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Sample records for 819 tt genotype

  1. Association of TNF-α-(308(GG)), IL-10(-819(TT)), IL-10(-1082(GG)) and IL-1R1(+1970(CC)) genotypes with the susceptibility and progression of leprosy in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Mohd; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Santosh, K V; Kamal, Vineet Kumar; Khanna, Neena; Rao, D N

    2015-05-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by M. leprae. We analyzed 48 cytokine polymorphisms in 13 (pro as well as anti-inflammatory) cytokine genes using PCR-SSP assay in 102 leprosy patients and 120 healthy controls with intent to find out a link between cytokine polymorphisms and disease susceptibility. TNF-α (-308) GG, IL-10 (-819) TT, IL-10 (-1082) GG and IL1R (+1970) CC genotypes are found to be predominant (p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.0001 and p=0.001, respectively) in both tuberculoid as well as lepromatous leprosy patients. This observation suggests these genotypes as play the central role(s) in the progression of disease. CBA assay demonstrates the varied serum concentration of these cytokines with respect to their genotypes. The above genotypes appeared as high producer genotypes in our study. Even in presence of high produce genotypes, TNF-α level are found to be affected/masked by the presence of IL-10 in leprosy patients. Expressional masking of TNF-α is associated with the expression of IL-10 in these patients. This is one the negative impact of SNP-SNP interaction in leprosy patients. Therefore, we can conclude that cytokine gene polymorphisms determine the predisposition to the leprosy progression.

  2. Interleukin-28b CC genotype predicts early treatment response and CT/TT genotypes predicts non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishak Chander; Trehanpati, Nirupma; Sukriti, Sukriti; Hissar, Syed; Midha, Vandana; Sood, Ajit; Sarin, Shiv K

    2014-04-01

    Response to antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends upon the genotype and host immune response. IL28b gene mutations have been shown to modulate host antiviral immune response against genotype 1. However, the predictive value of IL28b polymorphism in genotype 3 HCV patients is largely unknown. The association of IL28b polymorphism with virological response was studied in 356 patients with genotype 3 chronic HCV undergoing treatment with peg-interferon and ribavirin and was compared with matched controls. IL28b genotyping followed by DNA sequencing was performed to identify the CC, CT, or TT genotypes. Two log reduction of HCV RNA at Day 7 (Quick Viral Response, QVR) and HCV RNA negativity at Day 28 (Rapid Viral Response, RVR) were analyzed with CC and non-CC genotypes in addition to other predictors of response. The associations of alleles with the response patterns were predicted. Sustained viral response was seen in 250 (70.2%) patients and the IL28b genotype CC/CT/TT distribution was 61.1%; 30.5%; and 8.4%, respectively. The non-CC genotypes were significantly higher in non-responders when compared to responders (67.6% vs. 38.9%, P < 0.001). Interestingly, the rapid viral response in responders was observed in 72.7% with the CC genotype and in 27.2% with the non-CC genotype (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed CC genotype as an independent factor predicting the sustained viral response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3. In conclusion, the IL28b CT/TT genotype strongly correlates with treatment non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3 and CC genotype of IL28b is associated with higher quick viral response.

  3. Folate Intake at RDA Levels Is Inadequate for Mexican American Men with the Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase 677TT Genotype123

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Claudia; Veenema, Kristin; Ivanov, Alexandre A.; Tran, Sally; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Moriarty, David J.; Maletz, Charles V.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the establishment of the 1998 folate recommended dietary allowance (RDA), the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C→T variant has emerged as a strong modifier of folate status. This controlled feeding study investigated the adequacy of the RDA, 400 μg/d as dietary folate equivalents (DFE), for Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or TT genotype. Because of the interdependency between folate and choline, the influence of choline intake on folate status was also assessed. Mexican American men (n = 60; 18–55 y) with the MTHFR 677CC (n = 31) or TT (n = 29) genotype consumed 438 μg DFE/d and total choline intakes of 300, 550 (choline adequate intake), 1100, or 2200 mg/d for 12 wk. Folate status response was assessed via serum folate (SF), RBC folate, plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), and urinary folate. SF decreased (P < 0.001) 66% to 7.9 ± 0.7 nmol/L (means ± SEM) in men with the 677TT genotype and 62% to 11.3 ± 0.9 nmol/L in the 677CC genotype. Plasma tHcy increased (P < 0.0001) 170% to 31 ± 3 μmol/L in men with the 677TT genotype and 18% to 11.6 ± 0.3 μmol/L in the 677CC genotype. At the end of the study, 34% (677TT) and 16% (677CC) had SF concentrations <6.8 nmol/L and 79% (677TT) and 7% (677CC) had tHcy concentrations >14 μmol/L. Choline intake did not influence the response of the measured variables. These data showed that the folate RDA is not adequate for men of Mexican descent, particularly for those with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, and demonstrated a lack of influence of choline intake on the folate status variables measured in this study. PMID:18156406

  4. Novel Atlantic bottlenose dolphin parainfluenza virus TtPIV-1 clusters with bovine PIV-3 genotype B strains.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Kirsten C; Neill, John D; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; McGill, Jodi L; Sacco, Randy E

    2015-10-01

    Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) is a common viral infection not only in humans, but also in many other species. Serological evidence suggests that nearly 100 % of children in the United States have been infected with PIV-3 by 5 years of age. Similarly, in cattle, PIV-3 is commonly associated with bovine respiratory disease complex. A novel dolphin PIV-3 (TtPIV-1) was described by Nollens et al. in 2008 from a dolphin that was diagnosed with an unknown respiratory illness. At that time, TtPIV-1 was found to be most similar to, but distinct from, bovine PIV-3 (BPIV-3). In the present study, similar viral growth kinetics and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, and CXCL8) production were seen between BPIV-3 and TtPIV-1 in BEAS-2B, MDBK, and Vero cell lines. Initial nomenclature of TtPIV-1 was based on partial sequence of the fusion and RNA polymerase genes. Based on the similarities we saw with the in vitro work, it was important to examine the TtPIV-1 genome in more detail. Full genome sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that all six viral genes of TtPIV-1 clustered within the recently described BPIV-3 genotype B strains, and it is proposed that TtPIV-1 be re-classified with BPIV-3 genotype B strains.

  5. Different Risk Indictors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 T869C CC/CT Genotype and TT Genotype

    PubMed Central

    MOU, Xin; LIU, Yinghui; ZHOU, Diyi; HU, Yongbin; MA, Guoling; SHOU, Chengmin; CHEN, Jiawei; ZHOU, Danyang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor-beta 1(TGF-β1) T869C (rs1800470, the same below) gene polymorphism is notably relative with the development of Diabetic Nephropathy (DN), and CC/CT genotype diabetic have higher frequency of than TT genotype diabetic. To find out individual risk factors in the two genotypes especially in susceptible genotype could provide more efficient and targeted prevention. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. A total of 251 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients [53.4% male, 56(52–67) years] were enrolled in this cohort study. Multiple concerned factors were collected and the relationship of these risk factors and development of DN were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Hazard ratios of development of DN were calculated by Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazards model for CC/CT genotype versus TT genotype patients. Results: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN in T2DM patients (HR, 2.08; 95%CI, 1.18–3.66; P=0.012). Hyperlipemia (HR, 1.91; 95%CI, 1.19–3.08; P=0.007), age (HR, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.93–0.98; P=0.001) and smoking status (HR, 2.36; 95%CI, 1.07–5.21; P=0.033) were risk indictors of the development of DN in CC/CT genotype patients. HbA1c (HR, 2.8; 95%CI, 1.07–7.30; P=0.036), hypertension (HR, 7.46; 95%CI, 1.38–40.29; P=0.02), and hyperlipemia (HR, 12.33; 95%CI, 1.05–145.39; P=0.046) were risk indictors for the development of DN in TT genotype patients. Conclusion: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN for T2DM patients and CC/CT genotype had higher susceptibility to DN. CC/CT genotype and TT genotype patients had different risk indictors of DN. PMID:27648419

  6. Different Risk Indictors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 T869C CC/CT Genotype and TT Genotype

    PubMed Central

    MOU, Xin; LIU, Yinghui; ZHOU, Diyi; HU, Yongbin; MA, Guoling; SHOU, Chengmin; CHEN, Jiawei; ZHOU, Danyang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor-beta 1(TGF-β1) T869C (rs1800470, the same below) gene polymorphism is notably relative with the development of Diabetic Nephropathy (DN), and CC/CT genotype diabetic have higher frequency of than TT genotype diabetic. To find out individual risk factors in the two genotypes especially in susceptible genotype could provide more efficient and targeted prevention. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. A total of 251 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients [53.4% male, 56(52–67) years] were enrolled in this cohort study. Multiple concerned factors were collected and the relationship of these risk factors and development of DN were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Hazard ratios of development of DN were calculated by Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazards model for CC/CT genotype versus TT genotype patients. Results: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN in T2DM patients (HR, 2.08; 95%CI, 1.18–3.66; P=0.012). Hyperlipemia (HR, 1.91; 95%CI, 1.19–3.08; P=0.007), age (HR, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.93–0.98; P=0.001) and smoking status (HR, 2.36; 95%CI, 1.07–5.21; P=0.033) were risk indictors of the development of DN in CC/CT genotype patients. HbA1c (HR, 2.8; 95%CI, 1.07–7.30; P=0.036), hypertension (HR, 7.46; 95%CI, 1.38–40.29; P=0.02), and hyperlipemia (HR, 12.33; 95%CI, 1.05–145.39; P=0.046) were risk indictors for the development of DN in TT genotype patients. Conclusion: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN for T2DM patients and CC/CT genotype had higher susceptibility to DN. CC/CT genotype and TT genotype patients had different risk indictors of DN.

  7. Additional food folate derived exclusively from natural sources improves folate status in young women with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jean; Yang, Tai Li; Urrutia, Tania F; Li, Rui; Perry, Cydne A; Hata, Hiroko; Cogger, Edward A; Moriarty, David J; Caudill, Marie A

    2006-11-01

    The effectiveness of additional food folate in improving folate status in humans is uncertain particularly in people with the common genetic variant (677 C-->T) in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. To examine the effect of a doubling of food folate consumption on folate status response variables, women (n=32; 18-46 years) with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype consumed either 400 (n=15; 7 CC and 8 TT) or 800 (n=17; 8 CC and 9 TT) microg/day of dietary folate equivalents (DFE) derived exclusively from naturally occurring food folate for 12 weeks. A repeated measures two-factor ANOVA was used to examine the effect of the dietary treatment, the MTHFR C677T genotype and their interactions on serum folate, RBC folate and plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) during the last 3 weeks of the study. Consumption of 800 microg DFE/day resulted in serum folate concentrations that were 67% (P=.005) higher than consumption of 400 microg DFE/day (18.6+/-2.9 vs. 31.0+/-2.7 nmol/L, respectively) and RBC folate concentrations that were 33% (P=.001) higher (1172+/-75 vs. 1559+/-70 nmol/L, respectively). Serum folate (P=.065) and RBC folate (P=.022) concentrations were lower and plasma tHcy was higher (P=.039) in women with the MTHFR 677 TT genotype relative to the CC genotype. However, no genotype by dietary treatment interaction was detected. These data suggest that a doubling of food folate intake will lead to marked improvements in folate status in women with the MTHFR 677 CC or TT genotype.

  8. Association of neural tube defects in children of mothers with MTHFR 677TT genotype and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Benitez, N M; Yanes-Sosa, F; Gonzalez-Meneses, A; Cerrillos, L; Acosta, D; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Neth, O; Gomez de Terreros, I; Ybot-González, P

    2014-03-26

    Abnormalities in maternal folate and carbohydrate metabolism have both been shown to induce neural tube defects (NTD) in humans and animal models. However, the relationship between these two factors in the development of NTDs remains unclear. Data from mothers of children with spina bifida seen at the Unidad de Espina Bífida del Hospital Infantil Virgen del Rocío (case group) were compared to mothers of healthy children with no NTD (control group) who were randomly selected from patients seen at the outpatient ward in the same hospital. There were 25 individuals in the case group and 41 in the control group. Analysis of genotypes for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677CT polymorphism in women with or without risk factors for abnormal carbohydrate metabolism revealed that mothers who were homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism were more likely to have offspring with spina bifida and high levels of homocysteine, compared to the control group. The increased incidence of NTDs in mothers homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism stresses the need for careful metabolic screening in pregnant women, and, if necessary, determination of the MTHFR 677CT genotype in those mothers at risk of developing abnormal carbohydrate metabolism.

  9. The relationship between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase c.677TT genotype and oligozoospermia in infertile male patients living in the Trakya region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gurkan, H; Tozkır, H; Göncü, E; Ulusal, S; Yazar, M

    2015-11-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), the key enzyme of the folate metabolic pathway, has been reported to be five times more active in the testicles compared to other organs in adult mice. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between MTHFR c.677C>T and c.1298A>C polymorphisms and infertility in nonobstructive azoospermic and oligozoospermic male patients living in the Trakya region of Turkey. The study population included 75 nonobstructive azoospermic and 62 oligozoospermic, nonconsanguineous patients who were referred to the Department of Medical Genetics of Trakya University between 01.03.2012 and 01.06.2013 due to infertility and who had been diagnosed based on clinical examinations and spermiograms. All of the patients had a normal karyotype without a Y chromosome microdeletion. Melting curve analysis with labelled probes and primers that were designed by the manufacturers and the real-time polymerase chain reaction method were used. The MTHFR c.677TT genotype frequency in the oligozoospermic infertile male patient group was greater than that of the fertile control group [odds ratio (OR) = 2.675 (95% CI: 0.979-7.305), (P < 0.048)]. The MTHFR c.677TT genotype may be a genetic risk factor for oligozoospermic infertile male patients who live in the Trakya region of Turkey.

  10. A comparison of methods for determining genotypes at the tumour necrosis factor-alpha-308, interleukin (IL)-1beta+3953, IL-6 -174 and IL-10 -1082/-819/-592 polymorphic loci.

    PubMed

    Bown, M J; Weston, S; Horsburgh, T; Nicholson, M L; Bell, P R F; Sayers, R D

    2005-04-01

    Induced heteroduplex genotyping (IHG) is one of many methods that can be used to determine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). It is relatively new in comparison to other polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. The aim of this study was to compare the results of genotyping using IHG with the results of genotyping using either polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for SNPs in the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-10 genes. Ninety patients who consented to participate in the study had their genotypes determined by IHG and either PCR-SSP (TNF-alpha-308 and IL-10 -1082/-819/-592) or PCR-RFLP (IL-1beta +3953 and IL-6 -174). Results for each locus were compared between techniques by calculating the Kappa statistic as a measure of agreement. The IHG and more traditional genotyping methods produced very similar results at all loci. The Kappa statistics for each locus were as follows: TNF-alpha -308, K = 0.727; IL-1beta +3953, K = 0.886; IL-6 -174, K = 0.909; IL-10 -1082, K = 0.876; IL-10 -592, K = 0.920. IHG is a valid method for the determination of genotypes at the loci examined in this study and produces comparable results to those of more traditional methods of genotyping.

  11. The ABCB1, rs9282564, AG and TT Genotypes and the COMT, rs4680, AA Genotype are Less Frequent in Deceased Patients with Opioid Addiction than in Living Patients with Opioid Addiction.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Dorte J; Damkier, Per; Feddersen, Søren; Möller, Sören; Thomsen, Jørgen L; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Brøsen, Kim

    2016-10-01

    Sudden death due to acute intoxication occurs frequently in patients with opioid addiction (OA). To examine whether certain genotypes were associated with this, we examined the frequencies of 29 SNPs located in candidate genes related to opioid pharmacology: ABCB1, OPRM1, UGT2B7, CYP3A5, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, COMT, KCNJ6 and SCN9A in 274 deceased patients with OA (DOA), 309 living patients with OA (LOA) and in 394 healthy volunteers (HV). The main hypothesis of the study was that subjects homozygous for the variant 3435T in ABCB1 (rs1045642) occur more frequently in DOA than in LOA and HV because morphine and methadone more readily cross the blood barrier in these subjects due to a lower efflux transporter activity of the ABCB1 (p-glycoprotein) transporter. Our results did not support this hypothesis, because no statistically significant difference (p = 0.506) in the frequency of the TT genotype of rs1045642 was observed between the DOA, LOA and HV cohorts. However, for another ABCB1 variant, rs9282564, we found that the frequencies of the AG and TT genotypes were 13, 21 and 25% in DOA, LOA and HV, respectively, and after correcting for age, sex and multiple testing, the differences between DOA and LOA were statistically significantly different (p = 0.027). The COMT rs4680 AA genotype frequencies were 25%, 35% and 31% in DOA, LOA and HV, respectively, and the difference between DOA and LOA was also statistically significant (p = 0.0028). In conclusion, this study generated two hypotheses suggesting possible associations of a reduced risk of death and carrying, respectively, the ABCB1 rs9282564 AG and TT genotypes and the COMT rs4680 AA genotype among patients with OA. These findings should be confirmed in independent cohorts, and if a causal relationship between these variants and fatal poisoning in OA is confirmed, then it may be possible at least in theory to personalize prevention of sudden death in this patient group.

  12. Association of PTPN22 1858T/T genotype with type 1 diabetes, Graves' disease but not with rheumatoid arthritis in Russian population.

    PubMed

    Zhebrun, Daria; Kudryashova, Yulia; Babenko, Alina; Maslyansky, Alexei; Kunitskaya, Natalya; Popcova, Daria; Klushina, Alexandra; Grineva, Elena; Kostareva, Anna; Shlyakhto, Evgeny

    2011-04-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 gene (PTPN22) is an important negative regulator of signal transduction through the T-cell receptors (TCR). Recently a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 1858 C/T within this gene was shown to be a risk factor for several autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Graves' Disease (GD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). The aim of this study was to analyze a possible association between 1858 C/T SNP and a number of autoimmune diseases, including RA, GD and T1D in Russian population. Patients with T1D, GD, RA and healthy controls were genotyped for the 1858 C/T SNP in PTPN22 gene. We found a significant association between PTPN22 1858 C/T SNP and T1D and GD. 1858T/T genotype was observed more frequently in T1D and GD patients compared to control subjects. No such association was observed for RA. In concordance with a previous data establishing PTPN22 1858 C/T SNP association with several autoimmune diseases, our findings provide further evidence that the PTPN22 gene may play an important role in the susceptibility to some autoimmune diseases. PMID:21467606

  13. The CD14 rs2569190 TT Genotype Is Associated with an Improved 30-Day Survival in Patients with Sepsis: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Ashham; Liese, Benjamin; Steinau, Maximilian; Ghadimi, Michael; Bergmann, Ingo; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Popov, Aron Frederik; Beissbarth, Tim; Bauer, Martin; Hinz, José

    2015-01-01

    According to previous investigations, CD14 is suggested to play a pivotal role in initiating and perpetuating the pro-inflammatory response during sepsis. A functional polymorphism within the CD14 gene, rs2569190, has been shown to impact the pro-inflammatory response upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide, a central mediator of inflammation in sepsis. In this study, we hypothesized that the strong pro-inflammatory response induced by the TT genotype of CD14 rs2569190 may have a beneficial effect on survival (30-day) in patients with sepsis. A total of 417 adult patients with sepsis (and of western European descent) were enrolled into this observational study. Blood samples were collected for rs2569190 genotyping. Patients were followed over the course of their stay in the ICU, and the 30-day mortality risk was recorded as the primary outcome parameter. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were quantified at sepsis onset and throughout the observational period to monitor organ failure as a secondary variable. Moreover, organ support-free days were evaluated as a secondary outcome parameter. TT-homozygous patients were compared to C-allele carriers. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a higher 30-day mortality risk among C-allele carriers compared with T homozygotes (p = 0.0261). To exclude the effect of potential confounders (age, gender, BMI and type of infection) and covariates that varied at baseline with a p-value < 0.2 (e.g., comorbidities), we performed multivariate Cox regression analysis to examine the survival time. The CD14 rs2569190 C allele remained a significant covariate for the 30-day mortality risk in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.08-4.12; p = 0.0282). The 30-day mortality rate among C allele carriers was 23%, whereas the T homozygotes had a mortality rate of 13%. Additionally, an analysis of organ-specific SOFA scores revealed a significantly higher SOFA-Central nervous system score among patients

  14. Lack of association of the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype with vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy during the early phase of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Echebarria-Barona, Aizpea; Zabalza, Iñaki; Ruiz, Irune; Guerra-Merino, Isabel; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2016-02-01

    Vincristine is a component of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment with the potential to induce peripheral neuropathy. Recently, the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype was found to be associated with vincristine-induced toxicity during the continuation phase in pediatric ALL patients treated on the Total XIIIB and COG AALL0433 protocols at St Jude Children's Research Hospital and Children's Oncology Group. This finding could provide a base for safer dosing of vincristine. Nevertheless, there are variations in vincristine regimens among ALL treatment protocols and phases in different populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype is a useful marker of vincristine neuropathy during induction therapy among Spanish children with B-ALL treated on the LAL-SHOP protocols. No association was found between neurotoxicity during the induction phase and the rs924607 TT genotype. This lack of association could be because of population differences and/or differences in neurotoxicity etiology between induction and continuation phases of treatment. PMID:26618658

  15. Interleukin 10 (- 1082 G/A) and (- 819 C/T) gene polymorphisms in Egyptian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Talaat, Roba M; Mohamed, Yasmin A; Mohamad, Ehab H; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Guirgis, Adel A

    2016-09-01

    Cytokines play critical roles in the pathogenesis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). This work was designed to study the implication of IL10 gene polymorphisms (- 1082 G/A and - 819 C/T) on the susceptibility of Egyptian women to have PCOS. Rotterdam consensus criteria were used to diagnose PCOS patients. Genotyping was performed by single-stranded polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) in 61 PCOS patients and 80 healthy controls, and IL-10 serum levels were measured using Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The frequency of IL10 - 1082 G/G (46%) genotype was significantly increased (p < 0.001) while the frequency of - 1082 A/A (16%) genotype was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in PCOS patients compared to controls (14% and 35% for G/G and A/A genotypes; respectively). G allele (65%) is significantly increased (p < 0.01( in PCOS patients while A allele (61%) is significantly increased (p < 0.001( in control subjects. The distribution of IL10 -819 T/T genotype was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in PCOS group. G/G genotype (odd ratio (OR = 5.322) with confidence interval (CI = 2.364-11.982) and the G allele (OR = 2.828 with CI = 1.73-4.61) of - 1082 G/A and T/T genotype of - 819 C/T (OR = 4.18 with CI = 1.26-13.86) could be considered as risk factors for PCOS. IL-10 levels were significantly lower among PCOS patients (313.42 ± 30.10) compared to normal controls (4914.36 ± 303.72). Depending on our preliminary work, IL10 - 1082 G/G might be considered as a host genetic factor for PCOS susceptibility in Egyptian women. Studies concerning other cytokine gene polymorphisms are required to get a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCOS disease.

  16. Interleukin 10 (- 1082 G/A) and (- 819 C/T) gene polymorphisms in Egyptian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Talaat, Roba M; Mohamed, Yasmin A; Mohamad, Ehab H; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Guirgis, Adel A

    2016-09-01

    Cytokines play critical roles in the pathogenesis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). This work was designed to study the implication of IL10 gene polymorphisms (- 1082 G/A and - 819 C/T) on the susceptibility of Egyptian women to have PCOS. Rotterdam consensus criteria were used to diagnose PCOS patients. Genotyping was performed by single-stranded polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) in 61 PCOS patients and 80 healthy controls, and IL-10 serum levels were measured using Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The frequency of IL10 - 1082 G/G (46%) genotype was significantly increased (p < 0.001) while the frequency of - 1082 A/A (16%) genotype was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in PCOS patients compared to controls (14% and 35% for G/G and A/A genotypes; respectively). G allele (65%) is significantly increased (p < 0.01( in PCOS patients while A allele (61%) is significantly increased (p < 0.001( in control subjects. The distribution of IL10 -819 T/T genotype was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in PCOS group. G/G genotype (odd ratio (OR = 5.322) with confidence interval (CI = 2.364-11.982) and the G allele (OR = 2.828 with CI = 1.73-4.61) of - 1082 G/A and T/T genotype of - 819 C/T (OR = 4.18 with CI = 1.26-13.86) could be considered as risk factors for PCOS. IL-10 levels were significantly lower among PCOS patients (313.42 ± 30.10) compared to normal controls (4914.36 ± 303.72). Depending on our preliminary work, IL10 - 1082 G/G might be considered as a host genetic factor for PCOS susceptibility in Egyptian women. Studies concerning other cytokine gene polymorphisms are required to get a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCOS disease. PMID:27617227

  17. Prospective evaluation of the thrombotic risk in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the MTHFR TT 677 genotype, the prothrombin G20210A variant, and further prothrombotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Göttl, U; Wermes, C; Junker, R; Koch, H G; Schobess, R; Fleischhack, G; Schwabe, D; Ehrenforth, S

    1999-03-01

    The reported incidence of thromboembolism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with L-asparaginase, vincristine, and prednisone varies from 2.4% to 11.5%. The present study was designed to prospectively evaluate the role of the TT677 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype, the prothrombin G20210A mutation, the factor V G1691A mutation, deficiencies of protein C, protein S, antithrombin, and increased lipoprotein (a) concentrations in leukemic children treated according to the ALL-Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster (BFM) 90/95 study protocols with respect to the onset of vascular events. Three hundred and one consecutive leukemic children were enrolled in this study. Fifty-five of these 301 subjects investigated had one established single prothrombotic risk factor: 20 children showed the TT677 MTHFR genotype; 5 showed the heterozygous prothrombin G20210A variant; 11 were carriers of the factor V G1691A mutation (heterozygous, n = 10; homozygous, n = 1); 4 showed familial protein C, 4 protein S, and 2 antithrombin type I deficiency; 9 patients were suffering from familially increased lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] concentrations (>30 mg/dL). In addition, combined prothrombotic defects were found in a further 10 patients: the FV mutation was combined with the prothrombin G20210A variant (n = 1), increased Lp(a) (n = 3), protein C deficiency (n = 1), and homozygosity for the C677T MTHFR gene mutation (n = 1). Lp(a) was combined with protein C deficiency (n = 2) and the MTHFR TT 677 genotype (n = 2). Two hundred eighty-nine of the 301 patients were available for thrombosis-free survival analysis. In 32 (11%) of these 289 patients venous thromboembolism occurred. The overall thrombosis-free survival in patients with at least one prothrombotic defect was significantly reduced compared with patients without a prothrombotic defect within the hemostatic system (P <.0001). In addition, a clear-cut positive correlation (P <.0001) was found between

  18. 25 CFR 81.9 - Voting districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Voting districts. 81.9 Section 81.9 Indians BUREAU OF... STATUTE § 81.9 Voting districts. If: (a) Voting districts have not already been designated for tribal... board's judgment voting districts are needed, the board shall establish them and designate a...

  19. 25 CFR 81.9 - Voting districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voting districts. 81.9 Section 81.9 Indians BUREAU OF... STATUTE § 81.9 Voting districts. If: (a) Voting districts have not already been designated for tribal... board's judgment voting districts are needed, the board shall establish them and designate a...

  20. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Testing of IBCs § 178.819 Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the... vibration test. (b) Test method. (1) A sample IBC, selected at random, must be filled and closed as...

  1. 48 CFR 819.7108 - Application process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application process. 819.7108 Section 819.7108 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7108 Application process....

  2. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  3. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  4. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  5. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  6. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  7. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  8. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  9. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  10. 48 CFR 819.201 - General policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General policy. 819.201... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.201 General policy. The Secretary shall establish goals for each fiscal year for participation in Department contracts by SDVOSBs and VOSBs. In order to...

  11. 48 CFR 819.602 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures. 819.602 Section 819.602 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Certificates of Competency and Determinations of Responsibility...

  12. 26 CFR 1.819-1 - Taxable years affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Taxable years affected. 1.819-1 Section 1.819-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-1 Taxable years affected. Section 1.819-2 is applicable only to taxable years beginning after December 31, 1957, and all references to sections of part...

  13. 26 CFR 1.819-1 - Taxable years affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Taxable years affected. 1.819-1 Section 1.819-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-1 Taxable years affected. Section 1.819-2 is applicable only to taxable years beginning after December 31, 1957, and all references to sections of part...

  14. 26 CFR 1.819-1 - Taxable years affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Taxable years affected. 1.819-1 Section 1.819-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-1 Taxable years affected. Section 1.819-2 is applicable only to taxable years beginning after December 31, 1957, and all references to sections of part...

  15. 48 CFR 819.7108 - Application process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7108 Application process. (a... evaluated on the extent to which the mentor plans to provide developmental assistance. Evaluations will... eligible as a SDVOSB or VOSB to participate in VA's Mentor-Protégé Program; (3) A description of the...

  16. 48 CFR 819.7110 - Developmental assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to, the following: (a) Guidance relating to— (1) Financial management; (2) Organizational management; (3) Overall business management/planning; (4) Business development; and (5) Technical assistance. (b... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7110 Developmental...

  17. 50 CFR 81.9 - Assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND PLANTS-COOPERATION WITH THE STATES § 81.9 Assurances. The State must assure and certify...

  18. 50 CFR 81.9 - Assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND PLANTS-COOPERATION WITH THE STATES § 81.9 Assurances. The State must assure and certify...

  19. 50 CFR 81.9 - Assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND PLANTS-COOPERATION WITH THE STATES § 81.9 Assurances. The State must assure and certify...

  20. 48 CFR 819.7115 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7115 Solicitation provisions. (a... Business Subcontracting Plan. (b) Insert 852.219-72, Evaluation Factor for Participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program, in solicitations that include an evaluation factor for participation in VA's...

  1. 48 CFR 819.7115 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7115 Solicitation provisions. (a... Business Subcontracting Plan. (b) Insert 852.219-72, Evaluation Factor for Participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program, in solicitations that include an evaluation factor for participation in VA's...

  2. 38 CFR 8.19 - Beneficiary and optional settlement changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beneficiary and optional settlement changes. 8.19 Section 8.19 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Beneficiaries § 8.19 Beneficiary and optional settlement changes....

  3. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-2 Foreign life insurance companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign...

  4. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  5. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  6. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  7. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  8. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  9. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  10. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  11. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  12. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  13. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  14. 48 CFR 819.202-70 - HCA responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false HCA responsibilities. 819.202-70 Section 819.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-70 HCA responsibilities. An HCA must perform...

  15. 48 CFR 819.202-70 - HCA responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false HCA responsibilities. 819.202-70 Section 819.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-70 HCA responsibilities. An HCA must perform...

  16. 48 CFR 819.202-70 - HCA responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false HCA responsibilities. 819.202-70 Section 819.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-70 HCA responsibilities. An HCA must perform...

  17. 48 CFR 819.202-70 - HCA responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false HCA responsibilities. 819.202-70 Section 819.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-70 HCA responsibilities. An HCA must perform...

  18. 48 CFR 819.7114 - Measurement of program success.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 819.7114 Section 819.7114 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7114 Measurement of...

  19. 48 CFR 819.7114 - Measurement of program success.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 819.7114 Section 819.7114 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7114 Measurement of...

  20. 48 CFR 819.7114 - Measurement of program success.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 819.7114 Section 819.7114 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7114 Measurement of...

  1. 48 CFR 819.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions. 819.502 Section 819.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  2. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... Access to Justice Act (Pub. L. 96-481). Accordingly, in any proceeding conducted pursuant to...

  3. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... Access to Justice Act (Pub. L. 96-481). Accordingly, in any proceeding conducted pursuant to...

  4. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... Access to Justice Act (Pub. L. 96-481). Accordingly, in any proceeding conducted pursuant to...

  5. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... Access to Justice Act (Pub. L. 96-481). Accordingly, in any proceeding conducted pursuant to...

  6. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... Access to Justice Act (Pub. L. 96-481). Accordingly, in any proceeding conducted pursuant to...

  7. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-2 Foreign life insurance companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign life insurance...

  8. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-2 Foreign life insurance companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign...

  9. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-2 Foreign life insurance companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign...

  10. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-2 Foreign life insurance companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign...

  11. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  12. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  13. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  14. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  15. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  16. Beat frequency is bimodally distributed in spermatozoa from T/t12 mice.

    PubMed

    Katz, D F; Erickson, R P; Nathanson, M

    1979-12-01

    Flagellar beat frequencies of spermatozoa from mice of varying genotype were studied using highspeed cinemicrography. Beat frequency was variable but unimodal in two inbred lines, their F1, and an outbred line. In contrast, beat frequency in spermatozoa from T-complex, balanced lethal stocks (T/t6 and T/t12) tended not to vary between individual males of each genotype up to four hours after collection. The two-hour distribution of beat frequency for T/t12 was, moreover, bimodal, suggesting the possible existence of two subpopulations of spermatozoa.

  17. Period Adjustment of TT Scuti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederbloom, Steve E.

    1985-12-01

    The RR Lyrae variable TT Scuti was studied using photographic photometry. The O-C data show a possible downwards curve, which would indicate a decreasing period, but the results are not conclusive. New linear elements are: JD(max) = 2439384.915 + 0.45293855 E. A limit for the maximum rate of change of the period is -0.03 +/- 0.04 cycles per million years.

  18. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  19. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  20. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  1. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted to minimize disturbances of the prevailing hydrologic balance in accordance with the requirements of §§...

  2. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  3. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  4. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  5. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  6. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  7. 7 CFR 760.819 - Misrepresentation, scheme, or device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misrepresentation, scheme, or device. 760.819 Section....819 Misrepresentation, scheme, or device. (a) A person is ineligible to receive assistance under this part if it is determined that such person has: (1) Adopted any scheme or device that tends to...

  8. 48 CFR 819.7109 - VA review of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VA review of application... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7109 VA review of application. (a... that the information that is in VAAR 819.7108 is included. If the application relates to a...

  9. 48 CFR 819.502-3 - Partial set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partial set-asides. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-3 Partial set-asides. When... particular procurement will be partially set aside for small business participation, the solicitation...

  10. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  11. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  12. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  13. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  14. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819....13 Auger mining: Coal recovery. (a) Auger mining shall be conducted so as to maximize the utilization and conservation of the coal in accordance with § 816.59 of this chapter. (b) Auger mining shall...

  15. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  16. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  17. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  18. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  19. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  20. 26 CFR 1.819-1 - Taxable years affected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Insurance Company Income Tax Act of 1959 (73 Stat. 112). ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-1 Taxable years affected. Section 1.819-2 is...

  1. 7 CFR 760.819 - Misrepresentation, scheme, or device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Misrepresentation, scheme, or device. 760.819 Section 760.819 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS 2005-2007 Crop Disaster Program §...

  2. 33 CFR 81.9 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance: Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Compliance: Contents. 81.9 Section 81.9 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Certificate of Alternative Compliance: Contents. The Chief of the Marine Safety Division issues the Certificate of Alternative Compliance to the vessel based on a determination that it cannot comply fully...

  3. 33 CFR 81.9 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance: Contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Compliance: Contents. 81.9 Section 81.9 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Certificate of Alternative Compliance: Contents. The Chief of the Marine Safety Division issues the Certificate of Alternative Compliance to the vessel based on a determination that it cannot comply fully...

  4. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  5. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  6. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  7. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  8. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  9. 48 CFR 819.7004 - Contracting Order of Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Acquisition Program 819.7004 Contracting Order of Priority. In determining the acquisition strategy applicable..., contracting preferences that ensure contracts will be awarded: (a) To SDVOSBs; (b) To VOSB, including but...

  10. 48 CFR 819.202-70 - HCA responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-70 HCA responsibilities. An HCA must perform the following functions in support of the small business program. These functions cannot be delegated without... the share of contracts and purchase orders awarded to the small business programs prescribed in...

  11. 25 CFR 700.819 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....819 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION... cause. (1) The Federal Land Manager may suspend a permit issued pursuant to this part upon determining... prohibition of the Act or § 700.807. The Federal Land Manager shall provide written notice to the permittee...

  12. 25 CFR 700.819 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....819 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION... cause. (1) The Federal Land Manager may suspend a permit issued pursuant to this part upon determining... prohibition of the Act or § 700.807. The Federal Land Manager shall provide written notice to the permittee...

  13. 25 CFR 700.819 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....819 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION... cause. (1) The Federal Land Manager may suspend a permit issued pursuant to this part upon determining... prohibition of the Act or § 700.807. The Federal Land Manager shall provide written notice to the permittee...

  14. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  15. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  16. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  17. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  18. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  19. 19 CFR 10.819 - Goods eligible for tariff preference claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Goods eligible for tariff preference claims. 10.819 Section 10.819 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Free Trade Agreement Tariff Preference Level § 10.819 Goods eligible for tariff preference claims....

  20. 48 CFR 819.202-5 - Data collection and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data collection and reporting requirements. 819.202-5 Section 819.202-5 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-5 Data collection...

  1. Evidence for tty Production and Measurement of (σ tt)γ/(σtt)

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, ttγ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The ttγ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selectionmore » optimized for the ttγ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tttt), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 ttγ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the ttγ cross section (σtt) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σttγ to σtt to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tty production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.« less

  2. Evidence for spin correlation in tt production

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2012-01-19

    We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and t spins to the total number of tt events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 tt candidate events with a single lepton ℓ (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed pp collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1 and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy \\(\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\) TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement withmore » the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in tt events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.« less

  3. Evidence for spin correlation in tt production

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2012-01-19

    We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and t spins to the total number of tt events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 tt candidate events with a single lepton ℓ (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed pp collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1 and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy \\(\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\) TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement with the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in tt events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.

  4. Association Between IL-10 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms (-592 A/C, -819 T/C, -1082 A/G) and Susceptibility to HBV Infection in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Bita; Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza; Hashemi, Mohammad; Metanat, Malihe; Khosravi, Soheila; Farrokh, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Background IL-10 can play a vital role in immune response against HBV. Three biallelic SNPs from the transcription start site control the transcription of the IL-10 gene. An association between susceptibility to HBV and IL-10 polymorphisms has been suggested in patients with HBV infection. Objectives The present study was designed to study the association between polymorphisms in interleukin-10 (-1082 A/G, -819 T/C and -592 A/C) promoter gene and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Patients and Methods 221 chronically infected patients and 200 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. Three biallelic (-1082 A/G, -819 T/C and -592 A/C) polymorphisms in the IL-10 promoter gene were determined by PCR-RFLP method. Results Persistent HBV infection was associated with IL-10-1082 AG (P = 0.001) and GG (P = 0.004) genotypes and G (P = 0.000) allele. IL-10-819 T/C and -592 A/C genotype and allele frequencies did not show any correlation with the risk of chronic hepatitis B infection. Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphisms in interleukin-10 gene promoter influence clinical outcome of HBV infection and susceptibility to HBV infection. PMID:27148384

  5. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  6. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203.3... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  7. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203.3... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  8. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  9. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203.3... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  10. The double contact nature of TT Herculis

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, Dirk; Nelson, Robert H. E-mail: bob.nelson@shaw.ca

    2014-03-01

    We present new radial velocities and photometry of the short-period Algol TT Herculis. Previous attempts to model the light curves of the system have met with limited success, primarily because of the lack of a reliable mass ratio. Our spectroscopic observations are the first to result in radial velocities for the secondary star, and thus provide a spectroscopic mass ratio. Simultaneous analysis of the radial velocities and new photometry shows that the system is a double contact binary, with a rapidly rotating primary that fills its limiting lobe.

  11. Analytical solution of tt dilepton equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2006-03-01

    The top quark antiquark production system in the dilepton decay channel is described by a set of equations which is nonlinear in the unknown neutrino momenta. Its most precise and least time consuming solution is of major importance for measurements of top quark properties like the top quark mass and tt spin correlations. The initial system of equations can be transformed into two polynomial equations with two unknowns by means of elementary algebraic operations. These two polynomials of multidegree two can be reduced to one univariate polynomial of degree four by means of resultants. The obtained quartic equation is solved analytically.

