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Sample records for 819 tt genotype

  1. Association of TNF-α-(308(GG)), IL-10(-819(TT)), IL-10(-1082(GG)) and IL-1R1(+1970(CC)) genotypes with the susceptibility and progression of leprosy in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Mohd; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Santosh, K V; Kamal, Vineet Kumar; Khanna, Neena; Rao, D N

    2015-05-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by M. leprae. We analyzed 48 cytokine polymorphisms in 13 (pro as well as anti-inflammatory) cytokine genes using PCR-SSP assay in 102 leprosy patients and 120 healthy controls with intent to find out a link between cytokine polymorphisms and disease susceptibility. TNF-α (-308) GG, IL-10 (-819) TT, IL-10 (-1082) GG and IL1R (+1970) CC genotypes are found to be predominant (p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.0001 and p=0.001, respectively) in both tuberculoid as well as lepromatous leprosy patients. This observation suggests these genotypes as play the central role(s) in the progression of disease. CBA assay demonstrates the varied serum concentration of these cytokines with respect to their genotypes. The above genotypes appeared as high producer genotypes in our study. Even in presence of high produce genotypes, TNF-α level are found to be affected/masked by the presence of IL-10 in leprosy patients. Expressional masking of TNF-α is associated with the expression of IL-10 in these patients. This is one the negative impact of SNP-SNP interaction in leprosy patients. Therefore, we can conclude that cytokine gene polymorphisms determine the predisposition to the leprosy progression.

  2. Prostate stem cell antigen gene TT genotype and development of intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Uotani, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Aim Gastric cancer is etiologically related to interactions between Helicobacter pylori infection, environmental, and host factors. Gastric carcinoma is associated with a cascade of increasing atrophic gastric mucosal damage. Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms have been associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Here, we examined the interaction between prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms and H. pylori in the progression of H. pylori gastritis. Methods Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms (TT, TC and CC) among H. pylori infected and uninfected Bhutanese were compared with the severity of H. pylori gastritis (neutrophils, monocytes, atrophy scores, H. pylori density, and the presence and extent of intestinal metaplasia) using the updated Sydney system. Results Biopsies from 339 patients were included. The proportion of biopsies with intestinal metaplasia was also significantly (P<0.05) greater among those with the TT genotype than with either the CT or CC genotype. Despite no significant differences in inflammation or H. pylori density scores, the scores for the premalignant condition, intestinal metaplasia in both the gastric corpus and antrum, among H. pylori infected with the TT genotype was significantly (P <0.05) greater than C allele carriers. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen TT genotype was associated with more than a 3-fold increase in the prevalence and extent of gastric mucosal intestinal metaplasia compared to C allele carriers among H. pylori infected Bhutanese. PMID:26706772

  3. Interleukin-28b CC genotype predicts early treatment response and CT/TT genotypes predicts non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishak Chander; Trehanpati, Nirupma; Sukriti, Sukriti; Hissar, Syed; Midha, Vandana; Sood, Ajit; Sarin, Shiv K

    2014-04-01

    Response to antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends upon the genotype and host immune response. IL28b gene mutations have been shown to modulate host antiviral immune response against genotype 1. However, the predictive value of IL28b polymorphism in genotype 3 HCV patients is largely unknown. The association of IL28b polymorphism with virological response was studied in 356 patients with genotype 3 chronic HCV undergoing treatment with peg-interferon and ribavirin and was compared with matched controls. IL28b genotyping followed by DNA sequencing was performed to identify the CC, CT, or TT genotypes. Two log reduction of HCV RNA at Day 7 (Quick Viral Response, QVR) and HCV RNA negativity at Day 28 (Rapid Viral Response, RVR) were analyzed with CC and non-CC genotypes in addition to other predictors of response. The associations of alleles with the response patterns were predicted. Sustained viral response was seen in 250 (70.2%) patients and the IL28b genotype CC/CT/TT distribution was 61.1%; 30.5%; and 8.4%, respectively. The non-CC genotypes were significantly higher in non-responders when compared to responders (67.6% vs. 38.9%, P < 0.001). Interestingly, the rapid viral response in responders was observed in 72.7% with the CC genotype and in 27.2% with the non-CC genotype (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed CC genotype as an independent factor predicting the sustained viral response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3. In conclusion, the IL28b CT/TT genotype strongly correlates with treatment non-response in patients infected with HCV genotype 3 and CC genotype of IL28b is associated with higher quick viral response.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of TT virus (TTV) and characterization of two novel TTV genotypes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Muljono, D H; Nishizawa, T; Tsuda, F; Takahashi, M; Okamoto, H

    2001-07-01

    The prevalence of TT virus (TTV) DNA among 244 healthy individuals in 23 cities on 12 islands in Indonesia was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers derived from the coding region (N22), which can detect TTV DNA of genotypes 1-6. By N22 PCR, TTV DNA was detected in 102 (42%) individuals. The amplified PCR products were molecularly cloned and three clones each were subjected to sequence analysis. Three hundred one (98%) of the 306 TTV clones were classified into genotype 1, 2 or 3, and none into genotypes 4-6. The remaining five clones from two individuals (Kt-08 and Kt-10) on Kutai, Kalimantan Island, differed by >30% from known TTV isolates of all 21 genotypes and were tentatively classified into genotypes 22 and 23, respectively. Using primers specific for the new TTV genotype 22 or 23, TTV genotype 22 was detected significantly more frequently in Kutai than in the other 22 cities (41% vs. 5%, P < 0.001). TTV genotype 23 was restricted to Kutai (17% vs. 0%, P < 0.001), suggesting the indigenous nature of this genotype. Analysis of two TTV isolates (Kt-08F and Kt-10F) demonstrated the extreme diversity of TTV and the preservation of the genomic organization and transcription profile.

  5. TT virus (TTV) genotyping in blood donors and multiple transfused patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Castro Amarante, Maria Fernanda; Kashima, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2007-12-01

    TT virus (TTV) is widely distributed in the general population. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of TTV genotypes among blood donor candidates and multiple transfused patients in the Southeast region of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. TTV-DNA detection by amplification of a segment of the ORF-1 region, presented a prevalence of 11.9% in 270 serum samples from blood donors, of 46.2% in 18 samples from patients with coagulopathies, and of 31.8% in 15 samples from patients with hemoglobinopathies. When specific primers for the non-coding (UTR) region of the TTV genome were used the prevalences were 50.5%, 95.0%, and 82.0% for blood donors, patients with coagulopathies and patients with hemoglobinopathies, respectively. Positive samples from 49 individuals were sequenced and partial segments of 230 base pairs referring to the ORF-1 region of the TTV genome were used for the determination of their genotypes with the aid of phylogenetic analysis. The most frequent genotype was 1 (74.0%), followed by genotype 2 (26.0%). These data indicate a high prevalence of this virus in the populations of blood donors and transfused patients, providing further evidence for the role of transfusions as an efficient pathway in the transmission chain.

