentum transfer, is derived by taking advantage of the restricted range of Fermi momentum allowed by the deuteron wave function. This amplitude can be directly compared to approximations which have neglected target recoil or are limited to small momentum transfer; the target recoil and large momentum transfer effects are evaluated explicitly within the context of a Gaussian model.

  15. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A [Riverside, CA; Beloussov, Alexandre V [Bernardino, CA; Bakir, Julide [Alta Loma, CA; Armon, Deganit [Redlands, CA; Olsen, Howard B [Colton, CA; Salem, Dana [Riverside, CA

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  16. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  17. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  18. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  19. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K. S.; Mas, J. F.; McConnell, J. W.; Yu, C.-H.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R. C.; Woods, P. J.; Ginter, T. N.; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S. H.; Weintraub, W.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; MacDonald, B. D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E. F.

    1998-12-21

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu.

  20. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  2. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  3. Sigmatropic proton shifts: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2017-09-13

    A quantum chemical study of [1,j] sigmatropic proton shifts in polyenyl anions and related conjugated systems has been performed. We found that the Woodward-Hoffmann rules can be applied to understand the stereochemical outcome of these sigmatropic rearrangements, showing that [1,j] sigmatropic proton shift occurs antarafacially when j = 4n + 2, while suprafacial proton shift is symmetry-allowed when j = 4n. The activation barriers for [1,j] proton shifts in polyenyl anions CjHj+3(-) are 48.2 (j = 2), 32.8 (j = 4), 21.0 (j = 6), 40.5 (j = 8), and 49.1 (j = 10) kcal mol(-1), respectively. This trend can be explained by the trade-off between stereoelectronic requirement and ring strain in the proton shift transition structure. Among these reactions, only the [1,6] proton shift with the lowest activation barrier can occur intramolecularly under mild reaction conditions. The others are unlikely to take place in a direct manner. Consequently, proton shuttles are generally required to facilitate these sigmatropic proton shifts through a protonation/deprotonation mechanism.

  4. Extracellular proton release by stimulated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    van Zwieten, R.; Wever, R.; Hamers, M.N.; Weening, R.S.; Roos, D.

    1981-07-01

    We have tried to elucidate the mechanism of phagosome acidification in human neutrophils. Assuming that phenomena occurring at the plasma membrane reflect reactions in the phagocytic vacuoles, we have stimulated human neutrophils with agents that induce a ''respiratory burst,'' and we have measured the release of protons into the extracellular medium. Phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and serum-opsonized zymosan particles each caused a rapid release of protons, concomitant with the increase in oxygen consumption. The stimulated release of protons was strictly coupled to the increase respiration of the cells, because inhibition of the respiration of either anaerobiosis, chlorpromazine, or glycolytic inhibitors also inhibited the release of protons. Also, in the presence of the above-mentioned stimulating agents, neutrophils from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease enhanced neither respiration not proton release. In normal cells, the ratio of deltaH+/-deltaO2 was 1.04 +/- 0.19 (mean +/ SD, n . 13). The mechanism of this proton release is not clear. The amount of lactic and carbonic acid produced by stimulated neutrophils was inadequate to explain the amount of protons released. Perhydroxyl radicals were also ruled out as the source of the protons. Because the cells did not release measurable amounts of phosphate ions, a phosphate-hydroxyl-ion antiport was also excluded. Finally, the lack of any effect of uncouplers renders it unlikely that a respiration-driven proton gradient is built up across the plasma membrane.

  5. Nuclear interaction cross sections for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, M. B.; Jones, D. T. L.; Arendse, G. J.; Cowley, A. A.; Richter, W. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Newman, R. T.; Pilcher, J. V.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F.; Koen, JW; Stander, JA

    Model calculations of proton-induced nuclear reaction cross sections are described for biologically-important targets. Measurements made at the National Accelerator Centre are presented for double-differential proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha particle spectra, for 150 and 200 MeV protons incident on C, N, and O. These data are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and absorbed dose in proton therapy. Data relevant to the use of positron emission tomography to locate the Bragg peak are also described.

  6. Molecular mechanisms for proton transport in membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J F; Morowitz, H J

    1978-01-01

    Likely mechanisms for proton transport through biomembranes are explored. The fundamental structural element is assumed to be continuous chains of hydrogen bonds formed from the protein side groups, and a molecular example is presented. From studies in ice, such chains are predicted to have low impedance and can function as proton wires. In addition, conformational changes in the protein may be linked to the proton conduction. If this possibility is allowed, a simple proton pump can be described that can be reversed into a molecular motor driven by an electrochemical potential across the membrane. PMID:272644

  7. Parameterization of spectral distributions for pion and kaon production in proton-proton collisions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J P; Norbury, J W; Cucinotta, F A

    1995-04-01

    Accurate semi-empirical parameterizations of the energy-differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production from proton-proton collisions are presented at energies relevant to cosmic rays. The parameterizations depend on the outgoing meson momentum and also the proton energy, and are able to be reduced to very simple analytical formulas suitable for cosmic-ray transport.

  8. Parameterization of spectral distributions for pion and kaon production in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, John P.; Norbury, John W.; Cucinotta, Frank A.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate semi-empirical parameterizations of the energy-differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production from proton-proton collisions are presented at energies relevant to cosmic rays. The parameterizations depend on the outgoing meson momentum and also the proton energy, and are able to be reduced to very simple analytical formulas suitable for cosmic-ray transport.

  9. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  10. Water Molecules in Short- and Long-Distance Proton Transfer Steps of Bacteriorhodopsin Proton Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, JEREMY C.

    2009-07-01

    The proton pumping cycle of bacteriorhodopsin consists of five consecutive proton transfer steps in which water molecules are likely to play critical roles. The role of water molecules in bacteriorhodopsin function is reviewed, with emphasis on computations of the retinal Schiff base deprotonation reaction and the open questions regarding the participation of water molecules in the longer-distance proton transfer reactions.

  11. Parameterization of spectral distributions for pion and kaon production in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, John P.; Norbury, John W.; Cucinotta, Frank A.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate semi-empirical parameterizations of the energy-differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production from proton-proton collisions are presented at energies relevant to cosmic rays. The parameterizations depend on the outgoing meson momentum and also the proton energy, and are able to be reduced to very simple analytical formulas suitable for cosmic-ray transport.

  12. Temperature mapping of thermal ablation using MRI.

    PubMed

    Samset, Eigil

    2006-01-01

    MRI is a unique tool for minimally invasive thermal ablation in that it can provide both targeting, monitoring and control during the procedure. Monitoring is achieved by using MRI temperature mapping. In this review the relevant physics is explained as a background to the state-of-the-art methods for computing temperature maps as well as the more cutting edge methods. The review covers both methods to monitor heating and cooling of tissue and explains temperature mapping using Proton Resonance Frequency shift, T1 mapping, diffusion mapping, R2* mapping and thermal models.

  13. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH{sup +}s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 {mu}m interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH{sup +}s have a band near 6.2 {mu}m, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH{sup +}s still have emission near 6.2 {mu}m, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 {mu}m overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 {mu}m, so that the 6.2 {mu}m band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH{sup +}s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 {mu}m (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 {mu}m Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  14. MCNP5 for proton radiography.

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H. G.; Brown, F. B.; Bull, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.; Little, R. C.; Liu, L. C.; Mashnik, S. G.; Prael, R. E.; Selcow, Elizabeth Carol,; Sierk, A. J.; Sweezy, J. E.; Zumbro, J. D.; Mokhov, N. V.; Striganov, S.; Gudima, K. K.

    2004-01-01

    The developmental version of MCNPS has recently been extended to provide for continuous-energy transport of high-energy protons. This enhancement involves the incorporation of several significant new physics models into the code. Multiple Coulomb scattering is treated with an advanced model that takes account of projectile and nuclear target form factors. In the next version, this model will provide a coupled sampling of both angular deflection and collisional energy loss, including straggling. The proton elastic scattering model is also new, based on recent theoretical work. Charged particle transport in the presence of magnetic fields is accomplished either by using transfer maps from the COSY INFINITY code (in void regions) or by using an algorithm adapted from the MARS code (in void regions or in scattering materials). Work is underway to validate and implement the latest versions of the Cascade-Exciton Model and the Los Alamos Quark-Gluon-String Model, which will process inelastic nuclear interactions and generate secondary particles.

  15. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  16. The proton driver design study

    SciTech Connect

    Editors: W. Chou, C.M. Ankenbrandt and E.I. Malamud

    2001-03-08

    In a 1997 summer study, a team led by Steve Holmes formulated a development plan for the Fermilab proton source and described the results in TM-2021. Subsequently, at the end of 1998, a task group was formed to prepare a detailed design of a high intensity facility called the Proton Driver to replace the Fermilab Booster. In the past two years the design effort has attracted more than fifty participants, mostly from the Beams Division. Physicists and engineers from the Technical Division and FESS as well as other institutions, including the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Stanford University, University of Hawaii, CERN in Switzerland, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England and the IHEP in Russia also contributed heavily. The results of that effort are summarized in this document describing the design of a 16 GeV synchrotron, two new beam transport lines (a 400 MeV injection line and a 12/16 GeV extraction line), and related improvements to the present negative ion source and the 400 MeV Linac. A construction cost estimate is presented in Appendix A.

  17. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  18. Neutron-proton bremsstrahlung experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.E.; Nelson, R.O.; Schillaci, M.E.; Wender, S.A.; Mayo, D.; Brady, F.P.; Romero, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Blann, M.; Anthony, P.; Brown, V.R.; Hansen, L.; Pohl, B.; Sangster, T.C.; Nifenecker, H.; Pinston, J.A.

    1992-12-01

    It is well known that charged particles emit bremsstrahlung radiation when they are accelerated. Classical electron bremsstrahlung occurs when a photon is emitted by an electron accelerated in the field of a nucleus. The bremsstrahlung process also occurs in the scattering of nucleons, for which it is the lowest energy inelastic process that can occur. Like electron bremsstrahlung, nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung also requires the exchange of a virtual particle to conserve energy and momentum. In electron bremsstrahlung a virtual photon is exchanged but with two nucleons a meson can be exchanged. Unlike electron bremsstrahlung, in nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung the photon can originate from the exchanged meson. This exchange contribution has been shown in calculations to be a significant fraction of bremsstrahlung events. Thus bremsstrahlung serves as a probe of exchange currents in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Because of a lack of a free neutron target or an intense neutron beam, few measurements of neutron-proton bremsstrahlung exist, each having poor statistical accuracy and poor energy resolution. The white neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) target area at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) produces neutrons with energies from below 50 to above 400 MeV. Using time-of-flight techniques and a liquid hydrogen target, we are measuring the outgoing photons of energies up to 250 MeV at gamma ray angles of around 90{degree} relative to the incident beam. Protons scattered at very forward angles are also detected in coincidence with the gamma rays.

