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Sample records for 80s initiation complex

  1. Structural integrity of {alpha}-helix H12 in translation initiation factor eIF5B is critical for 80S complex stability.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Acker, Michael G; Kim, Joo-Ran; Maher, Kathryn N; Arefin, Shamsul M; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2011-04-01

    Translation initiation factor eIF5B promotes GTP-dependent ribosomal subunit joining in the final step of the translation initiation pathway. The protein resembles a chalice with the α-helix H12 forming the stem connecting the GTP-binding domain cup to the domain IV base. Helix H12 has been proposed to function as a rigid lever arm governing domain IV movements in response to nucleotide binding and as a molecular ruler fixing the distance between domain IV and the G domain of the factor. To investigate its function, helix H12 was lengthened or shortened by one or two turns. In addition, six consecutive residues in the helix were substituted by Gly to alter the helical rigidity. Whereas the mutations had minimal impacts on the factor's binding to the ribosome and its GTP binding and hydrolysis activities, shortening the helix by six residues impaired the rate of subunit joining in vitro and both this mutation and the Gly substitution mutation lowered the yield of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) bound to 80S complexes formed in the presence of nonhydrolyzable GTP. Thus, these two mutations, which impair yeast cell growth and enhance ribosome leaky scanning in vivo, impair the rate of formation and stability of the 80S product of subunit joining. These data support the notion that helix H12 functions as a ruler connecting the GTPase center of the ribosome to the P site where Met-tRNA(i)(Met) is bound and that helix H12 rigidity is required to stabilize Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding.

  2. Coupled release of eukaryotic translation initiation factors 5B and 1A from 80S ribosomes following subunit joining.

    PubMed

    Fringer, Jeanne M; Acker, Michael G; Fekete, Christie A; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-03-01

    The translation initiation GTPase eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) binds to the factor eIF1A and catalyzes ribosomal subunit joining in vitro. We show that rapid depletion of eIF5B in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in the accumulation of eIF1A and mRNA on 40S subunits in vivo, consistent with a defect in subunit joining. Substituting Ala for the last five residues in eIF1A (eIF1A-5A) impairs eIF5B binding to eIF1A in cell extracts and to 40S complexes in vivo. Consistently, overexpression of eIF5B suppresses the growth and translation initiation defects in yeast expressing eIF1A-5A, indicating that eIF1A helps recruit eIF5B to the 40S subunit prior to subunit joining. The GTPase-deficient eIF5B-T439A mutant accumulated on 80S complexes in vivo and was retained along with eIF1A on 80S complexes formed in vitro. Likewise, eIF5B and eIF1A remained associated with 80S complexes formed in the presence of nonhydrolyzable GDPNP, whereas these factors were released from the 80S complexes in assays containing GTP. We propose that eIF1A facilitates the binding of eIF5B to the 40S subunit to promote subunit joining. Following 80S complex formation, GTP hydrolysis by eIF5B enables the release of both eIF5B and eIF1A, and the ribosome enters the elongation phase of protein synthesis.

  3. Initial '80s Development of Inflated Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friese, G. J.; Bilyeu, G. D.; Thomas, M.

    1983-01-01

    State of the art technology was considered in the definition and documentation of a membrane surface suitable for use in a space reflector system for long durations in orbit. Requirements for a metal foil-plastic laminate structural element were determined and a laboratory model of a rigidized element to test for strength characteristics was constructed. Characteristics of antennas ranging from 10 meters to 1000 meters were determined. The basic antenna configuration studied consists of (1) a thin film reflector, (2) a thin film cone, (3) a self-rigidizing structural torus at the interface of the cone and reflector; and (4) an inflation system. The reflector is metallized and, when inflated, has a parabolic shape. The cone not only completes the enclosure of the inflatant, but also holds the antenna feed at its apex. The torus keeps the inflated cone-reflector from collapsing inward. Laser test equipment determined the accuracy of the inflated paraboloids.

  4. Requirement of rRNA Methylation for 80S Ribosome Assembly on a Cohort of Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Abhijit; Das, Priyanka; Chaudhuri, Sujan; Bevilacqua, Elena; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Hatzoglou, Maria; Komar, Anton A.; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2011-01-01

    Protein syntheses mediated by cellular and viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are believed to have many features in common. Distinct mechanisms for ribosome recruitment and preinitiation complex assembly between the two processes have not been identified thus far. Here we show that the methylation status of rRNA differentially influenced the mechanism of 80S complex formation on IRES elements from the cellular sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) versus the hepatitis C virus mRNA. Translation initiation involves the assembly of the 48S preinitiation complex, followed by joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit and formation of the 80S complex. Abrogation of rRNA methylation did not affect the 48S complex but resulted in impairment of 80S complex assembly on the cellular, but not the viral, IRESs tested. Impairment of 80S complex assembly on the amino acid transporter SNAT2 IRES was rescued by purified 60S subunits containing fully methylated rRNA. We found that rRNA methylation did not affect the activity of any of the viral IRESs tested but affected the activity of numerous cellular IRESs. This work reveals a novel mechanism operating on a cohort of cellular IRESs that involves rRNA methylation for proper 80S complex assembly and efficient translation initiation. PMID:21930789

  5. Intoxicants, Human Development, and the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Ken

    1980-01-01

    Major developments in learning technologies, particularly interactive television systems, will result in increases in self-defeating behaviors. They might be used to deepen our hypnotic preoccupation with high impact diversions. If this happens, counselors and students of the 80s can look forward to higher levels of destructive dependencies,…

  6. Education in the 80's: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Mary Budd, Ed.

    Designed to serve as a resource for science teachers, kindergarten through college, this publication contains 10 chapters, each focused on a topic of interest to science teachers working in the 1980's. Chapter titles and their authors are: (1) Understanding Science as a Cultural Phenomenon - Mission for the 80's, Drew Christianson; (2) What…

  7. Topography of the euryarchaeal transcription initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael S; Thomm, Michael; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2004-02-13

    Transcription in the Archaea is carried out by RNA polymerases and transcription factors that are highly homologous to their eukaryotic counterparts, but little is known about the structural organization of the archaeal transcription complex. To address this, transcription initiation complexes have been formed with Pyrococcus furiosus transcription factors (TBP and TFB1), RNA polymerase, and a linear DNA fragment containing a strong promoter. The arrangement of proteins from base pair -35 to +20 (relative to the transcriptional start site) has been analyzed by photochemical protein-DNA cross-linking. TBP cross-links to the TATA box and TFB1 cross-links both upstream and downstream of the TATA box, as expected, but the sites of most prominent TFB1 cross-linking are located well downstream of the TATA box, reaching as far as the start site of transcription, suggesting a role for TFB1 in initiation of transcription that extends beyond polymerase recruitment. These cross-links indicate the transcription factor orientation in the initiation complex. The pattern of cross-linking of four RNA polymerase subunits (B, A', A", and H) to the promoter suggests a path for promoter DNA relative to the RNA polymerase surface in this archaeal transcription initiation complex. In addition, an unidentified protein approximately the size of TBP cross-links to the non-transcribed DNA strand near the upstream edge of the transcription bubble. Cross-linking is specific to the polymerase-containing initiation complex and requires the gdh promoter TATA box. The location of this protein suggests that it, like TFB1, could also have a role in transcription initiation following RNA polymerase recruitment.

  8. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  9. Energy in the '80s: a call for leadership

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The theme of this conference - Energy in the '80s: A Call for Leadership - was selected to focus attention on what was believed to be what America needs now - to get on with the tasks at hand. This proceedings of the Public Awareness Symposium, held on February 19, featured six speakers; the address of Senator Jackson at the banquet on February 20, which concluded the conference is also included; a separate abstract was prepared for each of these seven presentations. Also, the society-sponsored technical session papers are listed in Appendix A, and the Engineering/Communication scholarships are noted in Appendix B.

  10. Converting PSO dynamics into complex network - Initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhacek, Michal; Janostik, Jakub; Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper it is presented the initial study on the possibility of capturing the inner dynamic of Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm into a complex network structure. Inspired in previous works there are two different approaches for creating the complex network presented in this paper. Visualizations of the networks are presented and commented. The possibilities for future applications of the proposed design are given in detail.

  11. Initial planning benefits complex prospective memory at a cost.

    PubMed

    Settle, Jill R; Clawson, Deborah M; Sebrechts, Marc M

    2017-08-01

    The effect of initial planning on complex prospective memory was investigated using a virtual environment and a sample of healthy young adults (N = 34). Participants were assigned to either an initial planning or a control condition and were asked to complete a series of time- and event-based prospective memory tasks. The planning group completed the tasks more quickly and accurately than the control group. However, the total time spent, including both planning and task execution, was comparable for the two groups. Within the planning group, tasks that were planned were more likely to be completed than unplanned tasks, but inclusion of overly detailed information in the plans resulted in poorer performance. These results suggest that although initial planning can be beneficial to task completion, the complexity of a plan may contribute to decrements in performance.

  12. The TRTGn motif stabilizes the transcription initiation open complex.

    PubMed

    Voskuil, Martin I; Chambliss, Glenn H

    2002-09-20

    The effect on transcription initiation by the extended -10 motif (5'-TRTG(n)-3'), positioned upstream of the -10 region, was investigated using a series of base substitution mutations in the alpha-amylase promoter (amyP). The extended -10 motif, previously referred to as the -16 region, is found frequently in Gram-positive bacterial promoters and several extended -10 promoters from Escherichia coli. The inhibitory effects of the non-productive promoter site (amyP2), which overlaps the upstream region of amyP, were eliminated by mutagenesis of the -35 region and the TRTG motif of amyP2. Removal by mutagenesis of the competitive effects of amyP2 resulted in a reduced dependence of amyP on the TRTG motif. In the absence of the second promoter, mutations in the TRTG motif of amyP destabilized the open complex and prevented the maintenance of open complexes at low temperatures. The open complex half-life was up to 26-fold shorter in the mutant TRTG motif promoters than in the wild-type promoter. We demonstrate that the amyP TRTG motif dramatically stabilizes the open complex intermediate during transcription initiation. Even though the open complex is less stable in the mutant promoters, the region of melted DNA is the same in the wild-type and mutant promoters. However, upon addition of the first three nucleotides, which trap RNAP (RNA polymerase) in a stable initiating complex, the melted DNA region contracts at the 5'-end in a TRTG motif promoter mutant but not at the wild-type promoter, indicating that the motif contributes to maintaining DNA-strand separation.

  13. Voices of Chinese Post-­80s Students in English Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Que, Hua; Li, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    This study looks into the changing voice of Chinese Post-80s' students in English academic writing. Data were collected qualitatively through interviews with four Chinese Post-80s overseas graduate students and through an examination of their English essays with a focus on discursive features. Findings indicate that Chinese Post-80s' voice is…

  14. Subseabed Radioactive Waste Disposal Feasibility Program: ocean engineering challenges for the 80's

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program is to assess the feasibility of disposing of high-level radioactive wastes or spent fuel in suitable geologic formations beneath the deep ocean floor. The program is entering a phase which will address engineering feasibility. While the current phase of the program to determine the scientific and environmental feasibility of the concept is not yet complete, activities to assess the engineering aspects are being initiated in parallel to facilitate the development of the concept on a time scale commensurate with other related programs both in the United States and abroad. It is anticipated that engineering aspects will become the central focus of the program during the early 80's and will continue so through the establishment of a pilot-plant level activity which could occur by the mid-90's.

  15. Microplastics in the Solent estuarine complex, UK: An initial assessment.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Anthony; Rees, Aldous; Rowe, Rob; Stevens, John; Wright, Paul

    2016-01-30

    Microplastics are known to be an increasing component found within both marine sediments and the water column. This study carried out an initial assessment of the levels of microplastics present within the Solent estuarine complex, focusing specifically on the water column. A plankton net trawl survey was carried out, with samples analysed using visual observation and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). The study identified significant quantities of plastics, ranging in shape, with hot spots found at confluence points within the estuary. Though the FT-IR analysis was inconclusive, the nature of the samples indicates the effect of oceanographic conditions on the prevalent types of microplastics found, which in turn identifies key local sources such as wastewater treatment plants and the plastics industry as being the dominant inputs.

  16. Calcium-dependent interaction of calmodulin with human 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Petra; Davis, Elizabeth; Delaney, Erin; Frohm, Birgitta; Bauer, Mikael; Cedervall, Tommy; O'Connell, David; Åkerfeldt, Karin S; Linse, Sara

    2012-08-28

    Ribosomes are the protein factories of every living cell. The process of protein translation is highly complex and tightly regulated by a large number of diverse RNAs and proteins. Earlier studies indicate that Ca(2+) plays a role in protein translation. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous Ca(2+)-binding protein, regulates a large number of proteins participating in many signaling pathways. Several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins have been identified to interact with CaM, and here, we report that CaM binds with high affinity to 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. No binding is observed in buffer with 6 mM Mg(2+) and 1 mM EGTA that chelates Ca(2+), suggesting high specificity of the CaM-ribosome interaction dependent on the Ca(2+) induced conformational change of CaM. The interactions between CaM and ribosomes are inhibited by synthetic peptides comprising putative CaM-binding sites in ribosomal proteins S2 and L14. Using a cell-free in vitro translation system, we further found that these synthetic peptides are potent inhibitors of protein synthesis. Our results identify an involvement of CaM in the translational activity of ribosomes.

  17. Evaluation of a Complex, Multisite, Multilevel Grants Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollison, Julia; Hill, Gary; Yu, Ping; Murray, Stephen; Mannix, Danyelle; Mathews-Younes, Anne; Wells, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) national evaluation seeks to assess both the implementation process and the results of the SS/HS initiative, exploring factors that have contributed to or detracted from grantee success. Each site is required to forge partnerships with representatives from education, mental health, juvenile justice, and…

  18. A DNA topoisomerase VI-like complex initiates meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Vrielynck, Nathalie; Chambon, Aurélie; Vezon, Daniel; Pereira, Lucie; Chelysheva, Liudmila; De Muyt, Arnaud; Mézard, Christine; Mayer, Claudine; Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-02-26

    The SPO11 protein catalyzes the formation of meiotic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and is homologous to the A subunit of an archaeal topoisomerase (topo VI). Topo VI are heterotetrameric enzymes comprising two A and two B subunits; however, no topo VIB involved in meiotic recombination had been identified. We characterized a structural homolog of the archaeal topo VIB subunit [meiotic topoisomerase VIB-like (MTOPVIB)], which is essential for meiotic DSB formation. It forms a complex with the two Arabidopsis thaliana SPO11 orthologs required for meiotic DSB formation (SPO11-1 and SPO11-2) and is absolutely required for the formation of the SPO11-1/SPO11-2 heterodimer. These findings suggest that the catalytic core complex responsible for meiotic DSB formation in eukaryotes adopts a topo VI-like structure.

  19. Futurism in the Education of the Deaf: Directions and Alternatives for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, William J. A.

    The author presents a rationale for the study of futurism in education and analyzes the effects of significant future changes upon deaf education in the 80s. The roles that change agents play in influencing the permanence of innovations within the school are examined: advocacy, information sharing, and organizational development training.…

  20. Therapeutic Discourse and ACOA Films of the '80s and '90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Joan Driscoll

    2000-01-01

    Argues that many family melodramas in films of the '80s and '90s focus their narrative on the negative dynamics of the parental relationship. Identifies underlying generic patterns and ideas found in these films. Explores representations of mothers, fathers, and children; gender representation and codependency; and familial dysfunction. Broadens…

  1. Advertising for the 80's. Marketing and Distributive Education. Advertising. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Craig; Elias, John

    This module contains a teacher's guide, student materials for a seminar on "advertising for the 80's" conducted for small business representatives, a 35mm slide presentation, and an audiocassette. The instructor guide contains an outline of the course, time plan, end-of-course critique, a script for the slide-tape presentation (with content on the…

  2. Evaluation of a complex, multisite, multilevel grants initiative.

    PubMed

    Rollison, Julia; Hill, Gary; Yu, Ping; Murray, Stephen; Mannix, Danyelle; Mathews-Younes, Anne; Wells, Michael E

    2012-05-01

    The Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) national evaluation seeks to assess both the implementation process and the results of the SS/HS initiative, exploring factors that have contributed to or detracted from grantee success. Each site is required to forge partnerships with representatives from education, mental health, juvenile justice, and law enforcement, coordinating and integrating their efforts and working together to contribute to comparable outcomes (e.g., reduced violence and alcohol and drug use, improved mental health services). The evaluation uses multiple data collection techniques (archival data, surveys, site visits, interviews, and focus groups) from a variety of sources (project directors, community partners, schools, and students) over several years. Certain characteristics of the SS/HS initiative represent unique challenges for the evaluation, including the absence of common metrics for baseline, outcome data, and lack of comparison group. A unifying program theory was required to address these challenges and synthesize the large amounts of qualitative and quantitative information collected. This article stresses the role of program theory in guiding the evaluation.

  3. Complex Flare Dynamics Initiated by a Filament-Filament Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunming; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong; McAteer, James

    2015-04-01

    We report on a filament eruption that led to a relatively rare filament-filament interaction event. The filaments were located at different heights above the same segment of a circular polarity inversion line (PIL) around a condensed leading sunspot. The onset of the eruption of the lower of the two filaments was accompanied by a simultaneous descent of the upper filament resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction led to the subsequent merger of the filaments into a single magnetically complex structure that erupted to create a large solar flare and an array of complex dynamical activity. A hard X-ray coronal source and an associated enhancement of hot plasma are observed at the interface between the two interacting filaments. These phenomena are related to the production of a small C flare and the subsequent development of a much stronger M flare. Magnetic loop shrinkage and descending dark voids were observed at different locations as part of the large flare energy release giving us a unique insight into these dynamic flare phenomena.

  4. A joint experimental/theoretical investigation of the MMA polymerization initiated by yttrium phenoxyamine complexes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Tschan, Mathieu J-L; Brulé, E; Robert, Carine; Thomas, Christophe M; Maron, Laurent

    2013-07-07

    A joint experimental/theoretical study has been carried out on the putative MMA polymerization catalyzed by an yttrium isopropyloxide complex. Despite its high activity in lactone polymerization, this catalyst is found to be unreactive on methyl methacrylate (MMA) polymerization. This surprising result is rationalized using a computational approach at the DFT level. Indeed, the endothermicity of the initiation step explains this lack of reactivity. The theoretical proposal of yttrium amido complexes as catalysts allows overcoming this initiation problem.

  5. Genome-wide uniformity of human ‘open’ pre-initiation complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, William K.M.; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2017-01-01

    Transcription of protein-coding and noncoding DNA occurs pervasively throughout the mammalian genome. Their sites of initiation are generally inferred from transcript 5′ ends and are thought to be either locally dispersed or focused. How these two modes of initiation relate is unclear. Here, we apply permanganate treatment and chromatin immunoprecipitation (PIP-seq) of initiation factors to identify the precise location of melted DNA separately associated with the preinitiation complex (PIC) and the adjacent paused complex (PC). This approach revealed the two known modes of transcription initiation. However, in contrast to prevailing views, they co-occurred within the same promoter region: initiation originating from a focused PIC, and broad nucleosome-linked initiation. PIP-seq allowed transcriptional orientation of Pol II to be determined, which may be useful near promoters where sufficient sense/anti-sense transcript mapping information is lacking. PIP-seq detected divergently oriented Pol II at both coding and noncoding promoters, as well as at enhancers. Their occupancy levels were not necessarily coupled in the two orientations. DNA sequence and shape analysis of initiation complex sites suggest that both sequence and shape contribute to specificity, but in a context-restricted manner. That is, initiation sites have the locally “best” initiator (INR) sequence and/or shape. These findings reveal a common core to pervasive Pol II initiation throughout the human genome. PMID:27927716

  6. The translational fidelity function of IF3 during transition from the 30 S initiation complex to the 70 S initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadou, Christina; Marzi, Stefano; Pan, Dongli; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Cooperman, Barry S

    2007-10-26

    IF3 has a fidelity function in the initiation of translation, inducing the dissociation of fMet-tRNA(fMet) from the 30 S initiation complexes (30SIC) containing a non-canonical initiation triplet (e.g. AUU) in place of a canonical initiation triplet (e.g., AUG). IF2 has a complementary role, selectively promoting initiator tRNA binding to the ribosome. Here, we used parallel rapid kinetics measurements of GTP hydrolysis, Pi release, light-scattering, and changes in intensities of fluorophore-labeled IF2 and fMet-tRNA(fMet) to determine the effects on both 30SIC formation and 30SIC conversion to 70 S initiation complexes (70SIC) of (a) substituting AUG with AUU, and/or (b) omitting IF3, and/or (c) replacing GTP with the non-hydrolyzable analog GDPCP. We demonstrate that the presence or absence of IF3 has, at most, minor effects on the rate of 30SIC formation using either AUG or AUU as the initiation codon, and conclude that the high affinity of IF2 for both 30 S subunit and initiator tRNA overrides any perturbation of the codon-anticodon interaction resulting from AUU for AUG substitution. In contrast, replacement of AUG by AUU leads to a dramatic reduction in the rate of 70SIC formation from 30SIC upon addition of 50 S subunits. Interpreting our results in the framework of a quantitative kinetic scheme leads to the conclusion that, within the overall process of 70SIC formation, the step most affected by substituting AUU for AUG involves the conversion of an initially labile 70 S ribosome into a more stable complex. In the absence of IF3, the difference between AUG and AUU largely disappears, with each initiation codon affording rapid 70SIC formation, leading to the hypothesis that it is the rate of IF3 dissociation from the 70 S ribosome during IC70S formation that is critical to its fidelity function.

  7. Human Mitochondrial Transcription Initiation Complexes Have Similar Topology on the Light and Heavy Strand Promoters.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yaroslav I; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2016-06-24

    Transcription is a highly regulated process in all domains of life. In human mitochondria, transcription of the circular genome involves only two promoters, called light strand promoter (LSP) and heavy strand promoter (HSP), located in the opposite DNA strands. Initiation of transcription occurs upon sequential assembly of an initiation complex that includes mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) and the initiation factors mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and TFB2M. It has been recently suggested that the transcription initiation factor TFAM binds to HSP and LSP in opposite directions, implying that the mechanisms of transcription initiation are drastically dissimilar at these promoters. In contrast, we found that binding of TFAM to HSP and the subsequent recruitment of mtRNAP results in a pre-initiation complex that is remarkably similar in topology and properties to that formed at the LSP promoter. Our data suggest that assembly of the pre-initiation complexes on LSP and HSP brings these transcription units in close proximity, providing an opportunity for regulatory proteins to simultaneously control transcription initiation in both mtDNA strands.

  8. Dom34-Hbs1 mediated dissociation of inactive 80S ribosomes promotes restart of translation after stress.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, Antonia M G; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2014-02-03

    Following translation termination, ribosomal subunits dissociate to become available for subsequent rounds of protein synthesis. In many translation-inhibiting stress conditions, e.g. glucose starvation in yeast, free ribosomal subunits reassociate to form a large pool of non-translating 80S ribosomes stabilized by the 'clamping' Stm1 factor. The subunits of these inactive ribosomes need to be mobilized for translation restart upon stress relief. The Dom34-Hbs1 complex, together with the Rli1 NTPase (also known as ABCE1), have been shown to split ribosomes stuck on mRNAs in the context of RNA quality control mechanisms. Here, using in vitro and in vivo methods, we report a new role for the Dom34-Hbs1 complex and Rli1 in dissociating inactive ribosomes, thereby facilitating translation restart in yeast recovering from glucose starvation stress. Interestingly, we found that this new role is not restricted to stress conditions, indicating that in growing yeast there is a dynamic pool of inactive ribosomes that needs to be split by Dom34-Hbs1 and Rli1 to participate in protein synthesis. We propose that this provides a new level of translation regulation.

  9. Computational Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with a Complex Initial Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob; Reilly, David; Greenough, Jeffrey; Ranjan, Devesh

    2014-11-01

    Results are presented for a computational study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with a complex initial condition. This study covers experiments which will be conducted at the newly-built inclined shock tube facility at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The complex initial condition employed consists of an underlying inclined interface perturbation with a broadband spectrum of modes superimposed. A three-dimensional staggered mesh arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code developed at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory called ARES was used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative results. Qualitative results are discussed using time series of density plots from which mixing width may be extracted. Quantitative results are also discussed using vorticity fields, circulation components, and energy spectra. The inclined interface case is compared to the complex interface case in order to study the effect of initial conditions on shocked, variable-density flows.

  10. Inhibition of replicon initiation in human cells following stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, W K; Boyer, J C; Estabrooks, L L; Wilson, S J

    1991-01-01

    Diploid human fibroblast strains were treated for 10 min with inhibitors of type I and type II DNA topoisomerases, and after removal of the inhibitors, the rate of initiation of DNA synthesis at replicon origins was determined. By alkaline elution chromatography, 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (amsacrine), an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, was shown to produce DNA strand breaks. These strand breaks are thought to reflect drug-induced stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. Removal of the drug led to a rapid resealing of the strand breaks by dissociation of the complexes. Velocity sedimentation analysis was used to quantify the effects of amsacrine treatment on DNA replication. It was demonstrated that transient exposure to low concentrations of amsacrine inhibited replicon initiation but did not substantially affect DNA chainelongation within operating replicons. Maximal inhibition of replicon initiation occurred 20 to 30 min after drug treatment, and the initiation rate recovered 30 to 90 min later. Ataxia telangiectasia cells displayed normal levels of amsacrine-induced DNA strand breaks during stabilization of cleavable complexes but failed to downregulate replicon initiation after exposure to the topoisomerase inhibitor. Thus, inhibition of replicon initiation in response to DNA damage appears to be an active process which requires a gene product which is defective or missing in ataxia telangiectasia cells. In normal human fibroblasts, the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I by camptothecin produced reversible DNA strand breaks. Transient exposure to this drug also inhibited replicon initiation. These results suggest that the cellular response pathway which downregulates replicon initiation following genotoxic damage may respond to perturbations of chromatin structure which accompany stabilization of topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complexes. PMID:1646393

  11. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  12. Initiating Molecular Growth in the Interstellar Medium via Dimeric Complexes of Observed Ions and Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bera, Partha P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    A feasible initiation step for particle growth in the interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by means of ab quantum chemistry methods. The systems studied are dimer ions formed by pairing nitrogen containing small molecules known to exist in the ISM with ions of unsaturated hydrocarbons or vice versa. Complexation energies, structures of ensuing complexes and electronic excitation spectra of the encounter complexes are estimated using various quantum chemistry methods. Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAP2), coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples corrections (CCSD(T)), and density functional theory (DFT) methods (B3LYP) were employed along with the correlation consistent cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. Two types of complexes are predicted. One type of complex has electrostatic binding with moderate (7-20 kcal per mol) binding energies, that are nonetheless significantly stronger than typical van der Waals interactions between molecules of this size. The other type of complex develops strong covalent bonds between the fragments. Cyclic isomers of the nitrogen containing complexes are produced very easily by ion-molecule reactions. Some of these complexes show intense ultraviolet visible spectra for electronic transitions with large oscillator strengths at the B3LYP, omegaB97, and equations of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) levels. The open shell nitrogen containing carbonaceous complexes especially exhibit a large oscillator strength electronic transition in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  13. Mefloquine targets the Plasmodium falciparum 80S ribosome to inhibit protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wilson; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Sleebs, Brad E; Triglia, Tony; Brown, Alan; Thompson, Jennifer K; Jackson, Katherine E; Hanssen, Eric; Marapana, Danushka S; Fernandez, Israel S; Ralph, Stuart A; Cowman, Alan F; Scheres, Sjors H W; Baum, Jake

    2017-03-13

    Malaria control is heavily dependent on chemotherapeutic agents for disease prevention and drug treatment. Defining the mechanism of action for licensed drugs, for which no target is characterized, is critical to the development of their second-generation derivatives to improve drug potency towards inhibition of their molecular targets. Mefloquine is a widely used antimalarial without a known mode of action. Here, we demonstrate that mefloquine is a protein synthesis inhibitor. We solved a 3.2 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Plasmodium falciparum 80S ribosome with the (+)-mefloquine enantiomer bound to the ribosome GTPase-associated centre. Mutagenesis of mefloquine-binding residues generates parasites with increased resistance, confirming the parasite-killing mechanism. Furthermore, structure-guided derivatives with an altered piperidine group, predicted to improve binding, show enhanced parasiticidal effect. These data reveal one possible mode of action for mefloquine and demonstrate the vast potential of cryo-electron microscopy to guide the development of mefloquine derivatives to inhibit parasite protein synthesis.

  14. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994). PMID:7651413

  15. Site-directed photo-cross-linking of rRNA transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Radebaugh, C A; Geiss, G K; Simon, M N; Paule, M R

    1995-09-01

    Site-specific photo-cross-linking of the rRNA committed transcription complex was carried out by using 5-[N-(p-azidobenzoyl)-3-aminoallyl]-dUMP-derivatized promoter DNA. Putative TAFIs of 145, 99, 96, and 91 kDa, as well as TATA-binding protein (TBP), were found to specifically photo-cross-link to different positions along the promoter. These had been identified as potential subunits of the fundamental transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (also known as SL1, factor D, and TFID) from Acanthamoeba castellanii by purification to apparent homogeneity. No other polypeptides attributable to the rRNA architectural transcription factor UBF were identified, suggesting that this protein is not part of the committed complex. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the complexes was used to estimate the mass of the complex and the contour length of the DNA in the complex. This showed that a single molecule of TIF-IB is in each committed complex and that the DNA is not looped around the protein, as would be expected if UBF were in the complex. A circular permutation analysis of DNA bending resulting from TIF-IB binding revealed a 45 +/- 3.1 degrees (n = 14) bend centered 23 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. This degree of bending and the position of the bend relative to the site of TBP photo-cross-linking are consistent with earlier data showing that the TBP TATA box-binding domain is not utilized in the assembly of the rRNA committed complex (C. A. Radebaugh, J. L. Mathews, G. K. Geiss, F. Liu, J. Wong, E. Bateman, S. Camier, A. Sentenac, and M. R. Paule, Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:597-605, 1994).

  16. Implications for Evaluating Multi-Component, Complex Prevention Initiatives: Taking Guidance from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felix, Erika; Furlong, Michael; Sharkey, Jill; Osher, David

    2007-01-01

    The Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) Initiative is an ambitious and comprehensive prevention initiative to promote evidence-based practice to address school safety and the reduction of substance abuse. This article describes the history of the SS/HS initiative and the national evaluation efforts to monitor the success of the initiative. To…

  17. Cell cycle regulated phosphorylation of RPA-32 occurs within the replication initiation complex.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, R; Roberts, J M

    1992-01-01

    The transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle may be regulated by modification of proteins which are essential for initiating DNA replication. One of the first events during initiation is to unwind the origin DNA and this requires a single-stranded DNA binding protein. RPA, a highly conserved multi-subunit single-stranded DNA binding protein, was first identified as a cellular protein necessary for the initiation of SV40 DNA replication. The 32 kDa subunit of RPA has been shown to be phosphorylated at the start of S phase. Using SV40 replication as a model, we have reproduced in vitro the S phase-dependent phosphorylation of RPA-32 and show that it occurs specifically within the replication initiation complex. Phosphorylated RPA-32 is predominantly associated with DNA. Phosphorylation is not a pre-requisite for association with DNA, but occurs after RPA binds to single-stranded DNA formed at the origin during the initiation phase. The protein kinase(s) which phosphorylates RPA-32 is present at all stages of the cell cycle but RPA-32 does not bind to the SV40 origin or become phosphorylated in extracts from G1 cells. Therefore, the cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of RPA-32 may be regulated by its binding to single-stranded origin DNA during replication initiation. Images PMID:1318194

  18. A QUANTITATIVE KINETIC SCHEME FOR 70S TRANSLATION INITIATION COMPLEX FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadou, Christina; Marzi, Stefano; Kirillov, Stanislas; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Association of the 30S initiation complex (30SIC) and the 50S ribosomal subunit, leading to formation of the 70S initiation complex (70SIC), is a critical step of the translation initiation pathway. The 70SIC contains initiator tRNA, fMet-tRNAfMet, bound in the P (peptidyl)-site in response to the AUG start codon. We have formulated a quantitative kinetic scheme for the formation of an active 70SIC from 30SIC and 50S subunits on the basis of parallel rapid kinetics measurements of GTP hydrolysis, Pi release, light scattering, and changes in fluorescence intensities of fluorophore-labeled IF2 and fMet-tRNAfMet. According to this scheme, an initially formed labile 70S complex, which promotes rapid IF2-dependent GTP hydrolysis, either dissociates reversibly into 30S and 50S subunits or is converted to a more stable form, leading to 70SIC formation. The latter process takes place with intervening conformational changes of ribosome-bound IF2 and fMet-tRNAfMet, which are monitored by spectral changes of fluorescent derivatives of IF2 and fMet-tRNAfMet. The availability of such a scheme provides a useful framework for precisely elucidating the mechanisms by which substituting the nonhydrolyzable analogue GDPCP for GTP or adding thiostrepton inhibit formation of a productive 70SIC. GDPCP does not affect stable 70S formation, but perturbs fMet-tRNAfMet positioning in the P-site. In contrast, thiostrepton severely retards stable 70S formation, but allows normal binding of fMet-tRNAfMet(prf20) to the P-site. PMID:17868692

  19. Architecture of the RNA polymerase II-Mediator core initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Plaschka, C; Larivière, L; Wenzeck, L; Seizl, M; Hemann, M; Tegunov, D; Petrotchenko, E V; Borchers, C H; Baumeister, W; Herzog, F; Villa, E; Cramer, P

    2015-02-19

    The conserved co-activator complex Mediator enables regulated transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II. Here we reconstitute an active 15-subunit core Mediator (cMed) comprising all essential Mediator subunits from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cryo-electron microscopic structure of cMed bound to a core initiation complex was determined at 9.7 Å resolution. cMed binds Pol II around the Rpb4-Rpb7 stalk near the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). The Mediator head module binds the Pol II dock and the TFIIB ribbon and stabilizes the initiation complex. The Mediator middle module extends to the Pol II foot with a 'plank' that may influence polymerase conformation. The Mediator subunit Med14 forms a 'beam' between the head and middle modules and connects to the tail module that is predicted to bind transcription activators located on upstream DNA. The Mediator 'arm' and 'hook' domains contribute to a 'cradle' that may position the CTD and TFIIH kinase to stimulate Pol II phosphorylation.

  20. Critical initial-slip scaling for the noisy complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weigang; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2016-10-01

    We employ the perturbative fieldtheoretic renormalization group method to investigate the universal critical behavior near the continuous non-equilibrium phase transition in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with additive white noise. This stochastic partial differential describes a remarkably wide range of physical systems: coupled nonlinear oscillators subject to external noise near a Hopf bifurcation instability; spontaneous structure formation in non-equilibrium systems, e.g., in cyclically competing populations; and driven-dissipative Bose-Einstein condensation, realized in open systems on the interface of quantum optics and many-body physics, such as cold atomic gases and exciton-polaritons in pumped semiconductor quantum wells in optical cavities. Our starting point is a noisy, dissipative Gross-Pitaevski or nonlinear Schrödinger equation, or equivalently purely relaxational kinetics originating from a complex-valued Landau-Ginzburg functional, which generalizes the standard equilibrium model A critical dynamics of a non-conserved complex order parameter field. We study the universal critical behavior of this system in the early stages of its relaxation from a Gaussian-weighted fully randomized initial state. In this critical aging regime, time translation invariance is broken, and the dynamics is characterized by the stationary static and dynamic critical exponents, as well as an independent ‘initial-slip’ exponent. We show that to first order in the dimensional expansion about the upper critical dimension, this initial-slip exponent in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is identical to its equilibrium model A counterpart. We furthermore employ the renormalization group flow equations as well as construct a suitable complex spherical model extension to argue that this conclusion likely remains true to all orders in the perturbation expansion.

  1. Initial formation of an indigenous crop complex in eastern North America at 3800 B.P

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce D.; Yarnell, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Although geneticists and archaeologists continue to make progress world-wide in documenting the time and place of the initial domestication of a growing number of plants and animals, far less is known regarding the critically important context of coalescence of various species into distinctive sets or complexes of domesticates in each of the world's 10 or more independent centers of agricultural origin. In this article, the initial emergence of a crop complex is described for one of the best-documented of these independent centers, eastern North America (ENA). Before 4000 B.P. there is no indication of a crop complex in ENA, only isolated evidence for single indigenous domesticate species. By 3800 B.P., however, at least 5 domesticated seed-bearing plants formed a coherent complex in the river valley corridors of ENA. Accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates and reanalysis of archaeobotanical assemblages from a short occupation of the Riverton Site in Illinois documents the contemporary cultivation at 3800 B.P. of domesticated bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria), marshelder (Iva annua var. macrocarpa), sunflower (Helianthus annuus var. macrocarpus), and 2 cultivated varieties of chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), as well as the possible cultivation of Cucurbita pepo squash and little barley (Hordeum pusillum). Rather than marking either an abrupt developmental break or a necessary response to population-packing or compressed resource catchments, the coalescence of an initial crop complex in ENA appears to reflect an integrated expansion and enhancement of preexisting hunting and gathering economies that took place within a context of stable long-term adaptation to resource-rich river valley settings. PMID:19366669

  2. Initial formation of an indigenous crop complex in eastern North America at 3800 B.P.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bruce D; Yarnell, Richard A

    2009-04-21

    Although geneticists and archaeologists continue to make progress world-wide in documenting the time and place of the initial domestication of a growing number of plants and animals, far less is known regarding the critically important context of coalescence of various species into distinctive sets or complexes of domesticates in each of the world's 10 or more independent centers of agricultural origin. In this article, the initial emergence of a crop complex is described for one of the best-documented of these independent centers, eastern North America (ENA). Before 4000 B.P. there is no indication of a crop complex in ENA, only isolated evidence for single indigenous domesticate species. By 3800 B.P., however, at least 5 domesticated seed-bearing plants formed a coherent complex in the river valley corridors of ENA. Accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates and reanalysis of archaeobotanical assemblages from a short occupation of the Riverton Site in Illinois documents the contemporary cultivation at 3800 B.P. of domesticated bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria), marshelder (Iva annua var. macrocarpa), sunflower (Helianthus annuus var. macrocarpus), and 2 cultivated varieties of chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), as well as the possible cultivation of Cucurbita pepo squash and little barley (Hordeum pusillum). Rather than marking either an abrupt developmental break or a necessary response to population-packing or compressed resource catchments, the coalescence of an initial crop complex in ENA appears to reflect an integrated expansion and enhancement of preexisting hunting and gathering economies that took place within a context of stable long-term adaptation to resource-rich river valley settings.

  3. Sec3 promotes the initial binary t-SNARE complex assembly and membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Peng; Zhang, Yubo; Mei, Kunrong; Wang, Shaoxiao; Lesigang, Johannes; Zhu, Yueyao; Dong, Gang; Guo, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) constitute the core machinery for membrane fusion during eukaryotic cell vesicular trafficking. However, how the assembly of the SNARE complex is initiated is unknown. Here we report that Sec3, a component of the exocyst complex that mediates vesicle tethering during exocytosis, directly interacts with the t-SNARE protein Sso2. This interaction promotes the formation of an Sso2-Sec9 ‘binary' t-SNARE complex, the early rate-limiting step in SNARE complex assembly, and stimulates membrane fusion. The crystal structure of the Sec3-Sso2 complex suggests that Sec3 binding induces conformational changes of Sso2 that are crucial for the relief of its auto-inhibition. Interestingly, specific disruption of the Sec3–Sso2 interaction in cells blocks exocytosis without affecting the function of Sec3 in vesicle tethering. Our study reveals an activation mechanism for SNARE complex assembly, and uncovers a role of the exocyst in promoting membrane fusion in addition to vesicle tethering. PMID:28112172

  4. Arterio-Venous Fistula: Is it Critical for Prolonged Survival in the over 80's Starting Haemodialysis?

    PubMed Central

    Jakes, Adam D.; Jani, Poonam; Allgar, Victoria; Lamplugh, Archie; Zeidan, Ahmed; Bhandari, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Background Dialysis in elderly patients (>80-years-old) carries a poor prognosis, but little is known about the most effective vascular access method in this age group. An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is both time-consuming and initially expensive, requiring surgical insertion. A central venous catheter (CVC) is initially a cheaper alternative, but carries a higher risk of infection. We examined whether vascular access affected 1-year and 2-year mortality in elderly patients commencing haemodialysis. Methods Initial vascular access, demographic and survival data for elective haemodialysis patients >80-years was collated using regional databases. A cohort of conservatively managed patients was included for comparison. A log-rank test was used to compare survival between groups and a chi-square test was used to compare 1-year and 2-year survival. Results 167 patients (61% male) were included: CVC (101), AVF (25) and conservative management (41). Mean age (median) of starting haemodialysis (eGFR ≤10mL/min/1.73m2): CVC; 83.4 (2.3) and AVF; 82.3 (1.8). Mean age of conservatively managed patients reaching an eGFR ≤10mL/min/1.73m2 was 85.8 (3.6). Mean (median) survival on dialysis was 2.2 (1.8) years for AVF patients, 2.1 (1.2) for CVC patients, and 1.5 (0.9) for conservatively managed patients (p = 0.107, controlling for age/sex p = 0.519). 1-year and 2-year mortality: AVF (28%/52%); CVC (49%/57%), and conservative management (54%/68%). There was no significant difference between the groups at 1-year (p = 0.108) or 2-years (p = 0.355). Conclusion These results suggest that there is no significant survival benefit over a 2-year period when comparing vascular access methods. In comparison to conservative management, survival benefit was marginal. The decision of whether and how (choice of their vascular access method) to dialysis the over 80s is multifaceted and requires a tailored, multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27684071

  5. Complex oncogenic translocations with gene amplification are initiated by specific DNA breaks in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wright, Sarah M; Woo, Yong H; Alley, Travis L; Shirley, Bobbi-Jo; Akeson, Ellen C; Snow, Kathy J; Maas, Sarah A; Elwell, Rachel L; Foreman, Oded; Mills, Kevin D

    2009-05-15

    Chromosomal instability is a hallmark of many tumor types. Complex chromosomal rearrangements with associated gene amplification, known as complicons, characterize many hematologic and solid cancers. Whereas chromosomal aberrations, including complicons, are useful diagnostic and prognostic cancer markers, their molecular origins are not known. Although accumulating evidence has implicated DNA double-strand break repair in suppression of oncogenic genome instability, the genomic elements required for chromosome rearrangements, especially complex lesions, have not been elucidated. Using a mouse model of B-lineage lymphoma, characterized by complicon formation involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus and the c-myc oncogene, we have now investigated the requirement for specific genomic segments as donors for complex rearrangements. We now show that specific DNA double-strand breaks, occurring within a narrow segment of Igh, are necessary to initiate complicon formation. By contrast, neither specific DNA breaks nor the powerful intronic enhancer Emu are required for complicon-independent oncogenesis. This study is the first to delineate mechanisms of complex versus simple instability and the first to identify specific chromosomal elements required for complex chromosomal aberrations. These findings will illuminate genomic cancer susceptibility and risk factors.

  6. The Atg1-kinase complex tethers Atg9-vesicles to initiate autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yijian; Perna, Marco G.; Hofmann, Benjamin; Beier, Viola; Wollert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagosomes are double-membrane vesicles that sequester cytoplasmic material for lysosomal degradation. Their biogenesis is initiated by recruitment of Atg9-vesicles to the phagophore assembly site. This process depends on the regulated activation of the Atg1-kinase complex. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we reconstitute this early step in autophagy from purified components in vitro. We find that on assembly from its cytoplasmic subcomplexes, the Atg1-kinase complex becomes activated, enabling it to recruit and tether Atg9-vesicles. The scaffolding protein Atg17 targets the Atg1-kinase complex to autophagic membranes by specifically recognizing the membrane protein Atg9. This interaction is inhibited by the two regulatory subunits Atg31 and Atg29. Engagement of the Atg1-Atg13 subcomplex restores the Atg9-binding and membrane-tethering activity of Atg17. Our data help to unravel the mechanism that controls Atg17-mediated tethering of Atg9-vesicles, providing the molecular basis to understand initiation of autophagosome-biogenesis.

  7. Conformational Differences between Open and Closed States of the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Llácer, Jose L.; Hussain, Tanweer; Marler, Laura; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Thakur, Anil; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Translation initiation in eukaryotes begins with the formation of a pre-initiation complex (PIC) containing the 40S ribosomal subunit, eIF1, eIF1A, eIF3, ternary complex (eIF2-GTP-Met-tRNAi), and eIF5. The PIC, in an open conformation, attaches to the 5′ end of the mRNA and scans to locate the start codon, whereupon it closes to arrest scanning. We present single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of 48S PICs from yeast in these open and closed states, at 6.0 Å and 4.9 Å, respectively. These reconstructions show eIF2β as well as a configuration of eIF3 that appears to encircle the 40S, occupying part of the subunit interface. Comparison of the complexes reveals a large conformational change in the 40S head from an open mRNA latch conformation to a closed one that constricts the mRNA entry channel and narrows the P site to enclose tRNAi, thus elucidating key events in start codon recognition. PMID:26212456

  8. Complex polymer brush gradients based on nanolithography and surface-initiated polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiankun; He, Qiang; Li, Junbai

    2012-05-07

    Confined surface gradients consisting of polymer brushes have great potential in various applications such as microfluidic devices, sensors, and biophysical research. Among the available fabrication approaches, nanolithographies combined with self-assembled monolayers and surface-initiated polymerization have became powerful tools to engineer confined gradients or predefined complex gradients on the nanometre size. In this tutorial review, we mainly highlight the research progress of the fabrication of confined polymer brush gradients by using electron beam, laser, and probe-based nanolithographies and the physical base for these approaches. The application of these polymer brush gradients in biomedical research is also addressed.

  9. Structure of the human autophagy initiating kinase ULK1 in complex with potent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Michael B; Novotny, Chris J; Shokat, Kevan M

    2015-01-16

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that involves the degradation of cellular components for energy maintenance and cytoplasmic quality control that has recently gained interest as a novel target for a variety of human diseases, including cancer. A prime candidate to determine the potential therapeutic benefit of targeting autophagy is the kinase ULK1, whose activation initiates autophagy. Here, we report the first structures of ULK1, in complex with multiple potent inhibitors. These structures show features unique to the enzyme and will provide a path for the rational design of selective compounds as cellular probes and potential therapeutics.

  10. Structure of an RNA Polymerase II-TFIIB Complex and the Transcription Initiation Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Wang, Dong; Calero, Guillermo; Kornberg, Roger D

    2010-01-14

    Previous x-ray crystal structures have given insight into the mechanism of transcription and the role of general transcription factors in the initiation of the process. A structure of an RNA polymerase II-general transcription factor TFIIB complex at 4.5 angstrom resolution revealed the amino-terminal region of TFIIB, including a loop termed the 'B finger,' reaching into the active center of the polymerase where it may interact with both DNA and RNA, but this structure showed little of the carboxyl-terminal region. A new crystal structure of the same complex at 3.8 angstrom resolution obtained under different solution conditions is complementary with the previous one, revealing the carboxyl-terminal region of TFIIB, located above the polymerase active center cleft, but showing none of the B finger. In the new structure, the linker between the amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions can also be seen, snaking down from above the cleft toward the active center. The two structures, taken together with others previously obtained, dispel long-standing mysteries of the transcription initiation process.

  11. Architecture of TFIIIC and its role in RNA polymerase III pre-initiation complex assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, Gary; von Appen, Alexander; Glatt, Sebastian; Taylor, Nicholas M. I.; Cristovao, Michele; Groetsch, Helga; Beck, Martin; Müller, Christoph W.