  6. Novel Atlantic bottlenose dolphin parainfluenza virus TtPIV-1 clusters with bovine PIV-3 genotype B strains.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Kirsten C; Neill, John D; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; McGill, Jodi L; Sacco, Randy E

    2015-10-01

    Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) is a common viral infection not only in humans, but also in many other species. Serological evidence suggests that nearly 100 % of children in the United States have been infected with PIV-3 by 5 years of age. Similarly, in cattle, PIV-3 is commonly associated with bovine respiratory disease complex. A novel dolphin PIV-3 (TtPIV-1) was described by Nollens et al. in 2008 from a dolphin that was diagnosed with an unknown respiratory illness. At that time, TtPIV-1 was found to be most similar to, but distinct from, bovine PIV-3 (BPIV-3). In the present study, similar viral growth kinetics and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, and CXCL8) production were seen between BPIV-3 and TtPIV-1 in BEAS-2B, MDBK, and Vero cell lines. Initial nomenclature of TtPIV-1 was based on partial sequence of the fusion and RNA polymerase genes. Based on the similarities we saw with the in vitro work, it was important to examine the TtPIV-1 genome in more detail. Full genome sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis revealed that all six viral genes of TtPIV-1 clustered within the recently described BPIV-3 genotype B strains, and it is proposed that TtPIV-1 be re-classified with BPIV-3 genotype B strains.

  7. Positive association between--1021TT genotype of dopamine beta hydroxylase gene and progressive behavior of injection heroin users.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaohu; Xu, Limin; Liu, Huifen; Chen, Weisheng; Zhuang, Dingding; Zhang, Jianbing; Duan, Shiwei; Zhou, Wenhua

    2013-04-29

    By balancing the ratios of dopamine and norepinephrine, dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) plays an important role in brain reward circuit that is involved with behavioral effects of heroin addiction. DBH -1021C/T (rs1611115) is a functional variant with strong correlation with plasma DBH activity and several nerval and psychic disorders. In the present study, we have collected 333 male cases with heroin addiction and 200 male healthy controls to explore the role of -1021C/T in heroin addiction. There is no evidence of association between -1021C/T and heroin addiction on both genotype and allele levels (P>0.05). In the injection subgroup of cases, -1021TT carriers have longer heroin addiction time (P<0.001) and higher dosage of self-administered heroin (P=0.045) than carriers with -1021CC or -1021CT, suggesting that patients with TT genotype are likely to have more progressive style of heroin users with injection route. In conclusion, our results support -1021TT genotype may be implicated with a more progressive nature of heroin addiction, although DBH -1021C/T is unlikely to be involved in the risk of heroin addiction.

  8. High serum trypsin levels and the -409 T/T genotype of PRSS1 gene are susceptible to neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingquan; Xue, Heng; Chen, Min; Gao, Feng; Xu, Jianping; Liu, Qicai; Yang, Xiulin; Zheng, Lie; Chen, Hong

    2014-10-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains an important and common cause of morbidity and mortality among newborn infants, especially in developing countries. The aim of the present study was to determine whether serum trypsin levels and genotypes of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene could be served as markers for predicting neonatal sepsis. The serum trypsin levels and genotypes of PRSS1 were examined in both 50 infants with infection during neonatal period and 56 healthy neonates as controls. The infected infants were further subdivided into infants with sepsis group (n=18) and infected infants without sepsis (n=32). The genotype of PRSS1 was analyzed by direct sequencing, and the serum trypsin level was measured by immunoassay. It showed that the median value of serum trypsin was significantly higher in infected infants (31.90 ng/mL) than in controls (12.85 ng/mL; P=0.030). More importantly, sepsis subgroup (50.95 ng/mL) had significantly higher median serum trypsin than infected infants without sepsis subgroup (19.10 ng/mL) and controls (12.85 ng/mL) (P=0.015 and P=0.002, respectively). Additionally, the median serum trypsin levels were found significantly higher in infants who had T/T (37.90 ng/mL) genotype of PRSS1 compared with those who had C/T genotype (12.80 ng/mL; P=0.005). This study suggested that serum trypsin and rs10273639 C/T of PRSS1 were revealed to be novel markers for predicting neonatal sepsis.

  9. Choline Intake, Plasma Riboflavin, and the Phosphatidylethanolamine N-Methyltransferase G5465A Genotype Predict Plasma Homocysteine in Folate-Deplete Mexican-American Men with the Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase 677TT Genotype12

    PubMed Central

    Caudill, Marie A.; Dellschaft, Neele; Solis, Claudia; Hinkis, Sabrina; Ivanov, Alexandre A.; Nash-Barboza, Susan; Randall, Katharine E.; Jackson, Brandi; Solomita, Gina N.; Vermeylen, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that provision of the folate recommended dietary allowance and either 300, 550, 1100, or 2200 mg/d choline for 12 wk resulted in diminished folate status and a tripling of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) in men with the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677TT genotype. However, the substantial variation in tHcy within the 677TT genotype at wk 12 implied that several factors were interacting with this genotype to affect homocysteine. As an extension of this work, the present study sought to identify the main predictors of wk-12 plasma tHcy, alone and together with the MTHFR C677T genotype (29 TT, 31 CC), using linear regression analysis. A basic model explaining 82.5% of the variation (i.e. adjusted R2 = 0.825) was constructed. However, the effects of the variables within this model were dependent upon the MTHFR C677T genotype (P for interaction ≤ 0.021). Within the 677TT genotype, serum folate (P = 0.005) and plasma riboflavin (P = 0.002) were strong negative predictors (inversely related) explaining 12 and 15%, respectively, of the variation in tHcy, whereas choline intake (P = 0.003) and serum creatinine (P < 0.001) were strong positive predictors, explaining 19 and 25% of the variation. None of these variables, except creatinine (P = 0.021), correlated with tHcy within the 677CC genotype. Of the 8 additional polymorphisms tested, none appeared to influence tHcy. However, when creatinine was not in the model, the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase 5465G→A variant predicted lower tHcy (P < 0.001); an effect confined to the MTHFR 677TT genotype. Thus, in folate-deplete men, several factors with roles in 1-carbon metabolism interact with the MTHFR C677T genotype to affect plasma tHcy. PMID:19211833

  10. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase 677TT Genotype may be Associated with an Increased Lung Cancer Risk in North China: An Updated Meta