  19. Treatment planning for conformal proton radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bussière, Mark R; Adams, Judith A

    2003-10-01

    Clinical results from various trials have demonstrated the viability of protons in radiation therapy and radiosurgery. This has motivated a few large medical centers to design and build expensive hospital based proton facilities based proton facilities (current cost estimates for a proton facility is around 100 million US dollars). Until this development proton therapy was done using retrofitted equipment originally designed for nuclear experiments. There are presently only three active proton therapy centers in the United States, 22 worldwide. However, more centers are under construction and being proposed in the US and abroad. The important difference between proton and x-ray therapy is in the dose distribution. X-rays deposit most of their dose at shallow depths of a few centimeters with a gradual decay with depth in the patient. Protons deliver most of their dose in the Bragg peak, which can be delivered at most clinically required depths followed by a sharp fall-off. This sharp falloff makes protons sensitive to variations in treatment depths within patients. Treatment planning incorporates all the knowledge of protons into a process, which allows patients to be treated accurately and reliably. This process includes patient immobilization, imaging, targeting, and modeling of planned dose distributions. Although the principles are similar to x-ray therapy some significant differences exist in the planning process, which described in this paper. Target dose conformality has recently taken on much momentum with the advent of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with photon beams. Proton treatments provide a viable alternative to IMRT because they are inherently conformal avoiding normal tissue while irradiating the intended targets. Proton therapy will soon bring conformality to a new high with the development of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Future challenges include keeping the cost down, increasing access to conventional proton therapy as

  20. Proton-proton correlations in distinguishing the two-proton emission mechanism of 23Al and 22Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Sun, X. Y.; Zhou, P.; Togano, Y.; Aoi, N.; Baba, H.; Cai, X. Z.; Cao, X. G.; Chen, J. G.; Fu, Y.; Guo, W.; Hara, Y.; Honda, T.; Hu, Z. G.; Ieki, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kanno, S.; Kawabata, T.; Kimura, H.; Kondo, Y.; Kurita, K.; Kurokawa, M.; Moriguchi, T.; Murakami, H.; Ooishi, H.; Okada, K.; Ota, S.; Ozawa, A.; Sakurai, H.; Shimoura, S.; Shioda, R.; Takeshita, E.; Takeuchi, S.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, M.; Yamada, K.; Yamada, Y.; Yasuda, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Zhang, G. Q.; Motobayashi, T.

    2016-10-01

    The proton-proton momentum correlation functions [Cp p(q ) ] for the kinematically complete decay channels 23Al→p +p +21Na and 22Mg→p +p +20Ne have been measured at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. From the very different correlation strength of Cp p(q ) for 23Al and 22Mg, the source size and emission time information were extracted from the Cp p(q ) data by assuming a Gaussian source profile in the correlation function calculation code (crab). The results indicated that the mechanism of two-proton emission from 23Al was mainly sequential emission, while that of 22Mg was mainly three-body simultaneous emission. By combining our earlier results of the two-proton relative momentum and the opening angle, it is pointed out that the mechanism of two-proton emission could be distinguished clearly.

  1. Double-Relativistic-Electron-Layer Proton Acceleration with High-Contrast Circular-Polarization Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Nai-Yan; Tang, Xiu-Zhang; Shi, Yi-Jin; Zhang, Shan

    2013-02-01

    A new laser-proton acceleration scheme consisting of two relativistic electron layers, a suprathermal electron layer and a thermal electron cloud is proposed for a0 ≳ 80σ0, where a0 is the normalized laser field and σ0 is the normalized plasma surface density. This is essentially different from target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration. The persistent opaqueness of the first relativistic electron layer for the incident circular-polarization laser pulse and electron recirculation are key points in forming the new acceleration scheme. A proton beam with a uniform energy distribution in the energy range 1-2 GeV and a monoenergetic proton beam with hundreds of MeV have been predicted for a0 = 39.5.

  2. Long-lived states to monitor protein unfolding by proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Aurélien; Ahuja, Puneet; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Fernandes, Laetitia; Hadji, Sonia; Lee, Shirley Y; Haririnia, Aydin; Fushman, David; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Vasos, Paul R

    2011-10-24

    The relaxation of long-lived states (LLS) corresponds to the slow return to statistical thermal equilibrium between symmetric and antisymmetric proton spin states. This process is remarkably sensitive to the presence of external spins and can be used to obtain information about partial unfolding of proteins. We detected the appearance of a destabilized conformer of ubiquitin when urea is added to the protein in its native state. This conformer shows increased mobility in the C-terminus, which significantly extends the lifetimes of proton LLS magnetisation in Ser-65. These changes could not be detected by conventional measurements of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times of protons, and would hardly be sensed by carbon-13 or nitrogen-15 relaxation measurements. Conformers with similar dynamic and structural features, as revealed by LLS relaxation times, could be observed, in the absence of urea, in two ubiquitin mutants, L67S and L69S.

  3. Chitin nanowhisker-supported sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) proton exchange for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chan; Zhuang, Xupin; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Wei; Cheng, Bowen; Kang, Weimin; Cai, Zhanjun; Li, Mengqin

    2016-04-20

    To balance the relationship among proton conductivity and mechanic strength of sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) (SPES) membrane, chitin nanowhisker-supported nanocomposite membranes were prepared by incorporating whiskers into SPES. The as-prepared chitin whiskers were prepared by 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) mediated oxidation of α-chitin from crab shells. The structure and properties of the composite membranes were examined as proton exchange membrane (PEM). Results showed that chitin nanowhiskers were dispersed incompactly in the SPES matrix. Thermal stability, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of the nanocomposite films were improved from those of the pure SPES film with increasing whisker content, which ascribed to strong interactions between whiskers and between SPES molecules and chitin whiskers via hydrogen bonding. These indicated that composition of filler and matrix got good properties and whisker-supported membranes are promising materials for PEM.

  4. Proton-transfer polymerization (HTP): converting methacrylates to polyesters by an N-heterocyclic carbene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Miao; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2014-10-27

    A new polymerization termed proton (H)-transfer polymerization (HTP) has been developed to convert dimethacrylates to unsaturated polyesters. HTP is catalyzed by a selective N-heterocyclic carbene capable of promoting intermolecular Umpolung condensation through proton transfer and proceeds through the step-growth propagation cycles via enamine intermediates. The role of the added suitable phenol, which is critical for achieving an effective HTP, is twofold: shutting down the radically induced chain-growth addition polymerization under HTP conditions (typically at 80-120 °C) and facilitating proton transfer after each monomer enchainment. The resulting unsaturated polyesters have a high thermal stability and can be readily cross-linked to robust polyester materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Bend-fatigue properties of 590 MeV proton irradiated JPCA and 316F SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Usami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Nishino, Y.; Kawai, M.; Dai, Y.

    2004-08-01

    A beam window of a spallation target will be subjected to proton/neutron irradiation, pressure wave and thermal stresses accompanied by high-energy proton beam injection. To obtain irradiation data, the SINQ target irradiation program (STIP) was initiated in 1996 at PSI. JAERI takes part in STIP and conducted the post-irradiation examination of JPCA, 316F. Irradiation conditions of JAERI specimens were as follows: proton energy was 590 MeV. Irradiation temperature ranged from 135 to 360 °C and irradiation dose from 6.3 to 12.5 dpa. The fatigue life of irradiated specimens is almost the same as that of unirradiated specimens. On the other hand, fracture surfaces varied with irradiation conditions. Specimens irradiated at low temperature fractured in a ductile manner. However, intergranular fractured surfaces were observed for 316F irradiated up to 12.5 dpa at 360 °C.

  6. M2 Proton Channel: Toward a Model of a Primitive Proton Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  7. M2 proton channel: toward a model of a primitive proton pump.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  8. Thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslett, B.

    1984-02-01

    There are basically three key ingredients to the thermal control system for any large space platform or space station. These are heat rejection (from a centralized radiator or from body mounted radiators), heat acquisition (from payloads), and heat transport (via a transport loop to the radiator). The echnical approach in the heat rejection area is to construct the radiator from individual elements so that it can be built on-orbit, is very insensitive to meteoroid and debris hazards, and is repairable. In the area of thermal acquisition and transport an added effort to better understand two phase flow in zero gravity by analysis and testing is suggested.

  9. Matrix thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  10. Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra through Decays of Neutral Pions Produced in Proton-Proton Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ching-Yuan

    2003-07-01

    The accuracy of different parameterisations of neutral pion production in proton-proton collisions is investigated based on analyses of accelerator measurements of differential and integrated total cross sections. The energy spectra of gamma-rays from the decay of secondary particles produced by interactions of cosmic-ray protons with ambient gas is calculated over wide energy range for different primary spectra of protons. It is found that a proton flux with a spectral index α = 2.4 ˜ 2.6 is appropriate to repro duce the GeV bump in the diffuse γ -ray flux.

  11. On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections

  12. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  13. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  14. Reduced Calibration Curve for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yevseyeva, Olga; Assis, Joaquim de; Diaz, Katherin

    2010-05-21

    The pCT deals with relatively thick targets like the human head or trunk. Thus, the fidelity of pCT as a tool for proton therapy planning depends on the accuracy of physical formulas used for proton interaction with thick absorbers. Although the actual overall accuracy of the proton stopping power in the Bethe-Bloch domain is about 1%, the analytical calculations and the Monte Carlo simulations with codes like TRIM/SRIM, MCNPX and GEANT4 do not agreed with each other. A tentative to validate the codes against experimental data for thick absorbers bring some difficulties: only a few data is available and the existing data sets have been acquired at different initial proton energies, and for different absorber materials. In this work we compare the results of our Monte Carlo simulations with existing experimental data in terms of reduced calibration curve, i.e. the range - energy dependence normalized on the range scale by the full projected CSDA range for given initial proton energy in a given material, taken from the NIST PSTAR database, and on the final proton energy scale - by the given initial energy of protons. This approach is almost energy and material independent. The results of our analysis are important for pCT development because the contradictions observed at arbitrary low initial proton energies could be easily scaled now to typical pCT energies.

  15. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  16. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  17. Proton Therapy Research and Treatment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Goodnight, J.E. Jr.; Alonso, J.R.

    1992-05-01

    This Grant proposal outlines the steps that will be undertaken to bring the UC Davis Proton Therapy Research and Treatment, known locally as the Proton Therapy Facility (PTF), through its design and construction phases. This application concentrates on the design phase of the PTF project.

  18. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  19. Proton Therapy Research and Treatment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Goodnight, J.E. Jr. . Cancer Center); Alonso, J.R. )

    1992-05-01

    This Grant proposal outlines the steps that will be undertaken to bring the UC Davis Proton Therapy Research and Treatment, known locally as the Proton Therapy Facility (PTF), through its design and construction phases. This application concentrates on the design phase of the PTF project.