    2015-06-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA Polymerase III (Pol III) is specifically responsible for transcribing genes encoding tRNAs and other short non-coding RNAs. The recruitment of Pol III to tRNA-encoding genes requires the transcription factors (TF) IIIB and IIIC. TFIIIC has been described as a conserved, multi-subunit protein complex composed of two subcomplexes, called τA and τB. How these two subcomplexes are linked and how their interaction affects the formation of the Pol III pre-initiation complex (PIC) is poorly understood. Here we use chemical crosslinking mass spectrometry and determine the molecular architecture of TFIIIC. We further report the crystal structure of the essential TPR array from τA subunit τ131 and characterize its interaction with a central region of τB subunit τ138. The identified τ131-τ138 interacting region is essential in vivo and overlaps with TFIIIB-binding sites, revealing a crucial interaction platform for the regulation of tRNA transcription initiation.

  12. Structural Changes Enable Start Codon Recognition by the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanweer; Llácer, Jose L.; Fernández, Israel S.; Munoz, Antonio; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Savva, Christos G.; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During eukaryotic translation initiation, initiator tRNA does not insert fully into the P decoding site on the 40S ribosomal subunit. This conformation (POUT) is compatible with scanning mRNA for the AUG start codon. Base pairing with AUG is thought to promote isomerization to a more stable conformation (PIN) that arrests scanning and promotes dissociation of eIF1 from the 40S subunit. Here, we present a cryoEM reconstruction of a yeast preinitiation complex at 4.0 Å resolution with initiator tRNA in the PIN state, prior to eIF1 release. The structure reveals stabilization of the codon-anticodon duplex by the N-terminal tail of eIF1A, changes in the structure of eIF1 likely instrumental in its subsequent release, and changes in the conformation of eIF2. The mRNA traverses the entire mRNA cleft and makes connections to the regulatory domain of eIF2α, eIF1A, and ribosomal elements that allow recognition of context nucleotides surrounding the AUG codon. PMID:25417110

  13. Three-dimensional EM Structure of an Intact Activator-dependent Transcription Initiation Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Quispe, J; Lara-González, S; Kim, Y; Berman, H; Arnold, E; Ebright, R; Lawson, C

    2009-01-01

    We present the experimentally determined 3D structure of an intact activator-dependent transcription initiation complex comprising the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein (CAP), RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and a DNA fragment containing positions -78 to +20 of a Class I CAP-dependent promoter with a CAP site at position -61.5 and a premelted transcription bubble. A 20-{angstrom} electron microscopy reconstruction was obtained by iterative projection-based matching of single particles visualized in carbon-sandwich negative stain and was fitted using atomic coordinate sets for CAP, RNAP, and DNA. The structure defines the organization of a Class I CAP-RNAP-promoter complex and supports previously proposed interactions of CAP with RNAP {alpha} subunit C-terminal domain ({alpha}CTD), interactions of {alpha}CTD with {sigma}70 region 4, interactions of CAP and RNAP with promoter DNA, and phased-DNA-bend-dependent partial wrapping of DNA around the complex. The structure also reveals the positions and shapes of species-specific domains within the RNAP {beta}{prime}, {beta}, and {sigma}70 subunits.

  14. Kinematics invariance in multi-directional complex movements in free space: effect of changing initial direction.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Draye, J P; Bengoetxea, A; Dan, B

    1999-04-01

    We investigated in normal human subjects the effect of changing the initial direction on the kinematic properties of figure '8' movement performed as fast as possible by the right arm extended in free space. To this end, the motion of the index finger was monitored by the ELITE system. The figure '8' movement was characterized by a complex tangential velocity profile (Vt) presenting 5 bell-shaped components. It was found that the temporal segmentation following Vt was not significantly different, whatever the initial direction of the movement. The decomposition of Vt into different velocity profiles with respect to vertical (3 phases, Iy-IIIy) and horizontal (5 phases, Iz-Vz) directions showed a significant relationship between the amplitude and the maximal velocity for all the different phases (except the IIy phase), which demonstrated a good conservation of the Isochrony Principle. However, we showed that the transition between the clockwise and counter-clockwise loop (inflection point) induced greater variability in the vertical velocity profile than in the horizontal one. Moreover, some parameters such as the maximal velocity of Iy and the movement amplitude of the last phases (IIIy and Vz) showed significant changes depending on the initial direction. A highly significant positive correlation was observed between the instantaneous curvature and angular velocity. This was expressed by a power law similar to that previously describe for other types of movement. Furthermore, it was found that this covariation between geometrical and kinematic properties of the trajectory is not dependent on the initial direction of movement. In conclusion, these results support the idea that the fast execution in different directions of a figure '8' movement is mainly controlled by two types of invariant commands. The first one is reflected in the 2/3 power law between angular velocity and curvature and the second one is represented by a segmented tangential velocity profile.

  15. Initial characterization of the FlgE hook high molecular weight complex of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kelly A; Motaleb, Md A; Liu, Jun; Hu, Bo; Caimano, Melissa J; Miller, Michael R; Charon, Nyles W

    2014-01-01

    The spirochete periplasmic flagellum has many unique attributes. One unusual characteristic is the flagellar hook. This structure serves as a universal joint coupling rotation of the membrane-bound motor to the flagellar filament. The hook is comprised of about 120 FlgE monomers, and in most bacteria these structures readily dissociate to monomers (∼ 50 kDa) when treated with heat and detergent. However, in spirochetes the FlgE monomers form a large mass of over 250 kDa [referred to as a high molecular weight complex (HMWC)] that is stable to these and other denaturing conditions. In this communication, we examined specific aspects with respect to the formation and structure of this complex. We found that the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi synthesized the HMWC throughout the in vitro growth cycle, and also in vivo when implanted in dialysis membrane chambers in rats. The HMWC was stable to formic acid, which supports the concept that the stability of the HMWC is dependent on covalent cross-linking of individual FlgE subunits. Mass spectrometry analysis of the HMWC from both wild type periplasmic flagella and polyhooks from a newly constructed ΔfliK mutant indicated that other proteins besides FlgE were not covalently joined to the complex, and that FlgE was the sole component of the complex. In addition, mass spectrometry analysis also indicated that the HMWC was composed of a polymer of the FlgE protein with both the N- and C-terminal regions remaining intact. These initial studies set the stage for a detailed characterization of the HMWC. Covalent cross-linking of FlgE with the accompanying formation of the HMWC we propose strengthens the hook structure for optimal spirochete motility.

  16. Spontaneous initiation of premature ventricular complexes and arrhythmias in type 2 long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaodong; Kim, Tae Yun; Koren, Gideon; Choi, Bum-Rak; Qu, Zhilin

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of early afterdepolarizations (EADs) and increased dispersion of repolarization are two known factors for arrhythmogenesis in long QT syndrome. However, increased dispersion of repolarization tends to suppress EADs due to the source-sink effect, and thus how the two competing factors cause initiation of arrhythmias remains incompletely understood. Here we used optical mapping and computer simulation to investigate the mechanisms underlying spontaneous initiation of arrhythmias in type 2 long QT (LQT2) syndrome. In optical mapping experiments of transgenic LQT2 rabbit hearts under isoproterenol, premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) were observed to originate from the steep spatial repolarization gradient (RG) regions and propagated unidirectionally. The same PVC behaviors were demonstrated in computer simulations of tissue models of rabbits. Depending on the heterogeneities, these PVCs could lead to either repetitive focal excitations or reentry without requiring an additional vulnerable substrate. Systematic simulations showed that cellular phase 2 EADs were either suppressed or confined to the long action potential region due to the source-sink effect. Tissue-scale phase 3 EADs and PVCs occurred due to tissue-scale dynamical instabilities caused by RG and enhanced L-type calcium current (ICa,L), occurring under both large and small RG. Presence of cellular EADs was not required but potentiated PVCs when RG was small. We also investigated how other factors affect the dynamical instabilities causing PVCs. Our main conclusion is that tissue-scale dynamical instabilities caused by RG and enhanced ICa,L give rise to both the trigger and the vulnerable substrate simultaneously for spontaneous initiation of arrhythmias in LQT2 syndrome.

  17. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA.

    PubMed

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-09

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the -10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD.

  18. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the −10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22520.001 PMID:28067618

  19. The Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI): Insights to understanding air pollution in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu; Jaffe, Dan; Burley, Joel

    2015-10-15

    The Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI) was established to better understand O3 concentrations in the Western United States (US). The major working hypothesis for development of the sampling network was that the sources of O3 to Nevada are regional and global. Within the framework of this overarching hypothesis, we specifically address two conceptual meteorological hypotheses: (1) The high elevation, complex terrain, and deep convective mixing that characterize Nevada, make this state ideally located to intercept polluted parcels of air transported into the US from the free troposphere; and (2) site specific terrain features will influence O3 concentrations observed at surface sites. Here, the impact of complex terrain and site location on observations are discussed. Data collected in Nevada at 6 sites (1385 to 2082 m above sea level (asl)) are compared with that collected at high elevation sites in Yosemite National Park and the White Mountains, California. Average daily maximum 1-hour concentrations of O3 during the first year of the NVROI ranged from 58 to 69 ppbv (spring), 53 to 62 ppbv (summer), 44 to 49 ppbv (fall), and 37 to 45 ppbv (winter). These were similar to those measured at 3 sites in Yosemite National Park (2022 to 3031 m asl), and at 4 sites in the White Mountains (1237 to 4342 m asl) (58 to 67 ppbv (summer) and 47 to 58 ppbv (fall)). Results show, that in complex terrain, collection of data should occur at high and low elevation sites to capture surface impacts, and site location with respect to topography should be considered. Additionally, concentrations measured are above the threshold reported for causing a reduction in growth and visible injury for plants (40 ppbv), and sustained exposure at high elevation locations in the Western USA may be detrimental for ecosystems.

  20. Complexities in rift initiation and development within the Iceland Plateau, North-Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdóttir, Bryndís; Hooft, Emilie; Mjelde, Rolf; Murai, Yoshio

    2015-04-01

    Spreading north of Iceland has been complex since the break-up of the North Atlantic in late Paleocene-early Eocene. Magnetic anomalies within the Iceland Plateau, west of the Ægir Ridge and along the Greenland-Iceland-Faeroe Ridge are irregular, formed by plate boundary complexities at breakup, branched accretion zones, westward rifting relocations, and large overlapping rifts. The 700 km long KRISE7 seismic refraction/reflection and gravity profile, straddles 66.5°N, between the Kolbeinsey and Ægir Ridges, crossing the three physiographic provinces that characterize this region: the Iceland Shelf, Iceland Plateau and Norway Basin. On the basis of crustal thickness and velocity structure, combined with older seismic reflection profiles and drill cores, these provinces correspond to three individual spreading rifts that were active at different time periods. The deep, fan shaped Norway basin was formed during the initial opening of the Atlantic by spreading at the now extinct Ægir Ridge. The oldest crust in the western Norway Basin has thickness 8-10 km and this thins to 4-5 km at the Ægir Ridge reflecting the progressive abandonment of spreading at this rift axis. The eastern Iceland Plateau was the locus of an extinct spreading center, which was segmented and overlapped the Ægir Ridge by 300 km. Spreading on the Iceland Plateau rift occurred simultaneously with that on the Ægir Ridge prior to 26 Ma, when the Kolbeinsey Ridge was initiated by a westward rift jump. The Iceland Plateau rift formed by rifting along the continent-ocean transition at the former central E-Greenland margin, associated with the formation of the Jan Mayen Ridge. Lower crustal domes and corresponding gravity highs across the Iceland Plateau mark the location of the extinct rift axis. The crust at the Iceland Plateau rift is thicker (12-15 km) that that at the conjugate Ægir Ridge and formed under active upwelling conditions (normal lower crustal velocities), which we attribute to

  1. Iron Isotope Systematics of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stausberg, N.; Lesher, C. E.; Hoffmann-Barfod, G.; Glessner, J. J.; Tegner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Iron isotopes show systematic changes in igneous rocks that have been ascribed to fractional crystallization, partial melting, as well as, diffusion effects. Layered mafic intrusions, such as the Paleoproterozoic Bushveld Igneous Complex, are ideally suited to investigate stable isotope fractionation arising principally by fractional crystallization. The upper 2.1km of the Bushveld Complex (Upper and Upper Main Zone, UUMZ) crystallized from a basaltic magma produced by a major recharge event, building up a sequence of tholeiitic, Fe-rich, gabbroic cumulate rocks that display systematic variations in mineralogy and mineral compositions consistent with fractional crystallization. Within this sequence, magnetite joins the liquidus assemblage at ˜260m, followed by olivine at 460m and apatite at 1000m. Here, we present iron isotope measurements of bulk cumulate rocks from the Bierkraal drill core of UUMZ of the western limb. Iron was chemically separated from its matrix and analyzed for δ56Fe (relative to IRMM- 014) with a Nu plasma MC-ICPMS at the University of California, Davis, using (pseudo-) high resolution and sample-standard bracketing. The δ56Fe values for Bushveld cumulates span a range from 0.04‰ to 0.36‰, and systematically correlate with the relative abundance of pyroxene + olivine, magnetite and plagioclase. Notably, the highest δ56Fe values are found in plagioclase-rich cumulates that formed prior to magnetite crystallization. δ56Fe is also high in magnetite-rich cumulates at the onset of magnetite crystallization, while subsequent cumulates exhibit lower and variable δ56Fe principally reflecting fractionation of and modal variations in magnetite, pyroxene and fayalitic olivine. The overall relationships for δ56Fe are consistent with positive mineral - liquid Fe isotope fractionation factors for magnetite and plagioclase, and negative to near zero values for pyroxene and olivine. These initial results are being integrated into a forward model of

  2. Initial experience with transluminally placed endovascular grafts for the treatment of complex vascular lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Marin, M L; Veith, F J; Cynamon, J; Sanchez, L A; Lyon, R T; Levine, B A; Bakal, C W; Suggs, W D; Wengerter, K R; Rivers, S P

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Complex arterial occlusive, traumatic, and aneurysmal lesions may be difficult or impossible to treat successfully by standard surgical techniques when severe medical or surgical comorbidities exist. The authors describe a single center's experience over a 2 1/2-year period with 96 endovascular graft procedures performed to treat 100 arterial lesions in 92 patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients had 36 large aortic and/or peripheral artery aneurysms, 48 had 53 multilevel limb-threatening aortoiliac and/or femoropopliteal occlusive lesions, and 11 had traumatic arterial injuries (false aneurysms and arteriovenous fistulas). Endovascular grafts were placed through remote arteriotomies under local (16[17%]), epidural (42[43%]), or general (38[40%]) anesthesia. RESULTS: Technical and clinical successes were achieved in 91% of the patients with aneurysms, 91% with occlusive lesions, and 100% with traumatic arterial lesions. These patients and grafts have been followed from 1 to 30 months (mean, 13 months). The primary and secondary patency rates at 18 months for aortoiliac occlusions were 77% and 95%, respectively. The 18-month limb salvage rate was 98%. Immediately after aortic aneurysm exclusion, a total of 6 (33%) perigraft channels were detected; 3 of these closed within 8 weeks. Endovascular stented graft procedures were associated with a 10% major and a 14% minor complication rate. The overall 30-day mortality rate for this entire series was 6%. CONCLUSIONS: This initial experience with endovascular graft repair of complex arterial lesions justifies further use and careful evaluation of this technique for major arterial reconstruction. Images Figure 1. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 11. PMID:7574926

  3. Bis(phosphinic)diamido yttrium amide, alkoxide, and aryloxide complexes: an evaluation of lactide ring-opening polymerization initiator efficiency.

    PubMed

    Platel, Rachel H; White, Andrew J P; Williams, Charlotte K

    2011-08-15

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of bis(phosphinic)diamido yttrium alkoxide, amide, and aryloxide initiators are reported. The new complexes are characterized using multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and, in some cases, X-ray crystallography. The alkoxide complexes are all dimeric in both the solid state and in solution, as are the amide complexes substituted with iso-propyl or phenyl groups on the phosphorus atoms. On the other hand, increasing the steric hindrance of the phosphorus substituents (tert-butyl), enables isolation of mononuclear yttrium amide complexes with either 2,2-dimethylpropylene or ethylene diamido ligand backbones. The complex of 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenoxide is also mononuclear. All the new complexes are efficient initiators for rac-lactide ring-opening polymerization. The polymerization kinetics are compared and pseudo first order rate constants, k(obs), determined. The polymerization control is also discussed, by monitoring the number-averaged molecular weight, M(n), and polydispersity index, PDI, obtained using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The alkoxide complexes are the most efficient initiators, showing very high rates and good polymerization control, behavior consistent with rapid rates of initiation. The phenoxide and amide complexes are less efficient as manifest by nonlinear regions in the kinetic plots, lower values for k(obs), and reduced polymerization control. One of the mononuclear yttrium amide complexes shows heteroselectivity in the polymerization of rac-lactide; however, this effect is reduced on changing the initiating group to phenoxide or on changing the ancillary ligand diamido backbone group.

  4. [SWI/SNF Protein Complexes Participate in the Initiation and Elongation Stages of Drosophila hsp70 Gene Transcription].

    PubMed

    Mazina, M Yu; Nikolenko, Yu V; Krasnov, A N; Vorobyeva, N E

    2016-02-01

    The participation of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex in the stimulation of the RNA polymerase II binding to gene promotors was demonstrated in all model eukaryotic organisms. It was shown eight years ago that the SWI/SNF complex influence on transcription is not limited to its role in initiation but also includes participation in elongation and alternative splicing. In the current work, we describe the subunit composition of the SWI/SNF complexes participating in initiation, preparing for the elongation and elongation of hsp70 gene transcription in Drosophila melanogaster. The data reveal the high mobility of the SWI/SNF complex composition during the hsp 70 gene transcription process. We suggest a model describing the process of sequential SWI/SNF complex formation during heat-shock induced transcription of the hsp 70 gene.

  5. Complex Events Initiated by Individual Spikes in the Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Komlósi, Gergely; Füle, Miklós; Szabadics, János; Varga, Csaba; Barzó, Pál; Tamás, Gábor

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic interactions between neurons of the human cerebral cortex were not directly studied to date. We recorded the first dataset, to our knowledge, on the synaptic effect of identified human pyramidal cells on various types of postsynaptic neurons and reveal complex events triggered by individual action potentials in the human neocortical network. Brain slices were prepared from nonpathological samples of cortex that had to be removed for the surgical treatment of brain areas beneath association cortices of 58 patients aged 18 to 73 y. Simultaneous triple and quadruple whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed testing mono- and polysynaptic potentials in target neurons following a single action potential fired by layer 2/3 pyramidal cells, and the temporal structure of events and underlying mechanisms were analyzed. In addition to monosynaptic postsynaptic potentials, individual action potentials in presynaptic pyramidal cells initiated long-lasting (37 ± 17 ms) sequences of events in the network lasting an order of magnitude longer than detected previously in other species. These event series were composed of specifically alternating glutamatergic and GABAergic postsynaptic potentials and required selective spike-to-spike coupling from pyramidal cells to GABAergic interneurons producing concomitant inhibitory as well as excitatory feed-forward action of GABA. Single action potentials of human neurons are sufficient to recruit Hebbian-like neuronal assemblies that are proposed to participate in cognitive processes. PMID:18767905

  6. Functional Sphere Profiling Reveals the Complexity of Neuroblastoma Tumor-Initiating Cell Model12

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Aurélie; Flahaut, Marjorie; Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick; Meier, Roland; Liberman, Julie; Balmas-Bourloud, Katia; Nardou, Katya; Yan, Pu; Tercier, Stéphane; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Sommer, Lukas; Gross, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a neural crest-derived childhood tumor characterized by a remarkable phenotypic diversity, ranging from spontaneous regression to fatal metastatic disease. Although the cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides a trail to characterize the cells responsible for tumor onset, the NB tumor-initiating cell (TIC) has not been identified. In this study, the relevance of the CSC model in NB was investigated by taking advantage of typical functional stem cell characteristics. A predictive association was established between self-renewal, as assessed by serial sphere formation, and clinical aggressiveness in primary tumors. Moreover, cell subsets gradually selected during serial sphere culture harbored increased in vivo tumorigenicity, only highlighted in an orthotopic microenvironment. A microarray time course analysis of serial spheres passages from metastatic cells allowed us to specifically “profile” the NB stem cell-like phenotype and to identify CD133, ABC transporter, and WNT and NOTCH genes as spheres markers. On the basis of combined sphere markers expression, at least two distinct tumorigenic cell subpopulations were identified, also shown to preexist in primary NB. However, sphere markers-mediated cell sorting of parental tumor failed to recapitulate the TIC phenotype in the orthotopic model, highlighting the complexity of the CSC model. Our data support the NB stem-like cells as a dynamic and heterogeneous cell population strongly dependent on microenvironmental signals and add novel candidate genes as potential therapeutic targets in the control of high-risk NB. PMID:22028624

  7. Post-transcription initiation function of the ubiquitous SAGA complex in tissue-specific gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Weake, Vikki M.; Dyer, Jamie O.; Seidel, Christopher; Box, Andrew; Swanson, Selene K.; Peak, Allison; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Spt–Ada–Gcn5–acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex was discovered from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been well characterized as an important transcriptional coactivator that interacts both with sequence-specific transcription factors and the TATA-binding protein TBP. SAGA contains a histone acetyltransferase and a ubiquitin protease. In metazoans, SAGA is essential for development, yet little is known about the function of SAGA in differentiating tissue. We analyzed the composition, interacting proteins, and genomic distribution of SAGA in muscle and neuronal tissue of late stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The subunit composition of SAGA was the same in each tissue; however, SAGA was associated with considerably more transcription factors in muscle compared with neurons. Consistent with this finding, SAGA was found to occupy more genes specifically in muscle than in neurons. Strikingly, SAGA occupancy was not limited to enhancers and promoters but primarily colocalized with RNA polymerase II within transcribed sequences. SAGA binding peaks at the site of RNA polymerase pausing at the 5′ end of transcribed sequences. In addition, many tissue-specific SAGA-bound genes required its ubiquitin protease activity for full expression. These data indicate that in metazoans SAGA plays a prominent post-transcription initiation role in tissue-specific gene expression. PMID:21764853

  8. Crystal Structure of pi Initiator Protein-iteron Complex of Plasmid R6K: Implications for Initiation of Plasmid DNA Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Swan,M.; Bastia, D.; Davies, C.

    2006-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of a monomeric biologically active form of the {pi} initiator protein of plasmid R6K as a complex with a single copy of its cognate DNA-binding site (iteron) at 3.1-{angstrom} resolution. The initiator belongs to the family of winged helix type of proteins. The structure reveals that the protein contacts the iteron DNA at two primary recognition helices, namely the C-terminal {alpha}4' and the N-terminal {alpha}4 helices, that recognize the 5' half and the 3' half of the 22-bp iteron, respectively. The base-amino acid contacts are all located in {alpha}4', whereas the {alpha}4 helix and its vicinity mainly contact the phosphate groups of the iteron. Mutational analyses show that the contacts of both recognition helices with DNA are necessary for iteron binding and replication initiation. Considerations of a large number of site-directed mutations reveal that two distinct regions, namely {alpha}2 and {alpha}5 and its vicinity, are required for DNA looping and initiator dimerization, respectively. Further analysis of mutant forms of {pi} revealed the possible domain that interacts with the DnaB helicase. Thus, the structure-function analysis presented illuminates aspects of initiation mechanism of R6K and its control.

  9. Assembly of RNA polymerase II preinitiation complexes before assembly of nucleosomes allows efficient initiation of transcription on nucleosomal templates

    SciTech Connect

    Knezetic, J.A.; Jacob, G.A.; Luse, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The authors have previously shown that assembly of nucleosomes on the DNA template blocks transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II in vitro. In the studies reported here, they demonstrate that assembly of a complete RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex before nucleosome assembly results in nucleosomal templates which support initiation in vitro as efficiently as naked DNA. Control experiments prove that the observations are not the result of slow displacemnt of nucleosomes by the transcription machinery during chromatin assembly, nor are they an artifact of inefficient nucleosome deposition on templates already bearing an RNA polymerase. Thus, the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex appears to be resistant to disruption by subsequent nucleosome assembly.

  10. Initial Isotopic Heterogeneities in ZAGAMI: Evidence of a Complex Magmatic History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y. D.

    2006-01-01

    Interpretations of Zagami s magmatic history range from complex [1,2] to relatively simple [3]. Discordant radiometric ages led to a suggestion that the ages had been reset [4]. In an attempt to identify the mechanism, Rb-Sr isochrons were individually determined for both fine-grained and coarse-grained Zagami [5]. Ages of approx.180 Ma were obtained from both lithologies, but the initial Sr-87/Sr-86 (ISr) of the fine-grained lithology was higher by 8.6+/-0.4 e-units. Recently, a much older age of approx.4 Ga has been advocated [6]. Here, we extend our earlier investigation [5]. Rb-Sr Data: In [5] we applied identical, simplified, procedures to both lithologies to test whether a grain-size dependent process such as thermally-driven subsolidus isotopic reequilibration had caused age-resetting. Minerals were separated only by density. In the present experiment, purer mineral separates were analysed with improved techniques. Combined Rb-Sr results give ages (T) = 166+/-12 Ma and 177+/-9 Ma and I(subSr) = 0.72174+/-9 and 0.72227+/-7 for the coarse-grained and fine-grained lithologies, respectively. ISr in the fine-grained sample is thus higher than in the coarse-grained sample by 7.3+/-1.6 e-units. The results for the coarse-grained lithology are in close agreement with T = 166+/-6 Ma, ISr = 0.72157+/-8 for an adjacent sample [7] and T = 178+/-4 Ma, ISr = 0.72151+/-5 [4, adjusted] for a separate sample. Thus, fine-grained Zagami appears on average to be less typical of the bulk than coarse-grained Zagami.

  11. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  12. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy. PMID:25950479

  13. Polo kinase interacts with RacGAP50C and is required to localize the cytokinesis initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Saman; Fraval, Hamilton; Murray, Michael; Saint, Robert; Gregory, Stephen L

    2010-09-10

    The assembly and constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring in cytokinesis is dependent on the activation of Rho at the equatorial cortex by a complex, here termed the cytokinesis initiation complex, between a microtubule-associated kinesin-like protein (KLP), a member of the RacGAP family, and the RhoGEF Pebble. Recently, the activity of the mammalian Polo kinase ortholog Plk1 has been implicated in the formation of this complex. We show here that Polo kinase interacts directly with the cytokinesis initiation complex by binding RacGAP50C. We find that a new domain of Polo kinase, termed the intermediate domain, interacts directly with RacGAP50C and that Polo kinase is essential for localization of the KLP-RacGAP centralspindlin complex to the cell equator and spindle midzone. In the absence of Polo kinase, RacGAP50C and Pav-KLP fail to localize normally, instead decorating microtubules along their length. Our results indicate that Polo kinase directly binds the conserved cytokinesis initiation complex and is required to trigger centralspindlin localization as a first step in cytokinesis.

  14. Does higher education expansion promote educational homogamy? Evidence from married couples of the post-80s generation in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anning; Qian, Zhenchao

    2016-11-01

    The expansion of higher education witnessed in many societies influences the pattern of educational assortative mating. Structural transition theory predicts growing educational homogamy due to increasing preference for highly-educated partners who become more widely available. In contrast, social closure theory suggests depressed educational homogamy because the inflation of the education elite circle fosters the openness of marriage market, reducing the preference for a highly-educated mate and increasing the penetrability across social-status boundaries. Capitalizing the survey data that are representative of the post-80s one-child generation collected in Shanghai, China, we test the hypotheses derived from the two theories. Empirical results suggest that, with increasing availability of highly educated individuals, the extent of educational homogamy by birth cohort reveals a U-shaped pattern. This U-shaped pattern demonstrates increasing levels of educational homogamy and lends support to structural transition theory.

  15. Initial Inductive Learning in a Complex Computer Simulated Environment: The Role of Metacognitive Skills and Intellectual Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenman, M. V. J.; Prins, F. J.; Elshout, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses conceptual knowledge acquisition using computer simulation and describes a study of undergraduates that examined the role of metacognitive skillfulness and intellectual ability during initial inductive learning with a complex computer simulation. Results showed that metacognitive skillfulness was positively related to learning behavior…

  16. Developing Organizational Capacity for Implementing Complex Education Reform Initiatives: Insights from a Multiyear Study of a Teacher Incentive Fund Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malen, Betty; Rice, Jennifer King; Matlach, Lauren K. B.; Bowsher, Amanda; Hoyer, Kathleen Mulvaney; Hyde, Laura H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to enhance our understanding of the ever-present challenge of developing organizational capacity to implement complex education reform initiatives. We analyze the strategies in one large metropolitan education system used to address the district-level and site-level capacity challenges that surfaced as they implemented…

  17. Highly heteroselective ring-opening polymerization of racemic lactide initiated by divalent ytterbium complexes bearing amino bis(phenolate) ligands.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Du, Zhu; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Qi

    2012-10-09

    Polymerization of racemic lactide initiated by divalent ytterbium complexes supported by either dimethylamino-amino bis(phenolate) or methoxy-amino bis(phenolate) ligands proceeds rapidly at room temperature in a living fashion to give heterotactic polylactide with the racemic enchainment of monomer units P(r) ranging from 0.97-0.99.

  18. Runoff initiation versus runoff yield: Understanding the complexity of the hydrological effect of biological soil crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidron, G. J.; Monger, H. C.; Büdel, B.; Vonshak, A.; Conrod, W.

    2012-04-01

    The differentiation between runoff initiation and runoff yield (amount) is not always clear. In many cases they often seem interchangeable. Some of the differences were pinpointed following research conducted at two sand fields in Israel (Nizzanim, NIM, at the southern coast and Nizzana, NIZ in the Negev) and three sites in the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA (silty-loessial sediments at the Jornada Experimental Range, JER; quartzose sand in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, SEV; gypseous sand at the White Sands National Monument, WS) during which intact plots were compared to scalped plots. While the parent material, the effective rain, and the exopolysacharide (EPS) content of the crust determined runoff initiation in the Chihuahuan Desert, the effective rain and the crust microrelief determined the amount (yield) of runoff in areas where runoff initiation took place. Low EPS-crusts did not facilitated runoff initiation, even at high-chlorophyll crusts such as in WS. Similar results were obtained for NIM. Data from NIZ also highlighted the fundamental role played by the EPS in the determination of the amounts of runoff. This however was not the case with the chlorophyll content per se, that did not determine runoff initiation or yield. The findings also indicate that under the conditions examined, microrelief could not have controlled runoff initiation. Nevertheless, it affected the runoff amounts, as found in the Chihuahuan Desert and the Negev. The presence of rills and gullies may be indicative of the potentiality of BSCs to initiate runoff.

  19. Ctk1 Function Is Necessary for Full Translation Initiation Activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Coordes, Britta; Brünger, Katharina M.; Burger, Kaspar; Soufi, Boumediene; Horenk, Juliane; Eick, Dirk; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2014-01-01

    Translation is a fundamental and highly regulated cellular process. Previously, we reported that the kinase and transcription elongation factor Ctk1 increases fidelity during translation elongation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we show that loss of Ctk1 function also affects the initiation step of translation. Translation active extracts from Ctk1-depleted cells show impaired translation activity of capped mRNA, but not mRNA reporters containing the cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Furthermore, the formation of 80S initiation complexes is decreased, which is probably due to reduced subunit joining. In addition, we determined the changes in the phosphorylation pattern of a ribosome enriched fraction after depletion of Ctk1. Thus, we provide a catalogue of phosphoproteomic changes dependent on Ctk1. Taken together, our data suggest a stimulatory function of Ctk1 in 80S formation during translation initiation. PMID:25416238

  20. Alteration of the major phosphorylation site of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E prevents its association with the 48 S initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Joshi-Barve, S; Rychlik, W; Rhoads, R E

    1990-02-15

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace the serine residue at the primary phosphorylation site of human eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E with an alanine residue. The mutated cDNA was transcribed in vitro, and the transcript was used to direct protein synthesis in a reticulocyte lysate system. The variant protein (eIF-4EAla) was retained on a 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m7GTP)-Sepharose affinity column and was specifically eluted by m7GTP. Examination of eIF-4EAla by isoelectric focusing revealed two species which had the same pI values as the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of unaltered eIF-4E (here designated eIF-4ESer). However, conversion of unphosphorylated eIF-4EAla to the putative phosphorylated eIF-4EAla in the reticulocyte lysate system was slower than the corresponding conversion of eIF-4ESer. The possibility that the more acidic form of eIF-4EAla was due to NH2-terminal acetylation was ruled out by an experiment in which the acetyl-CoA pool of the reticulocyte lysate system was depleted with oxaloacetate and citrate synthase. The more acidic form of eIF-4EAla was, however, eliminated by treatment with calf intestine alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that it results from a second-site phosphorylation. When translation reaction mixtures were resolved on sucrose density gradients, the 35S-labeled eIF-4ESer was found on the 48 S initiation complex in the presence of guanylyl imidodiphosphate, as reported earlier (Hiremath, L.S., Hiremath, S.T., Rychlik, W., Joshi, S., Domier, L.L., and Rhoads, R.E. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 1132-1138). eIF-4EAla, by contrast, was not found on the 48 S complex, suggesting that phosphorylation of eIF-4E is necessary for it to carry out its role of transferring mRNA to the 48 S complex. Supporting this interpretation was the finding that eIF-4ESer isolated from 48 S initiation complexes consisted predominantly of the phosphorylated form.

  1. Selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS)-binding protein 2 alters conformational dynamics of residues involved in tRNA accommodation in 80 S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Caban, Kelvin; Copeland, Paul R

    2012-03-23

    Sec-tRNA(Sec) is site-specifically delivered at defined UGA codons in selenoprotein mRNAs. This recoding event is specified by the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element and requires the selenocysteine (Sec)-specific elongation factor, eEFSec, and the SECIS binding protein, SBP2. Sec-tRNA(Sec) is delivered to the ribosome by eEFSec-GTP, but this ternary complex is not sufficient for Sec incorporation, indicating that its access to the ribosomal A-site is regulated. SBP2 stably associates with ribosomes, and mutagenic analysis indicates that this interaction is essential for Sec incorporation. However, the ribosomal function of SBP2 has not been elucidated. To shed light on the functional relevance of the SBP2-ribosome interaction, we screened the functional centers of the 28 S rRNA in translationally competent 80 S ribosomes using selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). We demonstrate that SBP2 specifically alters the reactivity of specific residues in Helix 89 (H89) and expansion segment 31 (ES31). These results are indicative of a conformational change in response to SBP2 binding. Based on the known functions of H89 during translation, we propose that SBP2 allows Sec incorporation by either promoting Sec-tRNA(Sec) accommodation into the peptidyltransferase center and/or by stimulating the ribosome-dependent GTPase activity of eEFSec.

  2. Molecular Architecture of the 40S⋅eIF1⋅eIF3 Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Erzberger, Jan P.; Stengel, Florian; Pellarin, Riccardo; Zhang, Suyang; Schaefer, Tanja; Aylett, Christopher H.S.; Cimermančič, Peter; Boehringer, Daniel; Sali, Andrej; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ban, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic translation initiation requires the recruitment of the large, multiprotein eIF3 complex to the 40S ribosomal subunit. We present X-ray structures of all major components of the minimal, six-subunit Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF3 core. These structures, together with electron microscopy reconstructions, cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry, and integrative structure modeling, allowed us to position and orient all eIF3 components on the 40S⋅eIF1 complex, revealing an extended, modular arrangement of eIF3 subunits. Yeast eIF3 engages 40S in a clamp-like manner, fully encircling 40S to position key initiation factors on opposite ends of the mRNA channel, providing a platform for the recruitment, assembly, and regulation of the translation initiation machinery. The structures of eIF3 components reported here also have implications for understanding the architecture of the mammalian 43S preinitiation complex and the complex of eIF3, 40S, and the hepatitis C internal ribosomal entry site RNA. PMID:25171412

  3. Radical Polymerization of Vinyl Acetate and Methyl Methacrylate Using Organochromium Initiators Complexed with Macrocyclic Polyamines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    METHYL METHACRYLATE USING ORGANOCHROMIUM REA NTS COMPLEXED WITH MACROCYCLIC A• by Daniela Mardare, Scott Gaynor, Krzysztof Matyjaszewski DTIC Published... Daniela Mardare, Scott Gaynor, Krzysztof Matyjaszewski 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) a. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Carnegie Mellon

  4. Attachment of ribosomal complexes and retrograde scanning during initiation on the Halastavi árva virus IRES

    PubMed Central

    Abaeva, Irina S.; Pestova, Tatyana V.; Hellen, Christopher U.T.

    2016-01-01

    Halastavi árva virus (HalV) has a positive-sense RNA genome, with an 827 nt-long 5′ UTR and an intergenic region separating two open reading frames. Whereas the encoded proteins are most homologous to Dicistrovirus polyproteins, its 5′ UTR is distinct. Here, we report that the HalV 5′ UTR comprises small stem-loop domains separated by long single-stranded areas and a large A-rich unstructured region surrounding the initiation codon AUG828, and possesses cross-kingdom internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. In contrast to most viral IRESs, it does not depend on structural integrity and specific interaction of a structured element with a translational component, and is instead determined by the unstructured region flanking AUG828. eIF2, eIF3, eIF1 and eIF1A promote efficient 48S initiation complex formation at AUG828, which is reduced ∼5-fold on omission of eIF1 and eIF1A. Initiation involves direct attachment of 43S preinitiation complexes within a short window at or immediately downstream of AUG828. 40S and eIF3 are sufficient for initial binding. After attachment, 43S complexes undergo retrograde scanning, strongly dependent on eIF1 and eIF1A. eIF4A/eIF4G stimulated initiation only at low temperatures or on mutants, in which areas surrounding AUG828 had been replaced by heterologous sequences. However, they strongly promoted initiation at AUG872, yielding a proline-rich oligopeptide. PMID:26783202

  5. Differential evolution based on the node degree of its complex network: Initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skanderova, Lenka; Zelinka, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is reported our progress in the synthesis of two partially different areas of research: complex networks and evolutionary computation. Ideas and results reported and mentioned here are based on our previous results and experiments. The main core of our participation is an evolutionary algorithm performance improvement by means of complex network use. Complex network is related to the evolutionary dynamics and reflect it. We report here our latest results as well as propositions on further research that is in process in our group (http://navy.cs.vsb.cz/). Only the main ideas and results are reported here, for more details it is recommended to read related literature of our previous research and results.

  6. Through the '80s: thinking globally, acting locally. [Combined Canadian Futures Society and Third General Assembly of World Future Society

    SciTech Connect

    Feather, F.

    1980-01-01

    This volume was prepared in conjunction with the First Global Conference on the Future, held in Toronto, Canada, July 20-24, 1980. The conference combined the Third General Assembly of the World Future Society and the fifth annual conference of the Canadian Futures Society. The 59 papers presented here were selected from the very large number submitted to the conference committee; space limitations permitted only a small number of papers to be published in this volume. Included also are: the foreword, Mystery of the Future, by Edward R. Schreyer, Governor General of Canada; preface, A Time for Action, by Maurice F. Strong; introduction, Transition to Harmonic Globalism, by Frank Feather; conclusion, What We Must Do: An Agenda for Futurists; and postscript, The Challenge of the '80s, by Aurelio Peccei. The papers were presented under the following topics: The Trauma of Change (4); A Global Perspective (7); Inventorying Our Resources (7); The International Context (8); Economics: Getting Down to Business (9); Human Values: Personal, Social, Religious (6); Communications: Connecting Ourselves Together (4); Education: Learning to Meet Tomorrow (4); Health: New Approaches to Staying Fit (3); Futurism as a Way of Life (5); and Dreams into Action: Methods and Real-Life Experience (2).

  7. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  8. Physical Education Initial Teacher Educators' Expressions of Critical Pedagogy(ies): Coherency, Complexity or Confusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philpot, Rod

    2016-01-01

    While an emphasis on social justice has emerged as a theme in initial teacher education (ITE) over the past decade, there is much debate about how to engage ITE students in foregrounding issues of equity and social justice in their own teaching. One strategy, the introduction of critical pedagogy in ITE, has been promoted in teacher education…

  9. Molecular view of 43 S complex formation and start site selection in eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2010-07-09

    A central step to high fidelity protein synthesis is selection of the proper start codon. Recent structural, biochemical, and genetic analyses have provided molecular insights into the coordinated activities of the initiation factors in start codon selection. A molecular model is emerging in which start codon recognition is linked to dynamic reorganization of factors on the ribosome and structural changes in the ribosome itself.

  10. Confinement regulates complex biochemical networks: initiation of blood clotting by "diffusion acting".

    PubMed

    Shen, Feng; Pompano, Rebecca R; Kastrup, Christian J; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2009-10-21

    This study shows that environmental confinement strongly affects the activation of nonlinear reaction networks, such as blood coagulation (clotting), by small quantities of activators. Blood coagulation is sensitive to the local concentration of soluble activators, initiating only when the activators surpass a threshold concentration, and therefore is regulated by mass transport phenomena such as flow and diffusion. Here, diffusion was limited by decreasing the size of microfluidic chambers, and it was found that microparticles carrying either the classical stimulus, tissue factor, or a bacterial stimulus, Bacillus cereus, initiated coagulation of human platelet-poor plasma only when confined. A simple analytical argument and numerical model were used to describe the mechanism for this phenomenon: confinement causes diffusible activators to accumulate locally and surpass the threshold concentration. To interpret the results, a dimensionless confinement number, Cn, was used to describe whether a stimulus was confined, and a Damköhler number, Da(2), was used to describe whether a subthreshold stimulus could initiate coagulation. In the context of initiation of coagulation by bacteria, this mechanism can be thought of as "diffusion acting", which is distinct from "diffusion sensing". The ability of confinement and diffusion acting to change the outcome of coagulation suggests that confinement should also regulate other biological "on" and "off" processes that are controlled by thresholds.

  11. Vitamin B-complex initiates growth and development of human embryonic brain cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Danielyan, K E; Abramyan, R A; Galoyan, A A; Kevorkian, G A

    2011-09-01

    We studied a combined effect of subcomponents of vitamin B complex on the growth, development, and death of human embryonic brain-derived cells (E90) cultured using a modified method of Matson. Cell death was detected by trypan blue staining. According to our results, vitamin B-complex in low-doses promote the development, maturation, and enlargement of human embryonic brain cells, on the one hand, and increases the percent of cell death, which attests to accelerated maturation and metabolism, on the other.

  12. Catalytic Isonitrile Insertions and Condensations Initiated by RNC–X Complexation

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Fraser F.

    2014-01-01

    Isonitriles are delicately poised chemical entities capable of being coaxed to react as nucleophiles or electrophiles. Directing this tunable reactivity with metal and non-metal catalysts provides rapid access to a large array of complex nitrogenous structures ideally functionalized for medicinal applications. Isonitrile insertion into transition metal complexes has featured in numerous synthetic and mechanistic studies, leading to rapid deployment of isonitriles in numerous catalytic processes, including multicomponent reactions (MCR). Covering the literature from 1990–2014, the present review collates reaction types to highlight reactivity trends and allow catalyst comparison. PMID:25484847

  13. Translation initiation factor (iso) 4E interacts with BTF3, the beta subunit of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex.

    PubMed

    Freire, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-31

    A two-hybrid screen with the translation initiation factor, eIF(iso)4E from Arabidopsis, identified a clone encoding a lipoxygenase type 2 [Freire, M.A., et al., 2000. Plant lipoxygenase 2 is a translation initiation factor-4E-binding protein. Plant Molecular Biology 44, 129-140], and three cDNA clones encoding the homologue of the mammalian BTF3 factor, the beta subunit of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC). Here we report on the interaction between the translation initiation factor eIF(iso)4E and AtBTF3. AtBTF3 protein is able to interact with the wheat initiation factors eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E. AtBTF3 contains a sequence related to the prototypic motif found on most of the 4E-binding proteins, and competes with the translation initiation factor eIF(iso)4G for eIF4(iso)4E binding, in a two hybrid interference assay. These findings provide a molecular link between the translation initiation mechanism and the emergence of the nascent polypeptide chains.

  14. Initial Insights into Phoneme Awareness Intervention for Children with Complex Communication Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clendon, Sally; Gillon, Gail; Yoder, David

    2005-01-01

    This study provides insights into the benefits of phoneme awareness intervention for children with complex communication needs (CCN). The specific aims of the study were: (1) to determine whether phoneme awareness skills can be successfully trained in children with CCN; and (2) to observe any transfer effects to phoneme awareness tasks not…

  15. When Complexity Theory Meets Critical Realism: A Platform for Research on Initial Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Ell, Fiona; Grudnoff, Lexie; Ludlow, Larry; Haigh, Mavis; Hill, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Many scholars have concluded that teacher education research needs to take a complex view, resist simplification, and account more fully for teacher education's contexts and processes as well as its impact on teacher candidates' and school students' learning (Cochran-Smith & Zeichner, 2005; Grossman & McDonald, 2008; Opfer & Pedder,…

  16. Redox-Initiated Reactivity of Dinuclear β-Diketiminatoniobium Imido Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Benjamin M; Naested, Lara C E; Nocton, Grégory; Lakshmi, K V; Lohrey, Trevor D; Bergman, Robert G; Arnold, John

    2017-02-06

    High-valent dichloride and dimethylniobium complexes 1 and 2 bearing tert-butylimido and N,N'-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-β-diketiminate (BDI(Ar)) ligands were prepared. The dimethyl complex reacted with dihydrogen to release methane and generate the hydride-bridged diniobium(IV) complex 3 in high yield. One-electron oxidation of 3 with silver salts resulted in the release of dihydrogen and conversion to a mixed-valent Nb(III)-Nb(IV) complex, 4, that displayed a frozen-solution X-band electron paramagnetic resonance signal consistent with a slight dissymmetry between the two Nb centers. Spectroscopic and computational analysis supported the presence of Nb-Nb σ-bonding interactions in both 3 and 4. Finally, one-electron reduction of 4 resulted in conversion to the highly dissymmetric Nb(V)-Nb(V) dimer 5 that formed from the reductive C-N bond cleavage of one of the BDI(Ar) supporting ligands.