  12. IL-10 -1082A/G, -592C/A, and -819T/C polymorphisms in association with lung cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the association between interleukin-10 (IL-10 -1082A/G, -592C/A, and -819T/C) gene polymorphisms and risk of lung cancer, but these have revealed inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between these polymorphisms and the risk of lung cancer by performing a meta-analysis. The published literature concerning IL-10 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk were retrieved by systematically searching PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang, and Database of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals (VIP) database. Statistical analysis was conducted with Stata 12.0 software. A total of ten published articles comprising of 19 studies were selected, including seven studies (1,960 controls and 1,321 cases) for IL-10 -1082A/G, seven studies (2,613 controls and 1,839 cases) for IL-10 -592C/A, and five studies (1,558 controls and 926 cases) for IL-10 -819T/C. This study found that the IL-10 -1082A/G and -592C/A polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer in the overall analysis. When stratified by ethnicity, significantly increased risks were observed for IL-10 -1082A/G, -592C/A, and -819T/C polymorphisms in Asians (for -1082A/G, AA vs [AG + GG]: odds ratio [OR] =1.20, confidence interval [CI] =1.05–1.39, P<0.05; for C-592A, C vs A, OR =1.36, CI =1.20–1.53, P<0.05; CC vs AA, OR =1.85, CI =1.45–2.37, P<0.05; CC vs [CA + AA], OR =1.36, CI =1.15–1.61, P<0.05; for -819T/C, T vs C: OR =1.21, CI =1.06–1.38, P<0.05; TT vs CC, OR =1.54, CI =1.18–2.01, P<0.05; [TT + TC] vs CC, OR =1.51, CI =1.17–1.95, P<0.05). Moreover, the data indicated that there was a significant association between IL-10 -819T/C polymorphism and non-small-cell lung cancer risk. No significant publication bias was detected under the four genetic models (allele model, homozygous model, dominant model, and recessive model) in this meta-analysis. On the basis of these 19

  13. The Association of Il28b Genotype with the Histological Features of Chronic Hepatitis C Is HCV Genotype Dependent

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosio, Roberta; Aghemo, Alessio; De Francesco, Raffaele; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Galmozzi, Enrico; De Nicola, Stella; Cheroni, Cristina; Clark, Paul J.; Ronchi, Guido; Lampertico, Pietro; Colombo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin 28B (IL28B) rs12979860 polymorphism is associated with treatment outcome in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and 4 patients. Its association with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C and disease severity needs further clarifications. To assess the correlation between IL28B genotype, HCV genotype and liver biopsy findings in untreated patients. Materials and Methods Pre-treatment liver biopsies from 335 HCV Caucasian patients (59% males, age 50 years) enrolled in the MIST study were staged for fibrosis and inflammation according to the METAVIR and the Ishak scoring systems; steatosis was dichotomized as <5% or ≥5%. IL28B was typed by Taqman Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. HCV genotype was 1 in 151 (45%), 2 in 99 (30%), 3 in 50 (15%) and 4 in 35 (10%) patients. IL28B genotype was CC in 117 (34%), CT in 166 (49%) and TT in 52 (15%). At univariate analysis, the IL28B CC genotype was associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 86% vs. 63%, p = 0.005), severe lobular inflammation in HCV-2 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 44% vs. 23%, p = 0.03), and less fatty infiltration in HCV-1 patients (CC vs. CT/TT: 72% vs. 51%, p = 0.02). Despite the lack of any association between IL28B and fibrosis stage, in HCV-3 patients IL28B CC correlated with METAVIR F3–F4 (CC vs. CT/TT: 74% vs. 26%, p = 0.05). At multivariate analysis, the genotype CC remained associated with severe portal inflammation in HCV-1, only (Odds Ratio (OR): 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 3.24 (1.23–8.51)). IL28B genotype is associated with the histological features of chronic hepatitis C in a HCV genotype dependent manner, with CC genotype being independently associated with severe portal inflammation. PMID:24776764

  14. 14 CFR 25.819 - Lower deck service compartments (including galleys).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lower deck service compartments (including galleys). 25.819 Section 25.819 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... be designed to prevent the activation of the life if the lift door, or the hatch required...

  15. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  16. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  17. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  18. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  19. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  20. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  1. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  2. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  3. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  4. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  5. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  6. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  7. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  8. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  9. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  10. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  11. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  12. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  13. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  14. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  15. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  16. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  17. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  18. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  19. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  20. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  1. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  2. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  3. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  4. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  5. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  6. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  7. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  8. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  9. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  10. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  11. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  12. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  13. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  14. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  15. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  16. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  17. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  18. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  19. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  20. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  1. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  2. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  3. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  4. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  5. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  6. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  7. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  8. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  9. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  10. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  11. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  12. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  13. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  14. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  15. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the communication-satellite service, applicants must also comply with the requirements of § 101.21....

  16. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the communication-satellite service, applicants must also comply with the requirements of § 101.21....

  17. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the communication-satellite service, applicants must also comply with the requirements of § 101.21....

  18. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the communication-satellite service, applicants must also comply with the requirements of § 101.21....

  19. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the communication-satellite service, applicants must also comply with the requirements of § 101.21....

  20. Prevalence of leukokeratosis nicotina palati among 3,819 danes.

    PubMed

    Saietz, L

    1975-03-01

    Clinical inspection was made of the palatal mucosa of 3,819 patients at the Royal Dental College, Copenhagen. Any occurrence of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (LNP) was recorded, as were the patients' general data and information on their smoking habits. LNP was most prevalent in 30- to 39-year-olds. Prevalence was considerably greater among males than females, even when comparing groups with the same smoking habits. LNP was found in connection with all forms of smoking. In male patients, approx. 30% of pipe smokers had LNP compared with approx. 7% of other smokers. The greatest single factor of importance to the prevalence of LNP, among those who smoked a pipe only, was the level of consumption. The smoking period was of no particular significance. Individual susceptibility is illustrated by the fact that even among pipe smokers with a relatively high consumption, 40% did not exhibit LNP.

  1. TT Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates and Characterization of the Viral Genome: Identification of Simian TT Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kenji; Inami, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nakamura, Shin; Goto, Shunji

    2000-01-01

    Newly discovered TT virus (TTV) is widely distributed in human populations. To understand more about the relationship between TTV and its hosts, we tested 400 sera from various nonhuman primates for the presence of TTV DNA by PCR assay. We collected serum samples from 24 different species of nonhuman primates. TTV DNA was determined by PCR with primers designed from the 5′-end region of the TTV genome. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of viral genomes were also performed. TTV DNA was detected in 87 of 98 (89%) chimpanzees and 3 of 21 (14%) crab-eating macaques. Nucleotide sequences of the PCR products obtained from both animals were 80 to 100% identical between two species. In contrast, the sequences differed from TTV isolates in humans by 24 to 33% at the nucleotide level and 36 to 50% at the amino acid level. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all TTV isolates obtained from simians were distinct from the human TTV isolates. Furthermore, TTV in simians, but not in humans, was classified into three different genotypes. Our results indicate that TTV in simians represents a group different from, but closely related to, TTV in humans. From these results, we tentatively named this TTV simian TTV (s-TTV). The existence of the s-TTV will be important in determining the origin, nature, and transmission of human TTV and may provide useful animal models for studies of the infection and pathogenesis of this new DNA virus. PMID:10627568

  2. IL28B expression depends on a novel TT/-G polymorphism which improves HCV clearance prediction.

    PubMed

    Bibert, Stéphanie; Roger, Thierry; Calandra, Thierry; Bochud, Murielle; Cerny, Andreas; Semmo, Nasser; Duong, François H T; Gerlach, Tilman; Malinverni, Raffaele; Moradpour, Darius; Negro, Francesco; Müllhaupt, Beat; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 3% of the world population is chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), with potential development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the availability of new antiviral agents, treatment remains suboptimal. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified rs12979860, a polymorphism nearby IL28B, as an important predictor of HCV clearance. We report the identification of a novel TT/-G polymorphism in the CpG region upstream of IL28B, which is a better predictor of HCV clearance than rs12979860. By using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from individuals carrying different allelic combinations of the TT/-G and rs12979860 polymorphisms, we show that induction of IL28B and IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) mRNA relies on TT/-G, but not rs12979860, making TT/-G the only functional variant identified so far. This novel step in understanding the genetic regulation of IL28B may have important implications for clinical practice, as the use of TT/G genotyping instead of rs12979860 would improve patient management.

  3. Algebraic approach to solve tt dilepton equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2005-11-01

    The set of nonlinear equations describing the standard model kinematics of the top quark antiquark production system in the dilepton decay channel has at most a fourfold ambiguity due to two not fully reconstructed neutrinos. Its most precise solution is of major importance for measurements of top quark properties like the top quark mass and tt spin correlations. Simple algebraic operations allow one to transform the nonlinear equations into a system of two polynomial equations with two unknowns. These two polynomials of multidegree eight can in turn be analytically reduced to one polynomial with one unknown by means of resultants. The obtained univariate polynomial is of degree 16. The number of its real solutions is determined analytically by means of Sturm's theorem, which is as well used to isolate each real solution into a unique pairwise disjoint interval. The solutions are polished by seeking the sign change of the polynomial in a given interval through binary bracketing.

  4. The two periods of TT ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, J. R.; Smak, J.; Hessman, F. V.

    1985-05-01

    To clarify the spectroscopic period and demonstrate that the spectroscopic and photometric periods are distinct, velocities of the cataclysmic variable TT Ari in its high and intermediate photometric states are obtained. Evidence for periodicity is found near the period of Cowley et al. (1975) in both the high-state and intermediate-state velocities and in a reanalysis of the Cowley et al. velocities no evidence is found for periodicity near the photometric period. Since no single period fits all the data well and since the original Cowley et al. period fits all the high-state data quite well, it is shown that the velocities change phase between the high and the intermediate states. Results indicate that the intermediate-state velocities lag the high-state velocities by 0.28 of a cycle and that in the high-state data, the gamma velocities tend to be systematically lower for the high-order Balmer lines.

  5. 25 CFR 166.819 - What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty? 166.819 Section 166.819 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Penalties, Damages, and Costs § 166.819 What happens if the...

  6. 25 CFR 166.819 - What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty? 166.819 Section 166.819 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Penalties, Damages, and Costs § 166.819 What happens if the...

  7. 25 CFR 166.819 - What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty? 166.819 Section 166.819 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Penalties, Damages, and Costs § 166.819 What happens if the...

  8. 25 CFR 166.819 - What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty? 166.819 Section 166.819 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Penalties, Damages, and Costs § 166.819 What happens if the...

  9. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...

  10. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...

  11. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...

  12. Evidence for tty Production and Measurement of (σ tt)γ/(σtt)

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, ttγ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The ttγ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selection optimized for the ttγ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tttt), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 ttγ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the ttγ cross section (σtt) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σttγ to σtt to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tty production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.

  13. 394delTT: a Nordic cystic fibrosis mutation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, M; Anvret, M; Claustres, M; Eiken, H G; Eiklid, K; Schaedel, C; Stolpe, L; Tranebjaerg, L

    1994-02-01

    In a systematic screening for mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator among Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we identified a mutation in exon 3 (394delTT); this mutation was found to be relatively common in Denmark. We therefore screened for 394delTT in Sweden and Norway, where it turned out to be the second most frequent mutation, accounting for 4% of all CF mutations. It also occurs with a high frequency in Finland, but has not been found in larger surveys of mutations in the CFTR gene. Thus, 394delTT seems to be a specific Nordic CF mutation.

  14. Measurement of the ratio σ{tt}/σ{Z/γ{*}→ll} and precise extraction of the tt cross section.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-07-01

    We report a measurement of the ratio of the tt to Z/γ{*} production cross sections in sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV pp collisions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.6  fb{-1}, collected by the CDF II detector. The tt cross section ratio is measured using two complementary methods, a b-jet tagging measurement and a topological approach. By multiplying the ratios by the well-known theoretical Z/γ{*}→ll cross section predicted by the standard model, the extracted tt cross sections are effectively insensitive to the uncertainty on luminosity. A best linear unbiased estimate is used to combine both measurements with the result σ{tt}=7.70±0.52  pb, for a top-quark mass of 172.5  GeV/c{2}.

  15. 25 CFR 166.819 - What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to satisfy the penalty? 166.819 Section 166.819 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Trespass Penalties, Damages, and Costs § 166.819 What happens if the BIA does not collect enough money to...

  16. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as TT&L depositaries. 203.5 Section 203.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... financial institutions as TT&L depositaries. (a) Parties to the agreement. To be designated as a TT&L... and maintaining a TT&L account, or for processing tax payments through EFTPS or PATAX,...

  17. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. (a) To be designated as a TT&L depositary, a... secure TT&L account balances, a TIP main account balance, an SDI account balance, or a no account...

  18. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. (a) To be designated as a TT&L depositary, a... secure TT&L account balances, a TIP main account balance, an SDI account balance, or a no account...

  19. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. (a) To be designated as a TT&L depositary, a... secure TT&L account balances, a TIP main account balance, an SDI account balance, or a no account...

  20. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as TT&L depositaries. 203.5 Section 203.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... financial institutions as TT&L depositaries. (a) Parties to the agreement. To be designated as a TT&L... and maintaining a TT&L account, or for processing tax payments through EFTPS or PATAX,...

  1. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. (a) To be designated as a TT&L depositary, a... secure TT&L account balances, a TIP main account balance, an SDI account balance, or a no account...

  2. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as TT&L depositaries. 203.5 Section 203.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... financial institutions as TT&L depositaries. (a) Parties to the agreement. To be designated as a TT&L... and maintaining a TT&L account, or for processing tax payments through EFTPS or PATAX,...

  3. Fetal Vegf Genotype is More Important for Abortion Risk than Mother Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Yalcintepe, Sinem Atik; Silan, Fatma; Hacivelioglu, Servet Ozden; Uludag, Ahmet; Cosar, Emine; Ozdemir, Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    VEGF gene has been reported to be related with many diseases and recurrent pregnancy loss in various studies. Concerning the role of VEGF polymorphisms in pregnancy losses, generally mothers genotypes have been analyzed. To evaluate the association between VEGF A +405G/C (rs2010963), −460T/C (rs833061), +936C/T (rs3025039) and - 2578A/C (rs699947) polymorphisms and spontaneous abortion, we studied the genotypes of spontaneously aborted fetuses, their mothers and healthy controls. 23 spontaneously aborted fetal materials, 22 mothers who had these abortions and 86 healthy controls were included in this study. rs2010963, rs833061, rs3025039 and rs699947 polymorphisms were analyzed by Real Time PCR technique after genomic DNA isolation from all subjects. The frequencies of VEGF A rs2010963 GG genotype and rs2010963 G allele were higher in fetuses compared both with mothers and healthy controls. VEGF A rs3025039 TT genotype and rs3025039 T allele frequencies were higher in fetuses comparing with mothers. VEGF A rs833061 CT and TT genotypes frequencies were higher in fetuses comparing with mothers. We ascertained that VEGF A rs2010963, rs833061 and rs3025039 are the risk factors for spontaneous abortion in fetal genotypes comparing with their mothers and healthy controls. PMID:25035858

  4. Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Kulis, Michael J.; Lytle, John K.; Fisher, John W.; Vaccaro, Helen; Ewert, Michael K.; Broyan, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Technologies that reduce logistical needs are a key to long term space missions. Currently, trash and waste generated during a mission is carried during the entire roundtrip mission or stored inside a logistic module which is de-orbited into Earth's atmosphere for destruction. The goal of the Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG) project is to develop space technology alternatives for converting trash and other waste materials from human spaceflight into high-value products that might include propellants or power system fuels in addition to life support oxygen and water. In addition to producing a useful product from waste, TtSG will decrease the volume needed to store waste on long term space missions. This paper presents an overview of the TtSG technologies and future plans for the project.

  5. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  6. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  7. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  8. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  9. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  10. 48 CFR 819.7106 - Eligibility of Mentor and Protégé firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7106... capabilities of protégés to perform as contractors and/or subcontractors. Eligible small business entities...) Eligibility. A Mentor: (1) May be either a large or small business entity and either a prime contractor...

  11. 48 CFR 819.7106 - Eligibility of Mentor and Protégé firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7106... capabilities of protégés to perform as contractors and/or subcontractors. Eligible small business entities...) Eligibility. A Mentor: (1) May be either a large or small business entity and either a prime contractor...

  12. 48 CFR 819.502-2 - Total small business set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Total small business set... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-2 Total small business set-asides. (a) When a total small business set-aside is made, one of the following statements, as...

  13. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  14. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  15. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  16. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  17. 33 CFR 147.819 - Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allegheny Tension Leg Platform... SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES SAFETY ZONES § 147.819 Allegheny Tension Leg Platform safety zone. (a) Description. The Allegheny Tension Leg Platform (Allegheny TLP), Green...

  18. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks. Compartment separation and cover interlock switches for motor-starter enclosures must be maintained...

  19. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks. Compartment separation and cover interlock switches for motor-starter enclosures must be maintained...

  20. 48 CFR 819.602-3 - Resolving differences between VA and the Small Business Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of Competency and Determinations of Responsibility 819.602-3 Resolving differences between VA and the... of correspondence sent to the SBA seeking a certificate of competency determination must be concurrently provided to the Director, OSDBU. Before appealing a certificate of competency, the HCA must...

  1. 48 CFR 819.307 - SDVOSB/VOSB small business status protests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SDVOSB/VOSB small business... AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Determination of Small Business Status for Small Business Programs 819.307 SDVOSB/VOSB small business status protests. (a) All protests relating to...

  2. 14 CFR 91.819 - Civil supersonic airplanes that do not comply with part 36.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes that do not... RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.819 Civil supersonic airplanes that do not comply with part 36. (a) Applicability. This section applies to civil supersonic airplanes that have not been shown to comply with...

  3. T-T Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caggiano, Joseph; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Bacher, Andrew; McNabb, Denns

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of the T(2n,)^4He reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity tritium, gas-filled capsules in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. At the OMEGA laser facility, TT neutron spectra were measured using two instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) facility and the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) facility. The resolutions of these systems were improved for nTOF by using a crystal with much faster decay time and for MRS by using a thinner, more uniform CD2 recoil foil. Measurements at c.m. energies of 10-30 keV can be used to study the TT three-body reaction mechanism near astrophysical energies. With both nTOF and MRS, we observe a small, narrow peak starting at the 9.44 MeV endpoint, corresponding to the n + ^5He (g.s.) reaction channel. Most of the TT reaction proceeds through other reaction channels which produce broad, continuous neutron spectra in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. Implications for ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility will be discussed. Work in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, D. T. Casey, M. J.-E. Manuel, N. Sinenian, A. B. Zylstra, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, V. Yu Glebov, P. B. Radha, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, P. A. Amendt, R. Hatarik, D. B. Sayre, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann and Y. H. Kim.

  4. Three colour photoelectric observations of the eclipsing binary TT HER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchi, R.; Dipaolantonio, A.; Mancuso, S.; Milano, L.; Vittone, A.

    1982-07-01

    Three color photoelectric observations of the eclipsing binary TT Her are presented. The observation sequence and the automation of the measurement cycle allowed 3742 points in each of the colors to be collected. The measurements were reduced to phase by means of an ephemeris and are shown. A preliminary analysis of the period variability is made.

  5. TT Mutant Homozygote of Kruppel-like Factor 5 Is a Key Factor for Increasing Basal Metabolic Rate and Resting Metabolic Rate in Korean Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ran; Kwon, In-Su; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Lee, Myoungsook

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the contribution of genetic variations of KLF5 to basal metabolic rate (BMR) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) and the inhibition of obesity in Korean children. A variation of KLF5 (rs3782933) was genotyped in 62 Korean children. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we developed a model to predict BMR in children. We divided them into several groups; normal versus overweight by body mass index (BMI) and low BMR versus high BMR by BMR. There were no differences in the distributions of alleles and genotypes between each group. The genetic variation of KLF5 gene showed a significant correlation with several clinical factors, such as BMR, muscle, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and insulin. Children with the TT had significantly higher BMR than those with CC (p = 0.030). The highest muscle was observed in the children with TT compared with CC (p = 0.032). The insulin and C-peptide values were higher in children with TT than those with CC (p= 0.029 vs. p = 0.004, respectively). In linear regression analysis, BMI and muscle mass were correlated with BMR, whereas insulin and C-peptide were not associated with BMR. In the high-BMR group, we observed that higher muscle, fat mass, and C-peptide affect the increase of BMR in children with TT (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.018, respectively), while Rohrer's index could explain the usual decrease in BMR (adjust r(2) = 1.000, p < 0.001, respectively). We identified a novel association between TT of KLF5 rs3782933 and BMR in Korean children. We could make better use of the variation within KLF5 in a future clinical intervention study of obesity.

  6. Comment on measuring the tt forward-backward asymmetry at ATLAS and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Arguin, Jean-Francois; Ligeti, Zoltan; Freytsis, Marat

    2011-10-01

    We suggest a new possibility for ATLAS and CMS to explore the tt forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron, by attempting to reconstruct tt events, with one of the tops decaying semileptonically in the central region (|{eta}|<2.5) and the other decaying hadronically in the forward region (|{eta}|>2.5). For several models which give comparable Tevatron signals, we study the charge asymmetry at the LHC as a function of cuts on |{eta}| and on the tt invariant mass, m{sub tt}. We show that there is an interesting complementarity between cuts on |{eta}| and m{sub tt} to suppress the dominant and symmetric gg{yields}tt rate, and different combinations of cuts enhance the distinguishing power between models. This complementarity is likely to hold in other new physics scenarios as well, which affect the tt cross section, so it motivates extending tt reconstruction to higher |{eta}|.

  7. Orbital period variation of the eclipsing binary system TT Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selam, S. O.; Albayrak, B.

    2007-02-01

    % New photoelectric U BV observations were obtained for the eclipsing binary TT Her at the Ankara University Observatory (AUO) and three new times of minima were calculated from these observations. The (O-C) diagram constructed for all available times of minima of TT Her exhibits a cyclic character superimposed on a quadratic variation. The quadratic character yields an orbital period decrease with a rate of dP/dt=-8.83×10-8 day yr-1 which can be attributed to the mass exchange/loss mechanism in the system. By assuming the presence of a gravitationally bound third body in the system, the analysis of the cyclic nature in the (O-C) diagram revealed a third body with a mass of 0.21 M\\sun orbiting around the eclipsing pair. The possibility of magnetic activity cycle effect as a cause for the observed cyclic variation in the (O-C) diagram was also discussed.

  8. UBVRI photometry and polarimetry of cataclysmic variable TT Ari.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Yu. S.; Shakhovskoj, N. M.; Andronov, I. L.; Kolesnikov, S. V.

    The characteristic color indices of mean brightness, "3-hour", and "15 - 25-minute" photometric variations of TT Ari in an active state were determined. Variations in different colors correlated strongly, their amplitude decreases with wavelength. The color indices increase with a characteristic time of variability. Oscillations of brightness are not coherent, their preferable frequencies are 30 - 56, 76 - 80, and 134 - 142 cycles/day. The mean value of circular polarization is 0.04±0.03%.

  9. Improved measurement of ttZ couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, U.; Juste, A.; Rainwater, D.; Orr, L.H.; /Rochester U.

    2005-12-01

    We consider QCD t{bar t}Z production at the LHC with Z {yields} {bar {nu}}{nu} and all-hadronic t{bar t} decays, i.e. pp {yields} p{sub T}b{bar b}+4 jets, as a tool to measure ttZ couplings. This channel has a significantly larger cross section than those where the Z boson decays leptonically. However, t{bar t}, b{bar b} + 4 jet, t{bar t}j and t{bar t}jj production give rise to potentially large backgrounds. We show that these processes can be suppressed to an acceptable level with suitable cuts, and find that adding the p{sub T} b{bar b} + 4 jet channel to the final states used in previous ttZ couplings analyses will improve the sensitivity by 10-60%. We also discuss how the measurement of the ttZ couplings may constrain Little Higgs models.

  10. TT Arietis: 1985-1999 accretion disc behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraicheva, Z.; Stanishev, V.; Genkov, V.; Iliev, L.

    1999-11-01

    Results of a long-term (1985-1999) photometric study of the VY Scl novalike TT Ari and CCD spectroscopic observations of the star in the region of Hα are presented. Photoelectric UBV observations carried out at Rozhen and Belogradchik observatories confirmed ~ 6 years cyclical variability of the accretion disc luminosity in high state found by frequency analysis of 70 years long light curve. The data show that the color indexes vary with the same cycle length and that in the maximum of the cycle TT Ari becomes bluer. The analysis of the ``3-hour" modulations in 1995-1998 data indicates a replacement of the ~ 0 d.1340 ``negative superhump" by ~ 0 d.1492 ``positive" one in 1997. The new wave remains active for at least a year. Based on 45 runs obtained from 1987 to 1998 in U and B bands the behaviour of the ``20-min" quasi-periodic oscillations and the flickering during both ``negative" and ``positive superhumps" regimes is investigated. All runs show strong flickering activity and power spectra with a typical red noise shape. It is found that Hα profiles and the observational characteristics of the flickering are different after 1997 when the ``positive superhump" regime started. Generally, the activity of the flickering decreased by ~ 50% in 1997-1998. The autoregressive analysis suggests that the ``20-min" QPOs observed in TT Ari light curves are most probably generated by some stochastic process such as the flickering.

  11. UV observations of TT ARIETIS and the magnetic rotator hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, R. F.; Sherrington, M. R.; King, A. R.; Frank, J.

    1982-11-01

    Observations of four short and four long wavelength low dispersion spectra obtained with the IUE satellite spectrometer are examined. Variations in ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths around the orbital cycle are reported to rule out a hot spot/accretion disk model for TT Ari. It is proposed that TT Ari has a magnetized white dwarf primary rotating with the photometric period of 0.1329 days. It is noted that a disk atmosphere model may be the explanation of the whole observed spectral shape range of 5500-1265 A, but the correlation of the UV and X-ray variation renders such a model implausible. In addition, the axisymmetry of models involving an accretion disk with X-rays generated at the boundary layer would cause short wavelength UV and X-ray modulation to be difficult since absorption events are not seen and scattering is not plausible. Finally, it is noted that TT Ari can be described as an intermediate between the DQ Her and AM Her types.

  12. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  13. SSR genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mason, Annaliese S

    2015-01-01

    SSR genotyping involves the use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) as DNA markers. SSRs, also called microsatellites, are a type of repetitive DNA sequence ubiquitous in most plant genomes. SSRs contain repeats of a motif sequence 1-6 bp in length. Due to this structure SSRs frequently undergo mutations, mainly due to DNA polymerase errors, which involve the addition or subtraction of a repeat unit. Hence, SSR sequences are highly polymorphic and may be readily used for detection of allelic variation within populations. SSRs are present within both genic and nongenic regions and are occasionally transcribed, and hence may be identified in expressed sequence tags (ESTs) as well as more commonly in nongenic DNA sequences. SSR genotyping involves the design of DNA-based primers to amplify SSR sequences from extracted genomic DNA, followed by amplification of the SSR repeat region using polymerase chain reaction, and subsequent visualization of the resulting DNA products, usually using gel electrophoresis. These procedures are described in this chapter. SSRs have been one of the most favored molecular markers for plant genotyping in the last 20 years due to their high levels of polymorphism, wide distribution across most plant genomes, and ease of use and will continue to be a useful tool in many species for years to come.

  14. Synthesis, structure, and properties of four ternary compounds: CaSrTt, Tt=Si, Ge, Sn, Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shengfeng; Corbett, John D. . E-mail: jcorbett@iastate.edu

    2006-03-15

    The title compounds were synthesized and characterized by structural measurements and electronic structure calculations. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses established that they all have the orthorhombic inverse-PbCl{sub 2}-type structure (Pnma, Z=4, a=8.108(2), 8.124(2), 8.421(2), 8.509(2)A; b=4.944(1), 4.949(1), 5.168(1), 5.189(1)A; c=9.170(2), 9.184(2), 9.685(2), 9.740(2)A, respectively). The tetrel (Tt) atoms are situated in tricapped trigonal prisms of ordered Sr and Ca atoms in which the smaller Ca atoms play a distinctive role. The structure is distinguishable from the Co{sub 2}Si type by its more nearly ideal 6+3 (TCTP) environment about Tt rather than a higher coordination by cations. Other representations of the two structural types are also considered. Electronic band structure calculations suggest that the compounds are semiconductors, in agreement with literature data on their Ae{sub 2}Tt analogues.

  15. Thermolabile MTHFR genotype and retinal vascular occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, M; Karabatzaki, M; Donoghue, C; Meleady, R; Mynett-Johnson, L; Mooney, D; Graham, I; Whitehead, A; Shields, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Raised levels of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) are associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. A thermolabile form of a pivotal enzyme in homocysteine metabolism, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), has been associated with vascular occlusive disease and raised tHcy levels. The relation between thermolabile MTHFR genotype, tHcy, and retinal vascular occlusive disease has not been determined.
METHODS—A retrospective case-control study involving hospital based controls and cases with retinal vascular occlusions in whom tHcy levels had been determined was undertaken. Genotyping for the MTHFR 677 C-T mutation that specifies the thermolabile form of the enzyme was performed by established methods in all subjects. The relation between homozygosity for thermolabile MTHFR genotype (TT), raised tHcy levels, and risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease was examined.
RESULTS—87 cases of retinal vascular occlusive disease (mean age 68.7 years) comprising 26 cases of retinal artery occlusion and 61 of retinal vein occlusion were compared with 87 controls (mean age 70.2 years). The TT genotype did not confer a significantly increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. The mean tHcy level was significantly higher in the cases than in the controls (p<0.0001). Overall, and in both the cases and controls, the frequency of the TT genotype was higher in those with normal tHcy levels than in those with increased levels of tHcy. However, the TT genotype did not significantly alter the risk of increased tHcy levels in these patients.
CONCLUSIONS—The TT genotype is not associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease or increased tHcy levels in this group of elderly patients. In older patients, nutritional rather than genetic factors may be more important in increasing tHcy levels, a known risk factor for retinal vascular occlusive disease.

 PMID:11133719

  16. On the X-Ray Variability of Tt-Arietis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    Comparison of the power spectra obtained by the Fourier and maximum entropy methods (ME, Fahlman and Ulrych, 1982) for Jensen's et al. (1983) X-ray light curves of the intermediate polar star candidate TT Arietis confirms that the methods give consistent results. However, the ME method has higher resolution in frequency, and at least in some cases, it has the ability to select the correct period among aliases. The author found that of the two close optical periods of the star, the spectroscopic period is the one which manifests itself also in X-rays.

  17. Analytical solution of tt¯ dilepton equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2006-03-01

    The top quark antiquark production system in the dilepton decay channel is described by a set of equations which is nonlinear in the unknown neutrino momenta. Its most precise and least time consuming solution is of major importance for measurements of top quark properties like the top quark mass and tt¯ spin correlations. The initial system of equations can be transformed into two polynomial equations with two unknowns by means of elementary algebraic operations. These two polynomials of multidegree two can be reduced to one univariate polynomial of degree four by means of resultants. The obtained quartic equation is solved analytically.

  18. Study on TT&C resources scheduling technique based on inter-satellite link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaosong; Bai, Jian; Zhang, Chunze; Gao, Huili

    2014-11-01

    The navigation constellation will have the capability of supporting Tracking Telemetry and Command (TT&C) operations by inter-satellite link (ISL). The ISL will become an important solution to reduce the shortage of ground TT&C resources. The problems need to be studied urgently in the field of space TT&C network resources scheduling management are how to determine the availability of ISL and how to allocate TT&C resources of ISL. The performance and scheduling constraints of navigation constellation's ISL are analyzed, and three utilization strategies of ISL to perform TT&C operations are proposed. The allocation of TT&C resources based on ISL falls into two successive phases. Firstly, master satellite determination equation is established by using 0-1 Programming model based on the availability matrix. Mathematical method is used to solve the equation to determine the master satellite and the topology of ISL. Secondly, Constraint Programming (CP) model is used to describe the ground TT&C resources scheduling problem with special requirements of TT&C operations based on master satellite, and a heuristic algorithm is designed to solve the CP model. The equations and algorithm are verified by simulation examples. The algorithm of TT&C resources scheduling based on ISL has realized the synthesized usage of both the ISL and ground resources on TT&C field. This algorithm can improve TT&C supports of territorial ground TT&C network for global navigation constellation, and provides technical reference for the TT&C mission planning of global constellation by using ISL.

  19. PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in non-hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasta, Linda; Pasta, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the different roles of thrombophilia in patients with and without viral etiology. The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 1079 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), enrolled from January 2000 to January 2014. METHODS: All Caucasian LC patients consecutively observed in a fourteen-year period were included; the presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd Chiari syndrome (BCS) was registered. The differences between the proportions of each THRGF with regard to the presence or absence of viral etiology and the frequencies of the THRGF genotypes with those predicted in a population by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were registered. RESULTS: Four hundred and seventeen/one thousand and seventy-six patients (38.6%) showed thrombophilia: 217 PAI-1 4G-4G, 176 MTHFR C677TT, 71 V Leiden factor and 41 prothrombin G20210 A, 84 with more than 1 THRGF; 350 presented with no viral liver cirrhosis (NVLC) and 729 with, called viral liver cirrhosis (VLC), of whom 56 patients were hepatitis C virus + hepatitis B virus. PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR C677TT, the presence of at least one TRHGF and the presence of > 1 THRGF, were statistically more frequent in patients with NVLC vs patients with VLC: All χ2 > 3.85 and P < 0.05. Patients with PVT and/or BCS with at least one TRHGF were 189/352 (53.7%). The Hardy-Weinberg of PAI-1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes deviated from that expected from a population in equilibrium in patients with NVLC (respectively χ2 = 39.3; P < 0.000 and χ2 = 27.94; P < 0.05), whereas the equilibrium was respected in VLC. CONCLUSION: MTHFR 677TT was nearly twofold and PAI-1 4G-4G more than threefold more frequently found in NVLC vs patients with VLC; the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of these two polymorphisms confirms this data in NVLC. We suggest that PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT could be considered as factors of fibrosis and thrombosis mechanisms, increasing

  20. Trash to Gas (TtG) Simulant Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, John D., II; Hintze, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Space exploration in outer earths orbit is a long-term commitment, where the reuse of discarded materials is a critical component for its success. The Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project under the NASA Advanced Exploration System Program is a project focused on technologies that reduce the amount of consumables that are needed to be sent into space, repurpose items sent to space, or convert wastes to commodities. In particular, Trash to Gas (TtG), part of the LRR project, is a novel space technology capable of converting raw elements from combustible waste including food waste and packaging, paper, wipes and towels, nitrile gloves, fecal matter, urine brine, maximum absorbency garments, and other organic wastes from human space exploration into useful gases. Trash to gas will ultimately reduce mission cost by producing a portion of important consumables in situ. This paper will discuss results of waste processing by steam reforming. Steam reforming is a thermochemical process developed as part of TtG, where waste is heated in the presence of oxygen and steam to produce carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane and water. The aim of this experiment is to investigate the processing of different waste simulants and their gaseous products. This will lay a foundation for understating and optimizing the production of useful gases for propulsion and recovery of water for life support.

  1. The TT, TB, EB and BB correlations in anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-08-01

    The ongoing and future experiments will measure the B-mode from different sky coverage and frequency bands, with the potential to reveal non-trivial features in polarization map. In this work we study the TT, TB, EB and BB correlations associated with the B-mode polarization of CMB map in models of charged anisotropic inflation. The model contains a chaotic-type large field complex inflaton which is charged under the U(1) gauge field. We calculate the statistical anisotropies generated in the power spectra of the curvature perturbation, the tensor perturbation and their cross-correlation. It is shown that the asymmetry in tensor power spectrum is a very sensitive probe of the gauge coupling. While the level of statistical anisotropy in temperature power spectrum can be small and satisfy the observational bounds, the interactions from the gauge coupling can induce large directional dependence in tensor modes. This will leave interesting anisotropic fingerprints in various correlations involving the B-mode polarization such as the TB cross-correlation which may be detected in upcoming Planck polarization data. In addition, the TT correlation receives an anisotropic contribution from the tensor sector which naturally decays after l ∼> 100. We expect that the mechanism of using tensor sector to induce asymmetry at low l to be generic which can also be applied to address other low l CMB anomalies.

  2. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Kuniholm, Mark H.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R.; Peters, Marion G.; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B.; Strickler, Howard D.; Villacres, Maria C.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gange, Stephen J.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; O’Brien, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV–1 and HSV–2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV–2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV–1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV–2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV–1 or HSV–2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV–2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV–2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large

  3. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes.

    PubMed

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Kuniholm, Mark H; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R; Peters, Marion G; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B; Strickler, Howard D; Villacres, Maria C; Quinn, Thomas C; Gange, Stephen J; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M; O'Brien, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV-1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV-2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV-2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV-2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large prospective study, IFNL4-ΔG/TT

  4. TT2NE: a novel algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Michaël; Orland, Henri

    2011-01-01

    We present TT2NE, a new algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. The method is based on a classification of RNA structures according to their topological genus. TT2NE is guaranteed to find the minimum free energy structure regardless of pseudoknot topology. This unique proficiency is obtained at the expense of the maximum length of sequences that can be treated, but comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms shows that TT2NE significantly improves the quality of predictions. Analysis of TT2NE's incorrect predictions sheds light on the need to study how sterical constraints limit the range of pseudoknotted structures that can be formed from a given sequence. An implementation of TT2NE on a public server can be found at http://ipht.cea.fr/rna/tt2ne.php. PMID:21593129

  5. Collider-independent tt forward-backward asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Juste, A

    2012-11-21

    We introduce the forward-backward asymmetries A(u), A(d) corresponding to uū, dd → tt production, respectively, at hadron colliders. These are collider and center-of-mass independent observables, directly related to the forward-backward and charge asymmetries measured at the Tevatron and the LHC, respectively. We discuss how to extract these asymmetries from data. Because these asymmetries are collider independent, their measurement at these two colliders could elucidate the nature of the anomalous forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron. Our framework also shows in a model independent fashion that a positive Tevatron asymmetry exceeding the standard model expectation is compatible with the small asymmetry measured at the LHC.

  6. Negative Superhumps and Red Noise in the Cataclysmic Binary TT Arietis: the International Campaign "tt ARI-94"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Arai, K.; Chinarova, L. L.; Dorokhov, N. I.; Dorokhova, T. A.; Dumitrescu, A.; Nogami, D.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Lepardo, A.; Mason, P. A.; Matsumoto, K.; Oprescu, G.; Pajdosz, G.; Passuelo, R.; Patkos, L.; Senio, D. S.; Sostero, G.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Tremko, J.; Zhukov, G. V.; Zola, S.

    Results obtained during the international observational campaign "TT Ari-94" are briefly discussed. During 258 hours, totally 51299 observations were obtained in 12 observatories. The moments of 68 individual maxima and 74 minima are tabulated. The linear ephemeris for the maximum is MaxHJD=2449645.4255+/-0.0003 deg +(0.133160 +/- 0.000004 deg)ṡ E for our data obtained in JD 2 449 614-690. The period value is distinctly outside the interval 0.1326-0.13298 deg obtained for previous years. It still corresponds to the 'negative superhump' state, whereas for a normal 'positive superhump' the value predicted by Tremko et al. (1996, As.Ap. 312, 121) is P=0.1426+/-0.00006 deg. The data prewhitened in respect to the superhump variations show the red noise power-law power spectrum with an index gamma=1.3...2.6.

  7. Dysregulation Of Innate Immunity In HCV Genotype 1 IL28B Unfavorable Genotype Patients: Impaired Viral Kinetics And Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Naggie, Susanna; Osinusi, Anu; Katsounas, Antonios; Lempicki, Richard; Herrmann, Eva; Thompson, Alexander J; Clark, Paul J; Patel, Keyur; Muir, Andrew J; McHutchison, John G; Schlaak, Joerg F; Trippler, Martin; Shivakumar, Bhavana; Masur, Henry; Polis, Michael A.; Kottilil, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of the interleukin (IL)-28B gene plays a major role in predicting therapeutic response in HCV-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon-alpha (IFN)/ribavirin. We sought to investigate the mechanism of the IL28B polymorphism, specifically as it relates to early HCV viral kinetics (VK), IFN pharmacokinetics (PK), IFN pharmacodynamics (PD), and gene expression profiles. Two prospective cohorts (HIV/HCV co-infected and HCV mono-infected) completing treatment with IFN/ribavirin were enrolled. Patients (N=88; 44 HIV/HCV and 44 HCV) were genotyped at the polymorphic site rs12979860. In the HIV/HCV cohort frequent serum sampling was completed for HCV RNA and IFN-levels. DNA microarray of PBMCs and individual expression of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) were quantified on IFN-therapy. The IL28B favorable (CC) genotype was associated with improved therapeutic response compared to unfavorable (CT/TT) genotypes. Patients with favorable genotype had greater first and second phase VK (P=0.004 and P=0.036, respectively), IFN maximum anti-viral efficiency (P=0.007) and infected cell death loss (P=0.009) compared to unfavorable genotypes. Functional annotation analysis of DNA microarray data was consistent with depressed innate immune function, particularly of NK cells, from patients with unfavorable genotypes (P<0.004). Induction of innate immunity genes was also lower in unfavorable genotype. ISG expression at baseline and induction with IFN was independent of IL28B genotype. Conclusions Carriers of the IL28B favorable genotype were more likely to have superior innate immune response to IFN-therapy compared to unfavorable genotypes, this suggests the unfavorable genotype has aberrant baseline induction of innate immune response pathways resulting in impaired virologic response. IL28B genotype is associated with more rapid viral kinetics and improved treatment response outcomes independent of

  8. 17 CFR 249.819 - Form 19b-4, for electronic filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all self-regulatory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all self-regulatory organizations. 249.819 Section 249..., SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Forms for Self-Regulatory Organization Rule Changes and Forms for....819 Form 19b-4, for electronic filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all...

  9. 17 CFR 249.819 - Form 19b-4, for electronic filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all self-regulatory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all self-regulatory organizations. 249.819 Section 249..., SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Forms for Self-Regulatory Organization Rule Changes and Forms for....819 Form 19b-4, for electronic filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all...

  10. Expression and characterization of hyperthermostable exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in E. coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and detai...

  11. Characterization of the transgenic rice event TT51-1 and construction of a reference plasmid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yinglong; Wu, Gang; Wu, Yuhua; Nie, Shujing; Zhang, Li; Lu, Changming

    2011-08-24

    Transgenic rice TT51-1 (BT63) is an insect resistant strain that was granted for safety certificate in China in 2009. This study characterizes the transgenic event TT51-1 using a GenomeWalker strategy. The organization of the transgenes indicated that the transgenes on two plasmids, pFHBT1 and pGL2RC7, had been integrated at the same locus. The sequence of the event TT51-1 spanned 8725 bp, including a truncated Cry1Ab/Ac cassette, an intact Cry1Ab/Ac cassette, two Amp gene segments, and an Hph gene segment. The 5' and 3' plant flanking sequences were isolated and used to locate the transgenes to chromosome 10 in TT51-1. The isolated TT51-1 fragment and a fragment of the rice PLD gene were integrated into a plasmid vector, to create plasmid pK-TT51 as a calibrator for detecting rice containing TT51-1. Analysis of unknown samples indicated that the reference plasmid was a reliable alternative to TT51-1 genomic DNA.