  20. First Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, T.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Brennan, J. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E. D.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fliller, R.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; van Zeijts, J.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Deshpande, A.; Kurita, K.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; Syphers, M.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.; Ranjbar, V.; Tojo, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Okamura, M.; Saito, N.

    2003-05-01

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180° about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV.

  1. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  2. Strangeness production with protons and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1993-04-01

    We discuss the spectrum of physics questions related to strangeness which could be addressed with intense beams of protons and pions in the few GeV region. We focus on various aspects of strangeness production, including hyperon production in pp collisions, studies of hyperon-nucleon scattering, production of hypernuclei in proton and pion-nucleus collisions, and spin phenomena in hypernuclei.

  3. Perspective Study of Charmonium and Exotics in Antiproton-Proton Annihilation and Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Olsen, Stephen; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the Dbar{D} threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using a high quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c.

  4. MO-A-18C-01: Proton Therapy I: Basics of Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, B; Sahoo, N; Pankuch, M

    2014-06-15

    The goal of this session is to introduce the audience to the physics, dosimetry and treatment planning procedures used in proton therapy. The course material covers the basic physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for scattered and scanning proton beams. It will include the requirements for dosimetry measurements and present the equipment needed for commissioning of proton beams for clinical use and quality assurance checks as well as methods used for proton beam calibration and dose verification of patient treatment fields. The session covers the treatment planning strategies for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. Challenges involved in the motion management in proton therapy will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge on physics, dosimetry, treatment planning and quality assurance for proton therapy. Understand the uncertainties associated with proton therapy and currently used strategies for their mitigation in treatment planning.

  5. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; Barnes, C. W.; Bogdanov, A.; Danly, C. R.; Efimov, S.; Endres, M.; Fertman, A.; Golubev, A. A.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Ionita, B.; Kantsyrev, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Lang, P. M.; Lomonosov, I.; Mariam, F. G.; Markov, N.; Mintsev, V. B.; Nikolaev, D.; Panyushkin, V.; Rodionova, M.; Schanz, M.; Schoenberg, K.; Semennikov, A.; Shestov, L.; Skachkov, V. S.; Turtikov, V.; Udrea, S.; Vasylyev, O.; Weyrich, K.; Wilde, C.; Zubareva, A.; Merrill, F. E.

    2016-02-18

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5–4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This study describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic protonradiography experiments performed at GSI.

  6. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; ...

    2016-02-18

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5–4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This study describes the PRIOR setup as well asmore » the results of the first static and dynamic protonradiography experiments performed at GSI.« less

  7. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S; Nair, Balakrishnan G; Small, Troy; Heck, Brian

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  8. Energy transport mechanism in the form of proton soliton in a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded polypeptide chain.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, L; Priya, R; Ayyappan, N; Gopi, D; Jayanthi, S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of protons in a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded (HB) polypeptide chain (PC) is investigated theoretically. A new Hamiltonian is formulated with the inclusion of higher-order molecular interactions between peptide groups (PGs). The wave function of the excitation state of a single particle is replaced by a new wave function of a two-quanta quasi-coherent state. The dynamics is governed by a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the energy transport is performed by the proton soliton. A nonlinear multiple-scale perturbation analysis has been performed and the evolution of soliton parameters such as velocity and amplitude is explored numerically. The proton soliton is thermally stable and very robust against these perturbations. The energy transport by the proton soliton is more appropriate to understand the mechanism of energy transfer in biological processes such as muscle contraction, DNA replication, and neuro-electric pulse transfer on biomembranes.

  9. High temperature polymers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsla, Brian Russel

    Novel proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were investigated that show potential for operating at higher temperatures in both direct methanol (DMFC) and H 2/air PEM fuel cells. The need for thermally stable polymers immediately suggests the possibility of heterocyclic polymers bearing appropriate ion conducting sites. Accordingly, monomers and random disulfonated poly(arylene ether) copolymers containing either naphthalimide, benzoxazole or benzimidazole moieties were synthesized via direct copolymerization. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied by simply changing the ratio of disulfonated monomer to nonsulfonated monomer in the copolymerization step. Water uptake and proton conductivity of cast membranes increased with IEC. The water uptake of these heterocyclic copolymers was lower than that of comparable disulfonated poly(arylene ether) systems, which is a desirable improvement for PEMs. Membrane electrode assemblies were prepared and the initial fuel cell performance of the disulfonated polyimide and polybenzoxazole (PBO) copolymers was very promising at 80°C compared to the state-of-the-art PEM (NafionRTM); nevertheless these membranes became brittle under operating conditions. Several series of poly(arylene ether)s based on disodium-3,3'-disulfonate-4,4 '-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (S-DCDPS) and a benzimidazole-containing bisphenol were synthesized and afforded copolymers with enhanced stability. Selected properties of these membranes were compared to separately prepared miscible blends of disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers and polybenzimidazole (PBI). Complexation of the sulfonic acid groups with the PBI structure reduced water swelling and proton conductivity. The enhanced proton conductivity of NafionRTM membranes has been proposed to be due to the aggregation of the highly acidic side-chain sulfonic acid sites to form ion channels. A series of side-chain sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers based on methoxyhydroquinone was

  10. Thermal defoliation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The negative perception some consumers hold regarding agricultural chemicals has resulted in an increased demand for organic foods and fibers, and in increasing political pressure for the regulation of agricultural production practices. This has revived interest in thermal defoliation of cotton and ...

  11. Detection of spallation neutrons and protons using the (nat)Cd activation technique in transmutation experiments at Dubna.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Fragopoulou, M; Brandt, R; Westmeier, W; Krivopustov, M; Sosnin, A; Zamani, M

    2006-07-01

    Various spallation sources have been used to transmute long-lived radioactive waste, mostly making use of the wide energy neutron fluence. In addition to neutrons, a large number of protons and gamma rays are also emitted from these sources. In this paper (nat)Cd is proved to be a useful activation detector for determining both thermal-epithermal neutron as well as secondary proton fluences. The fluences measured with (nat)Cd compared with other experimental data and calculations of DCM-DEM code were found to be in reasonable agreement. An accumulation of thermal-epithermal neutrons around the center of the target (i.e. after approx. 10 cm) and of secondary protons towards the end of the target is observed.

  12. High density scintillating glass proton imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C. J.; Goranson, K.; Turney, A.; Xie, Q.; Tillman, I. J.; Thune, Z. L.; Dong, A.; Pritchett, D.; McInally, W.; Potter, A.; Wang, D.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proton therapy has achieved remarkable precision in delivering doses to cancerous cells while avoiding healthy tissue. However, in order to utilize this high precision treatment, greater accuracy in patient positioning is needed. An accepted approximate uncertainty of +/-3% exists in the current practice of proton therapy due to conversions between x-ray and proton stopping power. The use of protons in imaging would eliminate this source of error and lessen the radiation exposure of the patient. To this end, this study focuses on developing a novel proton-imaging detector built with high-density glass scintillator. The model described herein contains a compact homogeneous proton calorimeter composed of scintillating, high density glass as the active medium. The unique geometry of this detector allows for the measurement of both the position and residual energy of protons, eliminating the need for a separate set of position trackers in the system. Average position and energy of a pencil beam of 106 protons is used to reconstruct the image rather than by analyzing individual proton data. Simplicity and efficiency were major objectives in this model in order to present an imaging technique that is compact, cost-effective, and precise, as well as practical for a clinical setting with pencil-beam scanning proton therapy equipment. In this work, the development of novel high-density glass scintillator and the unique conceptual design of the imager are discussed; a proof-of-principle Monte Carlo simulation study is performed; preliminary two-dimensional images reconstructed from the Geant4 simulation are presented.

  13. Liquid hydrogen in protonic chabazite.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Lamberti, Carlo; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-05-04

    Due to its fully reversible nature, H(2) storage by molecular adsorption could represent an advantage with respect to dissociative processes, where kinetic effects during the charging and discharging processes are present. A drawback of this strategy is represented by the extremely weak interactions that require low temperature and high pressure. High surface area materials hosting polarizing sites can represent a viable way toward more favorable working conditions. Of these, in this contribution, we have studied hydrogen adsorption in a series of zeolites using volumetric techniques and infrared spectroscopy at 15 K. We have found that in H-SSZ-13 zeolite the cooperative role played by high surface area, internal wall topology, and presence of high binding energy sites (protons) allows hydrogen to densify inside the nanopores at favorable temperature and pressure conditions.

  14. Proton Irradiation Creep in Pyrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-10-01

    This project aims to understand irradiation creep in pyrocarbon using proton irradiation under controlled stresses and temperatures. Experiments will be conducted over a range of temperatures and stresses per the proposal submitted. The work scope will include the preparation of samples, measurement of deposition thickness, thickness uniformity, and anisotropy. The samples produced will be made in strips, which will be used for the creep experiments. Materials used will include pyrolytic carbon (PyC), Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), or graphite strip samples in that order depending upon success. Temperatures tested under will range from 800°C to 1200°C, and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa. Optional testing may occur at 900°C and 1100°C and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa if funding is available.

  15. The "heartbeat of the proton"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisskopf, Victor F.

    Once Nino came to my office to tell me about his ideas of studying lepton pair production at PS. I was still not Director General, but Research Director at CERN. In addition to (e+e-) and (μ+μ-) pairs, he wanted to search for (e±μ∓) pairs as a signature of a new lepton carrying its own lepton number. He told me that if such a lepton existed with one GeV mass, it would have escaped detection in hadron accelerator experiments for two reasons: i) it would decay with a lifetime of order 10-11 sec and ii) because there is no π → μ mechanism for such a heavy new lepton: for its production a time-like photon would be needed. Time-like photons could be produced in hadronic interactions: for example in (bar{p}p) annihilation. This was before Lederman-Schwartz and Steinberger had discovered the two neutrinos. To think of a "sequential" Heavy Lepton and to work out the possible ways to get it in a hadron machine was for me extremely interesting Nino had just finished his first high precision work on the muon (g-2). It was some time after the Rochester Conference in 1960. I gave Nino the following suggestion: if you want to search for something so revolutionary as a Heavy Lepton carrying its own lepton number you should work out a proposal for a series of experiments where the study of lepton pairs (e+e-) and (μ+μ-) could be justified in terms of physics accepted by the community. In addition a high intensity antiproton beam was needed. He came later to tell me that he had two very good friends, both excellent engineers: Mario Morpurgo and Guido Petrucci. A very high intensity antiproton beam could be built to study the electromagnetic form factor of the proton in the time-like region. If the proton was "point-like" in the time-like region, the rate of time-like photons yielding (e+e-) and (μ+μ-) pairs could be accessible to experimental observation, thus allowing to establish some limits on the new Heavy Lepton mass, or to see it, via the (e±μ∓) channel. The

  16. Blockage of intracellular proton extrusion with proton extrusions with proton pump inhibitor induces apoptosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Marie; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Hee Jin; Cho, Sung Won; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lee, Kwang Jae

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors have been used for treatment of acid-related gastroesophageal diseases and they act as potent inhibitors of gastric acid pump, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Since cancer cells in vivo often exist in an ischemic microenvironment with a lower pH, maintenance of cellular pH is important for cell survival. In this study, we evaluated whether blocking of proton extrusion with proton pump inhibitors could inhibit the viability of gastric cancer cells. Treatment of human gastric cancer cells with proton pump inhibitors significantly attenuated cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The pro-apoptotic activity of proton pump inhibitors was mediated by release of cytochrome c and caspases activation. Gastric cancer cells showed the resistance to acidity of culture medium, which was related with a remarkable increase of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the acidic condition. This ERK1/2 phosphorylation was completely inhibited by pretreatment with proton pump inhibitors, suggesting that its inhibitory action on phosphorylation of ERK1/2 might contribute to the induction of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest novel therapeutic approaches for gastric cancer with proton pump inhibitors.