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-Bo; Li, Jun; Qi, Jia-Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Zhong; Wu, Xu; Zhang, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Although many epidemiology studies have investigated the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and their associations with lung cancer (LC), definite conclusions cannot be drawn. To clarify the effects of MTHFR polymorphisms on the risk of LC, we performed a meta-analysis in Chinese populations. Material/Methods Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) until 16 February 2014. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the associations. Results A total of 11 studies with 2487 LC cases and 3228 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was found between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and LC risk when all studies in Chinese populations were pooled into this meta-analysis. In subgroup analyses stratified by geographical location and source of controls, significantly increased risk was found in North China (T vs. C: OR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.14–1.44; TT vs. CC: OR=1.67, 95% CI: 1.33–2.10; TT + CT vs. CC, OR=1.39, 95% CI=1.15–1.69; TT vs. CC + CT: OR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.03–2.06) and in population-based studies (TT vs. CC: OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.14–1.65; TT vs. CC + CT: OR=1.25, 95% CI: 1.07–1.45). Conclusions This meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR C677T polymorphism may contribute to LC development in North China. Studies with larger sample sizes and wider spectrum of populations are warranted to verify this finding. PMID:25544260

  11. High prevalence of TT virus (TTV) in naive chimpanzees and in hepatitis C virus-infected humans: frequent mixed infections and identification of new TTV genotypes in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Romeo, R; Hegerich, P; Emerson, S U; Colombo, M; Purcell, R H; Bukh, J

    2000-04-01

    A recently discovered DNA virus, TT virus (TTV), is prevalent in humans. In the present study, the genetic heterogeneity of TTV was evaluated in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients and in chimpanzees. TTV DNA was detected by PCR in serum samples from all ten HCV-infected patients studied; at least five major TTV genotypes, all previously identified in humans, were recovered. Eight patients were infected with multiple variants of TTV. TTV DNA was detected by PCR in serum samples from 11 (65%) of 17 naive chimpanzees bred in captivity; a persistent infection was present in three of six animals. At least five chimpanzees were infected with more than one TTV variant. Detection of TTV DNA in chimpanzee faecal samples suggests the possibility of faecal-oral transmission. Phylogenetic analysis of ORF1 sequences amplified from chimpanzees identified three major genotypes which had not previously been recognized in humans.

  12. Association of neural tube defects in children of mothers with MTHFR 677TT genotype and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Benitez, N M; Yanes-Sosa, F; Gonzalez-Meneses, A; Cerrillos, L; Acosta, D; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Neth, O; Gomez de Terreros, I; Ybot-González, P

    2014-03-26

    Abnormalities in maternal folate and carbohydrate metabolism have both been shown to induce neural tube defects (NTD) in humans and animal models. However, the relationship between these two factors in the development of NTDs remains unclear. Data from mothers of children with spina bifida seen at the Unidad de Espina Bífida del Hospital Infantil Virgen del Rocío (case group) were compared to mothers of healthy children with no NTD (control group) who were randomly selected from patients seen at the outpatient ward in the same hospital. There were 25 individuals in the case group and 41 in the control group. Analysis of genotypes for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677CT polymorphism in women with or without risk factors for abnormal carbohydrate metabolism revealed that mothers who were homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism were more likely to have offspring with spina bifida and high levels of homocysteine, compared to the control group. The increased incidence of NTDs in mothers homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism stresses the need for careful metabolic screening in pregnant women, and, if necessary, determination of the MTHFR 677CT genotype in those mothers at risk of developing abnormal carbohydrate metabolism.

  13. Transmission of human TT virus of genotype 1a to chimpanzees with fecal supernatant or serum from patients with acute TTV infection.

    PubMed

    Tawara, A; Akahane, Y; Takahashi, M; Nishizawa, T; Ishikawa, T; Okamoto, H

    2000-11-19

    Fecal supernatant or serum containing TT virus (TTV) of genotype 1a (10(5) copies/ml) from patients with acute TTV infection was inoculated intravenously into two naive chimpanzees. Serum samples were obtained weekly and tested for TTV DNA by genotype 1-specific polymerase chain reaction. TTV DNA was detected in chimpanzee 228 at weeks 5-15 after inoculation with 0.5 ml of serum, and in chimpanzee 234 at weeks 7-19 after inoculation with 1 ml of fecal supernatant. The TTV DNA titer peaked at weeks 12 and 13 in chimpanzee 228 and at weeks 14-16 in chimpanzee 234. Mild biochemical and histological changes in biopsied liver samples were observed in both chimpanzees in association with the reduction in TTV titer. TTV DNA was transient in chimpanzee 228, but in chimpanzee 234 it reappeared at week 21 and persisted through week 30. These results indicate that TTV in feces is infectious and suggest that TTV has hepatitis-inducing capacity.

  14. Lack of association of the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype with vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy during the early phase of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Echebarria-Barona, Aizpea; Zabalza, Iñaki; Ruiz, Irune; Guerra-Merino, Isabel; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2016-02-01

    Vincristine is a component of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment with the potential to induce peripheral neuropathy. Recently, the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype was found to be associated with vincristine-induced toxicity during the continuation phase in pediatric ALL patients treated on the Total XIIIB and COG AALL0433 protocols at St Jude Children's Research Hospital and Children's Oncology Group. This finding could provide a base for safer dosing of vincristine. Nevertheless, there are variations in vincristine regimens among ALL treatment protocols and phases in different populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype is a useful marker of vincristine neuropathy during induction therapy among Spanish children with B-ALL treated on the LAL-SHOP protocols. No association was found between neurotoxicity during the induction phase and the rs924607 TT genotype. This lack of association could be because of population differences and/or differences in neurotoxicity etiology between induction and continuation phases of treatment.

  15. Interleukin 10 (- 1082 G/A) and (- 819 C/T) gene polymorphisms in Egyptian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Talaat, Roba M; Mohamed, Yasmin A; Mohamad, Ehab H; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Guirgis, Adel A

    2016-09-01

    Cytokines play critical roles in the pathogenesis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). This work was designed to study the implication of IL10 gene polymorphisms (- 1082 G/A and - 819 C/T) on the susceptibility of Egyptian women to have PCOS. Rotterdam consensus criteria were used to diagnose PCOS patients. Genotyping was performed by single-stranded polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) in 61 PCOS patients and 80 healthy controls, and IL-10 serum levels were measured using Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The frequency of IL10 - 1082 G/G (46%) genotype was significantly increased (p < 0.001) while the frequency of - 1082 A/A (16%) genotype was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in PCOS patients compared to controls (14% and 35% for G/G and A/A genotypes; respectively). G allele (65%) is significantly increased (p < 0.01( in PCOS patients while A allele (61%) is significantly increased (p < 0.001( in control subjects. The distribution of IL10 -819 T/T genotype was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in PCOS group. G/G genotype (odd ratio (OR = 5.322) with confidence interval (CI = 2.364-11.982) and the G allele (OR = 2.828 with CI = 1.73-4.61) of - 1082 G/A and T/T genotype of - 819 C/T (OR = 4.18 with CI = 1.26-13.86) could be considered as risk factors for PCOS. IL-10 levels were significantly lower among PCOS patients (313.42 ± 30.10) compared to normal controls (4914.36 ± 303.72). Depending on our preliminary work, IL10 - 1082 G/G might be considered as a host genetic factor for PCOS susceptibility in Egyptian women. Studies concerning other cytokine gene polymorphisms are required to get a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCOS disease.