  12. Relationship Between Interleukin-10 Gene C-819T Polymorphism and Gastric Cancer Risk: Insights From a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xigang; Huang, Qingxian; Li, Xianglin; Liu, Fang; Wang, Dan; Yan, Dong; Wang, Bin; Yang, Chunhua; Mi, Jia; Tian, Geng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As a pleiotropic cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays a regulatory role in carcinogenesis and tumor growth. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the susceptibility of the IL-10 gene C-819T polymorphism to gastric cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS Study identification and data extraction were independently completed by 2 authors. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated and summarized. RESULTS In total, 11 articles including 1960 gastric cancer patients and 3705 controls were qualified. Overall analyses revealed a 13% reduced risk of gastric cancer conferred by the -819T allele relative to the -819C allele (OR=0.87; 95% CI: 0.77-0.97; P=0.016), without heterogeneity (I2=35.1%). In subgroup analyses, a significant difference was identified in East Asian populations (OR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.73-0.98; P=0.029, I2=43.6%), for gastric adenocarcinoma (OR=0.80; 95% CI: 0.66-0.96; P=0.017, I2=0.0%), and in population-based studies (OR=0.81; 95% CI: 0.70-0.93; P=0.003, I2=0.0%). The visual funnel plots and Egger's tests suggested no evidence of publication bias. CONCLUSIONS Extending previous findings, we demonstrate a protective role of the IL-10 gene -819T allele in susceptibility to gastric cancer, and this role was more evident for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27516059

  13. The Phenotype/Genotype Correlation of Lactase Persistence among Omani Adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abri, Abdulrahim; Bayoumi, Riad

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the correlation of lactase persistence phenotype with genotype in Omani adults. Methods Lactase persistence phenotype was tested by hydrogen breath test in 52 Omani Adults using the Micro H2 analyzer. Results were checked against genotyping using direct DNA sequencing. Results Forty one individuals with C/C-13910 and T/T-13915 genotypes had positive breath tests (≥20 ppm); while eight of nine individuals with T/C-13910 or T/G-13915 genotypes had negative breath tests (<20 ppm) and two subjects were non-hydrogen producers. The agreement between phenotype and genotype using Kappa value was very good (0.93). Conclusion Genotyping both T/C-13910 and T/G-13915 alleles can be used to assist diagnosis and predict lactose intolerance in the Omani population. PMID:24044061

  14. The Association of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes with the Risk of Childhood Leukemia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Miao, Chia-En; Hsu, Yuan-Nian; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most prevalent type of pediatric cancer, the causes of which are likely to involve an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. To evaluate the effects of the genotypic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) on childhood ALL risk in Taiwan, two well-known polymorphic genotypes of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed to examine the extent of their associations with childhood ALL susceptibility and to discuss the MTHFR genotypic contribution to childhood ALL risk among different populations. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 266 patients with childhood ALL and an equal number of non-cancer controls recruited were genotyped utilizing PCR-RFLP methodology. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between childhood ALL and control groups. The CT and TT of MTHFR C677T genotypes were significantly more frequently found in controls than in childhood ALL patients (odds ratios=0.60 and 0.48, 95% confidence intervals=0.42–0.87 and 0.24–0.97, respectively). As for gender, the boys carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype conferred a lower odds ratio of 0.51 (95% confidence interval=0.32–0.81, P=0.0113) for childhood ALL. As for age, those equal to or greater than 3.5 years of age at onset of disease carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype were of lower risk (odds ratio= 0.43 and 95% confidence interval=0.26–0.71, P=0.0016). Conclusions Our results indicated that the MTHFR C677T T allele was a protective biomarker for childhood ALL in Taiwan, and the association was more significant in male patients and in patients 3.5 years of age or older at onset of disease. PMID:25793509

  15. Coordinate Regulation of Metabolite Glycosylation and Stress Hormone Biosynthesis by TT8 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Amit; Umashankar, Shivshankar; Rai, Megha; Kiat, Lim Boon; Bing, Johanan Aow Shao; Swarup, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Secondary metabolites play a key role in coordinating ecology and defense strategies of plants. Diversity of these metabolites arises by conjugation of core structures with diverse chemical moieties, such as sugars in glycosylation. Active pools of phytohormones, including those involved in plant stress response, are also regulated by glycosylation. While much is known about the enzymes involved in glycosylation, we know little about their regulation or coordination with other processes. We characterized the flavonoid pathway transcription factor TRANSPARENT TESTA8 (TT8) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using an integrative omics strategy. This approach provides a systems-level understanding of the cellular machinery that is used to generate metabolite diversity by glycosylation. Metabolomics analysis of TT8 loss-of-function and inducible overexpression lines showed that TT8 coordinates glycosylation of not only flavonoids, but also nucleotides, thus implicating TT8 in regulating pools of activated nucleotide sugars. Transcriptome and promoter network analyses revealed that the TT8 regulome included sugar transporters, proteins involved in sugar binding and sequestration, and a number of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importantly, TT8 affects stress response, along with brassinosteroid and jasmonic acid biosynthesis, by directly binding to the promoters of key genes of these processes. This combined effect on metabolite glycosylation and stress hormones by TT8 inducible overexpression led to significant increase in tolerance toward multiple abiotic and biotic stresses. Conversely, loss of TT8 leads to increased sensitivity to these stresses. Thus, the transcription factor TT8 is an integrator of secondary metabolism and stress response. These findings provide novel approaches to improve broad-spectrum stress tolerance. PMID:27432888

  16. Coordinate Regulation of Metabolite Glycosylation and Stress Hormone Biosynthesis by TT8 in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kiat, Lim Boon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites play a key role in coordinating ecology and defense strategies of plants. Diversity of these metabolites arises by conjugation of core structures with diverse chemical moieties, such as sugars in glycosylation. Active pools of phytohormones, including those involved in plant stress response, are also regulated by glycosylation. While much is known about the enzymes involved in glycosylation, we know little about their regulation or coordination with other processes. We characterized the flavonoid pathway transcription factor TRANSPARENT TESTA8 (TT8) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using an integrative omics strategy. This approach provides a systems-level understanding of the cellular machinery that is used to generate metabolite diversity by glycosylation. Metabolomics analysis of TT8 loss-of-function and inducible overexpression lines showed that TT8 coordinates glycosylation of not only flavonoids, but also nucleotides, thus implicating TT8 in regulating pools of activated nucleotide sugars. Transcriptome and promoter network analyses revealed that the TT8 regulome included sugar transporters, proteins involved in sugar binding and sequestration, and a number of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importantly, TT8 affects stress response, along with brassinosteroid and jasmonic acid biosynthesis, by directly binding to the promoters of key genes of these processes. This combined effect on metabolite glycosylation and stress hormones by TT8 inducible overexpression led to significant increase in tolerance toward multiple abiotic and biotic stresses. Conversely, loss of TT8 leads to increased sensitivity to these stresses. Thus, the transcription factor TT8 is an integrator of secondary metabolism and stress response. These findings provide novel approaches to improve broad-spectrum stress tolerance. PMID:27432888

  17. Higher Tetanus Toxoid Immunity 2 Years After PsA-TT Introduction in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Nicole E.; Borrow, Ray; Berthe, Abdoulaye; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Dembélé, Awa Traoré Eps; Almond, Rachael; Frankland, Sarah; Patel, Sima; Wood, Daniel; Nascimento, Maria; Manigart, Olivier; Trotter, Caroline L.; Greenwood, Brian; Sow, Samba O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2010, mass vaccination with a then-new meningococcal A polysaccharide–tetanus toxoid protein conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, or MenAfriVac) was undertaken in 1- to 29-year-olds in Bamako, Mali. Whether vaccination with PsA-TT effectively boosts tetanus immunity in a population with heterogeneous baseline tetanus immunity is not known. We assessed the impact of PsA-TT on tetanus toxoid (TT) immunity by quantifying age- and sex-specific immunity prior to and 2 years after introduction. Methods. Using a household-based, age-stratified design, we randomly selected participants for a prevaccination serological survey in 2010 and a postvaccination survey in 2012. TT immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were quantified and geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) pre- and postvaccination among all age groups targeted for vaccination were compared. The probability of TT IgG levels ≥0.1 IU/mL (indicating short-term protection) and ≥1.0 IU/mL (indicating long-term protection) by age and sex was determined using logistic regression models. Results. Analysis of 793 prevaccination and 800 postvaccination sera indicated that while GMCs were low pre–PsA-TT, significantly higher GMCs in all age–sex strata were observed 2 years after PsA-TT introduction. The percentage with short-term immunity increased from 57.1% to 88.4% (31.3-point increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 26.6–36.0;, P < .0001) and with long-term immunity increased from 20.0% to 58.5% (38.5-point increase; 95% CI, 33.7–43.3; P < .0001) pre- and postvaccination. Conclusions. Significantly higher TT immunity was observed among vaccine-targeted age groups up to 2 years after Mali's PsA-TT mass vaccination campaign. Our results, combined with evidence from clinical trials, strongly suggest that conjugate vaccines containing TT such as PsA-TT should be considered bivalent vaccines because of their ability to boost tetanus immunity. PMID:26553691

  18. First measurement of the tt[over ] differential cross section dsigma/dM_{tt[over ]} in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-06-01

    We present a measurement of the tt[over ] differential cross section with respect to the tt[over ] invariant mass, dsigma/dM_{tt[over ]}, in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb;{-1} collected by the CDF II experiment. The tt[over ] invariant mass spectrum is sensitive to a variety of exotic particles decaying into tt[over ] pairs. The result is consistent with the standard model expectation, as modeled by PYTHIA with CTEQ5L parton distribution functions.

  19. Calling Home in 2003: JPL Roadmap to Standardized TT&C Customer Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtik, S.; Berner, J.; Levesque, M.

    2000-01-01

    The telecommunications and Mission Operations Directorate (TMOD at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) provides tracking, telemetry and command (TT&C) services for execution of a broad spectrum of deep space missions.

  20. One-Loop Helicity Amplitudes for tt Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, Simon; Sattler, Ralf; Yundin, Valery

    2011-04-01

    We present compact analytic expressions for all one-loop helicity amplitudes contributing to tt production at hadron colliders. Using recently developed generalized unitarity methods and a traditional Feynman based approach we produce a fast and flexible implementation.

  1. The contributions of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 genotypes to triple negative breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Liang-Chih; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Su, Chen-Hsien; Wang, Hwei-Chung; Ji, Hong-Xue; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Maa, Ming-Chei; Bau, Da-Tian

    2016-03-01

    The tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are a family of multifunctional proteins which have been shown to be upregulated in various types of cancers. However, the contribution of TIMPs in breast cancer is not fully understood, not to mention triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). This study's aim was to evaluate the contribution of TIMP-1 rs4898, rs6609533, and rs2070584 genotypes to the risk of breast cancer, especially the subtype of TNBC. The contributions of these TIMP-1 genotypes to cancer risk were examined among 1232 breast cancer patients and 1232 healthy controls, and several clinicopathologic factors were also analyzed. The results showed that the percentages of CC, CT, and TT of TIMP-1 rs4898 were differentially distributed at 28.5%, 33.1% and 38.4% in the breast cancer patient group and 34.5%, 41.0% and 24.5% in the control group, respectively (P for trend = 7.99*10(-13)). It was also found that the CC genotype carriers were of increased risk for breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.90, 95% confidence interval = 1.55-2.33, P = 0.0001) than the TT genotype carriers. In addition, we analyzed the allelic frequency distributions of all three TIMP-1s, and the results showed that the C allele of TIMP-1 rs4898 contributes to an increase in breast cancer susceptibility (P = 2.41*10(-12)). On the other hand, there was no difference found in the distribution of genotypic or allelic frequencies among the patients and the controls for TIMP-1 rs6609533 and rs2070584. Thus, it is our conclusion that the CC genotype of TIMP-1 rs4898 compared to the TT wild-type genotype may increase the risk for breast cancer, especially TNBC in Taiwan, and may serve as an early detective and predictive marker.

  2. Relationship Between Interleukin-10 Gene C-819T Polymorphism and Gastric Cancer Risk: Insights From a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xigang; Huang, Qingxian; Li, Xianglin; Liu, Fang; Wang, Dan; Yan, Dong; Wang, Bin; Yang, Chunhua; Mi, Jia; Tian, Geng

    2016-01-01

    Background As a pleiotropic cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays a regulatory role in carcinogenesis and tumor growth. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the susceptibility of the IL-10 gene C-819T polymorphism to gastric cancer. Material/Methods Study identification and data extraction were independently completed by 2 authors. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated and summarized. Results In total, 11 articles including 1960 gastric cancer patients and 3705 controls were qualified. Overall analyses revealed a 13% reduced risk of gastric cancer conferred by the −819T allele relative to the −819C allele (OR=0.87; 95% CI: 0.77–0.97; P=0.016), without heterogeneity (I2=35.1%). In subgroup analyses, a significant difference was identified in East Asian populations (OR=0.85; 95% CI: 0.73–0.98; P=0.029, I2=43.6%), for gastric adenocarcinoma (OR=0.80; 95% CI: 0.66–0.96; P=0.017, I2=0.0%), and in population-based studies (OR=0.81; 95% CI: 0.70–0.93; P=0.003, I2=0.0%). The visual funnel plots and Egger’s tests suggested no evidence of publication bias. Conclusions Extending previous findings, we demonstrate a protective role of the IL-10 gene −819T allele in susceptibility to gastric cancer, and this role was more evident for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27516059

  3. 9th Transgenic Technology Meeting (TT2010) in Berlin, Germany: a meeting report.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Thomas L; Sobieszczuk, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The first Transgenic Technology (TT) Meeting was organized in 1999 by Johannes Wilbertz, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden as a regional meeting. The TT Meetings continued in this way, constantly gathering additional practitioners of transgenic methodologies until the breakthrough in 2005 when the 6th TT Meeting in Barcelona, Spain, hosted by Lluis Montoliu (Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Madrid, Spain), generated the momentum to establish the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). Since 2006, the ISTT has continued to promote the TT Meetings and provide its membership with a forum to discuss best practices and new methods in the field. The TT2010 Meeting was held at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (Berlin, Germany). Participation at the TT2010 Meeting exceeded the registration capacity and set a new attendance record. Session topics included methods for the generation of rat and mouse models of human disease, fundamental and advanced topics in rodent embryonic stem cells, and the newest transgenic technologies. Short presentations from selected abstracts were of especial interest. Roundtable discussions on transgenic facility establishment and cryoarchiving of mouse lines were favorably received. Students, technical staff, and professors participated in numerous discussions and came away with practical methods and new ideas for research.

  4. Sustained efficacy of the novel topical repellent TT-4302 against mosquitoes and ticks.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, B W; Kennedy, M K; Carroll, S P

    2016-03-01

    Mosquitoes and ticks are blood-feeding pests of humans and animals that can vector many important aetiological agents of disease. Previous research demonstrated that TT-4302 (Guardian(®) Wilderness) containing 5% geraniol applied to human subjects gave 5-6 h of repellency against mosquitoes (depending on species) and was repellent to ticks in vitro. This study was conducted to obtain an independent third-party evaluation of TT-4302 against Stegomyia aegypti (= Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes and to test the efficacy of the product in the field against ticks. TT-4302 provided an average of 6.5 h of repellency of ≥ 95% [Weibull mean protection time: 7.4 h, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.8-11.3 h] for St. aegypti, whereas a 15% DEET formulation provided 4.7 h of repellency (Weibull mean protection time: 5.2 h, 95% CI 3.7-6.9 h). In tick field trials, the efficacy of TT-4302 did not differ significantly from that of a 25% DEET formulation against Amblyomma americanum (Ixodida: Ixodidae). TT-4302 was 81.3% repellent at 2.5 h after application, whereas DEET was 77.2% repellent at the same time-point. Results at 3.5 h after application were 71.4% for TT-4302 and 72.9% for DEET. PMID:26614394

  5. Community Perspectives Associated With the African PsA-TT (MenAfriVac) Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Idoko, Olubukola T.; Diallo, Aldiouma; Sow, Samba O.; Hodgson, Abraham; Akinsola, Adebayo; Diarra, Bou; Haidara, Fadima Cheick; Ansah, Patrick Odum; Kampmann, Beate; Bouma, Enricke; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Enwere, Godwin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was established to address epidemic meningitis as a public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa and, to that end, worked to develop a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT. Methods. Experiences in 4 clinical trial sites are described. Culturally sensitive collaborative strategies were adopted to manage acceptable communication methods, peculiarities with the consent process, participant medical issues, community care, and death. Results. The clinical trials were completed successfully through community acceptance and active community collaboration. The trials also strengthened the capacities in the participating communities, and actively worked to resolve community problems. Conclusions. The understanding and integration of sociocultural realities of communities were major assets in the conduct and acceptance of these trials. MVP succeeded in these sites and provided a sound example for future clinical studies in Africa. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRTCN78147026 (PsA-TT 002); ISRCTN87739946 (PsA-TT 003); ISRCTN82484612 (PsA-TT 004); PACTR ATMR2010030001913177 (PsA-TT 006); and PACTR201110000328305 (PsA-TT 007). PMID:26553669

  6. Novel Atlantic bottlenose dolphin parainfluenza virus TtPIV-1 clusters with bovine PIV-3 genotype B strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) is a common viral infection not only in humans, but many other species. Serological evidence suggests that nearly 100% of children in the United States have been infected with PIV-3 by five years of age. Similarly, in cattle PIV-3 is commonly associated with bovine re...

  7. The effect of supplementing zilpaterol hydrochloride on feeding performance and carcass characteristics of steers sorted by leptin genotype.

    PubMed

    McEvers, T J; Walter, L J; Defoor, P J; Swingle, R S; Hutcheson, J P; Lawrence, T E

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this investigation was to identify interactions that may exist among alleles of the leptin gene and supplementation of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH). Steers (n = 4,246; initial BW = 389.8 ± 8.8 kg) were genotyped and sorted into 1 of 3 leptin genotype (LG) groups (homozygous normal [CC], heterozygous [CT], or homozygous mutant ) from a candidate pool of 7,506 steers. Steers were allocated into 48 pens of which one-half were fed the β-adrenergic agonist ZH and the balance, a control diet. During the pretreatment period (d 1 to 102), cattle of the TT genotype exhibited increased (P = 0.02) DMI compared to other genotypes and lower G:F than the CC genotype (P = 0.03). Cattle of the CT genotype had lower (P = 0.02) ADG compared to other genotypes for the treatment period. Cattle fed ZH had improved (P < 0.01) ADG and G:F compared to cattle on the control diet for both the treatment and entire study periods (d 1 to 125). For the entire study period, cattle of the TT genotype had greater (P = 0.03) DMI than the CT allele, with CT cattle having the lowest (P < 0.01) ADG and CC cattle having greatest (P < 0.01) G:F of all alleles. Cattle of the TT genotype had greater (P = 0.03) final shrunk weight than the CT allele. Cattle of the TT genotype had lower (P = 0.04) dressed yield compared to CT cattle and greater (P = 0.01) marbling score compared to CC cattle, with a concurrent increase (P < 0.01) in calculated empty body fat (EBF) over all alleles. Cattle fed ZH had greater (P < 0.01) final shrunk weight, HCW, dressed yield, and LM area coupled with reduced (P < 0.01) marbling score, s.c. fat depth, EBF, and calculated USDA yield grade compared to control steers. Carcasses of the TT allele had a greater (P = 0.01) proportion of Choice carcasses than CT or CC alleles and lesser (P = 0.03) proportion of Select carcasses than CC alleles. Additionally, ZH supplemented cattle had fewer (P < 0.01) carcasses grading Premium Choice or better, Choice, and yield grade

  8. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯Wmore » nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.« less

  9. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. 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E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯W nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.

  10. Anomalous DD and TT yields relative to the DT yield in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Daniel T.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (DD), T(t,2n)4He (TT) and D(t,n)4He (DT) reactions have been conducted using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In these experiments, which were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility, absolute spectral measurements of the DD protons and TT neutrons were conducted and compared to neutron-time-of-flight measured DT-neutron yields. From these measurements, it is concluded that the DD yield is anomalously low and the TT yield is anomalously high relative to the DT yield, an effect that is enhanced with increasing ion temperature. These results can be explained by an enrichment of tritium in the core of an ICF implosion, which may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. In addition, the spectral measurements of the TT-neutron spectrum were conducted for the first time at reactant central-mass energies in the range of 15-30 keV. The results from these measurements indicate that the TT reaction proceeds primarily through the direct three-body reaction channel, producing a continuous TT-neutron spectrum in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. This work was conducted in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, M. J.-E. Manuel, H. G. Rinderknecht, N. Sinenian, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, P. B. Radha, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, D. P. McNabb, P. A. Amendt, R. N. Boyd, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann, Y. H. Kim, G. P. Grim and A. D. Bacher. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG03-03SF22691), LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974).

  11. Characterization of Biosurfactant Produced by Bacillus licheniformis TT42 Having Potential for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Harish; Nerurkar, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus licheniformis TT42 produced a low-molecular weight anionic biosurfactant that reduced the surface tension of water from 72 to 27 mN/m and the interfacial tension from 12 to 0.05 mN/m against crude oil. We have earlier reported significant enhancement in oil recovery in laboratory sand pack columns and core flood studies, by biosurfactant-TT42 compared to standard strain, Bacillus mojavensis JF2. In the context of this application of the biosurfactant-TT42, its characterization was deemed important. In the preliminary studies, the biosurfactant-TT42 was found to be functionally stable at under conditions of temperature, pH, and salinity generally prevalent in oil reservoirs. Furthermore, the purified biosurfactant-TT42 was found to have a CMC of 22 mg/l. A newly developed activity staining TLC method was used for the purification of biosurfactant-TT42. Structural characterization of biosurfactant-TT42 using TLC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), GC-MS, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF)/TOF suggested that it was a mixture of lipopeptide species, all having a common hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptide head with the sequence, Gln-Leu/Ileu-Leu/Ileu-Val-Asp-Leu/Ileu-Leu/Ileu linked to hydrophobic tails of different lengths of 3β-OH-fatty acids bearing 1043, 1057 and 1071 Da molecular weight, where 3β-OH-C19 fatty acid was predominant. This is the longest chain length of fatty acids reported in a lipopeptide.

  12. Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT as risk factors of alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Mario; Pasta, Francesca; Pasta, Linda

    2015-08-15

    The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and Prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 865 Caucasian patients with liver cirrhosis, consecutively enrolled from June 2008 to January 2014. A total of 582 HCV, 80 HBV, 94 alcohol, (82 with more than one etiologic factor) and 191 cryptogenic patients with liver cirrhosis had been consecutively enrolled; 243 patients showed portal vein thrombosis (PVT). At least one of the above THRGFs was present in 339/865 patients (39.2%). PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT were the most frequent THRGFs, statistically significant in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT: respectively 24 and 28, 50 and 73, and 65 and 83 (all chi-square tests>3.84, and p values<0.05). Two logistic regression analysis, using PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, as dependent variable, confirmed the independent significant relationship of these THRGFs with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and PVT. PAI 1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes, deviated from those expected in populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (all p values<0.05), in the subgroups of patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and presence of PVT. Our study shows the pivotal role of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT, in a Caucasian population. In conclusion, thrombo and fibro-genetic mechanisms of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, could have a role in the development of liver cirrhosis, mainly in patients without HCV and HBV, and PVT.

  13. [Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Manisa region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Sanlidağ, Tamer; Akçali, Sinem; Ozbakkaloğlu, Beril; Ertekin, Deniz; Akduman, Elçin

    2009-10-01

    The duration of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the response to the standard therapy is strongly related to the HCV genotypes. In addition, the geographical distribution of HCV genotypes is important for the epidemiological studies in terms of distribution and possible risk groups. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the distribution of HCV genotypes in Manisa region (located at the Aegean part of Turkey). A total of 100 anti-HCV (microparticle EIA; Abbott Laboratories, USA) and HCV-RNA (real time RT-PCR; Applied Biosystems, USA) positive patients (53 female, 47 male; mean age: 44.4 +/- 10.4 years), who were admitted to Celal Bayar University Medical School Hospital between 2002-2005, were included to the study. Quantitative HCV-RNA levels of the patients were between 10(4)-10(8) copies/ml. Complementary DNAs obtained from HCV-RNAs isolated by Invitek RTP DNA/RNA Virus Mini Kit were used for genotyping with selected primers [primer 11 (5'-AGG TCT CTG AGA CCG TGC ACC ATG AGC AC-3') and primer 13 (5'-CTG TGA GGA ACT ACT GTC TT-3') for the first PCR; primer 12 (5'-ACT GCC TGA TAG GGT GCT TGC GAG TG-3') and primer 14 (5'-CAC GCA GAA AGC GTC TAG-3') for the second PCR]. The RT-PCR products were purified with Invisorb Spin PCRapid Kit and sequenced by BigDye Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit in ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer. Genotype 1 was found in 92% of the patients (92%) and genotypes 2 and 4 were found in 7% of the patients, while HCV genotype could not be identified in one patient (1%). When evaluating the subtypes, genotype 1b was determined in 90 patients (90%), genotype 4a in five patients (5%), genotype 1a in two patients (2%) and genotype 2a in two patients (2%). In conclusion, 1b was found to be the most common HCV genotype in Manisa region in concordance with the previous data obtained in Turkey, followed by genotype 4a, although a rare one. The data of this study is noteworthy especially for the arrangement of treatment and

  14. The Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Core Amino Acid 70 Substitution and Genotypes of Polymorphisms Near the IFNL3 Gene in Iranian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kadjbaf, Danesh; Keshvari, Maryam; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Pouryasin, Ali; Behnava, Bita; Salimi, Shima; Mehrnoush, Leila; Karimi Elizee, Pegah; Sharafi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    Background Molecular studies have demonstrated that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and host genetics play predictive roles in the management of patients infected with HCV. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the HCV genotype, core amino acid (aa) 70 substitution, and polymorphisms near the IFNL3 gene (including rs12979860 and rs8099917) among Iranian patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the molecular profiles of the HCV genotype, core aa 70 substitution, and rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms and plasma HCV RNA levels were determined in 429 CHC patients including 141 hemophilic, 84 thalassemic, and 204 non-hemophilic, non-thalassemic patients. Results The hepatitis C virus subtype 1a was the most common subtype in the study population. Core aa substitution Arg70Gln was strongly associated with cirrhosis (OR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.13 - 5.50; P = 0.020). Core aa 70 substitutions were more frequently observed in patients with the HCV subtype 1b than in patients with any other HCV subtypes (P < 0.001). Core aa 70 substitutions were also more common in patients with the rs12979860 TT genotype than in patients with non-TT genotypes (17.3% vs. 8.5%, P = 0.022) and also in rs8099917 non-TT genotypes than in the TT genotype (14.0% vs. 7.0%, P = 0.026). The HCV genotypes and rs8099917 polymorphisms were correlated in which HCV subtype 1b was in favor of rs8099917 GG and HCV subtype 3a favored rs8099917 TT (P = 0.021). Furthermore, the rs12979860 TT and rs8099917 GG genotypes showed significantly lower HCV RNA levels than the other genotypes (P < 0.001). Conclusions There is an as yet unexplained association between HCV and host parameters with unknown mechanisms in patients with chronic HCV infection. The assessments of core aa 70 substitution and polymorphisms near the IFNL3 gene could offer promising steps to improve the management of patients with HCV.

  15. The Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Core Amino Acid 70 Substitution and Genotypes of Polymorphisms Near the IFNL3 Gene in Iranian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kadjbaf, Danesh; Keshvari, Maryam; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Pouryasin, Ali; Behnava, Bita; Salimi, Shima; Mehrnoush, Leila; Karimi Elizee, Pegah; Sharafi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    Background Molecular studies have demonstrated that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and host genetics play predictive roles in the management of patients infected with HCV. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the HCV genotype, core amino acid (aa) 70 substitution, and polymorphisms near the IFNL3 gene (including rs12979860 and rs8099917) among Iranian patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the molecular profiles of the HCV genotype, core aa 70 substitution, and rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms and plasma HCV RNA levels were determined in 429 CHC patients including 141 hemophilic, 84 thalassemic, and 204 non-hemophilic, non-thalassemic patients. Results The hepatitis C virus subtype 1a was the most common subtype in the study population. Core aa substitution Arg70Gln was strongly associated with cirrhosis (OR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.13 - 5.50; P = 0.020). Core aa 70 substitutions were more frequently observed in patients with the HCV subtype 1b than in patients with any other HCV subtypes (P < 0.001). Core aa 70 substitutions were also more common in patients with the rs12979860 TT genotype than in patients with non-TT genotypes (17.3% vs. 8.5%, P = 0.022) and also in rs8099917 non-TT genotypes than in the TT genotype (14.0% vs. 7.0%, P = 0.026). The HCV genotypes and rs8099917 polymorphisms were correlated in which HCV subtype 1b was in favor of rs8099917 GG and HCV subtype 3a favored rs8099917 TT (P = 0.021). Furthermore, the rs12979860 TT and rs8099917 GG genotypes showed significantly lower HCV RNA levels than the other genotypes (P < 0.001). Conclusions There is an as yet unexplained association between HCV and host parameters with unknown mechanisms in patients with chronic HCV infection. The assessments of core aa 70 substitution and polymorphisms near the IFNL3 gene could offer promising steps to improve the management of patients with HCV. PMID:27630727

  16. Search for tt-bar-Resonances in the Lepton+Jets Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Schliephake, Thorsten

    2008-11-23

    A search for a narrow-width heavy resonance decaying into top quark pairs (X{yields}tt-bar) in pp-bar collisions at {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV has been performed using data collected with the DOe detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis considers tt-bar candidate events in the lepton+jets channel using a neural network tagger to identify b-jets and the tt-bar invariant mass distribution to search for evidence of resonant production. The analyzed dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 2.1 fb{sup -1}. We find no evidence for a narrow resonance X decaying to tt-bar. Therefore, we set upper limits on {sigma}{sub X}{center_dot}B(X{yields}tt-bar) for different hypothesized resonance masses using a Bayesian approach. Within a topcolor-assisted technicolor model, the existence of a leptophobic Z' boson with mass M{sub Z'}<760 GeV and width {gamma}{sub Z'} = 0.012M{sub Z'} can be excluded at 95% C.L.

  17. Effect of BMAP-28 on human thyroid cancer TT cells is mediated by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DAQI; WAN, LANLAN; ZHANG, JINNAN; LIU, CHANG; SUN, HUI

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant endocrine tumor, with significant morbidity and mortality. Bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28) is a cathelicidin that is found in bovine neutrophils. In the present study, the effect and relative mechanism of BMAP-28 on the human thyroid cancer TT cell line in vitro and in vivo were investigated. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry and a TT-xenograft mouse model were used in this study. The data obtained indicated that BMAP-28 significantly inhibited the proliferation of the TT cells in vitro. In addition, the Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay detected that BMAP-28 induced apoptotic effects in the TT cells. Moreover, the expression of activated caspase-3 and -9 was upregulated at the transcriptional and translational levels. Simultaneously, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)3 and MMP9 was downregulated following BMAP-28 treatment. Finally, BMAP-28 significantly prevented the tumor growth in the TT-xenograft mouse model. These results indicated that BMAP-28 could be a potential agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26622900

  18. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  19. Abnormal differentiation, hyperplasia and embryonic/perinatal lethality in BK5-T/t transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Schneider-Broussard, Robin; Hollowell, Debra; McArthur, Mark; Jeter, Collene R.; Benavides, Fernando; DiGiovanni, John; Tang, Dean G.

    2009-01-01

    The cell-of-origin has a great impact on the types of tumors that develop and the stem/progenitor cells have long been considered main targets of malignant transformation. The SV40 large T and small t antigens (T/t), have been targeted to multiple differentiated cellular compartments in transgenic mice. In most of these studies, transgenic animals develop tumors without apparent defects in animal development. In this study, we used the bovine keratin 5 (BK5) promoter to target the T/t antigens to stem/progenitor cell-containing cytokeratin 5 (CK5) cellular compartment. A transgene construct, BK5-T/t, was made and microinjected into the male pronucleus of FVB/N mouse oocytes. After implanting ∼1700 embryos, only 7 transgenics were obtained, including 4 embryos (E9.5, E13, E15, and E20) and 3 postnatal animals, which died at P1, P2, and P18, respectively. Immunohistological analysis revealed aberrant differentiation and prominent hyperplasia in several transgenic CK5 tissues, especially the upper digestive organs (tongue, oral mucosa, esophagus, and forestomach) and epidermis, the latter of which also showed focal dysplasia. Altogether, these results indicate that constitutive expression of the T/t antigens in CK5 cellular compartment results in abnormal epithelial differentiation and leads to embryonic/perinatal animal lethality. PMID:19272531

  20. A two-generation reproduction study with transgenic Bt rice TT51 in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Er Hui; Yu, Zhou; Hu, Jing; Jia, Xu Dong; Xu, Hai Bin

    2014-03-01

    TT51 is a transgenic Bt rice created by fusion a synthetic CryAb/CryAc gene into rice MingHui63. A significant number of animal feeding studies with transgenic crops have been carried out with the rapid development of transgenic crops. However, the evidence is far from identifying whether certain novel transgenic crops possess potential danger for human or animal health after long-term consumption. Rice-based diets, containing 60% ordinary grocery rice, MingHui63 rice or TT51 rice by weight, were fed to two generations of male and female rats in order to determine the potential reproductive effects of TT51. In this study, both clinical performance variables and histopathological responses were examined and compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups on body weights, food consumption, reproductive data and relative organ/body weights. There were some statistically significant differences in hematology and serum chemistry parameters, but no histological abnormalities were seen in the brain, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, stomach, small intestine, thymus, ovaries, uterus, testes and epididymides. Based on the results, under the circumstance of this study TT51 show no significant differences on reproduction performance of rats compared with MingHui63 and the control.

  1. Folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in young Mexican American women☆

    PubMed Central

    Abratte, Christian M.; Wang, Wei; Li, Rui; Moriarty, David J.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported a relationship between folate status, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C→T variant and disease risk. Although folate and choline metabolism are inter-related, only limited data are available on the relationship between choline and folate status in humans. This study sought to examine the influences of folate intake and the MTHFR 677C→T variant on choline status. Mexican-American women (n =43; 14 CC, 12 CT and 17 TT) consumed 135 μg/day as dietary folate equivalents (DFE) for 7 weeks followed by randomization to 400 or 800 μg DFE/day for 7 weeks. Throughout the study, total choline intake remained unchanged at ∼350 mg/day. Plasma concentrations of betaine, choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were measured via LC-MS/MS for Weeks 0, 7 and 14. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin declined ( P=.001, P=.009, respectively) in response to folate restriction and increased ( P=.08, P=.029, respectively) in response to folate treatment. The increase in phosphatidylcholine occurred in response to 800 ( P=.03) not 400 ( P=.85) μg DFE/day (week×folate interaction, P=.017). The response of phosphatidylcholine to folate intake appeared to be influenced by MTHFR C677T genotype. The decline in phosphatidylcholine during folate restriction occurred primarily in women with the CC or CT genotype and not in the TT genotype (week×genotype interaction, P=.089). Moreover, when examined independent of folate status, phosphatidylcholine was higher ( P <.05) in the TT genotype relative to the CT genotype. These data suggest that folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in humans. PMID:17588738

  2. English-Spanish equivalence of the Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Elizabeth A; Kallen, Michael A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Ganschow, Pamela S; Garcia, Sofia F; Burns, James L

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased measurement instruments are needed to reliably estimate health literacy in diverse populations. The study aimed (a) to evaluate measurement equivalence of Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT) and (b) to compare Health LiTT scores between English- and Spanish-speaking individuals. Health LiTT and several patient-reported outcome instruments were completed by adult patients receiving care for type 2 diabetes at a safety net clinic. English-Spanish measurement equivalence was evaluated with an item response theory approach to differential item functioning (DIF) detection and impact. Health LiTT scores were compared by language using multivariable linear regression. Approximately equal numbers of English-speaking patients (n=146) and Spanish-speaking patients (n=149) with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. English participants were primarily non-Hispanic Black (65%); all Spanish participants were Hispanic. Six Health LiTT items were flagged for DIF. The Pearson correlation between unadjusted and DIF adjusted scores was 0.995; the mean difference of individual difference scores was 0.0005 (SD=0.0888). After adjusting for predisposing characteristics, enabling resources and need for care, Health LiTT scores were comparable for Spanish-speaking individuals versus English-speaking individuals. The effect of DIF items on Health LiTT scores appeared to be trivial. English-Spanish equivalence of Health LiTT will permit researchers to determine the independent effects of limited English proficiency and limited literacy. PMID:25315599

  3. English-Spanish equivalence of the Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Elizabeth A; Kallen, Michael A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Ganschow, Pamela S; Garcia, Sofia F; Burns, James L

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased measurement instruments are needed to reliably estimate health literacy in diverse populations. The study aimed (a) to evaluate measurement equivalence of Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT) and (b) to compare Health LiTT scores between English- and Spanish-speaking individuals. Health LiTT and several patient-reported outcome instruments were completed by adult patients receiving care for type 2 diabetes at a safety net clinic. English-Spanish measurement equivalence was evaluated with an item response theory approach to differential item functioning (DIF) detection and impact. Health LiTT scores were compared by language using multivariable linear regression. Approximately equal numbers of English-speaking patients (n=146) and Spanish-speaking patients (n=149) with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. English participants were primarily non-Hispanic Black (65%); all Spanish participants were Hispanic. Six Health LiTT items were flagged for DIF. The Pearson correlation between unadjusted and DIF adjusted scores was 0.995; the mean difference of individual difference scores was 0.0005 (SD=0.0888). After adjusting for predisposing characteristics, enabling resources and need for care, Health LiTT scores were comparable for Spanish-speaking individuals versus English-speaking individuals. The effect of DIF items on Health LiTT scores appeared to be trivial. English-Spanish equivalence of Health LiTT will permit researchers to determine the independent effects of limited English proficiency and limited literacy.

  4. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  5. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Assessment ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Lipid Profile ; Triglycerides Were you looking instead for APOE genotyping ordered ... the skin called xanthomas, a high level of triglycerides in the blood, and atherosclerosis that develops at ...

  6. Induced heteroduplex genotyping of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-10 polymorphisms associated with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Morse, H R; Olomolaiye, O O; Wood, N A; Keen, L J; Bidwell, J L

    1999-10-01

    We describe the construction and use of 7 induced heteroduplex generators, reagents for the rapid and unequivocal genotyping of nucleotide sequence polymorphism in TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-10. Polymorphisms detected are those previously associated with regulation of gene transcription: TNF-alpha positions -308 and -238; IL-1beta position +3953; IL-6 position -174; and IL-10 positions -1082, -819 and -592. The reagents were used for analysis of allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of healthy Caucasian volunteer blood donors.

  7. Prolonged activation of innate antiviral gene signature after childbirth is determined by IFNL3 genotype.

    PubMed

    Price, Aryn A; Tedesco, Dana; Prasad, Mona R; Workowski, Kimberly A; Walker, Christopher M; Suthar, Mehul S; Honegger, Jonathan R; Grakoui, Arash

    2016-09-20

    Maternal innate and adaptive immune responses are modulated during pregnancy to concurrently defend against infection and tolerate the semiallogeneic fetus. The restoration of these systems after childbirth is poorly understood. We reasoned that enhanced innate immune activation may extend beyond gestation while adaptive immunity recovers. To test this hypothesis, the transcriptional profiles of total peripheral blood mononuclear cells following delivery in healthy women were compared with those of nonpregnant control subjects. Interestingly, interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) encoding proteins such as IFIT1, IFIT2, and IFIT3, as well as signaling proteins such as STAT1, STAT2, and MAVS, were enriched postpartum. Antiviral genes were primarily expressed in CD14(+) cells and could be stratified according to genetic variation at the interferon-λ3 gene (IFNL3, also named IL28B) SNP rs12979860. Antiviral gene expression was sustained beyond 6 mo following delivery in mothers with a CT or TT genotype, but resembled baseline nonpregnant control levels following delivery in mothers with a CC genotype. CT and TT IFNL3 genotypes have been associated with persistent elevated ISG expression in individuals chronically infected with hepatitis C virus. Together, these data suggest that postpartum, the normalization of the physiological rheostat controlling IFN signaling depends on IFNL3 genotype. PMID:27601663

  8. Caffeine and 3-km cycling performance: Effects of mouth rinsing, genotype, and time of day.

    PubMed

    Pataky, M W; Womack, C J; Saunders, M J; Goffe, J L; D'Lugos, A C; El-Sohemy, A; Luden, N D

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of caffeine mouth rinsing on 3-km cycling performance and determined whether caffeine mouth rinsing affects performance gains influenced by the CYP1A2 polymorphism. Thirty-eight recreational cyclists completed four simulated 3-km time trials (TT). Subjects ingested either 6 mg/kg BW of caffeine or placebo 1 h prior to each TT. Additionally, 25 mL of 1.14% caffeine or placebo solution were mouth rinsed before each TT. The treatments were Placebo, caffeine Ingestion, caffeine Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse. Subjects were genotyped and classified as AA homozygotes or AC heterozygotes for the rs762551 polymorphism of the CYP1A2 gene involved in caffeine metabolism. Magnitude-based inferences were used to evaluate treatment differences in mean power output based on a predetermined meaningful treatment effect of 1.0%. AC heterozygotes (4.1%) and AA homozygotes (3.4%) benefited from Ingestion+Rinse, but only AC performed better with Ingestion (6.0%). Additionally, Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse elicited better performance relative to Placebo among subjects that performed prior to 10:00 h (Early) compared with after 10:00 h (Late). The present study provides additional evidence of genotype and time of day factors that affect the ergogenic value of caffeine intake that may allow for more personalized caffeine intake strategies to maximize performance.