  17. Thermal Hardware for the Thermal Analyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). NCTS 21070-1. Most Thermal analysts do not have a good background into the hardware which thermally controls the spacecraft they design. SINDA and Thermal Desktop models are nice, but knowing how this applies to the actual thermal hardware (heaters, thermostats, thermistors, MLI blanketing, optical coatings, etc...) is just as important. The course will delve into the thermal hardware and their application techniques on actual spacecraft. Knowledge of how thermal hardware is used and applied will make a thermal analyst a better engineer.

  18. Distinct Modulations of Human Capsaicin Receptor by Protons and Magnesium through Different Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu; Poon, Kinning; Oswald, Robert E.; Chuang, Huai-hu

    2010-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel that integrates multiple painful stimuli, including capsaicin, protons, and heat. Protons facilitate the capsaicin- and heat-induced currents by decreasing thermal threshold or increasing agonist potency for TRPV1 activation (Tominaga, M., Caterina, M. J., Malmberg, A. B., Rosen, T. A., Gilbert, H., Skinner, K., Raumann, B. E., Basbaum, A. I., and Julius, D. (1998) Neuron 21, 531–543). In the presence of saturating capsaicin, rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) reaches full activation, with no further stimulation by protons. Human TRPV1 (hTRPV1), a species ortholog with high homology to rTRPV1, is potentiated by extracellular protons and magnesium, even at saturating capsaicin. We investigated the structural basis for protons and magnesium modulation of fully capsaicin-bound human receptors. By analysis of chimeric channels between hTRPV1 and rTRPV1, we found that transmembrane domain 1–4 (TM1–4) of TRPV1 determines whether protons can further open the fully capsaicin-bound receptors. Mutational analysis identified a titratable glutamate residue (Glu-536) in the linker between TM3 and TM4 critical for further stimulation of fully liganded hTRPV1. In contrast, hTRPV1 TM5–6 is required for magnesium augmentation of capsaicin efficacy. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin efficacy of hTRPV1 correlates with the extracellular ion milieu and unravel the relevant structural basis of modulation by protons and magnesium. PMID:20145248

  19. Free-Energy Landscape and Proton Transfer Pathways in Oxidative Deamination by Methylamine Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zelleke, Theodros; Marx, Dominik

    2017-01-18

    The rate-determining step in the reductive half-reaction of the bacterial enzyme methylamine dehydrogenase, which is proton abstraction from the native substrate methylamine, is investigated using accelerated QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Generation of the multidimensional thermal free-energy landscape without restriction of the degrees of freedom beyond a multidimensional reaction subspace maps two rather similar pathways for the underlying proton transfer to one of two aspartate carboxyl oxygen atoms, termed OD1 and OD2, which hydrogen bond with Thr122 and Trp108, respectively. Despite significant large-amplitude motion perpendicular to the one-dimensional proton transfer coordinate, due to fluctuations of the donor-acceptor distance of about 3 Å, it is found that the one-dimensional proton transfer free-energy profiles are essentially identical to the minimum free-energy pathways on the multidimensional free-energy landscapes for both proton transfer channels. Proton transfer to one of the acceptor oxygen atoms-the OD2 site-is slightly favored in methylamine dehydrogenase by approximately 2 kcal mol(-1) , both kinetically and thermodynamically. Mechanistic analyses reveal that the hydrogen bond between Thr122β and OD1 is always present in the transition state independently of the proton transfer channel. Population analysis confirms that the electronic charge gained upon oxidation of the substrate is delocalized within the ring systems of the tryptophan tryptophylquinone cofactor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Enhanced proton transport in nanostructured polymer electrolyte/ionic liquid membranes under water-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Yeon; Kim, Suhan; Park, Moon Jeong

    2010-10-05

    Proton exchange fuel cells (PEFCs) have the potential to provide power for a variety of applications ranging from electronic devices to transportation vehicles. A major challenge towards economically viable PEFCs is finding an electrolyte that is both durable and easily passes protons. In this article, we study novel anhydrous proton-conducting membranes, formed by incorporating ionic liquids into synthetic block co-polymer electrolytes, poly(styrenesulphonate-b-methylbutylene) (S(n)MB(m)), as high-temperature PEFCs. The resulting membranes are transparent, flexible and thermally stable up to 180 °C. The increases in the sulphonation level of S(n)MB(m) co-polymers (proton supplier) and the concentration of the ionic liquid (proton mediator) produce an overall increase in conductivity. Morphology effects were studied by X-ray scattering and electron microscopy. Compared with membranes having discrete ionic domains (including Nafion 117), the nanostructured membranes revealed over an order of magnitude increase in conductivity with the highest conductivity of 0.045 S cm(-1) obtained at 165 °C.

  1. From Particle Physics to Astroparticle Physics: Proton Decay and the Rise of Non-accelerator Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hinrich

    The search for proton decay was motivated by simple questions about the content of the observable universe. Why is matter so stable and why do we not see antimatter of primordial origin? The symmetry of the standard model of particle physics would have required that matter and antimatter annihilated in the early universe. In 1968, Sacharov showed that the matter-antimatter asymmetry could have formed in a state of thermal non-equilibrium of the universe, as given in big bang cosmology, together with the well-confirmed C and CP violations, and proton decay. The latter phenomenon could be only investigated in large none-accelerator experiments. The SU(5) extension of the standard model implied a proton lifetime of about 1029 years. With detectors consisting of 1 000 tons of matter and located deep under the Earth surface, such as the French-German Fréjus iron-calorimeter, in the mid 1980s one expected to detect several proton decays per year. Here, we report on the way leading from accelerator laboratories to underground physics, which paradoxically enough turned out to studying cosmic rays. There has not been any evidence for the instability of protons, and lifetime limits of more than 1034 years have been obtained. However, great progress in particle physics and in the physics of cosmic rays could be achieved with neutrinos.

  2. Molecular sieve/sulfonated poly(ether ketone ether sulfone) composite membrane as proton exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changkhamchom, Sairung; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2012-02-01

    A proton exchange membrane (PEM) is an electrolyte membrane used in both polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Currently, PEMs typically used for PEMFCs are mainly the commercially available Nafion^ membranes, which is high cost and loss of proton conductivity at elevated temperature. In this work, the Sulfonated poly(ether ketone ether sulfone), (S-PEKES), was synthesized by the nucleophilic aromatic substitution polycondensation between bisphenol S and 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone, and followed by the sulfonation reaction with concentrated sulfuric acid. The molecular sieve was added in the S-PEKES matrix at various ratios to form composite membranes to be the candidate for PEM. Properties of both pure sulfonated polymer and composite membranes were compared with the commercial Nafion^ 117 membrane from Dupont. S-PEKES membranes cast from these materials were evaluated as a polymer electrolyte membrane for direct methanol fuel cells. The main properties investigated were the proton conductivity, methanol permeability, thermal, chemical, oxidative, and mechanical stabilities by using a LCR meter, Gas Chromatography, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fenton's reagent, and Universal Testing Machine. The addition of the molecular sieve helped to increase both the proton conductivity and the methanol stability. These composite membranes are shown as to be potential candidates for use as a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM).

  3. Electrospun nanofiber enhanced sulfonated poly(arylene ether nitriles)-based proton conducting membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mengna; Huang, Yumin; Liu, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    To study the effect of electrospun nanofiber on proton conductivity of sulfonated poly(arylene ether nitriles) (SPEN), the nanofiber mats were prepared by the electrospinning technology and the nanofiber/SPEN proton conducting membranes with different SHQ content were fabricated via impregnation method. For comparison, the casting SPEN membrane was also prepared by the solution-casting method. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the morphologies of electrospinning nanofiber mats. The water uptake, thermal and oxidative stability of casting SPEN and the nanofiber/SPEN membranes were also detailed studied. Besides, the nanofiber/SPEN membranes possess the higher proton conductivity than that of casting SPEN. The SPEN composite membrane with 5 wt% SHQ nanofiber exhibits the highest proton conductivity of 0.044 S/cm and 0.0865 S/cm at 20 °C and 80 °C, respectively. However, after second times water treatment, the conductivities of nanofiber/SPEN membranes are all lower than that of original value due to the shift loss of dissociative sulfonic acid group. Therefore, although the electrospinning is a good method to improve proton conductivity, it is also a great challenge to avoid the shift loss of sulfonic acid group for the nanofiber/SPEN.

  4. Cationic Covalent Organic Frameworks: A Simple Platform of Anionic Exchange for Porosity Tuning and Proton Conduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heping; Liu, Bailing; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yang-Guang; Tan, Hua-Qiao; Zang, Hong-Ying; Zhu, Guangshan

    2016-05-11

    Mimicking proton conduction mechanism of Nafion to construct novel proton-conducting materials with low cost and high proton conductivity is of wide interest. Herein, we have designed and synthesized a cationic covalent organic framework with high thermal and chemical stability by combining a cationic monomer, ethidium bromide (EB) (3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-phenylphenanthridinium bromide), with 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol (TFP) in Schiff base reactions. This is the first time that the stable cationic crystalline frameworks allowed for the fabrication of a series of charged COFs (EB-COF:X, X = F, Cl, Br, I) through ion exchange processes. Exchange of the extra framework ions can finely modulate the COFs' porosity and pore sizes at nanoscale. More importantly, by introducing PW12O40(3-) into this porous cationic framework, we can greatly enhance the proton conductivity of ionic COF-based material. To the best of our knowledge, EB-COF:PW12 shows the best proton conductivity at room temperature among ever reported porous organic materials.