  16. MTHFR 677 TT genotype in a mother and her child with Down syndrome, atrioventricular canal and exstrophy of the bladder: implications of a mutual genetic risk factor?

    PubMed

    Reutter, Heiko; Betz, Regina C; Ludwig, Michael; Boemers, Thomas M

    2006-08-01

    Apart from Husmann and Vandersteen [in: Gearhart JP, Matthews R (eds) The Epispadias-Exstrophy Complex. Kluwer, New York, pp 199-206, 1999], we report only the second case of Down syndrome (DS) associated with exstrophy of the bladder (EB). Besides the appearance of DS, the newborn exhibited a complete atrioventricular canal (CAVC) and classical EB, including diastases of the symphysis, an epispadic penis and an open bladder plate. Despite current recommendations, the mother had not supplemented her intake of folic acid during the periconceptional period. In a comparable case, Al-Gazali et al. (Am J Med Genet 103:128-132, 2001) found the homozygous 677T allele of the methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) gene 677C-->T polymorphism in a mother and her child with DS and cervical meningomyelocele. They found that the mother, who also had not supplemented her folic acid intake, had a secondarily altered folate status with an increased homocysteine level, suggesting that the homozygous TT mutation in the MTHFR gene in both mother and her child had contributed to the presentation of DS and a neural tube defect. The combined clinical findings of the present case and the observations of Al-Gazali et al. led us to investigate the 677C-->T polymorphism in our mother-child pair. Likewise we found that mother and child were homozygous for the mutant 677T allele. Our findings support the suggestion of Al-Gazali et al. that the MTHFR 677TT could be a mutual genetic risk factor for the co-occurrence of trisomy 21 and midline defects, the risk of which may be reduced by periconceptional folic acid supplementation.

  17. 32 CFR 700.819 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Records. 700.819 Section 700.819 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Commanding Officer Commanding Officers in General § 700.819 Records. The commanding officer shall require that records relative...

  18. 32 CFR 700.819 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Records. 700.819 Section 700.819 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Commanding Officer Commanding Officers in General § 700.819 Records. The commanding officer shall require that records relative...

  19. 32 CFR 700.819 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Records. 700.819 Section 700.819 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Commanding Officer Commanding Officers in General § 700.819 Records. The commanding officer shall require that records relative...

  20. 32 CFR 700.819 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Records. 700.819 Section 700.819 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Commanding Officer Commanding Officers in General § 700.819 Records. The commanding officer shall require that records relative...

  1. 32 CFR 700.819 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Records. 700.819 Section 700.819 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Commanding Officer Commanding Officers in General § 700.819 Records. The commanding officer shall require that records relative...

  2. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  3. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  4. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  5. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  6. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  7. 48 CFR 819.7112 - Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Internal controls. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7112 Internal controls. (a) OSDBU... Program objectives. OSDBU will establish internal controls as checks and balances applicable to...

  8. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819... Vibration test. (a) General. The vibration test must be conducted for the qualification of all rigid IBC design types. Flexible IBC design types must be capable of withstanding the vibration test. (b)...

  9. 48 CFR 819.7009 - Contract clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contract clauses. 819.7009... Acquisition Program 819.7009 Contract clauses. The contracting officer shall insert VAAR clause 852.219-10... Veteran-Owned Small Business Set-Aside in solicitations and contracts for acquisitions under this subpart....

  10. 48 CFR 819.709 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contract clause. 819.709... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program 819.709 Contract clause. The contracting officer shall insert VAAR clause 852.219-9, Small Business Subcontracting Plan...

  11. 48 CFR 819.7009 - Contract clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract clauses. 819.7009... Acquisition Program 819.7009 Contract clauses. The contracting officer shall insert VAAR clause 852.219-10... Veteran-Owned Small Business Set-Aside in solicitations and contracts for acquisitions under this subpart....

  12. 48 CFR 819.709 - Contract clause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract clause. 819.709... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program 819.709 Contract clause. The contracting officer shall insert VAAR clause 852.219-9, Small Business Subcontracting Plan...

  13. 49 CFR 178.819 - Vibration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vibration test. 178.819 Section 178.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  14. 50 CFR 81.9 - Assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances. 81.9 Section 81.9 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES OF...

  15. 50 CFR 81.9 - Assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances. 81.9 Section 81.9 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES OF...

  16. 50 CFR 81.9 - Assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances. 81.9 Section 81.9 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE AND SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES...

  17. 50 CFR 81.9 - Assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assurances. 81.9 Section 81.9 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES OF...

  18. 48 CFR 819.7115 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Solicitation provisions... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7115 Solicitation provisions. (a) Insert 852.219-71, VA Mentor-Protégé Program, in solicitations that include FAR clause 52.219-9,...

  19. 48 CFR 819.7115 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Solicitation provisions... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7115 Solicitation provisions. (a) Insert 852.219-71, VA Mentor-Protégé Program, in solicitations that include FAR clause 52.219-9,...

  20. 48 CFR 819.7115 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation provisions... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7115 Solicitation provisions. (a) Insert 852.219-71, VA Mentor-Protégé Program, in solicitations that include FAR clause 52.219-9,...

  1. 48 CFR 819.7115 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Solicitation provisions... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7115 Solicitation provisions. (a) Insert 852.219-71, VA Mentor-Protégé Program, in solicitations that include FAR clause 52.219-9,...

  2. 48 CFR 819.7115 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Solicitation provisions... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7115 Solicitation provisions. (a) Insert 852.219-71, VA Mentor-Protégé Program, in solicitations that include FAR clause 52.219-9,...

  3. 48 CFR 819.7110 - Developmental assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to, the following: (a) Guidance relating to— (1) Financial management; (2) Organizational management; (3) Overall business management/planning; (4) Business development; and (5) Technical assistance. (b... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7110 Developmental...

  4. 48 CFR 819.7108 - Application process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7108 Application process. (a... assistance; (7) Criteria for evaluation of the protégé's developmental success; (8) A plan addressing how...