  9. Method for the production of human T-T cell hybrids and production suppressor factor by human T-T cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Platsoucas, C.

    1989-06-27

    This patent describes a method for production of human T-T cell hybrids which produce Suppressor Factor wherein cells of lymphoid origin are fused with comprises: (a) mixing cells from a first parent cell line comprising a non-mutagenized Jurkat lymoblastoid T cell line, wherein the Jurkat lymphoblastoid cells are not sensitive and cannot be killed by hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium, with a second parent cell comprising mitogen or alloantigen activated peripheral blood leukocyte T cells or purified T-cells, (b) allowing the first and second parent cells to fuse in the presence of polyethylene glycol for about 10-20 minutes with gentle agitation to generate hybrids in the cell mixture, (c) incubating the cell mixture containing the hybrids and the first and second parent cells, after removal of the polyethylene glycol, for periods of between one to sixty days at 37{sup 0} in 5% CO/sub 2/, (d) selecting for the hybrids by separating the hybrids from the first parent Jurkat lymphoblastoid cells by coloning in agar medium wherein the hybrids form colonies, (e) recovering the hybrids that form colonies in agar medium and expanding them in culture, and (f) determining the presence of Suppressor Factor in the culture and recovering the T-T cell hybrids which produce suppressor factor.

  10. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Andrew J.; West, Catharine M.; Risk, Janet M.; Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara; Crichton, Siobhan; Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn; Shaw, Richard J.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-{beta}1 gene (TGF-{beta}1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-{beta}1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7-19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-{beta}1 gene.

  11. The $16,819 pay gap for newly trained physicians: the unexplained trend of men earning more than women.

    PubMed

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Richards, Michael R; Chou, Chiu-Fang; Gerber, Susan E

    2011-02-01

    Prior research has suggested that gender differences in physicians' salaries can be accounted for by the tendency of women to enter primary care fields and work fewer hours. However, in examining starting salaries by gender of physicians leaving residency programs in New York State during 1999-2008, we found a significant gender gap that cannot be explained by specialty choice, practice setting, work hours, or other characteristics. The unexplained trend toward diverging salaries appears to be a recent development that is growing over time. In 2008, male physicians newly trained in New York State made on average $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999. PMID:21289339

  12. The $16,819 pay gap for newly trained physicians: the unexplained trend of men earning more than women.

    PubMed

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Richards, Michael R; Chou, Chiu-Fang; Gerber, Susan E

    2011-02-01

    Prior research has suggested that gender differences in physicians' salaries can be accounted for by the tendency of women to enter primary care fields and work fewer hours. However, in examining starting salaries by gender of physicians leaving residency programs in New York State during 1999-2008, we found a significant gender gap that cannot be explained by specialty choice, practice setting, work hours, or other characteristics. The unexplained trend toward diverging salaries appears to be a recent development that is growing over time. In 2008, male physicians newly trained in New York State made on average $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999.

  13. MTHFR C677T genotype influences the isotopic enrichment of one-carbon metabolites in folate-compromised men consuming d9-choline123

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Gregory, Jesse F; Malysheva, Olga; Brenna, J Thomas; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Homozygosity for the variant 677T allele in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene increases the requirement for folate and may alter the metabolic use of choline. The choline adequate intake is 550 mg/d for men, although the metabolic consequences of consuming extra choline are unclear. Objective: Deuterium-labeled choline (d9-choline) as tracer was used to determine the differential effects of the MTHFR C677T genotype and the effect of various choline intakes on the isotopic enrichment of choline derivatives in folate-compromised men. Design: Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or 677TT genotype consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline chloride for total choline intakes of 550 (n = 11; 4 with 677CC and 7 with 677TT) or 1100 (n = 12; 4 with 677CC and 8 with 677TT) mg/d for 12 wk. During the last 3 wk, 15% of the total choline intake was provided as d9-choline. Results: Low but measurable enrichments of the choline metabolites were achieved, including that of d3-phosphatidylcholine (d3-PtdCho)—a metabolite produced in the de novo pathway via choline-derived methyl groups. Men with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had a higher urinary enrichment ratio of betaine to choline (P = 0.041), a higher urinary enrichment of sarcosine (P = 0.041), and a greater plasma enrichment ratio of d9-betaine to d9-PtdCho with the 1100 mg choline/d intake (P = 0.033). Conclusion: These data show for the first time in humans that choline itself is a source of methyl groups for de novo PtdCho biosynthesis and indicate that the MTHFR 677TT genotype favors the use of choline as a methyl donor. PMID:21123458

  14. 25 CFR 115.819 - What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... per capita check is returned as undeliverable or not cashed within twelve (12) months of issuance? 115... TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Unclaimed Per Capita Funds § 115.819 What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as undeliverable or...

  15. 25 CFR 115.819 - What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Unclaimed Per Capita Funds § 115.819 What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as undeliverable or not cashed... per capita checks were returned as undeliverable or not cashed within twelve (12) months of...

  16. 25 CFR 115.819 - What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... per capita check is returned as undeliverable or not cashed within twelve (12) months of issuance? 115... TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Unclaimed Per Capita Funds § 115.819 What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as undeliverable or...

  17. 25 CFR 115.819 - What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... per capita check is returned as undeliverable or not cashed within twelve (12) months of issuance? 115... TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Unclaimed Per Capita Funds § 115.819 What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as undeliverable or...

  18. 25 CFR 115.819 - What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... per capita check is returned as undeliverable or not cashed within twelve (12) months of issuance? 115... TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Unclaimed Per Capita Funds § 115.819 What steps will be taken to locate an individual whose per capita check is returned as undeliverable or...

  19. Precise Ionosphere Monitoring via a DSFH Satellite TT&C Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Li, Guangxia; Li, Zhiqiang; Yue, Chao

    2014-11-01

    A phase-coherent and frequency-hopped PN ranging system was developed, originally for the purpose of anti-jamming TT&C (tracking, telemetry and telecommand) of military satellites of China, including the Beidou-2 navigation satellites. The key innovation in the synchronization of this system is the unambiguous phase recovery of direct sequence and frequency hopping (DSFH) spread spectrum signal and the correction of frequency-dependent phase rotation caused by ionosphere. With synchronization achieved, a TEC monitoring algorithm based on maximum likelihood (ML) principle is proposed and its measuring precision is analyzed through ground simulation, onboard confirmation tests will be performed when transionosphere DSFH links are established in 2014. The measuring precision of TEC exceeds that obtained from GPS receiver data because the measurement is derived from unambiguous carrier phase estimates, not pseudorange estimates. The observation results from TT&C stations can provide real time regional ionosphere TEC estimation.

  20. Secondary Synaptic T-T Circuits Drive Protective CD8+ T cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Audrey; Khan, Omar; Beemiller, Peter; Oswald, Erin; Hu, Joyce; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization results in the differentiation of CD8+ T cells, such that they acquire effector capabilities and convert into a memory pool capable of rapid response upon re-exposure. The initial priming of T cells takes place via an immunological synapse (IS) formed with an antigen-presenting cell (APC). By disrupting synaptic stability at different times, we show that CD8+ T cell differentiation requires cell interactions beyond those made with APC. We identify a `Critical Differentiation Period' (CDP) characterized by and requiring the interaction between primed T cells. We show that T-T synaptic interactions play a major role in the generation of protective CD8+ T cell memory. T-T synapses and allow T cells to polarize critical interferon-γ secretion towards one another. “Collective” activation and homotypic clustering therefore drive private cytokine sharing and act as regulatory stimuli for T cell differentiation. PMID:23475183

  1. Measurement of the electric charge of the top quark in tt xAF events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We present a measurement of the electric charge of top quarks using tt ¯ events produced in pp ¯ collisions at the Tevatron. The analysis is based on fully reconstructed tt ¯ pairs in lepton+jets final states. Using data corresponding to 5.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, we exclude the hypothesis that the top quark has a charge of Q =-4/3e at a significance greater than 5 standard deviations. We also place an upper limit of 0.46 on the fraction of such quarks that can be present in an admixture with the standard model top quarks (Q =+2/3e) at a 95% confidence level.

  2. Natural mutations in two homoeologous TT8 genes control yellow seed coat trait in allotetraploid Brassica juncea (AABB).

    PubMed

    Padmaja, Lakshmi K; Agarwal, Parul; Gupta, Vibha; Mukhopadhyay, Arundhati; Sodhi, Yaspal S; Pental, Deepak; Pradhan, Akshay K

    2014-02-01

    Identification of the candidate gene responsible for the seed coat colour variation in Brassica juncea was undertaken following an earlier study where two independent loci (BjSc1 and BjSc2) were mapped to two linkage groups, LG A9 and B3 (Padmaja et al. in Theor Appl Genet 111:8-14, 2005). The genome search from BRAD data for the presence of flavonoid genes in B. rapa identified three candidate genes namely, DFR, TT1 and TT8 in the LG A9. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed absence of transcript for the late biosynthetic genes (LBGs) and showed significant reduction of transcript in the TT8 from the developing seeds of yellow-seeded line. While mapping of two DFR genes, the BjuA.DFR and BjuB.DFR did not show perfect co-segregation with the seed coat colour loci, that of the two TT8 genes, BjuA.TT8 and BjuB.TT8 showed perfect co-segregation with the seed coat colour phenotype. The BjuA.TT8 allele from the yellow-seeded line revealed the presence of an insertion of 1,279 bp in the exon 7 and did not produce any transcript as revealed by reverse transcriptase PCR. The BjuB.TT8 allele from the yellow-seeded line revealed the presence of an SNP (C→T) in the exon 7 resulting in a stop codon predicting a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal 8 amino acid residues and produced significantly low level of transcript than its wild-type counterpart. Hence, it is hypothesized that the mutations in both the TT8 genes are required for inhibiting the transcription of LBGs in the yellow-seeded mutant of B. juncea.

  3. Natural mutations in two homoeologous TT8 genes control yellow seed coat trait in allotetraploid Brassica juncea (AABB).

    PubMed

    Padmaja, Lakshmi K; Agarwal, Parul; Gupta, Vibha; Mukhopadhyay, Arundhati; Sodhi, Yaspal S; Pental, Deepak; Pradhan, Akshay K

    2014-02-01

    Identification of the candidate gene responsible for the seed coat colour variation in Brassica juncea was undertaken following an earlier study where two independent loci (BjSc1 and BjSc2) were mapped to two linkage groups, LG A9 and B3 (Padmaja et al. in Theor Appl Genet 111:8-14, 2005). The genome search from BRAD data for the presence of flavonoid genes in B. rapa identified three candidate genes namely, DFR, TT1 and TT8 in the LG A9. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed absence of transcript for the late biosynthetic genes (LBGs) and showed significant reduction of transcript in the TT8 from the developing seeds of yellow-seeded line. While mapping of two DFR genes, the BjuA.DFR and BjuB.DFR did not show perfect co-segregation with the seed coat colour loci, that of the two TT8 genes, BjuA.TT8 and BjuB.TT8 showed perfect co-segregation with the seed coat colour phenotype. The BjuA.TT8 allele from the yellow-seeded line revealed the presence of an insertion of 1,279 bp in the exon 7 and did not produce any transcript as revealed by reverse transcriptase PCR. The BjuB.TT8 allele from the yellow-seeded line revealed the presence of an SNP (C→T) in the exon 7 resulting in a stop codon predicting a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal 8 amino acid residues and produced significantly low level of transcript than its wild-type counterpart. Hence, it is hypothesized that the mutations in both the TT8 genes are required for inhibiting the transcription of LBGs in the yellow-seeded mutant of B. juncea. PMID:24247234

  4. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to tt+jet Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmaier, S.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.

    2007-06-29

    We report on the calculation of the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the production of top-quark-top-antiquark pairs in association with a hard jet at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We present results for the tt+jet cross section and the forward-backward charge asymmetry. The corrections stabilize the leading-order prediction for the cross section. The charge asymmetry receives large corrections.

  5. Systematic synthesis of CCCCTA-based T-T filters using NAM expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongan; Cao, Rui

    2016-06-01

    In the light of nullor-mirror models for current-controlled current conveyor trans-conductance amplifier (CCCCTA), initiating the admittance matrices of the Tow-Thomas (T-T) filter, three different types of the T-T filter are synthesised by means of the nodal admittance matrix (NAM) expansion method. The type A filter, which employ one CCCCTA, one grounded resistor and two grounded capacitors, has eight different forms, the type B filter, which employ one CCCCTA, two grounded capacitors and a second-generation current-controlled conveyor (CCCII) or an second-generation inverting current-controlled conveyor (ICCCII) or an operational trans-conductance amplifier (OTA), has 64 different forms and the type C filter employing one CCCCTA and two grounded capacitors has eight different forms. In all, 80 voltage-mode/current-mode T-T filter circuits are obtained. Because of using canonic number components, the circuits are highly desirable from the viewpoint of IC fabrication and their parameters can be electronically tuned through tuning bias currents of CCCCTAs. The hand analysis and computer simulation results have been provided to support the synthesis method.

  6. Public Health Impact After the Introduction of PsA-TT: The First 4 Years

    PubMed Central

    Diomandé, Fabien V. K.; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Daugla, Doumagoum M.; Novak, Ryan T.; Kristiansen, Paul A.; Collard, Jean-Marc; Gamougam, Kadidja; Kandolo, Denis; Mbakuliyemo, Nehemie; Mayer, Leonard; Stuart, James; Clark, Thomas; Tevi-Benissan, Carol; Perea, William A.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Marc LaForce, F.; Caugant, Dominique; Messonnier, Nancy; Walker, Oladapo; Greenwood, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background. During the first introduction of a group A meningococcal vaccine (PsA-TT) in 2010–2011 and its rollout from 2011 to 2013, >150 million eligible people, representing 12 hyperendemic meningitis countries, have been vaccinated. Methods. The new vaccine effectiveness evaluation framework was established by the World Health Organization and partners. Meningitis case-based surveillance was strengthened in PsA-TT first-introducer countries, and several evaluation studies were conducted to estimate the vaccination coverage and to measure the impact of vaccine introduction on meningococcal carriage and disease incidence. Results. PsA-TT implementation achieved high vaccination coverage, and results from studies conducted showed significant decrease of disease incidence as well as significant reduction of oropharyngeal carriage of group A meningococci in vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals, demonstrating the vaccine's ability to generate herd protection and prevent group A epidemics. Conclusions. Lessons learned from this experience provide useful insights in how to guide and better prepare for future new vaccine introductions in resource-limited settings. PMID:26553676

  7. Light colored scalars from grand unification and the forward-backward asymmetry in tt production

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsner, Ilja; Fajfer, Svjetlana; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Kosnik, Nejc

    2010-03-01

    The experimental results on the tt production cross section at the Tevatron are well described by the QCD contributions within the standard model, while the recently measured forward-backward asymmetry is larger than predicted within this framework. We consider light colored scalars appearing in a particular SU(5) grand unified theory model within the 45-dimensional Higgs representation. A virtue of the model is that it connects the presence of a light colored SU(2) singlet ({Delta}{sub 6}) and a color octet weak doublet ({Delta}{sub 1}) with bounds on the proton lifetime, which constrain the parameter space of both scalars. We find that both the total tt production cross section and the forward-backward asymmetry can be accommodated simultaneously within this model. The experimental results prefer a region for the mass of {Delta}{sub 6} around 400 GeV, while {Delta}{sub 1} is then constrained to have a mass around the TeV scale as well. We analyze possible experimental signatures and find that {Delta}{sub 6} associated top production could be probed in the tt+jets final states at Tevatron and the LHC.

  8. Expression and Characterization of Hyperthermostable Exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Wagschal, Kurt; Rose Stoller, J; Chan, Victor J; Lee, Charles C; Grigorescu, Arabela A; Jordan, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    D-galacturonic acid is a potential platform chemical comprising the principal component of pectin in the citrus processing waste stream. Several enzyme activities are required for the enzymatic production of galacturonic acid from pectin, including exo- and endo-polygalacturonases. The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and details of their catalytic mechanism have been elucidated shows that three catalytic Asp residues and several other key active site residues are strictly conserved. Purified TtGH28 was dimeric and hyperthermostable, with K t (0.5)  = 86.3 °C. Kinetic parameters for activity on digalacturonic acid, trigalacturonic acid, and polygalacturonic acid were obtained. No substrate inhibition was observed for polygalacturonate, while the K si values for the oligogalacturonides were in the low mM range, and K i for product galacturonic acid was in the low μM range. Kinetic modeling of the progress of reaction showed that the enzyme is both fully exo- and fully non-processional. PMID:27209035

  9. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  10. Impact of Interleukin 28B Genotype on the Virological Responses in Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aygen, Bilgehan; Yildiz, Orhan; Akhan, Sila; Gunal, Ozgur; Taheri, Serpil; Zararsiz, Gokmen; Sayan, Murat; Rustemoglu, Aydin; Altinok, Elif Sargin

    2014-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL) 28B single nucleotide polymorphisms may play a role in the clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV). We aimed to evaluate the treatment response of chronic HCV infection patients to pegile interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin treatment with regard to IL28B rs12979860 C/T polymorphism. Methods A total of 186 patients (mean age, 55.6 ± 10 years; 65.1% female) who underwent pegIFN and ribavirin treatment for chronic HCV infection were studied. We analyzed demographics, HCV genotype, baseline alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, histopathological data, viral load before treatment and at 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 weeks from the treatment start, and IL28B genotype. IL28B polymorphism was genotyped using polymerase chain reaction based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in all the subjects. Results One hundred forty-five (86.8%) patients were infected with viral genotype 1b, and 13.2% were infected with viral genotype 4. The rates of C/C, C/T, and T/T genotypes were 22.6%, 52.7%, and 24.7% respectively. The percentage of patients with a viral load over 400,000 IU/mL was higher in the C/T group (P = 0.020). Of the patients, 44.6% provided sustained virological response (SVR) to pegIFN and ribavirin combination treatment. The frequency of T allele was 41% in patients with SVR, whereas 59% patients provided no response (P < 0.001). SVR was obtained in 66.7%, 42.9%, and 28.3% of CC, CT, and TT groups (P = 0.001). The rates of rapid virological response (RVR), early virological response (EVR), end-of-treatment response (ETR), and SVR were higher in the CC group than other groups (P = 0.216, P < 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.001, respectively). The relapse and null response (NR) rates were higher in TT group and partial response rate (PR) was higher in CT group. Conclusions IL28B rs12979860 C/T gene polymorphism affects the response to antiviral treatment in the patients with chronic HCV genotypes 1b and 4 infections.

  11. Effects of crack tip plastic zone on corrosion fatigue cracking of alloy 690(TT) in pressurized water reactor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, J.; Qiu, S. Y.; Chen, Y.; Fu, Z. H.; Lin, Z. X.; Xu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Alloy 690(TT) is widely used for steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactor (PWR), where it is susceptible to corrosion fatigue. In this study, the corrosion fatigue behavior of Alloy 690(TT) in simulated PWR environments was investigated. The microstructure of the plastic zone near the crack tip was investigated and labyrinth structures were observed. The relationship between the crack tip plastic zone and fatigue crack growth rates and the environment factor Fen was illuminated.

  12. Efavirenz and Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Relationship with CYP2B6 c.516G→T Genotype and Perturbed Blood-Brain Barrier Due to Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Fisher, Martin; Nelson, Mark; Winston, Alan; Else, Laura; Carr, Daniel F.; Taylor, Steven; Ustianowski, Andrew; Back, David; Pirmohamed, Munir; Solomon, Tom; Farrar, Jeremy; Törok, M. Estée; Khoo, Saye

    2016-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFZ) has been associated with neuropsychiatric side effects. Recently, the 8-hydroxy-EFZ (8OH-EFZ) metabolite has been shown to be a potent neurotoxin in vitro, inducing neuronal damage at concentrations of 3.3 ng/ml. EFZ induced similar neuronal damage at concentrations of 31.6 ng/ml. We investigated the effect of genotype and blood-brain barrier integrity on EFZ metabolite concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We measured CSF drug concentrations in subjects from two separate study populations: 47 subjects with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) coinfection in Vietnam receiving 800 mg EFZ with standard antituberculous treatment and 25 subjects from the PARTITION study in the United Kingdom without central nervous system infection receiving 600 mg EFZ. EFZ and metabolite concentrations in CSF and plasma were measured and compared with estimates of effectiveness and neurotoxicity from available published in vitro and in vivo data. The effect of the CYP2B6 c.516G→T genotype (GG genotype, fast EFV metabolizer status; GT genotype, intermediate EFV metabolizer status; TT genotype, slow EFV metabolizer status) was examined. The mean CSF concentrations of EFZ and 8OH-EFZ in the TBM group were 60.3 and 39.3 ng/ml, respectively, and those in the no-TBM group were 15.0 and 5.9 ng/ml, respectively. Plasma EFZ and 8OH-EFZ concentrations were similar between the two groups. CSF EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 76% of samples (GG genotype, 61%; GT genotype, 90%; TT genotype, 100%) in the TBM group and 13% of samples (GG genotype, 0%; GT genotype, 18%; TT genotype, 50%) in the no-TBM group. CSF 8OH-EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 98% of the TBM group and 87% of the no-TBM group; levels were independent of genotype but correlated with the CSF/plasma albumin ratio. Potentially neurotoxic concentrations of 8OH-EFZ are frequently observed in CSF independently of the CYP2B6 genotype, particularly in those

  13. A Search for Periodic and Quasi-periodic Photometric Behavior in the Cataclysmic Variable TT ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Arai, K.; Chinarova, L. L.; Dorokhov, N. I.; Dorokhova, T. N.; Dumitrescu, A.; Nogami, D.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Lepardo, A.; Mason, P. A.; Matsumoto, K.; Oprescu, G.; Pajdosz, G.; Passuelo, R.; Patkos, L.; Senio, D. S.; Sostero, G.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Tremko, J.; Zhukov, G. V.; Zola, S.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of TT Ari obtained at 11 observatories (campaign TT Ari-94) during 258 hr were carried out to study optical variability on timescales from minutes to weeks. The best-fit primary photometric period determined from 16 nights of data obtained at the Dushak-Eregdag station of the Odessa State University is P=0.133160°+/-0.000004° with a mean amplitude of 0.0513+/-0.0008 mag. This new primary photometric period is larger than that obtained during the TT Ari-88 campaign and is well outside the range of estimates published since 1961. Contrary to previous findings, the ``5-7 hr'' secondary photometric period is not seen. Our observations do show evidence for periods of 2.916° and 0.3040° with amplitudes of 43 and 25 mmag, respectively. The beat period between the spectroscopic and photometric periods is not seen. No coherent oscillations in the range f=10-2500 cycles day^-1 are found. The highest peaks in the power spectrum cover the wide range of 24-139 cycles day^-1. In the mean periodogram, the highest peak corresponds to 21 and 30 minutes for the largest sets of observations, i.e., those obtained at Odessa and Krakow Universities, respectively. In the instrumental B system, variations with an amplitude exceeding 0.011 mag occur 8 times (from 33 runs) at 24 minutes. We conclude that quasi-periodic variations occur at a few preferred timescales rather than at a relatively stable period with a secular decrease. In the frequency range 90-900 cycles day^-1, the power spectrum obeys a power law with a slope ranging from gamma=1.3 to 2.6 for different runs.

  14. Screening for UGT1A1 Genotype in Study A5257 Would Have Markedly Reduced Premature Discontinuation of Atazanavir for Hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Currier, Judith S.; Olson, Lana M.; Haas, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Some patients are not prescribed atazanavir because of concern about possible jaundice. Atazanavir-associated hyperbilirubinemia correlates with UGT1A1 rs887829 genotype. We examined bilirubin-related discontinuation of atazanavir in participants from AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5257. Methods. Discriminatory properties of UGT1A1 T/T genotype for predicting bilirubin-related atazanavir discontinuation through 96 weeks after antiretroviral initiation were estimated. Results. Genetic analyses involved 1450 participants, including 481 who initiated randomized atazanavir/ritonavir. Positive predictive values of rs887829 T/T for bilirubin-related discontinuation of atazanavir (with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were 20% (CI, 9%–36%) in Black, 60% (CI, 32%–84%) in White, and 29% (CI, 8%–58%) in Hispanic participants; negative predictive values were 97% (CI, 93%–99%), 95% (CI, 90%–98%), and 97% (CI, 90%–100%), respectively. Conclusions. Bilirubin-related discontinuation of atazanavir was rare in participants not homozygous for rs887829 T/T, regardless of race or ethnicity. We hypothesize that the higher rate of discontinuation among White participants homozygous for rs887829 T/T may reflect differences in physical manifestations of jaundice by race and ethnicity. Selective avoidance of atazanavir initiation among individuals with T/T genotypes would markedly reduce the likelihood of bilirubin-related discontinuation of atazanavir while allowing atazanavir to be prescribed to the majority of individuals. This genetic association will also affect atazanavir/cobicistat. PMID:26180834

  15. Search for anomalous kinematics in tt dilepton events at CDF II.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dörr, C; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ehlers, J; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschhbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademachker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Trkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-07-01

    We report on a search for anomalous kinematics of tt dilepton events in pp collisions at square root of s=1.96 TeV using 193 pb(-1) of data collected with the CDF II detector. We developed a new a priori technique designed to isolate the subset in a data sample revealing the largest deviation from standard model (SM) expectations and to quantify the significance of this departure. In the four-variable space considered, no particular subset shows a significant discrepancy, and we find that the probability of obtaining a data sample less consistent with the SM than what is observed is 1.0%-4.5%.

  16. Egyptian genotyping of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Atef M; Mowafy, Nawras; Soliman, Mohamed; El-Bendary, Mahmoud; Morsy, Ayman T A; Ramadan, Nashwa I I; Arafa, Wafaa A S

    2004-04-01

    Out of 105 patients infected with Giardia, 38 patients have Genotype I (36.19%), 13 have Genotype II (12.38%), 10 have Genotype III (9.52%), 16 have mixed Genotype infection (15.24%) and 28 with undetermined Giardia infection by PCR (26.67%). None of the control group gave positive results for Giardia in stool by PCR. So, the sensitivity of the test for detection and identification of Giardia Genotypes from the original stool samples was 73.33% and specificity was 100%. Out of 61 cases in the symptomatic group, the prevalence of Giardia Genotype I was 32.79%, Genotype II was 16.39%, Genotype III was 9.84%, mixed Genotype infection was 16.39% and undetermined Genotype was 24.59% as compared to 40.91%, 6.82%, 9.09%, 13.64% & 29.55% in the asymptomatic group respectively. There is statistically insignificant difference between both groups as regarding the prevalence of the different Giardia Genotypes. (P < or = 0.05). The use of PCR as a routine work for diagnosis of giardiasis is not accepted at least in the developing and under-developing countries due to its high cost, the high quality of technical staff and advanced laboratory equipments required for PCR performance. Its application is usually limited to research activities, the detection of water sources contamination and for the detection of a potential source of Giardia infection in epidemics.

  17. Assessment of tailor-made prevention of atherosclerosis with folic acid supplementation: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in each MTHFR C677T genotype.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Koichi; Murata, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Haruhito; Takei, Izumi; Nakayama, Takeo; Watanabe, Kiyoaki; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effect of folic acid supplementation quantitatively in each MTHFR C677T genotype and considered the efficiency of tailor-made prevention of atherosclerosis. Study design was genotype-stratified, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. The setting was a Japanese company in the chemical industry. Subjects were 203 healthy men after exclusion of those who took folic acid or drugs known to effect folic acid metabolism. Intervention was folic acid 1 mg/day p.o. for 3 months. The primary endpoint was plasma total homocysteine level (tHcy). In all three genotypes, there were significant tHcy decreases. The greatest decrease was in the TT homozygote [6.61 (3.47-9.76) micromol/l] compared with other genotypes [CC: 2.59 (1.81-3.36), CT: 2.64 (2.16-3.13)], and there was a significant trend between the mutated allele number and the decrease. The tHcy were significantly lowered in all the genotypes, but the amount of the decrease differed significantly in each genotype, which was observed at both 1 and 3 months. Using these time-series data, the largest benefit obtained by the TT homozygote was appraised as 2.4 times compared with the CC homozygote. Taking into account the high allele frequency of this SNP, this quantitative assessment should be useful when considering tailor-made prevention of atherosclerosis with folic acid. PMID:15895286

  18. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    PubMed

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  19. Performance and Value of IFN-Lambda3 and IFN-Lambda4 Genotyping in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) Genotype 2/3 in a Real World Setting

    PubMed Central

    Susser, Simone; Rogalska-Taranta, Magdalena; Petersen, Jörg; Böker, Klaus H. W.; Grigorian, Natalia; Link, Ralph; Naumann, Uwe; John, Christine; Lueth, Stefan; Malfertheiner, Peter; Manns, Michael P.; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Sarrazin, Christoph; Cornberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background SNPs near the interferon lambda (IFNL) 3 gene are predictors for sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype (GT) 1. In addition, a dinucleotide frame shift in ss469415590 was described, which generates IFNL4. In this study, we compared the role of IFNL4 variants with IFNL3-(rs12979860) and IFNL3-(rs8099917) on response to pegylated (PEG)-IFN and Ribavirin (RBV) in patients with chronic hepatitis C GT2/3. Methods We recruited 1006 patients with chronic hepatitis C and GT2/3 in a large German registry. A treatment with PEG-IFN and Ribavirin was started by 959 patients. We performed genotyping of IFNL3 (rs12979860, n = 726; rs8099917, n = 687) and of IFNL4 (ss469415590; n = 631). Results Both preferable IFNL3 genotypes were associated with RVR (both p<0.0001) rather than with SVR (rs12979860: p = 0.251; rs8099917: p = 0.447). Only RVR was linked to SVR in univariate and multivariate analyzes (both p<0.001). Concordance of genotyping in patients with available serum samples and EDTA blood samples (n = 259) was more than 96% for both IFNL3 SNPs. IFNL3-(rs12979860) correlated with IFNL4: 99.2% of patients with IFNL3-(rs12979860)-CC were IFNL4-(ss469415590)-TT/TT. IFNL3-(rs12979860)-CT was linked with IFNL4-(ss469415590)-TT/ΔG (98.0%) and IFNL3-(rs12979860)-TT was associated with IFNL4-(ss469415590)-ΔG/ΔG (97.6%). Conclusion IFNL3 genotyping from serum was highly efficient and can be used as an alternative if EDTA whole blood is not available. In Caucasian GT2/3 patients genotyping for INFL4-(ss469415590) does not lead to additional information for the decision-making process. Importantly, IFNL3 SNPs were not associated with SVR but with RVR. Even in the era of new direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies, IFNL3 testing may therefore still be considered for naïve GT2/3 patients to decide if dual Peg-IFN/RBV therapy is an option in resource limited regions. PMID:26699619

  20. Magnetic activity and hot Jupiters of young Suns: the weak-line T Tauri stars V819 Tau and V830 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Moutou, C.; Malo, L.; Grankin, K.; Vidotto, A. A.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M. M.; Herczeg, G.; Morin, J.; Fares, R.; Ménard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Doyon, R.; Takami, M.; Figueira, P.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; MaTYSSE Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTSs) V819 Tau and V830 Tau within the MaTYSSE (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets) programme, involving the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. At ≃3 Myr, both stars dissipated their discs recently and are interesting objects for probing star and planet formation. Profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines, whose rotational modulation we modelled using tomographic imaging, yielding brightness and magnetic maps for both stars. We find that the large-scale magnetic fields of V819 Tau and V830 Tau are mostly poloidal and can be approximated at large radii by 350-400 G dipoles tilted at ≃30° to the rotation axis. They are significantly weaker than the field of GQ Lup, an accreting classical T Tauri star (cTTS) with similar mass and age which can be used to compare the magnetic properties of wTTSs and cTTSs. The reconstructed brightness maps of both stars include cool spots and warm plages. Surface differential rotation is small, typically ≃4.4 times smaller than on the Sun, in agreement with previous results on wTTSs. Using our Doppler images to model the activity jitter and filter it out from the radial velocity (RV) curves, we obtain RV residuals with dispersions of 0.033 and 0.104 km s-1 for V819 Tau and V830 Tau, respectively. RV residuals suggest that a hot Jupiter may be orbiting V830 Tau, though additional data are needed to confirm this preliminary result. We find no evidence for close-in giant planet around V819 Tau.

  1. Differential effect of IL10 and TNFα genotypes on determining susceptibility to discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, A; Lopez, P; Mozo, L; Gutierrez, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the possible involvement of functional interleukin 10 (IL10) and tumour necrosis α (TNFα) cytokine promoter polymorphisms on the susceptibility to discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus (DLE, SLE), and their associations with immunological features. Methods: Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the IL10 (–1082, –819, and –592) and TNFα (–308) genes were determined using allele specific probes in 248 lupus patients and 343 matched controls. To assess functional significance of genotypes, basal mRNA cytokine levels were quantified in 106 genotyped healthy controls by real time RT-PCR. Specific autoantibodies and cutaneous manifestations were analysed in SLE patients and associated with functional genotypes. Results: After analysing the distribution of IL10 and TNFα transcript levels according to promoter genotypes in healthy individuals, patients and controls were classified into functional single and combined genotypes according to the expected high or low constitutive cytokine production. High TNFα genotypes (–308AA or AG) were associated with SLE independently of IL10 alleles, whereas the risk of developing DLE and the prevalence of discoid lesion in SLE were higher in the high IL10/low TNFα producer group (–1082GG/–308GG). Cytokine interaction also influences the appearance of autoantibodies. Antibodies against Sm are prevalent among low producer patients for both cytokines, a genotype not associated with lupus incidence, whereas low IL10/high TNFα patients have the highest frequency of antibodies to SSa and SSb. Conclusions: IL10/TNFα interaction influences susceptibility to DLE and the appearance of specific autoantibodies in SLE patients, whereas high TNFα producer genotypes represent a significant risk factor for SLE. PMID:15800006

  2. Characterization of Truncated Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (ttNOX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Malone, Christine C.; Burk, Melissa; Moore, Blake P.; Achari, Aniruddha; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial, plant and animal cells possess novel surface proteins that exhibit both NADH oxidation (NOX) or hydroquinone and protein disulfide-thiol interchange. These enzymatic activities alternate to yield oscillating patterns wjth period lengths of approximately 24 minutes. The catalytic period of NOX proteins are temperature compensated and gravity responsive. We report the cloning, expression and characterization of truncated tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ttNOX), in which the membrane spanning region has been deleted. The cDNA (originated from HeLa cells) was cloned into pET-34b and pET-14b (Novagen) vectors for E. coli expression. Optimized expression and purification protocols yielded greater than 300mg per liter of culture with greater than 95% purity. Circular dichroism data was collected from a 2.7mg/ml solution in a 0.1mm cuvette with variable scanning using an Olis RSM CD spectrophotometer. The ellipticity values were scanned from 190 to 260nm. The spectra recorded have characteristics for alpha proteins with band maxima at 216nm and a possible shoulder at 212nm at 12OC and 250 C. Protein crystal screens are in progress and, to date, only small crystals have been observed. The regular periodic oscillatory change in the ttNOX protein is indicative of a possible time-keeping functional role. A single protein possessing alternating catalytic activities, with a potential biological clock function, is unprecedented and structural determination is paramount to understanding this role.

  3. Selective plugging strategy-based microbial-enhanced oil recovery using Bacillus licheniformis TT33.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Harish; Hingurao, Krushi; Desai, Anjana; Nerurkar, Anuradha

    2009-10-01

    The selective plugging strategy of microbial enhanced oil recovery involves the use of microbes that grow and produce exopolymeric substances, which block the high permeability zones of an oil reservoir, thus allowing the water to flow through the low permeability zones leading to increase in oil recovery. Bacillus licheniformis TT33, a hot water spring isolate, is facultatively anaerobic, halotolerant, and thermotolerant. It produces EPS as well as biosurfactant and has a biofilm-forming ability. The viscosity of its cell-free supernatant is 120 mPas at 28 degrees C. Its purified EPS contained 26% carbohydrate and 3% protein. Its biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of water from 72 to 34 mN/m. This strain gave 27.7+/-3.5% oil recovery in a sand pack column. Environmental scanning electron microscopy analysis showed bacterial growth and biofilm formation in the sand pack. Biochemical tests and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis confirmed that the oil recovery obtained in the sand pack column was due to Bacillus licheniformis TT33. PMID:19884785

  4. The Anti-hypertensive Drug Prazosin Induces Apoptosis in the Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Line TT

    PubMed Central

    STRACKE, ANIKA; MEIER-ALLARD, NATHALIE; ABSENGER, MARKUS; INGOLIC, ELISABETH; HAAS, HELGA SUSANNE; PFRAGNER, ROSWITHA; SADJAK, ANTON

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a tumor associated with poor prognosis since it exhibits high resistance against conventional cancer therapy. Recent studies have shown that quinazolines exhibit a pro-apoptotic effect on malignant cells. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether MTC cells are affected by quinazolines, in particular prazosin. Materials and Methods Proliferation, apoptosis and cell morphology of the MTC cell line TT were analyzed by WST-1 assay, caspase 3/7 activation tests and microscopy. Fibroblasts were used as control for non-malignant cells. Results Prazosin potently inhibited the growth of TT cells, induced apoptosis and caused vacuolization, as well as needle-like filopodia. Fibroblasts were affected by prazosin in the same way as MTC cells. Conclusion MTC cells are responsive to prazosin treatment similar to other malignancies. The fact that fibroblasts also respond to prazosin further highlights the importance to identify the unknown pro-apoptotic target of quinazolines. PMID:25550532

  5. Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS): Telemetry, Tracking, and Command (TT/C) Coverage Tradeoff Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Reusable Reentry Satellite (RRS) Telemetry, Tracking & Command (TT&C) Coverage Tradeoff Study described herein was performed during Part 1 of the RRS Phase B contract. This report is one of several that describes the results of various trade studies performed to arrive at a recommended design for the RRS satellite system. The overall RRS Phase B Study objective is to design a relatively inexpensive satellite to access space for extended periods of time, with eventual recovery of experiments on Earth. The RRS will be capable of: (1) being launched by a variety of expendable launch vehicles; (2) operating in low earth orbit as a free flying unmanned laboratory; and (3) executing an independent atmospheric reentry and soft landing. The RRS will be designed to be refurbished and reused up to three times a year for a period of 10 years. The expected principal use for such a system is research on the effects of variable gravity (0 to 1.5 g) and radiation on small animals, plants, lower life forms, tissue samples, and materials processes. This Summary Report provides a description of the RRS Telemetry, Tracking & Command Analysis performed to study the ground station coverage available to meet RRS requirements. Concepts were considered that used off-the-shelf technology, had generous margins of capability, and high reliability, were easily maintained, cost effective, and were compatible with existing support networks. From this study, a recommended RRS TT&C configuration will be developed.

  6. Period analysis of three close binary systems: TW And, TT Her and W UMi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreiner, J. M.; Pribulla, T.; Tremko, J.; Stachowski, G. S.; Zakrzewski, B.

    2008-02-01

    Orbital period changes of three close binaries, TW And, TT Her and W UMi, were studied using the Kraków data base of minima of eclipsing binaries, and new photoelectric observations obtained by the authors. The interval of the observations spans roughly a century. The major orbital period change in TW And is explained by the presence of a third body with P3 = 49.6 yr and a continuous secular period increase. A third body, with P3 = 41.0 yr, was also found in the system TT Her. The (O-C) diagram of W UMi can be interpreted as either an abrupt orbital period decrease which occurred around the end of 1973 or as a secular orbital period decrease combined with cyclic change. In this case, the orbital period of the third body is 62.2 yr and the sum of squares of residuals is lower than for a broken-line fit, therefore cyclic variations should be preferred. In all three systems, the third body is a low-mass companion.

  7. A Spectroscopic Study of the RV Tauri Stars TT Oph and UZ Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Guillermo; Walter, D. K.; Cash, J.; Howell, S. B.; McKay, M.

    2013-01-01

    TT and UZ Orphiuchus are listed as RV Tauri types in the General Catalog of Variable Stars, although Percy and Mohammed (2004, JAAVSO, 32, 9) question this classification. We have acquired spectra of these objects with the Coude Feed Telescope at KPNO over the past decade. In this study we have phase folded the dates of our spectral observations from 2003 to 2012 in order to examine the variation of luminosity and temperature as a function of phase. The luminosity of TT Oph changes by a factor of 3 or more while its temperature varies as much as 1000 K over its 61 day period. UZ Oph varies by nearly an order of magnitude in luminosity and up to 1200 K during its 87 day oscillation. The cyclic behavior of these variations and the change in position on the HR Diagram is demonstrated. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814. We thank the director of KPNO for his generous allocation of telescope time to this project over the years.