  5. CARBON, HELIUM, AND PROTON KINETIC TEMPERATURES IN A CYGNUS LOOP SHOCK WAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Edgar, Richard J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.

    2015-06-01

    Observations of SN 1006 have shown that ions and electrons in the plasma behind fast supernova remnant shock waves are far from equilibrium, with the electron temperature much lower than the proton temperature and ion temperatures approximately proportional to ion mass. In the ∼360 km s{sup −1}shock waves of the Cygnus Loop, on the other hand, electron and ion temperatures are roughly equal, and there is evidence that the oxygen kinetic temperature is not far from the proton temperature. In this paper, we report observations of the He ii λ1640 line and the C iv λ1550 doublet in a 360 km s{sup −1}shock in the Cygnus Loop. While the best-fit kinetic temperatures are somewhat higher than the proton temperature, the temperatures of He and C are consistent with the proton temperature and the upper limits are 0.5 and 0.3 times the mass-proportional temperatures, implying efficient thermal equilibration in this collisionless shock. The equilibration of helium and hydrogen affects the conversion between proton temperatures determined from Hα line profiles and shock speeds, and the efficient equilibration found here reduces the shock speed estimates and the distance estimate to the Cygnus Loop of Medina et al. to about 800 pc.

  6. Transition in the Temperature-Dependence of GFP Fluorescence: From Proton Wires to Proton Exit

    PubMed Central

    Leiderman, Pavel; Huppert, Dan; Agmon, Noam

    2006-01-01

    In green fluorescent protein, photo-excitation leads to excited-state proton transfer from its chromophore, leaving behind a strongly fluorescing anion, while the proton is commonly thought to migrate internally to Glu-222. X-ray data show that the protein contains more extended hydrogen-bonded networks that can support proton migration (i.e., proton wires). Here we study the temperature-dependence of the transient fluorescence from both the acid and anionic forms up to 15 ns. At low temperatures, we find that the (lifetime-corrected) fluorescence of the acidic form decays asymptotically as t−1/2, following quantitatively the solution of a one-dimensional diffusion equation for reversible geminate recombination with quenching. This indicates proton migration along the internal proton wires. A small degree of geminate proton quenching is attributed to the formation of the zwitterion by proton migration on a side-branch of the proton wire. Above 230 K, the fluorescence kinetics undergo a transition, exhibiting an asymptotic t−3/2 decay, and the quenching effect disappears. We interpret these findings as evidence for a conformational change enabling the rotation of Thr-203, which eventually allows the proton to escape to the exterior solution. PMID:16284263

  7. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegun, A. K.; Takatsu, J.; Nakaji, T.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Koffeman, E. N.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, should be minimized from 3-5% or higher to less than 1%, to make the treatment plan with proton beams more accurate, and thereby better treatment for the patient. With Geant4 we simulated a proton radiography detection system with two position-sensitive and residual energy detectors. A complex phantom filled with various materials (including tissue surrogates), was placed between the position sensitive detectors. The phantom was irradiated with 150 MeV protons and the energy loss radiograph and scattering angles were studied. Protons passing through different materials in the phantom lose energy, which was used to create a radiography image of the phantom. The multiple Coulomb scattering of a proton traversing different materials causes blurring of the image. To improve image quality and material identification in the phantom, we selected protons with small scattering angles. A good quality proton radiography image, in which various materials can be recognized accurately, and in combination with xCT can lead to more accurate relative stopping powers predictions.

  8. [Robust treatment planning in proton therapy].

    PubMed

    Sterpin, E; Barragan, A; Souris, K; Lee, J A

    2016-10-01

    The concentration of the dose delivered by protons at the end of their path, the Bragg peak, has the potential to improve external radiotherapy treatments. Unfortunately, the main strength of the protons, their finite range, is also their greatest weakness. Any uncertainty on the range may lead to inadequate target coverage or excessive toxicity. The uncertainties have multiple origins and include, among others, ballistic errors, morphological modifications or inaccurate estimations of the physical quantities necessary to predict the proton range. Uncertainties have been part of daily practice in conventional radiotherapy with X-rays for a long time. However, dose distributions delivered with X-rays are much less sensitive to uncertainties than the ones delivered with protons. This relative insensitivity enabled the management of uncertainties through safety margins using a simple formalism. The conditions of validity of this formalism are much more restrictive for proton therapy, leading to the need of developing new tools and adapted strategies to manage accurately these uncertainties. The objective of this paper is to present a vision for the management of uncertainties in proton therapy in the continuity of formalisms established for X-rays. The latter are first summarized before discussing the necessary developments in order to consistently apply them to protons. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [Current situation and perspectives of proton therapy].

    PubMed

    Doyen, J; Bondiau, P-Y; Bénézéry, K; Chand, M-È; Thariat, J; Leysalle, A; Gérard, J-P; Habrand, J-L; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M

    2015-05-01

    Proton beam therapy is indicated as a treatment for some rare tumours and paediatric tumours because the technique allows a good local control with minimal toxicity; the growing number of centres that use proton beam therapy is associated with an increase of dosimetric and clinical data for other malignant tumours as well. This paper reviews potential indications of proton beam therapy. A systematic review on Medline was performed with the following keywords proton beam therapy, cancer, heavy particle, charged particle. No phase III trial has been published using proton beam therapy in comparison with the best photon therapy, but numerous retrospective and dosimetric studies have revealed an advantage of proton beam therapy compared to photons, above all in tumours next to parallel organs at risk (thoracic and abdominal tumours). This could be accompanied with a better safety profile and/or a better tumoural control; numerous phase 0, I, II, III and IV studies are ongoing to examine these hypotheses in more common cancers. Use of proton beam therapy is growing for common cancers within clinical trials but some indications could be applied sooner since in silico analysis showed major advantages with this technique.

  10. Nerve Conduction Through Dendrites via Proton Hopping.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies of nerve conduction conducted by proton hopping, we have considered the axon, soma, synapse and the nodes of Ranvier. The role of proton hopping described the passage of information through each of these units of a typical nerve system. The synapse projects information from the axon to the dendrite and their associated spines. We have invoked the passage of protons via a hopping mechanism to illustrate the continuum of the impulse through the system, via the soma following the dendrites. This is proposed to be a continuum invoked by the proton hopping method. With the proposal of the activity through the dendrites, via proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve function is invoked. At each step to the way, a water pathway is present and is invoked in the proposed model as the carrier of the message via proton hopping. The importance of the dendrites is evident by the presence of a vast number of spines, each possessing the possibility to carry unique messages through the nervous system. With this model of the role of dendrites, functioning with the presence of proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve system is presented. The validity of this model will be available for further studies and models to assess it's validity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. A New Proton Dose Algorithm for Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chungchi (Chris).

    This algorithm recursively propagates the proton distribution in energy, angle and space at one level in an absorbing medium to another, at slightly greater depth, until all the protons are stopped. The angular transition density describing the proton trajectory is based on Moliere's multiple scattering theory and Vavilov's theory of energy loss along the proton's path increment. These multiple scattering and energy loss distributions are sampled using equal probability spacing to optimize computational speed while maintaining calculational accuracy. Nuclear interactions are accounted for by using a simple exponential expression to describe the loss of protons along a given path increment and the fraction of the original energy retained by the proton is deposited locally. Two levels of testing for the algorithm are provided: (1) Absolute dose comparisons with PTRAN Monte Carlo simulations in homogeneous water media. (2) Modeling of a fixed beam line including the scattering system and range modulator and comparisons with measured data in a homogeneous water phantom. The dose accuracy of this algorithm is shown to be within +/-5% throughout the range of a 200-MeV proton when compared to measurements except in the shoulder region of the lateral profile at the Bragg peak where a dose difference as large as 11% can be found. The numerical algorithm has an adequate spatial accuracy of 3 mm. Measured data as input is not required.

  12. Updating the Jovian Proton Radiation Environment - 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry; Martinez-Sierra, Luz Maria; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Since publication in 1983 by N. Divine and H. Garrett, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's plasma and radiation models have been the design standard for NASA's missions to Jupiter. These models consist of representations of the cold plasma and electrons, the warm and auroral electrons and protons, and the radiation environment (electron, proton, and heavy ions). To date, however, the high-energy proton model has been limited to an L-shell of 12. With the requirement to compute the effects of the high energy protons and other heavy ions on the proposed Europa mission, the extension of the high energy proton model from approximately 12 L-shell to approximately 50 L-shell has become necessary. In particular, a model of the proton environment over that range is required to estimate radiation effects on the solar arrays for the mission. This study describes both the steps taken to extend the original Divine proton model out to an approximately 50 L-shell and the resulting model developed to accomplish that goal. In addition to hydrogen, the oxygen, sulfur, and helium heavy ion environments have also been added between approximately 6 L-shell and approximately 50 L-shell. Finally, selected examples of the model's predictions are presented to illustrate the uses of the tool.

  13. Proton transfer through the water gossamer.

    PubMed

    Hassanali, Ali; Giberti, Federico; Cuny, Jérôme; Kühne, Thomas D; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-08-20

    The diffusion of protons through water is understood within the framework of the Grotthuss mechanism, which requires that they undergo structural diffusion in a stepwise manner throughout the water network. Despite long study, this picture oversimplifies and neglects the complexity of the supramolecular structure of water. We use first-principles simulations and demonstrate that the currently accepted picture of proton diffusion is in need of revision. We show that proton and hydroxide diffusion occurs through periods of intense activity involving concerted proton hopping followed by periods of rest. The picture that emerges is that proton transfer is a multiscale and multidynamical process involving a broader distribution of pathways and timescales than currently assumed. To rationalize these phenomena, we look at the 3D water network as a distribution of closed directed rings, which reveals the presence of medium-range directional correlations in the liquid. One of the natural consequences of this feature is that both the hydronium and hydroxide ion are decorated with proton wires. These wires serve as conduits for long proton jumps over several hydrogen bonds.