  17. Translation initiation by the hepatitis C virus IRES requires eIF1A and ribosomal complex remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Zane A; Oguro, Akihiro; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are important RNA-based translation initiation signals, critical for infection by many pathogenic viruses. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) IRES is the prototype for the type 3 IRESs and is also invaluable for exploring principles of eukaryotic translation initiation, in general. Current mechanistic models for the type 3 IRESs are useful but they also present paradoxes, including how they can function both with and without eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2. We discovered that eIF1A is necessary for efficient activity where it stabilizes tRNA binding and inspects the codon-anticodon interaction, especially important in the IRES’ eIF2-independent mode. These data support a model in which the IRES binds preassembled translation preinitiation complexes and remodels them to generate eukaryotic initiation complexes with bacterial-like features. This model explains previous data, reconciles eIF2-dependent and -independent pathways, and illustrates how RNA structure-based control can respond to changing cellular conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21198.001 PMID:28009256

  18. RPA70 depletion induces hSSB1/2-INTS3 complex to initiate ATR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Ananya; Kaur, Manpreet; Ghosh, Tanushree; Khan, Md. Muntaz; Sharma, Aparna; Shekhar, Ritu; Varshney, Akhil; Saxena, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    The primary eukaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding protein, Replication protein A (RPA), binds to single-stranded DNA at the sites of DNA damage and recruits the apical checkpoint kinase, ATR via its partner protein, ATRIP. It has been demonstrated that absence of RPA incapacitates the ATR-mediated checkpoint response. We report that in the absence of RPA, human single-stranded DNA-binding protein 1 (hSSB1) and its partner protein INTS3 form sub-nuclear foci, associate with the ATR-ATRIP complex and recruit it to the sites of genomic stress. The ATRIP foci formed after RPA depletion are abrogated in the absence of INTS3, establishing that hSSB-INTS3 complex recruits the ATR-ATRIP checkpoint complex to the sites of genomic stress. Depletion of homologs hSSB1/2 and INTS3 in RPA-deficient cells attenuates Chk1 phosphorylation, indicating that the cells are debilitated in responding to stress. We have identified that TopBP1 and the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex are essential for the alternate mode of ATR activation. In summation, we report that the single-stranded DNA-binding protein complex, hSSB1/2-INTS3 can recruit the checkpoint complex to initiate ATR signaling. PMID:25916848

  19. Autophagy initiation by ULK complex assembly on ER tubulovesicular regions marked by ATG9 vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Karanasios, Eleftherios; Walker, Simon A.; Okkenhaug, Hanneke; Manifava, Maria; Hummel, Eric; Zimmermann, Hans; Ahmed, Qashif; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Collinson, Lucy; Ktistakis, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagosome formation requires sequential translocation of autophagy-specific proteins to membranes enriched in PI3P and connected to the ER. Preceding this, the earliest autophagy-specific structure forming de novo is a small punctum of the ULK1 complex. The provenance of this structure and its mode of formation are unknown. We show that the ULK1 structure emerges from regions, where ATG9 vesicles align with the ER and its formation requires ER exit and coatomer function. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that the ULK1 compartment consists of regularly assembled punctate elements that cluster in progressively larger spherical structures and associates uniquely with the early autophagy machinery. Correlative electron microscopy after live imaging shows tubulovesicular membranes present at the locus of this structure. We propose that the nucleation of autophagosomes occurs in regions, where the ULK1 complex coalesces with ER and the ATG9 compartment. PMID:27510922

  20. Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization Tailored to Prepare the Liver for Complex Resections: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, T. de Robinson, J. M.; Deschamps, F.; Rao, P.; Teriitheau, C.; Goere, D.; Elias, D.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) tailored to prepare the liver for complex and extended resections. During the past 5 years, 12 PVEs were performed in noncirrhotic patients with liver metastases from colon cancer (n = 10), choroidal melanoma (n = 1), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 1) to prepare complex anatomical liver resections in patients with small future remnant livers. These liver resections planned to preserve only segment IV in four patients, segments IV, V, and VIII in four patients, segments II, III, VI, and VII in three patients, and segments V and VI in one patient. PVE was performed under general anesthesia with a flow-guided injection of a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol using a 5-Fr catheter. All portal branches feeding the liver segments to be resected were successfully embolized with cyanoacrylate except one, which was occluded with coils due to the risk of reflux with cyanoacrylate. After a mean of 32 days, CT volumetry revealed a mean hypertrophy of the unembolized liver of 47 {+-} 25% (range, 21-88%). Liver resections could be performed in 10 patients but were canceled in 2, due to the occurrence of a new hepatic tumor in one and an insufficiently increased volume in the other. Among the 10 patients who underwent the liver resection, 1 died of postoperative sepsis, 3 died 3 to 32 months after surgery, including 1 death unrelated to cancer, and 6 were alive after 6 to 36 months after surgery. In conclusion, in this preliminary report, PVE appears to be feasible and able to induce hypertrophy of the future remnant liver before a complex and extended hepatectomy. Further evaluation is needed in a larger cohort.

  1. Deformylation Reaction by a Nonheme Manganese(III)-Peroxo Complex via Initial Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction.

    PubMed

    Barman, Prasenjit; Upadhyay, Pranav; Faponle, Abayomi S; Kumar, Jitendra; Nag, Sayanta Sekhar; Kumar, Devesh; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-09-05

    Metal-peroxo intermediates are key species in the catalytic cycles of nonheme metalloenzymes, but their chemical properties and reactivity patterns are still poorly understood. The synthesis and characterization of a manganese(III)-peroxo complex with a pentadentate bispidine ligand system and its reactivity with aldehydes was studied. Manganese(III)-peroxo can react through hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions instead of the commonly proposed nucleophilic addition reaction. Evidence of the mechanism comes from experiments which identify a primary kinetic isotope effect of 5.4 for the deformylation reaction. Computational modeling supports the established mechanism and identifies the origin of the reactivity preference of hydrogen-atom abstraction over nucleophilic addition.

  2. Sunlight-initiated Chemistry of Aqueous Pyruvic Acid: Building Complexity in the Origin of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Elizabeth C.; Shoemaker, Richard K.; Vaida, Veronica

    2013-10-01

    Coupling chemical reactions to an energy source is a necessary step in the origin of life. Here, we utilize UV photons provided by a simulated sun to activate aqueous pyruvic acid and subsequently prompt chemical reactions mimicking some of the functions of modern metabolism. Pyruvic acid is interesting in a prebiotic context due to its prevalence in modern metabolism and its abiotic availability on early Earth. Here, pyruvic acid (CH3COCOOH, a C3 molecule) photochemically reacts to produce more complex molecules containing four or more carbon atoms. Acetoin (CH3CHOHCOCH3), a C4 molecule and a modern bacterial metabolite, is produced in this chemistry as well as lactic acid (CH3CHOHCOOH), a molecule which, when coupled with other abiotic chemical reaction pathways, can provide a regeneration pathway for pyruvic acid. This chemistry is discussed in the context of plausible environments on early Earth such as near the ocean surface and atmospheric aerosol particles. These environments allow for combination and exchange of reactants and products of other reaction environments (such as shallow hydrothermal vents). The result could be a contribution to the steady increase in chemical complexity requisite in the origin of life.

  3. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface

    SciTech Connect

    Forst, M.; Wilkins, S. B.; Caviglia, A. D.; Scherwitz, R.; Mankowsky, R.; Zubko, P.; Khanna, V.; Bromberger, H.; Chuang, Y. -D.; Lee, W. S.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Dakovski, G. L.; Minitti, M. P.; Robinson, J.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.; Triscone, J. -M.; Hill, J. P.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-07-06

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures1,2 has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium3. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically4. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion. Lastly, light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism, for example by driving domain wall motion to transport information across suitably designed devices.

  4. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface

    DOE PAGES

    Forst, M.; Wilkins, S. B.; Caviglia, A. D.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures1,2 has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium3. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically4. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion.more » Lastly, light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism, for example by driving domain wall motion to transport information across suitably designed devices.« less

  5. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caviglia, Andrea

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion. Light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism.

  6. Spatially resolved ultrafast magnetic dynamics initiated at a complex oxide heterointerface.

    PubMed

    Först, M; Caviglia, A D; Scherwitzl, R; Mankowsky, R; Zubko, P; Khanna, V; Bromberger, H; Wilkins, S B; Chuang, Y-D; Lee, W S; Schlotter, W F; Turner, J J; Dakovski, G L; Minitti, M P; Robinson, J; Clark, S R; Jaksch, D; Triscone, J-M; Hill, J P; Dhesi, S S; Cavalleri, A

    2015-09-01

    Static strain in complex oxide heterostructures has been extensively used to engineer electronic and magnetic properties at equilibrium. In the same spirit, deformations of the crystal lattice with light may be used to achieve functional control across heterointerfaces dynamically. Here, by exciting large-amplitude infrared-active vibrations in a LaAlO3 substrate we induce magnetic order melting in a NdNiO3 film across a heterointerface. Femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction is used to determine the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic disordering. We observe a magnetic melt front that propagates from the substrate interface into the film, at a speed that suggests electronically driven motion. Light control and ultrafast phase front propagation at heterointerfaces may lead to new opportunities in optomagnetism, for example by driving domain wall motion to transport information across suitably designed devices.

  7. Herpesvirus Late Gene Expression: A Viral-Specific Pre-initiation Complex Is Key

    PubMed Central

    Gruffat, Henri; Marchione, Roberta; Manet, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    During their productive cycle, herpesviruses exhibit a strictly regulated temporal cascade of gene expression that can be divided into three general stages: immediate-early (IE), early (E), and late (L). This expression program is the result of a complex interplay between viral and cellular factors at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, as well as structural differences within the promoter architecture for each of the three gene classes. Since the cellular enzyme RNA polymerase II (RNAP-II) is responsible for the transcription of herpesvirus genes, most viral promoters contain DNA motifs that are common with those of cellular genes, although promoter complexity decreases from immediate-early to late genes. Immediate-early and early promoters contain numerous cellular and viral cis-regulating sequences upstream of a TATA box, whereas late promoters differ significantly in that they lack cis-acting sequences upstream of the transcription start site (TSS). Moreover, in the case of the β- and γ-herpesviruses, a TATT box motif is frequently found in the position where the consensus TATA box of eukaryotic promoters usually localizes. The mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the late viral gene promoters appear to be different between α-herpesviruses and the two other herpesvirus subfamilies (β and γ). In this review, we will compare the mechanisms of late gene transcriptional regulation between HSV-1, for which the viral IE transcription factors – especially ICP4 – play an essential role, and the two other subfamilies of herpesviruses, with a particular emphasis on EBV, which has recently been found to code for its own specific TATT-binding protein. PMID:27375590

  8. A Day-Hospital Approach to Treatment of Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Initial Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E.; Carpino, Elizabeth A.; Chiang, Gloria; Condon, Marianne; Firn, Emily; Gaughan, Veronica J.; Hogan, Melinda, P.T.; Leslie, David S.; Olson, Katie, P.T.; Sager, Susan; Sethna, Navil; Simons, Laura E.; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine clinical outcomes of an interdisciplinary day hospital treatment program (comprised of physical, occupational, and cognitive-behavioral therapies with medical and nursing services) for pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Methods The study is a longitudinal case series of consecutive patients treated in a day hospital pediatric pain rehabilitation program. Participants were 56 children and adolescents ages 8–18 years (median = 14 years) with CRPS spectrum conditions who failed to progress sufficiently with a previous outpatient and/or inpatient treatments. Patients participated in daily physical therapy, occupational therapy and psychological treatment and received nursing and medical care as necessary. The model places equal emphasis on physical and cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management. Median duration of stay was 3 weeks. Outcome measures included assessments of physical, occupational, and psychological functioning at program admission, discharge, and at post-treatment follow-up at a median of 10 months post-discharge. Scores at discharge and follow-up were compared with measures on admission by Wilcoxon tests, paired t tests, or ANOVA as appropriate, with corrections for multiple comparisons. Results Outcomes demonstrate clinically and statistically significant improvements from admission to discharge in pain intensity (p<0.001), functional disability (p<0.001), subjective report of limb function (p<0.001), timed running (p<0.001) occupational performance (p<0.001), medication use (p<0.01), use of assistive devices (p<0.001), and emotional functioning (anxiety, p<0.001; depression, p<0.01). Functional gains were maintained or further improved at follow-up. Discussion A day-hospital interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach appears effective in reducing disability and improving physical and emotional functioning and occupational performance among children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndromes that

  9. [Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical analysis of the synaptonemal complex at the initiation of synapsis].

    PubMed

    Flores-Rivera, E; Villegas-Castrejon, H; Vazquez-Nin, G H

    1996-04-01

    The synaptonemal complexes (SCs) are nuclear structures specific for meiosis. They have a central role in homolog chromosomes coupling; they are essential in crossing over events and chromosomic segregation during the first meiotic division. When its joining ends in pakiteno stage, each synaptonemal extends along the bivalent joining the ends to nuclear wrapping. The SCs are characterized by the presence of two lateral elements and a central region. The lateral elements are parallel and equidistant. The chromatine of homolog chromosomes fixes in a series of loops to these elements. The central region is between the lateral elements. It is formed by the latero-medial fibers and the medial element. The first ones are perpendicularly oriented to the longitudinal axis of CS and connect lateral elements with the medial element. The recombination modules have an active role in recombination processes and quiasma formation, they are associated, at intervals, with the central region among the homolog chromosomes. The localization and function of nucleic acids in formation and coupling of synaptonemal complex is little known, so methodologic alternatives are looked for to resolve this type of problems. In this work, ADN distribution in chicken ovocytes in cigotene, using techniques for electronic microscopy of immuno-oro, were studied. Besides, cytochemical techniques, were used as preferential contrast for ADN or preferential for ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). The combination of preferential tincture for RNPs and immunolocalization of ADN show that chromatin accumulates jointly with ribonucleoproteins in nor coupled lateral elements and the presence of numerous RNPs fibers distributed around lateral elements. Recombination nodules were found among lateral elements during the coupling, these nodules are PTA positives, which means ADN presence, and so, ADN presence among lateral elements. THe presence of a bridge of marked fibers with coloidal gold (ADN) uniting not coupled

  10. Path integral for stochastic inflation: Nonperturbative volume weighting, complex histories, initial conditions, and the end of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Steven

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we present a path integral formulation of stochastic inflation. Volume weighting can be naturally implemented from this new perspective in a very straightforward way when compared to conventional Langevin approaches. With an in-depth study of inflation in a quartic potential, we investigate how the inflaton evolves and how inflation typically ends both with and without volume weighting. The calculation can be carried to times beyond those accessible to conventional Fokker-Planck approaches. Perhaps unexpectedly, complex histories sometimes emerge with volume weighting. The reward for this excursion into the complex plane is an insight into how volume-weighted inflation both loses memory of initial conditions and ends via slow roll. The slow-roll end of inflation mitigates certain “Youngness Paradox”-type criticisms of the volume-weighted paradigm. Thus it is perhaps time to rehabilitate proper-time volume weighting as a viable measure for answering at least some interesting cosmological questions.

  11. Complex role for the immune system in initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Inman, Kristin S; Francis, Amanda A; Murray, Nicole R

    2014-08-28

    The immune system plays a complex role in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Inflammation can promote the formation of premalignant lesions and accelerate pancreatic cancer development. Conversely, pancreatic cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive environment, which is thought to promote tumor progression and invasion. Here we review the current literature describing the role of the immune response in the progressive development of pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the mechanisms that drive recruitment and activation of immune cells at the tumor site, and our current understanding of the function of the immune cell types at the tumor. Recent clinical and preclinical data are reviewed, detailing the involvement of the immune response in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, including the role of specific cytokines and implications for disease outcome. Acute pancreatitis is characterized by a predominantly innate immune response, while chronic pancreatitis elicits an immune response that involves both innate and adaptive immune cells, and often results in profound systemic immune-suppression. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked immune dysfunction driven by immunosuppressive cell types, tumor-promoting immune cells, and defective or absent inflammatory cells. Recent studies reveal that immune cells interact with cancer stem cells and tumor stromal cells, and these interactions have an impact on development and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Finally, current PDAC therapies are reviewed and the potential for harnessing the actions of the immune response to assist in targeting pancreatic cancer using immunotherapy is discussed.

  12. Complex role for the immune system in initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inman, Kristin S; Francis, Amanda A; Murray, Nicole R

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays a complex role in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Inflammation can promote the formation of premalignant lesions and accelerate pancreatic cancer development. Conversely, pancreatic cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive environment, which is thought to promote tumor progression and invasion. Here we review the current literature describing the role of the immune response in the progressive development of pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the mechanisms that drive recruitment and activation of immune cells at the tumor site, and our current understanding of the function of the immune cell types at the tumor. Recent clinical and preclinical data are reviewed, detailing the involvement of the immune response in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, including the role of specific cytokines and implications for disease outcome. Acute pancreatitis is characterized by a predominantly innate immune response, while chronic pancreatitis elicits an immune response that involves both innate and adaptive immune cells, and often results in profound systemic immune-suppression. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by marked immune dysfunction driven by immunosuppressive cell types, tumor-promoting immune cells, and defective or absent inflammatory cells. Recent studies reveal that immune cells interact with cancer stem cells and tumor stromal cells, and these interactions have an impact on development and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Finally, current PDAC therapies are reviewed and the potential for harnessing the actions of the immune response to assist in targeting pancreatic cancer using immunotherapy is discussed. PMID:25170202

  13. Differentiation of the DnaA-oriC subcomplex for DNA unwinding in a replication initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Shogo; Noguchi, Yasunori; Hayashi, Yasuhisa; Miyazaki, Erika; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2012-10-26

    In Escherichia coli, ATP-DnaA multimers formed on the replication origin oriC promote duplex unwinding, which leads to helicase loading. Based on a detailed functional analysis of the oriC sequence motifs, we previously proposed that the left half of oriC forms an ATP-DnaA subcomplex competent for oriC unwinding, whereas the right half of oriC forms a distinct ATP-DnaA subcomplex that facilitates helicase loading. However, the molecular basis for the functional difference between these ATP-DnaA subcomplexes remains unclear. By analyzing a series of novel DnaA mutants, we found that structurally distinct DnaA multimers form on each half of oriC. DnaA AAA+ domain residues Arg-227 and Leu-290 are specifically required for oriC unwinding. Notably, these residues are required for the ATP-DnaA-specific structure of DnaA multimers in complex with the left half of oriC but not for that with the right half. These results support the idea that the ATP-DnaA multimers formed on oriC are not uniform and that they can adopt different conformations. Based on a structural model, we propose that Arg-227 and Leu-290 play a crucial role in inter-ATP-DnaA interaction and are a prerequisite for the formation of unwinding-competent DnaA subcomplexes on the left half of oriC. These residues are not required for the interaction with DnaB, nucleotide binding, or regulatory DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, which further supports their important role in inter-DnaA interaction. The corresponding residues are evolutionarily conserved and are required for unwinding in the initial complexes of Thermotoga maritima, an ancient hyperthermophile. Therefore, our findings suggest a novel and common mechanism for ATP-DnaA-dependent activation of initial complexes.

  14. ETV6-NTRK3 fusion oncogene initiates breast cancer from committed mammary progenitors via activation of AP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Tognon, Cristina E.; Godinho, Frank J.; Yasaitis, Laura; Hock, Hanno; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Lannon, Chris L.; Cho, Eunah; Kim, Seong-Jin; Bronson, Roderick T.; Perou, Charles M.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY To better understand the cellular origin of breast cancer, we developed a mouse model that recapitulates expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) fusion oncoprotein, the product of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation characteristic of human secretory breast carcinoma. Activation of EN expression in mammary tissues by Wap-Cre leads to fully penetrant, multifocal malignant breast cancer with short latency. We provide genetic evidence that in nulliparous Wap-Cre;EN females, committed alveolar bipotent or CD61+ luminal progenitors, are targets of tumorigenesis. Furthermore, EN transforms these otherwise transient progenitors through activation of the AP1 complex. Given increasing relevance of chromosomal translocations in epithelial cancers, such mice serve as a paradigm for the study of their genetic pathogenesis and cellular origins, and generation of novel preclinical models. SIGNIFICANCE For the largest class of human tumors, those of epithelial origin, little is known about their initiating genetic hits or cells of origin. Whether tissue stem cells or more committed progenitors are targets for transformation is uncertain. We developed a system in which epithelial tumorigenesis can be assessed from the initial event to frank malignancy. In this breast cancer model based on chromosomal translocation, we show through genetic marking that committed mammary progenitors, rather than mammary stem cells, are direct targets of transformation. We show that activation of the AP1 complex represents a critical downstream event of the ETV6-NTRK3 translocation. Further focus on this transcriptional complex as a target in human breast cancer is warranted. PMID:18068631

  15. RAG-2 promotes heptamer occupancy by RAG-1 in the assembly of a V(D)J initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Swanson, P C; Desiderio, S

    1999-05-01

    V(D)J recombination occurs at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) containing conserved heptamer and nonamer elements. RAG-1 and RAG-2 initiate recombination by cleaving DNA between heptamers and antigen receptor coding segments. RAG-1 alone contacts the nonamer but interacts weakly, if at all, with the heptamer. RAG-2 by itself has no DNA-binding activity but promotes heptamer occupancy in the presence of RAG-1; how RAG-2 collaborates with RAG-1 has been poorly understood. Here we examine the composition of RAG-RSS complexes and the relative contributions of RAG-1 and RAG-2 to heptamer binding. RAG-1 exists as a dimer in complexes with an isolated RSS bearing a 12-bp spacer, regardless of whether RAG-2 is present; only a single subunit of RAG-1, however, participates in nonamer binding. In contrast, multimeric RAG-2 is not detectable by electrophoretic mobility shift assays in complexes containing both RAG proteins. DNA-protein photo-cross-linking demonstrates that heptamer contacts, while enhanced by RAG-2, are mediated primarily by RAG-1. RAG-2 cross-linking, while less efficient than that of RAG-1, is detectable near the heptamer-coding junction. These observations provide evidence that RAG-2 alters the conformation or orientation of RAG-1, thereby stabilizing interactions of RAG-1 with the heptamer, and suggest that both proteins interact with the RSS near the site of cleavage.

  16. The ULK1 complex mediates MTORC1 signaling to the autophagy initiation machinery via binding and phosphorylating ATG14.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Man; Jung, Chang Hwa; Seo, Minchul; Otto, Neil Michael; Grunwald, Douglas; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Moriarity, Branden; Kim, Young-Mi; Starker, Colby; Nho, Richard Seonghun; Voytas, Daniel; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    ULK1 (unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1), the key mediator of MTORC1 signaling to autophagy, regulates early stages of autophagosome formation in response to starvation or MTORC1 inhibition. How ULK1 regulates the autophagy induction process remains elusive. Here, we identify that ATG13, a binding partner of ULK1, mediates interaction of ULK1 with the ATG14-containing PIK3C3/VPS34 complex, the key machinery for initiation of autophagosome formation. The interaction enables ULK1 to phosphorylate ATG14 in a manner dependent upon autophagy inducing conditions, such as nutrient starvation or MTORC1 inhibition. The ATG14 phosphorylation mimics nutrient deprivation through stimulating the kinase activity of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) complex and facilitates phagophore and autophagosome formation. By monitoring the ATG14 phosphorylation, we determined that the ULK1 activity requires BECN1/Beclin 1 but not the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-conjugation machinery and the PIK3C3 kinase activity. Monitoring the phosphorylation also allowed us to identify that ATG9A is required to suppress the ULK1 activity under nutrient-enriched conditions. Furthermore, we determined that ATG14 phosphorylation depends on ULK1 and dietary conditions in vivo. These results define a key molecular event for the starvation-induced activation of the ATG14-containing PtdIns3K complex by ULK1, and demonstrate hierarchical relations between the ULK1 activation and other autophagy proteins involved in phagophore formation.

  17. Functional interactions of Rec24, the fission yeast ortholog of mouse Mei4, with the meiotic recombination–initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Bonfils, Sandrine; Rozalén, Ana E.; Smith, Gerald R.; Moreno, Sergio; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    A physical connection between each pair of homologous chromosomes is crucial for reductional chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division and therefore for successful meiosis. Connection is provided by recombination (crossing over) initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although the topoisomerase-like protein Spo11 makes DSBs and is evolutionarily conserved, how Spo11 (Rec12 in fission yeast) is regulated to form DSBs at the proper time and place is poorly understood. Several additional (accessory) proteins for DSB formation have been inferred in different species from yeast to mice. Here, we show that Rec24 is a bona fide accessory protein in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Rec24 is required genome-wide for crossing-over and is recruited to meiotic chromosomes during prophase in a Rec12-independent manner forming foci on linear elements (LinEs), structurally related to the synaptonemal complex of other eukaryotes. Stabilization of Rec24 on LinEs depends on another accessory protein, Rec7, with which Rec24 forms complexes in vivo. We propose that Rec24 marks LinE-associated recombination sites, that stabilization of its binding by Rec7 facilitates the loading or activation of Rec12, and that only stabilized complexes containing Rec24 and Rec7 promote DSB formation. Based on the recent report of Rec24 and Rec7 conservation, interaction between Rec24 and Rec7 might be widely conserved in DSB formation. PMID:21429938

  18. The CCA-end of P-tRNA Contacts Both the Human RPL36AL and the A-site Bound Translation Termination Factor eRF1 at the Peptidyl Transferase Center of the Human 80S Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Hountondji, Codjo; Bulygin, Konstantin; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Woisard, Anne; Tuffery, Pierre; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Frolova, Ludmila; Nierhaus, Knud H; Karpova, Galina; Baouz, Soria

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the E-site specific protein RPL36AL present in human ribosomes can be crosslinked with the CCA-end of a P-tRNA in situ. Here we report the following: (i) We modeled RPL36AL into the structure of the archaeal ortholog RPL44E extracted from the known X-ray structure of the 50S subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Superimposing the obtained RPL36AL structure with that of P/E tRNA observed in eukaryotic 80S ribosomes suggested that RPL36AL might in addition to its CCA neighbourhood interact with the inner site of the tRNA elbow similar to an interaction pattern known from tRNA•synthetase pairs. (ii) Accordingly, we detected that the isolated recombinant protein RPL36AL can form a tight binary complex with deacylated tRNA, and even tRNA fragments truncated at their CCA end showed a high affinity in the nanomolar range supporting a strong interaction outside the CCA end. (iii) We constructed programmed 80S complexes containing the termination factor eRF1 (stop codon UAA at the A-site) and a 2',3'-dialdehyde tRNA (tRNAox) analog at the P-site. Surprisingly, we observed a crosslinked ternary complex containing the tRNA, eRF1 and RPL36AL crosslinked both to the aldehyde groups of tRNAox at the 2'- and 3'-positions of the ultimate A. We also demonstrated that, upon binding to the ribosomal A-site, eRF1 induces an alternative conformation of the ribosome and/or the tRNA, leading to a novel crosslink of tRNAox to another large-subunit ribosomal protein (namely L37) rather than to RPL36AL, both ribosomal proteins being labeled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Since the human 80S ribosome in complex with P-site bound tRNAox and A-site bound eRF1 corresponds to the post-termination state of the ribosome, the results represent the first biochemical evidence for the positioning of the CCA-arm of the P-tRNA in close proximity to both RPL36AL and eRF1 at the end of the translation process.

  19. Sexual Initiation and Complex Recent Polydrug Use Patterns Among Male Sex Workers in Vietnam: A Preliminary Epidemiological Trajectory.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gary; Goldsamt, Lloyd A; Clatts, Michael C; Giang, Lê Minh

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the age of onset of sexual and drug risk and their association with complex patterns of recent drug use among male sex workers (MSW) in a developing country, such as Vietnam. The aim of this study was to determine whether latent class analysis (LCA) would aid in the detection of current individual and polydrug use combinations to predict how different trajectories of sexual and drug initiation contribute to different patterns of current illicit drug use. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey administered to young MSWs between 2010 and 2011 in Vietnam (N = 710). LCA clustered participants into recent drug use groups, incorporating both the specific types and overall count of different drugs used. Men reported drug use within a 1 month period from an 11-item drug use list. LCA identified three distinct drug use classes: (1) alcohol use, (2) alcohol and tobacco use, and (3) high polydrug use. The current drug use classes are associated with sex worker status, housing stability, income level, educational attainment, marital status, sexual identity, and sexual preferences. High levels of drug use are strongly associated with being a recent sex worker, not having recent stable housing, higher than median income, more than a high school education, less likely to be currently in school and more likely to have non-homosexual preferences and heterosexual partners. An event history analysis approach (time-event displays) examined the timing of the age of onset of drug and sexual risks. Early ages of drug and sexual initiation are seen for all three classes. High current drug users show earlier onset of these risks, which are significantly delayed for moderate and low current drug users. LCA incorporating an overall count of different drugs detected three distinct current drug use classes. The data illustrates that the complexity of drug factors that must be accounted for, both in advancing our epidemiological understanding of the complexity

  20. Electrophilic Pt(II) Complexes: Precision Instruments for the Initiation of Transformations Mediated by the Cation–Olefin Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A discontinuity exists between the importance of the cation–olefin reaction as the principal C–C bond forming reaction in terpene biosynthesis and the synthetic tools for mimicking this reaction under catalyst control; that is, having the product identity, stereochemistry, and functionality under the control of a catalyst. The main reason for this deficiency is that the cation–olefin reaction starts with a reactive intermediate (a carbocation) that reacts exothermically with an alkene to reform the reactive intermediate; not to mention that reactive intermediates can also react in nonproductive fashions. In this Account, we detail our efforts to realize catalyst control over this most fundamental of reactions and thereby access steroid like compounds. Our story is organized around our progress in each component of the cascade reaction: the metal controlled electrophilic initiation, the propagation and termination of the cyclization (the cyclase phase), and the turnover deplatinating events. Electrophilic Pt(II) complexes efficiently initiate the cation–olefin reaction by first coordinating to the alkene with selection rules that favor less substituted alkenes over more substituted alkenes. In complex substrates with multiple alkenes, this preference ensures that the least substituted alkene is always the better ligand for the Pt(II) initiator, and consequently the site at which all electrophilic chemistry is initiated. This control element is invariant. With a suitably electron deficient ligand set, the catalyst then activates the coordinated alkene to intramolecular addition by a second alkene, which initiates the cation–olefin reaction cascade and generates an organometallic Pt(II)-alkyl. Deplatination by a range of mechanisms (β-H elimination, single electron oxidation, two-electron oxidation, etc.) provides an additional level of control that ultimately enables A-ring functionalizations that are orthogonal to the cyclase cascade. We particularly

  1. Initiation of poliovirus plus-strand RNA synthesis in a membrane complex of infected HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, N.; Kuhn, R.J.; Yang, C.F.; Takegami, T.; Wimmer, E.

    1986-10-01

    An in vitro poliovirus RNA-synthesizing system derived from a crude membrance fraction of infected HeLa cells was used to analyze the mechanism of initiation of poliovirus plus-strand RNA synthesis. This system contains an activity that synthesizes the nucleotidyl proteins VPg-pU and VPg-pUpU. These molecules represent the 5'-terminal structure of nascent RNA molecules and of virion RNA. The membranous replication complex is also capable of synthesizing mucleotidyl proteins containing nine or more of the poliovirus 5'-proximal nucleotides as assayed by the formation of the RNase T/sub 1/-resistant oligonucleotide VPg-pUUAAAACAGp or by fingerprint analysis of the in vitro-synthesized /sup 32/P-RNA. Incubation of preformed VPg-pUpU with unlabeled nucleoside triphosphates resulted in the formation of VPg-pUUAAAACAGp. This reaction, which appeared to be an elongation of VPg-pUpU, was stimulated by the addition of a soluble fraction (S-10) obtained from uninfected HeLa cells. Preformed VPg-pU could be chased into VPg-pUpU in the presence of UTP. The data are consistent with a model that VPg-pU can function as a primer for poliovirus plus-strand RNA synthesis in the membranous replication complex and that the elongation reaction may be stimulated by a host cellular factor.

  2. A receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, BIK1, associates with a flagellin receptor complex to initiate plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dongping; Wu, Shujing; Gao, Xiquan; Zhang, Yulan; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Plants and animals rely on innate immunity to prevent infections by detection of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) through pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). The plant PRR FLS2, a leucine-rich repeat-receptor kinase, recognizes bacterial flagellin and initiates immune signaling by association with another leucine-rich repeat-receptor-like kinase, BAK1. It remains unknown how the FLS2/BAK1 receptor complex activates intracellular signaling cascades. Here we identified the receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 that is rapidly phosphorylated upon flagellin perception, depending on both FLS2 and BAK1. BIK1 associates with FLS2 and BAK1 in vivo and in vitro. BIK1 is phosphorylated by BAK1, and BIK1 also directly phosphorylates BAK1 and FLS2 in vitro. The flagellin phosphorylation site Thr237 of BIK1 is required for its phosphorylation on BAK1 and FLS2, suggesting that BIK1 is likely first phosphorylated upon flagellin perception and subsequently transphosphorylates FLS2/BAK1 to propagate flagellin signaling. Importantly, bik1 mutants are compromised in diverse flagellin-mediated responses and immunity to the nonpathogenic bacterial infection. Thus, BIK1 is an essential component in MAMP signal transduction, which links the MAMP receptor complex to downstream intracellular signaling. PMID:20018686

  3. Formation of a Complex between Nucleolin and Replication Protein a after Cell Stress Prevents Initiation of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Daniely, Yaron; Borowiec, James A.

    2000-01-01

    We used a biochemical screen to identify nucleolin, a key factor in ribosome biogenesis, as a high-affinity binding partner for the heterotrimeric human replication protein A (hRPA). Binding studies in vitro demonstrated that the two proteins physically interact, with nucleolin using an unusual contact with the small hRPA subunit. Nucleolin significantly inhibited both simian virus 40 (SV-40) origin unwinding and SV-40 DNA replication in vitro, likely by nucleolin preventing hRPA from productive interaction with the SV-40 initiation complex. In vivo, use of epifluorescence and confocal microscopy showed that heat shock caused a dramatic redistribution of nucleolin from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Nucleolin relocalization was concomitant with a tenfold increase in nucleolin–hRPA complex formation. The relocalized nucleolin significantly overlapped with the position of hRPA, but only poorly with sites of ongoing DNA synthesis. We suggest that the induced nucleolin–hRPA interaction signifies a novel mechanism that represses chromosomal replication after cell stress. PMID:10811822

  4. [Promotion of nurses to academic management: discussing their role through the theory of adaptation (70's 80's)].

    PubMed

    Gómez Torres, Danelia

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative research aimed to show the nurses role performed during the management challenge in nursing schools. A retrospective diachronic historical type study was conducted through data collection, critical evaluation and facts presentation based on Roy's adaptation theory. The study reveal that pioneer nurse managers achieved a professional projection inside the university academic scope, based on adaptation, interdependence, by transcending in optimal way between organization members and showing initially a compensatory adaptation level and later on integrated with innovation in the performance of manager's role, based on dialogue, with presence in several scenarios as well as participation in several sectors.

  5. Direct chemical probing of the conformation of the 3' functional domain of rabbit 18S rRNA in 40S subunits, 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubino, H.M.; Rairkar, A.; Lockard, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the 3' minor domain of eukaryotic 18S rRNA, as in prokaryotes, is directly involved in protein biosynthesis. To determine regions of possible functional importance, they have probed the higher order structure of rabbit 18S rRNA in both 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes, as well as polyribosomes using the single-strand specific chemical probes dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) which react with unpaired guanosine and adenosine residues, respectively. The modified 18S rRNA was isolated from these particles and the resultant modified nucleotides identified on polyacrylamide sequencing gels upon either aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact rRNA or by DNA primer extension using sequence specific deoxyoligomers with reverse transcriptase. Their results indicate a decreased reactivity of residue C-1692 in rabbit 18S rRNA (corresponding to C-1400 E. coli) within the putative tRNA contact site in polyribosomes as compared with 40S subunits and 80S ribosomes. They have also determined varying reactivities of a number of other residues within specific regions of the 3' functional domain when 40S, 80S, and polyribosomes are compared, which may be important for both subunit association as well as mRNA binding.

  6. [Preparing the awakening of Lilith: gender in nursing in articles of REBEn in th 80s and 90s].

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucia Helena Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the conditions of women/nurses in the articles published by REBEn (Brazilian Journal of Nursing) in the 1980's and 1990's. Initially, the researcher intended to analyze specifically those articles which had some reference to gender. However, in the beginnings of the 1980's, some articles pointed in the direction of the social problems involving women and the implication of these problems to nurses, without making explicit reference to gender category. Thus, the author decided to evaluate abstracts and the content of different articles, in order to detect those which were related to the subject of investigation. Eleven articles and two thematic editorials selected show that REBEn, although timidly, is a magazine which is updated regarding decisive moments of women's worldwide movement.

  7. Events during eucaryotic rRNA transcription initiation and elongation: Conversion from the closed to the open promoter complex requires nucleotide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-05-01

    Chemical footprinting and topological analysis were carried out on the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA transcription initiation factor (TIF) and RNA polymerase I complexes with DNA during transcription initiation and elongation. The results show that the binding of TIF and polymerase to the promoter does not alter the supercoiling of the DNA template and the template does not become sensitive to modification by diethylpyro-carbonate, which can identify melted DNA regions. Thus, in contrast to bacterial RNA polymerase, the eucaryotic RNA polymerase I-promoter complex is in a closed configuration preceding addition of nucleotides in vitro. Initiation and 3'-O-methyl CTP-limited translocation by RNA polymerase I results in separation of the polymerase-TIF footprints, leaving the TIF footprint unaltered. In contrast, initiation and translocation result in a significant change in the conformation of the polymerase-DNA complex, culminating in an unwound DNA region of at least 10 base pairs.

  8. The role of "indirect" recognition in initiating rejection of skin grafts from major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, H; Lee, R; Shea, S; Markowitz, J S; Grusby, M J; Glimcher, L H

    1993-01-01

    In vitro studies have revealed several pathways by which T cells can respond to alloantigens, including CD4+ direct responses to allogeneic class II antigens, CD8+ direct responses to allogeneic class I antigens, and CD4+ "indirect" responses to peptides of alloantigens presented in association with responder class II molecules. In vivo studies of skin graft rejection, however, have so far provided clear evidence for the contribution of only the two direct pathways and not for indirect recognition. We have used major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient mice as donors to test the role of indirect recognition in rejection of skin grafts. Class II-deficient skin was always rejected without delay by normal recipients. Removal of recipient CD8+ cells (to leave the animals dependent on CD4+ function) or depletion of recipient CD4+ cells revealed that CD4+ cells were usually involved and sometimes absolutely required in this rapid rejection. Since the donor grafts lacked class II antigens, the CD4+ cells must have recognized donor antigens presented in association with recipient class II molecules. These results therefore indicate that indirect recognition can initiate rapid skin graft rejection. PMID:8475083

  9. Influence of steroid-hormone-receptor-protein complexes on initiation of ribonucleic acid synthesis in liver nuclei isolated from rats of various ages.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J K; Bolla, R

    1981-01-01

    The effect of age on the induction of the initiation of RNA synthesis was investigated in liver nuclei isolated from adrenalectomized rats of various ages after binding of a dexamethasone-receptor-protein complex. Binding of this complex to nuclear chromatin resulted in increased initiation of nuclear RNA synthesis at all ages; however, an age-associated decline in the extent of this induction was observed. This suggests an age-related decrease of total rat liver nuclear RNA synthesis with a decreased response to glucocorticoid hormones. PMID:6171268

  10. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    PubMed Central

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-01-01

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79–Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3–4.8 Å in the Cα atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a ‘flipped-out’ conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1′ binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallo­graphic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency. PMID:21636892

  11. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-09-06

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79-Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3-4.8 {angstrom} in the C{alpha} atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a 'flipped-out' conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1' binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallographic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency.

  12. Inhibition of translation initiation complex formation by GE81112 unravels a 16S rRNA structural switch involved in P-site decoding

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Schedlbauer, Andreas; Brandi, Letizia; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Giuliodori, Anna Maria; Garofalo, Raffaella; Ochoa-Lizarralde, Borja; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Connell, Sean R.; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    In prokaryotic systems, the initiation phase of protein synthesis is governed by the presence of initiation factors that guide the transition of the small ribosomal subunit (30S) from an unlocked preinitiation complex (30S preIC) to a locked initiation complex (30SIC) upon the formation of a correct codon–anticodon interaction in the peptidyl (P) site. Biochemical and structural characterization of GE81112, a translational inhibitor specific for the initiation phase, indicates that the main mechanism of action of this antibiotic is to prevent P-site decoding by stabilizing the anticodon stem loop of the initiator tRNA in a distorted conformation. This distortion stalls initiation in the unlocked 30S preIC state characterized by tighter IF3 binding and a reduced association rate for the 50S subunit. At the structural level we observe that in the presence of GE81112 the h44/h45/h24a interface, which is part of the IF3 binding site and forms ribosomal intersubunit bridges, preferentially adopts a disengaged conformation. Accordingly, the findings reveal that the dynamic equilibrium between the disengaged and engaged conformations of the h44/h45/h24a interface regulates the progression of protein synthesis, acting as a molecular switch that senses and couples the 30S P-site decoding step of translation initiation to the transition from an unlocked preIC to a locked 30SIC state. PMID:27071098

  13. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  14. Challenges for the 80's

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    Finding and developing the necessary petroleum reserves in the 1980's will require drilling deeper wells in more hostile environments, drilling in increasing water depths, drilling in hostile Arctic areas and in waters where icebergs must be dealt with, and exploring deeper onshore horizons in more difficult topographical areas. These conditions impose severe demands on drilling and production equipment. The deeper wells will challenge drilling and production capabilities because of higher down-hole temperatures, greater capacity requirements on surface equipment, and more critical demands on the associated down-hole equipment. Drilling fluids, tools, and elastomers will need to withstand higher temperatures and greater stresses. Drilling in deeper waters will require the development and refinement of better and more economical drilling and production platforms. Increased drilling from platforms will necessitate improved drilling fluids to minimize torque, drill string, and casing wear in highly deviated holes. Another technological challenge is rig automation to minimize the physical work and injury factors associated with tripping and to reduce personnel requirements on the drilling rig.

  15. Does complex absorption behavior leading to conditioning and damage in KDP/DKDP reflect the electronic structure of initiators?

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; DeMange, P P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Demos, S G

    2007-10-24

    Currently, most of our thinking about the defects responsible for initiating laser damage considers them as featureless absorbers. However, an increasing body of evidence, particularly involving multi-wavelength irradiation, suggests electronic structure of damage initiators is important in determining both initiation and conditioning behaviors in KDP. The effective absorption coefficient of energy under multi-wavelength irradiation cannot be accounted for by a structureless absorber, but is consistent with an initiator with a multi-level structure. We outline the evidence and assess the ability of such a simple multi-level model to explain these and other experimentally observed behaviors.

  16. Polyhomologation based on in situ generated boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites: a novel strategy towards the synthesis of polyethylene-based complex architectures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Hefeng; Gnanou, Yves; Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2015-06-21

    A novel strategy, based on the in situ generated boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites for the polyhomologation of dimethylsulfoxonium methylide, has been developed for the synthesis of complex polyethylene-based architectures. As examples, the synthesis of a 4-arm polyethylene star, three (polystyrene)(polyethylene)2 3-miktoarm stars and a PE-branched double graft copolymer is given.

  17. Initiation of RNA synthesis in vitro by vesicular stomatitis virus: single internal initiation in the presence of aurintricarboxylic acid and vanadyl ribonucleoside complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Talib, S; Hearst, J E

    1983-01-01

    In the presence of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) and vanadyl ribonucleoside complexes (VRC), we have isolated and characterized a small RNA, product of VSV in vitro transcription. This RNA is capped and lacks poly(A) at its 3'-end. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that this RNA corresponds to the 5'-terminal transcription product of the N-gene. The termination of the transcription occurs precisely at the 118th base from the 3'-end of the VSV genome. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence around this region reveals a potential secondary structure. Photoreaction of the VSV with 4'-substituted psoralen fails to inhibit the synthesis of the 68-mer RNA under conditions where full length mRNA synthesis is blocked, indicating that the psoralen binding site is located further into the N-gene. Since this RNA is the only in vitro transcription product synthesized under these conditions, the existence of two types of polymerase activities, one for the synthesis of leader RNA and one for mRNA, is suggested. Images PMID:6314272

  18. An immunoaffinity purified Schizosaccharomyces pombe TBP-containing complex directs correct initiation of the S.pombe rRNA gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Guo, A; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    The multi-protein complex SL1, containing TBP, which is essential for RNA polymerase I catalyzed transcription, has been analyzed in fission yeast. It was immunopurified based on association of component subunits with epitope-tagged TBP. To enable this analysis, a strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was created where the only functional TBP coding sequences were those of FLAG-TBP. RNA polymerase I transcription components were fractionated from this strain and the TBP-associated polypeptides were subsequently immunopurified together with the epitope- tagged TBP. An assessment of the activity of this candidate SL1 complex was undertaken cross-species. This fission yeast TBP-containing complex displays two activities in redirecting transcriptional initiation of an S. pombe rDNA gene promoter cross-species in Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription reactions: it both blocks an incorrect transcriptional start site at +7 and directs initiation at the correct site for S. pombe rRNA synthesis. This complex is essential for accurate initiation of the S.pombe rRNA gene: rRNA synthesis is reconstituted when this S.pombe TBP-containing complex is combined with a S.pombe fraction immunodepleted of TBP. PMID:9092673

  19. eIF1A/eIF5B interaction network and its functions in translation initiation complex assembly and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nag, Nabanita; Lin, Kai Ying; Edmonds, Katherine A; Yu, Jielin; Nadkarni, Devika; Marintcheva, Boriana; Marintchev, Assen

    2016-09-06

    Eukaryotic translation initiation is a highly regulated process involving multiple steps, from 43S pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly, to ribosomal subunit joining. Subunit joining is controlled by the G-protein eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B (eIF5B). Another protein, eIF1A, is involved in virtually all steps, including subunit joining. The intrinsically disordered eIF1A C-terminal tail (eIF1A-CTT) binds to eIF5B Domain-4 (eIF5B-D4). The ribosomal complex undergoes conformational rearrangements at every step of translation initiation; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report three novel interactions involving eIF5B and eIF1A: (i) a second binding interface between eIF5B and eIF1A; (ii) a dynamic intramolecular interaction in eIF1A between the folded domain and eIF1A-CTT; and (iii) an intramolecular interaction between eIF5B-D3 and -D4. The intramolecular interactions within eIF1A and eIF5B interfere with one or both eIF5B/eIF1A contact interfaces, but are disrupted on the ribosome at different stages of translation initiation. Therefore, our results indicate that the interactions between eIF1A and eIF5B are being continuously rearranged during translation initiation. We present a model how the dynamic eIF1A/eIF5B interaction network can promote remodeling of the translation initiation complexes, and the roles in the process played by intrinsically disordered protein segments.

  20. Identification of partners of TIF34, a component of the yeast eIF3 complex, required for cell proliferation and translation initiation.

    PubMed Central

    Verlhac, M H; Chen, R H; Hanachi, P; Hershey, J W; Derynck, R

    1997-01-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor-3 (eIF3) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in initiation of translation. The eIF3 complex contains at least eight different proteins, but, as yet, little is known about the function of the individual proteins. In this study we have characterized the role of TIF34 (eIF3-p39), a recently identified WD-40 domain-containing protein of 39 kDa, in the eIF3 complex. Using temperature-sensitive mutants of TIF34 we show that this protein is required for cell cycle progression and for mating and plays an essential role in initiation of protein synthesis. By two-hybrid screening we have identified two partners that directly associate with TIF34: PRT1, a previously characterized eIF3 subunit, and a novel protein of 33 kDa (eIF3-p33) which is part of the eIF3 complex and has an RNA binding domain. TIF34 and p33 interact with each other and overexpression of p33 complements the growth defect of a tif34-ts mutant. Our results provide support for both physical and functional interactions between three subunits, TIF34, PRT1 and p33, in the eIF3 complex. PMID:9362495

  1. Translation complex profile sequencing to study the in vivo dynamics of mRNA-ribosome interactions during translation initiation, elongation and termination.

    PubMed

    Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Archer, Stuart K; Beilharz, Traude H; Powell, David; Preiss, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) translation is a tightly controlled process that is integral to gene expression. It features intricate and dynamic interactions of the small and large subunits of the ribosome with mRNAs, aided by multiple auxiliary factors during distinct initiation, elongation and termination phases. The recently developed ribosome profiling method can generate transcriptome-wide surveys of translation and its regulation. Ribosome profiling records the footprints of fully assembled ribosomes along mRNAs and thus primarily interrogates the elongation phase of translation. Importantly, it does not monitor multiple substeps of initiation and termination that involve complexes between the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) and mRNA. Here we describe a related method, termed 'translation complex profile sequencing' (TCP-seq), that is uniquely capable of recording positions of any type of ribosome-mRNA complex transcriptome-wide. It uses fast covalent fixation of translation complexes in live cells, followed by RNase footprinting of translation intermediates and their separation into complexes involving either the full ribosome or the SSU. The footprints derived from each type of complex are then deep-sequenced separately, generating native distribution profiles during the elongation, as well as the initiation and termination stages of translation. We provide the full TCP-seq protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae liquid suspension culture, including a data analysis pipeline. The protocol takes ∼3 weeks to complete by a researcher who is well acquainted with standard molecular biology techniques and who has some experience in ultracentrifugation and the preparation of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries. Basic Bash and UNIX/Linux command skills are required to use the bioinformatics tools provided.