  8. TT and C - First TDRSS, Then Commercial GEO and Big LEO and Now through LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Dwayne; Bull, Barton; Grant, Charles; Streich, Ronald; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communications satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce Telemetry Tracking and Control (TT&C) costs of launch vehicles and Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) by reducing or eliminating ground infrastructure. Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia have successfully used commercial GEO & Big LEO communications satellites for Long Duration Balloon flight TT&C. In addition, TDRSS capability for these balloons has been developed by WFF for the Ultra Long Duration Balloons with the first test flight launch in January 2001 for one global circumnavigation at 120,000 feet altitude launched from Alice Springs. Australia. Numerous other low cost applications can new utilize the commercial LEO satellites for TT&C. The Flight Modern became a GSFC/WFF Advanced Range Technology Initiative (ARTI) in an effort to streamline TT&C capability to the user community at low cost. Phase I ground tests of The Flight Modem verified downlink communications quality of service and measured transmission latencies. These tests were completed last year, Phase II consisting of aircraft flight tests provide much of the data presented in this paper. Phase III of the Flight Modern baseline test program is a demonstration of the ruggedized version of the WFF Flight Modem flown on one sounding rocket launched from Sweden. Flights of opportunity have been and are being actively pursued with other centers, ranges and users at universities. The WFF goal is to reduce TT&C costs by providing a low cost COTS Flight Modem with a User Handbook containing system capability and limitation descriptions. Additionally, since data transmission is by packetized Internet Protocol (IP), data can be received and commands initialed from practically any location with no infrastructure. The WFF, like most ranges, has been using GPS receivers on sounding rockets and long duration balloons for several years

  9. Safety and Immunogenicity of Cuban Antipneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine PCV7-TT in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    González, Nadezhda; Paredes, Beatriz; Pérez, Sonia; Mirabal, Mayelín; Rivero, Ivonne; González, Carlos A; Díaz, Alina; García, Dagmar; Rodríguez, Laura; Pérez, Amarilis; Soroa, Yamilka; Santana, Darielis; Alvarez, Alina; Valdés, Yury; Vérez, Vicente

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and are associated with considerable economic burden on health systems. To prevent pneumococcal infections, 7-valent conjugate vaccines have been available for over a decade; more recently, 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccines have been formulated, which are more immunogenic than vaccines with capsular polysaccharides only. In Cuba, a new vaccine candidate has been developed, PCV7-TT, a conjugate of tetanus toxoid with antigens of seven of the serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae with highest circulation in Cuba and in the world: 1, 5, 6B, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F. OBJECTIVE Assess the safety of the vaccine candidate PCV7-TT in healthy adults and conduct a preliminary assessment of its immunogenicity. METHODS A phase I, double-blind clinical trial was performed at the National Toxicology Center in Havana, Cuba. Healthy male volunteers aged 18-35 years were randomly assigned to two groups: 20 received the vaccine candidate PCV7-TT and 20 the polyvalent antipneumococcal vaccine PNEUMO-23 used as control, each in a single intramuscular dose. To assess safety, the occurrence of adverse events was monitored for 30 days following inoculation. To explore immunogenicity, concentrations of serotype-specific antibodies was quantified before and 30 days after inoculation, as well titers of opsonophagocytic antibodies. (National Clinical Trial Registry RPCEC00000133) RESULTS Local adverse events were pain, redness, induration, increased sensitivity to touch, and warmth in the injection area. Pain was registered in 70% of individuals who received PCV7-TT and in 75% of those vaccinated with PNEUMO-23. Reported systemic adverse events were general malaise, headache and drowsiness. All adverse events appeared in the first 72 hours post inoculation and lasted no longer than 3 days. One event was reported that was classified as severe in intensity and serious in consequences, but it was unrelated to

  10. Effects of 90-day feeding of transgenic Bt rice TT51 on the reproductive system in male rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Er Hui; Yu, Zhou; Hu, Jing; Xu, Hai Bin

    2013-12-01

    Rice is a staple food crop; however, the threat of pests leads to a serious decline in its output and quality. The CryAb/CryAc gene, encodes a synthetic fusion Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal protein, was introduced into rice MingHui63 to produce insect-resistant rice TT51. This study was undertaken to investigate potential unintended effects of TT51 on the reproductive system in male rats. Male rats were treated with diets containing 60% of either TT51 or MingHui63 by weight, nutritionally balanced to an AIN93G diet, for 90days. An additional negative control group of rats were fed with a rice-based AIN93G diet. Body weights, food intake, hematology, serum chemistry, serum hormone levels, sperm parameters and relative organ/body weights were measured, and gross as well as microscopic pathology were examined. No diet-related significant differences in the values of response variables were observed between rats that were fed with diet containing transgenic TT51, MingHui63 and the control in this 90-day feeding study. In addition, necropsy and histopathology examination indicated no treatment-related changes. The results from the present study indicated that TT51 does not appear to exert any effect on the reproductive system in male rats compared with MingHui63 or the control.

  11. Genotyping Sleep Disorders Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shadan, Farhad F.; Dawson, Arthur; Cronin, John W.; Jamil, Shazia M.; Grizas, Alexandra P.; Koziol, James A.; Kline, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The genetic susceptibility factors underlying sleep disorders might help us predict prognoses and responses to treatment. Several candidate polymorphisms for sleep disorders have been proposed, but there has as yet inadequate replication or validation that the candidates may be useful in the clinical setting. Methods To assess the validity of several candidate associations, we obtained saliva deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples and clinical information from 360 consenting research participants who were undergoing clinical polysomnograms. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. These were thought to be related to depression, circadian sleep disorders, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome (RLS), excessive sleepiness, or to slow waves in sleep. Results With multivariate generalized linear models, the association of TEF rs738499 with depressive symptoms was confirmed. Equivocal statistical evidence of association of rs1801260 (the C3111T SNP in the CLOCK gene) with morningness/eveningness and an association of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) rs429358 with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were obtained, but these associations were not strong enough to be of clinical value by themselves. Predicted association of SNPs with sleep apnea, RLS, and slow wave sleep were not confirmed. Conclusion The SNPs tested would not, by themselves, be of use for clinical genotyping in a sleep clinic. PMID:20396431

  12. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks or gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore » gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  14. Beneficial IL28B genotype associated with lower frequency of hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Tillmann, Hans L.; Patel, Keyur; Muir, Andrew J.; Guy, Cynthia D.; Li, Josephine H.; Lao, Xiang Qian; Thompson, Alexander; Clark, Paul J.; Gardner, Stephen D.; McHutchison, John G.; McCarthy, Jeanette J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND IL28B polymorphisms have been associated with both treatment induced and spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV). We previously found that LDL cholesterol levels were higher in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients with the CC genotype at the rs12979860 polymorphism, located proximal to the IL28 gene. Here we analyzed the association of steatosis with IL28B genotype in treatment naïve patients with CHC. METHODS Two independent cohorts of 145 genotype 1 infected patients from an antifibrotic study and 180 genotype 1 patients from Duke were analyzed for presence and severity of steatosis in relation to the rs12979860 polymorphism at the IL28B locus. TaqMan assay based genotyping classified three groups CC, CT and TT. RESULTS CC genotype was associated with a lower prevalence of steatosis. In the antifibrotic study steatosis was found in 47.6% (50/105) of IL28B non-CC versus 22.5% (9/40; p=0.008) in CC patients. Similarly, steatosis was found in 67.4% (89/132) of non-CC patients compared to only 39.6% (19/48; p=0.001) of CC patients in the Duke cohort. CONCLUSIONS IL28B CC genotype is associated with less pronounced disturbances of lipid metabolism, as reflected both in serum lipoprotein levels and hepatic steatosis, in HCV infection. PMID:21703198

  15. Measurement of the fraction of tt production via gluon-gluon fusion in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.

    2009-02-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the tt production cross section via gluon-gluon fusion to the total tt production cross section in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV at the Tevatron. Using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 955 pb{sup -1} recorded by the CDF II detector at Fermilab, we select events based on the tt decay to lepton+jets. Using an artificial neural network technique we discriminate between tt events produced via qq annihilation and gg fusion, and find G{sub f}={sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt)<0.33 at the 68% confidence level. This result is combined with a previous measurement to obtain the most stringent measurement of this quantity by CDF to date, G{sub f}=0.07{sub -0.07}{sup +0.15}.

  16. Celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, potentiates the chemotherapic effect of vinorelbine in the medullary thyroid cancer TT cell line.

    PubMed

    Vivaldi, A; Ciampi, R; Tacito, A; Molinaro, E; Agate, L; Bottici, V; Pinchera, A; Collecchi, P; Elisei, R

    2012-05-15

    We analyzed the in vitro effects of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, and determined if celecoxib can sensitize a human MTC-derived cell line (TT) to chemotherapeutics. We found that celecoxib induced apoptosis in TT cells and decreased drug efflux by reducing the expression of MDR-1 mRNA, which codes for the drug efflux pump P-gp. We also observed that TT cells were 10-fold more resistant to doxorubicin than to vinorelbine, mimicking what can be observed in clinical practice. In addition, we found that the combination of celecoxib and vinorelbine, but not doxorubicin, induced a significant reduction in cell viability and a significant increase in apoptosis. In conclusion, we showed that celecoxib was able to enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of vinorelbine. A clinical trial exploring the in vivo activities of celecoxib in MTC patients who cannot benefit from available treatments would be desirable, taking into account the possible risks of cardiovascular effects of this drug. PMID:22305971

  17. IFN-stimulated gene expression is independent of the IFNL4 genotype in chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Katia; Scheri, Giuseppe Corano; Statzu, Maura; Selvaggi, Carla; Falasca, Francesca; Giustini, Noemi; Mezzaroma, Ivano; Turriziani, Ombretta; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Antonelli, Guido; Scagnolari, Carolina

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between the IFNL4 rs368234815 (ΔG/TT) dinucleotide polymorphism and the IFN response during chronic HIV-1 infection. We carried out genotyping analysis and measured the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) (myxovirus resistance protein A [MxA], ISG15, ISG56, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like [APOBEC] 3F and APOBEC3G) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from naïve and HAART-treated HIV-1-infected patients. There were no statistically significant differences in endogenous ISGs mRNA levels among HIV-1-positive patients bearing different IFNL4 genotypes, suggesting that ISG expression is independent of the IFNL4 genotype in HIV-1 infection. PMID:27558125

  18. CNTFR Genotype and Sprint/power Performance: Case-control Association and Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto-Mikami, E; Fujita, Y; Murakami, H; Ito, M; Miyachi, M; Kawahara, T; Fuku, N

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether rs41274853 in the 3'-untranslated region of the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor gene (CNTFR) is associated with elite sprint/power athletic status and assess its functional significance. A total of 211 Japanese sprint/power track and field athletes (62 international, 72 national, and 77 regional athletes) and 814 Japanese controls were genotyped at rs41274853. Luciferase reporter assay was conducted to investigate whether this C-to-T polymorphism affects binding of microRNA miR-675-5p to this region. The TT genotype was significantly more frequent among international sprint/power athletes (19.4%) than in the controls after Bonferroni correction (7.9%, P=0.036, OR=2.81 [95% CI: 1.43-5.55]). Furthermore, in non-athletic young/middle-aged men (n=132), TT genotype carriers exhibited significantly greater leg extension power (26.6±5.4 vs. 24.0±5.4 W/kg BW, P=0.019) and vertical jump performance (50.1±6.9 vs. 47.9±7.5 cm, P=0.047) than the CC+CT genotype carriers. Reporter assays revealed that the miR-675-5p binds to this polymorphic region within the CNTFR mRNA, irrespective of the rs41274853 allele present. Although the functional significance of the rs41274853 polymorphism remains unclear, the CNTFR is one of the candidate genes contributing to sprint/power performance. PMID:26837930

  19. CNTFR Genotype and Sprint/power Performance: Case-control Association and Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto-Mikami, E; Fujita, Y; Murakami, H; Ito, M; Miyachi, M; Kawahara, T; Fuku, N

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether rs41274853 in the 3'-untranslated region of the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor gene (CNTFR) is associated with elite sprint/power athletic status and assess its functional significance. A total of 211 Japanese sprint/power track and field athletes (62 international, 72 national, and 77 regional athletes) and 814 Japanese controls were genotyped at rs41274853. Luciferase reporter assay was conducted to investigate whether this C-to-T polymorphism affects binding of microRNA miR-675-5p to this region. The TT genotype was significantly more frequent among international sprint/power athletes (19.4%) than in the controls after Bonferroni correction (7.9%, P=0.036, OR=2.81 [95% CI: 1.43-5.55]). Furthermore, in non-athletic young/middle-aged men (n=132), TT genotype carriers exhibited significantly greater leg extension power (26.6±5.4 vs. 24.0±5.4 W/kg BW, P=0.019) and vertical jump performance (50.1±6.9 vs. 47.9±7.5 cm, P=0.047) than the CC+CT genotype carriers. Reporter assays revealed that the miR-675-5p binds to this polymorphic region within the CNTFR mRNA, irrespective of the rs41274853 allele present. Although the functional significance of the rs41274853 polymorphism remains unclear, the CNTFR is one of the candidate genes contributing to sprint/power performance.

  20. An association analysis between OXT genotype and milk yield and flow in Italian Mediterranean river buffalo.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Cosenza, Gianfranco; Steri, Roberto; Coletta, Angelo; Jemma, Lazzaro; Feligini, Maria; Di Berardino, Dino; Macciotta, Nicolò P P; Ramunno, Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate possible associations between three SNPs at the oxytocin locus (AM234538: g.28C>T; g.204A>G and g.1627G>T) and two productive traits, milk yield and milkability, in Italian Mediterranean river buffaloes. Effects of parity, calving season and month of production were also evaluated. A total of 41 980 test-day records belonging to 219 lactations of 163 buffalo cows were investigated. The allele call rate was 98·8% and the major allele frequency for all the investigated loci was 0·76. The OXT genotype was significantly associated with milk yield (P=0·029). The TT genotype showed an average daily milk yield approximately 1·7 kg higher than GT buffaloes. Such a difference represents about 23% more milk/d. A large dominance effect (-1·17±0·43 kg) was estimated, whereas the contribution of OXT genotype (r(2)(OXT)) to the total phenotypic variance in milk yield was equal to 0·06. The TT genotype showed higher values also for the milk flow, even though the estimated difference did not reach a level of statistical significance (P=0·07). Such an association, among the first reported for the oxytocin locus in ruminants, should be tested on a population scale and possible effects on milk composition traits should be evaluated in order to supply useful indications for the application of marker-assisted selection programmes in river buffaloes. PMID:22280971

  1. Experiment-specific cosmic microwave background calculations made easier - Approximation formula for smoothed delta T/T windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    1993-01-01

    Simple and easy to implement elementary function approximations are introduced to the spectral window functions needed in calculations of model predictions of the cosmic microwave backgrond (CMB) anisotropy. These approximations allow the investigator to obtain model delta T/T predictions in terms of single integrals over the power spectrum of cosmological perturbations and to avoid the necessity of performing the additional integrations. The high accuracy of these approximations is demonstrated here for the CDM theory-based calculations of the expected delta T/T signal in several experiments searching for the CMB anisotropy.

  2. Discovery of Pulsating Components in the Southern Eclipsing Binary Systems AW Velorum, HM Puppis, and TT Horologii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. J. W.; Bohlsen, T.; Heathcote, B.; Richards, T.; Streamer, M.

    2013-09-01

    Eclipsing binary stars with pulsating components are especially valuable for studies of stellar evolution. We have discovered that three eclipsing binary stars in the southern sky have a pulsating component with oscillations similar to those of delta Scuti stars. The systems are: AW Velorum, HM Puppis, and TT Horologii. Their spectral types were determined as A7 for AW Vel and HM Pup and F0-F2 for TT Hor. The dominant pulsation frequencies are 15-38 cycles per day with amplitudes of 10-60 millimagnitudes.

  3. The detached dust shells of AQ Andromedae, U Antliae, and TT Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschbaum, F.; Ladjal, D.; Ottensamer, R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Mecina, M.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Baumann, B.; Decin, L.; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.; Posch, T.; Huygen, E.; De Meester, W.; Regibo, S.; Royer, P.; Exter, K.; Jean, C.

    2010-07-01

    Detached circumstellar dust shells are detected around three carbon variables using Herschel-PACS. Two of them are already known on the basis of their thermal CO emission and two are visible as extensions in IRAS imaging data. By model fits to the new data sets, physical sizes, expansion timescales, dust temperatures, and more are deduced. A comparison with existing molecular CO material shows a high degree of correlation for TT Cyg and U Ant but a few distinct differences with other observables are also found. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Table 1 and Figs. 3 to 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Bounds on invisible Higgs boson decays extracted from LHC ttH production data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Khechadoorian, Zepyoor; Whiteson, Daniel; Tait, Tim M P

    2014-10-10

    We present an upper bound on the branching fraction of the Higgs boson to invisible particles by recasting a CMS Collaboration search for stop quarks decaying to tt + E(T)(miss). The observed (expected) bound, BF(H → inv.) < 0.40(0.65) at 95% C.L., is the strongest direct limit to date, benefiting from a downward fluctuation in the CMS data in that channel. In addition, we combine this new constraint with existing published constraints to give an observed (expected) bound of BF(H → inv.) < 0.40(0.40) at 95% C.L., and we show some of the implications for theories of dark matter which communicate through the Higgs portal.

  5. A space demonstration of the next generation TT and C standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shave, N. P.; Wells, N. S.; Hooke, A.; Durst, R.

    1996-01-01

    An initiative to develop an integrated set of space data communication protocols, which will complement and expand upon the current Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) telemetry and telecommand standards, is reported on. The aim is to provide a comprehensive set of spacecraft control and monitoring data handling services. The space communications protocol standards (SCPS) initiative will provide a set of spacecraft telemetry, telecommand and control (TT and C) standards that will serve a wide range of civilian and military space missions. A software flight test and demonstration of the capabilities of the SCPS protocols was performed using the in orbit space technology research vehicle and compared to laboratory simulations. The results from this test will contribute to the continued SCPS protocol development program.

  6. TT Crateris - A long-period, double-lined dwarf nova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, Paula; Williams, Robert E.; Margon, Bruce; Howell, Steve B.; Mateo, Mario

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved CCD photometry and spectroscopy of the dwarf nova TT Crt during quiescence are presented. The spectra reveal Balmer emission as well as absorption features of a K5-M0 secondary. The B, V, R light curves are dominated by a periodic variation of full amplitude 0.35 mag in V, which are interpreted as the ellipsoidal variation of the secondary star. The remarkably large amplitude indicates a high inclination (50-65 deg) and a massive white dwarf M greater than 0.8 solar mass. The ratio of the radial velocity semiamplitudes of the primary to the secondary is 0.5-1.4. The best period that can be determined from the observations is 438.17 minutes, with a possible alias at 445 minutes.

  7. Interferon lambda 3 genotype predicts hepatitis C virus RNA levels in early acute infection among people who inject drugs: The InC3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grady, Bart; Page, Kimberly; Kim, Arthur Y.; McGovern, Barbara H.; Cox, Andrea L.; Rice, Thomas M.; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan; Amin, Janaki; Schinkel, Janke; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Prins, Maria; Geskus, Ronald B; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA level in acute HCV infection is predictive of spontaneous clearance. This study assessed factors associated with HCV RNA levels during early acute infection among people who inject drugs with well-defined acute HCV infection. Study design Data were from International Collaboration of Incident HIV and Hepatitis C in Injecting Cohorts (InC3) Study, an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts studying acute HCV infection. Individuals with available HCV RNA levels during early acute infection (first two months following infection) were included. The distribution of HCV RNA levels during early acute infection were compared by selected host and virological factors. Results A total of 195 individuals were included. Median HCV RNA levels were significantly higher among individuals with interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3, formerly called IL28B) CC genotype compared to those with TT/CT genotype (6.28 vs. 5.39 log IU/mL, respectively; P=0.01). IFNL3 CC genotype was also associated with top tertile HCV RNA levels (≥6.3 IU/mL; vs. TT/CT genotype; adjusted Odds Ratio: 4.28; 95%CI: 2.01, 9.10; P<0.01). Conclusions This study indicates that IFNL3 CC genotype predicts higher HCV RNA levels in early acute HCV infection. PMID:25256151

  8. PT, aPTT, TT and the hemostatic safety threshold of dabigatran and rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Firas; Calmette, Leyla; Layka, Ayham; Horellou, Marie-Hélène; Mazoyer, Élisabeth; Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle; Flaujac, Claire

    2016-08-01

    The proposals of the Working group on perioperative hemostasis (Groupe d'intérêt en hémostase péri-opératoire (GIHP)) concerning the perioperative management of patients receiving the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are based on the measure of their anticoagulant activities (anti-Xa for rivaroxaban and anti-IIa for dabigatran) with a safety threshold ≤ 30 ng/mL. If the dosage of the drug is not available, proposals are based on the combination of a PT ≥80% and an aPTT ≤1.20. The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance of PT, aPTT and thrombin time to predict values above or below the safety threshold. The measurement of DOACs concentration was carried out in 64 samples from patients treated with rivaroxaban and 48 samples from patients treated with dabigatran. The PT and aPTT were measured for all samples, while the TT was measured only for patients receiving dabigatran. The absence of agreement between the global hemostasis tests and the DOACs concentrations was observed for 10% of patients receiving dabigatran and 27% of patients with rivaroxaban treatment. Apart from dabigatran for which the predictive negative value of PT and aPTT or TT allows to exclude a concentration >30 ng/mL in 100% of cases, our results highlight the risk of misinterpretation when using global coagulation tests (PT and aPPT) for determination of the safety threshold for patients receiving the DOACs. PMID:27492699

  9. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  10. HBV genotypic variability in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Carmen L; Aguilar, Julio C; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions.

  11. Ternary arsenides ATt3As3 (A=K, Rb; Tt=Ge, Sn) with layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, Mansura; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Mar, Arthur

    2016-06-01

    The four ternary arsenides ATt3As3 (A=K, Rb; Tt=Ge, Sn) were obtained by reaction of the elements at 600-650 °C. They adopt an orthorhombic structure (space group Pnma, Z=4, with cell parameters ranging from a=9.9931(11) Å, b=3.7664(4) Å, c=18.607(2) Å for KGe3As3 to a=10.3211(11) Å, b=4.0917(4) Å, c=19.570(2) Å for RbSn3As3) containing corrugated [Tt3As3] layers built from Tt-centred trigonal pyramids and tetrahedra forming five-membered rings decorated with As handles. They can be considered to be Zintl phases with Tt atoms in +4, +3, and +1 oxidation states. Band structure calculations predict that these compounds are semiconductors with narrow band gaps (0.71 eV in KGe3As3, 0.50 eV in KSn3As3).

  12. AN EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM GENOTYPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of 11 previously described species differentiation and genotyping PCR protocols for detection of Cryptosporidium parasites. Genomic DNA from three species of Crytosporidium parasites (genotype 1 and genotype 2 of C. parvum, C. muris, a...

  13. Fat mass- and obesity-associated genotype, dietary intakes and anthropometric measures in European adults: the Food4Me study.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; San-Cristobal, Rodrigo; Forster, Hannah; O'Donovan, Clare B; Woolhead, Clara; Marsaux, Cyril F M; Macready, Anna L; Fallaize, Rosalind; Kolossa, Silvia; Tsirigoti, Lydia; Lambrinou, Christina P; Moschonis, George; Godlewska, Magdalena; Surwiłło, Agnieszka; Drevon, Christian A; Manios, Yannis; Traczyk, Iwona; Gibney, Eileen R; Brennan, Lorraine; Walsh, Marianne C; Lovegrove, Julie A; Martinez, J Alfredo; Saris, Wim H M; Daniel, Hannelore; Gibney, Mike; Mathers, John C

    2016-02-14

    The interplay between the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene variants and diet has been implicated in the development of obesity. The aim of the present analysis was to investigate associations between FTO genotype, dietary intakes and anthropometrics among European adults. Participants in the Food4Me randomised controlled trial were genotyped for FTO genotype (rs9939609) and their dietary intakes, and diet quality scores (Healthy Eating Index and PREDIMED-based Mediterranean diet score) were estimated from FFQ. Relationships between FTO genotype, diet and anthropometrics (weight, waist circumference (WC) and BMI) were evaluated at baseline. European adults with the FTO risk genotype had greater WC (AA v. TT: +1·4 cm; P=0·003) and BMI (+0·9 kg/m2; P=0·001) than individuals with no risk alleles. Subjects with the lowest fried food consumption and two copies of the FTO risk variant had on average 1·4 kg/m2 greater BMI (Ptrend=0·028) and 3·1 cm greater WC (Ptrend=0·045) compared with individuals with no copies of the risk allele and with the lowest fried food consumption. However, there was no evidence of interactions between FTO genotype and dietary intakes on BMI and WC, and thus further research is required to confirm or refute these findings.

  14. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility. PMID:26886161

  15. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility.

  16. Relation between Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Genotypes and Oxidative Stress Markers in Larynx Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yanar, K; Çakatay, U; Aydın, S; Verim, A; Atukeren, P; Özkan, N E; Karatoprak, K; Cebe, T; Turan, S; Ozkök, E; Korkmaz, G; Cacına, C; Küçükhüseyin, O; Yaylım, İ

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) is responsible for the endothelial synthesis of nitric oxide (NO(•)). G894T polymorphism leads to the amino acid substitution from Glu298Asp that causes lower NOS3 activity and basal NO(•) production in NOS3 894T (298Asp) allele carriers compared with the GG homozygotes. NO(•) acts as an antioxidant protecting against Fenton's reaction which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Allelic variation of NOS3 may influence an individual's risk of laryngeal cancer (LC). In the current study we have examined the possible relationship between NOS3 G894T genotypes and various systemic oxidative damage markers such as protein carbonyl, advanced oxidation protein products, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, thiol group fractions, and lipid hydroperoxides in LC patients. Genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP. In LC patients with TT genotype, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase activities and nonprotein thiol levels were significantly higher than the controls. In patients with GT and GG genotype, high levels of lipid hydroperoxides showed statistical significance when compared to controls. Our results indicate a potential relationship among G894T polymorphism of NOS3, and impaired redox homeostasis. Further studies are required to determine the role of NOS3 gene polymorphism and impaired plasma redox homeostasis. PMID:26682008

  17. Dopamine and cognitive control: sex-by-genotype interactions influence the capacity to switch attention.

    PubMed

    Gurvich, C; Rossell, S L

    2015-03-15

    Cognitive performance in healthy persons varies widely between individuals. Sex differences in cognition are well reported, and there is an emerging body of evidence suggesting that the relationship between dopaminergic neurotransmission, implicated in many cognitive functions, is modulated by sex. Here, we examine the influence of sex and genetic variations along the dopaminergic pathway on aspects of cognitive control. A total of 415 healthy individuals, selected from an international consortium linked to Brain Research and Integrative Neuroscience Network (BRAINnet), were genotyped for two common and functional genetic variations of dopamine regulating genes: the catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT] gene (rs4680) and the dopamine receptor D2 [DRD2] gene (rs6277). Cognitive measures were selected to explore sustained attention (using a continuous performance task), switching of attention (using a Trails B adaptation) and working memory (a visual computerised adaptation of digit span). While there were no main effects for genotype across any tasks, analyses revealed significant sex by genotype interactions for the capacity to switch attention. In relation to COMT, superior performance was noted in females with the Val/Val genotype and for DRD2, superior performance was seen for TT females and CC males. These findings highlight the importance of considering genetic variation in baseline dopamine levels in addition to sex, when considering the impact of dopamine on cognition in healthy populations. These findings also have important implications for the many neuropsychiatric disorders that implicate dopamine, cognitive changes and sex differences.

  18. Relation between Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Genotypes and Oxidative Stress Markers in Larynx Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yanar, K.; Çakatay, U.; Aydın, S.; Verim, A.; Atukeren, P.; Özkan, N. E.; Karatoprak, K.; Cebe, T.; Turan, S.; Ozkök, E.; Korkmaz, G.; Cacına, C.; Küçükhüseyin, O.; Yaylım, İ.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) is responsible for the endothelial synthesis of nitric oxide (NO•). G894T polymorphism leads to the amino acid substitution from Glu298Asp that causes lower NOS3 activity and basal NO• production in NOS3 894T (298Asp) allele carriers compared with the GG homozygotes. NO• acts as an antioxidant protecting against Fenton's reaction which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Allelic variation of NOS3 may influence an individual's risk of laryngeal cancer (LC). In the current study we have examined the possible relationship between NOS3 G894T genotypes and various systemic oxidative damage markers such as protein carbonyl, advanced oxidation protein products, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, thiol group fractions, and lipid hydroperoxides in LC patients. Genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP. In LC patients with TT genotype, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase activities and nonprotein thiol levels were significantly higher than the controls. In patients with GT and GG genotype, high levels of lipid hydroperoxides showed statistical significance when compared to controls. Our results indicate a potential relationship among G894T polymorphism of NOS3, and impaired redox homeostasis. Further studies are required to determine the role of NOS3 gene polymorphism and impaired plasma redox homeostasis. PMID:26682008

  19. Dopamine and cognitive control: sex-by-genotype interactions influence the capacity to switch attention.

    PubMed

    Gurvich, C; Rossell, S L

    2015-03-15

    Cognitive performance in healthy persons varies widely between individuals. Sex differences in cognition are well reported, and there is an emerging body of evidence suggesting that the relationship between dopaminergic neurotransmission, implicated in many cognitive functions, is modulated by sex. Here, we examine the influence of sex and genetic variations along the dopaminergic pathway on aspects of cognitive control. A total of 415 healthy individuals, selected from an international consortium linked to Brain Research and Integrative Neuroscience Network (BRAINnet), were genotyped for two common and functional genetic variations of dopamine regulating genes: the catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT] gene (rs4680) and the dopamine receptor D2 [DRD2] gene (rs6277). Cognitive measures were selected to explore sustained attention (using a continuous performance task), switching of attention (using a Trails B adaptation) and working memory (a visual computerised adaptation of digit span). While there were no main effects for genotype across any tasks, analyses revealed significant sex by genotype interactions for the capacity to switch attention. In relation to COMT, superior performance was noted in females with the Val/Val genotype and for DRD2, superior performance was seen for TT females and CC males. These findings highlight the importance of considering genetic variation in baseline dopamine levels in addition to sex, when considering the impact of dopamine on cognition in healthy populations. These findings also have important implications for the many neuropsychiatric disorders that implicate dopamine, cognitive changes and sex differences. PMID:25510197

  20. Meningococcal Seroepidemiology 1 Year After the PsA-TT Mass Immunization Campaign in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Haoua; Yaro, Seydou; Kpoda, Hervé B. N.; Ouangraoua, Soumeya; Trotter, Caroline L.; Njanpop Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Martin, Catherine; Nwakamma, Ikenna; Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco; Gessner, Bradford D.; Borrow, Ray; Mueller, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A group A meningococcal (MenA) conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), was introduced in Burkina Faso via mass campaigns between September and December 2010, targeting the 1- to 29-year-old population. This study describes specific antibody titers in the general population 11 months later and compares them to preintroduction data obtained during 2008 using the same protocol. Methods. During October–November 2011, we recruited a representative sample of the population of urban Bobo-Dioulasso aged 6 months to 29 years, who underwent standardized interviews and blood draws. We assessed anti-MenA immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations (n = 200) and, using rabbit complement, serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titers against 2 group A strains: reference strain F8238 (SBAref) (n = 562) and strain 3125 (SBA3125) (n = 200). Results. Among the 562 participants, 481 (86%) were aged ≥23 months and had been eligible for the PsA-TT campaign. Among them, vaccine coverage was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82.7%–89.9%). Prevalence of putatively protective antibodies among vaccine-eligible age groups was 97.3% (95% CI, 95.9%–98.7%) for SBAref titers ≥128, 83.6% (95% CI, 77.6%–89.7%) for SBA3125 ≥128, and 84.2% (95% CI, 78.7%–89.7%) for anti-MenA IgG ≥2 µg/mL. Compared to the population aged 23 months to 29 years during 2008, geometric mean titers of SBAref were 7.59-fold higher during 2011, 51.88-fold for SBA3125, and 10.56-fold for IgG. Conclusions. This study shows high seroprevalence against group A meningococci in Burkina Faso following MenAfriVac introduction. Follow-up surveys will provide evidence on the persistence of population-level immunity and the optimal vaccination strategy for long-term control of MenA meningitis in the African meningitis belt. PMID:26553686

  1. Radiologic Measurement of Tibial Tuberosity-Trochlear Groove (TT-TG) Distance by Lower Extremity Rotational Profile Computed Tomography in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Jong Keun; Kim, Min Cheol; Seol, Young-Jun; Lee, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background Tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance is important in the assessment and treatment of patellofemoral disorders. However, normal and pathological TT-TG values have not been established in Koreans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the TT-TG distance in the Korean population using lower leg rotational profile computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods One hundred rotational profile CT scans were retrospectively collected from patients without knee joint problems aged between 25 to 82 years. TT-TG distances were measured, and statistical analysis was performed. Each CT scan was measured twice in a blinded, randomized manner by three reviewers. Patients with pre-existing knee joint problems were excluded from the study; hence 15 of the 100 patients were excluded because of deformity or unreadable CT scans. Thus, 85 of the 100 patients were included in the study. Results Interobserver and intraobserver reliability of TT-TG distance measurements was good. The median TT-TG distance for this Korean population was 11.24 mm (mean, 10.24 ± 0.8 mm). TT-TG distance measured nearly 2 mm less on rotational profile CT scans. Conclusions Some of the TT-TG distances on rotational profile CT scans were significantly correlated, indicating that they could be accepted. Furthermore, the values on CT scans showed good reliability. In this study, the TT-TG distance in normal Korean people was approximately 10.24 mm without significant differences in TT-TG values between genders. PMID:26929798

  2. The interaction between the interleukin 6 receptor gene genotype and dietary energy intake on abdominal obesity in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Song, Yixuan; Miyaki, Koichi; Araki, Jungo; Zhang, Ling; Omae, Kazuyuki; Muramatsu, Masaaki

    2007-07-01

    Previous reports have shown that the Asp358Ala (T/G) polymorphism of the interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) gene is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but few studies have examined this association in the Japanese population. We performed the current study to investigate the relationship between the IL6R Asp358Ala (T/G) polymorphism and obesity in healthy Japanese men. Two hundred eighty-five healthy Japanese men (age, 46.1 +/- 11.5 years [mean +/- SD]; waist circumference [WC], 83.9 +/- 9.3 cm; body mass index, 23.3 +/- 3.3 kg/m(2)) employed by a Japanese company were enrolled in this study. Height, weight, and WC were measured, and daily energy intake levels were assessed by self-reported questionnaires. Genotyping of polymorphisms was performed by using melting curve analysis; no association was found between IL6R genotype and WC or body mass index. However, when the subjects were stratified by IL6R genotype, an association between WC and dietary energy intake level was found in the TT + GT-type subjects (P for linear regression = .048), but not in GG subjects (P for linear regression = .555). In addition, logistic regression analysis revealed that the interaction of IL6R (GG vs TT + GT) genotypes and dietary energy intake levels affected risk for abdominal obesity (P for interaction = .030). We concluded that the IL6R Asp358Ala (T/G) polymorphism appears to interact with energy intake and affect abdominal obesity in Japanese men. The interaction of this genotype and energy intake warrants further study.

  3. Association study of IL28B: rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms with SVR in patients infected with chronic HCV genotype 1 to PEG-INF/RBV therapy using systematic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yueqiu; Jin, Caixia; Ling, Zongxin; Mou, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Qiong; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-01-25

    Recently, genome-wide associated studies (GWAS) have identified that host genetics IL28B SNPs rs12979860 and rs8099917 were significantly associated with SVR in patients infected with chronic HCV genotype 1 to PEG-INF/RBV therapy. Results from these studies remain conflicting. We conducted this meta-analysis to estimate the overall association of SVR with rs12979860 and rs8099917. We searched the PubMed, Embase, Scholar Google, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases for all articles before July 30, 2012. The odds ratio (OR) corresponding to the 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to assess the association. The statistical heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the I(2) statistics. Begg's test and Egger's test were performed to evaluate the publication bias. Eventually, twenty studies were selected for the meta-analysis. The IL-28B SNPs rs12979860 genotype CC and rs8099917 genotype TT significantly positive associated with SVR in patients infected chronic HCV genotype 1 to PEG-INF/RBV therapy (OR=4.473, 95% CI=3.814-5.246, OR=5.171, 95% CI=4.372-6.117 respectively). The results suggested that rs12979860 genotype CC and rs8099917 genotype TT could be used as independent predictors of the HCV-1 infected patients. PMID:23142377

  4. Whole genome response in guinea pigs infected with the high virulence strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis TT372

    PubMed Central

    Aiyaz, Mohamed; Bipin, Chand; Pantulwar, Vinay; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Shanley, Crystal A.; Ordway, Diane J; Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this study we conducted a microarray-based whole genomic analysis of gene expression in the lungs after exposure of guinea pigs to a low dose aerosol of the Atypical Beijing Western Cape TT372 strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, after harvesting lung tissues three weeks after infection at a time that effector immunity is starting to peak. The infection resulted in a very large up-regulation of multiple genes at this time, particularly in the context of a “chemokine storm” in the lungs. Overall gene expression was considerably reduced in animals that had been vaccinated with BCG two months earlier, but in both cases strong signatures featuring gamma interferon [IFNγ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNFα] were observed indicating the potent TH1 response in these animals. Even though their effects are not seen until later in the infection, even at this early time point gene expression patterns associated with the potential emergence of regulatory T cells were observed. Genes involving lung repair, response to oxidative stress, and cell trafficking were strongly expressed, but interesting these gene patterns differed substantially between the infected and vaccinated/infected groups of animals. Given the importance of this species as a relevant and cost-effective small animal model of tuberculosis, this approach has the potential to provide new information regarding the effects of vaccination on control of the disease process. PMID:25621360

  5. A prospective study on TT virus infection in transfusion-dependent patients with beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Prati, D; Lin, Y H; De Mattei, C; Liu, J K; Farma, E; Ramaswamy, L; Zanella, A; Lee, H; Rebulla, P; Allain, J P; Sirchia, G; Chen, B

    1999-03-01

    A novel DNA virus designated TT virus (TTV) has been reported to be involved in the development of posttransfusion non-A-C hepatitis. We evaluated the frequency and natural course of TTV infection in a cohort of transfusion-dependent thalassemic patients in a 3-year follow-up study. Ninety-three serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody-negative patients (median age of 8 years; range, 0 to 25) from eight centers were studied. Of them, 34 (37%) had an abnormal alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) baseline pattern, and the other 12 (13%) showed ALT flare-ups during the follow-up. TTV DNA in patient sera collected at the time of enrollment and at the end of follow-up was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In parallel, serum samples from 100 healthy blood donors were also tested. At baseline, 87 patient sera (93.5%) tested positive for the TTV DNA. Of these TTV DNA-positive patients, 84 (96.5%) remained viremic at the end of the study period. Of the 6 TTV DNA-negative patients, 3 acquired TTV infection during follow-up. However, no definite relation was observed between the results of TTV DNA determination and ALT patterns. TTV viremia was also detectable in 22% of blood donors. In conclusion, TTV infection is frequent and persistent among Italian transfusion-dependent patients. The high rate of viremia observed in healthy donors indicates that the parenteral route is not the only mode of TTV spread.

  6. EM Modeling of Far-Field Radiation Patterns for Antennas on the GMA-TT UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.

    2015-01-01

    To optimize communication with the Generic Modular Aircraft T-Tail (GMA-TT) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), electromagnetic (EM) simulations have been performed to predict the performance of two antenna types on the aircraft. Simulated far-field radiation patterns tell the amount of power radiated by the antennas and the aircraft together, taking into account blockage by the aircraft as well as radiation by conducting and dielectric portions of the aircraft. With a knowledge of the polarization and distance of the two communicating antennas, e.g. one on the UAV and one on the ground, and the transmitted signal strength, a calculation may be performed to find the strength of the signal travelling from one antenna to the other and to check that the transmitted signal meets the receiver system requirements for the designated range. In order to do this, the antenna frequency and polarization must be known for each antenna, in addition to its design and location. The permittivity, permeability, and geometry of the UAV components must also be known. The full-wave method of moments solution produces the appropriate dBi radiation pattern in which the received signal strength is calculated relative to that of an isotropic radiator.

  7. EM modeling of far-field radiation patterns for antennas on the GMA-TT UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.

    2015-05-01

    To optimize communication with the Generic Modular Aircraft T-Tail (GMA-TT) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), electromagnetic (EM) simulations have been performed to predict the performance of two antenna types on the aircraft. Simulated far-field radiation patterns tell the amount of power radiated by the antennas and the aircraft together, taking into account blockage by the aircraft as well as radiation by conducting and dielectric portions of the aircraft. With a knowledge of the polarization and distance of the two communicating antennas, e.g. one on the UAV and one on the ground, and the transmitted signal strength, a calculation may be performed to find the strength of the signal travelling from one antenna to the other and to check that the transmitted signal meets the receiver system requirements for the designated range. In order to do this, the antenna frequency and polarization must be known for each antenna, in addition to its design and location. The permittivity, permeability, and geometry of the UAV components must also be known. The full-wave method of moments solution produces the appropriate dBi radiation pattern in which the received signal strength is calculated relative to that of an isotropic radiator.

  8. Whole genome response in guinea pigs infected with the high virulence strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis TT372.

    PubMed

    Aiyaz, Mohamed; Bipin, Chand; Pantulwar, Vinay; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Shanley, Crystal A; Ordway, Diane J; Orme, Ian M

    2014-12-01

    In this study we conducted a microarray-based whole genomic analysis of gene expression in the lungs after exposure of guinea pigs to a low dose aerosol of the Atypical Beijing Western Cape TT372 strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, after harvesting lung tissues three weeks after infection at a time that effector immunity is starting to peak. The infection resulted in a very large up-regulation of multiple genes at this time, particularly in the context of a "chemokine storm" in the lungs. Overall gene expression was considerably reduced in animals that had been vaccinated with BCG two months earlier, but in both cases strong signatures featuring gamma interferon [IFNγ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNFα] were observed indicating the potent TH1 response in these animals. Even though their effects are not seen until later in the infection, even at this early time point gene expression patterns associated with the potential emergence of regulatory T cells were observed. Genes involving lung repair, response to oxidative stress, and cell trafficking were strongly expressed, but interesting these gene patterns differed substantially between the infected and vaccinated/infected groups of animals. Given the importance of this species as a relevant and cost-effective small animal model of tuberculosis, this approach has the potential to provide new information regarding the effects of vaccination on control of the disease process.