  14. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Meson cloud models describe the proton sea in terms of fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from states which contain a kaon and a Lambda or Sigma hyperon. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these states to determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented by meson-baryon splitting functions, which determine the total strangeness of the proton. Strangeness asymmetry, the difference between momentum distributions of the s and sbar quarks in the proton, arises because the quarks are constituents of different hadrons. For the parton distributions of the s(sbar) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. We show that strangeness asymmetry depends strongly on the parton distributions used for the hadrons in the cloud. We compare our results to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  15. Proton binding within a membrane protein by a protonated water cluster

    PubMed Central

    Garczarek, Florian; Brown, Leonid S.; Lanyi, Janos K.; Gerwert, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Proton transfer is crucial for many enzyme reactions. Here, we show that in addition to protonatable amino acid side chains, water networks could constitute proton-binding sites in proteins. A broad IR continuum absorbance change during the proton pumping photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) indicates most likely deprotonation of a protonated water cluster at the proton release site close to the surface. We investigate the influence of several mutations on the proton release network and the continuum change, to gain information about the location and extent of the protonated water network and to reveal the participating residues necessary for its stabilization. We identify a protonated water cluster consisting in total of one proton and about five water molecules surrounded by six side chains and three backbone groups (Tyr-57, Arg-82, Tyr-83, Glu-204, Glu-194, Ser-193, Pro-77, Tyr-79, and Thr-205). The observed perturbation of proton release by many single-residue mutations is now explained by the influence of numerous side chains on the protonated H bonded network. In situ hydrogen/deuterium exchange Fourier transform IR measurements of the bR ground state, show that the proton of the release group becomes localized on Glu-204 and Asp-204 in the ground state of the mutants E194D and E204D, respectively, even though it is delocalized in the ground state of wild-type bR. Thus, the release mechanism switches between the wild-type and mutated proteins from a delocalized to a localized proton-binding site. PMID:15738416

  16. Thermal Clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Gateway Technologies, Inc. is marketing and developing textile insulation technology originally developed by Triangle Research and Development Corporation. The enhanced thermal insulation stems from Small Business Innovation Research contracts from NASA's Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Air Force. The effectiveness of the insulation comes from the microencapsulated phase-change materials originally made to keep astronauts gloved hands warm. The applications for the product range from outer wear, housing insulation, and blankets to protective firefighting gear and scuba diving suits. Gateway has developed and begun marketing thermal regulating products under the trademark, OUTLAST. Products made from OUTLAST are already on the market, including boot and shoe liners, winter headgear, hats and caps for hunting and other outdoor sports, and a variety of men's and women's ski gloves.

  17. Spontaneous proton transfers induced by beryllium bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2014-03-01

    Through the use of B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have shown that when a molecule participates as a proton donor in a complex, it yields much stronger hydrogen bonds (HBs) if it participates simultaneously in beryllium bonds. This is indeed the case of the complexes formed by oxyacids such as acetic, benzoic and phosphinic acids with BeCl2, which yield much stronger HBs with different bases than the isolated oxyacids due to a significant acidity enhancement, triggered by the charge transfer from the oxyacid to BeCl2. More importantly, depending on the intrinsic basicity of the base acting as proton acceptor, a spontaneous proton transfer from the oxyacid to the base may occur, leading to the formation of an ion pair in the gas phase. This is indeed the case in complexes involving ammonia. For slightly weaker bases, such as trimethylphosphine, two local minima are stable: one in which the proton remains attached to the oxyacid and one in which this proton has been transferred to the trimethylphosphine, the latter being always the most stable. When a compound is able to act simultaneously as a proton donor and as a proton acceptor, its participation in a beryllium bond necessarily leads to an enhancement and a dampening of both properties, respectively. Hence, the HB in which they participate as proton donors becomes stronger, whereas the HB in which they act as proton acceptors becomes weaker. The dimers of 1H-tetrazole and the dimers of isatin nicely illustrate this finding.

  18. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment.

  19. Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The University of Georgia used NASTRAN, a COSMIC program that predicts how a design will stand up under stress, to develop a model for monitoring the transient cooling of vegetables. The winter use of passive solar heating for poultry houses is also under investigation by the Agricultural Engineering Dept. Another study involved thermal analysis of black and green nursery containers. The use of NASTRAN has encouraged student appreciation of sophisticated computer analysis.

  20. PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite for proton radiation shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhao; Chen, Siyuan; Nambiar, Shruti; Sun, Yonghai; Zhang, Mingyu; Zheng, Wanping; Yeow, John T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation shielding in space missions is critical in order to protect astronauts, spacecraft and payloads from radiation damage. Low atomic-number materials are efficient in shielding particle-radiation, but they have relatively weak material properties compared to alloys that are widely used in space applications as structural materials. However, the issues related to weight and the secondary radiation generation make alloys not suitable for space radiation shielding. Polymers, on the other hand, can be filled with different filler materials for reinforcement of material properties, while at the same time provide sufficient radiation shielding function with lower weight and less secondary radiation generation. In this study, poly(methyl-methacrylate)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (PMMA/MWCNT) nanocomposite was fabricated. The role of MWCNTs embedded in PMMA matrix, in terms of radiation shielding effectiveness, was experimentally evaluated by comparing the proton transmission properties and secondary neutron generation of the PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite with pure PMMA and aluminum. The results showed that the addition of MWCNTs in PMMA matrix can further reduce the secondary neutron generation of the pure polymer, while no obvious change was found in the proton transmission property. On the other hand, both the pure PMMA and the nanocomposite were 18%-19% lighter in weight than aluminum for stopping the protons with the same energy and generated up to 5% fewer secondary neutrons. Furthermore, the use of MWCNTs showed enhanced thermal stability over the pure polymer, and thus the overall reinforcement effects make MWCNT an effective filler material for applications in the space industry.

  1. A Nonvolatile MOSFET Memory Device Based on Mobile Protons in SiO(2) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Vanheusden, K.; Warren, W.L.; Devine, R.A.B.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Draper, B.L.; Schwank, J.R.

    1999-03-02

    It is shown how mobile H{sup +} ions can be generated thermally inside the oxide layer of Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si structures. The technique involves only standard silicon processing steps: the nonvolatile field effect transistor (NVFET) is based on a standard MOSFET with thermally grown SiO{sub 2} capped with a poly-silicon layer. The capped thermal oxide receives an anneal at {approximately}1100 C that enables the incorporation of the mobile protons into the gate oxide. The introduction of the protons is achieved by a subsequent 500-800 C anneal in a hydrogen-containing ambient, such as forming gas (N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} 95:5). The mobile protons are stable and entrapped inside the oxide layer, and unlike alkali ions, their space-charge distribution can be controlled and rapidly rearranged at room temperature by an applied electric field. Using this principle, a standard MOS transistor can be converted into a nonvolatile memory transistor that can be switched between normally on and normally off. Switching speed, retention, endurance, and radiation tolerance data are presented showing that this non-volatile memory technology can be competitive with existing Si-based non-volatile memory technologies such as the floating gate technologies (e.g. Flash memory).

  2. The Enhancement on Proton Conductivity of Stable Polyoxometalate-Based Coordination Polymers by the Synergistic Effect of MultiProton Units.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cao, Xue-Li; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Shu-Ran; Du, Dong-Ying; Qin, Jun-Sheng; Li, Shun-Li; Su, Zhong-Min; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2016-06-27

    Two novel polyoxometalate (POM)-based coordination polymers, namely, [Co(bpz)(Hbpz)][Co(SO4 )0.5 (H2 O)2 (bpz)]4 [PMo(VI) 8 Mo(V) 4 V(IV) 4 O42 ]⋅13 H2 O (NENU-530) and [Ni2 (bpz)(Hbpz)3 (H2 O)2 ][PMo(VI) 8 Mo(V) 4 V(IV) 4 O44 ]⋅8 H2 O (NENU-531) (H2 bpz=3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole), were isolated by hydrothermal methods, which represented 3D networks constructed by POM units, the protonated ligand and sulfate group. In contrast with most POM-based coordination polymers, these two compounds exhibit exceptional excellent chemical and thermal stability. More importantly, NENU-530 shows a high proton conductivity of 1.5×10(-3)  S cm(-1) at 75 °C and 98 % RH, which is one order of magnitude higher than that of NENU-531. Furthermore, structural analysis and functional measurement successfully demonstrated that the introduction of sulfate group is favorable for proton conductivity. Herein, the syntheses, crystal structures, proton conductivity, and the relationship between structure and property are presented. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Space Environments and Effects: Trapped Proton Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, S. L.; Kauffman, W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An improved model of the Earth's trapped proton environment has been developed. This model, designated Trapped Proton Model version 1 (TPM-1), determines the omnidirectional flux of protons with energy between 1 and 100 MeV throughout near-Earth space. The model also incorporates a true solar cycle dependence. The model consists of several data files and computer software to read them. There are three versions of the mo'del: a FORTRAN-Callable library, a stand-alone model, and a Web-based model.

  4. Polarized proton acceleration program at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1981-01-01

    The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A multi-university/laboratory collaborative effort involving Argonne, Brookhaven, Michigan, Rice and Yale is underway to improve and modify to accelerate polarized protons. From the experience at the ZGS and careful studies made us confident of the feasibility of achieving a polarization of over 60 percent up to 26 GeV/c with an intensity of 10/sup 11/ approx. 10/sup 12/ per pulse. The first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS is expected in 1983.

  5. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today's nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  6. Third Zemach moment of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Ian C. Cloet, Gerald A. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Modern electron scattering experiments have determined the proton electric form factor, G_{Ep}(Q^2), to high precision. We utilize this data, represented by the different form factor parametrizations, to compute the third Zemach moment of the proton charge distribution. We find that existing data rule out a value of the third Zemach moment large enough to explain the current puzzle with the proton charge radius determined from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. This is in contrast with the recent claim of De Rujula [arXiv:1008.3861].

  7. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Fesseha G.

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  8. Production of organic molecules by proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T.; Lesser, P.; Owen, T.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary experiments were carried out to investigate the effectiveness of proton irradiation for producing organic chromophores. The source of the 2 MeV protons used in the experiments was a model Van de Graaff accelerator. The gas cells used were hollow aluminum cylinders. The test results show that energetic protons can be an effective energy source for the formation of complex molecules from simple ones. With the exception of sulfide compounds none of the molecules that were identified are colored. However, coloring agents could be contained in unresolvable fractions.

  9. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-22

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  10. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M.; Bonanno, D.; Brianzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Presti, D. Lo; Maccioni, G.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Sipala, V.; Talamonti, C.; Vanzi, E.

    2017-02-01

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to 1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of 15‧ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  11. New developments in proton radiography at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Christopher; Proton Radiography Team

    2014-09-01

    In a new application of nuclear physics, a facility for using proton for flash radiography has been developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons will be discussed and data from some of the recent experiments will be presented.

  12. Probing the Spin Structure of the Proton Using Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions and the Production of W Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumier, Michael J.

    2016-08-01

    This thesis discusses the process of extracting the longitudinal asymmetry, A$W±\\atop{L}$ describing W → μ production in forward kinematic regimes. This asymmetry is used to constrain our understanding of the polarized parton distribution functions characterizing $\\bar{u}$ and $\\bar{d}$ sea quarks in the proton. This asymmetry will be used to constrain the overall contribution of the sea-quarks to the total proton spin. The asymmetry is evaluated over the pseudorapidity range of the PHENIX Muon Arms, 2.1 < |η| 2.6, for longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at 510 GeV √s. In particular, I will discuss the statistical methods used to characterize real muonic W decays and the various background processes is presented, including a discussion of likelihood event selection and the Extended Unbinned Maximum Likelihood t. These statistical methods serve estimate the yields of W muonic decays, which are used to calculate the longitudinal asymmetry.