  2. PMLABe diol synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of racemic benzyl β-malolactonate initiated by rare-earth trisborohydride complexes: an experimental and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Jaffredo, Cédric G; Schmid, Matthias; Del Rosal, Iker; Mevel, Teddy; Roesky, Peter W; Maron, Laurent; Guillaume, Sophie M

    2014-10-27

    Polymer diols are a class of polymeric building blocks of high interest for the synthesis of complex macromolecular edifices. Rare-earth borohydride complexes are known as efficient initiators for the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic esters, directly affording α,ω-dihydroxy-telechelic polyesters. Here, were report the direct synthesis of poly(benzyl β-malolactonate) (PMLABe) diols, from the ROP of racemic (benzyl β-malolactonate) (rac-MLABe), a valuable and renewable monomer, initiated by the homoleptic [Ln(BH4 )3 (thf)3 ] (Ln=La, Nd, and Sm) complexes. These initiators enabled the controlled ROP of this β-lactone, affording well-defined syndiotactic-enriched (Pr ≈0.83) PMLABes (Mn up to 21 300 g mol(-1) , ÐM ≈1.5) as evidenced by size exclusion chromatography, (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy, and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry analyses. The first and second insertions of rac-MLABe, as assessed by DFT calculations, revealed more favorable stationary front-side than migratory back-side insertions, the thermodynamically and kinetically competitive ROP on two distinct arms with that on a one arm-only, and the thermodynamically slightly favored formation of syndiotactic-enriched PMLABes.

  3. The 70 S monosome accumulation and in vitro initiation complex formation by Escherichia coli ribosomes at 5 C. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeze, R. J.; Pope, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The inhibition of translation which is observed after shifting Escherichia coli to low temperature was investigated. 70 S ribosomes were isolated from E. coli 8 hours after a shift to 5 C synthesized protein in the absence of added mRNA (i.e., endogenous protein synthesis by 70 S monosomes) at a rate which was three times greater than the rate of endogenous protein synthesis by 70 S ribosomes which were isolated at the time of the shift to 5 C. Calculations based on the rates of endogenous protein synthesis and polyphenylalanine synthesis indicate that 70 S monosomes comprise only 0.1% of the total E. coli 70 S ribosome population after 8 hours at 5 c. Experiments designed to test initiation complex formation on ApUpG or formaldehyde treated MS-2 viral RNA demonstrated that, although the rate of formation of 30 S initiation complexes was not inhibited, the rate of formation of active 70 S initiation complexes, able to react with puromycin, was inhibited to a great extent at 5 C. A model depicting the effects of low temperature on the E. coli translation system is proposed.

  4. Yeast Gcn4p Stabilization Is Initiated by the Dissociation of the Nuclear Pho85p/Pcl5p Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bömeke, Katrin; Pries, Ralph; Korte, Virginia; Scholz, Eva; Herzog, Britta; Schulze, Florian

    2006-01-01

    Protein stability of the c-jun-like yeast bZIP transcriptional activator Gcn4p is exclusively controlled in the yeast nucleus. Phosphorylation by the nuclear Pho85p cyclin-dependent protein kinase, a functional homolog of mammalian Cdk5, initiates the Gcn4p degradation pathway in complex with the cyclin Pcl5p. We show that the initial step in Gcn4p stabilization is the dissociation of the Pho85p/Pcl5p complex. Pcl7p, another nuclear and constantly present cyclin, is required for Gcn4p stabilization and is able to associate to Pho85p independently of the activity of the Gcn4p degradation pathway. In addition, the nuclear cyclin-dependent Pho85p kinase inhibitor Pho81p is required for Gcn4p stabilization. Pho81p only interacts with Pcl5p when Gcn4p is rapidly degraded but constitutively interacts with Pcl7p. Our data suggest that Pcl7p and Pho81p are antagonists of the Pho85p/Pcl5p complex formation in a yet unknown way, which are specifically required for Gcn4p stabilization. We suggest that dissociation of the Pho85p/Pcl5p complex as initial step in Gcn4p stabilization is a prerequisite for a shift of equilibrium to an increased amount of the Pho85p/Pcl7p complexes and subsequently results in decreased Gcn4p phosphorylation and therefore increased stability of the transcription factor. PMID:16611745

  5. Effects of Syntactic Complexity and Sentence-Structure Priming on Speech Initiation Time in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiamtsiouris, Jim; Cairns, Helen Smith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypotheses that adults who stutter will be slower in producing syntactically complex sentences than fluent adults and will benefit more from sentence-structure priming than will fluent adults. Method: Adults who stutter (n = 15) and fluent adults (n = 15) participated in 2 experiments. In Experiment 1, adults in both groups…

  6. Mechanism of Origin DNA Recognition and Assembly of an Initiator-Helicase Complex by SV40 Large Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y. Paul; Xu, Meng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Yu, Xian Jessica; Rohs, Remo; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA tumor virus Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a model system for studying eukaryotic replication. SV40 large tumor antigen (LTag) is the initiator/helicase that is essential for genome replication. LTag recognizes and assembles at the viral replication origin. We determined the structure of two multidomain LTag subunits bound to origin DNA. The structure reveals that the origin binding domains (OBDs) and Zn and AAA+ domains are involved in origin recognition and assembly. Notably, the OBDs recognize the origin in an unexpected manner. The histidine residues of the AAA+ domains insert into a narrow minor groove region with enhanced negative electrostatic potential. Computational analysis indicates that this region is intrinsically narrow, demonstrating the role of DNA shape readout in origin recognition. Our results provide important insights into the assembly of the LTag initiator/ helicase at the replication origin and suggest that histidine contacts with the minor groove serve as a mechanism of DNA shape readout. PMID:23545501

  7. Open-complex formation by the host initiator, DnaA, at the origin of P1 plasmid replication.

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, G; Carr, K M; Kaguni, J M; Chattoraj, D K

    1993-01-01

    Replication of P1 plasmid requires both the plasmid-specific initiator, RepA, and the host initiator, DnaA. Here we show that DnaA can make the P1 origin reactive to the single-strand specific reagents KMnO4 and mung bean nuclease. Addition of RepA further increased the KMnO4 reactivity of the origin, although RepA alone did not influence the reaction. The increased reactivity implies that the two initiators interact in some way to alter the origin conformation. The KMnO4 reactivity was restricted to one strand of the origin. We suggest that the roles of DnaA in P1 plasmid and bacterial replication are similar: origin opening and loading of the DnaB helicase. The strand-bias in chemical reactivity at the P1 origin most likely indicates that only one of the strands is used for the loading of DnaB, a scenario consistent with the unidirectional replication of the plasmid. Images PMID:8223464

  8. An initial investigation into the anti-inflammatory activity and antioxidant capacity of alpha-cyclodextrin-complexed Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Chepulis, Lynne M; Francis, Evelyn

    2012-09-24

    The bioactive properties of Manuka honey are now well recognised, but the nature of honey (a sticky, viscous fluid) can make it hard to use as a health remedy. A new technology using encapsulation of Manuka honey with alpha-cyclodextrin molecules has been developed, creating a free-flowing powder that can easily be added to foods and beverages, or tableted / made into capsules for use in health. In this study, we investigated for antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Antioxidant capacity of raw Manuka honeys and matched complexes was measured using the CUPRAC method. Results showed that the antioxidant activity of honey decreased when complexed, this being directly related to dilution of the final product with alpha-cyclodextrin. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by measuring inhibition of neutrophil TNF-alpha secretion. Contradictory results were produced, with both stimulation and inhibition of TNF-alpha being observed. Data from this study indicate that the formation of cyclodextrin-based complexes of Manuka honey may potentiate the anti-inflammatory activity of honey, but this may differ depending on methylglyoxal content and the presence of other factors.

  9. Identifying families with complex needs after an initial child abuse investigation: A comparison of demographics and needs related to domestic violence, mental health, and substance use.

    PubMed

    Simon, James David; Brooks, Devon

    2017-03-16

    Families with complex needs related to domestic violence, mental health, and substance use have some of the worst child protective services (CPS) outcomes. Although many of these families are identified during a CPS investigation and subsequently referred to home-based postinvestigation services (HBPS), many are re-reported to CPS, so it is important to understand the postinvestigation experiences of this vulnerable group. Therefore, this study compared families with and without complex needs to understand their uniquedemographics, needs, and postinvestigation outcomes. The sample consisted of 2008 caregivers who received HBPS following an initial CPS investigation. The Family Assessment Form (FAF) was used to measure family functioning in eight domains using a 1-5 scale with higher ratings representing worse functioning. Complex needs were indicated by a mean FAF score of 3 or higher for either domestic violence, mental health, or substance use. Using Pearson chi-square analyses and two-sample t-tests, comparisons were made between families with (n=836) and without (n=1172) complex needs. Half of caregivers with complex needs had a history of abuse, 25% had three to five needs, and nearly half had six to eight needs; 90% of caregivers without complex needs had zero to two needs. Furthermore, caregivers with complex needs had higher mean scores for concrete, educational, and clinical needs. These findings highlight the importance of recognizing variation among families referred to HBPS and accurate screening to ensure that families with complex needs are offered and receive services matched to their unique characteristics and needs.

  10. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF5 promotes the accuracy of start codon recognition by regulating Pi release and conformational transitions of the preinitiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Adesh K.; Nanda, Jagpreet S.; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Dong, Jinsheng; Zhang, Fan; Bhardwaj, Monika; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    eIF5 is the GTPase activating protein (GAP) for the eIF2·GTP·Met-tRNAiMet ternary complex with a critical role in initiation codon selection. Previous work suggested that the eIF5 mutation G31R/SUI5 elevates initiation at UUG codons by increasing GAP function. Subsequent work implicated eIF5 in rearrangement of the preinitiation complex (PIC) from an open, scanning conformation to a closed state at AUG codons, from which Pi is released from eIF2·GDP·Pi. To identify eIF5 functions crucial for accurate initiation, we investigated the consequences of G31R on GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and the effects of intragenic G31R suppressors on these reactions, and on the partitioning of PICs between open and closed states. eIF5-G31R altered regulation of Pi release, accelerating it at UUG while decreasing it at AUG codons, consistent with its ability to stabilize the closed complex at UUG. Suppressor G62S mitigates both defects of G31R, accounting for its efficient suppression of UUG initiation in G31R,G62S cells; however suppressor M18V impairs GTP hydrolysis with little effect on PIC conformation. The strong defect in GTP hydrolysis conferred by M18V likely explains its broad suppression of Sui− mutations in numerous factors. We conclude that both of eIF5's functions, regulating Pi release and stabilizing the closed PIC conformation, contribute to stringent AUG selection in vivo. PMID:25114053

  11. Quantum molecular dynamics of hydrogen bonded complexes of rigid molecules using the semiclassical initial value representation in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2007-08-07

    Semiclassical initial value representation calculations are performed for the constrained water dimer in Cartesian coordinates. The study represents the first application of a previously reported method [Issak and Roy, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 084103 (2005); 126, 024111 (2007)] to a molecular cluster. Bound state energies are calculated for a dimer of rigid water molecules (H2O)2 as well as its deuterated form (D2O)2. The results show that the approach fares well with respect to accuracy in capturing quantum effects in intermolecular interactions.

  12. Photo-initiated thiol-ene click reactions as a potential strategy for incorporation of [M(I)(CO)3]+ (M = Re, (99m)Tc) complexes.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Thomas R; Lyon, Patrice A; Silva-Lopez, Elsa; Twamley, Brendan; Benny, Paul D

    2013-03-18

    Click reactions offer a rapid technique to covalently assemble two molecules. In radiopharmaceutical construction, these reactions can be utilized to combine a radioactive metal complex with a biological targeting molecule to yield a potent tool for imaging or therapy applications. The photo-initiated radical thiol-ene click reaction between a thiol and an alkene was examined for the incorporation of [M(I)(CO)3](+) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) systems for conjugating biologically active targeting molecules containing a thiol. In this strategy, a potent chelate system, 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA), for [M(I)(CO)3](+) was functionalized at the central amine with a terminal alkene linker that was explored with two synthetic approaches, click then chelate and chelate then click, to determine the flexibility and applicability of the thiol-ene click reaction to specifically incorporate ligand systems and metal complexes with a thiol containing molecule. In the click then chelate approach, the thiol-ene click reaction was carried out with the DPA chelate followed by complexation with [M(I)(CO)3](+). In the chelate then click approach, the alkene functionalized DPA chelate was first complexed with [M(I)(CO)3](+) followed by the conduction of the thiol-ene click reaction. Initial studies utilized benzyl mercaptan as a model thiol for both strategies to generate the identical product from either route to provide information on reactivity and product formation. DPA ligands functionalized with two unique linker systems (allyl and propyl allyl ether) were prepared to examine the effect of the proximity of the chelate or complex on the thiol-ene click reaction. Both the thiol-ene click and coordination reactions with Re, (99m)Tc were performed in moderate to high yields demonstrating the potential of the thiol-ene click reaction for [M(I)(CO)3](+) incorporation into thiol containing biomolecules.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen activation by dinuclear copper complexes in aqueous solution: hydroxyl radical production initiated by internal electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Lian, Yuxiang; Thyagarajan, Sunita; Rokita, Steven E; Karlin, Kenneth D; Blough, Neil V

    2008-05-21

    Dinuclear Cu(II) complexes, CuII2Nn (n = 4 or 5), were recently found to specifically cleave DNA in the presence of a reducing thiol and O2 or in the presence of H2O2 alone. However, CuII2N3 and a closely related mononuclear Cu(II) complex exhibited no selective reaction under either condition. Spectroscopic studies indicate an intermediate is generated from CuII2Nn (n = 4 or 5) and mononuclear Cu(II) solutions in the presence of H2O2 or from CuI2Nn (n = 4 or 5) in the presence of O2. This intermediate decays to generate OH radicals and ligand degradation products at room temperature. The lack of reactivity of the intermediate with a series of added electron donors suggests the intermediate discharges through a rate-limiting intramolecular electron transfer from the ligand to the metal peroxo center to produce an OH radical and a ligand-based radical. These results imply that DNA cleavage does not result from direct reaction with a metal-peroxo intermediate but instead arises from reaction with either OH radicals or ligand-based radicals.

  14. LUPA: a European initiative taking advantage of the canine genome architecture for unravelling complex disorders in both human and dogs.

    PubMed

    Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Andersson, Leif; André, Catherine; Fredholm, Merete; Hitte, Christophe; Leeb, Tosso; Lohi, Hannes; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Georges, Michel

    2011-08-01

    The domestic dog offers a unique opportunity to explore the genetic basis of disease, morphology and behaviour. Humans share many diseases with our canine companions, making dogs an ideal model organism for comparative disease genetics. Using newly developed resources, genome-wide association studies in dog breeds are proving to be exceptionally powerful. Towards this aim, veterinarians and geneticists from 12 European countries are collaborating to collect and analyse the DNA from large cohorts of dogs suffering from a range of carefully defined diseases of relevance to human health. This project, named LUPA, has already delivered considerable results. The consortium has collaborated to develop a new high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Mutations for four monogenic diseases have been identified and the information has been utilised to find mutations in human patients. Several complex diseases have been mapped and fine mapping is underway. These findings should ultimately lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases in both humans and their best friend.

  15. RecQ4 promotes the conversion of the pre-initiation complex at a site-specific origin for DNA unwinding in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Yosuke; Kubota, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T; Takahashi, Tatsuro S; Mimura, Satoru; Takisawa, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is initiated through stepwise assembly of evolutionarily conserved replication proteins onto replication origins, but how the origin DNA is unwound during the assembly process remains elusive. Here, we established a site-specific origin on a plasmid DNA, using in vitro replication systems derived from Xenopus egg extracts. We found that the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) was preferentially assembled in the vicinity of GAL4 DNA-binding sites of the plasmid, depending on the binding of Cdc6 fused with a GAL4 DNA-binding domain in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Subsequent addition of nucleoplasmic S-phase extracts to the GAL4-dependent pre-RC promoted initiation of DNA replication from the origin, and components of the pre-initiation complex (pre-IC) and the replisome were recruited to the origin concomitant with origin unwinding. In this replication system, RecQ4 is dispensable for both recruitment of Cdc45 onto the origin and stable binding of Cdc45 and GINS to the pre-RC assembled plasmid. However, both origin binding of DNA polymerase α and unwinding of DNA were diminished upon depletion of RecQ4 from the extracts. These results suggest that RecQ4 plays an important role in the conversion of pre-ICs into active replisomes requiring the unwinding of origin DNA in vertebrates.

  16. The elongation factor RfaH and the initiation factor σ bind to the same site on the transcription elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Svetlov, Vladimir; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2008-01-01

    RNA polymerase is a target for numerous regulatory events in all living cells. Recent studies identified a few “hot spots” on the surface of bacterial RNA polymerase that mediate its interactions with diverse accessory proteins. Prominent among these hot spots, the β′ subunit clamp helices serve as a major binding site for the initiation factor σ and for the elongation factor RfaH. Furthermore, the two proteins interact with the nontemplate DNA strand in transcription complexes and thus may interfere with each other's activity. We show that RfaH does not inhibit transcription initiation but, once recruited to RNA polymerase, abolishes σ-dependent pausing. We argue that this apparent competition is due to a steric exclusion of σ by RfaH that is stably bound to the nontemplate DNA and clamp helices, both of which are necessary for the σ recruitment to the transcription complex. Our findings highlight the key regulatory role played by the clamp helices during both initiation and elongation stages of transcription. PMID:18195372

  17. Evaluating large and complex demonstrations: the CHAMPUS reform initiative experience. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services.

    PubMed Central

    Zwanziger, J; Hart, K D; Kravitz, R L; Sloss, E M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the evaluation process for the CHAMPUS Reform Initiative (CRI) both to highlight issues that evaluators must consider when undertaking such projects and to provide policymakers with tools to better assess demonstration project evaluations. DATA SOURCES: The CRI evaluation. STUDY DESIGN: Case study. DATA COLLECTION: Review of CRI evaluation reports. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although policymakers increasingly rely on the evaluations of demonstration projects to determine whether to extend the scope and funding of many public programs, the results of these evaluations are often difficult to assess. Despite its analytical sophistication, the CRI evaluation was no exception. The somewhat artificial time constraints imposed by policymakers made projection of the CRI's performance beyond the demonstration period particularly difficult. CONCLUSIONS: Much uncertainty generally remains even after well-planned and well-executed evaluations of demonstration projects. PMID:11221817

  18. Complex Regulatory Network Controls Initial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli via Regulation of the csgD Gene

    PubMed Central

    Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Brombacher, Eva; Vidal, Olivier; Ambert, Arnaud; Lejeune, Philippe; Landini, Paolo; Dorel, Corinne

    2001-01-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop. PMID:11717281

  19. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  20. Evaluating the outcomes of complex nursing initiatives: Insights from the CANO/ACIO National Strategy for Chemotherapy Administration Project.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Sally; Rashleigh, Laura; Truant, Tracy; Hartzell, Renée; McQuestion, Maurene

    2015-01-01

    Because nursing interventions are typically complex and dynamic, evaluating their impact upon care and care systems is a notoriously daunting challenge. Nursing organizations seeking to evaluate the impact of their efforts are frequently frustrated by the gap between the evaluation research ideal and their available resources. In this paper, we describe a practical and manageable process developed to address such an evaluation challenge. Using a three-step inquiry approach, supported by modest organizational funding and a realistic level of voluntary member time, we were able to generate a meaningful understanding of intersecting outcomes arising from the implementation of CANO/ACIO's National Strategy for Chemotherapy Administration. On the basis of our experience, we see considerable merit in both process and outcomes of this form of targeted evaluation.

  1. Evaluating key parameters for the initiation of a Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth with a single Earth System Model of intermediate complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegl, T. C.; Paeth, H.; Frimmel, H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Even after more than two decades of intense research the main drivers for a potential Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth continue to be discussed controversially. In this study we present results from 37 sensitivity experiments that were performed with the Planet Simulator (PlaSim), an Earth System Model of intermediate complexity. In contrast to previous studies, in which only a limited number of potential climate-controlling parameters were assessed with different climate models, we tested our presumed key parameters within one single model. This approach makes it easier to compare the influence of the various parameters on extreme climate change as postulated for the Neoproterozoic Era. Furthermore we compare the results obtained to most recent high complexity state-of-the-art approaches. This comparison helps to estimate, which internal model interactions and physics are crucial for a Snowball Earth simulation and hence should be included into a model that is capable of realistically simulating a Neoproterozoic climate. To this effect we carried out simulations that involved reduced solar irradiation, land-sea distributions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, relief of the land surface and length of day. In addition, we focus on different land surface albedo values, which were most likely exceptionally low and similar to the Martian albedo, and obliquity changes between 23.5° and 80°. Our findings suggest that changes in land surface albedo are a strong climate driver that can compensate a much lower Neoproterozoic total solar irradiance if it is combined with shifts in obliquity or atmospheric CO2 levels. We also obtained a critical threshold for increased obliquities beyond which a Snowball Earth situation turns into an extreme greenhouse climate with almost absent cryosphere, and furthermore, obliquity values that lead to a tropical ice age with sea ice spreading from the equator to high latitudes.

  2. Clinical Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE): A Pragmatic Trial of Complex Treatment for a Complex Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Leon, Andrew C.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen; Shesler, Leah W.; McElroy, Susan L.; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.; Shelton, Richard C.; Bowden, Charles; Tohen, Mauricio; Singh, Vivek; Deckersbach, Thilo; Ketter, Terence; Kocsis, James; McInnis, Melvin G.; Schoenfeld, David; Bobo, William V.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Classic and second generation antipsychotic mood stabilizers are recommended for treatment of bipolar disorder, yet there are no randomized comparative effectiveness studies that have examined the “real-world” advantages and disadvantages of these medications Purpose We describe the strategic decisions in the design of the Clinical and Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE). This paper outlines the key issues and solutions the investigators faced in designing a clinical trial that would maximize generalizability and inform real-world clinical treatment of bipolar disorder. Methods Bipolar CHOICE was a 6-month, multi-site, prospective, randomized clinical trial of outpatients with bipolar disorder. This study compares the effectiveness of quetiapine versus lithium, each with adjunctive personalized treatments. The co-primary outcomes selected are the overall benefits and harms of the study medications (as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Efficacy Index) and the Necessary Clinical Adjustments (a measure of the number of medication changes). Secondary outcomes are continuous measures of mood, the Framingham General Cardiovascular Risk Score and the Longitudinal Interval Follow up Evaluation Range of Impaired Functioning Tool. Results The final study design consisted of a single-blind, randomized comparative effectiveness trial of quetiapine versus lithium, plus adjunctive personalized treatment (APT), across ten sites. Other important study considerations included limited exclusion criteria to maximize generalizability, flexible dosing of APT medications to mimic real-world treatment, and an intent-to-treat analysis plan. 482 participants were randomized to the study and 364 completed. Limitations The potential limitations of the study include the heterogeneity of APT, selection of study medications, lack of a placebo-control group, and participants’ ability to pay for study medications

  3. Lactide as the Playmaker of the ROP Game: Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Ring-Opening Polymerization of Lactide Initiated by Aminonaphtholate Zinc Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jędrzkiewicz, Dawid; Adamus, Grażyna; Kwiecień, Michał; John, Łukasz; Ejfler, Jolanta

    2017-02-06

    A family of homo- and heteroleptic zinc complexes bearing aminonaphtholate ligands was synthesized and fully characterized. Using NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculation, bis-alkoxy-bridged complexes [LZn(μ-OR)]2 were confirmed to have dimeric structures in solution, analogous to those obtained via X-ray crystallography. Surprisingly, a detailed experimental and theoretical study of the catalytic activity of [LZn(μ-OR)]2 in the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of lactides showed that although well-defined alkoxy dimers possess a single-site structural motif, the most active initiator is obtained during in situ alcoholysis of the alkylzinc precursor. These results indicate that rational ancillary and alkoxy ligand design that takes into account its mutual interaction on monomer coordination may be key to the synthesis of new high-performance ROP catalysts.

  4. Lumped parameter model for prediction of initial breakthrough profiles for the chromatographic capture of antibodies from a complex feedstock.

    PubMed

    Bak, Hanne; Thomas, Owen R T; Abildskov, Jens

    2007-03-15

    A simple mathematical model to predict initial breakthrough profiles from preparative chromatographic separations of biological macromolecules has been developed. A lumped parameter approach was applied, employing Langmuirian adsorption kinetics to describe the rate of mass transfer (MT) from the bulk liquid in the column to the bound state. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption data were determined for six different packed bed chromatographic adsorbents: two derivatised with rProtein A; and four functionalised with synthetic low molecular weight ligands. All adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir model, whereas the data fitting to kinetic batch experiments showed that the model was inadequate after the first approximately 25 min of adsorption for four of the six adsorbents. The model underestimated the dynamic Ig breakthough on packed beds of rProtein A Sepharose FF, MabSelect, MBI HyperCel, and MabSorbent A1P, applying a feedstock of 20-100% (v/v) clarified rabbit antiserum. However, when employing a maximum adsorption capacity 25% greater than that determined in batch binding studies, excellent agreement was obtained at all antiserum strengths for most adsorbents. Useful insights into scale-up and process design can be obtained by applying the model, without determining tentative parameters specific for each adsorbent and target protein concentration. However, the model parameters are solvent dependent so a prerequisite for its true applicability is that binding is both Langmuirian and essentially independent of the ionic strength of the feedstock applied.

  5. H3K9me3 demethylase Kdm4d facilitates the formation of pre-initiative complex and regulates DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rentian; Wang, Zhiquan; Zhang, Honglian; Gan, Haiyun; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to occur once and only once per cell cycle. How chromatin, the physiological substrate of DNA replication machinery, regulates DNA replication remains largely unknown. Here we show that histone H3 lysine 9 demethylase Kdm4d regulates DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Depletion of Kdm4d results in defects in DNA replication, which can be rescued by the expression of H3K9M, a histone H3 mutant transgene that reverses the effect of Kdm4d on H3K9 methylation. Kdm4d interacts with replication proteins, and its recruitment to DNA replication origins depends on the two pre-replicative complex components (origin recognition complex [ORC] and minichromosome maintenance [MCM] complex). Depletion of Kdm4d impairs the recruitment of Cdc45, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and polymerase δ, but not ORC and MCM proteins. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which Kdm4d regulates DNA replication by reducing the H3K9me3 level to facilitate formation of pre-initiative complex. PMID:27679476

  6. Eduction, extension, and exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in metamorphic core complexes due to subduction initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Kenni Dinesen; Buck, W. Roger

    2015-09-01

    The controversy over the exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks centers on whether it involves rising of pieces of crust detached from subducted continental lithosphere or an entire subducted plate that undergoes "eduction," i.e., reverse subduction. We present a new thermomechanical model of continental subduction showing that these apparently contrasting mechanisms can occur together: crust subducted deep enough is heated and weakened, causing limited diapiric rise, while crust subducted to shallower depths retains strength and is exhumed only by eduction. The model also shows for the first time how eduction followed by seafloor spreading can occur in a zone of regional convergence. This occurs spontaneously when subduction of buoyant crust causes a subduction zone to "lock up" in one place causing a new subduction zone to form in another. The model is consistent with many features of the youngest region of UHP rock exhumation on earth: the D'Entrecasteaux Islands. UHP exhumation and the amount of regional extension, as well as the seismic structure around the islands, can be explained by eduction. Ductile flow fabrics, seen on the islands, would result from exhumation of the most deeply subducted crust heated enough to undergo partial melting. Reversal of motion on the north-dipping continental subduction zone, required by this model, was likely triggered by initiation of the New Britain Trench, as suggested previously. Our model implies that the crust of Goodenough Basin, south of the islands, was exhumed by eduction in the last 5 Ma and this hypothesis can be tested by drilling.

  7. Unwinding protein specific for mRNA translation fractionated together with rabbit reticulocyte initiation factor 3 complex

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Joseph; Ilan, Judith

    1977-01-01

    Experiments with a rabbit reticulocyte cell-free system dependent on the addition of initiation factor 3 (eIF-3) and mRNA were carried out. In this system, using ribosomal subunits, AUG(U)n can direct polyphenylalanine synthesis in the absence of eIF-3 at 3 mM MgCl2. Globin mRNA was not translated under similar conditions; its translation requires the addition of eIF-3. Moreover, the maximal rate of globin synthesis was achieved when the molar ratio of eIF-3 to ribosomes was approximately 1. This was taken to indicate that some ribosomal proteins were fractionated with eIF-3 and functioned in reconstitution of salt-washed ribosomes. In our system, almost all ribosomes were active, as evident from the fact that all were found in polysomes when analyzed at the time of linear incorporation, and the molar ratio of ribosomes to mRNA was maintained at 4:1. When AUG(U)n was hybridized with poly(A), it could not direct polyphenylalanine synthesis with or without eIF-3 and was a potent inhibitor of the translation of globin mRNA in the presence of eIF-3. When poly(A) containing 10% U was hybridized with AUG(U)n and added to the cell-free system, addition of eIF-3 promoted polyphenylalanine synthesis to about 80% of control. Moreover, eIF-3 was seen to shift significantly the melting temperature of globin and synthetic double-stranded RNA. These observations suggest that extraction of ribosomes with 0.5 M KCl may release a ribosomal protein that fractionates with eIF-3. This protein may function in unwinding or melting the secondary structure of mRNA and thus facilitate translation. PMID:267926

  8. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study of the Glen Mountains layered complex: initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Gilbert, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for rocks and minerals of the Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC), a midcontinent mafic layered intrusion in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma, constrain the time of initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and provide information on the chemistry of the early Paleozoic mantle. Four whole-rock samples define a Rb-Sr isochron corresponding to a maximum crystallization age of 577 +/- 165 Ma and an initial Sr isotopic composition of 0.70359 +/- 2. A three-point Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock (internal) isochron for an anorthositic gabbro provides a crystallization age of 528 +/- 29 Ma. These data suggest that the GMLC was emplaced into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the initial phase of rifting along the southern margin of the North American craton in the early Paleozoic. This Sm-Nd internal isochron age is within analytical uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages for granites and rhyolites from the Wichita Mountains; therefore, mafic and felsic magmatism may have been contemporaneous within the rift during the early stages of development. Hybrid rocks and composite dikes in the Wichita Mountains provide field evidence for contemporaneous mafic and felsic magmas. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest that magmas parental to the GMLC were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, Nd isotopic data for the GMLC plot distinctly below data for the depleted mantle source cited by DePaolo and thus suggest that the parental magmas of the GMLC were either contaminated by Proterozoic crust of the southern midcontinent or were derived from a heterogenous mantle source region that had variable initial Nd isotopic compositions.

  9. Mechanism of polypeptide chain initiation in eukaryotes and its control by phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of initiation factor 2.

    PubMed Central

    Siekierka, J; Mauser, L; Ochoa, S

    1982-01-01

    Earlier, we isolated eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF-2)-stimulating protein (SP) as a homogeneous complex with eIF-2 (eIF-2-SP) and showed that, in the presence of Mg2+, eIF-2-SP promotes formation of a ternary complex with GTP and eukaryotic initiator methionyl tRNA (Met-tRNAi) (eIF-2-GTP-Met-tRNAi) catalytically. We now show that SP-bound eIF-2 exchanges with eIF-2 (eIF-2 exchange). Furthermore, in the presence of Mg2+, eIF-2-SP catalyzes the exchange of eIF-2-bound [3H]GDP with unlabeled GDP or GTP (GDP exchange) and the release of [3H]GDP when the ternary complex is formed from eIF-2-[3H]GDP, GTP, and [35S]Met-tRNAi. All these reactions are blocked by alpha-subunit, but not by beta-subunit, phosphorylation of eIF-2. The eIF-2 and GDP exchanges are compatible with the reaction eIF-2-GDP + SP in equilibrium EIF-2-SP + GDP reminiscent of the exchange between the Tu and Ts components of prokaryotic elongation factor 1 (EF-Tu and EF-Ts, respectively) EF-Tu-GDP + EF-Ts in equilibrium EF-Tu-EF-Ts + GDP. Due to the high affinity of GDP (approximately 100 times greater than that of GDP) for eIF-2, 40S (eIF-2-GTP-Met-tRNAi-40S) to 80S (Met-tRNAi-mRNA-80S) initiation complex conversion, which is accompanied by GTP hydrolysis, probably releases eIF-2 as eIF-2-GDP. Our results suggest that, in the presence of Mg2+, GDP binding restricts the availability of eIF-2 for chain initiation and that SP relieves this restriction in a catalytic fashion, provided that the alpha subunit of eIF-2 is not phosphorylated. Images PMID:6953412

  10. Mutations in CDC45, Encoding an Essential Component of the Pre-initiation Complex, Cause Meier-Gorlin Syndrome and Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Aimee L; Kliszczak, Maciej; Cooper, Fay; Murray, Jennie; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Twigg, Stephen R F; Goriely, Anne; McGowan, Simon J; Miller, Kerry A; Taylor, Indira B; Logan, Clare; Bozdogan, Sevcan; Danda, Sumita; Dixon, Joanne; Elsayed, Solaf M; Elsobky, Ezzat; Gardham, Alice; Hoffer, Mariette J V; Koopmans, Marije; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Santen, Gijs W E; Savarirayan, Ravi; de Silva, Deepthi; Vanakker, Olivier; Wall, Steven A; Wilson, Louise C; Yuregir, Ozge Ozalp; Zackai, Elaine H; Ponting, Chris P; Jackson, Andrew P; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech; Bicknell, Louise S

    2016-07-07

    DNA replication precisely duplicates the genome to ensure stable inheritance of genetic information. Impaired licensing of origins of replication during the G1 phase of the cell cycle has been implicated in Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS), a disorder defined by the triad of short stature, microtia, and a/hypoplastic patellae. Biallelic partial loss-of-function mutations in multiple components of the pre-replication complex (preRC; ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, or CDC6) as well as de novo stabilizing mutations in the licensing inhibitor, GMNN, cause MGS. Here we report the identification of mutations in CDC45 in 15 affected individuals from 12 families with MGS and/or craniosynostosis. CDC45 encodes a component of both the pre-initiation (preIC) and CMG helicase complexes, required for initiation of DNA replication origin firing and ongoing DNA synthesis during S-phase itself, respectively, and hence is functionally distinct from previously identified MGS-associated genes. The phenotypes of affected individuals range from syndromic coronal craniosynostosis to severe growth restriction, fulfilling diagnostic criteria for Meier-Gorlin syndrome. All mutations identified were biallelic and included synonymous mutations altering splicing of physiological CDC45 transcripts, as well as amino acid substitutions expected to result in partial loss of function. Functionally, mutations reduce levels of full-length transcripts and protein in subject cells, consistent with partial loss of CDC45 function and a predicted limited rate of DNA replication and cell proliferation. Our findings therefore implicate the preIC as an additional protein complex involved in the etiology of MGS and connect the core cellular machinery of genome replication with growth, chondrogenesis, and cranial suture homeostasis.

  11. Interaction of PABPC1 with the translation initiation complex is critical to the NMD resistance of AUG-proximal nonsense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Peixeiro, Isabel; Inácio, Ângela; Barbosa, Cristina; Silva, Ana Luísa; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Romão, Luísa

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a surveillance pathway that recognizes and rapidly degrades mRNAs containing premature termination codons (PTC). The strength of the NMD response appears to reflect multiple determinants on a target mRNA. We have previously reported that mRNAs containing PTCs in close proximity to the translation initiation codon (AUG-proximal PTCs) can substantially evade NMD. Here, we explore the mechanistic basis for this NMD resistance. We demonstrate that translation termination at an AUG-proximal PTC lacks the ribosome stalling that is evident in an NMD-sensitive PTC. This difference is associated with demonstrated interactions of the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein 1, PABPC1, with the cap-binding complex subunit, eIF4G and the 40S recruitment factor eIF3 as well as the ribosome release factor, eRF3. These interactions, in combination, underlie critical 3′–5′ linkage of translation initiation with efficient termination at the AUG-proximal PTC and contribute to an NMD-resistant PTC definition at an early phase of translation elongation. PMID:21989405

  12. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 plays distinct roles at the mRNA entry and exit channels of the ribosomal preinitiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Beznosková, Petra; Vlčkova, Vladislava; Chiu, Wen-Ling; Zhou, Fujun; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) is a central player in recruitment of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) to mRNA. We probed the effects on mRNA recruitment of a library of S. cerevisiae eIF3 functional variants spanning its 5 essential subunits using an in vitro-reconstituted system. Mutations throughout eIF3 disrupt its interaction with the PIC and diminish its ability to accelerate recruitment to a native yeast mRNA. Alterations to the eIF3a CTD and eIF3b/i/g significantly slow mRNA recruitment, and mutations within eIF3b/i/g destabilize eIF2•GTP•Met-tRNAi binding to the PIC. Using model mRNAs lacking contacts with the 40S entry or exit channels, we uncovered a critical role for eIF3 requiring the eIF3a NTD, in stabilizing mRNA interactions at the exit channel, and an ancillary role at the entry channel requiring residues of the eIF3a CTD. These functions are redundant: defects at each channel can be rescued by filling the other channel with mRNA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20934.001 PMID:27782884

  13. Structure of the AvrBs3–DNA complex provides new insights into the initial thymine-recognition mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; Yefimenko, Igor; Prieto, Jesús; Silva, George; Bertonati, Claudia; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2013-09-01

    The crystal structure of the AvrBs3–DNA complex is reported. Transcription activator-like effectors contain a DNA-binding domain organized in tandem repeats. The repeats include two adjacent residues known as the repeat variable di-residue, which recognize a single base pair, establishing a direct code between the dipeptides and the target DNA. This feature suggests this scaffold as an excellent candidate to generate new protein–DNA specificities for biotechnological applications. Here, the crystal structure of AvrBs3 (residues 152–895, molecular mass 82 kDa) in complex with its target DNA sequence is presented, revealing a new mode of interaction with the initial thymine of the target sequence, together with an analysis of both the binding specificity and the thermodynamic properties of AvrBs3. This study quantifies the affinity and the specificity between AvrBs3 and its target DNA. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo analyses reveal that AvrBs3 does not show a strict nucleotide-binding preference for the nucleotide at the zero position of the DNA, widening the number of possible sequences that could be targeted by this scaffold.

  14. A novel transcription initiation factor (TIF), TIF-IE, is required for homogeneous Acanthamoeba castellanii TIF-IB (SL1) to form a committed complex.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, C A; Kubaska, W M; Hoffman, L H; Stiffler, K; Paule, M R

    1998-10-16

    The fundamental transcription initiation factor (TIF) for ribosomal RNA expression by eukaryotic RNA polymerase I, TIF-IB, has been purified to near homogeneity from Acanthamoeba castellanii using standard techniques. The purified factor consists of the TATA-binding protein and four TATA-binding protein-associated factors with relative molecular weights of 145,000, 99,000, 96,000, and 91,000. This yields a calculated native molecular weight of 460, 000, which compares well with its mass determined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (493,000) and its sedimentation rate, which is close to RNA polymerase I (515,000). Both impure and nearly homogeneous TIF-IB exhibit an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 56 +/- 3 pM. However, although impure TIF-IB can form a promoter-DNA complex resistant to challenge by other promoter-containing DNAs, near homogeneous TIF-IB cannot do so. An additional transcription factor, dubbed TIF-IE, restores the ability of near homogeneous TIF-IB to sequester DNA into a committed complex.

  15. Vaccinia Virus Protein Synthesis Has a Low Requirement for the Intact Translation Initiation Factor eIF4F, the Cap-Binding Complex, within Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Jacqueline; Robertson, Morwenna E. M.; Seamons, Rachael A.; Belsham, Graham J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the cap-binding complex, eIF4F, in the translation of vaccinia virus mRNAs has been analyzed within infected cells. Plasmid DNAs, which express dicistronic mRNAs containing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site, produced within vaccinia virus-infected cells both β-glucuronidase and a cell surface-targeted single-chain antibody (sFv). Cells expressing sFv were selected from nonexpressing cells, enabling analysis of protein synthesis specifically within the transfected cells. Coexpression of poliovirus 2A or foot-and-mouth disease virus Lb proteases, which cleaved translation initiation factor eIF4G, greatly inhibited cap-dependent protein (β-glucuronidase) synthesis. Under these conditions, internal ribosome entry site-directed expression of sFv continued and cell selection was maintained. Furthermore, vaccinia virus protein synthesis persisted in the selected cells containing cleaved eIF4G. Thus, late vaccinia virus protein synthesis has a low requirement for the intact cap-binding complex eIF4F. This may be attributed to the short unstructured 5′ noncoding regions of the vaccinia virus mRNAs, possibly aided by the presence of poly(A) at both 5′ and 3′ termini. PMID:9765426

  16. Toluene and Ethylbenzene Aliphatic C-H Bond Oxidations Initiated by a Dicopper(II)-μ-1,2-Peroxo Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Heather R.; Li, Lei; Sarjeant, Amy A. Narducci; Vance, Michael A.; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    With an anisole containing polypyridylamine potential tetradentate ligand OL, a μ-1,2-peroxo-dicopper(II) complex [{OLCuII}2(O22-)]2+ forms from the reaction of the mononuclear compound [CuI(OL)(MeCN)]B(C6F5)4(OLCuI) with O2 in non-coordinating solvents at -80 °C. Thermal decay of this peroxo complex in the presence of toluene or ethylbenzene leads to rarely seen C-H activation chemistry; benzaldehyde and acetophenone/1-phenylethanol mixtures, respectively, are formed. Experiments with 18O2 confirm that the oxygen source in the products is molecular O2 and deuterium labeling experiments indicate kH/kD = 7.5 ± 1 for the toluene oxygenation. The O2-reaction of [CuI(BzL)(CH3CN)]+ (BzLCuI) leads to a dicopper(III)-bis-μ-oxo species [{BzLCuIII}2(μ-O2-)2]2+ at -80 °C and from such solutions, very similar toluene oxygenation chemistry occurs. Ligand BzL is a tridentate chelate, possessing the same moiety found in OL, but without the anisole O-atom donor. In these contexts, the nature of the oxidant species in or derived from [{OLCuII}2(O22-)]2+ is discussed and likely mechanisms of reaction initiated by toluene H-atom abstraction chemistry are detailed. To confirm the structural formulations of the dioxygen-adducts, UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies have been carried out and these results are reported and compared to previously described systems including [{CuII(PYL)}2(O2)]2+ (PYL =TMPA = tris(2-methylpyridyl)amine). Using (L)CuI, CO-binding properties (i.e., νC-O values) along with electrochemical property comparisons, the relative donor abilities of OL, BzL and PYL are assessed. PMID:19216527

  17. The U.S. Department of Education's Rural Education Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Describes 1982 creation of United States Department of Education's Intra-Agency Committee on Rural Education. Summarizes 10 rural policy initiatives proposed in "Rural Education and Rural Family Education Policy for the 80s." Lists major accomplishments/strategies including conferences, annual reports, and information network. Outlines…

  18. Footprinting studies of specific complexes formed by RepA, a replication initiator of plasmid pCU1, and its binding site.

    PubMed

    Papp, P P; Elö, P; Semsey, S; Orosz, L

    2000-10-01

    The basic replicon of plasmid pCU1 contains three different replication origins. Replication initiated from the oriB origin requires pCU1-encoded protein RepA. Previously, information analysis of 19 natural RepA binding sequences predicted a 20-bp sequence as a RepA binding site. Guanines contacting RepA in the major groove of DNA have also been determined. In this study, we used the missing-nucleoside method to determine all of the bases relevant to RepA binding. The importance of some thymine bases was also confirmed by a missing-thymine site interference assay. Participation of the 5-methyl groups of two thymines (at positions -6 and 7) in RepA binding was pointed out by a missing-thymine methyl site interference assay. Phosphate groups of the DNA backbone which strongly interfered with RepA binding upon ethylation were also identified. The pattern of contacting positions mapped by hydroxyl radical protection footprinting indicates that RepA binds to one face of B-form DNA. The length of the binding site was found to be 20 bp by dissociation rate measurement of complexes formed between RepA and a variety of binding sequences. The symmetry of the binding site and that of the contacting bases, particularly the reacting 5-methyl groups of two thymines, suggest that pCU1-encoded RepA may contact its site as a homodimer.

  19. Structure of the AvrBs3–DNA complex provides new insights into the initial thymine-recognition mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; Yefimenko, Igor; Prieto, Jesús; Silva, George; Bertonati, Claudia; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors contain a DNA-binding domain organized in tandem repeats. The repeats include two adjacent residues known as the repeat variable di-residue, which recognize a single base pair, establishing a direct code between the dipeptides and the target DNA. This feature suggests this scaffold as an excellent candidate to generate new protein–DNA specificities for biotechnological applications. Here, the crystal structure of AvrBs3 (residues 152–895, molecular mass 82 kDa) in complex with its target DNA sequence is presented, revealing a new mode of interaction with the initial thymine of the target sequence, together with an analysis of both the binding specificity and the thermodynamic properties of AvrBs3. This study quantifies the affinity and the specificity between AvrBs3 and its target DNA. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo analyses reveal that AvrBs3 does not show a strict nucleotide-binding preference for the nucleotide at the zero position of the DNA, widening the number of possible sequences that could be targeted by this scaffold. PMID:23999294

  20. AMP as a low-energy charge signal autonomously initiates assembly of AXIN-AMPK-LKB1 complex for AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lin; Guo, Huiling; Zhang, Chen-Song; Lin, Shu-Yong; Yin, Zhenyu; Peng, Yongying; Luo, Hui; Shi, Yuzhe; Lian, Guili; Zhang, Cixiong; Li, Mengqi; Ye, Zhiyun; Ye, Jing; Han, Jiahuai; Li, Peng; Wu, Jia-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2013-10-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolic homeostasis by sensing cellular energy status. AMPK is mainly activated via phosphorylation by LKB1 when cellular AMP/ADP levels are increased. However, how AMP/ADP brings about AMPK phosphorylation remains unclear. Here, we show that it is AMP, but not ADP, that drives AXIN to directly tether LKB1 to phosphorylate AMPK. The complex formation of AXIN-AMPK-LKB1 is greatly enhanced in glucose-starved or AICAR-treated cells and in cell-free systems supplemented with exogenous AMP. Depletion of AXIN abrogated starvation-induced AMPK-LKB1 colocalization. Importantly, adenovirus-based knockdown of AXIN in the mouse liver impaired AMPK activation and caused exacerbated fatty liver after starvation, underscoring an essential role of AXIN in AMPK activation. These findings demonstrate an initiating role of AMP and demonstrate that AXIN directly transmits AMP binding of AMPK to its activation by LKB1, uncovering the mechanistic route for AMP to elicit AMPK activation by LKB1.

  1. Yeast Uri1p promotes translation initiation and may provide a link to cotranslational quality control.

    PubMed

    Deplazes, Anna; Möckli, Natalie; Luke, Brian; Auerbach, Daniel; Peter, Matthias

    2009-05-20

    Translation initiation in eukaryotes is accomplished by a large set of translation initiation factors, some of which are regulated by signals monitoring intracellular and environmental conditions. Here, we show that Uri1p is required for efficient translation initiation in budding yeast. Indeed, uri1Delta cells are slow growing, sensitive to translation inhibitors and they exhibit an increased 80S peak in polysome profiles. Moreover, GCN4 translation is derepressed in uri1Delta cells, strongly supporting an initiation defect. Genetic and biochemical experiments indicate that Uri1p interacts with the translation initiation factor eIF1A and promotes ternary complex (TC) recruitment to the 40S subunit. Interestingly, we found that Uri1p is also part of a chaperone-network, including the prefoldin Pfd6p and several other proteins involved in cotranslational quality control such as the ribosome-associated Hsp70 chaperone Ssb1p, the Hsp40 Sis1p and the translation elongation factor eEF1A. Together with genetic data, these interactions indicate that Uri1p may coordinate translation initiation and cotranslational quality control.