  5. 48 CFR 819.7102 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... designed to enhance the business success of the protégé. A mentor may be a large or small business concern. (b) OSDBU is the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization. This is the VA office... PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7102 Definitions. (a) A Mentor is...

  6. TT Arietis - The low state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Szkody, P.; Liebert, J.; Penning, W. R.; Bond, H. E.; Grauer, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive photometric and spectroscopic study of the low state of the novalike variable TT Ari has been made with observations spanning the UV to IR spectral regions. The roughly 5 mag drop in the system's luminosity from the high state indicates that the mass-transfer rate decreased by more than two orders of magnitude. The drastic reduction in the luminosity of the accretion disk between the high and low states enabled the white dwarf component to be directly observed for the first time. The broad absorption profiles at various lines and the UV energy distribution are best fitted by a hot white dwarf. A lower limit of 200 pc for the distance to TT Ari is derived, and the behavior of TT Ari is compared to that of another novalike variable, MV Lyr. The long-term photometric behavior of TT Ari makes it a typical member of the VY Scl subclass of novalike variables.

  7. 48 CFR 819.7114 - Measurement of program success.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 819.7114 Section 819.7114 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7114 Measurement of...

  8. 48 CFR 819.7114 - Measurement of program success.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 819.7114 Section 819.7114 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7114 Measurement of...

  9. 48 CFR 819.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions. 819.502 Section 819.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  10. 48 CFR 819.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions. 819.502 Section 819.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  11. 48 CFR 819.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions. 819.502 Section 819.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  12. 48 CFR 819.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions. 819.502 Section 819.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  13. 48 CFR 819.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions. 819.502 Section 819.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  14. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  15. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15 Section 819.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted...

  16. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  17. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  18. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  19. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15 Section 819.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted...

  20. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  1. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15 Section 819.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted...

  2. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15 Section 819.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted...

  3. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  4. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  5. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  6. 30 CFR 819.15 - Auger mining: Hydrologic balance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. 819.15 Section 819.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.15 Auger mining: Hydrologic balance. (a) Auger mining shall be planned and conducted...

  7. 30 CFR 819.17 - Auger mining: Subsidence protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Subsidence protection. 819.17 Section 819.17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.17 Auger mining: Subsidence protection. Auger mining shall be conducted in accordance...

  8. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  9. 29 CFR 8.19 - Equal Access to Justice Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equal Access to Justice Act. 8.19 Section 8.19 Labor Office... SERVICE CONTRACTS General Procedural Matters § 8.19 Equal Access to Justice Act. Proceedings under the... Access to Justice Act (Pub. L. 96-481). Accordingly, in any proceeding conducted pursuant to...

  10. 40 CFR 63.809-63.819 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 63.809-63.819 Section 63.809-63.819 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations §§ 63.809-63.819...

  11. 40 CFR 63.809-63.819 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 63.809-63.819 Section 63.809-63.819 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations §§ 63.809-63.819...

  12. 40 CFR 63.809-63.819 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 63.809-63.819 Section 63.809-63.819 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations §§ 63.809-63.819...

  13. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  14. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  15. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  16. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  17. 46 CFR 169.819 - Manning of lifeboats and liferafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. 169.819 Section 169.819 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.819 Manning of lifeboats and liferafts. (a) The provisions of this section shall apply to all vessels equipped...

  18. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.819-2 Foreign life insurance companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign life insurance...

  19. 48 CFR 819.7114 - Measurement of program success.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement of program success. 819.7114 Section 819.7114 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... success. The overall success of the VA Mentor-Protégé Program encompassing all participating mentors...

  20. 48 CFR 819.502-3 - Partial set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partial set-asides. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-3 Partial set-asides. When... particular procurement will be partially set aside for small business participation, the solicitation...

  1. 48 CFR 819.502-3 - Partial set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partial set-asides. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-3 Partial set-asides. When... particular procurement will be partially set aside for small business participation, the solicitation...

  2. 48 CFR 819.502-3 - Partial set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partial set-asides. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-3 Partial set-asides. When... particular procurement will be partially set aside for small business participation, the solicitation...

  3. 48 CFR 819.502-3 - Partial set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partial set-asides. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-3 Partial set-asides. When... particular procurement will be partially set aside for small business participation, the solicitation...

  4. 48 CFR 819.502-3 - Partial set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partial set-asides. 819... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-3 Partial set-asides. When... particular procurement will be partially set aside for small business participation, the solicitation...

  5. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  6. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  7. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  8. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  9. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  10. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  11. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  12. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  13. 30 CFR 819.13 - Auger mining: Coal recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Coal recovery. 819.13 Section 819.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  14. 30 CFR 819.11 - Auger mining: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: General. 819.11 Section 819.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SPECIAL PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-AUGER MINING §...

  15. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  16. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  17. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  18. 48 CFR 819.202-70 - HCA responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false HCA responsibilities. 819.202-70 Section 819.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS...-owned and service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns. (h) Attend conferences and...

  19. 48 CFR 819.7105 - Incentives for prime contractor participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Incentives for prime contractor participation. 819.7105 Section 819.7105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF... Annual Conference. At the conclusion of each year in the Mentor-Protégé Program, mentor firms will...

  20. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  1. 49 CFR 236.819 - Switch, hand operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, hand operated. 236.819 Section 236.819 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, hand operated. A non-interlocked switch which can only be operated manually....

  2. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign life insurance company carrying on a life insurance business within the United States, if with respect to...

  3. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign life insurance company carrying on a life insurance business within the United States, if with respect to...

  4. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign life insurance company carrying on a life insurance business within the United States, if with respect to...

  5. 26 CFR 1.819-2 - Foreign life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foreign life insurance companies. 1.819-2... companies. (a) Carrying on United States insurance business. Section 819(a) provides that a foreign life insurance company carrying on a life insurance business within the United States, if with respect to...

  6. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  7. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  8. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  9. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  10. 7 CFR 81.9 - Inspection and certification of diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.9 Inspection and certification of diversion. When the removal of the prune-plum trees is complete, the producer(s) will notify the...

  11. Evidence for spin correlation in tt production

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2012-01-19

    We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and t spins to the total number of tt events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 tt candidate events with a single lepton ℓ (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed pp collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1 and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy \\(\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\) TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement withmore » the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in tt events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.« less

  12. Evidence for tty Production and Measurement of (σ tt)γ/(σtt)

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, ttγ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The ttγ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selectionmore » optimized for the ttγ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tttt), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 ttγ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the ttγ cross section (σtt) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σttγ to σtt to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tty production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.« less

  13. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  14. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  15. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  16. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  17. 30 CFR 819.21 - Auger mining: Protection of underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. 819.21 Section 819.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT... STANDARDS-AUGER MINING § 819.21 Auger mining: Protection of underground mining. Auger holes shall not...