  9. Evaluation of High Resolution Melting for MTHFR C677T Genotyping in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuying; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Hui; Dong, Rui; Yang, Xiaomeng; Liu, Yi; Ma, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Background High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple, flexible and low-cost mutation screening technique. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encoding a critical enzyme, potentially affects susceptibility to some congenital defects like congenital heart disease (CHD). We evaluate the performance of HRM for genotyping of the MTHFR gene C677T locus in CHD cases and healthy controls of Chinese Han population. Methods A total of 315 blood samples from 147 CHD patients (male72, female 75) and 168 healthy controls (male 92, female 76) were enrolled in the study. HRM was utilized to genotype MTHFR C677T locus of all the samples. The results were compared to that of PCR-RFLP and Sanger sequencing. The association of the MTHFR C677T genotypes and the risk of CHD was analyzed using odds ratio with their 95% confidence interval (CIs) from unconditional logistic regression. Results All the samples were successfully genotyped by HRM within 1 hour and 30 minutes while at least 6 hours were needed for PCR-RFLP and sequencing. The genotypes of MTHFR C677T CC, CT, and TT were 9.52%, 49.66%, and 40.82% in CHD group but 29.17%, 50% and 20.83% in control group, which were identical using both methods of HRM and PCR-RFLP, demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of HRM were all 100%. Conclusion MTHFR C677T is a potential risk factor for CHD in our local residents of Shandong province in China. HRM is a fast, sensitive, specific and reliable method for clinical application of genotyping. PMID:26990189

  10. Interferon lambda genotype and low serum LDL cholesterol levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Josephine H.; Lao, Xiang Qian; Tillmann, Hans L.; Rowell, Jennifer; Patel, Keyur; Thompson, Alexander; Suchindran, Sunil; Muir, Andrew J.; Guyton, John R.; Gardner, Stephen D.; McHutchison, John G.; McCarthy, Jeanette J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, genetic polymorphisms occurring in the interferon lambda gene region were associated with response to interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C infection. Both infection with the hepatitis C virus and interferon therapy are associated with decreased serum cholesterol and high cholesterol has been associated with increased likelihood to respond to interferon. We sought to determine if the interferon lambda gene variant was also associated with serum lipid levels in chronic hepatitis C patients. We compared genotypes of the rs12979860 polymorphism, located proximal to the IL28 gene, with serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels in 746 subjects with chronic HCV infection, not currently undergoing treatment, using multivariable analysis of variance. Results Levels of total cholesterol (p=6.0×10-4), apolipoprotein B (p=1.3×10-6) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p=8.9×10-10) were significantly higher in subjects carrying the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype compared to those with the CT or TT genotype. Levels of triglycerides (p=0.03), apolipoprotein A-I (p=0.06) and apolipoprotein E (p=0.01) were slightly lower in the rs12979860 CC genotype group, while levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.78) and apolipoprotein C-III (p=0.74) did not vary by rs12979860 genotype. Conclusions Our results suggest that low levels of LDL cholesterol in chronic hepatitis C patients may be a marker of host endogenous interferon response to hepatitis C and that subjects with the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype may have a lower endogenous interferon response to the virus. PMID:20235331

  11. Development of certified matrix-based reference material of genetically modified rice event TT51-1 for real-time PCR quantification.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hui; Quan, Sheng; Liu, Yinan; Shen, Ping; Yang, Litao

    2015-09-01

    In 2009, the genetically modified (GM) rice event TT51-1 with an engineered insect resistance trait became the first GM rice event to be granted certification for safe production in China, and its derivative lines Bt 63 and Huahui No.1 are expected to be commercialized soon. The development of certified reference material (CRM) for TT51-1 is necessary to monitor and inspect the TT51-1 event and its derivates. In this work, we developed four matrix-based TT51-1 rice CRMs (TT51-1a, TT51-1b, TT51-1c, and TT51-1d) with different TT51-1 mass fraction ratios by blending seed powders of homozygous TT51-1 and its recipient cultivar Minghui 63. The between-bottle homogeneity and the within-bottle homogeneity were tested, and good results were obtained. The potential degradation during transportation and shelf life were evaluated, and demonstrated an expiration period of at least 36 months. The characterization values of the four TT51-1 CRMs based on the mass fraction ratio were 1000.000 ± 51.430 g/kg, 49.940 ± 4.620 g/kg, 9.990 ± 1.110 g/kg, and 4.990 ± 0.620 g/kg, respectively. The characterization values based on the copy number ratio were certified by digital PCR analysis as 97.442 ± 5.253 %, 4.851 ± 0.486 %, 1.042 ± 0.135 %, and 0.556 ± 0.073 %, respectively. These results suggested that the TT51-1 matrix-based CRMs developed are of high quality and can be used as potential calibrators for TT51-1 GM rice inspection and monitoring.

  12. Association between CXCL10 and DPP4 Gene Polymorphisms and a Complementary Role for Unfavorable IL28B Genotype in Prediction of Treatment Response in Thai Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Thanapirom, Kessarin; Suksawatamnuay, Sirinporn; Sukeepaisarnjaroen, Wattana; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Thaimai, Panarat; Wasitthankasem, Rujipat; Poovorawan, Yong; Komolmit, Piyawat

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment serum levels of interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10, CXCL10) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP IV) predict treatment response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). The association between functional genetic polymorphisms of CXCL10 and DPP4 and treatment outcome has not previously been studied. This study aimed to determine the association between genetic variations of CXCL10 and DPP4 and the outcome of treatment with pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN-α) based therapy in Thai patients with CHC. 602 Thai patients with CHC treated using a PEG-IFN-α based regimen were genotyped for CXCL10 rs56061981 G>A and IL28B rs12979860 C>T. In addition, in patients infected with CHC genotype 1, DPP4 (rs13015258 A>C, rs17848916 T>C, rs41268649 G>A, and rs 17574 T>C) were genotyped. Correlations between single nucleotide polymorphisms, genotype, and treatment response were analyzed. The rate of sustained virologic response (SVR) was higher for the CC genotype of IL28B rs12979860 polymorphisms than for non-CC in both genotype 1 (60.6% vs. 29.4%, P < 0.001) and non-genotype 1 (69.4% vs. 49.1%, P < 0.05) CHC. SVR was not associated with the CXCL10 gene variant in all viral genotypes or DPP4 gene polymorphisms in viral genotype1. Multivariate analysis revealed IL28B rs12979860 CC genotype (OR = 3.12; 95% CI, 1.72-5.67; P < 0.001), hepatitis C virus RNA < 400,000 IU/ml (OR = 2.21; 95% CI, 1.22-3.99, P < 0.05), age < 45 years (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.11-3.68; P < 0.05), and liver fibrosis stage 0-1 (OR = 1.64; 95% CI, 1.01-2.65, P < 0.05) were independent factors for SVR. Unfavorable IL28B rs12979860 CT or TT genotypes with the CXCL10 rs56061981 non-GG genotype were associated with a higher SVR than GG genotype (66.7% vs. 33.0%, P = 0.004) in viral genotype 1. In Thai CHC genotype 1 infected patients with an unfavorable IL28B rs12979860 CT/TT genotype, the complementary CXCL10 polymorphism strongly enhances prediction of treatment response.

  13. Impact of IL28B-Related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Liver Histopathology in Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 2 and 3

    PubMed Central

    Rembeck, Karolina; Alsiö, Åsa; Christensen, Peer Brehm; Färkkilä, Martti; Langeland, Nina; Buhl, Mads Rauning; Pedersen, Court; Mørch, Kristine; Westin, Johan; Lindh, Magnus; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Norkrans, Gunnar; Lagging, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Recently, several genome-wide association studies have revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to IL28B predict spontaneous clearance of HCV infection as well as outcome following peginterferon and ribavirin therapy among HCV genotype 1 infected patients. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of IL28B SNP variability on liver histology in the context of a phase III treatment trial (NORDynamIC) for treatment-naïve patients with chronic HCV genotype 2 or 3 infection, where pretreatment liver biopsies were mandatory. Methods Three hundred and thirty-nine Caucasian patients had samples available for IL28B genotyping (rs12979860) of whom 314 had pretreatment liver biopsies that were evaluated using the Ishak protocol, allowing for detailed grading and staging of liver histopathology. Results IL28B CCrs12979860 genotype in HCV genotype 3 infected patients was associated with higher ALT levels (p<0.0001), higher AST to platelet ratio index (APRI; p = 0.001), and higher baseline viral load (p<0.0001) as compared to patients with the CT or TT genotypes. Additionally the CCrs12979860 genotype entailed more pronounced portal inflammation (p = 0.02) and steatosis (p = 0.03). None of these associations were noted among HCV genotype 2 infected patients. Conclusion This study shows that the CCrs12979860 SNP is associated with more pronounced liver histopathology in patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 3, which may be secondary to higher viral load. The finding that IL28B variability did not impact on liver pathology or viral load among genotype 2 infected patients implies that IL28B may differentially regulate the course of genotype 2 and 3 infection. PMID:22253715

  14. Cystic fibrosis gene mutations deltaF508 and 394delTT in patients with chronic sinusitis in Finland.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, M; Patjas, M; Vento, S I; Kauppi, P; Malmberg, H; Ylikoski, J; Kere, J

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that cystic fibrosis (CF) gene mutations are linked to several severe chronic infections. Chronic sinusitis is one condition that may well be influenced by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. We studied two prevalent CF mutations (AF508 and 394delTT) in a population with a low incidence of CF. The carrier frequency of the CF mutations in the Finnish population is approximately 1 in 80. We examined DNA specimens from 127 chronic sinusitis patients and found one patient who was heterozygous for 394delTT gene mutation. None of the DNA specimens had any AF508 mutation. This study shows that in a population with a low incidence of CF there was no abnormal carrier distribution of the two most common CF gene mutations in a group of chronic sinusitis patients. Routine screening of sinusitis patients for CF mutations provides no additional information on the etiology of chronic sinusitis.

  15. T-T mismatch-driven biosensor using triple functional DNA-protein conjugates for facile detection of Hg2+.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoyu; Zhou, Xiaohong; Shi, Hanchang; Luo, Yi

    2016-04-15

    We report herein a T-T mismatch-driven biosensor using triple functional DNA-protein conjugates for facile detection of mercury ions (Hg(2+)) based on evanescent wave fluorescence excitation. Fluorescein-labeled DNA strands and streptavidin molecules were conjugated using heterobifunctional crosslinkers, and the obtained conjugates were named as "Hg(2+) dependent conjugates, HDCs". Initially hybridized with quencher-labeled DNA (Q-DNA) strands, HDCs showed low evanescent wave-induced fluorescence emission signals; however, in the presence of Hg(2+), the DNA moieties of HDCs tended to form hairpin structures stabilized by T-T mismatches, releasing Q-DNA strands, which was accompanied by increases in the fluorescent signals. The novel detection strategy enables the fluorescent detection of mercury ions with high specificity and a low detection limit of 1.06 nM in a facile way.

  16. Severe CF manifestation with anaemia and failure to thrive in a 394delTT homozygous patient.

    PubMed

    Kahre, Tiina; Teder, Maris; Panov, Maarja; Metspalu, Andres

    2004-03-01

    We report on a 394delTT homozygous cystic fibrosis (CF) patient with severe disease progression. At the diagnosis made at the age of 2.5 months, he suffered from macrocytic anaemia as the most prominent symptom of CF, malnutrition, hypoproteinaemia and profound hypoalbuminaemia, but demonstrated only minimal pulmonary symptoms. Abnormal sweat chlorides confirmed the diagnosis of CF. Severe pulmonary and liver disease caused death after 6 years.

  17. Measurement of color flow in tt events from pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Svoisky, P.; Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Adams, M.; Bazterra, V.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first measurement of the color representation of the hadronically decaying W boson in tt events, from 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 experiment. A novel calorimeter-based vectorial variable, ''jet pull,'' is used, sensitive to the color-flow structure of the final state. We find that the fraction of uncolored W bosons is 0.56{+-}0.42(stat+syst), in agreement with the standard model.

  18. Synergistic antitumour activity of RAF265 and ZSTK474 on human TT medullary thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertazza, Loris; Barollo, Susi; Radu, Claudia Maria; Cavedon, Elisabetta; Simioni, Paolo; Faggian, Diego; Plebani, Mario; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Rubin, Beatrice; Boscaro, Marco; Pezzani, Raffaele; Mian, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive malignancy responsible for up to 14% of all thyroid cancer-related deaths. It is characterized by point mutations in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene. The activated RET kinase is known to signal via extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), leading to enhanced proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of two serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf (BRAF) inhibitors (RAF265 and SB590885), and a PI3K inhibitor (ZSTK474), on RET-mediated signalling and proliferation in a MTC cell line (TT cells) harbouring the RETC634W activating mutation. The effects of the inhibitors on VEGFR2, PI3K/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling pathways, cell cycle, apoptosis and calcitonin production were also investigated. Only the RAF265+ ZSTK474 combination synergistically reduced the viability of treated cells. We observed a strong decrease in phosphorylated VEGFR2 for RAF265+ ZSTK474 and a signal reduction in activated Akt for ZSTK474. The activated ERK signal also decreased after RAF265 and RAF265+ ZSTK474 treatments. Alone and in combination with ZSTK474, RAF265 induced a sustained increase in necrosis. Only RAF265, alone and combined with ZSTK474, prompted a significant drop in calcitonin production. Combination therapy using RAF265 and ZSTK47 proved effective in MTC, demonstrating a cytotoxic effect. As the two inhibitors have been successfully tested individually in clinical trials on other human cancers, our preclinical data support the feasibility of their combined use in aggressive MTC. PMID:26081844

  19. [Investigation of TT virus-DNA in multitransfused children and healthy children].

    PubMed

    Yarar, Coşkun; Bör, Ozcan; Us, Tercan; Akgün, Yurdanur; Akgün, Necat A

    2005-01-01

    TT virus (TTV) is a naked, single stranded DNA virus, which has been discovered in the serum of a patient with posttransfusion hepatitis of unknown etiology. TTV is widespread in the population, however, the mode of its transmission is unclear. This study was conducted to search for TTV-DNA positivity rates and its relationship with the clinical outcomes of recipients who underwent multiple blood or blood product transfusion, together with healthy children. TTV-DNA was investigated in 52 multitransfused pediatric patients (age range: 3 mnths - 17.5 yrs, mean age: 9.2 +/- 5.7 years) and 18 healthy children (age range: 1 mnth - 16.5 yrs, mean age: 8.1 +/- 4.9 years), by qualitative in-house semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the primers NG059, NG061 and NG063, generated from ORF1 region of the viral genome. TTV-DNA was found positive in 30.8% of multitransfused, and 16.7% of healthy children. The differences of TTV-DNA positivity rates between the multitransfused and control groups, and ALT values between the patients with positive and negative TTV-DNA, were statistically insignificant (p>0.05). As a result, no relationship was detected between TTV positivity and hepatitis, although there was a statistically insignificant increase of TTV-DNA positivity in multitransfused children. However, since the primers of ORF1 N22 region used in our PCR method did not have enough sensitivity for the detection of TTV-DNA, it has been concluded that more sensitive primers such as UTR primers, should be used for more reliable evaluation of the results. PMID:15900838

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VRI light curves of TT Her (Terrell+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, D.; Nelson, R. H.

    2016-04-01

    In April of 2005, 2006, and 2007 R.H.N. took a total of nine medium resolution (reciprocal dispersion=10Å/mm, R=10000) spectra at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) in Victoria, BC using the 1.8m Plaskett Telescope. The exposure time was usually 1hr and the spectral coverage was approximately 5000-5260Å. The log of the spectroscopic observations is given in Table1. Photometric observations in the VRCIC photometric passbands were undertaken by R.H.N. at his private observatory in Prince George, BC, Canada in May and June of 2008. A total of 392 frames in V, 413 in RC, and 393 in IC were taken. Standard reduction techniques (bias subtraction, dark subtraction, and flat-fielding) were done and aperture photometry performed. Differential photometry was then performed with GSC 1525-0805 (V=9.82+/-0.03 and B-V=0.72+/-0.03 from the Tycho-2 catalog; Hog et al. 2000, cat. I/259) as the comparison star and GSC 1525-0939 (V=11.73+/-0.07 and B-V=0.82+/-0.07 from Data Release 7 of the APASS survey; Henden et al., 2012JAVSO..40..430H; see DR9 in Henden et al. 2016, cat. II/336) as the check star. No variation in the comparison and check stars greater than 0.01mag was detected, and the precision of the differential magnitudes for TT Her was about 0.005mag in each filter. The instrumental magnitude differences are given in Table2. (2 data files).

  1. Alt-Az telescope control system standardization attempt: case study of the TT1 (Toppo Telescope #1) control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Dario; Brescia, Massimo; Spirito, Gianfranco

    1998-05-01

    The TT1 is a 1.54 m Alt-Az telescope designed and built by the Technology Working Group of the Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte, Naples, Italy. The standardization process is of course one of the fundamental requirements for telescope control system design and development, well considered in the TT1 design. In this paper we present the approach used to identify a control system applicable to medium-size Alt-Az telescope. The TT1 control system architecture is based on a distributed working flow and it is PC-based, i.e. organized in several interconnected standard PCs and standard fast communication protocol. Every PC is based on the 'dedicated processing unit' concept and it makes real time own tasks independently by other units. Also, the extremely reduced communication flow between PCs, and the internal organization based on the preference given to software rather than hardware solutions, makes its control system extremely reliable, easily reconfigurable and upgradable, obsolescence deprived and independent from any hardware choice.

  2. Involvement of the cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway in thyroxine effects on calcitonin secretion from TT cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, C-C; Tsai, S-C

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that plasma calcitonin is lower in hypothyroid patients and that thyroxine stimulates the human thyroid to release calcitonin. Therefore, thyroid hormones may regulate the secretion of calcitonin, but further work is needed to address this possibility in more detail. TT cells, a model of human thyroid C cells, were incubated in a medium containing vehicle, thyroxine, or thyroxine methyl-hemisuccinate-bovine serum albumin (BSA-L-T(4), thyroxine was immobilized and linked to BSA); then, the levels of secreted calcitonin (hCT), calcitonin mRNA, and cAMP were measured. To study links that connect the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway to the observed thyroxine effects, cells were treated with either vehicle or thyroxine plus SQ22536 [an adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitor], KT5720 (a PKA inhibitor), or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor). The activity levels of AC and PKA, and secreted calcitonin were then measured. The results indicate that thyroxine increases calcitonin secretion, cellular cAMP accumulation, and the activities of AC and PKA, but does not increase hCT mRNA levels in TT cells. BSA-L-T(4) also increases calcitonin secretion. These effects are inhibited by SQ22536, and KT5720 and suggest that the nongenomic thyroxine effects that stimulate calcitonin secretion from TT cells involve the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway.

  3. SNP genotypes of olfactory receptor genes associated with olfactory ability in German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Geng, G-J; Zhang, W; Cui, L; Zhang, H-X; Zheng, J-L

    2016-04-01

    To find out the relationship between SNP genotypes of canine olfactory receptor genes and olfactory ability, 28 males and 20 females from German Shepherd dogs in police service were scored by odor detection tests and analyzed using the Beckman GenomeLab SNPstream. The representative 22 SNP loci from the exonic regions of 12 olfactory receptor genes were investigated, and three kinds of odor (human, ice drug and trinitrotoluene) were detected. The results showed that the SNP genotypes at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR2K2-like:c.518G>A, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci had a statistically significant effect on the scenting abilities (P < 0.001). The kind of odor influenced the performances of the dogs (P < 0.001). In addition, there were interactions between genotype and the kind of odor at the following loci: OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A (P < 0.001). The dogs with genotype CC at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, genotype AA at the OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, genotype TT at the OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and genotype GG at the OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci did better at detecting the ice drug. We concluded that there was linkage between certain SNP genotypes and the olfactory ability of dogs and that SNP genotypes might be useful in determining dogs' scenting potential.

  4. Combination of low producer AA-genotypes in IFN-γ and IL-10 genes makes a high risk genetic variant for HIV disease progression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhvinder; Sharma, Aman; Arora, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    Rate of HIV disease progression varies considerably among individuals, host genetic makeup be one of the possible reasons. We aimed to determine association of functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), (-179G/T and +874T/A) in IFN-γ and (-1082A/G, -819C/T and -592C/A) in IL-10 genes, with the rate of disease progression or susceptibility to HIV infection. Therapy naïve HIV infected individuals from North India, categorized as slow progressors or fast progressors and HIV exposed seronegative individuals were recruited for this study. Genotyping results revealed significantly higher frequencies of low producer AA genotype at +874T/A in IFN-γ gene and -592C/A position in IL-10 gene in FPs (p<0.002). Multifactor dimensional reduction (MDR) analysis revealed this to be a high risk combination for faster disease progression in HIV-1 infected individuals. Low producer AA genotype carriers at +874T/A in IFN-γ gene produced significantly low amounts of cellular IFN-γ. Low producing haplotype 'ATA' at -1082, -819 and -592 loci in IL-10 gene was significantly over-represented in FPs as compared to SPs (p<0.01) and these individuals showed poor response to therapy in terms of CD4 count gains after one year of ART, compared to high producing haplotype (GCC) carriers. Thus, a combination of genetic variations in IFN-γ and IL-10 cytokine genes in a single host associate with HIV disease progression and may help clinicians to better manage the HIV disease if known earlier.

  5. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  6. Population-Level Persistence of Immunity 2 Years After the PsA-TT Mass-Vaccination Campaign in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Nicole E.; Borrow, Ray; Berthe, Abdoulaye; Dembélé, Awa Traoré Eps; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Townsend, Kelly; Boukary, Rahamatou M.; Mabey, Lesley; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Sow, Samba O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2010, Africa's first preventive meningococcal mass vaccination campaign was launched using a newly developed Neisseria meningitidis group A (NmA) polysaccharide–tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), designed specifically for the meningitis belt. Given PsA-TT's recent introduction, the duration of protection against meningococcal group A is unknown. Methods. We conducted a household-based, age-stratified seroprevalence survey in Bamako, Mali, in 2012, 2 years after the vaccination campaign targeted all 1- to 29-year-olds. Randomly selected participants who had been eligible for PsA-TT provided a blood sample and responded to a questionnaire. Sera were analyzed to assess NmA-specific serum bactericidal antibody titers using rabbit complement (rSBA) and NmA-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proportion of participants putatively protected and the age group- and sex-specific rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) and IgG geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were determined. Results. Two years postvaccination, nearly all of the 800 participants (99.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 98.3%–99.7%) maintained NmA-specific rSBA titers ≥8, the accepted threshold for protection; 98.6% (95% CI, 97.8%–99.4%) had titers ≥128, and 89.5% (95% CI, 87.4%–91.6%) had titers ≥1024. The rSBA GMTs were significantly higher in females than in males aged <18 years at vaccination (P < .0001). NmA-specific IgG levels ≥2 µg/mL were found in 88.5% (95% CI, 86.3%–90.7%) of participants. Conclusions. Two years after PsA-TT introduction, a very high proportion of the population targeted for vaccination maintains high antibody titers against NmA. Assessing the duration of protection provided by PsA-TT is a priority for implementing evidence-based vaccination strategies. Representative, population-based seroprevalence studies complement clinical trials and provide this key evidence. PMID:26553687

  7. Direct Monitoring of β-Sheet Formation in the Outer Membrane Protein TtoA Assisted by TtOmp85.

    PubMed

    Henke, Katharina; Welte, Wolfram; Hauser, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied to investigate the folding of an outer membrane protein, TtoA, assisted by TtOmp85, both from the thermophilic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus. To directly monitor the formation of β-sheet structure in TtoA and to analyze the function of TtOmp85, we immobilized unfolded TtoA on an ATR crystal. Interaction with TtOmp85 initiated TtoA folding as shown by time-dependent spectra recorded during the folding process. Our ATR-FTIR experiments prove that TtOmp85 possesses specific functionality to assist β-sheet formation of TtoA. We demonstrate the potential of this spectroscopic approach to study the interaction of outer membrane proteins in vitro and in a time-resolved manner. PMID:27400268

  8. Cloning to reproduce desired genotypes.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Long, C R; Shin, T; Hill, J R; Looney, C R; Pryor, J H; Piedrahita, J A

    2001-01-01

    Cloned sheep, cattle, goats, pigs and mice have now been produced using somatic cells for nuclear transplantation. Animal cloning is still very inefficient with on average less than 10% of the cloned embryos transferred resulting in a live offspring. However successful cloning of a variety of different species and by a number of different laboratory groups has generated tremendous interest in reproducing desired genotypes. Some of these specific genotypes represent animal cell lines that have been genetically modified. In other cases there is a significant demand for cloning animals characterized by their inherent genetic value, for example prize livestock, household pets and rare or endangered species. A number of different variables may influence the ability to reproduce a specific genotype by cloning. These include species, source of recipient ova, cell type of nuclei donor, treatment of donor cells prior to nuclear transfer, and the techniques employed for nuclear transfer. At present, there is no solid evidence that suggests cloning will be limited to only a few specific animals, and in fact, most data collected to date suggests cloning will be applicable to a wide variety of different animals. The ability to reproduce any desired genotype by cloning will ultimately depend on the amount of time and resources invested in research.

  9. Variational study of the stability of the Nagaoka state against single-spin flips in the two-dimensional t-t' Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, M.; Hlubina, R.

    2001-06-01

    Making use of variational wave functions of the Basile-Elser type we study the stability of the Nagaoka state against single-spin flips in the two-dimensional t-t' Hubbard model for t'/t~0.5. In the low-density limit the variational estimate of the stability region of the Nagaoka state is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the T-matrix approximation.

  10. Topical delivery of DNA oligonucleotide to induce p53 generation in the skin via thymidine dinucleotide (pTT)-encapsulated liposomal carrier

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Transcription factor p53 has a powerful tumor suppressing function that is associated with many cancers. Since the molecular weight of p53 is 53 kDa, it is difficult to transport across cell membranes. Thymidine dinucleotide (pTT) is an oligonucleotide that can activate the p53 transcription factor and trigger the signal transduction cascade. However, the negative charge and high water solubility of pTT limit its transport through cellular membranes, thereby preventing it from reaching its target in the nucleus. A suitable delivery carrier for pTT is currently not available. Objective The purpose of this study was to employ a nanoscale liposomal carrier to resolve the delivery problem, and increase the bioavailability and efficiency of pTT. Methodology The approach was to employ liposomes to deliver pTT and then evaluate the particle size and zeta potential by laser light scattering (LLS), and permeation properties of pTT in vitro in a Franz diffusion assembly, and in vivo in a murine model using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We found that dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) combined with cholesterol 3 sulfate (C3S) were the best ingredients to achieve an average desired vehicle size of 133.6 ± 2.8 nm, a polydispersity index (PDI, representing the distribution of particle sizes) of 0.437, and a zeta potential of −93.3 ± 1.88. An in vitro penetration study showed that the liposomal carrier was superior to the free form of pTT at 2–24 hours. CLSM study observed that the penetration depth of pTT reached the upper epidermis and potential of penetration maintained up to 24 hours. Conclusion These preliminary data demonstrate that nanosized DOPE/C3S liposomes can be exploited as a potential carrier of drugs for topical use in treating skin diseases. PMID:22267922

  11. Spin polarisation of tt¯γγ production at NLO+PS with GoSam interfaced to MadGraph5_aMC@NLO

    DOE PAGES

    van Deurzen, Hans; Frederix, Rikkert; Hirschi, Valentin; Luisoni, Gionata; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Ossola, Giovanni

    2016-04-22

    Here, we present an interface between the multipurpose Monte Carlo tool MadGraph5_aMC@NLO and the automated amplitude generator GoSam. As a first application of this novel framework, we compute the NLO corrections to pp→ tt¯H and pp→ tt¯γγ matched to a parton shower. In the phenomenological analyses of these processes, we focus our attention on observables which are sensitive to the polarisation of the top quarks.

  12. Allelic Variation of BnaC.TT2.a and Its Association with Seed Coat Color and Fatty Acids in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nazim; Li, Zhilan; Wu, Dezhi; Jiang, Lixi

    2016-01-01

    Efficient molecular markers for the selection of rapeseed genetic materials with high seed oil content and ideal fatty acid (FA) composition are preferred by rapeseed breeders. Recently, we reported the molecular mechanism of TRANSPARENT TESTA 2 (TT2) in inhibiting seed FA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. However, evidence showing the association of rapeseed TT2 homologs and seed FA production are still insufficient. In this study, we collected 83 rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) landraces from different geographical backgrounds to conduct association mapping of BnaC.TT2.a in relation to seed coat color and FA biosynthesis. Population background was corrected by 84 pairs of SSR markers that were uniformly distributed among the linkage groups of the Tapidor-Ningyou-7 DH population. A single copy of BnaC.TT2.a for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay was cloned by a pair of previously reported specific primers. From the analysis of BnaC.TT2.a allelic variations using GLM+Q model, four SNPs on intron 1 of BnaC.TT2.a that were associated with seed FA were discovered. Moreover, an InDel at position 738 on exon 3 of BnaC.TT2.a indicated a change of protein function that was significantly associated with seed coat color, linoleic acid (C18:2), and total FA content. These findings revealed the role of BnaC.TT2.a in regulating the seed color formation and seed FA biosynthesis in rapeseed, thereby suggesting effective molecular markers for rapeseed breeding. PMID:26752200

  13. Performance of the plant-based repellent TT-4302 against mosquitoes in the laboratory and field and comparative efficacy to 16 mosquito repellents against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Bissinger, B W; Schmidt, J P; Owens, J J; Mitchell, S M; Kennedy, M K

    2014-03-01

    Repellent efficacy of the plant-based repellent, TT-4302 (5% geraniol), was compared with 16 other products in laboratory arm-in-cage trials against Aedes aegypti (L). Eight repellents (Badger, BioUD, Burt's bees, California Baby, Cutter Natural, EcoSMART, Herbal Armor, and SkinSmart) exhibited a mean repellency below 90% to Ae. aegypti at 0.5 h after application. Three repellents (Buzz Away Extreme, Cutter Advanced, and OFF! Botanicals lotion) fell below 90% repellency 1.5 h after application. TT-4302 exhibited 94.7% repellency 5 h posttreatment, which was a longer duration than any of the other repellents tested. The positive control, 15% DEET (OFF! Active), was repellent for 3 h before activity dropped below 90%. Additional arm-in-cage trials comparing TT-4302 with 15% DEET were carried out against Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say. At 6 h after treatment, TT-4302 provided 95.2% repellency while DEET exhibited 72.2%. In North Carolina field trials, TT-4302 provided 100% repellency 5 h after application against Aedes albopictus Skuse while DEET provided 77.6% repellency. These results demonstrate that TT-4302 is an efficacious plant-based repellent that provides an extended duration of protection compared with many other commercially available products.

  14. The complement receptor 2/factor H fusion protein TT30 protects paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria erythrocytes from complement-mediated hemolysis and C3 fragment.

    PubMed

    Risitano, Antonio M; Notaro, Rosario; Pascariello, Caterina; Sica, Michela; del Vecchio, Luigi; Horvath, Christopher J; Fridkis-Hareli, Masha; Selleri, Carmine; Lindorfer, Margaret A; Taylor, Ronald P; Luzzatto, Lucio; Holers, V Michael

    2012-06-28

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis because of the lack from erythrocyte surface of the complement regulators CD55 and CD59, with subsequent uncontrolled continuous spontaneous activation of the complement alternative pathway (CAP), and at times of the complement classic pathway. Here we investigate in an in vitro model the effect on PNH erythrocytes of a novel therapeutic strategy for membrane-targeted delivery of a CAP inhibitor. TT30 is a 65 kDa recombinant human fusion protein consisting of the iC3b/C3d-binding region of complement receptor 2 (CR2) and the inhibitory domain of the CAP regulator factor H (fH). TT30 completely inhibits in a dose-dependent manner hemolysis of PNH erythrocytes in a modified extended acidified serum assay, and also prevents C3 fragment deposition on surviving PNH erythrocytes. The efficacy of TT30 derives from its direct binding to PNH erythrocytes; if binding to the erythrocytes is disrupted, only partial inhibition of hemolysis is mediated by TT30 in solution, which is similar to that produced by the fH moiety of TT30 alone, or by intact human fH. TT30 is a membrane-targeted selective CAP inhibitor that may prevent both intravascular and C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis of PNH erythrocytes and warrants consideration for the treatment of PNH patients.

  15. Performance of the plant-based repellent TT-4302 against mosquitoes in the laboratory and field and comparative efficacy to 16 mosquito repellents against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Bissinger, B W; Schmidt, J P; Owens, J J; Mitchell, S M; Kennedy, M K

    2014-03-01

    Repellent efficacy of the plant-based repellent, TT-4302 (5% geraniol), was compared with 16 other products in laboratory arm-in-cage trials against Aedes aegypti (L). Eight repellents (Badger, BioUD, Burt's bees, California Baby, Cutter Natural, EcoSMART, Herbal Armor, and SkinSmart) exhibited a mean repellency below 90% to Ae. aegypti at 0.5 h after application. Three repellents (Buzz Away Extreme, Cutter Advanced, and OFF! Botanicals lotion) fell below 90% repellency 1.5 h after application. TT-4302 exhibited 94.7% repellency 5 h posttreatment, which was a longer duration than any of the other repellents tested. The positive control, 15% DEET (OFF! Active), was repellent for 3 h before activity dropped below 90%. Additional arm-in-cage trials comparing TT-4302 with 15% DEET were carried out against Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say. At 6 h after treatment, TT-4302 provided 95.2% repellency while DEET exhibited 72.2%. In North Carolina field trials, TT-4302 provided 100% repellency 5 h after application against Aedes albopictus Skuse while DEET provided 77.6% repellency. These results demonstrate that TT-4302 is an efficacious plant-based repellent that provides an extended duration of protection compared with many other commercially available products. PMID:24724289

  16. A TET2 rs3733609 C/T genotype is associated with predisposition to the myeloproliferative neoplasms harboring JAK2V617F and confers a proliferative potential on erythroid lineages

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-hui; Sun, Nan-nan; Yin, Ya-fei; Liu, Su-fang; Liu, Xiao-liu; Peng, Hong-ling; Dai, Chong-wen; Xu, Yun-xiao; Deng, Ming-yang; Luo, Yun-ya; Zheng, Wen-li; Zhang, Guang-sen

    2016-01-01

    Common germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at JAK2 locus have been associated with Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). And, the germline sequence variant rs2736100 C in TERT is related to risk of MPN, suggesting a complex association between SNPs and the pathogenesis of MPN. Our previous study (unpublished data) showed that there was a high frequency distribution in rs3733609 C/T genotype at Ten-Eleven Translocation 2 (TET2) locus in one Chinese familial primary myelofibrosis. In the present study, we evaluate the role and clinical significance of rs3733609 C/T genotype in JAK2V617F-positive sporadic MPN (n = 181). TET2 rs3733609 C/T genotype had a higher incidence (13.81%; 25/181) in JAK2V617F-positive sporadic MPN patients than that in normal controls (n = 236) (6.35%; 15/236), which was predisposing to MPN (odds ratio(OR) = 2.361; P = 0.01). MPN patients with rs3733609 C/T genotype had increased leukocyte and platelets counts, elevated hemoglobin concentration in comparison with T/T genotype. Thrombotic events were more common in MPN patients with rs3733609 C/T than those with T/T genotype (P < 0.01). We confirmed that rs3733609 C/T genotype downregulated TET2 mRNA transcription, and the mechanism may be involved in a disruption of the interaction between CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPA) and TET2 rs3733609 C/T locus.TET2 rs3733609 C/T genotype stimulated the erythroid hematopoiesis in MPN patients. Altogether, we found a novel hereditary susceptible factor-TET2 rs3733609 C/T variant for the development of MPN, suggesting the variant may be partially responsible for the pathogenesis and accumulation of MPN. PMID:26843622

  17. Lack of evidence to support the association of a single IL28B genotype SNP rs12979860 with the HTLV-1 clinical outcomes and proviral load

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Interleukin 28B (IL28B) rs12979860 polymorphisms was recently reported to be associated with the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load (PvL) and the development of the HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Methods In an attempt to examine this hypothesis, we assessed the association of the rs12979860 genotypes with HTLV-1 PvL levels and clinical status in 112 unrelated Brazilian subjects (81 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers, 24 individuals with HAM/TSP and 7 with Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL)). Results All 112 samples were successfully genotyped and their PvLs compared. Neither the homozygote TT nor the heterozygote CT mutations nor the combination genotypes (TT/CT) were associated with a greater PvL. We also observed no significant difference in allele distribution between asymptomatic carriers and patients with HTLV-1 associated HAM/TSP. Conclusions Our study failed to support the previously reported positive association between the IL28B rs12979860 polymorphisms and an increased risk of developing HAM/TSP in the Brazilian population. PMID:23259930

  18. Telemetry Tracking & Control (TT&C) - First TDRSS, then Commercial GEO & Big LEO and Now Through LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Dwayne R.; Streich, Ron G.; Bull, Barton; Grant, Chuck; Power, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communication satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce Telemetry, Tracking and Control (TT&C) costs of launch vehicles, Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), Research Balloons and spacecraft by reducing or eliminating ground infrastructure. Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC\\WFF) have successfully used commercial Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Big LEO communications satellites for Long Duration Balloon Flight TT&C. The Flight Modem is a GSFC\\WFF Advanced Range Technology initiative (ARTI) designed to streamline TT&C capability in the user community of these scientific data gathering platforms at low cost. Making use of existing LEO satellites and adapting and ruggedized commercially available components; two-way, over the horizon communications may be established with these vehicles at great savings due to reduced infrastructure. Initially planned as a means for permitting GPS data for tracking and recovery of sounding rocket and balloon payloads, expectations are that the bandwidth can soon be expanded to allow more comprehensive data transfer. The system architecture which integrates antennas, GPS receiver, commercial satellite packet data modem and a single board computer with custom software is described and technical challenges are discussed along with the plan for their resolution. A three-phase testing and development plan is outlined and the current results are reported. Results and status of ongoing flight tests on aircraft and sounding rockets are reported. Future applications on these platforms and the potential for satellite support are discussed along with an analysis of cost effectiveness of this method vs. other tracking and data transmission schemes.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype, northern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Judith R; Crampin, Amelia C; Traore, Hamidou; Yates, Malcolm D; Mwaungulu, Frank D; Ngwira, Bagrey M; Chaguluka, Steven D; Mwafulirwa, Donex T; Floyd, Sian; Murphy, Caroline; Drobniewski, Francis A; Fine, Paul E M

    2005-01-01

    In a 7-year population-based study in Malawi, we showed that Beijing genotype tuberculosis (TB) increased as a proportion of TB cases. All the Beijing genotype strains were fully drug sensitive. Contact histories, TB type, and case-fatality rates were similar for Beijing and non-Beijing genotype TB.

  20. [Hip metallosis caused by wear of a TT-1 stem on a ceramic modular head hip prosthesis --case report].

    PubMed

    Blacha, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The author presents a case of metal stem cone wear caused by a ceramic head. During revision hip arthroplasty procedure a new modular ceramic head was implanted in combination with a stable cemented TT-1 stem. 13 months after surgery the hip became symptomatic and 20 months after the procedure total loosening of the cup was observed. Wear of the stem cone was visible. During the next revision procedure all hip prosthesis elements were removed, soft tissue debridement was performed and a new cemented prosthesis was implanted. One year post-op the hip is pain free.

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosis and low-density lipoproteins in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Petta, S; Bellia, C; Mazzola, A; Cabibi, D; Cammà, C; Caruso, A; Di Marco, V; Craxì, A; Ciaccio, M

    2012-07-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase status, homocysteine and lipoproteins levels have been associated with severity of disease and both rapid and sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We aimed to assess the association of homocysteine and MTHFR status with serum cholesterol levels and their potential links to both histological findings and virological response, in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). A total of 119 consecutive patients were evaluated by biopsy and metabolic measurements. A total of 103 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Serum homocysteine and MTHFR C677T mutation were also evaluated. All patients underwent antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN alfa-2a plus ribavirin. HCV-RNA was assessed at baseline, week 4, week 12, at the end of therapy and after 6 months of follow-up. Mean serum values of homocysteine were higher in patients than in controls (15.8 ± 5.8 μg/L vs 12.5 ± 5.8 μg/L; P < 0.001), with a similar CC, CT and TT MTHFR distribution (23.6%, 48.7% and 27.7% in G1-CHC vs 34%, 48.5% and 17.5% in controls; P = 0.14). In genotype 1, HCV MTHFR TT homozygosis was independently linked to higher LDL (OR 1.016; CI 1.002-1.031; P = 0.03), but not to homocysteine. No association were found between homocysteine, MTHFR and histological features or both rapid virological response (RVR) and SVR. Low cholesterol (OR 0.988, 95%CI 0.975-0.999, P = 0.04) was independently linked to severe fibrosis, and high LDL was the only independent positive predictors of both RVR and SVR (OR 1.036; 95%CI 1.017-1.055; P < 0.001; and OR 1.016; 95%CI 1.001-1.031; P = 0.04 respectively). In patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C, showing higher homocysteine serum levels than controls, MTHFR C677T homozygosis, via modulating cholesterol levels, could interfere with liver fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy. PMID:22676358

  2. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability. PMID:27525915

  3. Hypertrophy of IMC of carotid artery in Parkinson's disease is associated with L-DOPA, homocysteine, and MTHFR genotype.