  2. A novel initiation mechanism of death in Streptococcus pneumoniae induced by the human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET and activated during physiological death.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Emily A; Marks, Laura R; Duffey, Michael E; Hakansson, Anders P

    2012-08-03

    To cause colonization or infection, most bacteria grow in biofilms where differentiation and death of subpopulations is critical for optimal survival of the whole population. However, little is known about initiation of bacterial death under physiological conditions. Membrane depolarization has been suggested, but never shown to be involved, due to the difficulty of performing such studies in bacteria and the paucity of information that exists regarding ion transport mechanisms in prokaryotes. In this study, we performed the first extensive investigation of ion transport and membrane depolarization in a bacterial system. We found that HAMLET, a human milk protein-lipid complex, kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) in a manner that shares features with activation of physiological death from starvation. Addition of HAMLET to pneumococci dissipated membrane polarity, but depolarization per se was not enough to trigger death. Rather, both HAMLET- and starvation-induced death of pneumococci specifically required a sodium-dependent calcium influx, as shown using calcium and sodium transport inhibitors. This mechanism was verified under low sodium conditions, and in the presence of ionomycin or monensin, which enhanced pneumococcal sensitivity to HAMLET- and starvation-induced death. Pneumococcal death was also inhibited by kinase inhibitors, and indicated the involvement of Ser/Thr kinases in these processes. The importance of this activation mechanism was made evident, as dysregulation and manipulation of physiological death was detrimental to biofilm formation, a hallmark of bacterial colonization. Overall, our findings provide novel information on the role of ion transport during bacterial death, with the potential to uncover future antimicrobial targets.

  3. Factors involved in the initiation of phage phi 29 DNA replication in vitro: requirement of the gene 2 product for the formation of the protein p3-dAMP complex.

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, L; Garcìa, J A; Peñalva, M A; Salas, M

    1983-01-01

    To study the requirements for the in vitro formation of the protein p3-dAMP complex, the first step in phi29 DNA replication, extracts from B. subtilis infected with phi29 mutants in genes 2, 3, 5, 6 and 17, involved in DNA synthesis, have been used. The formation of the initiation complex is completely dependent on the presence of a functional gene 2 product, in addition to protein p3 and phi29 DNA-protein p3 as template. ATP is also required, although it can be replaced by other nucleotides. The products of genes 5, 6 and 17 do not seem to be needed in the formation of the initiation complex. Inhibitors of the host DNA polymerase III, DNA gyrase or RNA polymerase had no effect on the formation of the protein p3-dAMP complex, suggesting that these proteins are not involved in the initiation of phi29 DNA replication. ddATP or aphidicolin, inhibitors of DNA chain elongation, had also no effect on the formation of the initiation complex. Images PMID:6402761

  4. Isolation and mapping of the human eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, D.M.; Wasco, W.; Murell, J.

    1994-09-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 (eIF-5) is essential for the initiation of protein synthesis. eIF-5 catalyzes the hydrolysis of GTP on the 40S ribosomal initiation complex. Subsequent to GTP hydrolysis and the release of eIF-2-GDP, the 60S ribosomal subunit is joined to the 40S subunit to form an 80S initiation complex which can engage in peptide transfer. In an effort to isolate the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (FAD) gene on chromosome 14, we have isolated expressed sequences from this autosome in the form of exons `trapped` from chromosome 14-specific cosmids (library provided by L. Deaven, Los Alamos, NM). One cosmid yielded multiple exons displaying strong DNA and amino acid homology (>90%) with the rat eIF-5 gene. These exons were used to isolate full-length cDNAs from a human brain library. The eIF-5 message is approximately 3.6 kB in size and is ubiquitously expressed. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals multiple phosphorylation sites which may be involved in regulation of activity of eIF-5 and regions with homology to the GTPase superfamily, consistent with eIF-5`s role in GTP hydrolysis. Further studies are underway to determine whether the eIF-5 gene resides within the FAD minimal candidate region on chromosome 14q24.3.

  5. Origin of ophiolite complexes related to intra-oceanic subduction initiation: implications of IODP Expedition 352 (Izu-Bonin fore arc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Avery, Aaron; Carvallo, Claire; Christeson, Gail; Ferré, Eric; Kurz, Walter; Kutterolf, Steffen; Morgan, Sally; Pearce, Julian; Reagan, Mark; Sager, William; Shervais, John; Whattam, Scott; International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 352 (Izu-Bonin-Mariana Fore Arc), the Scientific Party of

    2015-04-01

    modern arc formed c. 200 km westwards of the trench. The new drilling evidence proves that both fore arc-type basalt and boninite formed in a fore arc setting soon after subduction initiation (c.52 Ma). Comparisons with ophiolites reveal many similarities, especially the presence of fore arc-type basalts and low calcium boninites. The relative positions of the fore arc basalts, boninites and arc basalts in the Izu Bonin and Mariana forearc (based on previous studies) can be compared with the positions of comparable units in a range of ophiolite complexes in orogenic belts including the Troodos, Oman, Greek (e.g. Vourinos), Albanian (Mirdita), Coast Range (California) and Bay of Islands (Newfoundland) ophiolites. The comparisons support the interpretation that all of the ophiolites formed during intra-oceanic subduction initiation. There are also some specific differences between the individual ophiolites suggesting that ophiolites should be interpreted individually in their regional tectonic settings.

  6. Having a multi facetted approach to complex organic molecules formation: the European COST initiative ‘Our Astochemical History’ and the formaldehyde/methanol formation example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand

    2015-08-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) and methanol (CH3OH) are among the few molecules that have been detected in the solid phase, in the icy mantles that cover interstellar grains. They have been also widely observed in the gas phase of many cold gases, with high somewhat comparable abundances. The synthetic routes leading from ubiquitous CO to these hydrogenated CO molecules have been widely discussed in the literature. Also, deuterated (and per-deuterated) isotopomers of both H2CO and CH3OH have been detected, with very high enrichment in D over the 10-5 cosmic abundance of D with respect to H.In this presentation, we wish to review the first steps of the hysdrogenation processes and describe how they have been recently treated, in the laboratory, the modelling and in theoretical chemical physics.We take and discuss this example as the perfect illustration of the necessity of having a multifaceted approach to the problems we face:1. How to hydrogenated CO towards H2CO: gas phase/solid phase chemistry. (Peters29013; Rimola2014)2. How to detect H2CO / HDCO in the gas phase, in a quantitative manner: LTE vs. non-LTE excitation. (Wiesenfeld2014)3. What is the role of laboratory experiments, how relevant are they, and more important, how challenging are they? (Hama2013)4. Is deuterium enrichment a good tracer for the history ? (Taquet2013)Some of the questions have received an answer in recent years, and we shall briefly describe those, with special emphasis to a joint chemistry-astrophysics approach.We describe the European COST network ‘Our Astrochemical History’ (http://prague2015astrohistory.vscht.cz/) , whichbrings together specialists of many areas of chemistry together with astronomy, in order to address this kind of problem. Succeeding former European initiatives that shaped the field of Astrochemistry, it focussses on the molecular evolution towards higher complexity and aim sat delivering new schemes for physical chemistry at large, like chemistry of transient species

  7. Drama of the 80s (Booksearch).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Journal, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Recommends eight plays from the 1980s which will challenge the thinking of students with issues such as evolving independence of young people, growing up in the context of racism and discrimination, insights into the world of the deaf, and the suffering of humanity during the French Revolution. (MG)

  8. Transpersonalizing Education in the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vizbara-Kessler, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    The author explains how transpersonal psychology can be applied to education. She lists the emotional and academic benefits to students of relaxation and meditation, guided fantasy, dreams, parapsychology, biofeedback, and centering. (SJL)

  9. Planning for the 80s and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anza Coll., Cupertino, CA.

    Designed as a guide for policy formation, program development, and resource allocation, this report identifies and evaluates future trends and their implications for California's De Anza College (DAC). Section 1 contains introductory information on the purposes, processes, and components of institutional planning at DAC. Section 2 assesses the…

  10. The 80's--Return to Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deloria, Vine, Jr.

    Indians should be the ones to determine Indian education policy. Local control and freedom from outside interference would be the best thing for Indian education all around. Policymakers must first realize that education, if it is to be relevant to American Indians, must return in both content and substance to Indian traditions. Rather than…

  11. Management Tools for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seivert, Dick; Thomas, Frank B.

    Two functions necessary for managing a computer center (organizing and controlling) are discussed with a focus on a nomenclature that was found to be useful for identifying parts of a system and was compatible with the definitions of most operational systems. For example, it is necessary to identify files, reports, and programs used in daily…

  12. An Energy Dichotomy for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom

    1980-01-01

    Discusses past exploitation of Indians by energy development efforts on tribal lands and forecasts a changing climate in the coming decade in which tribes may negotiate vastly improved economic agreements for development of their resources or may reject energy development altogether. (DS)

  13. Numeric Databases in the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, John B.; Kovacs, Gabor J.

    1982-01-01

    Defining a numeric database as a computer-readable collection of data predominantly numeric in nature, this article reviews techniques and technologies having a positive influence on the growth of numeric databases, such as videotex, mini- and microcomputers, artificial intelligence, improved software, telecommunications, and office automation.…

  14. Education in the 80's: Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Robert D., Ed.; And Others

    Current and future status of issues in health education are discussed in thirteen articles by health educators. The topics of the essays are: (1) holistic health; (2) a holistic approach to stress reduction; (3) stress management education; (4) heart disease education; (5) consumer health education; (6) acceptance of traditional, nonscientific…

  15. Synfuels: nukes of the 80's

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, A.

    1980-05-01

    Toxic pollutants released to the air and water, as well as the impacts of massive strip mining, will characterize the era of synfuel development as a time of environmental costs which could be life-threatening. Tough water regulations in the western states may result in a few states bearing all the related social and economic impacts. Government incentives for utilities to develop synfuels have already resulted in major development projects in Illinois, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Alabama. Synfuel research by the Electric Power Research Institute has been costly, rivaling nuclear power as a main focus of interest and burying the scattered opposition. How the utilities will overcome the lack of a reliable synfuels market should be of interest to critics as well as the environmental implication. (DCK)

  16. Educational Challenges of the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Constance M.

    Growing conservatism, dwindling resources, and the increased diversity of students require that the California community colleges develop a plan to meet the challenges of the future. First, efforts must be made to ameliorate the current crisis in educational leadership caused by excessive concern with quantitative management techniques, reporting…

  17. Technological Innovation in the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, James S., Ed.

    This six-chapter book presents background papers used by participants at a meeting designed to examine the prospects for and roadblocks to scientific and technological innovations as the 21st century is approached. They include: (1) "Research Universities and Industrial Innovation in America" (Steven Muller); (2) "The Role of…

  18. Fuel cycles for the 80's

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Papers presented at the American Nuclear Society's topical meeting on the fuel cycle are summarized. Present progress and goals in the areas of fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, accountability, and safeguards are reported. Present governmental policies which affect the fuel cycle are also discussed. Individual presentations are processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.(DMC)

  19. New Lighting Standards for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Sheldon

    1980-01-01

    The New York State Lighting Efficiency Standards for existing public buildings were developed so that nontechnical persons can calculate present power used for lighting in various spaces of their buildings and then determine the recommended allowable power budget for lighting each space. (Author)

  20. Science policy for the '80s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Science policy (if it ever was a policy) usually was to support ill-defined or ‘basic’ research in science; the ‘policy’ was embodied in the hope that supported research would someday pay off in the form of improved technology. One of the fathers of this policy during the post-WW-II period was Simon Ramo, a founding member of the National Academy of Engineering, chief scientist of United States ICBM defense operation, founder of the TRW Corporation, and now a member of President Reagan's science and technology task force. Simon Ramo represents an influential group dedicated to a ‘systems analysis’ approach to forecasting technological progress, and as such the ‘systems’ approach emerges as a central theme for science policy in the 1980s.The new shift in national policy introduced by the Reagan administration includes revisions in science policy that have recently been termed as ‘searching examination’ (Chemical & Engineering News, Feb. 23, 1981, p. 22), ‘Unkind cuts’ (New Scientist, Feb. 12, 1981), and ‘The Spectrum from Truth to Power’ (Science, Technology, and National Policy, edited by T. Kuehn and A. Porter, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, N.Y., 1981). The idea now is to speed the conversion of scientific discovery into technology in an orderly way. As never before, there are growing debates over the roles of science in society, its lines of support, its applications. More than ever, social scientists, economists, and philosophical types are trying their hand at influencing science policy in very different ways than scientists themselves, as Vannevar Bush did 30 years ago.

  1. Initial Events in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Emily F.; Record, M. Thomas; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Transcription initiation is a highly regulated step of gene expression. Here, we discuss the series of large conformational changes set in motion by initial specific binding of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoter DNA and their relevance for regulation. Bending and wrapping of the upstream duplex facilitates bending of the downstream duplex into the active site cleft, nucleating opening of 13 bp in the cleft. The rate-determining opening step, driven by binding free energy, forms an unstable open complex, probably with the template strand in the active site. At some promoters, this initial open complex is greatly stabilized by rearrangements of the discriminator region between the −10 element and +1 base of the nontemplate strand and of mobile in-cleft and downstream elements of RNAP. The rate of open complex formation is regulated by effects on the rapidly-reversible steps preceding DNA opening, while open complex lifetime is regulated by effects on the stabilization of the initial open complex. Intrinsic DNA opening-closing appears less regulated. This noncovalent mechanism and its regulation exhibit many analogies to mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. PMID:26023916

  2. Initial stages of V(D)J recombination: the organization of RAG1/2 and RSS DNA in the postcleavage complex.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Gabrielle J; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Kotova, Svetlana; Biertümpfel, Christian; Heymann, J Bernard; Steven, Alasdair C; Gellert, Martin; Yang, Wei

    2009-07-31

    To obtain structural information on the early stages of V(D)J recombination, we isolated a complex of the core RAG1 and RAG2 proteins with DNA containing a pair of cleaved recombination signal sequences (RSS). Stoichiometric and molecular mass analysis established that this signal-end complex (SEC) contains two protomers each of RAG1 and RAG2. Visualization of the SEC by negative-staining electron microscopy revealed an anchor-shaped particle with approximate two-fold symmetry. Consistent with a parallel arrangement of DNA and protein subunits, the N termini of RAG1 and RAG2 are positioned at opposing ends of the complex, and the DNA chains beyond the RSS nonamer emerge from the same face of the complex, near the RAG1 N termini. These first images of the V(D)J recombinase in its postcleavage state provide a framework for modeling RAG domains and their interactions with DNA.

  3. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Naoya . E-mail: nakai@hss.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-05-19

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 ({alpha}2{beta}2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1{alpha} subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex.

  4. Semiclassical initial value representation treatment of a hydrogen bonded complex of rigid water molecules from a single trajectory in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Issack, Bilkiss B; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2007-10-14

    A semiclassical initial value representation approach for molecular systems in Cartesian coordinates is combined with a recently proposed time averaging technique [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7174 (2003)]. It is shown that a single trajectory can yield the zero-point energy of the water dimer with good accuracy for the model chosen when compared to fully constrained Cartesian semiclassical calculations. The convergence with respect to the number of averaging time origins is discussed.

  5. Complex alternative cytoplasmic protein isoforms of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 generated through noncanonical translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Toptan, Tuna; Fonseca, Lidia; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2013-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) protein is constitutively expressed in all KSHV-infected cells, as well as in all forms of KSHV-associated malignancies. LANA1 is a multifunctional KSHV oncoprotein containing multiple repeat sequences that is important for viral episome maintenance and the regulation of cellular and viral gene expression. We characterize here multiple LANA1 isoforms and show that ∼50% of LANA1 is naturally generated as N-terminally truncated shoulder proteins that are detected on SDS-PAGE as faster-migrating shoulder bands designated LANA1(S). Higher-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream at noncanonical sites within the N-terminal region, whereas lower-molecular-weight LANA1(S) isoforms initiate downstream within the central repeat 1 domain. LANA1(S) proteins lack an N-terminal nuclear localization signal motif, and some isoforms differ from full-length, canonical LANA1 by localizing to perinuclear and cytoplasmic sites. Although LANA1 has until now been assumed to be solely active in the nucleus, this finding indicates that this major KSHV oncoprotein may have cytoplasmic activities as well. KSHV overcomes its limited genetic coding capacity by generating alternatively initiated protein isoforms that may have distinct biological functions.

  6. Smart grid initialization reduces the computational complexity of multi-objective image registration based on a dual-dynamic transformation model to account for large anatomical differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Peter A. N.; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    We recently demonstrated the strong potential of using dual-dynamic transformation models when tackling deformable image registration problems involving large anatomical differences. Dual-dynamic transformation models employ two moving grids instead of the common single moving grid for the target image (and single fixed grid for the source image). We previously employed powerful optimization algorithms to make use of the additional flexibility offered by a dual-dynamic transformation model with good results, directly obtaining insight into the trade-off between important registration objectives as a result of taking a multi-objective approach to optimization. However, optimization has so far been initialized using two regular grids, which still leaves a great potential of dual-dynamic transformation models untapped: a-priori grid alignment with image structures/areas that are expected to deform more. This allows (far) less grid points to be used, compared to using a sufficiently refined regular grid, leading to (far) more efficient optimization, or, equivalently, more accurate results using the same number of grid points. We study the implications of exploiting this potential by experimenting with two new smart grid initialization procedures: one manual expert-based and one automated image-feature-based. We consider a CT test case with large differences in bladder volume with and without a multi-resolution scheme and find a substantial benefit of using smart grid initialization.

  7. Evolution and the universality of the mechanism of initiation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tokumasa

    2009-03-01

    have also conserved the prokaryotic initiation mechanism. The universality of a single process of protein synthesis in all kingdoms is also manifest in the conservation of a complex apparatus, consisting of ribosomes, mRNA's, tRNA's including an initiator methionyl-tRNA, aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, and other protein factors. Thus, the mechanism of initiation of protein synthesis is conserved, and it is universal. The third initiation mechanism is the scanning mechanism for eukaryotes. It proposes that the 40S ribosome-methionyl-tRNA complex recognizes and binds to the 5'-end of the mRNA and the complex then scans the messenger for the initiator codon. Once it is located, the 80S ribosome initiation complex is formed with the 60S subunit and initiation is completed when a second aminoacyl-tRNA is bound and a peptide bond is formed. Exceptions to this mechanism were observed, where the ribosome bound directly to internal mRNA sites and initiated synthesis. Consideration of the conflicting observations in this review, however, has led to the conclusion that the primary eukaryotic mechanism is a conserved prokaryotic mechanism and that the "scanning process" involves two steps. The first step is an interaction of the initiation factors with the cap, which makes the IS accessible, and the second, initiation of translation by the conserved prokaryotic mechanism.

  8. Initiation of Electron Transport Chain Activity in the Embryonic Heart Coincides with the Activation of Mitochondrial Complex 1 and the Formation of Supercomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Gisela; Eliseev, Roman A.; Porter, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria provide energy in form of ATP in eukaryotic cells. However, it is not known when, during embryonic cardiac development, mitochondria become able to fulfill this function. To assess this, we measured mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the activity of the complexes (Cx) 1 and 2 of the electron transport chain (ETC) and used immunoprecipitation to follow the generation of mitochondrial supercomplexes. We show that in the heart of mouse embryos at embryonic day (E) 9.5, mitochondrial ETC activity and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are not coupled, even though the complexes are present. We show that Cx-1 of the ETC is able to accept electrons from the Krebs cycle, but enzyme assays that specifically measure electron flow to ubiquinone or Cx-3 show no activity at this early embryonic stage. At E11.5, mitochondria appear functionally more mature; ETC activity and OXPHOS are coupled and respond to ETC inhibitors. In addition, the assembly of highly efficient respiratory supercomplexes containing Cx-1, -3, and -4, ubiquinone, and cytochrome c begins at E11.5, the exact time when Cx-1 becomes functional activated. At E13.5, ETC activity and OXPHOS of embryonic heart mitochondria are indistinguishable from adult mitochondria. In summary, our data suggest that between E9.5 and E11.5 dramatic changes occur in the mitochondria of the embryonic heart, which result in an increase in OXPHOS due to the activation of complex 1 and the formation of supercomplexes. PMID:25427064

  9. The nematode eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E/G complex works with a trans-spliced leader stem-loop to enable efficient translation of trimethylguanosine-capped RNAs.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Adam; Filbin, Megan E; Veo, Bethany; McFarland, Craig; Stepinski, Janusz; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Davis, Richard E

    2010-04-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA translation begins with recruitment of the 40S ribosome complex to the mRNA 5' end through the eIF4F initiation complex binding to the 5' m(7)G-mRNA cap. Spliced leader (SL) RNA trans splicing adds a trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap and a sequence, the SL, to the 5' end of mRNAs. Efficient translation of TMG-capped mRNAs in nematodes requires the SL sequence. Here we define a core set of nucleotides and a stem-loop within the 22-nucleotide nematode SL that stimulate translation of mRNAs with a TMG cap. The structure and core nucleotides are conserved in other nematode SLs and correspond to regions of SL1 required for early Caenorhabditis elegans development. These SL elements do not facilitate translation of m(7)G-capped RNAs in nematodes or TMG-capped mRNAs in mammalian or plant translation systems. Similar stem-loop structures in phylogenetically diverse SLs are predicted. We show that the nematode eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E/G (eIF4E/G) complex enables efficient translation of the TMG-SL RNAs in diverse in vitro translation systems. TMG-capped mRNA translation is determined by eIF4E/G interaction with the cap and the SL RNA, although the SL does not increase the affinity of eIF4E/G for capped RNA. These results suggest that the mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) can play a positive and novel role in translation initiation through interaction with the eIF4E/G complex in nematodes and raise the issue of whether eIF4E/G-RNA interactions play a role in the translation of other eukaryotic mRNAs.

  10. Magnesium chelatase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: initial characterization of the enzyme using purified subunits and evidence for a BchI-BchD complex.

    PubMed

    Gibson, L C; Jensen, P E; Hunter, C N

    1999-01-15

    The enzyme magnesium-protoporphyrin IX chelatase (Mg chelatase) catalyses the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin IX, the first committed step in (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthesis. In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, this reaction is catalysed by the products of the bchI, bchD and bchH genes. These genes have been expressed in Escherichia coli so that the BchI, BchD and BchH proteins are produced with N-terminal His6 affinity tags, which has led to the production of large amounts of highly purified, highly active Mg chelatase subunits from a single chromatography step. Furthermore, BchD has been purifed free of contamination with the chaperone GroEL, which had proven to be a problem in the past. BchD, present largely as an insoluble protein in E. coli, was purified in 6 M urea and refolded by addition of BchI, MgCl2 and ATP, yielding highly active protein. BchI/BchD mixtures prepared in this way were used in conjunction with BchH to determine the kinetic parameters of R. sphaeroides Mg chelatase for its natural substrates. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that BchI and BchD form a complex, and that Mg2+ and ATP are required to establish and maintain this complex. Gel filtration data suggest that BchI and BchD form a complex of molecular mass 200 kDa in the presence of Mg2+ and ATP. Our data suggest that, in vivo, BchD is only folded correctly and maintained in its correct conformation in the presence of BchI, Mg2+ and ATP.

  11. The shoot regeneration capacity of excised Arabidopsis cotyledons is established during the initial hours after injury and is modulated by a complex genetic network of light signalling.

    PubMed

    Nameth, Blair; Dinka, Steven J; Chatfield, Steven P; Morris, Adam; English, Jenny; Lewis, Dorrett; Oro, Rosalinda; Raizada, Manish N

    2013-01-01

    Excised plant tissues (explants) can regenerate new shoot apical meristems in vitro, but regeneration rates can be inexplicably variable. Light affects rates of shoot regeneration, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, excised Arabidopsis cotyledons were dark-light shifted to define the timing of explant light sensitivity. Mutants and pharmacological agents were employed to uncover underlying physiological and genetic mechanisms. Unexpectedly, explants were most light sensitive during the initial hours post-excision with respect to shoot regeneration. Only ∼100 µmol m(-2 ) s(-1) of fluorescent light was sufficient to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in new explants. By 48 h post-excision, induction of ROS, or quenching of ROS by xanthophylls, increased or decreased shoot regeneration, respectively. Phytochrome A-mediated signalling suppressed light inhibition of regeneration. Early exposure to blue/UV-A wavelengths inhibited regeneration, involving photoreceptor CRY1. Downstream transcription factor HY5 mediated explant photoprotection, perhaps by promoting anthocyanin accumulation, a pigment also induced by cytokinin. Surprisingly, early light inhibition of shoot regeneration was dependent on polar auxin transport. Early exposure to ethylene stimulated dark-treated explants to regenerate, but inhibited light-treated explants. We propose that variability in long-term shoot regeneration may arise within the initial hours post-excision, from inadvertent, variable exposure of explants to light, modulated by hormones.

  12. WAVE2-Abi2 complex controls growth cone activity and regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition as well as the initiation of glia-guided migration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Kuroda, Kazuki; Wang, Chen-Chi; Komada, Munekazu; Zhao, Hong; Sakakibara, Akira; Miyata, Takaki; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Oka, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Sato, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    Glia-guided migration (glia-guided locomotion) during radial migration is a characteristic yet unique mode of migration. In this process, the directionality of migration is predetermined by glial processes and not by growth cones. Prior to the initiation of glia-guided migration, migrating neurons transform from multipolar to bipolar, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this multipolar-bipolar transition and the commencement of glia-guided migration are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the multipolar-bipolar transition is not solely a cell autonomous event; instead, the interaction of growth cones with glial processes plays an essential role. Time-lapse imaging with lattice assays reveals the importance of vigorously active growth cones in searching for appropriate glial scaffolds, completing the transition, and initiating glia-guided migration. These growth cone activities are regulated by Abl kinase and Cdk5 via WAVE2-Abi2 through the phosphorylation of tyrosine 150 and serine 137 of WAVE2. Neurons that do not display such growth cone activities are mispositioned in a more superficial location in the neocortex, suggesting the significance of growth cones for the final location of the neurons. This process occurs in spite of the "inside-out" principle in which later-born neurons are situated more superficially.

  13. Initiation factor eIF2γ promotes eIF2-GTP-Met-tRNAi(Met) ternary complex binding to the 40S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Walker, Sarah E; Dong, Jinsheng; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2011-10-16

    In contrast to prokaryotic elongation factor EF-Tu, which delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosomal A-site, eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2 binds methionyl initiator transfer RNA (Met-tRNA(i)(Met)) to the P-site of the 40S ribosomal subunit. The results of directed hydroxyl radical probing experiments to map binding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF2 on the ribosome and on Met-tRNA(i)(Met) revealed that eIF2γ primarily contacts the acceptor stem of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) and identified a key binding interface between domain III of eIF2γ and 18S rRNA helix h44 on the 40S subunit. Whereas the analogous domain III of EF-Tu contacts the T stem of tRNAs, biochemical analyses demonstrated that eIF2γ domain III is important for ribosome, not Met-tRNA(i)(Met). Thus, despite their structural similarity, eIF2 and EF-Tu bind tRNAs in substantially different manners, and we propose that the tRNA-binding domain III of EF-Tu has acquired a new ribosome-binding function in eIF2γ.

  14. Distinctive activation and functionalization of hydrocarbon C-H bonds initiated by Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Rhett A; Legzdins, Peter

    2014-02-18

    Converting hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added chemicals continues to offer challenges to contemporary preparative chemists. A particularly important remaining challenge is the selective activation and functionalization of the C(sp(3))-H linkages of alkanes, which are relatively abundant but chemically inert. This Account outlines the discovery and development of C-H bond functionalization mediated by a family of tungsten organometallic nitrosyl complexes. Specifically, it describes how gentle thermolyses of any of four 18-electron Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5; η(3)-allyl = η(3)-H2CCHCHMe, η(3)-H2CCHCHSiMe3, η(3)-H2CCHCHPh, or η(3)-H2CCHCMe2) results in the loss of neopentane and the transient formation of a 16-electron intermediate species, Cp*W(NO)(η(2)-allene) and/or Cp*W(NO)(η(2)-diene). We have never detected any of these species spectroscopically, but we infer their existence based on trapping experiments with trimethylphosphine (PMe3) and labeling experiments using deuterated hydrocarbon substrates. This Account first summarizes the syntheses and properties of the four chiral Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes. It then outlines the various types of C-H activations we have effected with each of the 16-electron (η(2)-allene) or (η(2)-diene) intermediate nitrosyl complexes, and presents the results of mechanistic investigations of some of these processes. It next describes the characteristic chemical properties of the Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(η(1)-hydrocarbyl) compounds formed by the single activations of C(sp(3))-H bonds, with particular emphasis on those reactions that result in the selective functionalization of the original hydrocarbon substrate. We are continuing development of methods to release the acyl ligands from the metal centers while keeping the Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl) fragments intact, with the ultimate aim of achieving these distinctive conversions of alkanes into functionalized organics in a

  15. TRF2 is recruited to the pre-initiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF to promote haploid cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Martianov, Igor; Velt, Amandine; Davidson, Guillaume; Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Davidson, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode two genes related to the TATA-box binding protein (TBP), TBP-related factors 2 and 3 (TRF2 and TRF3). Male Trf2−/− mice are sterile and characterized by arrested spermatogenesis at the transition from late haploid spermatids to early elongating spermatids. Despite this characterization, the molecular function of murine Trf2 remains poorly characterized and no direct evidence exists to show that it acts as a bona fide chromatin-bound transcription factor. We show here that Trf2 forms a stable complex with TFIIA or the testis expressed paralogue ALF chaperoned in the cytoplasm by heat shock proteins. We demonstrate for the first time that Trf2 is recruited to active haploid cell promoters together with Tbp, Taf7l and RNA polymerase II. RNA-seq analysis identifies a set of genes activated in haploid spermatids during the first wave of spermatogenesis whose expression is down-regulated by Trf2 inactivation. We therefore propose that Trf2 is recruited to the preinitiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF that cooperates with Tbp and Taf7l to promote haploid cell gene expression. PMID:27576952

  16. Depletion of eIF2.GTP.Met-tRNAi translation initiation complex up-regulates BRCA1 expression in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peker, Selen; Merajver, Sophia; Halperin, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Most sporadic breast and ovarian cancers express low levels of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1. The BRCA1 gene produces two transcripts, mRNAa and mRNAb. mRNAb, present in breast cancer but not in normal mammary epithelial cells, contains three upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in its 5′UTR and is translationally repressed. Comparable tandem uORFs are characteristically seen in mRNAs whose translational efficiency paradoxically increases when the overall translation rate is decreased due to phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 α (eIF2α). Here we show fish oil derived eicosopanthenoic acid (EPA) that induces eIF2α phosphorylation translationally up-regulates the expression of BRCA1 in human breast cancer cells. We demonstrate further that a diet rich in EPA strongly induces expression of BRCA1 in human breast cancer xenografts. PMID:25762631

  17. Controlling Mercury Release from Source Zones to Surface Water: Initial Results of Pilot Tests at the Y-12 National Security Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, George R; Brooks, Scott C; Peterson, Mark J; Bogle, Mary Anna; Miller, Carrie L; Liang, Liyuan; Elliott, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This report presents initial results obtained during year 2008 and satisfies a deliverable listed in the work breakdown structure (WBS) element OR081301. Broad objectives of the multi-year project are: (1) evaluation of remediation technologies for waterborne mercury, (2) development of treatment methods for soil mercury, and (3) source identification, characterization and analyses to improve mass balance on mercury estimates. This report presents the results of pilot tests, conducted in summer and fall 2008, which focused on remediation of waterborne mercury. The goal of this task is to develop strategies and treatment technologies that reduce the concentration and loading of waterborne mercury discharges to the UEFPC, thus minimizing mercury uptake by fish. The two specific studies are: (1) reducing flow augmentation in UEFPC to lessen mercury mobilization from contaminated stream sediments, and (2) treatment of contaminated source waters with a chemical reductant to convert dissolved mercury to a volatile form that can be removed by air stripping or natural evasion. Diversion of 50% of the flow currently added to UEFPC by the flow management system appeared to reduce mercury inputs from a localized, highly contaminated streambed by 0.6-1.5 grams per day (g/d). A reduction of 0.6 g/d represents {approx} 7-10% decrease in mercury input to UEFPC. Mercury concentrations within UEFPC did not rise proportionately with the loss of dilution, in part because of the reduction in input from the streambed source and in part because of reduced flow from the Y-12 NSC storm drain system. A longer-term test that includes seasonal variability will be the next step to validate these initial field observations of the flow diversion experiment. Preliminary laboratory experiments show that a large fraction ({approx} 90%) of the mercury can be chemically reduced to Hg(0) by addition of low concentrations of tin, Sn(II). Conversion of mercury to volatile Hg(0) in UEFPC was also

  18. Ports Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of the ports initiative is to assist EPA and other participants to formulate strategies for moving forward on actions addressing the transportation, air quality and climate issues raised in the National Conversations.

  19. Dynamics of ribosome scanning and recycling revealed by translation complex profiling.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stuart K; Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    Regulation of messenger RNA translation is central to eukaryotic gene expression control. Regulatory inputs are specified by them RNA untranslated regions (UTRs) and often target translation initiation. Initiation involves binding of the 40S ribosomal small subunit (SSU) and associated eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs)near the mRNA 5′ cap; the SSU then scans in the 3′ direction until it detects the start codon and is joined by the 60S ribosomal large subunit (LSU) to form the 80S ribosome. Scanning and other dynamic aspects of the initiation model have remained as conjectures because methods to trap early intermediates were lacking. Here we uncover the dynamics of the complete translation cycle in live yeast cells using translation complex profile sequencing (TCP-seq), a method developed from the ribosome profiling approach. We document scanning by observing SSU footprints along 5′ UTRs. Scanning SSU have 5′-extended footprints (up to~75 nucleotides), indicative of additional interactions with mRNA emerging from the exit channel, promoting forward movement. We visualized changes in initiation complex conformation as SSU footprints coalesced into three major sizes at start codons (19, 29 and 37 nucleotides). These share the same 5′ start site but differ at the 3′ end, reflecting successive changes at the entry channel from an open to a closed state following start codon recognition. We also observe SSU 'lingering' at stop codons after LSU departure. Our results underpin mechanistic models of translation initiation and termination, built on decades of biochemical and structural investigation, with direct genome-wide in vivo evidence. Our approach captures ribosomal complexes at all phases of translation and will aid in studying translation dynamics in diverse cellular contexts. Dysregulation of translation is common in disease and, for example, SSU scanning is a target of anti-cancer drug development. TCP-seq will prove useful in discerning differences

  20. Expression of the core exon-junction complex factor eukaryotic initiation factor 4A3 is increased during spatial exploration and striatally-mediated learning.

    PubMed

    Barker-Haliski, M L; Pastuzyn, E D; Keefe, K A

    2012-12-13

    Regulation of dendritically localized mRNAs offers an important means by which neurons can sculpt precise signals at synapses. Arc is one such dendritically localized mRNA, and it has been shown to contain two exon-junction complexes (EJCs) within its 3'UTR. The EJC has been postulated to regulate cytoplasmic Arc mRNA availability through translation-dependent decay and thus contribute to synaptic plasticity. Core proteins of the EJC include eIF4A3, an RNA helicase, and Magoh, which stabilizes the interaction of eIF4A3 with target mRNAs. Arc mRNA expression is activity-regulated in numerous brain regions, including the dorsal striatum and hippocampus. Therefore in this study, the in vivo expression of these core EJC components was investigated in adult Sprague-Dawley rats to determine whether there are also behaviorally regulated changes in their expression. In the present work, there was no change in the expression of Magoh mRNA following spatial exploration, a paradigm previously reported to robustly and reliably upregulate Arc mRNA expression. Interestingly, however, there were increases in eIF4A3 mRNA levels in the dorsal striatum and hippocampus following spatial exploration, similar to previous reports for Arc mRNA. Furthermore, there were activity-dependent changes in eIF4A3 protein distribution and expression within the striatum following spatial exploration. Importantly, eIF4A3 protein colocalized with Arc mRNA in vivo. Like Arc mRNA expression, eIF4A3 mRNA expression in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral striatum or hippocampus, significantly correlated with behavioral performance on a striatally-mediated, response-reversal learning task. This study provides direct evidence that a core EJC component, eIF4A3, shows activity-dependent changes in both mRNA and protein expression in the adult mammalian brain. These findings thus further implicate eIF4A3 as a key mediator of Arc mRNA availability underlying learning and memory processes in vivo.

  1. Molecular Landscape of the Ribosome Pre-initiation Complex during mRNA Scanning: Structural Role for eIF3c and Its Control by eIF5.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Eiji; Luna, Rafael E; Nagata, Takashi; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Erzberger, Jan Peter; Zhang, Fan; Arthanari, Haribabu; Morris, Jacob; Pellarin, Riccardo; Moore, Chelsea; Harmon, Ian; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Yoshida, Hisashi; Nasr, Mahmoud L; Unzai, Satoru; Thompson, Brytteny; Aube, Eric; Hustak, Samantha; Stengel, Florian; Dagraca, Eddie; Ananbandam, Asokan; Gao, Philip; Urano, Takeshi; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Wagner, Gerhard; Asano, Katsura

    2017-03-14

    During eukaryotic translation initiation, eIF3 binds the solvent-accessible side of the 40S ribosome and recruits the gate-keeper protein eIF1 and eIF5 to the decoding center. This is largely mediated by the N-terminal domain (NTD) of eIF3c, which can be divided into three parts: 3c0, 3c1, and 3c2. The N-terminal part, 3c0, binds eIF5 strongly but only weakly to the ribosome-binding surface of eIF1, whereas 3c1 and 3c2 form a stoichiometric complex with eIF1. 3c1 contacts eIF1 through Arg-53 and Leu-96, while 3c2 faces 40S protein uS15/S13, to anchor eIF1 to the scanning pre-initiation complex (PIC). We propose that the 3c0:eIF1 interaction diminishes eIF1 binding to the 40S, whereas 3c0:eIF5 interaction stabilizes the scanning PIC by precluding this inhibitory interaction. Upon start codon recognition, interactions involving eIF5, and ultimately 3c0:eIF1 association, facilitate eIF1 release. Our results reveal intricate molecular interactions within the PIC, programmed for rapid scanning-arrest at the start codon.

  2. Structure of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E in complex with 4EGI-1 reveals an allosteric mechanism for dissociating eIF4G.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Jenni, Simon; Kabha, Eihab; Takrouri, Khuloud J; Yi, Tingfang; Salvi, Nicola; Luna, Rafael E; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Mahalingam, Poornachandran; Arthanari, Haribabu; Rodriguez-Mias, Ricard; Yefidoff-Freedman, Revital; Aktas, Bertal H; Chorev, Michael; Halperin, Jose A; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-08-05

    The interaction of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E with the initiation factor eIF4G recruits the 40S ribosomal particle to the 5' end of mRNAs, facilitates scanning to the AUG start codon, and is crucial for eukaryotic translation of nearly all genes. Efficient recruitment of the 40S particle is particularly important for translation of mRNAs encoding oncoproteins and growth-promoting factors, which often harbor complex 5' UTRs and require efficient initiation. Thus, inhibiting the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction has emerged as a previously unpursued route for developing anticancer agents. Indeed, we discovered small-molecule inhibitors of this eIF4E/eIF4G interaction (4EGIs) that inhibit translation initiation both in vitro and in vivo and were used successfully in numerous cancer-biology and neurobiology studies. However, their detailed molecular mechanism of action has remained elusive. Here, we show that the eIF4E/eIF4G inhibitor 4EGI-1 acts allosterically by binding to a site on eIF4E distant from the eIF4G binding epitope. Data from NMR mapping and high-resolution crystal structures are congruent with this mechanism, where 4EGI-1 attaches to a hydrophobic pocket of eIF4E between β-sheet2 (L60-T68) and α-helix1 (E69-N77), causing localized conformational changes mainly in the H78-L85 region. It acts by unfolding a short 310-helix (S82-L85) while extending α-helix1 by one turn (H78-S82). This unusual helix rearrangement has not been seen in any previous eIF4E structure and reveals elements of an allosteric inhibition mechanism leading to the dislocation of eIF4G from eIF4E.

  3. Youth Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Office of Youth Programs.

    Summarizing the first eight months of the planning, design, and implementation of the new federal youth programs created by the Youth Employment and Demonstration Projects Act of 1977 (YEDPA) and the efforts for expansion and enrichment of the Job Corps, this report explains the charters of the two projects and their initial successes in and…

  4. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-11-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  5. SCB initiator

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  6. Photo-Initiated Electron Transfer Within the P. denitrificans Cytochrome bc1 Complex: The mobility of the Iron Sulfur Protein is modulated by the occupant of the Qo site†

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Jeffrey; Castellani, Michela; Kleinschroth, Thomas; Ludwig, Bernd; Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Domain rotation of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (ISP) between the cytochrome (cyt) b and cyt c1 redox centers plays a key role in the mechanism of the cyt bc1 complex. Electron transfer within the cyt bc1 complex of P. denitrificans was studied using a ruthenium dimer to rapidly photo-oxidize cyt c1 within 1 μs and initiate the reaction. In the absence of any added quinol or inhibitor of the bc1 complex at pH 8.0, electron transfer from reduced ISP to cyt c1 was biphasic with rate constants of k1f = 6300 ± 3000 s−1 and k1s = 640 ± 300 s−1 and amplitudes of 10 ± 3% and 16 ± 4 % of the total amount of cyt c1 photooxidized. Upon addition of any of the Pm type inhibitors MOA-stilbene, myxothiazol, or azoxystrobin to cyt bc1 in the absence of quinol, the total amplitude increased 2-fold, consistent with a decrease in redox potential of the ISP. In addition, the relative amplitude of the fast phase increased significantly, consistent with a change in the dynamics of the ISP domain rotation. In contrast, addition of the Pf type inhibitors JG-144 and famoxadone decreased the rate constant k1f by 5 to 10-fold, and increased the amplitude over 2-fold. Addition of quinol substrate in the absence of inhibitors led to a two-fold increase in the amplitude of the k1f phase. The effect of QH2 on the kinetics of electron transfer from reduced ISP to cyt c1 was thus similar to that of the Pm inhibitors and very different from that of the Pf inhibitors. The current results indicate that the species occupying the Qo site has a significant conformational influence on the dynamics of the ISP domain rotation. PMID:22026826

  7. Development of a complex amino acid supplement, Fatigue Reviva™, for oral ingestion: initial evaluations of product concept and impact on symptoms of sub-health in a group of males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A new dietary supplement, Fatigue Reviva™, has been recently developed to address issues related to amino acid depletion following illness or in conditions of sub-health where altered amino acid homeostasis has been associated with fatigue. Complex formulations of amino acids present significant challenges due to solubility and taste constraints. This initial study sets out to provide an initial appraisal of product palatability and to gather pilot evidence for efficacy. Methods Males reporting symptoms of sub-health were recruited on the basis of being free from any significant medical or psychological condition. Each participant took an amino acid based dietary supplement (Fatigue Reviva™) daily for 30 days. Comparisons were then made between pre- and post-supplement general health symptoms and urinary amino acid profiles. Results Seventeen men took part in the study. Following amino acid supplementation the total Chalder fatigue score improved significantly (mean ± SEM, 12.5 ± 0.9 versus 10.0 ± 1.0, P<0.03). When asked whether they thought that the supplement had improved their health, 65% of participants responded positively. A subgroup of participants reported gastrointestinal symptoms which were attributed to the supplement and which were believed to result from the component fructooligosaccharide. Analysis of urinary amino acids revealed significant alterations in the relative abundances of a number of amino acids after supplementation including an increase in valine, isoleucine and glutamic acid and reduced levels of glutamine and ornithine. Discriminant function analysis of the urinary amino acid data revealed significant differences between the pre- and post-supplement urine excretion profiles. Conclusions The results indicated that Fatigue Reviva™ was palatable and that 65% of the study group reported that they felt the product had improved their health. The product could provide an effective tool for the management of unexplained

  8. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  9. RoXaN, a Novel Cellular Protein Containing TPR, LD, and Zinc Finger Motifs, Forms a Ternary Complex with Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4G and Rotavirus NSP3

    PubMed Central

    Vitour, Damien; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Vende, Patrice; Becker, Michelle M.; Poncet, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus mRNAs are capped but not polyadenylated, and viral proteins are translated by the cellular translation machinery. This is accomplished through the action of the viral nonstructural protein NSP3, which specifically binds the 3′ consensus sequence of viral mRNAs and interacts with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4G I. To further our understanding of the role of NSP3 in rotavirus replication, we looked for other cellular proteins capable of interacting with this viral protein. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we identified a novel cellular protein-binding partner for rotavirus NSP3. This 110-kDa cellular protein, named RoXaN (rotavirus X protein associated with NSP3), contains a minimum of three regions predicted to be involved in protein-protein or nucleic acid-protein interactions. A tetratricopeptide repeat region, a protein-protein interaction domain most often found in multiprotein complexes, is present in the amino-terminal region. In the carboxy terminus, at least five zinc finger motifs are observed, further suggesting the capacity of RoXaN to bind other proteins or nucleic acids. Between these two regions exists a paxillin leucine-aspartate repeat (LD) motif which is involved in protein-protein interactions. RoXaN is capable of interacting with NSP3 in vivo and during rotavirus infection. Domains of interaction were mapped and correspond to the dimerization domain of NSP3 (amino acids 163 to 237) and the LD domain of RoXaN (amino acids 244 to 341). The interaction between NSP3 and RoXaN does not impair the interaction between NSP3 and eIF4G I, and a ternary complex made of NSP3, RoXaN, and eIF4G I can be detected in rotavirus-infected cells, implicating RoXaN in translation regulation. PMID:15047801

  10. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  11. Cleavage of ether, ester, and tosylate C(sp3)-O bonds by an iridium complex, initiated by oxidative addition of C-H bonds. Experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sabuj; Choi, Jongwook; Wang, David Y; Choliy, Yuriy; Emge, Thomas J; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2013-04-03

    A pincer-ligated iridium complex, (PCP)Ir (PCP = κ(3)-C6H3-2,6-[CH2P(t-Bu)2]2), is found to undergo oxidative addition of C(sp(3))-O bonds of methyl esters (CH3-O2CR'), methyl tosylate (CH3-OTs), and certain electron-poor methyl aryl ethers (CH3-OAr). DFT calculations and mechanistic studies indicate that the reactions proceed via oxidative addition of C-H bonds followed by oxygenate migration, rather than by direct C-O addition. Thus, methyl aryl ethers react via addition of the methoxy C-H bond, followed by α-aryloxide migration to give cis-(PCP)Ir(H)(CH2)(OAr), followed by iridium-to-methylidene hydride migration to give (PCP)Ir(CH3)(OAr). Methyl acetate undergoes C-H bond addition at the carbomethoxy group to give (PCP)Ir(H)[κ(2)-CH2OC(O)Me] which then affords (PCP-CH2)Ir(H)(κ(2)-O2CMe) (6-Me) in which the methoxy C-O bond has been cleaved, and the methylene derived from the methoxy group has migrated into the PCP Cipso-Ir bond. Thermolysis of 6-Me ultimately gives (PCP)Ir(CH3)(κ(2)-O2CR), the net product of methoxy group C-O oxidative addition. Reaction of (PCP)Ir with species of the type ROAr, RO2CMe or ROTs, where R possesses β-C-H bonds (e.g., R = ethyl or isopropyl), results in formation of (PCP)Ir(H)(OAr), (PCP)Ir(H)(O2CMe), or (PCP)Ir(H)(OTs), respectively, along with the corresponding olefin or (PCP)Ir(olefin) complex. Like the C-O bond oxidative additions, these reactions also proceed via initial activation of a C-H bond; in this case, C-H addition at the β-position is followed by β-migration of the aryloxide, carboxylate, or tosylate group. Calculations indicate that the β-migration of the carboxylate group proceeds via an unusual six-membered cyclic transition state in which the alkoxy C-O bond is cleaved with no direct participation by the iridium center.