  18. Donor IFNL4 Genotype Is Associated with Early Post-Transplant Fibrosis in Recipients with Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Taylor; Garber, Ari; Thomas, Dawn; Hamon, Nicole; Lopez, Rocio; Konjeti, Rajesh; McCullough, Arthur; Zein, Nizar; Fung, John; Askar, Medhat; John, Binu V.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Early post-transplant hepatic fibrosis is associated with poor outcomes and may be influenced by donor/recipient genetic factors. The rs368234815 IFNL4 polymorphism is related to the previously described IL28B polymorphism, which predicts etiology-independent hepatic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to identify the impact of donor and/or recipient IFNL4 genotype on early fibrosis among patients transplanted for hepatitis C (HCV). Methods Clinical data were collected for 302 consecutive patients transplanted for HCV. 116 patients who had available liver biopsies and donor/recipient DNA were included. 28% of these patients with stage 2 fibrosis or greater were compared to patients without significant post-transplant fibrosis with respect to clinical features as well as donor/recipient IFNL4 genotype. Results The IFNL4 TT/TT genotype was found in 26.0% of recipients and 38.6% of donors. Patients who developed early post-transplant fibrosis had a 3.45 adjusted odds of having donor IFNL4 TT/TT genotype (p = 0.012). Donor IFNL4 TT/TT genotype also predicted decreased overall survival compared to non-TT/TT genotypes (p = 0.016). Conclusions Donor IFNL4 TT/TT genotype, a favorable predictor of spontaneous HCV clearance pre-transplant, is associated with increased early post-transplant fibrosis and decreased survival. PMID:27875564

  19. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203.3... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  20. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  1. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  2. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203.3... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  3. 31 CFR 203.3 - TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false TT&L depositaries. 203.3 Section 203.3... LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.3 TT&L depositaries. A financial institution that participates in PATAX and/or the investment program must be a TT&L depositary. There are three kinds of...

  4. The double contact nature of TT Herculis

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, Dirk; Nelson, Robert H. E-mail: bob.nelson@shaw.ca

    2014-03-01

    We present new radial velocities and photometry of the short-period Algol TT Herculis. Previous attempts to model the light curves of the system have met with limited success, primarily because of the lack of a reliable mass ratio. Our spectroscopic observations are the first to result in radial velocities for the secondary star, and thus provide a spectroscopic mass ratio. Simultaneous analysis of the radial velocities and new photometry shows that the system is a double contact binary, with a rapidly rotating primary that fills its limiting lobe.

  5. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the...

  6. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the...

  7. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY... Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. In frequency bands shared with the...

  8. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  9. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  10. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  11. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  12. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  13. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  14. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  15. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  16. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  17. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  18. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  19. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  20. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  1. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  2. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  3. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  4. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  5. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  6. 30 CFR 942.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 942.819 Section 942.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  7. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  8. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  9. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  10. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  11. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  12. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  13. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  14. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  15. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  16. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  17. 30 CFR 912.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 912.819 Section 912.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO §...

  18. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  19. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  20. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  1. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  2. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  3. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  4. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  5. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  6. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  7. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  8. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  9. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  10. 30 CFR 921.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 921.819 Section 921.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  11. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  12. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  13. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  14. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  15. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  16. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  17. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  18. 30 CFR 910.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 910.819 Section 910.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA §...

  19. 30 CFR 941.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 941.819 Section 941.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH...

  20. 30 CFR 933.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 933.819 Section 933.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  1. 30 CFR 947.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 947.819 Section 947.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  2. 30 CFR 937.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 937.819 Section 937.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON §...

  3. 30 CFR 903.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 903.819 Section 903.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA §...

  4. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  5. 30 CFR 922.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 922.819 Section 922.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  6. 30 CFR 905.819 - Special performance standards-Auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special performance standards-Auger mining. 905.819 Section 905.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE...

  7. 30 CFR 939.819 - Special performance standards-auger mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special performance standards-auger mining. 939.819 Section 939.819 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE...

  8. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Television Transmission Service §...

  9. 47 CFR 101.819 - Stations affected by coordination contour procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stations affected by coordination contour procedures. 101.819 Section 101.819 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Television Transmission Service §...

  10. 48 CFR 819.602-3 - Resolving differences between VA and the Small Business Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... between VA and the Small Business Administration. 819.602-3 Section 819.602-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Certificates... Small Business Administration. The Director, OSDBU, is the VA liaison with the SBA. Information...

  11. 48 CFR 819.7008 - Sole source awards to veteran-owned small business concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... determination whether to make a sole source award is a business decision wholly within the discretion of the... veteran-owned small business concerns. 819.7008 Section 819.7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Service-Disabled...

  12. Prevalence of leukokeratosis nicotina palati among 3,819 danes.

    PubMed

    Saietz, L

    1975-03-01

    Clinical inspection was made of the palatal mucosa of 3,819 patients at the Royal Dental College, Copenhagen. Any occurrence of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (LNP) was recorded, as were the patients' general data and information on their smoking habits. LNP was most prevalent in 30- to 39-year-olds. Prevalence was considerably greater among males than females, even when comparing groups with the same smoking habits. LNP was found in connection with all forms of smoking. In male patients, approx. 30% of pipe smokers had LNP compared with approx. 7% of other smokers. The greatest single factor of importance to the prevalence of LNP, among those who smoked a pipe only, was the level of consumption. The smoking period was of no particular significance. Individual susceptibility is illustrated by the fact that even among pipe smokers with a relatively high consumption, 40% did not exhibit LNP.