  13. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented H{sub 2}{sup +} protons

    SciTech Connect

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2006-02-15

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H{sub 2}{sup +} protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature T{sub e}=10 eV and density n=10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}, and proton velocities are v{sub p}=v{sub th}, v{sub p}=2v{sub th}, and v{sub p}=3v{sub th}, where v{sub th} is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H{sub 2}{sup +} ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (v{sub p}=v{sub th}) and misaligns for faster ones (v{sub p}=2v{sub th}, v{sub p}=3v{sub th}). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H{sub 2}{sup +} ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity.

  14. Study on strontium isotope abundance-ratio measurements by using a 13-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Rb-Sr dating method is used in dating Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. This method measures the 87Rb and the 87Sr concentrations by using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) [J. Hefne et al., Inter. J. Phys. Sci. 3(1), 28 (2008)]. In addition, it calculates the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio to increase the reliability of Rb-Sr dating. In this study, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was measured by using a 13-MeV proton accelerator. Proton kinetic energies are in the range of tens of megaelectronvolts, and protons have large absorption cross-sections for ( p, n) reactions with most substances. After absorbing a proton with such a high kinetic energy, an element is converted into a nuclide with its atomic number increased by one via nuclear transmutation. These nuclides usually have short half-lives and return to the original state through radioactive decay. When a strontium sample is irradiated with protons, nuclear transmutation occurs; thus, the strontium isotope present in the sample changes to a yttrium isotope, which is an activated radioisotope. Based on this, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was calculated by analyzing the gamma-rays emitted by each yttrium isotope. The KIRAMS-13 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Center of Chosun University, where 13-MeV protons can be extracted, was utilized in our experiment. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio was computed for samples irradiated with these protons, and the result was similar to the isotope ratio for the Standard Reference Material, i.e., 98.2 ± 3.4%. As part of the analysis, proton activation analyses were performed using 13-MeV protons, and the experimental results of this research suggest a possible approach for measuring the strontium-isotope abundance ratio of samples.

  15. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  16. Analysis performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubin, A. N. A.; Bahrom, M. H.; Azri, M.; Ibrahim, Z.; Rahim, N. A.; Raihan, S. R. S.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has gained much attention to the technology of renewable energy due to its mechanically ideal and zero emission power source. PEMFC performance reflects from the surroundings such as temperature and pressure. This paper presents an analysis of the performance of the PEMFC by developing the mathematical thermodynamic modelling using Matlab/Simulink. Apart from that, the differential equation of the thermodynamic model of the PEMFC is used to explain the contribution of heat to the performance of the output voltage of the PEMFC. On the other hand, the partial pressure equation of the hydrogen is included in the PEMFC mathematical modeling to study the PEMFC voltage behaviour related to the input variable input hydrogen pressure. The efficiency of the model is 33.8% which calculated by applying the energy conversion device equations on the thermal efficiency. PEMFC’s voltage output performance is increased by increasing the hydrogen input pressure and temperature.

  17. Towards developing a backing layer for proton exchange membrane electrolyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmeier, P.; Kolb, S.; Burggraf, F.; Gago, A. S.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2016-04-01

    Current energy policies require the urgent replacement of fossil energy carriers by carbon neutral ones, such as hydrogen. The backing or micro-porous layer plays an important role in the performance of hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, reducing contact resistance and improving reactant/product management. Such carbon-based coating cannot be used in PEM electrolysis since it oxidizes to CO2 at high voltages. A functional titanium macro-porous layer (MPL) on the current collectors of a PEM electrolyzer is developed by thermal spraying. It improves the contact with the catalyst layers by ca. 20 mΩ cm2, increasing significantly the efficiency of the device when operating at high current densities.

  18. A Generalized Weizsacker-Williams Method Applied to Pion Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahern, Sean C.; Poyser, William J.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    A new "Generalized" Weizsacker-Williams method (GWWM) is used to calculate approximate cross sections for relativistic peripheral proton-proton collisions. Instead of a mass less photon mediator, the method allows for the mediator to have mass for short range interactions. This method generalizes the Weizsacker-Williams method (WWM) from Coulomb interactions to GWWM for strong interactions. An elastic proton-proton cross section is calculated using GWWM with experimental data for the elastic p+p interaction, where the mass p+ is now the mediator. The resulting calculated cross sections is compared to existing data for the elastic proton-proton interaction. A good approximate fit is found between the data and the calculation.

  19. Mechanism of Proton Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes: Insights from Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory A. Voth

    2010-11-30

    The solvation and transport of hydrated protons in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) such as NafionTM will be described using a novel multi-state reactive molecular dynamics (MD) approach, combined with large scale MD simulation to help probe various PEM morphological models. The multi-state MD methodology allows for the treatment of explicit (Grotthuss) proton shuttling and charge defect delocalization which, in turn, can strongly influence the properties of the hydrated protons in various aqueous and complex environments. A significant extension of the methodology to treat highly acidic (low pH) environments such as the hydrophilic domains of a PEM will be presented. Recent results for proton solvation and transport in NafionTM will be described which reveal the significant role of Grotthuss shuttling and charge defect delocalization on the excess proton solvation structures and transport properties. The role of PEM hydration level and morphology on these properties will also be described.

  20. MO-B-18C-01: Proton Therapy II: Proton Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Winey, B; Daartz, J

    2014-06-15

    Proton stereotactic radiotherapy shares fundamental principles with general proton therapy physics, specifically range uncertainties and broad beam measurement techniques. Significant differences emerge when treating with smaller field sizes that suffer lateral disequilibrium and when fractions are reduced. This session will explore the history and scope of proton stereotactic radiotherapy in clinical practice. Uncertainties and treatment planning methods specific to stereotactic treatments will be discussed. The session will include an overview of the physical properties of small proton fields and resulting needs for accurate measurements and modeling of dose distributions for radiosurgery treatment planning. Learning Objectives: Understand the clinical rationale for proton radiosurgery. Understand the similarities and differences from general proton therapy. Understand the similarities and differences from photon stereotactic radiosurgery. Understand the basic physics and clinical physics methods for measuring and commissioning a radiosurgery program.

  1. New synthesis of nanopowders of proton conducting materials. A route to densified proton ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, Zohreh; Taillades-Jacquin, Melanie; Taillades, Gilles; Marrony, Mathieu; Jones, Deborah J.; Roziere, Jacques

    2009-04-15

    Low temperature routes have been developed for the preparation of BaCe{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 2.95} (BCY10) and BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 2.95} (BZY10) in the form of nanoparticulate powders for use after densification as ceramic membranes for a proton ceramic fuel cell. These methods make use on the one hand of the chelation of metal (II), (III) and (IV) ions by acrylates (hydrogelation route) and on the other of the destabilisation and precipitation of micro-emulsions. Both routes lead to single phase yttrium doped barium cerate or zirconate perovskites, as observed by X-ray diffraction, after thermal treatment at 900 deg. C for 4 h for BCY10 and 800 deg. C for BZY10. These temperatures, lower than those usually used for preparation of barium cerate or zirconate, lead to oxide nanoparticles of size <40 nm. Dense ceramics (>=95%) are obtained by sintering BCY10 pellets at 1350 deg. C and BZY10 pellets at 1500 deg. C for 10 h. The water uptake of compacted samples at 500 deg. C is 0.14 wt% for BCY10 and 0.26 wt% for BZY10. Total conductivities in the range 300-600 deg. C were determined using impedance spectroscopy in a humidified nitrogen atmosphere. The total conductivity was 1.8x10{sup -2} S/cm for BCY10 and 2x10{sup -3} S/cm for BZY10 at 600 deg. C. The smallest perovskite nanoparticles and highest conductivities were obtained by hydrogelation of precursor barium, zirconium, cerium and yttrium acrylates. - Graphical Abstract: Low temperature hydrogelation and micro-emulsion routes have been developed for the preparation of rare earth doped barium and zirconium cerates in the form of nanoparticulate powders for use after densification as ceramic membranes for a proton ceramic fuel cell.

  2. Mechanism of proton entry into the cytoplasmic section of the proton-conducting channel of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Checover, S; Nachliel, E; Dencher, N A; Gutman, M

    1997-11-11

    Bacteriorhodopsin is the light-driven proton-pumping protein of Halobacterium salinarum that extracts protons from the well-buffered cytoplasmic space within the time limits set by the photocycle turnover. The specific mechanism of the proton uptake by the cytoplasmic surface of the protein was investigated in this study by the laser-induced proton pulse technique. The purple membrane preparations were labeled by fluorescein at two residues (36 or 38) of the cytoplasmic surface of the protein, sites that are close to the orifice of the proton-conducting channel. The membranes were pulsed by protons discharged from photoexcited pyranine [Nachliel, E., Gutman, M., Kiryati, S., and Dencher, N.A. (1996) Proc. Nat Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 93, 10747-10752). The reaction of the discharged protons with the pyranine anion and the fluorescein was measured with sub-microsecond resolution. The experimental signals were reconstructed through numeric integration of differential rate equations which quantitated the rates of all proton transfer reactions between all reactants present in the system. The interaction of protons with the orifice of the cytoplasmic channel is enhanced by the exposed carboxylates of the protein. A cluster of three carboxylates acts as a strong proton attractor site while one carboxylate, identified as D36, acts as a mediator that delivers the proton to the channel. The combination of these reactions render the surface of the protein with properties of a proton-collecting antenna. The size of the collecting area is less than that of the protein's surface.

  3. Proton radius from electron-proton scattering and chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbatsch, Marko; Hessels, Eric A.; Pineda, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    We determine the root-mean-square proton charge radius, Rp, from a fit to low-Q2 electron-proton elastic-scattering cross-section data with the higher moments fixed (within uncertainties) to the values predicted by chiral perturbation theory. We obtain Rp=0.855 (11 ) fm. This number falls between the value obtained from muonic hydrogen analyses and the CODATA value (based upon atomic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron-proton scattering determinations).

  4. Parameterized spectral distributions for meson production in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, John P.; Norbury, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate semiempirical parameterizations of the energy-differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production from proton-proton collisions are presented at energies relevant to cosmic rays. The parameterizations, which depend on both the outgoing meson parallel momentum and the incident proton kinetic energy, are able to be reduced to very simple analytical formulas suitable for cosmic ray transport through spacecraft walls, interstellar space, the atmosphere, and meteorites.