  12. Combination of thrombin-antithrombin complex, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and protein C activity for early identification of severe coagulopathy in initial phase of sepsis: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current criteria for early diagnosis of coagulopathy in sepsis are limited. We postulated that coagulopathy is already complicated with sepsis in the initial phase, and severe coagulopathy or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) becomes overt after progressive consumption of platelet and coagulation factors. To determine early diagnostic markers for severe coagulopathy, we evaluated plasma biomarkers for association with subsequent development of overt DIC in patients with sepsis. Methods A single-center, prospective observational study was conducted in an adult ICU at a university hospital. Plasma samples were obtained from patients with sepsis at ICU admission. Fourteen biomarkers including global markers (platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen and fibrin degradation product (FDP)); markers of thrombin generation (thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) and soluble fibrin); markers of anticoagulants (protein C (PC) and antithrombin); markers of fibrinolysis (plasminogen, α2-plasmin inhibitor (PI), plasmin-α2-PI complex, and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1); and a marker of endothelial activation (soluble E-selectin) were assayed. Patients who had overt DIC at baseline were excluded, and the remaining patients were followed for development of overt DIC in 5 days, and for mortality in 28 days. Results A total of 77 patients were enrolled, and 37 developed overt DIC within the following 5 days. Most patients demonstrated hemostatic abnormalities at baseline with 98.7% TAT, 97.4% FDP and 88.3% PC. Most hemostatic biomarkers at baseline were significantly associated with subsequent development of overt DIC. Notably, TAT, PAI-1 and PC discriminated well between patients with and without developing overt DIC (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.64 to 0.86); 0.87 (0.78 to 0.92); 0.85 (0.76 to 0.91), respectively), and using the three

  13. Phage display biopanning identifies the translation initiation and elongation factors (IF1α-3 and eIF-3) as components of Hsp70-peptide complexes in breast tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Siebke, Christina; James, Tharappel C; Cummins, Robert; O'Grady, Tony; Kay, Elaine; Bond, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    The heat shock protein, HSP70, is over-expressed in many tumours and acts at the crossroads of key intracellular processes in its role as a molecular chaperone. HSP70 associates with a vast array of peptides, some of which are antigenic and can mount adaptive immune responses against the tumour from which they are derived. The pool of peptides associated with HSP70 represents a unique barcode of protein metabolism in tumour cells. With a view to identifying unique protein targets that may be developed as tumour biomarkers, we used purified HSP70 and its associated peptide pool (HSP70-peptide complexes, HSP70-PCs) from different human breast tumour cell lines as targets for phage display biopanning. Our results show that HSP70-PCs from each cell line interact with unique sets of peptides within the phage display library. One of the peptides, termed IST, enriched in the biopanning process, was used in a 'pull-down' assay to identify the original protein from which the HSP70-associated peptides may have been derived. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF-3), a member of the elongation factor EF1α family, and the HSP GRP78, were pulled down by the IST peptide. All of these proteins are known to be up-regulated in cancer cells. Immunohistochemical staining of tumour tissue microarrays showed that the peptide co-localised with HSP70 in breast tumour tissue. The data indicate that the reservoir of peptides associated with HSP70 can act as a unique indicator of cellular protein activity and a novel source of potential tumour biomarkers.

  14. Natural complexity, computational complexity and depth.

    PubMed

    Machta, J

    2011-09-01

    Depth is a complexity measure for natural systems of the kind studied in statistical physics and is defined in terms of computational complexity. Depth quantifies the length of the shortest parallel computation required to construct a typical system state or history starting from simple initial conditions. The properties of depth are discussed and it is compared with other complexity measures. Depth can only be large for systems with embedded computation.

  15. Quality initiative at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupprecht, Gero; Arsenault, Robin; Hanuschik, Reinhard; Kraus, Maximilian; Sivera, Paola; Tromp, Arnout; Verzichelli, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    An initiative is under way at ESO Headquarters to optimise operations, in particular in the engineering, technical and associated management areas. A systematic approach to strengthen the operating processes is in preparation, starting with a mapping of the extensive existing process network. Processes identified as sufficiently important and complex to merit an in-depth analysis will be properly specified and their implementation optimised to strike a sensible balance between organisational overhead (documentation) and efficiency. By applying methods and tools tried and tested in industry we expect to achieve a more unified approach to address recurrent tasks. This will enable staff to concentrate more on new challenges and improvement and avoid spending effort on issues already resolved in the past.

  16. Television in the 80's: New Technologies, New Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Sally

    Electronic media have undergone substantial growth and change in the past two decades, and the structure of the programming industry has also changed, with the competition for programming becoming more intense. At the same time, government has moved toward deregulation in this area, with the result being increasing concentration,…

  17. Resource Sharing: A Necessity for the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavo, Barbara, Comp.

    Papers presented at a 1981 seminar on library resource sharing covered topics related to Australasian databases, Australian and New Zealand document delivery systems, and shared acquisition and cataloging for special libraries. The papers included: (1) "AUSINET: Australasia's Information Network?" by Ian McCallum; (2) "Australia/New…

  18. An Overview of Occupational Alcoholism Issues for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Keith

    1982-01-01

    Analyzes the past decade as a period of learning and experimentation in occupational alcoholism and employee assistance programming (EAPs). Suggests future EAPs will place less emphasis on supervisory confrontation than on broader types of casefinding; and early identification, prior to a decline in job performance, will take place. (Author/RC)

  19. [Iron-deficiency anaemia in patients in their 80s].

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Sophia E; Royen, Hilde; Hamaker, Marije; Blom, Harmjo; Portielje, Johanneke; Bartelsman, Joep F

    2012-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anaemia in very old patients is a frequent finding; this often poses a diagnostic dilemma for the physician. For example, should additional testing take place? And if so, what kind of tests? Is prescribing iron supplement therapy and adopting an expectative course sufficient? The two cases in this article illustrate different treatment strategies. If doubts about which strategy to choose arise, it is recommended that iron first be supplied and the effect of this treatment checked after three weeks. The haemoglobin level should have risen at least 0.7 mmol/l. If there has been no effect, supplemental (endoscopic) examinations may be considered, provided they meet a therapeutic goal.

  20. Technologies of the '80s: Their Impact on Technical Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. A., Ed.; And Others

    This report is one of seven that identify major new and emerging technological advances expected to influence major vocational education program areas and to describe the programmatic implications in terms of skill-knowledge requirements, occupations most directly affected, and the anticipated diffusion rate. Chapter 1 considers technology as…

  1. Two Energy Futures: A National Choice for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    In 1980, the American Petroleum Institute published the first edition of "Two Energy Futures." It described the U.S. energy experience of the 1970s and prospects for the 1980s, concluding that the nation could drastically reduce its dependence on uncertain sources of imported oil if the right choices were made by individuals and the…

  2. Two Energy Futures: A National Choice for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    Examined in this American Petroleum Institute (API) publication on energy technology and energy policy, is the future potential of oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear energy, synthetic fuels, and renewable energy resources. Among the related issues emphasized are environmental protection, access to federal lands, government policies, and the national…

  3. Public Education. Task Forces on the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan

    This report addresses current concerns in public education defined as being important to American Jews. Issues discussed include strategies for improving educational quality; the effects of funding disparities, tax credits and vouchers on public education; and the importance of integration and bilingual education in the public schools. Also…

  4. Math Anxiety and the Student of the '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jean Burr

    As colleges take on increasing numbers of nontraditional students who have had only minimal exposure to mathematics, instructors must alleviate patterns of math anxiety and math avoidance which impede academic success, and, in a technological society, limit career opportunities. Among the obvious causes of math anxiety are: instructors' insistence…

  5. Managing Campus Security Programs in the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimble, Joseph Paul

    After presenting an imaginative depiction of the fiscal and administrative changes that may overwhelm community colleges during the 1980's, this paper looks at several factors that should be considered in planning and managing campus security departments. The paper offers suggestions related to: (1) the development of master parking plans which…

  6. High load distribution network in the 80's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, O.

    1982-08-01

    High duty, compact equipment having no negative environmental effects when used in high power distribution networks, was developed. Digital computer programs allowed for optimization of the design and simulation of the operating conditions of system components. A computer model allowed for testing and choosing the optimal medium voltage network and the possible extensions of the low tension network. Materials were elaborated and tested in order to guarantees a reliable long-term behavior of the components. This led to the development of a space saving insulator traverse and helped to solve stressing problems of VPE-cables also with internal forced water cooling. With the development and production of a subterranean muffled transformer for powerful low voltage consumers, all the necessary system components for a densely populated area are available.

  7. Urban Education in the 80s: The Never Ending Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA.

    Contemporary problems in urban education are explored in this collection of papers. The leading article discusses the implications of urban decay and demographic change for school finance and educational accountability. The second paper stresses the need for a basic skills curriculum, well-trained teachers, and the inclusion of parents in…

  8. Energy in the '80s: decade of decision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This proceeding includes the six papers presented at the Public Awareness Symposium plus the WATTEC/Engineers' Week banquet address on nuclear power by Dr. Harold M. Agnew of General Atomic Co.; these presentations on the final day, February 22, concluded the 1980 WATTEC conference. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper and for the banquet address.

  9. Two Year Computer System Technology Curricula for the '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palko, Donald N.; Hata, David M.

    1982-01-01

    The computer industry is viewed on a collision course with a human resources crisis. Changes expected during the next decade are outlined, with expectations noted that merging of hardware and software skills will be met in a technician's skill set. Essential curricula components of a computer system technology program are detailed. (MP)

  10. Solar '80s: A Teacher's Handbook for Solar Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaHart, David E.

    This guide is intended to assist the teacher in exploring energy issues and the technology of solar energy conversion and associated technologies. Sections of the guide include: (1) Rationale; (2) Technology Overview; (3) Sun Day Suggestions for School; (4) Backyard Solar Water Heater; (5) Solar Tea; (6) Biogas; (7) Solar Cells; (8) Economics; (9)…

  11. Training in the '80's: An Economic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Carl

    During the last decade, the manufacture of commodities has become increasingly simple, and as a result, has increasingly been exported from the United States to low-wage regions of the world. On the other hand, the U.S. economy has become increasingly service oriented, with service-sector jobs growing rapidly while manufacturing jobs decline. In…

  12. Tribology in the 80's. Volume 2: Sessions 5 - 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Tender standing and technical advancement of various disciplines and subdisciplines on tribology were discussed. Topics discussed included importance and definition of materials in tribology; directions of research in adhesion and friction; research in wear and wear resistant materials; liquid lubricants and additives; solid lubricants; and tribological materials for mechanical components of the future.

  13. The Ghost of Desegregation: An Agenda for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckum, Leonard C.; Dasho, Stefan J.

    The school desegregation movement grew out of a concern for educational equity, which has a basis in constitutional/judicial principles, psychological concerns (the belief that racial isolation is psychologically damaging to the disadvantaged), and black nationalism (manifested in a concern for developing students' self-esteem). Cultural…

  14. The Placement Director of the '80s: A Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, Larry R.; Tolle, Donald J.

    1982-01-01

    Conducted a national survey of career planning and placement directors (N=1,032) at colleges and universities to determine, describe, and analyze selected factors concerning the careers of placement directors. Results indicated the typical placement director in a four-year college is male, holds a masters degree, and reports to student affairs.…

  15. Public Elementary and Secondary Education in the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broudy, H. S.

    Privatism, vouchers, too many pressure groups, and a deemphasis of citizenship present the worst stumbling blocks to education. A five-point curriculum model includes: (1) the symbolics of information--the skills of language and computation; (2) the key concepts of a selected set of the physical sciences and mathematics; (3) developmental studies…

  16. Energy and the economy: which way in the '80s

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.

    1980-01-01

    Mr. Ross, in articulating Marathon Oil Company's view of America's key options, feels that new optimism since the election suggests that the means and ability to solve the energy and economic problems are available, given enlightened government policies. This optimism exists despite many government and industry leaders feeling that the country has lost its competitive edge because of government excesses and the disincentives caused by efforts to redistribute the nation's wealth. They suggest spending cuts, tax incentives for plant construction and modernization, and accelerated energy production. The latter requires improving access to Federal lands and easing environmental rules to allow coal, nuclear power, and synthetic fuels to be developed. Tax incentives and the removal of administrative barriers will provide the capital for the sophisticated technology to accomplish this. (DCK)

  17. Civil Rights in the '80's: The View from Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civiletti, Benjamin R.

    Progress in the area of civil rights attained under the Carter administration is described in this speech by the current United States Attorney General. Among the Federal activities mentioned are: (1) legal suits to end employment discrimination on the basis of race, sex, and national origin; (2) withholding of Federal funds from State and local…

  18. An American Profile: Trends and Issues in the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Sandra M.

    1982-01-01

    Migrations to the Sun Belt, exodus from urban areas, the aging of the baby-boom generation, and single-parent families are significantly altering the needs and priorities of America's schools. (Author/JM)

  19. Budgeting--A Management Approach for the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodel, Ross A.

    1980-01-01

    Zero-base budgeting is a management tool that provides a system that is responsive to change, incorporates sound principles of management, satisfies the need to effectively shift resources, and does not overload the budget staff. (Author/MLF)

  20. Projecting for the 80's: Managing Student Enrollments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonabocker, Louise; Halfond, Jay

    1984-01-01

    The techniques used by the Enrollment Management group at Boston College in reviewing enrollment through the year, predicting the attrition rate, and determining the number of new students to admit are outlined, and the data needs and manipulation are discussed. (MSE)

  1. Day Camping for the 80's--An Administrative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umstead, Elizabeth C.

    1980-01-01

    Previews the 1980 National Day Camp Symposium and discusses influences of the 1980s on day camps. Also discusses precamp planning, the camp season, and postcamp activities. Available from: Center for Environmental, Camping and Outdoor Education; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Pine Lake Field Campus; 4016 Blumenthal Road; Greensboro,…

  2. Planning for the 80's: Workforce Educational Development Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuyahoga Community Coll., Cleveland, OH.

    The findings and recommendations found in this report are the result of a cooperative planning process undertaken by Cuyahoga Community College (CCC) to determine the best way of meeting the training and educational needs of the employed adults in its service district. Background information is presented first, describing the composition and…

  3. Home Based Care: Direction for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Marvin E.

    Home based family centered (HBFC) service programs have been developed as alternatives to out-of-home placement. These programs have reported relatively high service success rates at costs signficantly lower than foster home and institutional care while, at the same time, avoiding the social and psychological risks of out-of-home placement.…

  4. Interagency Collaboration: A Must for the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullins, W. Robert

    1980-01-01

    Offers a rationale for interagency cooperation in times of fiscal restraint and enumerates the barriers that have stood in the way of effective community college cooperation with other community agencies providing similar services. Presents suggestions for nullifying these barriers and provides examples of colleges with successful collaborative…

  5. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention: Strategies for the '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Elizabeth T.; Bassoff, Betty Z.

    Most efforts at combating teenage pregnancy have focused on cognitive/educational levels felt by concerned adults to be of greatest importance. However, recent research has demonstrated the connection between lack of career goals, low self-esteem, perception of narrow options, and risk-taking behavior as factors leading to pregnancy. A 3-year…

  6. The Plus 50 Initiative Evaluation: Initiative Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), with funding from The Atlantic Philanthropies, created the Plus 50 Initiative (2008-2012). This initiative was designed to build the capacity of community colleges nationwide to develop programming that engages the plus 50 learner. This report contains: (1) An overview of the Plus 50…

  7. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  8. Initiation of translation can occur only in a restricted region of the CYC1 mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Yun, D F; Sherman, F

    1995-01-01

    The steady-state levels and half-lives of CYC1 mRNAs were estimated in a series of mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing (i) TAA nonsense codons, (ii) ATG initiator codons, or (iii) the sequence ATA ATG ACT TAA (denoted ATG-TAA) at various positions along the CYC1 gene, which encodes iso-1-cytochrome c. These mutational alterations were made in backgrounds lacking all internal in-frame and out-of-frame ATG triplets or containing only one ATG initiator codon at the normal position. The results revealed a "sensitive" region encompassing approximately the first half of the CYC1 mRNA, in which nonsense codons caused Upf1-dependent degradation. This result and the stability of CYC1 mRNAs lacking all ATG triplets, as well as other results, suggested that degradation occurs unless elements associated with this sensitive region are covered with 80S ribosomes, 40S ribosomal subunits, or ribonucleoprotein particle proteins. While elongation by 80S ribosomes could be prematurely terminated by TAA codons, the scanning of 40S ribosomal units could not be terminated solely by TAA codons but could be disrupted by the ATG-TAA sequence, which caused the formation and subsequent prompt release of 80S ribosomes. The ATG-TAA sequence caused degradation of the CYC1 mRNA only when it was in the region spanning nucleotide positions -27 to +37 but not in the remaining 3' distal region, suggesting that translation could initiate only in this restricted initiation region. CYC1 mRNA distribution on polyribosomes confirmed that only ATG codons within the initiation region were translated at high efficiency. This initiation region was not entirely dependent on the distance from the 5' cap site and was not obviously dependent on the short-range secondary structure but may simply reflect an open structural requirement for initiation of translation of the CYC1 mRNA. PMID:7823918

  9. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  10. Initial rate kinetic studies show an unexpected influence of para-substituents on the catalytic behaviour of manganese complexes of TMTACN in the epoxidation of styrenes with H2O2.

    PubMed

    Ilyashenko, Gennadiy; De Faveri, Giorgio; Masoudi, Shirin; Al-Safadi, Rawan; Watkinson, Michael

    2013-03-28

    Investigations into the efficacy of a range of enantiomerically pure BINOL additives in the epoxidation of styrene substrates with a number of manganese catalysts prepared from the ligand 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, TMTACN, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant have revealed that there are fundamental differences in reactivity between apparently similar systems. Whilst no asymmetric induction was obtained in the styrene oxide products formed, the data obtained from initial rate kinetic studies appear to be consistent with a number of different catalytically active species operating, the nature of which are profoundly affected by the starting materials used.

  11. Dioxin Exposure Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Dioxin Exposure Initiative (DEI) is no longer active. This page contains a summary of the dioxin exposure initiative with illustrations, contact and background information.Originally supported by scientist Matthew Lorber, who retired in Mar 2017.

  12. Glutathione Degradation by the Alternative Pathway (DUG Pathway) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Initiated by (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 Complex, a Novel Glutamine Amidotransferase (GATase) Enzyme Acting on Glutathione*

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hardeep; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    The recently identified, fungi-specific alternative pathway of glutathione degradation requires the participation of three genes, DUG1, DUG2, and DUG3. Dug1p has earlier been shown to function as a Cys-Gly-specific dipeptidase. In the present study, we describe the characterization of Dug2p and Dug3p. Dug3p has a functional glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) II domain that is catalytically important for glutathione degradation as demonstrated through mutational analysis. Dug2p, which has an N-terminal WD40 and a C-terminal M20A peptidase domain, has no peptidase activity. The previously demonstrated Dug2p-Dug3p interaction was found to be mediated through the WD40 domain of Dug2p. Dug2p was also shown to be able to homodimerize, and this was mediated by its M20A peptidase domain. In vitro reconstitution assays revealed that Dug2p and Dug3p were required together for the cleavage of glutathione into glutamate and Cys-Gly. Purification through gel filtration chromatography confirmed the formation of a Dug2p-Dug3p complex. The functional complex had a molecular weight that corresponded to (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 in addition to higher molecular weight oligomers and displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 had a Km for glutathione of 1.2 mm, suggesting a novel GATase enzyme that acted on glutathione. Dug1p activity in glutathione degradation was found to be restricted to its Cys-Gly peptidase activity, which functioned downstream of the (Dug2p-Dug3p)2 GATase. The DUG2 and DUG3 genes, but not DUG1, were derepressed by sulfur limitation. Based on these studies and the functioning of GATases, a mechanism is proposed for the functioning of the Dug proteins in the degradation of glutathione. PMID:22277648

  13. Translation initiation factors eIF3 and HCR1 control translation termination and stop codon read-through in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Beznosková, Petra; Cuchalová, Lucie; Wagner, Susan; Shoemaker, Christopher J; Gunišová, Stanislava; von der Haar, Tobias; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-11-01

    Translation is divided into initiation, elongation, termination and ribosome recycling. Earlier work implicated several eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) in ribosomal recycling in vitro. Here, we uncover roles for HCR1 and eIF3 in translation termination in vivo. A substantial proportion of eIF3, HCR1 and eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) but not eIF5 (a well-defined "initiation-specific" binding partner of eIF3) specifically co-sediments with 80S couples isolated from RNase-treated heavy polysomes in an eRF1-dependent manner, indicating the presence of eIF3 and HCR1 on terminating ribosomes. eIF3 and HCR1 also occur in ribosome- and RNA-free complexes with both eRFs and the recycling factor ABCE1/RLI1. Several eIF3 mutations reduce rates of stop codon read-through and genetically interact with mutant eRFs. In contrast, a slow growing deletion of hcr1 increases read-through and accumulates eRF3 in heavy polysomes in a manner suppressible by overexpressed ABCE1/RLI1. Based on these and other findings we propose that upon stop codon recognition, HCR1 promotes eRF3·GDP ejection from the post-termination complexes to allow binding of its interacting partner ABCE1/RLI1. Furthermore, the fact that high dosage of ABCE1/RLI1 fully suppresses the slow growth phenotype of hcr1Δ as well as its termination but not initiation defects implies that the termination function of HCR1 is more critical for optimal proliferation than its function in translation initiation. Based on these and other observations we suggest that the assignment of HCR1 as a bona fide eIF3 subunit should be reconsidered. Together our work characterizes novel roles of eIF3 and HCR1 in stop codon recognition, defining a communication bridge between the initiation and termination/recycling phases of translation.

  14. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  15. Robonaut Mobile Autonomy: Initial Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Goza, S. M.; Tyree, K. S.; Huber, E. L.

    2006-01-01

    A mobile version of the NASA/DARPA Robonaut humanoid recently completed initial autonomy trials working directly with humans in cluttered environments. This compact robot combines the upper body of the Robonaut system with a Segway Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid ideal for interacting with human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereovision to locate human teammates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form complex behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  16. DICE: Disk Initial Conditions Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Valentin

    2016-07-01

    DICE models initial conditions of idealized galaxies to study their secular evolution or their more complex interactions such as mergers or compact groups using N-Body/hydro codes. The code can set up a large number of components modeling distinct parts of the galaxy, and creates 3D distributions of particles using a N-try MCMC algorithm which does not require a prior knowledge of the distribution function. The gravitational potential is then computed on a multi-level Cartesian mesh by solving the Poisson equation in the Fourier space. Finally, the dynamical equilibrium of each component is computed by integrating the Jeans equations for each particles. Several galaxies can be generated in a row and be placed on Keplerian orbits to model interactions. DICE writes the initial conditions in the Gadget1 or Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) format and is fully compatible with Ramses (ascl:1011.007).

  17. Progress in Initiator Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hrousis, C A; Christensen, J S

    2009-05-04

    There is great interest in applying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation techniques to the designs of electrical high explosive (HE) initiators, for the purpose of better understanding a design's sensitivities, optimizing its performance, and/or predicting its useful lifetime. Two MHD-capable LLNL codes, CALE and ALE3D, are being used to simulate the process of ohmic heating, vaporization, and plasma formation in the bridge of an initiator, be it an exploding bridgewire (EBW), exploding bridgefoil (EBF) or slapper type initiator. The initiation of the HE is simulated using Tarver Ignition & Growth reactive flow models. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D models have been constructed and studied. The models provide some intuitive explanation of the initiation process and are useful for evaluating the potential impact of identified aging mechanisms (such as the growth of intermetallic compounds or powder sintering). The end product of this work is a simulation capability for evaluating margin in proposed, modified or aged initiation system designs.

  18. Monitoring Abortive Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lilian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abortive initiation, when first discovered, was an enigmatic phenomenon, but fully three decades hence, it has been shown to be an integral step in the transcript initiation process intimately tied to the promoter escape reaction undergone by RNA polymerase at the initiation-elongation transition. A detailed understanding of abortive initiation-promoter escape has brought within reach a full description of the transcription initiation mechanism. This enormous progress was the result of convergent biochemical, genetic, and biophysical investigations propelled by parallel advances in quantitation technology. This chapter discusses the knowledge gained through the biochemical approach and a high-resolution method that yields quantitative and qualitative information regarding abortive initiation-promoter escape at a promoter. PMID:18948204

  19. Initiation precursors and initiators in laser-induced copolymerization of styrene and maleic anhydride in acetone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Meador, Willard E.; Chang, C. Ken

    1990-01-01

    The initiation step of photopolymerized styrene/maleic anhydride copolymer was investigated at 365 nm. UV absorption measurements provide decisive evidence that the styrene/maleic anhydride charge transfer complex is the sole absorbing species; however, key laser experiments suggest intermediate reactions lead to a monoradical initiating species. A mechanism for the photoinitiation step of the copolymer is proposed.

  20. Genome-Wide Profiling of Alternative Translation Initiation Sites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangwei; Wan, Ji; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of translation initiation is a central control point in protein synthesis. Variations of start codon selection contribute to protein diversity and complexity. Systemic mapping of start codon positions and precise measurement of the corresponding initiation rate would transform our understanding of translational control. Here we describe a ribosome profiling approach that enables identification of translation initiation sites on a genome-wide scale. By capturing initiating ribosomes using lactimidomycin, this approach permits qualitative and quantitative analysis of alternative translation initiation.

  1. Winning with Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    A common complaint among high school coaches is the lack of initiative shown by some of their players. Coaches expect a certain level of decision-making and independence, and more so from team captains and senior players. Developing leadership skills is a major benefit to athletes who participate at a competitive level, and taking initiative can…

  2. The Fostering Hope Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Steven; Winters, Katie; Dean, Joyce; Seymour, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Fostering Hope Initiative is a neighborhood-based Collective Impact initiative that promotes optimum child and youth development by supporting vulnerable families, encouraging connections between neighbors, strengthening systems to ensure collective impact, and advocating for family-friendly public policy. This article describes the…

  3. Prioritizing Scientific Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahcall, John N.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the way in which a limited number of astronomy research initiatives were chosen and prioritized based on a consensus of members from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee. A list of recommended equipment initiatives and estimated costs is provided. (KR)

  4. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this

  5. How initiation factors tune the rate of initiation of protein synthesis in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of initiator transfer RNA (tRNA) interaction with the messenger RNA (mRNA)-programmed 30S subunit and the rate of 50S subunit docking to the 30S preinitiation complex were measured for different combinations of initiation factors in a cell-free Escherichia coli system for protein synthesis with components of high purity. The major results are summarized by a Michaelis–Menten scheme for initiation. All three initiation factors are required for maximal efficiency (kcat/KM) of initiation and for maximal in vivo rate of initiation at normal concentration of initiator tRNA. Spontaneous release of IF3 from the 30S preinitiation complex is required for subunit docking. The presence of initiator tRNA on the 30S subunit greatly increases the rate of 70S ribosome formation by increasing the rate of IF3 dissociation from the 30S subunit and the rate of 50S subunit docking to the IF3-free 30S preinitiation complex. The reasons why IF1 and IF3 are essential in E. coli are discussed in the light of the present observations. PMID:16724118

  6. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  7. Autonomous aircraft initiative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a consulting effort to aid NASA Ames-Dryden in defining a new initiative in aircraft automation are described. The initiative described is a multi-year, multi-center technology development and flight demonstration program. The initiative features the further development of technologies in aircraft automation already being pursued at multiple NASA centers and Department of Defense (DoD) research and Development (R and D) facilities. The proposed initiative involves the development of technologies in intelligent systems, guidance, control, software development, airborne computing, navigation, communications, sensors, unmanned vehicles, and air traffic control. It involves the integration and implementation of these technologies to the extent necessary to conduct selected and incremental flight demonstrations.

  8. Collaborative Procurement Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    GPP's Clean Energy Collaborative Procurement Initiative provides a platform for deploying clean energy technologies across multiple government and educational organizations for maximum impact on installed solar system capacity and local economic activity.

  9. About the RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative, a "hub and spoke" model, connects researchers to better understand and target the more than 30% of cancers driven by mutations in RAS genes. Includes oversight and contact information.

  10. RAS Initiative - Community Outreach

    Cancer.gov

    Through community and technical collaborations, workshops and symposia, and the distribution of reference reagents, the RAS Initiative seeks to increase the sharing of knowledge and resources essential to defeating cancers caused by mutant RAS genes.

  11. RAS Initiative - Events

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  12. Advanced Concepts Research Initiative

    EPA Science Inventory

    This initiative is investigating various approaches to controlling and treating wet-weather flow (WWF) discharges in the urban watershed. WWF, including combined sewer overflow (CSO), sanitary sewer overflow (SSO) and stormwater discharges are leading causes of receiving water q...

  13. The RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  14. Project Matching Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Green Power Partnership's Project Matching initiative works to connect green power users with new, not-yet-built renewable energy projects that may align with their energy, environmental, and financial objectives.

  15. PESP Landscaping Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Landscaping practices can positively or negatively affect local environments and human health. The Landscaping Initiative seeks to enhance benefits of landscaping while reducing need for pesticides, fertilizers, etc., by working with partners.

  16. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  17. Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative (MCDI) is a collaboration of federal, state and local agencies, along with communities, non-profit organizations and private companies working together by reducing exposure to emissions from diesel engines

  18. Piezoelectrically Initiated Pyrotechnic Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quince, Asia; Dutton, Maureen; Hicks, Robert; Burnham, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a pyrotechnic initiator and piezoelectric initiation system. The device will be capable of being initiated mechanically; resisting initiation by EMF, RF, and EMI (electromagnetic field, radio frequency, and electromagnetic interference, respectively); and initiating in water environments and space environments. Current devices of this nature are initiated by the mechanical action of a firing pin against a primer. Primers historically are prone to failure. These failures are commonly known as misfires or hang-fires. In many cases, the primer shows the dent where the firing pin struck the primer, but the primer failed to fire. In devices such as "T" handles, which are commonly used to initiate the blowout of canopies, loss of function of the device may result in loss of crew. In devices such as flares or smoke generators, failure can result in failure to spot a downed pilot. The piezoelectrically initiated ignition system consists of a pyrotechnic device that plugs into a mechanical system (activator), which on activation, generates a high-voltage spark. The activator, when released, will strike a stack of electrically linked piezo crystals, generating a high-voltage, low-amperage current that is then conducted to the pyro-initiator. Within the initiator, an electrode releases a spark that passes through a pyrotechnic first-fire mixture, causing it to combust. The combustion of the first-fire initiates a primary pyrotechnic or explosive powder. If used in a "T" handle, the primary would ramp the speed of burn up to the speed of sound, generating a shock wave that would cause a high explosive to go "high order." In a flare or smoke generator, the secondary would produce the heat necessary to ignite the pyrotechnic mixture. The piezo activator subsystem is redundant in that a second stack of crystals would be struck at the same time with the same activation force, doubling the probability of a first strike spark generation. If the first

  19. Initiation factor 2, tRNA, and 50S subunits cooperatively stabilize mRNAs on the ribosome during initiation

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tomoaki; Petrov, Alexey N.; Iizuka, Ryo; Funatsu, Takashi; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Uemura, Sotaro

    2012-01-01

    Initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a key factor in initiation of bacterial protein synthesis. It recruits initiator tRNA to the small ribosomal subunit and facilitates joining of the large ribosomal subunit. Using reconstituted translation system of Escherichia coli and optical tweezers, we directly measure the rupture force between single ribosomal complexes and mRNAs for initiation complexes in the presence and the absence of IF2. We demonstrate that IF2 together with codon recognition by initiator tRNA increases the force required to dislocate mRNA from the ribosome complexes; mRNA stabilization by IF2 required the presence of a joined 50S subunit, and was independent of bound guanine nucleotide. IF2 thus helps lock the 70S ribosome over the start codon during initiation, thus maintaining reading frame. Our results show how mRNA is progressively stabilized on the ribosome through distinct steps of initiation. PMID:22411833

  20. Multimodal microtubule binding by the Ndc80 kinetochore complex.

    PubMed

    Alushin, Gregory M; Musinipally, Vivek; Matson, Daniel; Tooley, John; Stukenberg, P Todd; Nogales, Eva

    2012-11-01

    The Ndc80 complex is a key site of kinetochore-microtubule attachment during cell division. The human complex engages microtubules with a globular 'head' formed by tandem calponin-homology domains and an 80-amino-acid unstructured 'tail' that contains sites of phosphoregulation by the Aurora B kinase. Using biochemical, cell biological and electron microscopy analyses, we dissected the roles of the tail in binding of microtubules and mediation of cooperative interactions between Ndc80 complexes. Two segments of the tail that contain Aurora B phosphorylation sites become ordered at interfaces; one with tubulin and the second with an adjacent Ndc80 head on the microtubule surface, forming interactions that are disrupted by phosphorylation. We propose a model in which Ndc80's interaction with either growing or shrinking microtubule ends can be tuned by the phosphorylation state of its tail.

  1. The Ndc80 kinetochore complex forms oligomeric arrays along microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Alushin, Gregory M.; Ramey, Vincent H.; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Ball, David A.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Musacchio, Andrea; Nogales, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The Ndc80 complex is a key site of regulated kinetochore-microtubule attachment, but the molecular mechanism underlying its function remains unknown. Here we present a subnanometer resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the human Ndc80 complex bound to microtubules, sufficient for precise docking of crystal structures of the component proteins. We find that Ndc80 binds the microtubule with a tubulin monomer repeat, recognizing α- and β-tubulin at both intra- and inter-dimer interfaces in a manner that is sensitive to tubulin conformation. Furthermore, Ndc80 complexes self-associate along protofilaments via interactions mediated by the amino-terminal tail of the Ndc80 protein, the site of phospho-regulation by the Aurora B kinase. Ndc80's mode of interaction with the microtubule and its oligomerization suggest a mechanism by which Aurora B could regulate the stability of load-bearing Ndc80-microtubule attachments. PMID:20944740

  2. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  3. ICT Reform Initiatives in Singapore Schools: A Complexity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Yancy; So, Hyo-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an exponential growth in the use of technology in our daily life. Notwithstanding its phenomenal influence, the use of technology in education remains sporadic and disjointed. The promise that technology will bring deep-seated changes in the way that educators teach and students learn remains, disappointedly,…

  4. DiffPy-CMI-Python libraries for Complex Modeling Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon; Juhas, Pavol; Farrow, Christopher; McKerns, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Software to manipulate and describe crystal and molecular structures and set up structural refinements from multiple experimental inputs. Calculation and simulation of structure derived physical quantities. Library for creating customized refinements of atomic structures from available experimental and theoretical inputs.

  5. Collaborative Initiative in Biomedical Imaging to Study Complex Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Weili; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2012-03-31

    The work reported addressed these topics: Fluorescence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; X-ray interferometer/phase imaging system; Quantitative imaging from scattered fields, Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy; and Multiphoton and Raman microscopy.

  6. ELECTRICAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT A COMPLEX WIDE TEAMING INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    GRAY BJ

    2007-11-26

    This paper describes the results of a year-long project, sponsored by the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) and designed to improve overall electrical safety performance throughout Department of Energy (DOE)-owned sites and laboratories. As evidenced by focused metrics, the Project was successful primarily due to the joint commitment of contractor and DOE electrical safety experts, as well as significant support from DOE and contractor senior management. The effort was managed by an assigned project manager, using classical project-management principles that included execution of key deliverables and regular status reports to the Project sponsor. At the conclusion of the Project, the DOE not only realized measurable improvement in the safety of their workers, but also had access to valuable resources that will enable them to do the following: evaluate and improve electrical safety programs; analyze and trend electrical safety events; increase electrical safety awareness for both electrical and non-electrical workers; and participate in ongoing processes dedicated to continued improvement.

  7. IT Tools in Initial Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlo, Dorin

    2016-01-01

    In initial teacher training, the call to use IT tools, and to integrate them into the virtual learning space, is not conjectural but is an example of introducing new technologies in the complexity of educational sciences. For this reason we approached the use of new technologies in the courses and seminars of subjects from the curriculum of…

  8. Tunnelling from non-localised initial states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowcock, Peter; Gregory, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    An approach for calculating tunneling amplitudes from a nonlocalized initial state is presented. Generalizing the matching conditions and equations of motion to allow for complex momentum permits a description of tunneling in the presence of so-called classical motion. Possible applications of the method are presented.

  9. Youth Initiatives and the Black College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lea E.

    1979-01-01

    Youth initiatives at four predominantly Black colleges are examined. Generally, Black institutions, it was found, lack available personnel to read and decipher complex CETA regulations; tend to remain clear of local political maneuvering; and are rarely sought out by local CETA delivery systems. (CT)

  10. Juggling key players in NMD initiation.

    PubMed

    Bono, Fulvia

    2014-08-05

    In this issue of Structure, Melero and colleagues use electron microscopy combined with biochemistry to provide structural insight into the complex between SMG1, SMG8, SMG9, UPF1, and UPF2, elucidating how key players in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay assemble at the initial steps of the process.

  11. Structure-function insights into prokaryotic and eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Myasnikov, Alexander G; Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2009-06-01

    Translation initiation is the rate-limiting and most complexly regulated step of protein synthesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In the last few years, cryo-electron microscopy has provided several novel insights into the universal process of translation initiation. Structures of prokaryotic 30S and 70S ribosomal initiation complexes with initiator transfer RNA (tRNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), and initiation factors have recently revealed the mechanism of initiator tRNA recruitment to the assembling ribosomal machinery, involving molecular rearrangements of the ribosome and associated factors. First three-dimensional pictures of the particularly complex eukaryotic translation initiation machinery have been obtained, revealing how initiation factors tune the ribosome for recruiting the mRNA. A comparison of the available prokaryotic and eukaryotic structures shows that--besides significant differences--some key ribosomal features are universally conserved.

  12. Research on diabatic initialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, Akira

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to contribute to improvement in the synoptic analyses in the tropics for numerical weather prediction and climate research. In addition to a prediction model, four dimensional data assimilation systems have two principal components. One is objective analysis and the other is initialization. Various methods of objective analysis are designed primarily to analyze the mass and rotational wind fields. Methods of initialization are developed to obtain the irrotational wind and its associated vertical velocity field which are balanced with the mass field and free from meteorological noise. There are essentially three approaches to the problem of initialization: quasi-geostrophic theory, bounded derivative method and nonlinear normal mode method. In the midlatitudes, these approaches generally produce satisfactory results even without diabatic effects for large-scale motions. In the tropics, the situation is quite different from that in the midlatitudes. Because of a small magnitude of the Coriolis parameter and a weak horizontal temperature gradient in the tropics, any method of initialization must incorporate diabatic effects. In fact, it can be said that understanding the problem of diabatic initialization is the key to improving the analysis and weather forecasting in the tropics.

  13. Research on diabatic initialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashara, Akira

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to contribute to the improvement of the analyses of irrotational wind and moisture fields in the tropics through advancement in the technique of initialization, incorporating diabatic effects and use of satellite-derived, radiometric imagery data that are not used currently by operational centers. Significant accomplishments during the period of May 1991 - April 1992 in research involving the following are presented: impact of tropical initialization upon the spin-up of precipitation forecasts; and a unified approach to diabatic initialization for improvement in the analysis of divergence and water vapor fields in the tropics. Focus of current research and plans for next year are discussed with respect to the topics of controlling the precipitation over shoot during the early part of a numerical forecast and the use of satellite imagery data for improvement of the tropical analysis.

  14. On the initiation of subduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Steve; Phillips, Roger J.

    1991-01-01

    Estimates of shear resistance associated with lithospheric thrusting and convergence represent lower bounds on the force necessary to promote trench formation. Three environments proposed as preferential sites of incipient subduction are investigated: passive continental margins, transform faults/fracture zones, and extinct ridges. None of these are predicted to convert into subduction zones simply by the accumulation of local gravitational stresses. Subduction cannot initiate through the foundering of dense oceanic lithosphere immediately adjacent to passive continental margins. The attempted subduction of buoyant material at a mature trench can result in large compressional forces in both subducting and overriding plates. This is the only tectonic force sufficient to trigger the nucleation of a new subduction zone. The ubiquitous distribution of transform faults and fracture zones, combined with the common proximity of these features to mature subduction complexes, suggests that they may represent the most likely sites of trench formation if they are even marginally weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  15. On the initiation of subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.; Phillips, R.J. )

    1991-01-10

    Estimates of shear resistance associated with lithospheric thrusting and convergence represent lower bounds on the force necessary to promote trench formation. Three environments proposed as preferential sites of incipient subduction are investigated: passive continental margins, transform faults/fracture zones, and extinct ridges. None of these are predicted to convert into subduction zones simply by the accumulation of local gravitational stresses. Subduction cannot initiate through the foundering of dense oceanic lithosphere immediately adjacent to passive continental margins. The attempted subduction of buoyant material at a mature trench can result in large compressional forces in both subducting and overriding plates. This is the only tectonic force sufficient to trigger the nucleation of a new subduction zone. The ubiquitous distribution of transform faults and fracture zones, combined with the common proximity of these features to mature subduction complexes, suggests that they may represent the most likely sites of trench formation if they are even marginally weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  16. Civil space technology initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) is a major, focused, space technology program of the Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) of NASA. The program was initiated to advance technology beyond basic research in order to expand and enhance system and vehicle capabilities for near-term missions. CSTI takes critical technologies to the point at which a user can confidently incorporate the new or expanded capabilities into relatively near-term, high-priority NASA missions. In particular, the CSTI program emphasizes technologies necessary for reliable and efficient access to and operation in Earth orbit as well as for support of scientific missions from Earth orbit.

  17. Shock initiation of nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.

    1993-12-31

    The shock initiation processes of nitromethane have been examined by using a fast time-resolved emission spectroscopy at a two-stage gas gun. a broad, but strong emission has been observed in a spectral range between 350 and 700 nm from shocked nitromethane above 9 GPa. The temporal profile suggests that shocked nitromethane detonates through three characteristic periods, namely an induction period, a hock initiation period, and a thermal explosion period. This paper discusses temporal and chemical characteristics of these periods and present the temperature of the shock-detonating nitromethane at pressures between 9 and 15 GPa.

  18. Research on diabatic initialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, Akira

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to contribute to the improvement of the analyses of irrotational wind and moisture fields in the trophics through advancement in the technique of initialization by incorporating diabatic effects. Significant accomplishments made during the period May 1990 to April 1991 in the following areas are presented: (1) estimation of the uncertainty of daily synoptic analyses in the tropics; (2) normal modes of Laplace's tidal equations for zonal wavenumber zero; and (3) tropical initialization to ameliorate the spin-up problem of precipitation forecasts. The focus of current research and plans for next year are also presented.

  19. STI Program Multimedia Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Kaye, Karen

    1993-01-01

    This paper relates the experience of the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program in introducing multimedia within the STI Program framework. A discussion of multimedia technology is included to provide context for the STI Program effort. The STI Program's Multimedia Initiative is discussed in detail. Parallels and differences between multimedia and traditional information systems project development are highlighted. Challenges faced by the program in initiating its multimedia project are summarized along with lessons learned. The paper concludes with a synopsis of the benefits the program hopes to provide its users through the introduction of multimedia illustrated by examples of successful multimedia projects.

  20. The ESCRT Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, James H.

    2010-01-01

    The ESCRT machinery consists of the peripheral membrane protein complexes, ESCRT-0, -I, -II, -III, and Vps4-Vta1, and the ALIX homodimer. The ESCRT system is required for degradation of unneeded or dangerous plasma membrane proteins; biogenesis of the lysosome and the yeast vacuole; the budding of most membrane enveloped viruses; the membrane abscission step in cytokinesis; macroautophagy; and several other processes. From their initial discovery in 2001-2002, the literature on ESCRTs has grown exponentially. This review will describe the structure and function of the six complexes noted above and summarizes current knowledge of their mechanistic roles in cellular pathways and in disease. PMID:20653365

  1. Four translation initiation pathways employed by the leaderless mRNA in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Akulich, Kseniya A.; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Terenin, Ilya M.; Smirnova, Victoria V.; Anisimova, Aleksandra S.; Makeeva, Desislava S.; Arkhipova, Valentina I.; Stolboushkina, Elena A.; Garber, Maria B.; Prokofjeva, Maria M.; Spirin, Pavel V.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Shatsky, Ivan N.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.

    2016-01-01

    mRNAs lacking 5′ untranslated regions (leaderless mRNAs) are molecular relics of an ancient translation initiation pathway. Nevertheless, they still represent a significant portion of transcriptome in some taxons, including a number of eukaryotic species. In bacteria and archaea, the leaderless mRNAs can bind non-dissociated 70 S ribosomes and initiate translation without protein initiation factors involved. Here we use the Fleeting mRNA Transfection technique (FLERT) to show that translation of a leaderless reporter mRNA is resistant to conditions when eIF2 and eIF4F, two key eukaryotic translation initiation factors, are inactivated in mammalian cells. We report an unconventional translation initiation pathway utilized by the leaderless mRNA in vitro, in addition to the previously described 80S-, eIF2-, or eIF2D-mediated modes. This mechanism is a bacterial-like eIF5B/IF2-assisted initiation that has only been reported for hepatitis C virus-like internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs). Therefore, the leaderless mRNA is able to take any of four different translation initiation pathways in eukaryotes. PMID:27892500

  2. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    SciTech Connect

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  3. The SEED Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teich, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Committed to fulfilling the promise of the green economy, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) launched the Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative (www.theseedcenter.org) in October 2010. The project advances sustainability and clean energy workforce development practices at community colleges by…

  4. Information Technology Initiative (Videorecording),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Physical description: 1 VHS video; col.; sd.; mono.; standard playback sp.; 35:40 mins.; 1/2 in. In this video, Dr. Kurt Fisher, Deputy Director for Information Technology , introduces the Corporate Information Management (CIM) program and explains the following major technical initiatives: reuse/repositories; I-case; data administration; information technology architecture; software process improvement; standards.

  5. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  6. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-01

    The initiative will strategically focus and rally EERE’s clean energy technology offices and Advanced Manufacturing Office around the urgent competitive opportunity for the United States to be the leader in the clean energy manufacturing industries and jobs of today and tomorrow.

  7. Kinesthetic Initial Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, Gladys

    1978-01-01

    The author's plans for Kinesthetic Initial Training (KIT), a system of interrelated subjects designed to teach handicapped and gifted students basic reading, writing, arithmetic, and grammar skills through the use of concrete materials, are described. KIT components are reviewed, and implications are considered for areas of psychomotor,…

  8. Envisioning Effective Laptop Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, Jon M.; Britten, Jody; Ring, Gail

    2008-01-01

    A recent survey of 74 building-level school administrators in Indiana challenged many of the assumptions regarding 1:1 laptop initiatives and how 1:1 access would affect teaching and learning. It also revealed disturbing realities regarding instructional practices of teachers, as well as efforts to improve school technology integration. The intent…

  9. Ontario's Student Voice Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This article describes in some detail aspects of the Student Voice initiative funded and championed by Ontario's Ministry of Education since 2008. The project enables thousands of students to make their voices heard in meaningful ways and to participate in student-led research. Some students from grades 7 to 12 become members of the Student…

  10. Department-Initiated Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne; De Geest, Els

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the activity of three secondary school mathematics departments in England in self-initiated states of change that led to overall improvements in students' achievements when compared to previous cohorts. This took place without intervention and without their participation in external projects. They provide examples of departments…

  11. Statistical initial orbit determination

    SciTech Connect

    Taff, L.G.; Belkin, B.; Schweiter, G.A.; Sommar, K. D.H. Wagner Associates, Inc., Paoli, PA )

    1992-02-01

    For the ballistic missile initial orbit determination problem in particular, the concept of 'launch folders' is extended. This allows to decouple the observational data from the initial orbit determination problem per se. The observational data is only used to select among the possible orbital element sets in the group of folders. Monte Carlo simulations using up to 7200 orbital element sets are described. The results are compared to the true orbital element set and the one a good radar would have been able to produce if collocated with the optical sensor. The simplest version of the new method routinely outperforms the radar initial orbital element set by a factor of two in future miss distance. In addition, not only can a differentially corrected orbital element set be produced via this approach - after only two measurements of direction - but also an updated, meaningful, six-dimensional covariance array for it can be calculated. This technique represents a significant advance in initial orbit determination for this problem, and the concept can easily be extended to minor planets and artificial satellites. 9 refs.