    PubMed

    Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Yasui, Kenichi; Kowa, Hisanori; Kusumi, Masayoshi; Ueda, Keigo; Yoshimoto, Yuko; Takeshima, Takao; Sasaki, Kiyohiro; Nakashima, Kenji

    2003-03-15

    In recent years, an intense interest has developed in the association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine (Hcy) is a neuronal excitotoxic amino acid, and is well known as a risk factor for vascular diseases. Some reports suggest that the administration of L-DOPA may promote hyperhomocysteinemia and idiopathic atherosclerosis. In this study, we report that a mild hypertrophy of the intima-media complex (IMC) of the carotid artery, which has been established as a marker for systemic atherosclerosis, is observed in PD patients compared with normal subjects. PD patients that were treated with L-DOPA for long durations showed a hypertrophic IMC, while the patients that were not treated with L-DOPA did not show any hypertrophic changes in the IMC. These hypertrophic changes were observed primarily in patients with a Hoehn-Yahr stage of 3-5. PD patients with hypertrophic IMC of the carotid artery also exhibited elevated plasma levels of Hcy associated with the C677T genotype of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Moreover, a prolonged duration of treatment with L-DOPA in patients with MTHFR T/T genotype enhanced the hypertrophy of IMC, compared with patients with the C/C or C/T genotype. These results suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia promoted by the C677T genotype of MTHFR and prolonged treatment with L-DOPA enhances atherosclerosis in PD patients and affects their general condition.

  4. Distribution and genotype frequency of the C1431T and pro12ala polymorphisms of the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma gene in an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Rooki, Hassan; Haerian, Monir-Sadat; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Mirhafez, Reza; Ferns, Gordon; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Zali, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear transcription factor regulating multiple genes involved in cell growth, differentiation, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and energy production. Several genetic variations in the PPARγ gene have been identified to be associated with diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease. The present study was designed to explore the distribution of two common single nucleotide polymorphisms of the PPARγ gene (C1431T and Pro12Ala) in an Iranian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genotype frequencies for these two polymorphisms were compared for 160 healthy Iranian individuals with reports from other populations. The Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The genotype distribution of the C1431T PPARγ polymorphism was 0.869 for the CC genotype, 0.119 for the CT genotype and 0.013 for uncommon TT genotype. Allelic frequencies were 0.93 for C and 0.07 for T allele respectively. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPARγ gene, genotypic distributions and allelic frequencies were, 0.813 for CC, 0.181 for CG and 0.06 for GG and 0.903 for C and 0.097 for G respectively. Allelic and genotypic frequencies for both polymorphisms of PPARγ gene were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. CONCLUSIONS: Iran is a country with an ethnically diverse population and a comparison of allelic and genotypic frequencies of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms between our population and others showed significant differences. PMID:24497707

  5. A large insertion in bHLH transcription factor BrTT8 resulting in yellow seed coat in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Chen, Li; Hong, Meiyan; Zhang, Yan; Zu, Feng; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2012-01-01

    Yellow seed is a desirable quality trait of the Brassica oilseed species. Previously, several seed coat color genes have been mapped in the Brassica species, but the molecular mechanism is still unknown. In the present investigation, map-based cloning method was used to identify a seed coat color gene, located on A9 in B. rapa. Blast analysis with the Arabidopsis genome showed that there were 22 Arabidopsis genes in this region including at4g09820 to at4g10620. Functional complementation test exhibited a phenotype reversion in the Arabidopsis thaliana tt8-1 mutant and yellow-seeded plant. These results suggested that the candidate gene was a homolog of TRANSPARENT TESTA8 (TT8) locus. BrTT8 regulated the accumulation of proanthocyanidins (PAs) in the seed coat. Sequence analysis of two alleles revealed a large insertion of a new class of transposable elements, Helitron in yellow sarson. In addition, no mRNA expression of BrTT8 was detected in the yellow-seeded line. It indicated that the natural transposon might have caused the loss in function of BrTT8. BrTT8 encodes a basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein that shares a high degree of similarity with other bHLH proteins in the Brassica. Further expression analysis also revealed that BrTT8 was involved in controlling the late biosynthetic genes (LBGs) of the flavonoid pathway. Our present findings provided with further studies could assist in understanding the molecular mechanism involved in seed coat color formation in Brassica species, which is an important oil yielding quality trait.

  6. Transformation with TT8 and HB12 RNAi Constructs in Model Forage (Medicago sativa, Alfalfa) Affects Carbohydrate Structure and Metabolic Characteristics in Ruminant Livestock Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Zhang, Yonggen; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-11-01

    Lignin, a phenylpropanoid polymer present in secondary cell walls, has a negative impact on feed digestibility. TT8 and HB12 genes were shown to have low expression levels in low-lignin tissues of alfalfa, but to date, there has been no study on the effect of down-regulation of these two genes in alfalfa on nutrient chemical profiles and availability in ruminant livestock systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of transformation of alfalfa with TT8 and HB12 RNAi constructs on carbohydrate (CHO) structure and CHO nutritive value in ruminant livestock systems. The results showed that transformation with TT8 and HB12 RNAi constructs reduced rumen, rapidly degraded CHO fractions (RDCA4, P = 0.06; RDCB1, P < 0.01) and totally degraded CHO fraction (TRDCHO, P = 0.08). Both HB12 and TT8 populations had significantly higher in vitro digestibility of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) at 30 h of incubation (ivNDF30) compared to the control (P < 0.01). The TT8 populations had highest ivDM30 and ivNDF240. Transformation of alfalfa with TT8 and HB12 RNAi constructs induced molecular structure changes. Different CHO functional groups had different sensitivities and different responses to the transformation. The CHO molecular structure changes induced by the transformation were associated with predicted CHO availability. Compared with HB12 RNAi, transformation with TT8 RNAi could improve forage quality by increasing the availability of both NDF and DM. Further study is needed on the relationship between the transformation-induced structure changes at a molecular level and nutrient utilization in ruminant livestock systems when lignification is much higher. PMID:26492548

  7. Persistence of the immune response two years after vaccination with quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) in Asian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Quiambao, Beatriz P.; Jain, Hermant; Bavdekar, Ashish; Dubey, Anand Prakash; Kolhe, Devayani; Bianco, Véronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasive meningococcal disease is a serious infection that is most often vaccine-preventable. Long-term protection relies on antibody persistence. Here we report the persistence of the immune response 2 y post-vaccination with a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) compared with a MenACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS), in Asian adolescents aged 11–17 y. We also report a re-analysis of data from the primary vaccination study. This persistence study (NCT00974363) conducted in India and the Philippines included subjects who previously (study NCT00464815) received a single dose of MenACWY-TT or Men-PS. Persistence of functional antibodies was measured in 407 MenACWY-TT recipients and 132 Men-PS recipients (according-to-protocol cohort) using a rabbit complement serum bactericidal assay (rSBA, cut-off 1:8). Vaccine-related serious adverse events (SAEs) occurring since the end of the initial vaccination study were retrospectively recorded. Two y post-vaccination ≥99.3% of adolescents who received MenACWY-TT had persisting antibody titers ≥1:8 against each vaccine serogroup. Antibody persistence was higher (exploratory analysis) in the MenACWY-TT group than the Men-PS group in terms of rSBA titers ≥1:8 for serogroups W and Y; rSBA titers ≥1:128 for serogroups A, W and Y; and rSBA GMTs for serogroups A, W and Y; and was lower in the MenACWY-TT group for rSBA GMTs for serogroup C. No vaccine-related SAEs were reported. The results of this study indicated that antibodies persisted for at least 2 y in the majority of adolescents after vaccination with a single dose of MenACWY-TT. PMID:27152501

  8. Evaluation of rep-PCR/DiversiLab versus PFGE and spa typing in genotyping methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Aguadero, V; González Velasco, C; Vindel, A; Gonzalez Velasco, M; Moreno, J J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the 'gold standard' for genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); however, the DiversiLab (DL) system, based on rep-PCR, is faster, simpler and could be better adapted to daily routine hospital work. We genotyped 100 MRSA isolates using PFGE, DL, and spa typing, and evaluated the discriminatory power of each technique and the correlation between them by Simpson's index(SI) and adjusted Rand coefficient (ARI), respectively. The isolates were from clinical samples from eight hospitals in Extremadura (Spain) during 2010. DL separated the 100 MRSA into 18 patterns, with 69% of the isolates grouped into four predominant patterns. spa typing reported 17 spa types, classifying 69% of MRSA into two major types (t067 and t002). PFGE revealed the existence of 27 patterns, gathering 54% of MRSA into three pulse types (E8a, E7a and E7b). SI values were 0.819, 0.726, 0.887 and 0.460 for DL, spa typing, PFGE and CC-BURP, respectively. ARI values of DL over PFGE, spa typing and CC-BURP were 0.151, 0.321 and 0.071, respectively. DL has less discriminatory power than PFGE but more than spa typing. The concordance of DL with PFGE is low, primarily because DL does not discriminate between the three predominant MRSA pulse types in our environment.

  9. Evaluation of rep-PCR/DiversiLab versus PFGE and spa typing in genotyping methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Aguadero, V; González Velasco, C; Vindel, A; Gonzalez Velasco, M; Moreno, J J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the 'gold standard' for genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); however, the DiversiLab (DL) system, based on rep-PCR, is faster, simpler and could be better adapted to daily routine hospital work. We genotyped 100 MRSA isolates using PFGE, DL, and spa typing, and evaluated the discriminatory power of each technique and the correlation between them by Simpson's index(SI) and adjusted Rand coefficient (ARI), respectively. The isolates were from clinical samples from eight hospitals in Extremadura (Spain) during 2010. DL separated the 100 MRSA into 18 patterns, with 69% of the isolates grouped into four predominant patterns. spa typing reported 17 spa types, classifying 69% of MRSA into two major types (t067 and t002). PFGE revealed the existence of 27 patterns, gathering 54% of MRSA into three pulse types (E8a, E7a and E7b). SI values were 0.819, 0.726, 0.887 and 0.460 for DL, spa typing, PFGE and CC-BURP, respectively. ARI values of DL over PFGE, spa typing and CC-BURP were 0.151, 0.321 and 0.071, respectively. DL has less discriminatory power than PFGE but more than spa typing. The concordance of DL with PFGE is low, primarily because DL does not discriminate between the three predominant MRSA pulse types in our environment. PMID:26510268

  10. Estimating genotypes with independently sampled descent graphs.

    PubMed

    Henshall, J M; Tier, B; Kerr, R J

    2001-12-01

    A method for estimating genotypic and identity-by-descent probabilities in complex pedigrees is described. The method consists of an algorithm for drawing independent genotype samples which are consistent with the pedigree and observed genotype. The probability distribution function for samples obtained using the algorithm can be evaluated up to a normalizing constant, and combined with the likelihood to produce a weight for each sample. Importance sampling is then used to estimate genotypic and identity-by-descent probabilities. On small but complex pedigrees, the genotypic probability estimates are demonstrated to be empirically unbiased. On large complex pedigrees, while the algorithm for obtaining genotype samples is feasible, importance sampling may require an infeasible number of samples to estimate genotypic probabilities with accuracy.

  11. Lessons Learned From Enhancing Vaccine Pharmacovigilance Activities During PsA-TT Introduction in African Countries, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Diomandé, Fabien V. K.; Yaméogo, Téné M.; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Viviani, Simonetta; Ouandaogo, Claude-Roger; Keita, Modibo; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Mbakuliyemo, Nehemie; Akanmori, Bartholomew Dicky; Sow, Samba O.; Zuber, Patrick L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The rollout of the group A meningococcal vaccine, PsA-TT, in Africa's meningitis belt countries represented the first introduction of a vaccine specifically designed for this part of the world. During the first year alone, the number of people who received the vaccine through mass vaccination campaigns was several hundredfold higher than that of subjects who participated in the closely monitored clinical trials. Implementation of a system to identify rare but potentially serious vaccine reactions was therefore a high priority in the design and implementation of those campaigns. Methods. National authorities and their technical partners set up effective vaccine pharmacovigilance systems, including conducting active surveillance projects. Results. Implementation of national expert advisory groups to review serious adverse events following immunization in all countries and active monitoring of conditions of interest in 3 early-adopter countries did not identify particular concerns with the safety profile of PsA-TT, which had already provided tremendous public health benefits. Conclusions. Lessons learned from this experience will help to improve preparations for future vaccine introductions in resource-poor settings and capitalize on such efforts to advance vaccine safety systems in the future. PMID:26553675

  12. Genotyping of IL-8-251 T > A yields prognostic information in patients with gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiuyu; Hu, Weihan; Zhang, Bei; Dai, Ni; Xu, Ruihua; Qiu, Huijuan; Wang, Deshen; Li, Zhiming

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the association of the IL-8-251 T > A gene polymorphism with clinicopathological features and the prognostic role of the gene polymorphism in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. The gene polymorphism was detected by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism method, followed by univariate and multivariate analyses to elicit its prognostic role. The frequency of IL-8-251 A/A, A/T and T/T genotypes were 11.0% (23/210), 43.8% (92/210) and 45.2% (95/210), respectively. The IL-8-251 gene polymorphism was closely correlated with depth of invasion (p = 0.007), grade of differentiation (p = 0.002) and TNM stage (p = 0.009). A/A genotype carriers showed more frequency of serosa involvement, low grade of differentiation and advanced stage of gastric carcinoma. IL-8-251 T > A gene polymorphism have no significant correlation with other clinicopathological features. The 5-year overall survival of IL-8-251 A/A genotype and T allele carriers were 30.8% and 59.2%, respectively. There is a significant discrepancy among the different genotype carriers. Multivariate analysis with the Cox regression model revealed that the IL-8-251 A/A genotype is an independent prognostic indicator (HR = 2.285, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06–4.93, p = 0.035). We conclude that the IL-8-251 A/A genotype may indicate a poor prognosis for gastric adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:23980896

  13. SIRT6 minor allele genotype is associated with >5-year decrease in lifespan in an aged cohort.

    PubMed

    TenNapel, Mindi J; Lynch, Charles F; Burns, Trudy L; Wallace, Robert; Smith, Brian J; Button, Anna; Domann, Frederick E

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a natural process involving complex interplay between environment, metabolism, and genes. Sirtuin genes and their downstream targets have been associated with lifespan in numerous organisms from nematodes to humans. Several target proteins of the sirtuin genes are key sensors and/or effectors of oxidative stress pathways including FOXO3, SOD3, and AKT1. To examine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at candidate genes in these pathways and human lifespan, we performed a molecular epidemiologic study of an elderly cohort (≥65 years old.). Using age at death as a continuous outcome variable and assuming a co-dominant genetic model within the framework of multi-variable linear regression analysis, the genotype-specific adjusted mean age at death was estimated for individual SNP genotypes while controlling for age-related risk factors including smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption and co-morbidity. Significant associations were detected between human lifespan and SNPs in genes SIRT3, SIRT5, SIRT6, FOXO3 and SOD3. Individuals with either the CC or CT genotype at rs107251 within SIRT6 displayed >5-year mean survival advantages compared to the TT genotype (5.5 and 5.9 years, respectively; q-value  = 0.012). Other SNPs revealed genotype-specific mean survival advantages ranging from 0.5 to 1.6 years. Gender also modified the effect of SNPs in SIRT3, SIRT5 and AKT1 on lifespan. Our novel findings highlight the impact of sirtuins and sirtuin-related genotypes on lifespan, the importance of evaluating gender and the advantage of using age as a continuous variable in analyses to report mean age at death. PMID:25541994

  14. Meningococcal groups C and Y and haemophilus B tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT; MenHibrix(®)): a review.

    PubMed

    Perry, Caroline M

    2013-05-01

    The meningococcal groups C and Y and Haemophilus b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) contains Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C and Y capsular polysaccharide antigens, and Hib capsular polysaccharide [polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP)]. The HibMenCY-TT vaccine is available in the USA for use as active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by N. meningitidis serogroups C (MenC) and Y (MenY), and Hib in children 6 weeks-18 months of age. HibMenCY-TT is the first meningococcal vaccine available for use in the USA that can be administered to infants as young as 6 weeks of age. In a randomized, controlled, phase III clinical trial, the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, administered to infants at 2, 4, 6 and 12-15 months of age, was immunogenic against MenC and MenY, and met the prespecified criteria for immunogenicity. Anti-PRP antibodies, which have been shown to correlate with protection against Hib invasive disease, were also induced in the infants who received the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, with induced levels of this antibody noninferior to those occurring in the control group of infants who received a Hib tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine at 2, 4, and 6 months and a single dose of Hib conjugated to N. meningitidis outer membrane protein at 12-15 months. In several randomized, controlled clinical trials, HibMenCY-TT was coadministered with vaccines that are routinely administered to infants and toddlers in the USA. These vaccines included: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B (recombinant) and inactivated poliovirus vaccine combined; 7-valent Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide conjugate vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella vaccine; and varicella vaccine. Coadministration of these vaccines did not interfere with the immunogenicity of the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. Similarly, immune responses to the coadministered vaccines were not affected by the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. The tolerability profile of the HibMenCY-TT

  15. Gene silencing of BnTT10 family genes causes retarded pigmentation and lignin reduction in the seed coat of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Lu, Kun; Qu, Cunmin; Liang, Ying; Wang, Rui; Chai, Yourong; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    Yellow-seed (i.e., yellow seed coat) is one of the most important agronomic traits of Brassica plants, which is correlated with seed oil and meal qualities. Previous studies on the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis and Brassica species, proposed that the seed-color trait is correlative to flavonoid and lignin biosynthesis, at the molecular level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the oxidative polymerization of flavonoid and biosynthesis of lignin has been demonstrated to be catalyzed by laccase 15, a functional enzyme encoded by the AtTT10 gene. In this study, eight Brassica TT10 genes (three from B. napus, three from B. rapa and two from B. oleracea) were isolated and their roles in flavonoid oxidation/polymerization and lignin biosynthesis were investigated. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, these genes could be divided into two groups with obvious structural and functional differentiation. Expression studies showed that Brassica TT10 genes are active in developing seeds, but with differential expression patterns in yellow- and black-seeded near-isogenic lines. For functional analyses, three black-seeded B. napus cultivars were chosen for transgenic studies. Transgenic B. napus plants expressing antisense TT10 constructs exhibited retarded pigmentation in the seed coat. Chemical composition analysis revealed increased levels of soluble proanthocyanidins, and decreased extractable lignin in the seed coats of these transgenic plants compared with that of the controls. These findings indicate a role for the Brassica TT10 genes in proanthocyanidin polymerization and lignin biosynthesis, as well as seed coat pigmentation in B. napus.

  16. Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT): A New Item Response Theory-based Measure of Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    HAHN, ELIZABETH A.; CHOI, SEUNG W.; GRIFFITH, JAMES W.; YOST, KATHLEEN J.; BAKER, DAVID W.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of health literacy has grown considerably among researchers, clinicians, patients and policymakers. Better instruments and measurement strategies are needed. Our objective was to develop a new health literacy instrument using novel health information technology and modern psychometrics. We designed Health LiTT as a self-administered multimedia touchscreen test based on item response theory (IRT) principles. We enrolled a diverse group of 619 English-speaking primary care patients in clinics for underserved patients. We tested three item types (prose, document, quantitative) that worked well together to reliably measure a single dimension of health literacy. The Health LiTT score meets psychometric standards (reliability of 0.90 or higher) for measurement of individual respondents in the low to middle range. Mean Health LiTT scores were associated with age, race/ethnicity, education, income and prior computer use (p<0.05). We created an IRT-calibrated item bank of 82 items. Standard setting needs to be performed to classify and map items onto the construct and to identify measurement gaps. We are incorporating Health LiTT into an existing online research management tool. This will enable administration of Health LiTT on the same touchscreen used for other patient-reported outcomes, as well as real-time scoring and reporting of health literacy scores. PMID:21951249

  17. Vacuolar protein sorting protein 13A, TtVPS13A, localizes to the tetrahymena thermophila phagosome membrane and is required for efficient phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Haresha S; Cowan, Ann E; Klobutcher, Lawrence A

    2011-09-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting 13 (VPS13) proteins have been studied in a number of organisms, and mutations in VPS13 genes have been implicated in two human genetic disorders, but the function of these proteins is poorly understood. The TtVPS13A protein was previously identified in a mass spectrometry analysis of the Tetrahymena thermophila phagosome proteome (M. E. Jacobs et al., Eukaryot. Cell 5:1990-2000, 2006), suggesting that it is involved in phagocytosis. In this study, we analyzed the structure of the macronuclear TtVPS13A gene, which was found to be composed of 17 exons spanning 12.5 kb and was predicted to encode a protein of 3,475 amino acids (aa). A strain expressing a TtVPS13A-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was constructed, and the protein was found to associate with the phagosome membrane during the entire cycle of phagocytosis. In addition, Tetrahymena cells with a TtVPS13A knockout mutation displayed impaired phagocytosis. Specifically, they grew slowly under conditions where phagocytosis is essential, they formed few phagosomes, and the digestion of phagosomal contents was delayed compared to wild-type cells. Overall, these results provide evidence that the TtVPS13A protein is required for efficient phagocytosis.

  18. Inflammation-related cytokine gene polymorphisms in Behçet’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Okaily, Fahda; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Rashidi, Seham; Al-Balawi, Maysoon; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Behçet’s disease (BD) is a complex, multisystemic inflammatory disorder of unclear etiology. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10 genes have been implicated in susceptibility to BD with inconsistent results in several ethnic populations. The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate the association of TNF-α (−308G/A), TNF-β (+252A/G), and IL-10 (−1082G/A, −819C/T, and −592 C/A) polymorphisms with susceptibility of BD in Saudi patients. Molecular genotyping of TNF-α, TNF-β, and IL-10 gene polymorphisms was performed to analyze the alleles and genotypes distribution in 272 Saudi subjects, including BD patients (61) and healthy controls (211). The frequencies of allele A and genotype GA of TNF-α (−308G/A) were significantly higher, whereas those of allele G and genotypes GG were significantly lower in BD patients than controls, indicating that A allele and GA genotype are susceptible, while G allele and GG genotype may be refractory to BD. The distribution of frequencies of alleles and genotype of TNF-β (+252A/G) promoter polymorphism was not significantly different between BD patients and healthy controls. Genotypes 1082GG, −819TT, and 592AA of IL-10 polymorphisms are significantly associated with susceptibility risk of BD, while genotypes 1082AA, 1082GA, 819CC, 819CT, 592CC, and 592CA are resistant to BD. This study indicates that TNF-α (−308G/A) and IL-10 (−1082G/A, −819C/T, and −592C/A) polymorphisms are associated with risk of BD susceptibility in Saudi patients. However, larger scale studies in Saudi population as well as in other ethnicities are needed to confirm this association. PMID:26451120

  19. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2012-06-19

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(lνl)(τhντ)bb¯, (l=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb⁻¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb⁻¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  20. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Dybowska, Dorota; Tretyn, Andrzej; Halota, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B) polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR) after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer’s modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P < 0.001). We found no differences in IP10 expression between the IL28B genotypes (P > 0.05); in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007). We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004). Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients. PMID:26115415

  1. UGT genotyping in belinostat dosing.

    PubMed

    Goey, Andrew K L; Figg, William D

    2016-03-01

    Certain genetic polymorphisms of UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) can reduce gene expression (*28, *60, *93) or activity (*6), thereby altering the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and the risk of toxicities of UGT1A1 substrates, of which irinotecan is a widely-described example. This review presents an overview of the clinical effects of UGT1A1 polymorphisms on the pharmacology of UGT1A1 substrates, with a special focus on the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat. Belinostat, approved for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, is primarily glucuronidated by UGT1A1. Recent preclinical and clinical data showed that UGT1A1*28 was associated with reduced glucuronidation in human liver microsomes, while in a retrospective analysis of a Phase I trial with patients receiving belinostat UGT1A1*60 was predominantly associated with increased belinostat plasma concentrations. Furthermore, both UGT1A1*28 and *60 variants were associated with increased incidence of thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Using population pharmacokinetic analysis a 33% dose reduction has been proposed for patients carrying UGT1A1 variant alleles. Clinical effects of this genotype-based dosing recommendation is currently prospectively being investigated. Overall, the data suggest that UGT1A1 genotyping is useful for improving belinostat therapy. PMID:26773202

  2. Evaluation of the modifying effects of unfavourable genotypes on classical clinical risk factors for ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Szolnoki, Z; Somogyvari, F; Kondacs, A; Szabo, M; Fodor, L; Bene, J; Melegh, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Ischaemic stroke is a frequent heterogeneous multifactorial disease that is affected by a number of genetic mutations and environmental factors. We hypothesised the clinical importance of the interactions between common, unfavourable genetic mutations and clinical risk factors in the development of ischaemic stroke. Methods: The Factor V Leiden G1691A (Leiden V), the prothrombin G20210A, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR C677T) mutations, the angiotensin converting enzyme I/D (ACE I/D), and apolipoprotein allele e4 (APO e4) genotypes were examined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in 867 ischaemic stroke patients and 743 healthy controls. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the roles of the co-occurrences of the clinical risk factors and common genetic mutations in ischaemic stroke. Results: The Leiden V mutation in combination with hypertension or diabetes mellitus increased the risk of ischaemic stroke. We found synergistic effects between the ACE D/D and MTHFR 677TT genotypes and drinking or smoking. The presence of the APO e4 greatly facilitated the unfavourable effects of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, or drinking on the incidence of ischaemic stroke. Conclusion: In certain combinations, pairing of common unfavourable genetic factors, which alone confer only minor or non-significant risk, with clinical risk factors can greatly increase the susceptibility to ischaemic stroke. PMID:14638877

  3. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  4. Impact of IL28B gene polymorphisms rs8099917 and rs12980275 on response to pegylated interferon-α/ribavirin therapy in chronic hepatitis C genotype 4 patients

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Mahmoud A; Abdelghany, Hend M; Ramzy, Maggie M; Khairy, Rasha M

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Host genetic factors may predict the outcome and treatment response in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of these factors is the single nucleotide polymorphisms of the interleukin 28B (IL28B) gene. We sought to evaluate the outcome of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy in association with IL-28B rs8099917 and rs12980275 in patients infected with HCV genotype 4. A total of 180 patients with chronic hepatitis C were selected from Egyptians who have received combined therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 6 months and their response was evaluated after follow-up at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48 weeks from the beginning of the therapy. Blood samples were collected from responders and non-responders. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood and genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Our results showed that TT genotype of rs8099917 was associated with higher sustained viral response (SVR) rates and G allele represented a risk factor for failure of response (OR = 3.7, CI = 1.8:7.64) while rs12980275 was not significantly associated with SVR in genotype 4 Egyptian patients. The determination of IL-28B SNPs may be useful in enhancing correct prediction of SVR achievement in treating this group of genotype 4 patients.

  5. Correlation between Genetic Variations and Serum Level of Interleukin 28B with Virus Genotypes and Disease Progression in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Al-Anazi, Mashael; Abdo, Ayman A.; Sanai, Faisal M.; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alswat, Khalid A.; Al-Ashgar, Hamad I.; Khan, Mohammed Q.; Khalaf, Nisreen; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that polymorphisms near the interleukin-28B (IL-28B) gene could predict the response to Peg-IFN-a/RBV combination therapy in HCV-infected patients. The aim of the study was to correlate the serum level of IL28B in HCV-infected patients with virus genotype/subgenotype and disease progression. IL28B serum level was detected and variations at five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL28B gene region were genotyped and analyzed. The variation of IL28B genetic polymorphisms was found to be strongly associated with HCV infection when healthy control group was compared to HCV-infected patients with all P values <0.0001. Functional analysis revealed that subjects carrying rs8099917-GG genotype had higher serum level of IL28B than those with GT or TT genotypes (P = 0.04). Also, patients who were presented with cirrhosis (Cirr) only or with cirrhosis plus hepatocellular carcinoma (Cirr+HCC) had higher levels of serum IL28B when compared to chronic HCV-infected patients (P = 0.005 and 0.003, resp.). No significant association was found when serum levels of IL28B were compared to virus genotypes/subgenotypes. This study indicates that variation at SNP rs8099917 could predict the serum levels of IL28B in HCV-infected patients. Furthermore, IL28B serum level may serve as a useful marker for the development of HCV-associated sequelae. PMID:25811035

  6. Mitochondrial DNA copy number - but not a mitochondrial tandem CC to TT transition - is increased in sun-exposed skin.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Daniel; Mahler, Bettina; Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Bergemann, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are causatively associated with photo-ageing and are used as biomarkers of UV exposure. The most prominent mitochondrial mutation is the common deletion (CD), which is induced in many tissues by oxidative stress. More photo-specific mutations might be CC to TT tandem transitions which arise from UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. As nucleotide excision repair is absent in mitochondria, this DNA damage can presumably not be repaired resulting in high mitochondrial mutation levels. Here, we analysed levels of the CD, a mitochondrial and a chromosomal tandem transition in epidermis and dermis from exposed and less UV-exposed skin. We also analysed mtDNA copy number, for which changes as a result of oxidative stress have been described in different experimental settings. Whereas mitochondrial tandem transition levels were surprisingly low with no discernible correlation with UV exposure, mtDNA copy number and CD were significantly increased in UV-exposed samples.

  7. Prospective Universal Application of Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping To Characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates for Fast Identification of Clustered and Orphan Cases▿

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Rodriguez, Noelia; Martínez-Lirola, Miguel; Sánchez, M. Luisa; Herranz, Marta; Peñafiel, Teresa; Bonillo, Magdalena del Carmen; Gonzalez-Rivera, Milagros; Martínez, Juan; Cabezas, Teresa; Diez-García, Luis Felipe; Bouza, Emilio; García de Viedma, Darío

    2009-01-01

    The use of molecular tools for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in epidemiological surveys in order to identify clustered and orphan strains requires faster response times than those offered by the reference method, IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping. A method based on PCR, the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) genotyping technique, is an option for fast fingerprinting of M. tuberculosis, although precise evaluations of correlation between MIRU-VNTR and RFLP findings in population-based studies in different contexts are required before the methods are switched. In this study, we evaluated MIRU-VNTR genotyping (with a set of 15 loci [MIRU-15]) in parallel to RFLP genotyping in a 39-month universal population-based study in a challenging setting with a high proportion of immigrants. For 81.9% (281/343) of the M. tuberculosis isolates, both RFLP and MIRU-VNTR types were obtained. The percentages of clustered cases were 39.9% (112/281) and 43.1% (121/281) for RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, and the numbers of clusters identified were 42 and 45, respectively. For 85.4% of the cases, the RFLP and MIRU-15 results were concordant, identifying the same cases as clustered and orphan (kappa, 0.7). However, for the remaining 14.6% of the cases, discrepancies were observed: 16 of the cases clustered by RFLP analysis were identified as orphan by MIRU-15 analysis, and 25 cases identified as orphan by RFLP analysis were clustered by MIRU-15 analysis. When discrepant cases showing subtle genotypic differences were tolerated, the discrepancies fell from 14.6% to 8.6%. Epidemiological links were found for 83.8% of the cases clustered by both RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, whereas for the cases clustered by RFLP or MIRU-VNTR analysis alone, links were identified for only 30.8% or 38.9% of the cases, respectively. The latter group of cases mainly comprised isolates that could also have been clustered

  8. Additional novel Cryptosporidium genotypes in ornamental fishes.

    PubMed

    Morine, M; Yang, R; Ng, J; Kueh, S; Lymbery, A J; Ryan, U M

    2012-12-21

    Current knowledge on the prevalence and genotypes of Cryptosporidium in fishes is still limited. This study investigated the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in 171 ornamental fishes, belonging to 33 species, collected from 8 commercial aquariums around Perth, Western Australia. All samples were screened by nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA locus. A total of 6 positives were identified by PCR at the 18S locus from 4 different species of fishes (red eye tetra, Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae; gold gourami, Trichogaster trichopterus; neon tetra, Paracheirodon innesi; goldfish, Carassius auratus auratus), giving an overall prevalence of 3.5% (6/171). Four different genotypes were identified, only one of which has been previously reported in fish; piscine genotype 4 in a neon tetra isolate, a rat genotype III-like isolate in a goldfish, a novel genotype in three isolates from red eye (piscine genotype 7) which exhibited a 3.5% genetic distance from piscine genotype 1 and a piscine genotype 6-like from a gold gourami (1% genetic distance). Further biological and genetic characterisation is required to determine the relationship of these genotypes to established species and strains of Cryptosporidium. PMID:22819587

  9. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  10. Using DNA pools for genotyping trios.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Kenneth B; Abel, Kenneth J; Braun, Andreas; Halperin, Eran

    2006-01-01

    The genotyping of mother-father-child trios is a very useful tool in disease association studies, as trios eliminate population stratification effects and increase the accuracy of haplotype inference. Unfortunately, the use of trios for association studies may reduce power, since it requires the genotyping of three individuals where only four independent haplotypes are involved. We describe here a method for genotyping a trio using two DNA pools, thus reducing the cost of genotyping trios to that of genotyping two individuals. Furthermore, we present extensions to the method that exploit the linkage disequilibrium structure to compensate for missing data and genotyping errors. We evaluated our method on trios from CEPH pedigree 66 of the Coriell Institute. We demonstrate that the error rates in the genotype calls of the proposed protocol are comparable to those of standard genotyping techniques, although the cost is reduced considerably. The approach described is generic and it can be applied to any genotyping platform that achieves a reasonable precision of allele frequency estimates from pools of two individuals. Using this approach, future trio-based association studies may be able to increase the sample size by 50% for the same cost and thereby increase the power to detect associations.

  11. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  12. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis.

  13. minimac2: faster genotype imputation

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hinds, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Genotype imputation is a key step in the analysis of genome-wide association studies. Upcoming very large reference panels, such as those from The 1000 Genomes Project and the Haplotype Consortium, will improve imputation quality of rare and less common variants, but will also increase the computational burden. Here, we demonstrate how the application of software engineering techniques can help to keep imputation broadly accessible. Overall, these improvements speed up imputation by an order of magnitude compared with our previous implementation. Availability and implementation: minimac2, including source code, documentation, and examples is available at http://genome.sph.umich.edu/wiki/Minimac2 Contact: cfuchsb@umich.edu, goncalo@umich.edu PMID:25338720

  14. Chikungunya Outbreaks Caused by African Genotype, India

    PubMed Central

    Yergolkar, Prasanna N.; Tandale, Babasaheb V.; Arankalle, Vidya A.; Sathe, Padmakar S.; Gandhe, Swati S.; Gokhle, Mangesh D.; Jacob, George P.; Hundekar, Supriya L.

    2006-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is reported in India after 32 years. Immunoglobulin M antibodies and virus isolation confirmed the cause. Phylogenic analysis based on partial sequences of NS4 and E1 genes showed that all earlier isolates (1963–1973) were Asian genotype, whereas the current and Yawat (2000) isolates were African genotype. PMID:17176577

  15. Disentangling pooled triad genotypes for association studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Umbach, David M; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2014-09-01

    Association studies that genotype affected offspring and their parents (triads) offer robustness to genetic population structure while enabling assessments of maternal effects, parent-of-origin effects, and gene-by-environment interaction. We propose case-parents designs that use pooled DNA specimens to make economical use of limited available specimens. One can markedly reduce the number of genotyping assays required by randomly partitioning the case-parent triads into pooling sets of h triads each and creating three pools from every pooling set, one pool each for mothers, fathers, and offspring. Maximum-likelihood estimation of relative risk parameters proceeds via log-linear modeling using the expectation-maximization algorithm. The approach can assess offspring and maternal genetic effects and accommodate genotyping errors and missing genotypes. We compare the power of our proposed analysis for testing offspring and maternal genetic effects to that based on a difference approach and that of the gold standard based on individual genotypes, under a range of allele frequencies, missing parent proportions, and genotyping error rates. Power calculations show that the pooling strategies cause only modest reductions in power if genotyping errors are low, while reducing genotyping costs and conserving limited specimens.

  16. Estimating Genotype- and Environment-Specific Heritabilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advantages of computing genotype- and environment-specific heritabilities are discussed. A statistical approach is used in which logvariances of both genotype by environment interaction and error are modeled as random variables. Resulting estimators of variances are weighted averages of a pool...

  17. Using genotypic information to reduce disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this presentation is to provide a cursory overview of how genotypic data may be utilized by veterinarians in the future. Genotypic information is accumulating at a rapid pace. This information may reveal deleterious genes, quantitative trait loci, and genetic predisposition for a ...

  18. Filling in missing genotypes using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unknown genotypes can be made known (imputed) from observed genotypes at the same or nearby loci of relatives using pedigree haplotyping, or from matching allele patterns (regardless of pedigree) using population haplotyping. Fortran program findhap.f90 was designed to combine population and pedigre...

  19. New cryptosporidium genotypes in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed Central

    Pieniazek, N. J.; Bornay-Llinares, F. J.; Slemenda, S. B.; da Silva, A. J.; Moura, I. N.; Arrowood, M. J.; Ditrich, O.; Addiss, D. G.

    1999-01-01

    Using DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, we identified four distinct Cryptosporidium genotypes in HIV-infected patients: genotype 1 (human), genotype 2 (bovine) Cryptosporidium parvum, a genotype identical to C. felis, and one identical to a Cryptosporidium sp. isolate from a dog. This is the first identification of human infection with the latter two genotypes. PMID:10341184

  20. Discovery and characterization of RecA protein of thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 that increases specificity of a PCR-based DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Aleksandra; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Plotka, Magdalena; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2014-07-20

    The recA gene of newly discovered Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 (Myoviridae) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The 1020-bp gene codes for a 339-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 38,155 which shows 38.7% positional identity to the E. coli RecA protein. When expressed in E. coli, the Tt72 recA gene did not confer the ability to complement the ultraviolet light (254nm) sensitivity of an E. coli recA mutant. Tt72 RecA protein has been purified with good yield to catalytic and electrophoretic homogeneity using a three-step chromatography procedure. Biochemical characterization indicated that the protein can pair and promote ATP-dependent strand exchange reaction resulting in formation of a heteroduplex DNA at 60°C under conditions otherwise optimal for E. coli RecA. When the Tt72 RecA protein was included in a standard PCR-based DNA amplification reaction, the specificity of the PCR assays was significantly improved by eliminating non-specific products.

  1. The intramolecular impact to the sequence specificity of B-->A transition: low energy conformational variations in AA/TT and GG/CC steps.

    PubMed

    Il'icheva, I A; Vlasov, P K; Esipova, N G; Tumanyan, V G

    2010-04-01

    It is well known, that local B--> A transformation in DNA is involved in several biological processes. In vitro B<--> A transition is sequence-specific. The physical basis of this specificity is not known yet. Here we analyze the effect of intramolecular interactions on the structural behavior of the GG/CC and AA/TT steps. These steps exemplify sequence specific bias to the B- or A-form structure. Optimization of potential energy of the molecular systems composed of an octanucleotide, neutralized by Na(+) and solvated with TIP3P water molecules in rectangular box with periodic boundary conditions gives the statistically representative sets of low energy structures for GG/CC and AA/TT steps in the middle of the diverse flanking sequences. Permissible 3D variations of GG/CC and AA/TT, and correlation of the relative motion of base pairs in these steps were analyzed. AA/TT step permits high variability for low energy conformers in the B-form DNA and small variability for low energy conformers in the A-form DNA. In contrast GG/CC step permits high variability for low energy conformers in the A-form DNA and small variability for low energy conformers in the B-form DNA. The relative motion of base pairs in GG/CC step is high correlated, while in AA/TT step this correlation is notably less. Atom-atom interactions inside-the-step always favors the B-form and their component - stacking interactions (atom-atom interactions between nucleic bases) is crucial for the duplex stabilization. Formation of the A-form for both steps is a result of interactions with the flanking sequences and water-cation environment in the box. The average energy difference between conformations presenting B-form and A-form for the GG/CC step is high, while for the AA/TT step it is rather low. Thus, intramolecular interactions in GG/CC and AA/TT steps affect the possible conformational diversity ("conformational entropy") of the A- and B- type structures of DNA step. This determines the known bias of

  2. The Intramolecular Impact to the Sequence Specificity of B→A Transition: Low Energy Conformational Variations in AA/TT and GG/CC Steps.