  13. IL-10 -1082A/G, -592C/A, and -819T/C polymorphisms in association with lung cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the association between interleukin-10 (IL-10 -1082A/G, -592C/A, and -819T/C) gene polymorphisms and risk of lung cancer, but these have revealed inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between these polymorphisms and the risk of lung cancer by performing a meta-analysis. The published literature concerning IL-10 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk were retrieved by systematically searching PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang, and Database of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals (VIP) database. Statistical analysis was conducted with Stata 12.0 software. A total of ten published articles comprising of 19 studies were selected, including seven studies (1,960 controls and 1,321 cases) for IL-10 -1082A/G, seven studies (2,613 controls and 1,839 cases) for IL-10 -592C/A, and five studies (1,558 controls and 926 cases) for IL-10 -819T/C. This study found that the IL-10 -1082A/G and -592C/A polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer in the overall analysis. When stratified by ethnicity, significantly increased risks were observed for IL-10 -1082A/G, -592C/A, and -819T/C polymorphisms in Asians (for -1082A/G, AA vs [AG + GG]: odds ratio [OR] =1.20, confidence interval [CI] =1.05–1.39, P<0.05; for C-592A, C vs A, OR =1.36, CI =1.20–1.53, P<0.05; CC vs AA, OR =1.85, CI =1.45–2.37, P<0.05; CC vs [CA + AA], OR =1.36, CI =1.15–1.61, P<0.05; for -819T/C, T vs C: OR =1.21, CI =1.06–1.38, P<0.05; TT vs CC, OR =1.54, CI =1.18–2.01, P<0.05; [TT + TC] vs CC, OR =1.51, CI =1.17–1.95, P<0.05). Moreover, the data indicated that there was a significant association between IL-10 -819T/C polymorphism and non-small-cell lung cancer risk. No significant publication bias was detected under the four genetic models (allele model, homozygous model, dominant model, and recessive model) in this meta-analysis. On the basis of these 19

  14. Evidence for tty Production and Measurement of (σ tt)γ/(σtt)

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, ttγ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The ttγ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selection optimized for the ttγ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tttt), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 ttγ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the ttγ cross section (σtt) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σttγ to σtt to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tty production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.

  15. Biliary excretion of TT virus (TTV).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, N; Ikoma, J; Ishihara, T; Yasui-Kawamura, N; Fujita, N; Iwasa, M; Kaito, M; Watanabe, S; Adachi, Y

    2000-08-01

    A novel DNA virus (TT virus; TTV) was isolated from a patient with post-transfusion hepatitis of unknown etiology. If TTV replicates in the liver, TTV may appear in the bile. In the present study, to clarify whether fecal-oral infection occur via biliary excretion, the presence of TTV DNA was assessed in paired serum and bile samples collected from 28 patients with obstructive jaundice without parenchymal liver disease. TTV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using semi-nested primers, and quantified by Real Time Detection PCR (RTD-PCR). The nucleotide sequence of isolates TTV DNAs was also determined and the sequences were compared between serum and bile samples. Among 28 patients, 7 were positive for TTV DNA in both samples, and 3 and 2 were positive in serum and bile respectively. Of 7 patients positive for TTV DNA in both samples, the TTV DNA titer was higher in serum of 4 patients and in bile of 1 patient. Among 7 patients positive for TTV DNA in serum and bile, 6 had the same sequence in both samples. Multiple distinct types of TTV DNA clones were isolated from serum in 2 patients and from bile in 4 patients. In conclusion, TTV DNA is detected frequently in bile from patients with obstructive jaundice, suggesting a fecal-oral route of infection and high prevalence of asymptomatic TTV carriers. TTV DNA was detected only in serum from some patients, suggesting that replication of TTV may occur in other organs as well as in the liver.

  16. 48 CFR 819.202-1 - Encouraging small business participation in acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-1 Encouraging small business participation in acquisitions. Contracting officers may negotiate payment terms of less than 30... the negotiated payment terms before awarding the contract....

  17. Measurement of the ratio σ{tt}/σ{Z/γ{*}→ll} and precise extraction of the tt cross section.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-07-02

    We report a measurement of the ratio of the tt to Z/γ{*} production cross sections in sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV pp collisions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.6  fb{-1}, collected by the CDF II detector. The tt cross section ratio is measured using two complementary methods, a b-jet tagging measurement and a topological approach. By multiplying the ratios by the well-known theoretical Z/γ{*}→ll cross section predicted by the standard model, the extracted tt cross sections are effectively insensitive to the uncertainty on luminosity. A best linear unbiased estimate is used to combine both measurements with the result σ{tt}=7.70±0.52  pb, for a top-quark mass of 172.5  GeV/c{2}.

  18. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. (a) To be designated as a TT&L depositary, a... secure TT&L account balances, a TIP main account balance, an SDI account balance, or a no account...

  19. 31 CFR 203.6 - Obligations of TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Obligations of TT&L depositaries. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.6 Obligations of TT&L depositaries. A TT&L... applicable, if participating in the investment program. (b) Administer a TT&L account, if participating...

  20. 31 CFR 203.6 - Obligations of TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Obligations of TT&L depositaries. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.6 Obligations of TT&L depositaries. A TT&L... applicable, if participating in the investment program. (b) Administer a TT&L account, if participating...

  1. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as TT&L depositaries. 203.5 Section 203.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... financial institutions as TT&L depositaries. (a) Parties to the agreement. To be designated as a TT&L... and maintaining a TT&L account, or for processing tax payments through EFTPS or PATAX,...

  2. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. (a) To be designated as a TT&L depositary, a... secure TT&L account balances, a TIP main account balance, an SDI account balance, or a no account...

  3. 31 CFR 203.6 - Obligations of TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Obligations of TT&L depositaries. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.6 Obligations of TT&L depositaries. A TT&L... applicable, if participating in the investment program. (b) Administer a TT&L account, if participating...

  4. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as TT&L depositaries. 203.5 Section 203.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... financial institutions as TT&L depositaries. (a) Parties to the agreement. To be designated as a TT&L... and maintaining a TT&L account, or for processing tax payments through EFTPS or PATAX,...

  5. 31 CFR 203.6 - Obligations of TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Obligations of TT&L depositaries. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.6 Obligations of TT&L depositaries. A TT&L... applicable, if participating in the investment program. (b) Administer a TT&L account, if participating...

  6. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as TT&L depositaries. 203.5 Section 203.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... financial institutions as TT&L depositaries. (a) Parties to the agreement. To be designated as a TT&L... and maintaining a TT&L account, or for processing tax payments through EFTPS or PATAX,...

  7. 31 CFR 203.6 - Obligations of TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Obligations of TT&L depositaries. 203... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM General Information § 203.6 Obligations of TT&L depositaries. A TT&L... applicable, if participating in the investment program. (b) Administer a TT&L account, if participating...

  8. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. (a) To be designated as a TT&L depositary, a... secure TT&L account balances, a TIP main account balance, an SDI account balance, or a no account...

  9. Synthesis and structure of the Zintl compounds Na 2BaTt 4 (Tt = Si, Ge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.; Corbett, J. D.