  12. Transformative Change Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, D. D.; Kirby, C.; Witt, M. A.; Richie, D.; Mix, S.; Feldbaum, M.; Liu, S.; Mason, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Transformative Change Initiative (TCI) is dedicated to assisting community colleges to scale up innovation in the form of guided pathways, programs of study, and evidence-based strategies to improve student outcomes and program, organization, and system performance. The impetus for TCI is the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and…

  13. Best Practices & Outstanding Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this article, "Training" editors recognize innovative and successful learning and development programs and practices. They share best practices from Automatic Data Processing, Inc., Farmers Insurance Group, FedEx Express, InterContinental Hotels Group, and Oakwood Temporary Housing. They also present the outstanding initiatives of EMD Serono,…

  14. Strategic Defense Initiative program

    SciTech Connect

    Conachan, F.C.

    1991-05-01

    This paper discusses the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program. It summarizes the major programmatic and technological lessons learned from the SDI program over the past 7 years. It provides information on: past uses of SDI funds, persistent optimism in planning and starting projects, evolution of SDI architecture, and accuracy of cost estimates.

  15. Focusing educational initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.

    1990-01-01

    The United States will soon be facing a critical shortage of aerospace scientists and engineers. To address this problem, Space Grant Colleges can assist in focusing interest in existing educational initiatives and in creating new educational opportunities, particularly for women and underrepresented minorities.

  16. America's Caribbean Basin Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasten, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly all of the countries that have succeeded in their development over the past 30 years have done so on the strength of market-oriented policies and vigorous participation in the international economy. Aid must be complemented by trade and investment. The Caribbean Basin Initiative puts these principles into practice. (RM)

  17. Initial Teaching Orthographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Godfrey

    To achieve its purpose, an initial teaching orthography (i.t.o.) should be as simple in form and substance as possible; it should be phonemic rather than phonetic. The 40 sounds distinguished by Pitmanic shorthand and some provision for schwa can serve as a basic code. The symbols can be derived from either of two major sources--standardizing the…

  18. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  19. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  20. Complex odontoma.

    PubMed

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  1. Electrogenic Tuning of the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian D.; Goldberg, Ethan M.; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-01-01

    Action potentials (APs) provide the primary means of rapid information transfer in the nervous system. Where exactly these signals are initiated in neurons has been a basic question in neurobiology and the subject of extensive study. Converging lines of evidence indicate that APs are initiated in a discrete and highly specialized portion of the axon—the axon initial segment (AIS). The authors review key aspects of the organization and function of the AIS and focus on recent work that has provided important insights into its electrical signaling properties. In addition to its main role in AP initiation, the new findings suggest that the AIS is also a site of complex AP modulation by specific types of ion channels localized to this axonal domain. PMID:20007821

  2. The Biophysics Microgravity Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical microgravity research on the International Space Station using biological materials has been ongoing for several decades. The well-documented substantive effects of long duration microgravity include the facilitation of the assembly of biological macromolecules into large structures, e.g., formation of large protein crystals under micro-gravity. NASA is invested not only in understanding the possible physical mechanisms of crystal growth, but also promoting two flight investigations to determine the influence of µ-gravity on protein crystal quality. In addition to crystal growth, flight investigations to determine the effects of shear on nucleation and subsequent formation of complex structures (e.g., crystals, fibrils, etc.) are also supported. It is now considered that long duration microgravity research aboard the ISS could also make possible the formation of large complex biological and biomimetic materials. Investigations of various materials undergoing complex structure formation in microgravity will not only strengthen NASA science programs, but may also provide invaluable insight towards the construction of large complex tissues, organs, or biomimetic materials on Earth.

  3. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  4. Life’s Order, Complexity, Organization, and Its Thermodynamic–Holistic Imperatives

    PubMed Central

    Egel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In memoriam Jeffrey S. Wicken (1942–2002)—the evolutionarily minded biochemist, who in the 1970/80s strived for a synthesis of biological and physical theories to fathom the tentative origins of life. Several integrative concepts are worth remembering from Wicken’s legacy. (i) Connecting life’s origins and complex organization to a preexisting physical world demands a thermodynamically sound transition. (ii) Energetic ‘charging’ of the prebiosphere must precede the emergence of biological organization. (iii) Environmental energy gradients are exploited progressively, approaching maximum interactive structure and minimum dissipation. (iv) Dynamic self-assembly of prebiotic organic matter is driven by hydrophobic tension between water and amphiphilic building blocks, such as aggregating peptides from non-polar amino acids and base stacking in nucleic acids. (v) The dynamics of autocatalytic self-organization are facilitated by a multiplicity of weak interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, within and between macromolecular assemblies. (vi) The coevolution of (initially uncoded) proteins and nucleic acids in energy-coupled and metabolically active so-called ‘microspheres’ is more realistic as a kinetic transition model of primal biogenesis than ‘hypercycle replication’ theories for nucleic acid replicators on their own. All these considerations blend well with the current understanding that sunlight UV-induced photo-electronic excitation of colloidal metal sulfide particles appears most suitable as a prebiotic driver of organic synthesis reactions, in tight cooperation with organic, phase-separated, catalytic ‘microspheres’. On the ‘continuist vs. miraculist’ schism described by Iris Fry for origins-of-life considerations (Table 1), Wicken was a fervent early protagonist of holistic ‘continuist’ views and agenda. PMID:25371269

  5. The NLM Indexing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Aronson, A R; Bodenreider, O; Chang, H F; Humphrey, S M; Mork, J G; Nelson, S J; Rindflesch, T C; Wilbur, W J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of NLM's Indexing Initiative (IND) is to investigate methods whereby automated indexing methods partially or completely substitute for current indexing practices. The project will be considered a success if methods can be designed and implemented that result in retrieval performance that is equal to or better than the retrieval performance of systems based principally on humanly assigned index terms. We describe the current state of the project and discuss our plans for the future.

  6. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  7. Genetics of Fiber Initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the cellular mechanisms involved in fiber initiation, three fiberless lines were crossed with wildtype and fuzzless seed cotton and the F1, F2 and BC1 progeny ratios are presently being evaluated. The three fiberless lines included: MD17 (N1N1n2n2), SL1-7-1 (N1N1fl1fl1n3n3) and XZ142w. XZ...

  8. The space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, Pete

    1991-01-01

    A number of view graph charts are presented which outline the presentation. Outlined are reasons for going to Mars, why it is necessary to go to the Moon first, and the presidential decision on the space exploration initiative. Other representative charts are entitled: Lunar transportation system requirement drivers; Mars transportation system requirement drivers; National space policy goals; Exploration hardware needed; Mars mission profile; Science on the Moon and Mars; and Two independent reviews.

  9. MSI develops refugee initiative.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This brief article highlights the new initiative by Marie Stopes International (MSI), which is part of a Reproductive Health for Refugees Consortium of four organizations formed in 1995. The new initiative will promote awareness about the need for reproductive health among refugees. Over 80% of refugees are women and children who fled a variety of disasters only to be at high risk from sexual violence, sexually transmitted infections, and the effects of unintended and unsafe pregnancies. The consortium members will work to increase donors' understanding of the health conditions of women and to significantly increase donor support for reproductive health initiatives. In addition to the role of advocacy, MSI will be introducing refugee services into its global network of reproductive health services. MSI gained experience in delivering reproductive health services in refugee situations in the former Yugoslavia and among Mozambican refugees in Malawi. MSI is investigating sources of information from several countries about refugees' needs. The consortium is also collecting information on the most effective ways of delivering reproductive health services in refugee situations. The aim is to institutionalize reproductive health services into all humanitarian responses. MSI has developed refugee programs over the past 3 years in the former Yugoslavia, Malawi, Sri Lanka, and Sierra Leone. MSI expects to establish projects in 1996 for refugees in Zaire, Guinea, and Mozambique. The numbers of displaced persons or refugees is continuing to increase worldwide, and there is a continued need to provide for these vulnerable communities.

  10. Initiation Train Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Elizabeth; Johnson, Carl; Liechty, Gary; Whitley, Von

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to evaluate and qualify a new detonator diagnostic, booster selection and main charge configuration, a variety of small-scale tests have been conducted. This paper will describe the needs, testing approach and model validation. Because of the limited size available some novel approaches were made to understand the observed phenomenon. Function time and time of arrival at various locations in the initiation train are desirable data points. Knowing when each segment initiates the next segment and the time to run up to detonation is critical. Results of our experiments were modeled for timing accuracy, wave shape and pressure. Agreement between the experiments and models will be discussed. The testing that will be discussed is time of arrival wires, PDV, and fiber optic arrays. The time of arrival wire measures the detonator cup breakout time. When correlated to bridge burst, an absolute time is collected. This data point also gives time zero for the booster initiation. Many models actually start at the booster, rather than the detonator, so the inclusion of this data point will improve modeling efforts.

  11. Precision flyer initiator

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A

    1999-04-19

    A propulsion point design is presented for lifting geological samples from Mars. Vehicle complexity is kept low by choosing a monopropellant single stage. Little new development is needed, as miniature pump fed hydrazine has been demonstrated. Loading the propellant just prior to operation avoids structural, thermal, and safety constraints otherwise imposed by earlier mission phases. hardware mass and engineering effort are thereby diminished. The Mars liftoff mass is 7/8 hydrazine, <5% propulsion hardware, and >3% each for the payload and guidance.

  12. Initial Ada components evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebes, Travis

    1989-01-01

    The SAIC has the responsibility for independent test and validation of the SSE. They have been using a mathematical functions library package implemented in Ada to test the SSE IV and V process. The library package consists of elementary mathematical functions and is both machine and accuracy independent. The SSE Ada components evaluation includes code complexity metrics based on Halstead's software science metrics and McCabe's measure of cyclomatic complexity. Halstead's metrics are based on the number of operators and operands on a logical unit of code and are compiled from the number of distinct operators, distinct operands, and total number of occurrences of operators and operands. These metrics give an indication of the physical size of a program in terms of operators and operands and are used diagnostically to point to potential problems. McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity Metrics (CCM) are compiled from flow charts transformed to equivalent directed graphs. The CCM is a measure of the total number of linearly independent paths through the code's control structure. These metrics were computed for the Ada mathematical functions library using Software Automated Verification and Validation (SAVVAS), the SSE IV and V tool. A table with selected results was shown, indicating that most of these routines are of good quality. Thresholds for the Halstead measures indicate poor quality if the length metric exceeds 260 or difficulty is greater than 190. The McCabe CCM indicated a high quality of software products.

  13. 70S-scanning initiation is a novel and frequent initiation mode of ribosomal translation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Wittek, Daniela; Gupta, Romi; Qin, Bo; Ueda, Takuya; Krause, Roland; Yamamoto, Kaori; Albrecht, Renate; Pech, Markus; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2016-01-01

    According to the standard model of bacterial translation initiation, the small ribosomal 30S subunit binds to the initiation site of an mRNA with the help of three initiation factors (IF1–IF3). Here, we describe a novel type of initiation termed “70S-scanning initiation,” where the 70S ribosome does not necessarily dissociate after translation of a cistron, but rather scans to the initiation site of the downstream cistron. We detailed the mechanism of 70S-scanning initiation by designing unique monocistronic and polycistronic mRNAs harboring translation reporters, and by reconstituting systems to characterize each distinct mode of initiation. Results show that 70S scanning is triggered by fMet-tRNA and does not require energy; the Shine–Dalgarno sequence is an essential recognition element of the initiation site. IF1 and IF3 requirements for the various initiation modes were assessed by the formation of productive initiation complexes leading to synthesis of active proteins. IF3 is essential and IF1 is highly stimulating for the 70S-scanning mode. The task of IF1 appears to be the prevention of untimely interference by ternary aminoacyl (aa)-tRNA•elongation factor thermo unstable (EF-Tu)•GTP complexes. Evidence indicates that at least 50% of bacterial initiation events use the 70S-scanning mode, underscoring the relative importance of this translation initiation mechanism. PMID:26888283

  14. Through bulkhead initiator studies

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D.R.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes recent work done to demonstrate feasibility of a fail-safe Through Bulkhead Initiator with minimum dimensions and suitable for use in cyclical thermal environments. Much of the ground work for a fail-safe TBI was previously done by A.C. Schwartz. This study is an expansion of Schwartz`s work to evaluate devices with bulkheads of 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718; explosive donors of PETN, BNCP, and a 0.005 inch thick steel flying plate donor traveling at 2.6 mm/{micro}s; and explosive acceptors of PETN and BNCP. Bulkhead thickness were evaluated in the range of 0.040 to 0.180 inch. The explosive acceptors initiated a small HMX pellet to drive a 0.005 inch thick steel flying plate, and VISAR histories of the HMX-driven flying plates were the measure of acceptable performance. A companion set of samples used a PMMA acceptor to measure the particle velocities at the bulkhead/PMMA interface with VISAR. These data were used to compute the input pressure to the acceptor explosives in an attempt to measure initiation threshold. Unfortunately, the range of bulkhead thicknesses tested did not give any failures, thus the threshold was not determined. It was found that either explosive or the flying plate would perform as a TBI in the bulkhead thickness range tested. The optimum TBI is about 0.060 inches thick, and steel bulkheads seem to be more structurally sound than those made of Inconel. That is, cross section views of the Inconel bulkheads showed it to be more prone to stress cracking than was the 304 stainless steel. Both PETN and BNCP showed good performance when tested at {minus}65 F following thermal cycling of {minus}65 F to +165 F. Analysis of the TBI function times showed that BNCP acceptor explosives were undergoing the classical deflagration to detonation process. The PETN acceptors were undergoing prompt detonation.

  15. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the Initial Blood Storage Experiment (IBSE) was based upon a carefully controlled comparison between identical sets of human blood cell suspensions - red cells, white cell, and platelets - one set of which was transported aboard the Columbia on a 6 day 11 hour mission, and the other held on the ground. Both sets were carried inside stainless steel dewars within specially fabricated flight hardware. Individual bags of cell suspensions were randomly assigned with respect to ground vs orbit status, dewar chamber, and specific location within the dewar. To foster optimal preservation, each cell type was held under specific optimal conditions of pH, ionic strength, solute concentration, gas tension, and temperature. An added variable in this initial experiment was provided by the use of three different polymer/plasticizer formulations for the sealed bags which held the blood cells. At termination of the experiment, aliquots of the suspensions, identified only by code, were distributed to be assayed. Assays were selected to constitute a broad survey of cellular properties and thereby maximize the chances of detection of gravitational effects. A total of 74 different outcome measurements were reported for statistical analysis. When the measurements were completed, the results were entered into the IBSE data base, at which time the data were matched with the original blood bag numbers to determine their status with respect to polymer/plasticizer type, orbit status (orbit or ground), and storage position within the experimental hardware. The data were studied by analysis of variance. Initially, type of bag and orbital status were main factors; later more detailed analyses were made on specific issues such as position in the hardware and specific plastic. If the analysis of variance indicated a statistical significance at the 5 percent level the corresponding p-value was reported.

  16. Stirling to Flight Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, Kenneth E.; Mason, Lee S.; Ndu, Obi; Smith, Clayton; Withrow, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Flight (S2F) initiative with the objective of developing a 100-500 We Stirling generator system. Additionally, a different approach is being devised for this initiative to avoid pitfalls of the past, and apply lessons learned from the recent ASRG experience. Two key aspects of this initiative are a Stirling System Technology Maturation Effort, and a Surrogate Mission Team (SMT) intended to provide clear mission pull and requirements context. The S2F project seeks to lead directly into a DOE flight system development of a new SRG. This paper will detail the proposed S2F initiative, and provide specifics on the key efforts designed to pave a forward path for bringing Stirling technology to flight.

  17. UNLV Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hechanova, Anthony E.; Johnson, Allen; O'Toole, Brendan; Trabia, Mohamed; Peterson, Per

    2012-10-25

    Evaluation of the Crack growth rate (CGR) of Alloy 617 and Alloy 276 under constant K at ambient temperature has been completed. Creep deformation of Alloy 230 at different temperature range and load level has been completed and heat to heat variation has been noticed. Creep deformation study of Alloy 276 has been completed under an applied initial stress level of 10% of yield stress at 950ºC. The grain size evaluation of the tested creep specimens of Alloy 276 has been completed.

  18. Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An overview of President Bush's Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) and it's three main components, Space Station Freedom, a Permanent Lunar Base, and a Manned Mission to Mars is provided. Computer simulations of the Space Station Freedom and Permanent Lunar Base are shown, and an animated sequence describes a Mars mission where heavy lift vehicle will bring components of a Mars Spacecraft into orbit, where it will be put together by astronauts using a robotic arm. The Mars spacecraft is shown orbiting Mars and discharging a lander to the surface, carrying human explorers. The video also details the SEI's Outreach Program, designed to garner interest in and ideas for Space Exploration.

  19. Initiation of slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanratty, T.J.; Woods, B.D.

    1995-12-31

    The initiation of slug flow in a horizontal pipe can be predicted either by considering the stability of a slug or by considering the stability of a stratified flow. Measurements of the shedding rate of slugs are used to define necessary conditions for the existence of a slug. Recent results show that slugs develop from an unstable stratified flow through the evolution of small wavelength waves into large wavelength waves that have the possibility of growing to form a slug. The mechanism appears to be quite different for fluids with viscosities close to water than for fluids with large viscosities (20 centipoise).

  20. Human Research Initiative (HRI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian

    2003-01-01

    A code U initiative starting in the FY04 budget includes specific funding for 'Phase Change' and 'Multiphase Flow Research' on the ISS. NASA GRC developed a concept for two facilities based on funding/schedule constraints: 1) Two Phase Flow Facility (TphiFFy) which assumes integrating into FIR; 2) Contact Line Dynamics Experiment Facility (CLiDE) which assumes integration into MSG. Each facility will accommodate multiple experiments conducted by NRA selected PIs with an overall goal of enabling specific NASA strategic objectives. There may also be a significant ground-based component.

  1. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-07-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System`s tank waste retrieval Program.

  2. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  3. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  4. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-03-19

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome-the high-eukaryote-specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)-remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  5. Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    In Brazil there is intense research activity in nanotechnology, most of these developed in universities and research institutes. The Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative (BNI) aims to integrate government actions to promote the competitiveness of the Brazilian industry. This initiative is founded on support for research and development in the laboratories of the National Laboratories for Nanotechnology (SisNANO), starting from an improvement in infrastructure and opening of laboratories for users of academia and business, promoting interaction and transfer knowledge between academia and business. Country currently has 26 thematic networks of nanotechnology, 16 -Virtual-National Institutes of Technology, seven National- Laboratories and 18 Associate Laboratories, which comprise the SisNANO. Seeking to expand and share governance with other government actors, the Interministries Committee for Nanotechnology was set up, composed of 10 ministries, and has the task of coordinating the entire program of the Federal Government Nanotechnology.Cooperation activities are an important part of BNI. Currently Brazil has cooperation programs with U.S., China, Canada and European Union among others. Recently, Brazil decided to join the European NanoReg program where 60 research groups are joining efforts to provide protocols and standards that can help regulatory agencies and governments.

  6. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway.

  7. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Lee, R.S.

    1998-05-26

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or ``flyer`` is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices. 10 figs.

  8. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Alan M.; Lee, Ronald S.

    1998-01-01

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or "flyer" is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices.

  9. Strategic defense initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Division has a leading role, including that of program management, in a major new programmatic thrust of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is in support of the national Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). It is appropriate for the Laboratory to become significantly involved in the program because several of the most promising SDI technologies are in areas for which ORNL (together with Y-12 and K-25) have strong capabilities and significant resources. The initial ORNL work in support of the SDI program is focused on three technologies in which ORNL has extensive experience and traditionally strong research and development programs: (1) space nuclear power, (2) flywheel energy storage, and (3) neutral particle beams. The space nuclear program will utilize our capabilities in areas such as refractory materials, high-temperature alkali metal systems, shielding, and instrumentation. Space nuclear reactors capable of supplying multimegawatt levels of electrical power on a continuous and long-term basis are envisioned to be required for a variety of SDI surveillance satellites and space-borne weapons platforms. The feasibility of an alkali metal Rankine power conversion cycle, which has promise of providing high power with a very low system mass, is planned for study.

  10. Kazakhstan Space Weather Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryakunova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    Kazakhstan experimental complex is a center of experimental study of space weather. This complex is situated near Almaty, Kazakhstan and includes experimental setup for registration of cosmic ray intensity (neutron monitor) at altitude of 3340 m above sea level, geomagnetic observatory and setup for registration of solar flux density with frequency of 1 and 3 GHz with 1 second time resolution. Results of space environment monitoring in real time are accessible via Internet. This experimental information is used for space weather investigations and different cosmic ray effects. Almaty mountain cosmic ray station is one of the most suitable and sensitive stations for investigation and forecasting of the dangerous situations for satellites; for this reason Almaty cosmic ray station is included in the world-wide neutron monitor network for the real-time monitoring of the space weather conditions and European Database NMDB (www.nmdb.eu). All data are represented on the web-site of the Institute of Ionosphere (www.ionos.kz) in real time. Since July, 2006 the space environment prediction laboratory represents the forecast of geomagnetic activity every day on the same site (www.ionos.kz/?q=en/node/21).

  11. Cap-dependent, scanning-free translation initiation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Haimov, Ora; Sinvani, Hadar; Dikstein, Rivka

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation is an intricate and multi-step process that includes 43S Pre-Initiation Complex (PIC) assembly, attachment of the PIC to the mRNA, scanning, start codon selection and 60S subunit joining. Translation initiation of most mRNAs involves recognition of a 5'end m7G cap and ribosomal scanning in which the 5' UTR is checked for complementarity with the AUG. There is however an increasing number of mRNAs directing translation initiation that deviate from the predominant mechanism. In this review we summarize the canonical translation initiation process and describe non-canonical mechanisms that are cap-dependent but operate without scanning. In particular we focus on several examples of translation initiation driven either by mRNAs with extremely short 5' leaders or by highly complex 5' UTRs that promote ribosome shunting.

  12. Initializing Embedded Data Processors From A Single Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Edward A.; D'Ambrose, John J.; Petras, Richard D.; Turner, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    Initial-computer-program-loading system provides startup information to all embedded data processors (EDP's) in general-purpose computer system. Remote processors given image of startup diskette so real local diskette and drive unneeded. System less complex and equipment costs less. Additional benefit, initial program loading tests bus. If boot-up program transmitted correctly, bus assumed to be operating properly.

  13. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  14. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  15. The Knowledge Stealing Initiative?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goshorn, Larry

    2005-01-01

    I have the honor of being on the Academy of Program and Project Leadership (APPL) Knowledge Sharing Feedback and Assessment Team (FAA), and as such, I am privileged to receive the feedback written by many of you as attendees of the Project Management (PM) Master s Forums. It is the intent of the FAA Team and APPL leadership to use this feedback as a tool for continuous program improvement. As a retired (sort of) PM in the payload contracting industry, I'm a big supporter of NASA s Knowledge Sharing Initiative (KSI), especially the Master's Forums. I really enjoy participating in them. Unfortunately I had to miss the 8th forum in Pasadena this past Spring, but I did get the feedback package for the Assessment Team work. So here I was, reviewing twelve pages of comments, reflections, learning notes and critiques from attendees of the 8th forum.

  16. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1982-09-01

    Report III, Volume 1 contains those specifications numbered A through J, as follows: General Specifications (A); Specifications for Pressure Vessels (C); Specifications for Tanks (D); Specifications for Exchangers (E); Specifications for Fired Heaters (F); Specifications for Pumps and Drivers (G); and Specifications for Instrumentation (J). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project, and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available to the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors. Report III, Volume 1 also contains the unique specifications prepared for Plants 8, 15, and 27. These specifications will be substantially reviewed during Phase I of the project, and modified as necessary for use during the engineering, procurement, and construction of this project.

  17. MONTANA PALLADIUM RESEARCH INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, John; McCloskey, Jay; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Snyder, Stuart; Gurney, Brian

    2012-05-09

    Project Objective: The overarching objective of the Montana Palladium Research Initiative is to perform scientific research on the properties and uses of palladium in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The purpose of the research will be to explore possible palladium as an alternative to platinum in hydrogen-economy applications. To achieve this objective, the Initiatives activities will focus on several cutting-edge research approaches across a range of disciplines, including metallurgy, biomimetics, instrumentation development, and systems analysis. Background: Platinum-group elements (PGEs) play significant roles in processing hydrogen, an element that shows high potential to address this need in the U.S. and the world for inexpensive, reliable, clean energy. Platinum, however, is a very expensive component of current and planned systems, so less-expensive alternatives that have similar physical properties are being sought. To this end, several tasks have been defined under the rubric of the Montana Palladium Research Iniative. This broad swath of activities will allow progress on several fronts. The membrane-related activities of Task 1 employs state-of-the-art and leading-edge technologies to develop new, ceramic-substrate metallic membranes for the production of high-purity hydrogen, and develop techniques for the production of thin, defect-free platinum group element catalytic membranes for energy production and pollution control. The biomimetic work in Task 2 explores the use of substrate-attached hydrogen-producing enzymes and the encapsulation of palladium in virion-based protein coats to determine their utility for distributed hydrogen production. Task 3 work involves developing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a real-time, in situ diagnostic technique to characterize PGEs nanoparticles for process monitoring and control. The systems engineering work in task 4 will

  18. Green Power Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Patrick Barry

    2013-01-28

    National energy policy supports the gathering of more detailed and authoritative data on the introduction of renewable bio-based fuels into new and existing district energy systems via the application of biomass gasification. The University of Iowa developed a biomass-fueled, university-scale steam generation system based on biomass gasification technologies. The system serves as a state-of-the-art research and educational facility in the emerging application of gasification in steam generation. The facility, which includes a smaller down-draft gasifier and a larger multi-stage biomass boiler, was designed to operate primarily on wood-based fuels, but has provisions for testing other biomass fuel sources produced within a 100-mile radius, providing enough flexibility to meet the fluctuating local supply of biomass from industry and Midwest agriculture. The equipment was installed in an existing, staffed facility. The down-draft gasifier unit is operated by College of Engineering staff and students, under the direct technical supervision of qualified Utilities plant staff. The Green Power Initiative also includes a substantial, innovative educational component. In addition to an onsite, graduate-level research program in biomass fuels, the investigators have integrated undergraduate and graduate level teaching – through classroom studies and experiential learning – and applied research into a biomass-based, university-scale, functioning power plant. University of Iowa is unique in that it currently has multiple renewable energy technologies deployed, including significant biomass combustion (oat hulls) at its Main Power Plant and a new reciprocating engine based renewable district energy system. This project complements and supports the national energy policy and State of Iowa initiatives in ethanol and biodiesel. Byproducts of ethanol and biodiesel processes (distiller grains) as well as industry residues (oat hulls, wood chips, construction and demolition

  19. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartly, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the importance of historical effects in fractional-order systems, this paper presents a general fractional-order control theory that includes the time-varying initialization response. Previous studies have not properly accounted for these historical effects. The initialization response, along with the forced response, for fractional-order systems is determined. Stability properties of fractional-order systems are presented in the complex Airplane, which is a transformation of the s-plane. Time responses are discussed with respect to pole positions in the complex Airplane and frequency response behavior is included. A fractional-order vector space representation, which is a generalization of the state space concept, is presented including the initialization response. Control methods for vector representations of initialized fractional-order systems are shown. Nyquist, root-locus, and other input-output control methods are adapted to the control of fractional-order systems. Finally, the fractional-order differintegral is generalized to continuous order-distributions that have the possibility of including a continuum of fractional orders in a system element.

  20. Cortical microtubule arrays are initiated from a nonrandom prepattern driven by atypical microtubule initiation.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Lioutas, Antonios; Deinum, Eva E; Tindemans, Simon H; Ehrhardt, David W; Emons, Anne Mie C; Vos, Jan W; Mulder, Bela M

    2013-03-01

    The ordered arrangement of cortical microtubules in growing plant cells is essential for anisotropic cell expansion and, hence, for plant morphogenesis. These arrays are dismantled when the microtubule cytoskeleton is rearranged during mitosis and reassembled following completion of cytokinesis. The reassembly of the cortical array has often been considered as initiating from a state of randomness, from which order arises at least partly through self-organizing mechanisms. However, some studies have shown evidence for ordering at early stages of array assembly. To investigate how cortical arrays are initiated in higher plant cells, we performed live-cell imaging studies of cortical array assembly in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 cells after cytokinesis and drug-induced disassembly. We found that cortical arrays in both cases did not initiate randomly but with a significant overrepresentation of microtubules at diagonal angles with respect to the cell axis, which coincides with the predominant orientation of the microtubules before their disappearance from the cell cortex in preprophase. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root cells, recovery from drug-induced disassembly was also nonrandom and correlated with the organization of the previous array, although no diagonal bias was observed in these cells. Surprisingly, during initiation, only about one-half of the new microtubules were nucleated from locations marked by green fluorescent protein-γ-tubulin complex protein2-tagged γ-nucleation complexes (γ-tubulin ring complex), therefore indicating that a large proportion of early polymers was initiated by a noncanonical mechanism not involving γ-tubulin ring complex. Simulation studies indicate that the high rate of noncanonical initiation of new microtubules has the potential to accelerate the rate of array repopulation.

  1. Code Disentanglement: Initial Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlbier, John Greaton; Kelley, Timothy M.; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Calef, Matthew Thomas

    2015-01-27

    The first step to making more ambitious changes in the EAP code base is to disentangle the code into a set of independent, levelized packages. We define a package as a collection of code, most often across a set of files, that provides a defined set of functionality; a package a) can be built and tested as an entity and b) fits within an overall levelization design. Each package contributes one or more libraries, or an application that uses the other libraries. A package set is levelized if the relationships between packages form a directed, acyclic graph and each package uses only packages at lower levels of the diagram (in Fortran this relationship is often describable by the use relationship between modules). Independent packages permit independent- and therefore parallel|development. The packages form separable units for the purposes of development and testing. This is a proven path for enabling finer-grained changes to a complex code.

  2. Cell complexes through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klette, Reinhard

    2000-10-01

    The history of cell complexes is closely related to the birth and development of topology in general. Johann Benedict Listing (1802 - 1882) introduced the term 'topology' into mathematics in a paper published in 1847, and he also defined cell complexes for the first time in a paper published in 1862. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777 - 1855) is often cited as the one who initiated these ideas, but he did not publish either on topology or on cell complexes. The pioneering work of Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783) on graphs is also often cited as the birth of topology, and Euler's work was cited by Listing in 1862 as a stimulus for his research on cell complexes. There are different branches in topology which have little in common: point set topology, algebraic topology, differential topology etc. Confusion may arise if just 'topology' is specified, without clarifying the used concept. Topological subjects in mathematics are often related to continuous models, and therefore quite irrelevant to computer based solutions in image analysis. Compared to this, only a minority of topology publications in mathematics addresses discrete spaces which are appropriate for computer-based image analysis. In these cases, often the notion of a cell complex plays a crucial role. This paper briefly reports on a few of these publications. This paper is not intended to cover the very lively progress in cell complex studies within the context of image analysis during the last two decades. Basically it stops its historic review at the time when this subject in image analysis research gained speed in 1980 - 1990. As a general point of view, the paper indicates that image analysis contributes to a fusion of topological concepts, the geometric and the abstract cell structure approach and point set topology, which may lead towards new problems for the study of topologies defined on geometric or abstract cell complexes.

  3. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  4. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science - which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour - is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  5. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... corner, the edge of the Antarctic coastline and some sea ice can be seen through some thin, high cirrus clouds. The right-hand panel ...

  6. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  7. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Robert; Asai, M.; Brand, H.; Chiera, N. M.; Di Nitto, A.; Dressler, R.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Even, J.; Fangli, F.; Goetz, M.; Haba, H.; Hartmann, W.; Jäger, E.; Kaji, D.; Kanaya, J.; Kaneya, Y.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Komori, Y.; Kraus, B.; Kratz, J. V.; Krier, J.; Kudou, Y.; Kurz, N.; Miyashita, S.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Murakami, M.; Nagame, Y.; Ooe, K.; Piguet, D.; Sato, N.; Sato, T. K.; Steiner, J.; Steinegger, P.; Sumita, T.; Takeyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Tomitsuka, T.; Toyoshima, A.; Tsukada, K.; Türler, A.; Usoltsev, I.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wiehl, N.; Wittwer, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaki, S.; Yano, S.; Yamaki, S.; Qin, Z.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO)6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  8. TFTR initial operations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fonck, R.

    1983-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has operated since December 1982 with ohmically heated plasmas. Routine operation with feedback control of plasma current, position, and density has been obtained for plasmas with I/sub p/ approx. = 800 kA, a = 68 cm, R = 250 cm, and B/sub t/ = 27 kG. A maximum plasma current of 1 MA was achieved with q approx. = 2.5. Energy confinement times of approx. 150 msec were measured for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas with anti n/sub e/ approx. = 2 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, T/sub e/ (0) approx. = 1.5 keV, T/sub i/ (0) approx. = 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. = 3. The preliminary results suggest a size-cubed scaling from PLT and are consistent with Alcator C scaling where tau approx. nR/sup 2/a. Initial measurements of plasma disruption characteristics indicate current decay rates of approx. 800 kA in 8 ms which is within the TFTR design requirement of 3 MA in 3 ms.

  9. ALOS-2 initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  10. Urban Environment Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Urban Environment Initiative (UEI), has been established as part of a Cooperative Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The UEI is part of NASA's overall High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) and the Information Infrastructure Technology Applications (IITA) programs. The goal of the UEI is to provide public access to Earth Science information and promote its use with a focus on the environment of urban areas. This goal will be accomplished through collaborative efforts of the UEI team with both community-based and local/regional governmental organizations. The UEI team is comprised of four organizations representing private industry, NASA, and universities: Prime Technologies Service Corporation, NASA's Minority University Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) California State University, at Los Angeles, and Central State University (Wilberforce, OH). "Urban Environment" refers to the web of environmental, economic, and social factors that combine to create the urban world in which we live. Examples of these factors are population distribution, neighborhood demographic profiles, economic resources, business activities, location and concentration of environmental hazards and various pollutants, proximity and level of urban services, which form the basis of the urban environment and ultimately affect our lives and experiences. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing allows data to be visualized in the forms of maps and spatial images. The use of these tools allow analysis of information about urban environments. Also included are descriptions of the four query types which will assist in understanding the maps.

  11. An Archean Biosphere Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Boyd, E. S.; Buick, R.; Claire, M.; DesMarais, D.; Domagal-Goldman, D.; Eigenbrode, J.; Erwin, D.; Freeman, K.; Hazen, R.; Johnson, C.; Lyons, T.; Meadows, V.; Ohmoto, H.; Ono, S.; Peters, J. W.; Shapiro, B.; Summons, R.; Walter, M.

    2011-01-01

    The search for life on extrasolar planets will necessarily focus on the imprints of biolgy on the composition of planetary atmospheres. The most notable biological imprint on the modern terrestrial atmosphere is the presence of 21 % O2, However, during most of the past 4 billion years, life and the surface environments on Earth were profoundly different than they are today. It is therefore a major goal of the astrobiology community to ascertain how the O2 content of the atmosphere has varied with time. and to understand the causes of these variations. The NAI and NASA Exobiology program have played critical roles in developing our current understanding of the ancient Earth's atmosphere, supporting diverse observational, analytical, and computational research in geoscience, life science, and related fields. In the present incarnation of the NAI, ongoing work is investigating (i) variations in atmospheric O2 in the Archean to the Cambrian, (ii) characterization of the redox state of the oceans shortly before, during and after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), and (iii) unraveling the complex connections between environmental oxygenation, global climate, and the evolution of life.

  12. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  13. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the Breckinridge Project and summarizes the results achieved during the development phase of the project performed under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States Department of Energy. The Breckinridge Project provides for the design, construction and operation of a 50,000 barrel per day coal liquefaction facility in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. The development of the basic technology used in the Breckinridge Project dates back to the late 1950's and the invention by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., (HRI) of the ebullated-bed reactor and the H-OIL process. The H-COAL process is based on the H-OIL technology. This coal liquefaction process produces clean low-sulfur petroleum substitutes suitable for most types of hydrocarbon-based fuel and chemical uses regardless of the sulfur content of the coal. A large H-COAL Pilot Plant in operation at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, is converting 220 tons of coal per day into 600 barrels of distillate products by catalytic hydrogenation. The estimated capital cost of the commercial facility is $3.17 billion, and the associated out-of-pocket operating cost is $18 per barrel, both in January 1981 dollars. Financial analysis shows the project to be an attractive investment under certain leveraged conditions which are possible through the assistance of the Synthetic Fuels Corporation. Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. is currently working with the Synthetic Fuels Corporation and potential partners to develop financing for the commercial venture. Critical permits are being obtained and an Environmental Impact Statement is being prepared pursuant to initiating site preparation in early 1983. Commercial operations are expected to start up in early 1988.

  14. Glennan Microsystems Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillson, Leonard J.

    2002-01-01

    During the 2001-2002 award period, we performed research on Pt/Ti/bare 6H-SiC and bare 4H-SiC interfaces in order to identify their electronic properties as a function of surface preparation. The overall aim of this work is to optimize the electronic properties of metal contacts to SiC as well as the active SiC material itself as a function of surface preparation and subsequent processing. Initially, this work has involved identifying bare surface, subsurface, and metal induced gap states at the metal-SiC contact and correlating energies and densities of deep levels with Schottky barrier heights. We used low energy electron-excited nanoluminescence (LEEN) spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) in order to correlate electronic states and energy bands with chemical composition, bonding, and crystal structure. A major development has been the discovery of polytype transformations that occur in 4H-SiC under standard microelectronic process conditions used to fabricate SiC devices. Our results are consistent with the stacking fault generation, defect formation, and consequent degradation of SiC recently reported for state-of-the-art ABB commercial diodes under localized electrical stress. Our results highlight the importance of -optimizing process conditions and material properties - anneal times, temperatures and doping to control such structural changes within epitaxial SiC layers. Thus far, we have established threshold times and temperatures beyond which 4H-SiC exhibits 3C-SiC transformation bands for a subset of dopant concentrations and process conditions. On the basis of this temperature time behavior, we have been able to establish an activation energy of approximately 2.5 eV for polytype transformation and dislocation motion. Work continues to establish the fundamental mechanisms underlying the polytype changes and its dependence on material parameters.

  15. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  16. Quantum Tunneling and Complex Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynig, Max; Haggard, Hal

    2017-01-01

    In general, the semiclassical approximation of quantum mechanical tunneling fails to treat tunneling through barriers if real initial conditions and trajectories are used. By analytically continuing classical dynamics to the complex plane the problems encountered in the approximation can be resolved. While, the complex methods discussed here have been previously explored, no one has exhibited an analytically solvable case. The essential features of the complex method will be discussed in the context of a novel, analytically solvable problem. These methods could be useful in quantum gravity, with applications to the tunneling of spacetime geometries.

  17. [Carney's Complex: familial cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Guerra, Miguel S; Santos, Nelson; Neves, Fátima; Carlos Mota, João; Miranda, José António; Vouga, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The Carney Complex is a very rare autosomal dominant disease including multiple neoplasia syndrome. This syndrome was initially described in 1985 under the rubric "...the complex of myxomas, spotty pigmentation, and endocrine overactivity". We present a case report of an old woman with Carney Complex who had the characteristic features of facial hirsutism and acromegalic facies, a large pigmented swelling over the face and a cardiac myxoma arising from the left atrium. We emphasize the need for periodic echocardiographic screening of patients and family members.

  18. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  19. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online

  20. The national geomagnetic initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field, through its variability over a spectrum of spatial and temporal scales, contains fundamental information on the solid Earth and geospace environment (the latter comprising the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere). Integrated studies of the geomagnetic field have the potential to address a wide range of important processes in the deep mantle and core, asthenosphere, lithosphere, oceans, and the solar-terrestrial environment. These studies have direct applications to important societal problems, including resource assessment and exploration, natural hazard mitigation, safe navigation, and the maintenance and survivability of communications and power systems on the ground and in space. Studies of the Earth's magnetic field are supported by a variety of federal and state agencies as well as by private industry. Both basic and applied research is presently supported by several federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) (through the Navy, Air Force, and Defense Mapping Agency). Although each agency has a unique, well-defined mission in geomagnetic studies, many areas of interest overlap. For example, NASA, the Navy, and USGS collaborate closely in the development of main field reference models. NASA, NSF, and the Air Force collaborate in space physics. These interagency linkages need to be strengthened. Over the past decade, new opportunities for fundamental advances in geomagnetic research have emerged as a result of three factors: well-posed, first-order scientific questions; increased interrelation of research activities dealing with geomagnetic phenomena; and recent developments in technology. These new opportunities can be exploited through a national geomagnetic initiative to define objectives and

  1. Architecture of human translation initiation factor 3.

    PubMed

    Querol-Audi, Jordi; Sun, Chaomin; Vogan, Jacob M; Smith, M Duane; Gu, Yu; Cate, Jamie H D; Nogales, Eva

    2013-06-04

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) plays a central role in protein synthesis by organizing the formation of the 43S preinitiation complex. Using genetic tag visualization by electron microscopy, we reveal the molecular organization of ten human eIF3 subunits, including an octameric core. The structure of eIF3 bears a close resemblance to that of the proteasome lid, with a conserved spatial organization of eight core subunits containing PCI and MPN domains that coordinate functional interactions in both complexes. We further show that eIF3 subunits a and c interact with initiation factors eIF1 and eIF1A, which control the stringency of start codon selection. Finally, we find that subunit j, which modulates messenger RNA interactions with the small ribosomal subunit, makes multiple independent interactions with the eIF3 octameric core. These results highlight the conserved architecture of eIF3 and how it scaffolds key factors that control translation initiation in higher eukaryotes, including humans.

  2. Catholic Health Initiatives at 10.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joyce M

    2007-01-01

    The summer of 2006 marked the 10th anniversary of the formation of Denver-based Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI). Formed in 1996 as the result of the merger of three Catholic health care systems, and soon joined by a fourth, the system integrated a diverse collection of health care facilities previously sponsored by 12 different religious congregations. It was the first Catholic health system to give laity a sponsorship role in its facilities. CHI's facilities are sponsored by a public juridic person (PJP), the Catholic Health Care Federation (CHCF). The same people who sit on the system's board also constitute CHCF. They are thus responsible for both governance and sponsorship. CHI was the first Catholic health care system to give laypersons a sponsorship role in its facilities. Establishing the PJP was a long and complex task. Eventually, the church determined that CHI's PJP should be pontifical, accountable to the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life in Rome. CHCF in 1991 became the first PJP in health care in the United States. CHI's staff, led by its first president and chief executive officer, Patricia Cahill, quickly took steps to help the new system begin to coalesce, establishing a single, systemwide pension plan, debt policy, and so forth. Also challenging was the creation of a systemwide new culture. An essential step in the development of CHI's culture was the involvement of employees in the identification of its core values: reverence, integrity, compassion, and excellence, The creation of CHI's Mission and Ministry Fund also helped give the system an identity. This fund provides grants to programs that take an innovative approach to building healthy communities, a goal expressed in CHI's mission and vision statements. The people who created CHI and nurtured it during its first decade give it high marks for faithful adherence to its mission. Even so, they acknowledge that there is always more work to be done.

  3. Safe motherhood: the FIGO initiative.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, G; Thomas, B

    2003-09-01

    Over the last twenty years the international community-realizing that the tragedy of women dying during pregnancy and in childbirth could no longer be tolerated-launched a series of initiatives aimed at making safe motherhood a cornerstone of health services in all countries. Making pregnancy and delivery safe events is particularly complex, as it involves infrastructural and logistic, as well as technical, issues. Women die because they have no access to skilled personnel during pregnancy and at the time of delivery and because--if an emergency situation arises--they cannot reach a facility where emergency obstetric services are available. FIGO, the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology-as the only global organization representing the Obstetricians of the world-decided some time ago that it could not limit its activities to proposing technical guidelines and debating scientific issues. It had to move into the field and, through its affiliated societies, help change the ability of the multitude of women in the developing world to obtain skilled attendance at birth. In 1997, plans were made to launch activities in five areas where maternal mortality was particularly high: Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and El Salvador), Ethiopia, Mozambique, Pakistan, and Uganda. Five member societies from the developed world (the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada, the Italian Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of the United Kingdom; and the Swedish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology) agreed to provide support to their counterparts in these five selected areas. The project is now in its final stage. Results are, by and large, positive, demonstrating that, by motivating health professionals in the field and for a relatively modest financial outlay, more efficient use of existing services could be made in a sustainable

  4. Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    2006-01-01

    Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

  5. Independent planning of timing and sequencing for complex movements.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Chua, Romeo; Klapp, Stuart T; Franks, Ian M

    2016-08-01

    The current studies examined the processes involved in response sequencing and timing initiation for complex, multiple-component movements. Participants performed a 3 key-press sequence in simple and choice reaction time (RT) paradigms (Experiment 1), or a study time paradigm that allowed the participants to control the foreperiod delay, which is thought to reflect advance preparation duration (Experiment 2). Sequencing complexity was manipulated by using either the same hand and effector for all key presses (low complexity) or different hands/effectors across key presses (high complexity) while timing initiation complexity was manipulated by using either an isochronous (low complexity) or nonisochronous (high complexity) timing pattern. Increasing sequencing complexity had little effect on simple RT but increased participant-controlled foreperiod delay (i.e., study time). Conversely, increasing timing initiation complexity had no effect on foreperiod delay but increased simple RT. These results provide compelling evidence that in a simple RT paradigm, sequencing preparation is performed during the foreperiod while preparation of timing initiation is delayed until the RT interval. Furthermore, choice RT increased with sequencing complexity and was relatively unaffected by timing initiation complexity, indicative of sequencing preparation occurring during the choice RT interval and preparation of timing initiation occurring online. Collectively, the data indicate a dissociation and independence of the preparation of timing initiation and sequencing for complex movements. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  7. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  8. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring

  9. Mechanically controlled radical polymerization initiated by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Hemakesh; Kleiman, Maya; Esser-Kahn, Aaron Palmer

    2016-10-01

    In polymer chemistry, mechanical energy degrades polymeric chains. In contrast, in nature, mechanical energy is often used to create new polymers. This mechanically stimulated growth is a key component of the robustness of biological materials. A synthetic system in which mechanical force initiates polymerization will provide similar robustness in polymeric materials. Here we show a polymerization of acrylate monomers initiated and controlled by mechanical energy provided by ultrasonic agitation. The activator for an atom-transfer radical polymerization is generated using piezochemical reduction of a Cu(II) precursor complex, which thus converts a mechanical activation of piezoelectric particles to the synthesis of a new material. This polymerization reaction has some characteristics of controlled radical polymerization, such as narrow molecular-weight distribution and linear dependence of the polymeric chain length on the time of mechanical activation. This new method of controlled radical polymerization complements the existing methods to synthesize commercially useful well-defined polymers.

  10. Damage detection in initially nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bornn, Luke; Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is to detect structural anomalies before they reach a critical level. Because of the potential life-safety and economic benefits, SHM has been widely studied over the past decade. In recent years there has been an effort to provide solid mathematical and physical underpinnings for these methods; however, most focus on systems that behave linearly in their undamaged state - a condition that often does not hold in complex 'real world' systems and systems for which monitoring begins mid-lifecycle. In this work, we highlight the inadequacy of linear-based methodology in handling initially nonlinear systems. We then show how the recently developed autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM) approach to time series modeling can be used for detecting damage in a system that exhibits initially nonlinear response. This process is applied to data acquired from a structure with induced nonlinearity tested in a laboratory environment.

  11. EPA`s clean air power initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Critchfield, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Power Initiative (CAPI) is a multi-stakeholder project intended to improve air pollution control efforts involving the power generating industry. This paper documents the progress made in the first year of the initiative, which included a number of meetings with interested stakeholders and development and analysis of alternative approaches for more efficient and effective pollution control. The project`s goal is to develop an integrated regulatory strategy or three major pollutants emitted from electric power generators; namely, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and, potentially, mercury. Major reductions in these pollutants are expected to be needed to reduce the detrimental health effects of ground-level ozone, fine particles, and hazardous air pollutants and reduce the environmental effects of acidification, eutrophication, ecosystem, crop, and materials damage, and regional haze. The Clean Air Power Initiative has considered, where feasible, new approaches to pollution control that recognize the long-range transport of many air pollutants and the economic benefits of emissions trading. The project was initiated by EPA`s Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation in 1995. As individual companies develop and implement strategies to participate in more competitive power markets, they could benefit from greater certainty in being able to plan for and reduce costs of future environmental regulations. The EPA is interested in reinventing its regulatory approach to reduce the number, administrative complexity, and cost of its requirements while improving the likelihood of achieving environmental results.