  5. SU-E-J-63: Feasibility Study of Proton Digital Tomosynthesis in Proton Beam Therapy.

    PubMed

    Min, B; Kwak, J; Lee, J; Cho, S; Park, S; Yoo, S; Chung, K; Cho, S; Lim, Y; Shin, D; Lee, S; Kim, J

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of proton tomosynthesis as daily positioning of patients and compared the results with photon tomosynthesis as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography. Dedicated photon-like proton beam using the passively scattered proton beams by the cyclotron was generated for proton imaging. The eleven projections were acquired over 30 degree with 3 degree increment in order to investigate the performance of proton tomosynthesis. The cylinder blocks and resolution phantom were used to evaluate imaging performance. Resolution phantom of a cylinder of diameter 12 cm was used to investigate the reconstructed imaging characteristics. Electron density cylinder blocks with diameter of 28 mm and height of 70 mm were employed to assess the imaging quality. The solid water, breast, bone, adipose, lung, muscle, and liver, which were tissue equivalent inserts, were positioned around the resolution phantom. The images were reconstructed by projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm and total variation minimization (TVM) methods. The Gafchromic EBT films were utilized for measuring the photon-like proton beams as a proton detector. In addition, the photon tomosynthesis images were obtained for a comparison with proton tomosynthesis images. The same angular sampling data were acquired for both proton and photon tomosynthesis. In the resolution phantom image obtained proton tomosynthesis, down to 1.6 mm diameter rods were resolved visually, although the separation between adjacent rods was less distinct. In contrast, down to 1.2 mm diameter rods were resolved visually in the reconstructed image obtained photon tomosynthesis. Both proton and photon tomosynthesis images were similar in intensities of different density blocks. Our results demonstrated that proton tomosynthesis could make it possible to provide comparable tomography imaging to photon tomosynthesis for positioning as determined by manual registration

  6. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To ‘scan’ the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s-1, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  7. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-11-07

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To 'scan' the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient's body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s(-1), changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  8. Spin structure of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1995-08-01

    In these lectures the author argues that their response to the spin crisis should not be to abandon the naive quark model baby, but rather to allow it to mature. He begin by recalling what a beautiful baby the quark model is via an overview of its successes in spectroscopy, dynamics, and valence spin structure. He also introduces the conservative hypothesis that dynamical q{anti q} pairs are its key missing ingredient. He then discusses dressing the baby. He first shows that it can be clothed in glue without changing its spectroscopic successes. In the process, several dynamical mysteries associated with quark model spectroscopy are potentially explained. Next, he dresses the baby in q{anti q} pairs, first showing that this can be done without compromising the naive quark model's success with either spectroscopy or the OZI rule. Finally, he shows that despite their near invisibility elsewhere, pairs do play an important role in the proton's spin structure by creating an antipolarized q{anti q} sea. In the context of an explicit calculation he demonstrate that it is plausible that the entire ''spin crisis'' arises from this effect.

  9. Proton-conducting cerate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, L.R.; Coffey, G.W.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    Single-cell solid oxide fuel cells were constructed using strontium cerate as the electrolyte and their performance tested. Like certain zirconates, hafnates, and tantalates, the cerate perovskites are among a class of solid electrolytes that conduct protons at elevated temperatures. Depending on the temperature and chemical environment, these ceramics also support electronic and oxygen ion currents. A maximum power output of {approx}100 mW per cm{sup 2} electrolyte surface area was obtained at 900{degrees}C using 4% hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. A series of rare earth/ceria/zirconia were prepared and their electrical properties characterized. Rare earth dopants included ytterbia, yttria, terbia, and europia. Ionic conductivities were highest for rare earth/ceria and rare earth zirconia compositions; a minimum in ionic conductivity for all series were found for equimolar mixtures of ceria and zirconia. Cerium oxysulfide is of interest in fossil energy applications because of its high chemical stability and refractory nature. An alternative synthesis route to preparing cerium oxysulfide powders has been developed using combustion techniques.

  10. [Proton therapy and particle accelerators].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Since the high energy accelerator plan was changed from a 40 GeV direct machine to a 12GeV cascade one, a 500 MeV rapid cycling booster synchrotron was installed between the injector linac and the 12 GeV main ring at KEK, National Lab. for High Energy Physics. The booster beams were used not only for injection to the main ring but also for medical use. Their energy was reduced to 250 MeV by a graphite block for clinical trial of cancer therapy. In 1970's, pi(-) or heavy ions were supposed to be promising. Although advantage of protons with Bragg Peak was pointed out earlier, they seemed effective only for eye melanoma at that time. In early 1980's, it was shown that they were effective for deep-seated tumor by Tsukuba University with KEK beams. The first dedicated facility was built at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Its synchrotron was made by Fermi National Accelerator Lab. Since a non-resonant accelerating rf cavity was installed, operation of the synchrotron became much easier. Later, innovation of the cyclotron was achieved. Its weight was reduced from 1,000 ton to 200 ton. Some of the cyclotrons are equipped with superconducting coils.

  11. Pharmacology of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jai Moo; Sachs, George

    2010-01-01

    The gastric H,K-ATPase is the primary target for the treatment of acid-related diseases. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are weak bases composed of two moieties, a substituted pyridine with a primary pKa of about 4.0, which allows selective accumulation in the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell, and a benzimidazole with a second pKa of about 1.0. PPIs are acid-activated prodrugs that convert to sulfenic acids or sulfenamides that react covalently with one or more cysteines accessible from the luminal surface of the ATPase. Because of covalent binding, their inhibitory effects last much longer than their plasma half-life. However, the short half-life of the drug in the blood and the requirement for acid activation impair their efficacy in acid suppression, particularly at night. PPIs with longer half-life promise to improve acid suppression. All PPIs give excellent healing of peptic ulcers and produce good results in reflux esophagitis. PPIs combined with antibiotics eradicate Helicobacter pylori. PMID:19006606

  12. Improvement Plans of Fermilab's Proton Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The flagship of Fermilab's long term research program is the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), located Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, which will study neutrino oscillations with a baseline of 1300 km. The neutrinos will be produced in the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a proposed new beam line from Fermilab's Main Injector. The physics goals of the DUNE require a proton beam with a power of some 2.4 MW at 120 GeV, which is roughly four times the current maximum power. Here I discuss current performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex, our plans for construction of the SRF proton linac as key part of the Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II), outline the main challenges toward multi-MW beam power operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex and the staged plan to achieve the required performance over the next 15 years.

  13. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOEpatents

    Warren, W.L.; Vanheusden, K.J.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Devine, R.A.B.

    1998-11-03

    An electrically written memory element is disclosed utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure laterally through the exposed edges of the silicon dioxide layer during a high temperature anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronic elements on the same silicon substrate. With the addition of an optically active layer, the memory element becomes an electrically written, optically read optical memory element. 19 figs.

  14. Third Zemach moment of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Cloeet, Ian C.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2011-01-15

    Modern electron scattering experiments have determined the proton electric form factor G{sub Ep}(Q{sup 2}) to high precision. We utilize this data, represented by the different empirical form-factor parametrizations, to compute the third Zemach moment of the proton charge distribution. We find that existing data rule out a value of the third Zemach moment large enough to explain the current puzzle with the proton charge radius, determined from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. This is in contrast to the recent paper of De Rujula. We also demonstrate that the size of the third Zemach moment is largely governed by the fourth moment of the conventional charge distributions , which enables us to obtain a rigorous upper bound on the magnitude of the third Zemach moment of the proton.

  15. Polywater: proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum.

    PubMed

    Page, T F; Jakobsen, R J; Lippincott, E R

    1970-01-02

    In the presence of water, the resonance of the strongly hydrogenbonded protons characteristic of polywater appears at 5 parts per million lower applied magnetic field than water. Polywater made by a new method confirms the infrared spectrum reported originally.

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectrum of polywater.

    PubMed

    Petsko, G A

    1970-01-09

    With the aid of a time average computer, the proton magnetic resonance spectrum of anomalous water (polywater) is obtained. The spectrum conisists of a single broad resonance shifted approximately 300 hertz downfield from the resonance of ordinary water.

  17. Polarized proton beams since the ZGS

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, A.D.

    1994-12-31

    The author discusses research involving polarized proton beams since the ZGS`s demise. He begins by reminding the attendee that in 1973 the ZGS accelerated the world`s first high energy polarized proton beam; all in attendance at this meeting can be proud of this accomplishment. A few ZGS polarized proton beam experiments were done in the early 1970`s; then from about 1976 until 1 October 1979, the majority of the ZGS running time was polarized running. A great deal of fundamental physics was done with the polarized beam when the ZGS ran as a dedicated polarized proton beam from about Fall 1977 until it shut down on 1 October 1979. The newly created polarization enthusiats then dispersed; some spread polarized seeds al over the world by polarizing beams elsewhere; some wound up running the High Energy and SSC programs at DOE.

  18. Memory device using movement of protons

    DOEpatents

    Warren, William L.; Vanheusden, Karel J. R.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Devine, Roderick A. B.; Archer, Leo B.; Brown, George A.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    An enhancement of an electrically written memory element utilizing the motion of protons within a dielectric layer surrounded by layers on either side to confine the protons within the dielectric layer with electrode means attached to the surrounding layers to change the spatial position of the protons within the dielectric layer. The device is preferably constructed as a silicon-silicon dioxide-silicon layered structure with the protons being introduced to the structure during an anneal in an atmosphere containing hydrogen gas. Device operation is enhanced by concluding this anneal step with a sudden cooling. The device operates at low power, is preferably nonvolatile, is radiation tolerant, and is compatible with convention silicon MOS processing for integration with other microelectronics elements on the same silicon substrate.

  19. OLYMPUS and the proton form factor puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ice, Lauren; Alarcon, Ricardo; Olympus Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    Recent measurements of the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio using polarization techniques reveal a large discrepancy with measurements found using the Rosenbluth separation technique. It has been proposed that this discrepancy is due to a non-negligible multiple photon exchange contribution in the electron-proton elastic scattering cross section. The OLYMPUS experiment will measure the multiple photon exchange contribution by finding the cross section ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton scattering within 1%. The experiment will be carried out at the DESY laboratory in Hamburg Germany using the electron and positron storage ring DORIS and an internal unpolarized hydrogen gas target. The scattered particles will be detected using the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST).

  20. Proton enhancement in an extended nanochannel.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Selcuk; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Qian, Shizhi

    2014-11-04

    Proton enhancement in an extended nanochannel is investigated by a continuum model consisting of three-dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for the ionic mass transport of multiple ionic species with the consideration of surface chemistry on the nanochannel wall. The model is validated by the existing experimental data of the proton distribution inside an extended silica nanochannel. The proton enhancement behavior depends substantially on the background salt concentration, pH, and dimensions of the nanochannel. The proton enrichment at the center of the nanochannel is significant when the bulk pH is medium high (ca. 8) and the salt concentration is relatively low. The results gathered are informative for the development of biomimetic nanofluidic apparatuses and the interpretation of relevant experimental data.