    PubMed

    Il'icheva, I A; Vlasov, P K; Esipova, N G; Tumanyan, V G

    2010-04-01

    Abstract It is well known, that local B→A transformation in DNA is involved in several biological processes. In vitro B↔A transition is sequence-specific. The physical basis of this specificity is not known yet. Here we analyze the effect of intramolecular interactions on the structural behavior of the GG/CC and AA/TT steps. These steps exemplify sequence specific bias to the B- or A-form structure. Optimization of potential energy of the molecular systems composed of an octanucle-otide, neutralized by Na(+) and solvated with TIP3P water molecules in rectangular box with periodic boundary conditions gives the statistically representative sets of low energy structures for GG/CC and AA/TT steps in the middle of the diverse flanking sequences. Permissible 3D variations of GG/CC and AA/TT, and correlation of the relative motion of base pairs in these steps were analyzed. AA/TT step permits high variability for low energy conformers in the B-form DNA and small variability for low energy conformers in the A-form DNA. In contrast GG/CC step permits high variability for low energy conformers in the A-form DNA and small variability for low energy conformers in the B-form DNA. The relative motion of base pairs in GG/CC step is high correlated, while in AA/TT step this correlation is notably less. Atom-atom interactions inside-the-step always favors the B-form and their component - stacking interactions (atomatom interactions between nucleic bases) is crucial for the duplex stabilization. Formation of the A-form for both steps is a result of interactions with the flanking sequences and water-cation environment in the box. The average energy difference between conformations presenting B-form and A-form for the GG/CC step is high, while for the AA/TT step it is rather low. Thus, intramolecular interactions in GG/CC and AA/TT steps affect the possible conformational diversity ("conformational entropy") of the A- and B- type structures of DNA step. This determines the known

  3. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Anisometry of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Patella Alta and Increased Tibial Tubercle-Trochlear Groove (TT-TG) Distance

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H.; Meyers, Kathleen N.; Munch, Jacqueline; Dennis, Elizabeth R.; Nguyen, Joseph; Stein, Beth E. Shubin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a common procedure to treat recurrent patellofemoral instability. However, the effects of an elevated tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance and patella alta, as measured by the Caton-Deschamps (C/D) ratio, on MPFL isometry remain unclear. We hypothesized that increased lateralization and proximalization of the tibial tubercle (TT) will have increasingly adverse effects on the isometry of the MPFL. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were placed on a custom testing fixture, with a fixed femur and tibia mobile through 120 degrees of flexion. The quadriceps tendon was loaded with 10.8 N in an anatomic direction using a weighted pulley system. A 0.2 N patellar lateral displacement load was used to simulate an intact lateral retinaculum to avoid over-medializing the patella. A tunnel was drilled under fluoroscopic guidance from Schottle’s point on the medial distal femur through the lateral cortex. A suture anchor was placed at the upper 66% of the medial border of the patella and the sutures were shuttled through to the lateral side and attached to a pulley with a 1 N weight. Retroreflective markers were attached to the femur, tibia, patella, and suture. MPFL length change, as measured by suture marker motion, was assessed using a 3D motion capture system through a range of motion between 0 deg and 110 deg with the native TT anatomy. Recordings were repeated after a flat TT osteotomy and transfer to a TT-TG of 20 mm and 25 mm and a C/D ratio of 1.2 and 1.4, including all combinations. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) modeling technique was used to analyze and control for the clustered nature of the data. SAS version 9.3 (SAS Inc., Cary, NC) was used for all data analyses. Results: Analysis was performed on 9 specimens secondary to significant deviations in the baseline normative data. Intact knees showed MPFL isometry through 20-70 degrees range of motion. Tibial tubercle

  5. Gene Silencing of BnTT10 Family Genes Causes Retarded Pigmentation and Lignin Reduction in the Seed Coat of Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Lu, Kun; Qu, Cunmin; Liang, Ying; Wang, Rui; Chai, Yourong; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    Yellow-seed (i.e., yellow seed coat) is one of the most important agronomic traits of Brassica plants, which is correlated with seed oil and meal qualities. Previous studies on the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis and Brassica species, proposed that the seed-color trait is correlative to flavonoid and lignin biosynthesis, at the molecular level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the oxidative polymerization of flavonoid and biosynthesis of lignin has been demonstrated to be catalyzed by laccase 15, a functional enzyme encoded by the AtTT10 gene. In this study, eight Brassica TT10 genes (three from B. napus, three from B. rapa and two from B. oleracea) were isolated and their roles in flavonoid oxidation/polymerization and lignin biosynthesis were investigated. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, these genes could be divided into two groups with obvious structural and functional differentiation. Expression studies showed that Brassica TT10 genes are active in developing seeds, but with differential expression patterns in yellow- and black-seeded near-isogenic lines. For functional analyses, three black-seeded B. napus cultivars were chosen for transgenic studies. Transgenic B. napus plants expressing antisense TT10 constructs exhibited retarded pigmentation in the seed coat. Chemical composition analysis revealed increased levels of soluble proanthocyanidins, and decreased extractable lignin in the seed coats of these transgenic plants compared with that of the controls. These findings indicate a role for the Brassica TT10 genes in proanthocyanidin polymerization and lignin biosynthesis, as well as seed coat pigmentation in B. napus. PMID:23613820

  6. A search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp̄ collision data at √s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt̄ candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt̄ production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt̄ pairs. A benchmark model of leptophobic Z' → tt̄ is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  7. A search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp̄ collision data at √s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt̄ candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt̄ production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt̄ pairs. A benchmark modelmore » of leptophobic Z' → tt̄ is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  8. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  9. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Tirana, Albania.

    PubMed

    Haldeda, Migena; Baume, Julien; Tamalet, Catherine; Bizhga, Melpomeni; Colson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide concern. Knowledge of the HCV genotype is clinically important because it predicts the rate of response to therapy and guides the treatment duration. Moreover, it allows molecular epidemiology to be performed. To our knowledge, the prevalence of HCV genotypes has been assessed only once in Albania, using a line probe genotyping assay. We determined HCV genotypes by population sequencing of HCV-infected patients in Tirana, Albania. HCV genotype and sequence analyses were performed for serum samples collected from January 2011 through May 2012 from 61 HCV-seropositive patients using population sequencing of the NS3 protease gene and alternatively the NS5b gene and the 5' untranslated region (UTR). HCV RNA was retrieved from the blood samples of 50 patients. The HCV NS3 protease gene was sequenced for 28 patients and NS5b and/or 5'UTR fragments were sequenced for an additional 22 patients. The predominant genotype was 1b in 25 patients (50%), followed by genotypes 2c, 4a, 3a, and 1a in 18%, 14%, 8%, and 6% of cases, respectively. Best matches for these HCV RNAs in GenBank were obtained in different countries worldwide. One NS3 protease naturally harbored an amino acid conferring minor drug resistance to newly available HCV protease inhibitors. In conclusion, HCV-1b was predominant in the present Albanian population, as in southeastern Europe.

  10. ACTN3 genotype in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Santiago, C; González-Freire, M; Serratosa, L; Morate, F J; Meyer, T; Gómez-Gallego, F; Lucia, A

    2008-01-01

    The authors studied the frequency distribution of alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) R577X genotypes in 60 top-level professional soccer players. The results were compared with those of 52 elite endurance athletes and 123 sedentary controls. The per cent distribution of RR and RX genotypes in soccer players (48.3% and 36.7%) was significantly higher and lower, respectively, than controls (28.5% and 53.7%) and endurance athletes (26.5% and 52%) (p = 0.041). Although there are notable exceptions, elite soccer players tend to have the sprint/power ACTN3 genotype.

  11. Clinical significance of human papillomavirus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main causative agent for its development. HPV is a heterogeneous virus, and a persistent infection with a high-risk HPV contributes to the development of cancer. In recent decades, great advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of HPV, and HPV's significance in cervical cancer prevention and management has received increased attention. In this review, we discuss the role of HPV genotyping in cervical cancer by addressing: clinically important issues in HPV virology; the current application of HPV genotyping in clinical medicine; and potential future uses for HPV genotyping.

  12. The relationship between alcohol consumption, perceived stress, and CRHR1 genotype on the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis in rural African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Obasi, Ezemenari M.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Brody, Gene H.; MacKillop, James; Pittman, Delishia M.; Cavanagh, Lucia; Philibert, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Rurally situated African Americans suffer from stress and drug-related health disparities. Unfortunately, research on potential mechanisms that underlie this public health problem have received limited focus in the scientific literature. This study investigated the effects of perceived stress, alcohol consumption, and genotype on the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) Axis. Methods: A rural sample of African American emerging adults (n = 84) completed a battery of assessments and provided six samples of salivary cortisol at wakeup, 30 min post wakeup, 90 min post wakeup, 3:00 PM, 3:30 PM, and 4:30 PM. Results: Participants with a TT genotype of the CRHR1 (rs4792887) gene tended to produce the most basal cortisol throughout the day while participants with a CC genotype produced the least amount. Increased levels of perceived stress or alcohol consumption were associated with a blunted cortisol awakening response (CAR). Moreover, the CAR was obliterated for participants who reported both higher stress and alcohol consumption. Conclusion: Perceived stress and alcohol consumption had a deleterious effect on the HPA-Axis. Furthermore, genotype predicted level of cortisol production throughout the day. These findings support the need to further investigate the relationship between stress dysregulation, drug-use vulnerability, and associated health disparities that affect this community. PMID:26150798

  13. Oxidative stress-related genotypes, fruit and vegetable consumption and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulin; Ambrosone, Christine B; McCullough, Marjorie J; Ahn, Jiyoung; Stevens, Victoria L; Thun, Michael J; Hong, Chi-Chen

    2009-05-01

    Dietary antioxidants may interact with endogenous sources of pro- and antioxidants to impact breast cancer risk. A nested case-control study of postmenopausal women (505 cases and 502 controls) from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort was conducted to examine the interaction between oxidative stress-related genes and level of vegetable and fruit intake on breast cancer risk. Genetic variations in catalase (CAT) (C-262T), myeloperoxidase (MPO) (G-463A), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) (G894T) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) [(GT)(n) dinucleotide length polymorphism] were not associated with breast cancer risk. Women carrying the low-risk CAT CC [odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-1.11], NOS3 TT (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.26-1.12, P-trend = 0.10) or HO-1 S allele and MM genotype (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.37-0.55), however, were found to be at non-significantly reduced breast cancer risk among those with high vegetable and fruit intake (> or = median; P-interactions = 0.04 for CAT, P = 0.005 for NOS3 and P = 0.07 for HO-1). Furthermore, those with > or = 4 putative low-risk alleles in total had significantly reduced risk (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.32-0.88, P-interaction = 0.006) compared with those with < or = 2 low-risk alleles. In contrast, among women with low vegetable and fruit intake (< median), the low-risk CAT CC (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 0.89-1.99), NOS3 TT (OR = 2.93, 95% CI = 1.38-6.22) and MPO AA (OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 0.73-5.95) genotypes appeared to be associated with raised breast cancer risk, with significantly increased risks observed in those with > or = 4 low-risk alleles compared with participants with < or = 2 low-risk alleles (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05-2.99, P-interaction = 0.006). Our results support the hypothesis that there are joint effects of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants.

  14. A revised chronology for the Grotte Vaufrey (Dordogne, France) based on TT-OSL dating of sedimentary quartz.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Marion; Mercier, Norbert; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Texier, Jean-Pierre; Delpech, Françoise

    2014-10-01

    Grotte Vaufrey, located in the Dordogne region of southwestern France, is well known for its substantial archaeological sequence containing a succession of Acheulean and Mousterian occupations. While over the last thirty years numerous studies have attempted to outline a detailed chronostratigraphy for this important sequence, the failure to employ a common chronological framework has complicated its interpretation. Here, we aim to resolve these inconsistencies by providing a new chronology for the site based on luminescence dating. To this end, thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dates were obtained from eight sediment samples distributed throughout the sequence, which, when combined with already available chronological information, produce a new chronostratigraphic model for the site. Our results demonstrate that the Typical Mousterian extends from MIS 7 to MIS 5, while the earliest Acheulean occupation could be associated with MIS 8 and may date to as early as MIS 10. When compared with other regional sequences, the Acheulean levels from the Grotte Vaufrey provide evidence for one of the earliest hominin occupations in southwestern France. PMID:25200888

  15. Improved performance of polymer solar cells using PBDTT-F-TT:PC71BM blend film as active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Yue; Gao, Xiumin; Lu, Xinmiao; Xin, Qing; Lin, Jun; Zhao, Jufeng

    2016-07-01

    A detailed study of high-efficiency polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on a low bandgap polymer PBDTT-F-TT and PC71BM as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. By using 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) as solvent additive to control the morphology of active layer and comparing different device architecture to optimize the optical field distribution, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the resulted devices can be reached as high as 9.34%. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of DIO and device geometry on photovoltaic performance. It was found that the addition of DIO can significantly improve the nanoscale morphology and increased electron mobility in the BHJ layer. The inverted device architecture was chosen because the results from optical modeling shows that it offers better optical field distribution and exciton generation profile. Based on these results, a low-temperature processed ZnO was finally introduced as an electron transport layer to facility the fabrication on flexible substrates and showed comparable performance with the device based on conventional ZnO interlayer prepared by sol-gel process.

  16. A revised chronology for the Grotte Vaufrey (Dordogne, France) based on TT-OSL dating of sedimentary quartz.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Marion; Mercier, Norbert; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Texier, Jean-Pierre; Delpech, Françoise

    2014-10-01

    Grotte Vaufrey, located in the Dordogne region of southwestern France, is well known for its substantial archaeological sequence containing a succession of Acheulean and Mousterian occupations. While over the last thirty years numerous studies have attempted to outline a detailed chronostratigraphy for this important sequence, the failure to employ a common chronological framework has complicated its interpretation. Here, we aim to resolve these inconsistencies by providing a new chronology for the site based on luminescence dating. To this end, thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dates were obtained from eight sediment samples distributed throughout the sequence, which, when combined with already available chronological information, produce a new chronostratigraphic model for the site. Our results demonstrate that the Typical Mousterian extends from MIS 7 to MIS 5, while the earliest Acheulean occupation could be associated with MIS 8 and may date to as early as MIS 10. When compared with other regional sequences, the Acheulean levels from the Grotte Vaufrey provide evidence for one of the earliest hominin occupations in southwestern France.

  17. Can Clustering in Genotype Space Reveal "Niches"?

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Rafael; Ostling, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Community ecology lacks the success enjoyed by population genetics to quantify the relative roles played by deterministic and stochastic processes. It has been proposed that clustered patterns of abundance in genotype space provide evidence of selection in microbial communities, since no such clustering would arise in the absence of selection. We critique this test for its unrealistic null hypothesis. We show mathematically and with simulations that point mutations alone lead to clustering in genotype space by causing correlations between abundances of similar genotypes. We also show potential deviations from the mutation-only pattern caused by immigration from a source pool. Clustered patterns in genotype space may still be revealing of selection if analyzed quantitatively but only if neutral and selective regimes can be distinguished once mutation and immigration are included in the null model.

  18. Rapid genotyping of swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Mak, Polly W Y; Wong, Chloe K S; Li, Olive T W; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S; Webby, Richard J; Guan, Yi; Malik Peiris, Joseph S; Poon, Leo L M

    2011-04-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse-transcription PCR-based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages.

  19. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  20. XYY genotype and crime: 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Freyne, A; O'Connor, A

    1992-07-01

    The presence of 47, XYY genotype has stimulated much debate as to whether these men are more likely to indulge in criminal and violent behaviour than 46, XY males. Two cases of XYY men who had committed murder are described, and the current literature regarding criminality and psychopathology in XYY males is reviewed. It is important that Forensic Psychiatrists with XYY patients are aware of these issues as the link between XYY genotype and criminality may be raised in court.

  1. Genotypic analysis of β-tubulin in Onchocerca volvulus from communities and individuals showing poor parasitological response to ivermectin treatment.

    PubMed

    Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Boakye, Daniel A; Awadzi, Kwablah; Gyapong, John O; Prichard, Roger K

    2012-12-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) has been in operational use for the control of onchocerciasis for two decades and remains the only drug of choice. To investigate the parasitological responses and genetic profile of Onchocerca volvulus, we carried out a 21 month epidemiological study to determine the response of the parasite to IVM in 10 Ghanaian endemic communities. Onchocerca nodules were surgically removed from patients in three IVM response categories (good, intermediate and poor) and one IVM naïve community. DNA from adult worms was analyzed to determine any association between genotype and IVM response phenotypic. Embryogramme analysis showed significantly higher reproductive activity in worms from poor response communities, which had up to 41% of females with live stretched microfilaria (mf) in utero, despite IVM treatment, compared with good response communities, which had no intra-uterine stretched mf. β-tubulin isotype 1 gene has been shown to be linked to IVM selection in O. volvulus and also known to be associated with IVM resistance in veterinary nematodes. We have genotyped the full length genomic DNA sequence of the β-tubulin gene from 127 adult worms obtained from the four community categories. We found SNPs at 24 sites over the entire 3696 bp. Eight of the SNPs occurred at significantly higher (p < 0.05) frequencies in the poor response communities compared with the good response communities and the IVM naïve community. Phenotypic and genotypic analyses show that IVM resistance has been selected and the genotype (1183GG/1188CC/1308TT/1545GG) was strongly associated with the resistance phenotype. Since the region in the β-tubulin gene where these four SNPs occur is within 362 bp, it is feasible to develop a genetic marker for the early detection of IVM resistance. PMID:24533268

  2. Polymorphism of IL-28B Gene (rs12979860) in HCV Genotype 1Patients Treated by Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Safarnezhad Tameshkel, Fahimeh; Karbalaie Niya, Mohammad Hadi; Sohrabi, Msuodreza; Panahi, Mahshid; Zamani, Farhad; Imanzade, Farid; Rakhshani, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, the immune response to hepatitis C (HCV) treatment has become a crucial issue mostly due to the interleukin 28B (IL-28B) polymorphism effects in chronic HCV patients. The aim of this study was to detect the polymorphism of IL-28B gene (rs12979860) in HCV genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin. Methods: From the 2010 to 2012, a total of 115 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HCV patients who presented to Gastrointestinal & Liver Disease Research Center (GILDRC), Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran were enrolled in this retrospective cross sectional study. Samples were then categorized based on the presence of sustained virologic response (SVR and no-SVR). Variables including age, gender, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels of the two groups were investigated based on different IL-28B genotypes. Results: Analysis by the variables of age and gender showed a mean age ± SD of 42.1±14.0 and gender variability of 44 females (38.2%) and 71 males (61.8%). Adding up these results, the analysis of ALT levels revealed that there was between 293 and 14 mg/ml; AST levels ranged between 217 and 17 mg/ml; the viral load (HCV RNA) ranged between 7,822,000 and 50 IU/ml; the prevalence of CC, CT and TT genotypes were 90.9%, 54% and 25.0%. Conclusion: IL-28B polymorphism has an effective impact on the therapeutic response to ribavirin and peginterferon combination therapy in chronic HCV patients infected by different genotypes. This polymorphism is crucial in natural clearance. PMID:27799970

  3. Genotype List String: a grammar for describing HLA and KIR genotyping results in a text string.

    PubMed

    Milius, R P; Mack, S J; Hollenbach, J A; Pollack, J; Heuer, M L; Gragert, L; Spellman, S; Guethlein, L A; Trachtenberg, E A; Cooley, S; Bochtler, W; Mueller, C R; Robinson, J; Marsh, S G E; Maiers, M

    2013-08-01

    Knowledge of an individual's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype is essential for modern medical genetics, and is crucial for hematopoietic stem cell and solid-organ transplantation. However, the high levels of polymorphism known for the HLA genes make it difficult to generate an HLA genotype that unambiguously identifies the alleles that are present at a given HLA locus in an individual. For the last 20 years, the histocompatibility and immunogenetics community has recorded this HLA genotyping ambiguity using allele codes developed by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). While these allele codes may have been effective for recording an HLA genotyping result when initially developed, their use today results in increased ambiguity in an HLA genotype, and they are no longer suitable in the era of rapid allele discovery and ultra-high allele polymorphism. Here, we present a text string format capable of fully representing HLA genotyping results. This Genotype List (GL) String format is an extension of a proposed standard for reporting killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotype data that can be applied to any genetic data that use a standard nomenclature for identifying variants. The GL String format uses a hierarchical set of operators to describe the relationships between alleles, lists of possible alleles, phased alleles, genotypes, lists of possible genotypes, and multilocus unphased genotypes, without losing typing information or increasing typing ambiguity. When used in concert with appropriate tools to create, exchange, and parse these strings, we anticipate that GL Strings will replace NMDP allele codes for reporting HLA genotypes.

  4. Efficient genotype elimination via adaptive allele consolidation.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, Nicoletta; Lettieri, Giuseppe; Martini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    We propose the technique of Adaptive Allele Consolidation, that greatly improves the performance of the Lange-Goradia algorithm for genotype elimination in pedigrees, while still producing equivalent output. Genotype elimination consists in removing from a pedigree those genotypes that are impossible according to the Mendelian law of inheritance. This is used to find errors in genetic data and is useful as a preprocessing step in other analyses (such as linkage analysis or haplotype imputation). The problem of genotype elimination is intrinsically combinatorial, and Allele Consolidation is an existing technique where several alleles are replaced by a single “lumped” allele in order to reduce the number of combinations of genotypes that have to be considered, possibly at the expense of precision. In existing Allele Consolidation techniques, alleles are lumped once and for all before performing genotype elimination. The idea of Adaptive Allele Consolidation is to dynamically change the set of alleles that are lumped together during the execution of the Lange-Goradia algorithm, so that both high performance and precision are achieved. We have implemented the technique in a tool called Celer and evaluated it on a large set of scenarios, with good results.

  5. Monitoring coyote population dynamics by genotyping faeces.

    PubMed

    Prugh, L R; Ritland, C E; Arthur, S M; Krebs, C J

    2005-04-01

    Reliable population estimates are necessary for effective conservation and management, and faecal genotyping has been used successfully to estimate the population size of several elusive mammalian species. Information such as changes in population size over time and survival rates, however, are often more useful for conservation biology than single population estimates. We evaluated the use of faecal genotyping as a tool for monitoring long-term population dynamics, using coyotes (Canis latrans) in the Alaska Range as a case study. We obtained 544 genotypes from 56 coyotes over 3 years (2000-2002). Tissue samples from all 15 radio-collared coyotes in our study area had > or = 1 matching faecal genotypes. We used flexible maximum-likelihood models to study coyote population dynamics, and we tested model performance against radio telemetry data. The staple prey of coyotes, snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus), dramatically declined during this study, and the coyote population declined nearly two-fold with a 1(1/2)-year time lag. Survival rates declined the year after hares crashed but recovered the following year. We conclude that long-term monitoring of elusive species using faecal genotyping is feasible and can provide data that are useful for wildlife conservation and management. We highlight some drawbacks of standard open-population models, such as low precision and the requirement of discrete sampling intervals, and we suggest that the development of open models designed for continuously collected data would enhance the utility of faecal genotyping as a monitoring tool.

  6. Inferring haplotypes from genotypes on a pedigree with mutations, genotyping errors and missing alleles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Bung; Jiang, Tao

    2011-04-01

    Inferring the haplotypes of the members of a pedigree from their genotypes has been extensively studied. However, most studies do not consider genotyping errors and de novo mutations. In this paper, we study how to infer haplotypes from genotype data that may contain genotyping errors, de novo mutations, and missing alleles. We assume that there are no recombinants in the genotype data, which is usually true for tightly linked markers. We introduce a combinatorial optimization problem, called haplotype configuration with mutations and errors (HCME), which calls for haplotype configurations consistent with the given genotypes that incur no recombinants and require the minimum number of mutations and errors. HCME is NP-hard. To solve the problem, we propose a heuristic algorithm, the core of which is an integer linear program (ILP) using the system of linear equations over Galois field GF(2). Our algorithm can detect and locate genotyping errors that cannot be detected by simply checking the Mendelian law of inheritance. The algorithm also offers error correction in genotypes/haplotypes rather than just detecting inconsistencies and deleting the involved loci. Our experimental results show that the algorithm can infer haplotypes with a very high accuracy and recover 65%-94% of genotyping errors depending on the pedigree topology. PMID:21523936

  7. [ESTIMATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HYPOLIPIDEMIC THERAPY WITH ROSUVASTATIN IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE DEPENDING ON THE GENOTYPE OF LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE].

    PubMed

    Zvyagina, M V; Mal, G S; Bushueva, O Yu; Alymenko, M A; Bykanova, M A; Letova, I M; Gribovskaya, I A; Churnosov, M I; Solodilova, M A; Polonikov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Taking into account the genetic heterogeneity of hyperlipidemias, polymorphic genes involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism may explain differences in the efficacy of hypolipidemic therapy. In the present prospective and randomized study, we have investigated the efficacy of rosuvastatin (10 mg/day) in the therapy of atherogenic hyperlipidemias in a group of 62 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), depending on the genotype of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). The pharmacological correction was carried out during one year under control of lipid metabolism parameters (total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, HDL-unrelated cholesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic index) at the baseline and on 4th, 8th, 24th and 48th week. The HindIII polymorphism (+495T > G, rs320) of the LPL gene was genotyped in all patients studied through a real-time PCR TaqMan assay. Rosuvastatin produced a significant hypolipidemic effect with respect to all investigated lipid metabolism parameters for 24 weeks of treatment. Changes in the parameters of lipid metabolism upon rosuvastatin treatment differed in patients with genotype +495GG as compared to the rest LPL genotypes. In comparison to the +495TT and TG genotypes, the genotype +495GG showed a greater reduction in total cholesterol on 8th week, and in LDL-C, HDL-unrelated cholesterol, and atherogenic index on the 48th week of rosuvastatin therapy (p <0.01). It can be suggested that the pronounced hypolipidemic effect of rosuvastatin in homozygotes +495GG of the LPL gene is associated with modulation of the LPL activity, as it has been previously reported for other statin drugs. PMID:27159952

  8. Measurement of the tt[over] production cross section in pp[over] collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-05-16

    We measure the tt[over] production cross section in pp[over] collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV in the lepton + jets channel. Two complementary methods discriminate between signal and background: b tagging and a kinematic likelihood discriminant. Based on 0.9 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure sigma(tt[over])=7.62+/-0.85 pb, assuming the current world average m(t)=172.6 GeV. We compare our cross section measurement with theory predictions to determine a value for the top-quark mass of 170+/-7 GeV. PMID:18518441

  9. Measurement of the tt¯ Production Cross Section in pp¯ Collisions at √(s)=1.96 TeV Using Dilepton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, G. J.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bishai, M.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Booth, P. S.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bourov, S.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calafiura, P.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canepa, A.; Casarsa, M.; Carlsmith, D.; Carron, S.; Carosi, R.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cerri, A.; Cerri, C.; Cerrito, L.; Chapman, J.; Chen, C.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, I.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chuang, S.; Chung, J. Y.; Chung, W.-H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobano, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A. G.; Clark, D.; Coca, M.; Connolly, A.; Convery, M.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cranshaw, J.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Currat, C.; Cyr, D.; Dagenhart, D.; da Ronco, S.; D'Auria, S.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; de Lentdecker, G.; dell'Agnello, S.; dell'Orso, M.; Demers, S.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmann, J. R.; Doksus, P.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Donega, M.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, T.; Drollinger, V.; Ebina, K.; Eddy, N.; Ely, R.; Erbacher, R.; Erdmann, M.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H.-C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, I.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferretti, C.; Field, R. D.; Fiori, I.; Flanagan, G.; Flaugher, B.; Flores-Castillo, L. R.; Foland, A.; Forrester, S.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Frisch, H.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, I.; Gajjar, A.; Gallas, A.; Galyardt, J.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.; Giolo, K.; Giordani, M.; Giurgui, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Goldstein, D.; Goldstein, J.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gotra, Y.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guenther, M.; Guimaraes de Costa, J.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartmann, F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Hayward, H.; Heider, E.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Hennecke, M.; Herndon, M.; Hill, C.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hoffman, K. D.; Holloway, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M. A.; Huffman, B. T.; Huang, Y.; Hughes, R. E.; Huston, J.; Ikado, K.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ishizawa, Y.; Issever, C.; Ivanov, A.; Iwata, Y.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jarrell, J.; Jeans, D.; Jensen, H.; Jeon, E. J.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S.; Junk, T.; Kamon, T.; Kang, J.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Karchin, P. E.; Kartal, S.; Kato, Y.; Kemp, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, T. H.; Kim, Y. K.; King, B. T.; Kirby, M.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, H.; Koehn, P.; Kong, D. J.; Kondo, K.; Konigsberg, J.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korytov, A.; Kotelnikov, K.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kovalev, A.; Kraus, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Kreymer, A.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuznetsova, N.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, J.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lazzizzera, I.; Le, Y.; Lecci, C.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, S. W.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, K.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Lindgren, M.; Liss, T. M.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Loverre, P.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lukens, P.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malferrari, L.; Manca, G.; Marginean, R.; Martin, M.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Maruyama, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Mattson, M.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, D.; McIntyre, P. M.; McNamara, P.; McNulty, R.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, L.; Miller, R.; Miller, J. S.; Mills, C.; Miquel, R.; Miscetti, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Miyazaki, Y.; Moggi, N.; Mohr, B.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Moulik, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, T.; Mumford, R.; Munar, A.; Murat, P.; Nachtman, J.; Nahn, S.; Nakamura, I.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Napora, R.; Naumov, D.; Necula, V.; Niell, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nelson, C.; Nelson, T.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Nicollerat, A.-S.; Nignamov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Oesterberg, K.; Ogawa, T.; Oh, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Ohsugi, T.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Orejudos, W.; Pagliarone, C.; Palmonari, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Pauly, T.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pitts, K. T.; Plager, C.; Pompoš, A.; Pondrom, L.; Pope, G.; Poukhov, O.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pratt, T.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rademacker, J.; Rakitine, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Ratnikov, F.; Ray, H.; Reichold, A.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Rinnert, K.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rolli, S.; Rosenson, L.; Roser, R.; Rossin, R.; Rott, C.; Russ, J.; Ruiz, A.; Ryan, D.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; St. Denis, R.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltzberg, D.; Sanchez, C.; Sansoni, A.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, K.; Savard, P.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schemitz, P.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Scodellaro, L.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shears, T.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semeria, F.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Siket, M.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Skiba, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Somalwar, S. V.; Spalding, J.; Spezziga, M.; Spiegel, L.; Spinella, F.; Spiropulu, M.; Squillacioti, P.; Stadie, H.; Stefanini, A.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumorok, K.; Sun, H.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Takach, S. F.; Takano, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takikawa, K.; Tanaka, M.; Takaka, R.; Tanimoto, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Tesarek, R. J.; Tether, S.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tollefson, K.; Tonelli, D.; Tonnesmann, M.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tseng, J.; Tsuchiya, R.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turini, N.; Turner, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unverhau, T.; Uozumi, S.; Usynin, D.; Vacavant, L.; Vaiciulis, A.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vejcik, S.; Velev, G.; Veramendi, G.; Vickey, T.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Volobouev, I.; von der Mey, M.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Yamashita, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Wan, Z.; Wang, M. J.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, B.; Waschke, S.; Waters, D.; Watts, T.; Weber, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolter, M.; Worcester, M.; Worm, S.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Wyatt, A.; Yagil, A.; Yang, U. K.; Yao, W.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yoon, P.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, I.; Yu, S.; Yu, Z.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zetti, F.; Zhou, J.; Zsenei, A.; Zucchelli, S.

    2004-09-01

    We report a measurement of the tt¯ production cross section using dilepton events with jets and missing transverse energy in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. Using a 197±12 pb-1 data sample recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab, we use two complementary techniques to select candidate events. We compare the number of observed events and selected kinematical distributions with the predictions of the standard model and find good agreement. The combined result of the two techniques yields a tt¯ production cross section of 7.0+2.4-2.1(stat)+1.6-1.1(syst)±0.4(lum) pb.

  10. The properties of thickness-twist (TT) wave modes in a rotated Y-cut quartz plate with a functionally graded material top layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Qian, Zhenghua; Li, Nian; Sarraf, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of thickness-twist (TT) wave modes of an AT-cut quartz crystal plate resonator for measurement of material parameters, such as stiffness, density and material gradient, of a functionally graded material (FGM) layer on its surface, whose material property varies exponentially in thickness direction. A theoretical analysis of dispersion relations for TT waves is presented using Mindlin's plate theory, with displacement mode shapes plotted, and the existence of face-shear (FS) wave modes discussed. Through numerical examples, the effects of material parameters (stiffness, density and material gradient) on dispersion curves, cutoff frequencies and mode shapes are thoroughly examined, which can act as a theoretical reference for measurements of unknown properties of FGM layer.

  11. Measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV using dilepton events.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobano, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgui, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes de Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nignamov, T; Nodulman, L; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shears, T; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Takaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2004-10-01

    We report a measurement of the tt production cross section using dilepton events with jets and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Using a 197+/-12 pb(-1) data sample recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab, we use two complementary techniques to select candidate events. We compare the number of observed events and selected kinematical distributions with the predictions of the standard model and find good agreement. The combined result of the two techniques yields a tt production cross section of 7.0(+2.4)(-2.1)(stat)+1.6-1.1(syst)+/-0.4(lum) pb.

  12. Measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McFarlane, M; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-08-25

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV using 318 pb(-1) of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select tt[over ] decays into the final states enu+jets and mu nu+ jets, in which at least one b quark from the t-quark decays is identified using a secondary vertex-finding algorithm. Assuming a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c2, we measure a cross section of 8.7 +/- 0.9(stat)(-0.9)+1.1(syst) pb. We also report the first observation of tt[over ] with significance greater than 5sigma in the subsample in which both b quarks are identified, corresponding to a cross section of 10.1(-1.4)+1.6(stat)(-1.3)+2.0(syst) pb.

  13. Measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McFarlane, M; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-08-25

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV using 318 pb(-1) of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select tt[over ] decays into the final states enu+jets and mu nu+ jets, in which at least one b quark from the t-quark decays is identified using a secondary vertex-finding algorithm. Assuming a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c2, we measure a cross section of 8.7 +/- 0.9(stat)(-0.9)+1.1(syst) pb. We also report the first observation of tt[over ] with significance greater than 5sigma in the subsample in which both b quarks are identified, corresponding to a cross section of 10.1(-1.4)+1.6(stat)(-1.3)+2.0(syst) pb. PMID:17026295

  14. Active Surveillance for Adverse Events After a Mass Vaccination Campaign With a Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PsA-TT) in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Vannice, Kirsten S.; Keita, Modibo; Sow, Samba O.; Durbin, Anna P.; Omer, Saad B.; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Yaméogo, Téné M.; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Sacko, Massambou; Diomandé, Fabien V. K.; Halsey, Neal A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The monovalent meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, MenAfriVac) was developed for use in the “meningitis belt” of sub-Saharan Africa. Mali was 1 of 3 countries selected for early introduction. As this is a new vaccine, postlicensure surveillance is particularly important to identify and characterize possible safety issues. Methods. The national vaccination campaign was phased from September 2010 to November 2011. We conducted postlicensure safety surveillance for PsA-TT in 40 government clinics from southern Mali serving approximately 400 000 people 1–29 years of age. We conducted analyses with individual-level data and population-level data, and we calculated rates of adverse events using the conditional exact test, a modified vaccine cohort risk interval method, and a modified self-controlled case series method for each outcome of interest, including 18 prespecified adverse events and 18 syndromic categories. Results. An increased rate of clinic visits for fever within 3 days after vaccination was found using multiple methods for all age groups. Although other signals were found with some methods, complete assessment of all other prespecified outcomes and syndromic categories did not reveal that PsA-TT was consistently associated with any other health problem. Conclusions. No new safety concerns were identified in this study. These results are consistent with prelicensure data and other studies indicating that PsA-TT is safe. The approach presented could serve as a model for future active postlicensure vaccine safety monitoring associated with large-scale immunization campaigns in low-income countries. PMID:26553680

  15. Centrifugal Distortion in the Microwave Spectrum of the Tt Conformer of the n-CH3CH2CH2OH Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qajar, Ch. O.; Kazimova, S. B.

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the microwave rotational spectrum of the Tt conformer of the propyl alcohol molecule n-CH3CH2CH2OH in the frequency range 37.0-78.0 GHz. Theoretical treatment of the spectrum was carried out using Watson's A-reduced rotational Hamiltonian. We identified 78 rotational transitions with values of the rotational quantum number up to J = 37 inclusive. We have refined the rotational and centrifugal constants of the molecule.

  16. Modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the cataclysmic variable TT Ari and evaluation of the system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, K. V.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Nikolaeva, E. A.; Borisov, N. V.

    2010-11-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the TT Ari system, which is well known from published IUE and optical photometric observations, was modeled by a steady-state accretion α-disc around a white dwarf. Parameters of the system were derived from time-resolved optical spectral observations in the bright state that we obtained in Sep. 1998. The radial velocity semiamplitude of the white dwarf (33.8+/-2.5 km s-1) and corresponding mass function (f(M) = 5.5+/-1.2×10-4 Msolar) were derived from the motion of the emission components of Balmer lines. The mass ratio q(~0.315) was evaluated from the fractional period excess of the superhump period over the orbital period ɛ(~0.085), and a secondary mass range (0.18-0.38 Msolar) was estimated from the orbital period. Therefore, the white dwarf mass range is 0.57-1.2 Msolar and the inclination angle of the system to the line of sight is 17-22.5 degrees. The adopted distance to the system is 335+/-50 pc. To fit the observed SED it is necessary to add a thermal spectrum with T~11600 K and luminosity ~0.4 Ld to the accretion disc spectrum. This combined spectrum successfully describes the observed Balmer lines absorption components. Formally the best fit of the HeI 4471 line gives minimum masses of the components (MRD = 0.18 Msolar and (MWD = 0.57 Msolar), with the corresponding inclination angle i = 22.°1 and mass-accretion rate M = 2.6×1017 g s-1.

  17. Site-targeted complement inhibition by a complement receptor 2-conjugated inhibitor (mTT30) ameliorates post-injury neuropathology in mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Rich, Megan C; Keene, Chesleigh N; Neher, Miriam D; Johnson, Krista; Yu, Zhao-Xue; Ganivet, Antoine; Holers, V Michael; Stahel, Philip F

    2016-03-23

    Intracerebral complement activation after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a cascade of neuroinflammatory pathological sequelae that propagate host-mediated secondary brain injury and adverse outcomes. There are currently no specific pharmacological agents on the market to prevent or mitigate the development of secondary cerebral insults after TBI. A novel chimeric CR2-fH compound (mTT30) provides targeted inhibition of the alternative complement pathway at the site of tissue injury. This experimental study was designed to test the neuroprotective effects of mTT30 in a mouse model of closed head injury. The administration of 500 μg mTT30 i.v. at 1 h, 4 h and 24 h after head injury attenuated complement C3 deposition in injured brains, reduced the extent of neuronal cell death, and decreased post-injury microglial activation, compared to vehicle-injected placebo controls. These data imply that site-targeted alternative pathway complement inhibition may represent a new promising therapeutic avenue for the future management of severe TBI. PMID:26892188

  18. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 can elicit dose- and time-dependent immune priming in Galleria mellonella larvae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong; Lv, Yingying; Li, Mei; Wang, Jia; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we primed Galleria mellonella larvae by haemocoel injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 to determine whether bacterial LPS can induce enhanced immune protection (recently called immune priming). We also analyzed the relationship between changes in the levels of innate immune elements and the degree of enhanced immune protection in the larvae at designated time points after priming. The larvae that received experimental doses (20.0, 10.0 and 5.0μg per larva) of LPS demonstrated increased resistance against lethal challenge with P. luminescens TT01; the degree and period of protection correlated positively with the priming dose. These results indicated that the P. luminescens TT01 LPS could induce typical immune priming in G. mellonella. Moreover, the levels of innate immune parameters (i.e. haemocyte density, phagocytosis, haemocyte encapsulation ability, and antibacterial activity of cell-free haemolymph) and endogenous enzyme activities (i.e. acid phosphatase, ACP; alkaline phosphatase, AKP; superoxide dismutase, SOD and lysozyme, LSZ) were significantly increased following priming of the larvae with LPS, whereas the activities of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were significantly decreased. All of the parameters examined changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that G. mellonella larvae could modulate their immune responses based on different doses of LPS used for priming, and that priming phenomenon in G. mellonella larvae elicited by LPS was mediated by the innate immune elements and enzyme activity. PMID:25796336

  19. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Stanković, Biljana; Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Ristić, Dragana; Radlović, Vladimir; Nikčević, Gordana; Kotur, Nikola; Vučićević, Ksenija; Kostić, Tatjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Zukić, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB1 alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development. PMID:25172978

  20. Imputation of ungenotyped parental genotypes in dairy and beef cattle from progeny genotypes.

    PubMed

    Berry, D P; McParland, S; Kearney, J F; Sargolzaei, M; Mullen, M P

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy of imputing the genotype of parents using information on the genotype of their progeny and a family-based and population-based imputation algorithm. Two separate data sets were used, one containing both dairy and beef animals (n=3122) with high-density genotypes (735 151 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) and the other containing just dairy animals (n=5489) with medium-density genotypes (51 602 SNPs). Imputation accuracy of three different genotype density panels were evaluated representing low (i.e. 6501 SNPs), medium and high density. The full genotypes of sires with genotyped half-sib progeny were masked and subsequently imputed. Genotyped half-sib progeny group sizes were altered from 4 up to 12 and the impact on imputation accuracy was quantified. Up to 157 and 258 sires were used to test the accuracy of imputation in the dairy plus beef data set and the dairy-only data set, respectively. The efficiency and accuracy of imputation was quantified as the proportion of genotypes that could not be imputed, and as both the genotype concordance rate and allele concordance rate. The median proportion of genotypes per animal that could not be imputed in the imputation process decreased as the number of genotyped half-sib progeny increased; values for the medium-density panel ranged from a median of 0.015 with a half-sib progeny group size of 4 to a median of 0.0014 to 0.0015 with a half-sib progeny group size of 8. The accuracy of imputation across different paternal half-sib progeny group sizes was similar in both data sets. Concordance rates increased considerably as the number of genotyped half-sib progeny increased from four (mean animal allele concordance rate of 0.94 in both data sets for the medium-density genotype panel) to five (mean animal allele concordance rate of 0.96 in both data sets for the medium-density genotype panel) after which it was relatively stable up to a half-sib progeny group size