  12. Initial development of 5D COGENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. H.; Lee, W.; Dorf, M.; Dorr, M.

    2015-11-01

    COGENT is a continuum gyrokinetic edge code being developed by the by the Edge Simulation Laboratory (ESL) collaboration. Work to date has been primarily focussed on a 4D (axisymmetric) version that models transport properties of edge plasmas. We have begun development of an initial 5D version to study edge turbulence, with initial focus on kinetic effects on blob dynamics and drift-wave instability in a shearless magnetic field. We are employing compiler directives and preprocessor macros to create a single source code that can be compiled in 4D or 5D, which helps to ensure consistency of physics representation between the two versions. A key aspect of COGENT is the employment of mapped multi-block grid capability to handle the complexity of diverter geometry. It is planned to eventually exploit this capability to handle magnetic shear, through a series of successively skewed unsheared grid blocks. The initial version has an unsheared grid and will be used to explore the degree to which a radial domain must be block decomposed. We report on the status of code development and initial tests. Work performed for USDOE, at LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Reduced dynamics with initial correlations: Multiconfigurational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, I.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamical equations for a subsystem interacting with an environment are proposed which are adapted to a multiconfigurational form of the density operator. Initial correlations are accounted for in a non-Markovian master equation. Two variants of the latter are derived by projection operator techniques and cumulant expansion techniques, respectively. The present scheme is developed in view of describing the ultrafast dynamics in solute-solvent complexes where the details of system-environment correlations are of importance. The master equation is readily integrated into the equations of motion derived by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method, which provides an efficient scheme for the numerical propagation of the density operator.

  14. Home initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Newton, Alyce F; DeLegge, Mark H

    2007-02-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has been successfully initiated in the home since the early 1990s. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Standards for Specialized Nutrition Support: Home Care Patients, Safe Practices for Parenteral Nutrition, and Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients do not contain specific information on the initiation of home PN (HPN). Peer-reviewed, published guidelines are necessary to provide safe and appropriate initiation of HPN. Certain patients should not have PN initiated in the home, such as those with organ failure, uncontrolled diabetes, or uncorrectable electrolyte abnormalities. Excellent candidates for initiation of HPN include patients who have failed enteral feedings, have gastrointestinal (GI) diseases without excessive GI losses, or those with an oncology diagnosis and inability to tube feed. One concern of initiation of HPN is the potential for refeeding syndrome. Refeeding syndrome can be prevented when patients are properly evaluated and managed before initiation of PN. Refeeding syndrome can be avoided by rehydration with fluid and electrolytes before initiation of HPN to normalize blood chemistry when necessary and by starting with a moderate-volume, low-carbohydrate HPN solution compounded with optimal potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium content, and slowly advanced to goal. The "start low and go slow" motto of nutrition support should continue to be followed, but more specific guidelines are needed to assist nutrition support clinicians with safe and appropriate initiation of HPN.

  15. Initiation into Adolescent Marijuana Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Judith S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relationship of three domains (personality/attitudinal orientations, peer relationships, and family socialization factors) with initiation into adolescent marihuana use. (Author/DB)

  16. Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Maureen; Prince, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, an accountability system implemented in 2005-06 that measures students' gains in college readiness, college credits earned, and degree or certificate completion. The goal of the initiative is to increase educational attainment by focusing on the critical momentum points…

  17. Maine: Early Head Start Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Maine has two initiatives that build on Early Head Start (EHS). The first initiative, Fund for a Healthy Maine, has since 2001 provided tobacco settlement money to existing Head Start and EHS programs to expand the number of children who receive full-day, full-year services. Local programs have the option of using these funds for EHS, depending on…

  18. Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2013

    2013-01-01

    California's education system--the largest in the United States--is an essential resource for ensuring strong economic growth in the state. The Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative (referred to as the Initiative in this report), which became law in 2005, brings together community colleges, K-12 school districts, employers, organized…

  19. Two black hole initial data

    SciTech Connect

    Leski, Szymon

    2005-06-15

    The Misner initial data are a standard example of time-symmetric initial data with two apparent horizons. Compact formulae describing such data are presented in the cases of equal or nonequal masses (i.e. isometric or nonisometric horizons). The interaction energy in the 'Schwarzschild + test-particle' limit of the Misner data is analyzed.

  20. The Internet 2 Middleware Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of middleware focuses on the Internet 2 Middleware Initiative. Topics include a description of middleware as a layer of software in a distributed system; middleware characteristics, including transparency, portability, reliability, scalability, and interoperability; and the Internet 2 Middleware Initiative which is focused on research…

  1. Thinking Forbidden Thoughts: The Oedipus Complex as a Complex of Knowing.

    PubMed

    Schein, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Oedipus complex, considered by Freud the "nuclear complex of development," played a central role in the evolution of psychoanalytic thought. This paper returns to the point of transition from the seduction theory, Freud's initial theorem, to the oedipal model, and suggests that the Oedipus complex is first and foremost a text and as such contains a multiplicity of narratives. In particular, the author articulates the close relation between the Oedipus complex and the subject of knowing, postulating that underlying its surface level, the deep-level structure of this complex is one of knowing. As a complex of knowing it is of dual quality, both promoting and impeding the ability to know.

  2. Molecular basis of transcription initiation in Archaea.

    PubMed

    De Carlo, Sacha; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hoenger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Compared with eukaryotes, the archaeal transcription initiation machinery-commonly known as the Pre-Initiation Complex-is relatively simple. The archaeal PIC consists of the TFIIB ortholog TFB, TBP, and an 11-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP). The relatively small size of the entire archaeal PIC makes it amenable to structural analysis. Using purified RNAP, TFB, and TBP from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, we assembled the biochemically active PIC at 65ºC. The intact archaeal PIC was isolated by implementing a cross-linking technique followed by size-exclusion chromatography, and the structure of this 440 kDa assembly was determined using electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction techniques. Combining difference maps with crystal structure docking of various sub-domains, TBP and TFB were localized within the macromolecular PIC. TBP/TFB assemble near the large RpoB subunit and the RpoD/L "foot" domain behind the RNAP central cleft. This location mimics that of yeast TBP and TFIIB in complex with yeast RNAP II. Collectively, these results define the structural organization of the archaeal transcription machinery and suggest a conserved core PIC architecture.

  3. Cost estimate of initial SSC experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect

    1986-06-01

    The cost of the initial detector complement at recently constructed colliding beam facilities (or at those under construction) has been a significant fraction of the cost of the accelerator complex. Because of the complexity of large modern-day detectors, the time-scale for their design and construction is comparable to the time-scale needed for accelerator design and construction. For these reasons it is appropriate to estimate the cost of the anticipated detector complement in parallel with the cost estimates of the collider itself. The fundamental difficulty with this procedure is that, whereas a firm conceptual design of the collider does exist, comparable information is unavailable for the detectors. Traditionally, these have been built by the high energy physics user community according to their perception of the key scientific problems that need to be addressed. The role of the accelerator laboratory in that process has involved technical and managerial coordination and the allocation of running time and local facilities among the proposed experiments. It seems proper that the basic spirit of experimentation reflecting the scientific judgment of the community should be preserved at the SSC. Furthermore, the formal process of initiation of detector proposals can only start once the SSC has been approved as a construction project and a formal laboratory administration put in place. Thus an ad hoc mechanism had to be created to estimate the range of potential detector needs, potential detector costs, and associated computing equipment.

  4. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was initiated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized, and the knowledge regarding the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant portion of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides is collaborators in the International Energy Agreement Task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and is an excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  5. Initiation of Submarine Granular Avalanches: Role of the Initial Volume Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pailha, Mickaël; Pouliquen, Olivier; Nicolas, Maxime

    2008-07-01

    Many geophysical flows involve a mixture of grains and fluids in a dense regime where contacts between grains are important. In order to better understand the dynamics of such complex systems, we perform laboratory experiments on the initiation of submarine granular avalanches. The experiment consists in preparing a uniform static layer of glass beads in a long box full of liquid. The initial volume fraction of the layer can be precisely controlled by tapping on the set up. The box is then suddenly inclined from horizontal. The motion of the layer, the evolution of the pore pressure and the evolution of the volume fraction are then recorded. The avalanche dynamics is shown to strongly depend on the initial volume fraction of the granular material, its initiation being dramatically delayed when the granular layer is initially slightly compacted. In parallel to this experimental work, a theoretical model based on two phase-flow equations is developed. The model relies on recent advances in the rheology of dense granular media and takes into account the change of volume fraction and the associated pore pressure variation. The theoretical approach gives quantitative predictions when compared with the experimental measurements.

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Emily S.; De La Cerda, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neurologic disorder that often results in debilitating chronic pain, but the diagnosis may elude providers as it is one of exclusion. A history of trauma may be elucidated. We report a case of CRPS and review the clinical findings, appropriate workup, and treatment options for the patient. The patient we describe went through an extensive workup before receiving the correct diagnosis. Delay in diagnosis leads to prolonged suffering for the patient and, at times, unnecessary invasive debridement procedures. Raising awareness of this entity may help physicians make the correct diagnosis early, as well as initiate a collaborative effort between neurology, anesthesiology, and dermatology to provide the patient the most favorable outcome. PMID:27365892

  7. Thin-film optical initiator

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    A thin-film optical initiator having an inert, transparent substrate, a reactive thin film, which can be either an explosive or a pyrotechnic, and a reflective thin film. The resultant thin-film optical initiator system also comprises a fiber-optic cable connected to a low-energy laser source, an output charge, and an initiator housing. The reactive thin film, which may contain very thin embedded layers or be a co-deposit of a light-absorbing material such as carbon, absorbs the incident laser light, is volumetrically heated, and explodes against the output charge, imparting about 5 to 20 times more energy than in the incident laser pulse.

  8. Green Power Partnership Program Initiatives

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Green Power Partnership has a number of initiatives that focus on the collective green power efforts within specific sectors and renewable energy procurement strategies, which provide recognition opportunities for Partners and increase awareness.

  9. Discovery Performs Terminal Initiation Burn

    NASA Video Gallery

    The terminal initiation burn, a left Orbital Maneuvering System engine firing that gave Discovery one last big push toward the space station, took place Feb. 26, 2011 at 10:33 a.m. The burn lasted ...

  10. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  11. Initiation and re-initiation of DNA unwinding by the Escherichia coli Rep helicase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Taekjip; Rasnik, Ivan; Cheng, Wei; Babcock, Hazen P.; Gauss, George H.; Lohman, Timothy M.; Chu, Steven

    2002-10-01

    Helicases are motor proteins that couple conformational changes induced by ATP binding and hydrolysis with unwinding of duplex nucleic acid, and are involved in several human diseases. Some function as hexameric rings, but the functional form of non-hexameric helicases has been debated. Here we use a combination of a surface immobilization scheme and single-molecule fluorescence assays-which do not interfere with biological activity-to probe DNA unwinding by the Escherichia coli Rep helicase. Our studies indicate that a Rep monomer uses ATP hydrolysis to move toward the junction between single-stranded and double-stranded DNA but then displays conformational fluctuations that do not lead to DNA unwinding. DNA unwinding initiates only if a functional helicase is formed via additional protein binding. Partial dissociation of the functional complex during unwinding results in interruptions (`stalls') that lead either to duplex rewinding upon complete dissociation of the complex, or to re-initiation of unwinding upon re-formation of the functional helicase. These results suggest that the low unwinding processivity observed in vitro for Rep is due to the relative instability of the functional complex. We expect that these techniques will be useful for dynamic studies of other helicases and protein-DNA interactions.

  12. Initiation and re-initiation of DNA unwinding by the Escherichia coli Rep helicase.

    PubMed

    Ha, Taekjip; Rasnik, Ivan; Cheng, Wei; Babcock, Hazen P; Gauss, George H; Lohman, Timothy M; Chu, Steven

    2002-10-10

    Helicases are motor proteins that couple conformational changes induced by ATP binding and hydrolysis with unwinding of duplex nucleic acid, and are involved in several human diseases. Some function as hexameric rings, but the functional form of non-hexameric helicases has been debated. Here we use a combination of a surface immobilization scheme and single-molecule fluorescence assays--which do not interfere with biological activity--to probe DNA unwinding by the Escherichia coli Rep helicase. Our studies indicate that a Rep monomer uses ATP hydrolysis to move toward the junction between single-stranded and double-stranded DNA but then displays conformational fluctuations that do not lead to DNA unwinding. DNA unwinding initiates only if a functional helicase is formed via additional protein binding. Partial dissociation of the functional complex during unwinding results in interruptions ('stalls') that lead either to duplex rewinding upon complete dissociation of the complex, or to re-initiation of unwinding upon re-formation of the functional helicase. These results suggest that the low unwinding processivity observed in vitro for Rep is due to the relative instability of the functional complex. We expect that these techniques will be useful for dynamic studies of other helicases and protein-DNA interactions.

  13. Shock Initiation of Energetic Materials at Different Initial Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Tarver, C M

    2005-01-14

    Shock initiation is one of the most important properties of energetic materials, which must transition to detonation exactly as intended when intentionally shocked and not detonate when accidentally shocked. The development of manganin pressure gauges that are placed inside the explosive charge and record the buildup of pressure upon shock impact has greatly increased the knowledge of these reactive flows. This experimental data, together with similar data from electromagnetic particle velocity gauges, has allowed us to formulate the Ignition and Growth model of shock initiation and detonation in hydrodynamic computer codes for predictions of shock initiation scenarios that cannot be tested experimentally. An important problem in shock initiation of solid explosives is the change in sensitivity that occurs upon heating (or cooling). Experimental manganin pressure gauge records and the corresponding Ignition and Growth model calculations are presented for two solid explosives, LX-17 (92.5 % triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) with 7.5 % Kel-F binder) and LX-04 (85 % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX) with 15 % Viton binder) at several initial temperatures.

  14. A National Network of Neurotechnology Centers for the BRAIN Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Chun, Miyoung; Church, George M.; Greenspan, Ralph J.; Roukes, Michael L.; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    We propose the creation of a national network of neurotechnology centers to enhance and accelerate the BRAIN Initiative and optimally leverage the effort and creativity of individual laboratories involved in it. As “brain observatories,” these centers could provide the critical interdisciplinary environment both for realizing ambitious and complex technologies and for providing individual investigators with access to them. PMID:26481036

  15. A National Network of Neurotechnology Centers for the BRAIN Initiative.

    PubMed

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Chun, Miyoung; Church, George M; Greenspan, Ralph J; Roukes, Michael L; Yuste, Rafael

    2015-11-04

    We propose the creation of a national network of neurotechnology centers to enhance and accelerate the BRAIN Initiative and optimally leverage the effort and creativity of individual laboratories involved in it. As "brain observatories," these centers could provide the critical interdisciplinary environment both for realizing ambitious and complex technologies and for providing individual investigators with access to them.

  16. Characterization of HIV replication complexes early after cell-to-cell infection.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, L; Li, P; Burrell, C

    1993-09-01

    In this study, we have characterized the HIV DNA-containing replication complexes present in cells early after cell-to-cell infection, using sucrose gradient sedimentation and immunoprecipitation. Six hours after cell-to-cell infection, a cytoplasmic HIV replication complex sedimented as a large structure (320S). This replication complex was precipitated by antisera to three virus-coded enzymes (reverse transcriptase, integrase, protease), to the matrix protein (p17), and to cellular histones but not to the major capsid protein (p24). This replication complex was not associated with cell membranes and could not be dissociated into smaller discrete subunits, using detergents. Nuclear extracts from the same cell-to-cell infection contained a smaller (80S) complex that lacked reverse transcriptase and matrix protein (p17). Cytoplasmic replication complexes from a cell-free virus infection sedimented as 160S structures under identical conditions, as previously reported. Our results indicate that, following cell-to-cell transmission of HIV, all the HIV pol gene products, the matrix protein p17, and cellular histones are present in cytoplasmic replication complexes that are taking part in or have completed reverse transcription. Transportation of the cytoplasmic replication complex to the nucleus is associated with structural changes, including a reduction in size and altered protein composition.

  17. Human-Modified Permafrost Complexes in Urbanized Areas of the Russian North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenets, V. I.; Streletskiy, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Economic development in permafrost regions is accompanied by modification of natural geocryological conditions. Drastic landscape transformations in urbanized areas on permafrost are characterized by changes of heat and moisture exchange in permafrost - atmosphere system, and by engineering and technogenic influence upon the frozen ground, leading to alteration of its physical, thermal and mechanical properties. In northern cities this leads to overall increase of ground temperature relative to undisturbed areas and intensification of hazardous cryogenic processes in areas under engineering development, which together leads to reduction in stability of geotechnical environment. For example, deformations of structures in Norilsk district, Northern Siberia, in the last 15 years, became much more abundant than those revealed throughout the previous 50 years. About 250 large buildings in the local towns were deformed considerably due to deterioration of geocryological conditions, about 100 structures were functioning in emergency state, and almost 50 nine- and five-storey houses, built in the 1960-80s, have been recently disassembled. Increase in accident risk for various facilities (water and oil pipelines, industrial enterprises, etc.) enhances the technogenic pressure on permafrost, leading to the new milestone of changes in permafrost characteristics, i.e. to creation of 'another reality' of geocryological conditions. Social and natural factors dictate clustered spatial pattern of industrial development in permafrost regions. Cryogenic processes within the urban areas on permafrost are seldom similar with those under the natural conditions as intensity, duration and extent of the processes changes under technogenic impacts. Moreover, new cryogenic processes and phenomena may occur, which have not been typical for a given region. This makes mapping and characterization of these processes difficult task. Peculiar natural-technogenic geocryological complexes (NTGC

  18. Pulsed COIL initiated by discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryshev, Nikolai N.

    2004-06-01

    Pulsed mode makes COIL possible to produce pulses which power can significantly exceed that of CW COIL mode at the same flowrate of chemicals. Such a mode can find application in material treatment, in drilling for oil wells, as an optical locator, in laser frequency conversion via non-linear processes, in laser propulsion, etc. The method of volume generation of iodine atoms was shown to be the most effective one in generation of high power pulses. The base of method is substitution of molecular iodine in operation mixture for iodide which is stable in the mixture with singlet oxygen, and subsequent forced dissociation of iodide. In this approach the advantage of direct I-atom injection in laser active medium is demonstrated. The comparison of experimental results obtained with different sources used for iodide dissociation shows the electric discharge provides significantly higher electrical laser efficiency in comparison with photolysis initiation. At the same time, the specific energy of the electric discharge initiated COIL is at disadvantage in relation with that obtained with photolysis initiation. This fact is a result of active medium temperature increase due to insufficient initiation selectivity of electric discharge. Both longitudinal and transverse electric discharges were investigated as possible sources for laser initiation. The transverse discharge is more promising for increased operation pressure of active medium. The operation pressure is limited by dark reaction of iodide with singlet delta oxygen. The repetitively pulsed operation with repetition rate of up to 75 Hz of pulsed COIL is demonstrated.

  19. Laser initiation of secondary explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.; Trott, Wayne M.

    Several experiments were performed to investigate the effects of explosive material parameters on energy thresholds for direct laser initiation of secondary explosives. Laser energy requirements for initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were decreased for small particle size powder and low density pressings. Promptness of detonation, however, was aided by higher densities. Initiation of PETN was achieved at energies at or below 10 mJ (power densities approximately 0.2 GW sq cm) at laser wavelengths of 1.06 micrometers, 532 nm and 355 nm and strong confinement of the explosive sample assisted build-up to detonation. At 355 and 308 nm PETN could be initiated by irradiation on the bare explosive surface. Hexahydro 1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) was initiated at 308 nm but not at 1.06 micrometers. Hexanitrostibene (HNS) by direct irradiation at any of these wavelengths was successful. The results suggest that if sufficient energy is deposited, a fast deflagration or convective burn is achieved and that this grows to detonation via a conventional deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  20. The replication initiator of the cholera pathogen's second chromosome shows structural similarity to plasmid initiators.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Natalia; Gerding, Matthew; Ivashkiv, Olha; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Chait, Brian T; Waldor, Matthew K; Jeruzalmi, David

    2016-12-27

    The conserved DnaA-oriC system is used to initiate replication of primary chromosomes throughout the bacterial kingdom; however, bacteria with multipartite genomes evolved distinct systems to initiate replication of secondary chromosomes. In the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae, and in related species, secondary chromosome replication requires the RctB initiator protein. Here, we show that RctB consists of four domains. The structure of its central two domains resembles that of several plasmid replication initiators. RctB contains at least three DNA binding winged-helix-turn-helix motifs, and mutations within any of these severely compromise biological activity. In the structure, RctB adopts a head-to-head dimeric configuration that likely reflects the arrangement in solution. Therefore, major structural reorganization likely accompanies complex formation on the head-to-tail array of binding sites in oriCII Our findings support the hypothesis that the second Vibrionaceae chromosome arose from an ancestral plasmid, and that RctB may have evolved additional regulatory features.

  1. Resistances et initiatives a Madagascar (Resistance and Initiatives in Madagascar).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georges, Claude

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the cultural, political, and institutional barriers to population education in Madagascar and the strategies and initiatives that have been adopted to overcome them, including emphasizing the national character of a project, accommodating the values and ideals of the people involved, and assuring teachers of their classroom autonomy.…

  2. Temporal variability of the initial threshold for motion - initial bed conditions and morphological trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Roy, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment transport as bedload has been studied for decades and as new data were collected both in the laboratory and in the field, it became more and more obvious that the phenomenon was utterly complex and consequently difficult to predict. Furthermore, in gravel-bed rivers , bedload transport and the consequent morphological changes are still not well understood as the factors involved have proven to be numerous and their interactions complex. A key variable in bedload transport predictions is the initial threshold for particle motion, often expressed as a critical flow shear stress or discharge. Typically, the initial threshold for motion is estimated using the channel bed slope and a representative grain size diameter. This implies that bedload motion will begin at a constant critical flow strength in a reach, which does not apply to gravel-bed rivers with a broad grain-size distribution due to the possible variations in grain arrangements. This raises issues about the implications of varying conditions for the onset of motion on the magnitude of the bedload fluxes and the morphological changes. Using a unique field data set, we will show how the threshold of incipient motion reflects the initial bed conditions and the morphological trajectory through a complex web of interactions and feedbacks. Bedload fluxes and morphological changes were monitored for 21 bedload events over three years at Béard Creek, a small gravel-bed river located in southern Quebec (Canada). Bankfull width, depth and discharge of the stream are 5 m, 1 m and 2.5 cumecs respectively. Median b axis of the bed surface material is 40 mm. Two 20 meters reaches were equipped with Birkbeck type bedload samplers with load cells recording real-time bedload rates. Morphological changes were tracked using repeated topographical surveys upstream of the bedload samplers. To circumvent the issue of the identification of bed areas that were mobilised without any elevation change, we completed the data

  3. Initial operation of the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The Tevatron is now the highest energy proton synchrotron and the only accelerator made with superconducting magnets. Operating since 1983 as a fixed-target machine at energies up to 800 GeV, it has now been modified to operate as a 900 GeV antiproton-proton collider. This paper describes the initial operation of the machine in this mode. The new features of the Fermilab complex, including the antiproton source and the Main Ring injector with its two overpasses and new rf requirements, are discussed. Beam characteristics in the Tevatron (including lifetimes, emittances, luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, backgrounds, and low beta complications), the coordination of the steps in the accelerator chain, and the commissioning history are also discussed. Finally, some plans for the improvement of the collider are presented.

  4. Initial conditions and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1987-01-01

    A theory of initial conditions is necessary for a complete explanation of the presently observed large scale structural features of the universe, and a quantum theory of cosmology is probably needed for its formulation. The kinematics of quantum cosmology are reviewed, and some candidates for a law of initial conditions are discussed. The proposal that the quantum state of a closed universe is the natural analog of the ground state for closed cosmologies and is specified by a Euclidean sum over histories is sketched. When implemented in simple models, this proposal is consistent with the most important large-scale observations.

  5. On State Complexes and Special Cube Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valerie J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the first steps toward a classification of non-positively curved cube complexes called state complexes. A "state complex" is a configuration space for a "reconfigurable system," i.e., an abstract system in which local movements occur in some discrete manner. Reconfigurable systems can be used to describe, for example,…

  6. New Universal Rules of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zur, Hadas; Tuller, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    The accepted model of eukaryotic translation initiation begins with the scanning of the transcript by the pre-initiation complex from the 5′end until an ATG codon with a specific nucleotide (nt) context surrounding it is recognized (Kozak rule). According to this model, ATG codons upstream to the beginning of the ORF should affect translation. We perform for the first time, a genome-wide statistical analysis, uncovering a new, more comprehensive and quantitative, set of initiation rules for improving the cost of translation and its efficiency. Analyzing dozens of eukaryotic genomes, we find that in all frames there is a universal trend of selection for low numbers of ATG codons; specifically, 16–27 codons upstream, but also 5–11 codons downstream of the START ATG, include less ATG codons than expected. We further suggest that there is selection for anti optimal ATG contexts in the vicinity of the START ATG. Thus, the efficiency and fidelity of translation initiation is encoded in the 5′UTR as required by the scanning model, but also at the beginning of the ORF. The observed nt patterns suggest that in all the analyzed organisms the pre-initiation complex often misses the START ATG of the ORF, and may start translation from an alternative initiation start-site. Thus, to prevent the translation of undesired proteins, there is selection for nucleotide sequences with low affinity to the pre-initiation complex near the beginning of the ORF. With the new suggested rules we were able to obtain a twice higher correlation with ribosomal density and protein levels in comparison to the Kozak rule alone (e.g. for protein levels r = 0.7 vs. r = 0.31; p<10−12). PMID:23874179

  7. Cortical Microtubule Arrays Are Initiated from a Nonrandom Prepattern Driven by Atypical Microtubule Initiation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Lioutas, Antonios; Deinum, Eva E.; Tindemans, Simon H.; Ehrhardt, David W.; Emons, Anne Mie C.; Vos, Jan W.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2013-01-01

    The ordered arrangement of cortical microtubules in growing plant cells is essential for anisotropic cell expansion and, hence, for plant morphogenesis. These arrays are dismantled when the microtubule cytoskeleton is rearranged during mitosis and reassembled following completion of cytokinesis. The reassembly of the cortical array has often been considered as initiating from a state of randomness, from which order arises at least partly through self-organizing mechanisms. However, some studies have shown evidence for ordering at early stages of array assembly. To investigate how cortical arrays are initiated in higher plant cells, we performed live-cell imaging studies of cortical array assembly in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 cells after cytokinesis and drug-induced disassembly. We found that cortical arrays in both cases did not initiate randomly but with a significant overrepresentation of microtubules at diagonal angles with respect to the cell axis, which coincides with the predominant orientation of the microtubules before their disappearance from the cell cortex in preprophase. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root cells, recovery from drug-induced disassembly was also nonrandom and correlated with the organization of the previous array, although no diagonal bias was observed in these cells. Surprisingly, during initiation, only about one-half of the new microtubules were nucleated from locations marked by green fluorescent protein-γ-tubulin complex protein2-tagged γ-nucleation complexes (γ-tubulin ring complex), therefore indicating that a large proportion of early polymers was initiated by a noncanonical mechanism not involving γ-tubulin ring complex. Simulation studies indicate that the high rate of noncanonical initiation of new microtubules has the potential to accelerate the rate of array repopulation. PMID:23300168

  8. Big Data Initiatives for Agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NAL has developed a workspace for research groups associated with the i5k initiative, which aims to sequence the genomes of all insesct species known to be important to worldwide agriculture, food safety, medicine, and energy production; all those used as models in biology; the most abundant in worl...

  9. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  10. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  11. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  12. Aerial Refueling Clearance Initiation Request

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-14

    and receiver agencies. The AR Clearance Initiation Request document recognizes the requirement for definitive aerial refueling agreements between...include directions for the development or content of these contractual agreements. 15. –SUBJECT TERMS See Document Terms and Definitions , Page 8 16...7 Terms and Definitions

  13. Anode initiated surface flashover switch

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, John P.; Koss, Robert J.

    2003-04-29

    A high voltage surface flashover switch has a pair of electrodes spaced by an insulator. A high voltage is applied to an anode, which is smaller than the opposing, grounded, cathode. When a controllable source of electrons near the cathode is energized, the electrons are attracted to the anode where they reflect to the insulator and initiate anode to cathode breakdown.

  14. Thermoelasticity of initially heated bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Iesan, D.

    1988-01-01

    A theory is presented for small thermoelastic deformations in a body that has already been subjected to a small thermoelastic deformation. The theory is used to study the torsion of an initally heated cylinder. Equations for isotropic thermoelastic bodies with a constant initial heat flux vector are also presented. 11 references.

  15. Teacher-Initiated Telecommunications Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrli, Odvard Egil

    1995-01-01

    A collection of teacher-initiated telecommunication projects for use in elementary and secondary schools. Projects utilize electronic mail and the Internet to help students communicate with peers in class and all over the world, with scientists in the South Pole, researchers in Australia, and WWII veterans. Project descriptions include electronic…

  16. Parenting and Adolescents' Sexual Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmore, Monica A.; Eng, Abbey L.; Giordano, Peggy C.; Manning, Wendy D.

    2009-01-01

    This study draws on social control and social learning theories to examine the role of dating-specific attitudes and practices as predictors of adolescents' sexual initiation. We include attention to the adolescent's reaction to control attempts as a further means of assessing family dynamics (i.e., frequency of dating disagreements). The study…

  17. Initiating Population Education in Baltimore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Caroline S.; McCrea, Lester C.

    1974-01-01

    After identifying the need for population education in Baltimore City Schools, the school system had the problem of initiating such a course. Working with the Planned Parenthood Association of Maryland, the school system sponsored an in-service program for teachers that resulted in the production of materials for all grades. (MA)

  18. Greenforce Initiative: Advancing Greener Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwase, Gloria; Keniry, Julian

    2011-01-01

    With support from the Bank of America Charitable Foundation and the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) and Jobs for the Future (JFF) formed the Greenforce Initiative--a two-year venture that will work with community colleges across the nation to strengthen their capacity to implement or refine quality pathways…

  19. Initiative Activities: A Good Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Allan C.

    1980-01-01

    Initiative activities are fabricated problems that require the mental and physical cooperation of a group of 8 to 15 people. A typical activity is the electric fence, in which students are instructed to get everyone over a chest-high barrier without touching it or reaching through it. (Author/IRT)

  20. Initiative Overview & Summary of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Funders Research Initiative, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Education Funders Research Initiative (EdFunders), a project of Philanthropy New York, is supported by a group of diverse funding organizations that have pursued an array of education reform strategies. EdFunders have come together to engage New Yorkers and focus leaders on new research into how to best prepare students for college and…

  1. Naval Research Laboratory Arctic Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Initiatives • Naval Arctic Environmental Research – Improved Physical Understanding – Integrated Arctic Modeling and Prediction – Developing New ...of the Arctic environment and important coupled processes operating in the Arctic region • Development of a new , dynamic, fully-integrated Arctic...longer lead times, including the use of satellite SAR data for assimilation into integrated models • Generation of new technologies (platforms

  2. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  3. Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) activities in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Laser initiated ordnance appears to offer the advantages of greater reliability, enhanced safety, lighter, less costly products, and improvements in spacecraft system designs which can lead to higher operational efficiency. But the lack of flight demonstrations has prevented the application of this new technology into new programs. Hence, a three-phase technology program was initiated by NASA to provide flight proof of their technical and programmatic feasibility: flight demonstration aboard an unmanned commercial vehicle (Pegasus), use as a Space Shuttle payload, and the most demanding of applications, namely, solid rocket motor vehicle ignition and flight termination. The programs investigate, via flight demonstrations the use of fully solid state laser diode systems to reduce potential hazards imposed by stray electrical signals. Inadvertent ignition has proven to cause serious problems. While the current electromechanical have been made safe, the result has been complex systems. Now is the time to take advantage of this new technology to further enhance safety and reliability of spacecraft systems. Two of the three phases are underway; an announcement of opportunity for the third, a sounding rocket flight demonstration, was made at the workshop.

  4. Savannah River Remediation Cost Savings Initiative - 12339

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Neil R.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River enjoyed two years of increased funding as a result of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act and Department of Energy (DOE) directed scope additions. Moving into FY2012, a much lower funding level is anticipated. In the past, the first response to a reduced funding scenario was to defer scope and slow down the program. This time, Savannah River decided that a better process was needed to try to maximize value to the government. This approach was named the Cost Savings Initiative (CSI). The CSI process is similar to a zero-based budget concept. Every element of work scope was screened to eliminate everything that was not directly related to safety and regulatory compliance. Then the schedules for the regulatory-driven scope were deferred such that the regulatory milestones were achieved just in time with no acceleration. This resulted in a strategy that met regulatory requirements in FY2012-13 with some remaining funding but not in FY2014-15. The remaining funding was then invested in cost savings initiatives in FY2012-13 to reduce the future cost of doing business in the FY2014-15 timeframe and beyond. This resulted in a Strategy that: - Meets all regulatory commitments; - Meets some regulatory commitments early; and - Preserves most of the life cycle savings that were built in to the baseline plan The CSI process used at Savannah River may be considered for application elsewhere in the DOE Complex. (authors)

  5. Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, Arthur

    2015-03-04

    The Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative represented a comprehensive and collaborative approach to promoting and implementing energy efficiency improvements. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. The ultimate goal of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative was to implement a total of 1,067 residential energy efficiency retrofits with a minimum 15% estimated energy efficiency savings per unit. Program partners included: United States Department of Energy, Allegheny Power, and Private Industry Council of Westmoreland-Fayette, Fayette County Redevelopment Authority, and various local partners. The program was open to any Fayette County residents who own their home and meet the prequalifying conditions. The level of assistance offered depended upon household income and commitment to undergo a BPI – Certified Audit and implement energy efficiency measures, which aimed to result in at least a 15% reduction in energy usage. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. Additionally, the program had components that involved recruitment and training for employment of persons in the energy sector (green jobs), as well as marketing and implementation of a commercial or community facilities component. The residential component of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative involved a comprehensive approach, providing assistance to low- moderate- and market-rate homeowners. The initiative will also coordinate activities with local utility providers to further incentivize energy efficiency improvements among qualifying homeowners. The commercial component of Fayette County’s Better Building Initiative involved grants

  6. Improving Student Discipline in the 80s: The Revival of Deterrance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, Edward A.

    1980-01-01

    The approach taken by Thomas Jefferson concerning problems of student discipline in colleges is viewed in historical perspective and comparisons are made to the contemporary view of adolescent disorder. Recommendations are made for the coming decade. (JN)

  7. Japanese Management Practices: The Educational Hula Hoop of the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquila, Frank D.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Japanese management concepts currently popular in business and education, including worker involvement, situational management, individual selection of workers, lifetime employment, and the quality circle. Suggests 10 applications of such concepts to educational administration but urges caution and recognition of the interrelationships…

  8. Community Information in the 80s: Towards the Automation of Information and Referral Files.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shroder, Emelie J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Four papers describe systems adopted by public libraries in the United States for computerizing community information services and information and referral programs. Word processing at the Fresno County Information and Referral Network and the automation of library processes in the Pikes Peak Library District are among the topics discussed. (JL)

  9. Knowledge-based systems: how will they affect manufacturing in the 80's

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.S.; Brooks, S.L.; Schaefer, R.M.

    1985-04-01

    Knowledge-based or ''expert'' systems have been in various stages of development and use for a long time in the academic world. Some of these systems have come out of the lab in recent years in the fields of medicine, geology, and computer system design. The use of knowledge-based systems in conjunction iwth manufacturing process planning and the emerging CAD/CAM/CAE technologies promises significant increases in engineering productivity. This paper's focus is on areas in manufacturing where knowledge-based systems could most benefit the engineer and industry. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  10. New York in Review, Theme: "Issues in Science Education for the '80s."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents edited excerpts of some of the major convention speeches presented at the National Science Teacher's Association National Convention in New York City, including those of Rosalyn Yalow, Peter Fenner, Verne N. Rockcastle, F. James Rutherford, John Brooks Slaughter, and Majorie H. Gardner. (CS)

  11. Preparation for the Battle against Censorship of Film and Video in the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David

    1986-01-01

    Documentation of the spread of censorship is extensive, and although challenges to films and videocassettes have not figured prominently in the literature, in the future there may be more emphasis on these media than on print material. On the state level, increasing censorship of films and videocassettes has occurred in North Carolina, California,…

  12. Parenting in the '80s. . . Student Guide. Brookhaven College Child Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Hilda; And Others

    This guide was developed to accompany a series of 16 seminars on parenting offered by the Brookhaven College Child Development Program to help meet the concerns and needs of working parents in a time of changing lifestyles and family patterns. In addition to providing an overview of each seminar topic, the guide contains informational essays…

  13. Engine condition monitoring: CF6 family 60's through the 80's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, H. J.; Dienger, G.

    1981-01-01

    The on condition program is described in terms of its effectiveness as a maintenance tool both at the line station as well as at home base by the early detection of engine faults, erroneous instrumentation signals and by verification of engine health. The system encompasses all known methods from manual procedures to the fully automated airborne integrated data system.

  14. Technologies of the '80s: Their Impact on Vocational Agriculture Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. A., Ed.; And Others

    This report is one of seven that identify major new and emerging technological advances expected to influence major vocational education program areas and to describe the programmatic implications in terms of skill-knowledge requirements, occupations most directly affected, and the anticipated diffusion rate. Chapter 1 considers technology as…

  15. Managing Higher Education in the 80s: Trying to Do More with Less. Touche Ross Roundtable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touche Ross & Co., New York, NY.

    Issues concerning the management of colleges and universities are considered in a roundtable discussion. It is suggested that higher education may be at a decisive juncture with respect to demographics, finances, institutional structure, and the political context. Attention is directed to the decline in the number of 18- to 22-year-olds and the…

  16. Professional Dress for the 80's. Marketing and Distributive Education Program, Professional Dress Unit. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Wally; And Others

    This guide for an adult marketing education course provides instructors with the necessary materials to present a seminar about "image management to project professionalism." General teaching suggestions are provided as well as a course outline and a time chart that provides guidelines for the minimum and maximum time to be spent on each…

  17. Moving toward Industrial Excellence in the '80s on the Competency-Based Education Bandwagon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrscher, Barton R.

    1981-01-01

    Underscores the problems of misunderstanding and misrepresentation in competency-based education (CBE). Proposes a definition of CBE, acknowledging that it must be adapted to individual colleges. Offers a rationale for adopting a CBE framework and provides an inventory model to facilitate the assessment of the quality of a CBE program. (CAM)

  18. Advanced Dental Education: Recommendations for the 80's. Issues in Dental Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Dental Schools, Washington, DC.

    Six statements of working principles and 11 major recommendations falling within those areas, as established by the Task Force on Advanced Dental Education, are presented. Supporting recommendations are also provided. The six principles include: (1) no change is recommended in the present goal of predoctoral education, to prepare students for…

  19. SLA Responds to U.S. Government Information Issues in the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Sandy I.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes Special Libraries Association activities on (1) Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-76 on contracting out of library services; (2) OMB Circular A-130 on management of federal information; (3) privatization and the National Technical Information Service (NTIS); (4) Federal Communications Commission (FCC) access charges; (5)…

  20. U.S. Media Coverage of Africa. A Media Source Guide, Issues for the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David S.

    One of a series on topics of concern to the U.S. media, this guide is intended to provide journalists with a critical analysis of U.S. media coverage of Africa. Section I provides an overview of the folklore about Africa and the nature and sources of stereotypes and misconceptions about Africa and the Western world. Findings and interpretations of…

  1. Developing Teacher Efficacy: A Triple Challenge to Professional Development in the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amodeo, Luiza; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The challenge to teacher development in the 1980s focuses on three areas: (1) multicultural education; (2) diagnosis and prescription based on learning styles, as well as on achievement level; and (3) awareness of the differences in function of the right and left hemispheres of the brain. (JN)

  2. American Foreign Policy for the '80s: A Voter's Guide to the Facts and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Wallace, Jr., Ed.; And Others

    The purpose of this guide is to provide voters, officeholders, and candidates with background information on major foreign policy issues so that they can follow the 1980 presidential debates and reach their own informed conclusions. Thirteen major foreign policy topics are covered. The material is written in telegraphic style to get the essential…

  3. Student Affairs in the 80s: Implications for the Use of Theory in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Don G.

    Student affairs professionals in community colleges are facing several major issues in need of resolution including: the insufficient use of existing knowledge about adolescent and adult development and organization development in program design and execution; and the insufficient use of knowledge of program evaluation for understanding the…

  4. Impact for the 80's: Proceedings of a Conference on Selected Technology for Business and Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of advanced energy technology are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to: aircraft propulsion; wind power commercialization; materials and structures, lubrication and bearings; Stirling and gas turbine engines; and electric and hybrid vehicles.

  5. Public Confidence in Public Education: A Growing Concern in the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.; Lintz, M. N.

    This literature review and analysis of the problem of building community confidence focuses on the work of the Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) Commission on Developing Public Confidence in Schools. Approaches to confidence building are categorized as: communications, concentrating on expanding communications one-way between school and the home; public…

  6. Technologies of the '80s: Their Impact on Trade and Industrial Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. A., Ed.; And Others

    This report is one of seven that identify major new and emerging technological advances expected to influence major vocational education program areas and to describe the programmatic implications in terms of skill-knowledge requirements, occupations most directly affected, and the anticipated diffusion rate. Chapter 1 considers technology as…

  7. A Quest for Quality: Consumer and Homemaking Education in the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Teacher of Home Economics, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the contributions that consumer and homemaking education make towards improving students' basic skills. These skills include verbal (discussing consumer issues, family relations, child development); reading (product labels, magazine articles, newspapers); writing (reports, notes, term papers); mathematics (budgets, recipe ingredients,…

  8. Niosomes from 80s to present: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Di Marzio, Luisa; Rinaldi, Federica; Celia, Christian; Paolino, Donatella; Alhaique, Franco; Esposito, Sara; Carafa, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Efficient and safe drug delivery has always been a challenge in medicine. The use of nanotechnology, such as the development of nanocarriers for drug delivery, has received great attention owing to the potential that nanocarriers can theoretically act as "magic bullets" and selectively target affected organs and cells while sparing normal tissues. During the last decades the formulation of surfactant vesicles, as a tool to improve drug delivery, brought an ever increasing interest among the scientists working in the area of drug delivery systems. Niosomes are self assembled vesicular nanocarriers obtained by hydration of synthetic surfactants and appropriate amounts of cholesterol or other amphiphilic molecules. Just like liposomes, niosomes can be unilamellar or multilamellar, are suitable as carriers of both hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs and are able to deliver drugs to the target site. Furthermore, niosomal vesicles, that are usually non-toxic, require less production costs and are stable over a longer period of time in different conditions, so overcoming some drawbacks of liposomes. The niosome properties are specifically dictated by size, shape, and surface chemistry which are able to modify the drug's intrinsic pharmacokinetics and eventual drug targeting to the areas of pathology. This up-to-date review deals with composition, preparation, characterization/evaluation, advantages, disadvantages and application of niosomes.

  9. Reporting the Immigration Imbrolio. A Media Source Guide, Issues for the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angle, James L.; Gonzales, Patricia

    Intended to provide journalists with concise, authoritative background information on immigration to the United States, particularly from Latin America, this guide is one of a series treating topics of continuing concern to the U.S. media. The United States accepts more legal immigrants every year than all other nations combined: 526,000 in 1979…

  10. Transformations in Higher Education: Looking Ahead at Management Issues in the '80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., New York, NY.

    Future changes that may affect higher education and management approaches that should be used by governing boards and administrators are discussed. Population trends that will affect academic and support programs are noted, and it is suggested that a declining demand from traditional students may cause institutions to specialize in selected…

  11. Loyola Sacred Heart High School: The Catholic School of the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Orlando R.

    1979-01-01

    Based on his experience in creating one revitalized Catholic high school from the merger of two declining ones in Missoula, Montana, the author outlines three rules for the survival of a school: promotion and publicity, financial solvency, and educational excellence. (SJL)

  12. Jobs in Unexpected Places--A Pattern for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Jack B.

    1983-01-01

    Opportunities now await the leisure service professional in several employment areas not traditionally occupied by people with training or experience in the recreation or leisure service profession. Areas include theme parks, auditorium and arena management, themed restaurants, shopping centers, and resort management. (CJ)

  13. A Kaleidoscope: Children Viewing the World through Books of the Late '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corboy, Margaret; And Others

    This paper presents nine sets of books which focus on specific contemporary international issues, and which have been used successfully with upper elementary grade students. The paper shows how the books (including picture books), which include subjects such as the preservation of the environment, world peace, endangered animals, and the coming of…

  14. Community College Leadership for the '80s. AACJC Leadership Bookshelf Series, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, John E., Ed.; Baker, George A., III, Ed.

    These essays were prepared by leaders with recognized success in community college and university management, who were asked to share their experiences, the techniques they have found useful, and their personal views about community college leadership. After an introduction by Dale Parnell to the importance of leadership in institutional success,…

  15. The ACT transport: Panacea for the 80's or designer's illusion (panel discussion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A panel discussion was held which attempted to make an objective and pragmatic assessment of the standing of active control technology. The discussion focused on the standing of active control technology relative to civil air transport applications, the value as opposed to the cost of the projected benefits, the need for research, development, and demonstration, the role of government and industry in developing the technology, the major obstacles to its implementation, and the probable timing of the full utilization of active control technology in commercial transportation. An edited transcription of the prepared statements of the panel members and the subsequent open discussion between the panel and the audience is presented.

  16. Libraries and Librarians in the 80's: Challenge and Change. 1980 LACUNY Institute Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Richard; And Others

    This list of citations covers three broad areas: (1) redefining librarianship: organizations, people, and technology; (2) continuing education for librarians; and (3) librarians and libraries in the 1980's: the White House Conference on Library and Information Services (WHCLIS) and beyond. The last is divided into three main sections devoted to…

  17. New directions in lubrication, materials, wear, and surface interactions - Tribology in the 80's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    New directions in tribology are described. A range of topics is addressed, extending from fundamental research on tribological materials of all kinds and their surface effects, to final technological applications in mechanical components such as bearings, gears, and seals. The general topics addressed include: importance and definition of materials in tribology; future directions of research in adhesion and friction, wear and wear-resistant materials, and liquid lubricants and additives; status and new directions in elastohydrodynamic lubrication and solid lubricants; and tribological materials for mechanical components of the future.

  18. Status and Direction of Tribology as a Science in the 80's. Understanding and Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabor, D.

    1984-01-01

    The most challenging research problems in tribology for the next decade or beyond are classified horizontally into two categories: (1) understanding of basic mechanisms and (2) prediction of practical performance. Vertical classifications are in terms of particular themes or fields of interest. Areas where more fundamental work is required are: adhesion and friction of clean and contaminated surfaces; lubrication; new materials; surface characterization at the engineering level (topography) and at the atomic levels (various spectroscopies); and wear.

  19. Toe of Ganges Chasma Landslide ( 8.0 S, 44.4W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows shear striations, dark dunes banked up against the toe of the slide and over-riding light-toned ripples and boulders on surface of slide. These features can be used to determine quantitative aspects of surface processes.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  20. Non-Credit Education's Response to the Challenges of the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazik, Martha S.

    Five of the major issues confronting postsecondary education today are the decline in the quality of education, the increase in competition from other education service providers for a share of the postsecondary market, the increase in the demand on education as a result of rapid changes in technology, the decline in educational revenues, and the…