    1999-10-01

    The isotypic title compounds ate obtained from reactions of stoichiometric mixtures of the elements in welded Ta containers at 700-800 °C. The structure of Na 2BaSi 4 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (orthorhombic, Ima2 (No. 46), Z = 8, a = 9.524, b = 17.980(3), c = 8.570(3) Å). The compound crystallizes in a novel structure type with Na + and Ba 2+ cations and two crystallographically-independent isolated Si 44- anions. The anions are nearly regular tetrahedra with bond distances of 2.385(3) to 2.448(4) Å and bond angles between 59.2 and 61.7°. The overall structure may be described as a distorted face-centered-cubic array of Si 44- anions in which Na + and Ba 2+ atoms occupy all tetrahedral and octahedral holes in an ordered way. The result is closely related to the topology of f.c.c. Li 3Bi type but with ordering of the two cations. Magnetic measurements showed that Na 2BaSi 4 is diamagnetic, and its family can be formulated in terms of oxidation states as Zintl phases (Na +) 2Ba 2+(Tt 44-).

  10. Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Kulis, Michael J.; Lytle, John K.; Fisher, John W.; Vaccaro, Helen; Ewert, Michael K.; Broyan, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Technologies that reduce logistical needs are a key to long term space missions. Currently, trash and waste generated during a mission is carried during the entire roundtrip mission or stored inside a logistic module which is de-orbited into Earth's atmosphere for destruction. The goal of the Trash to Supply Gas (TtSG) project is to develop space technology alternatives for converting trash and other waste materials from human spaceflight into high-value products that might include propellants or power system fuels in addition to life support oxygen and water. In addition to producing a useful product from waste, TtSG will decrease the volume needed to store waste on long term space missions. This paper presents an overview of the TtSG technologies and future plans for the project.

  11. TT-C-490 -Implementing Alternatives Through Specifications (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-18

    prove it” – Requires the use of certifiable process checks ( ISO 9001 /17025) to demonstrate competencies – Replaces “old” quality system which did not...Changes in TT-C-490F Courtesy of U.S. DoD • TT-C-490F will require Objective Quality Evidence (OQE) – Continuous monitoring… “Tell me, show me...adequately control ongoing quality production • Government had insufficient resources to follow-up • No more “set and forget” production lines

  12. 48 CFR 819.7007 - Sole source awards to service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... determination whether to make a sole source award is a business decision wholly within the discretion of the... service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns. 819.7007 Section 819.7007 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS...

  13. T-T Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caggiano, Joseph; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Bacher, Andrew; McNabb, Denns

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of the T(2n,)^4He reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity tritium, gas-filled capsules in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. At the OMEGA laser facility, TT neutron spectra were measured using two instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) facility and the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) facility. The resolutions of these systems were improved for nTOF by using a crystal with much faster decay time and for MRS by using a thinner, more uniform CD2 recoil foil. Measurements at c.m. energies of 10-30 keV can be used to study the TT three-body reaction mechanism near astrophysical energies. With both nTOF and MRS, we observe a small, narrow peak starting at the 9.44 MeV endpoint, corresponding to the n + ^5He (g.s.) reaction channel. Most of the TT reaction proceeds through other reaction channels which produce broad, continuous neutron spectra in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. Implications for ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility will be discussed. Work in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, D. T. Casey, M. J.-E. Manuel, N. Sinenian, A. B. Zylstra, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, V. Yu Glebov, P. B. Radha, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, P. A. Amendt, R. Hatarik, D. B. Sayre, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann and Y. H. Kim.

  14. The Unusual Behavior of TT Arietis: 2009 October Decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koff, Robert A.; Patterson, Joe

    This paper presents the results of the photometric study of TT Arietis during its decline phase of 2009 October, when the star exhibited very unexpected behavior. CBA observers and others provided time-series photometry to study the star and to complement the observations of the Swift and GALEX satellites.

  15. 14 CFR 91.819 - Civil supersonic airplanes that do not comply with part 36.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes that do not... RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.819 Civil supersonic airplanes that do not comply with part 36. (a) Applicability. This section applies to civil supersonic airplanes that have not been shown to comply with...

  16. 48 CFR 819.502-2 - Total small business set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Total small business set... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-2 Total small business set-asides. (a) When a total small business set-aside is made, one of the following statements, as...

  17. 28 CFR 8.19 - Petition for expedited release in an administrative forfeiture proceeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the property in a normal and customary manner; and (3) The owner did not know of or consent to the..., the owner did what reasonably could be expected to prevent the violation. (d) In addition to those... Involving the Possession of Personal Use Quantities of a Controlled Substance § 8.19 Petition for...

  18. 48 CFR 819.502-2 - Total small business set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Total small business set... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-2 Total small business set-asides. (a) When a total small business set-aside is made, one of the following statements, as...

  19. 48 CFR 819.502-2 - Total small business set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Total small business set... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-2 Total small business set-asides. (a) When a total small business set-aside is made, one of the following statements, as...

  20. 48 CFR 819.502-2 - Total small business set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Total small business set... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-2 Total small business set-asides. (a) When a total small business set-aside is made, one of the following statements, as...

  1. 48 CFR 819.502-2 - Total small business set-asides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Total small business set... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 819.502-2 Total small business set-asides. (a) When a total small business set-aside is made, one of the following statements, as...

  2. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  3. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  4. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  5. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  6. 29 CFR 780.819 - Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production must be of unrefined sugar or syrup. 780.819... STANDARDS ACT Employment in Ginning of Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup; Exemption From Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section...

  7. 48 CFR 819.202-5 - Data collection and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data collection and... VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 819.202-5 Data collection and... goals and providing other data necessary for goal assessment. (b) Each VA acquisition activity...

  8. 49 CFR 385.819 - Effect of failure to comply with remedial directive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Remedial Directives § 385.819 Effect of failure to comply with remedial... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of failure to comply with remedial... with § 385.811, does not meet the safety fitness standard set forth in § 385.5(b). With respect to...

  9. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks. Compartment separation and cover interlock switches for motor-starter enclosures must be maintained...

  10. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks. Compartment separation and cover interlock switches for motor-starter enclosures must be maintained...

  11. The "thermolabile" variant of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and neural tube defects: An evaluation of genetic risk and the relative importance of the genotypes of the embryo and the mother.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, D C; Kirke, P N; Mills, J L; Ramsbottom, D; Molloy, A M; Burke, H; Weir, D G; Scott, J M; Whitehead, A S

    1999-01-01

    Recent reports have implicated the "thermolabile" (T) variant of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in the causation of folate-dependent neural tube defects (NTDs). We report herein the largest genetic study of NTD cases (n=271) and families (n=218) to date, establishing that, in Ireland, the "TT" genotype is found in 18.8% of cases versus 8.3% of controls (odds ratio 2.57; confidence interval [CI] 1.48-4.45; P=.0005). The maternal and paternal TT genotypes have intermediate frequencies of 13.8% and 11.9%, respectively, indicating that the predominant MTHFR-related genetic effect acts via the TT genotype of the developing embryo. Analysis of the 218 family triads of mother, father, and affected child with log-linear models supports this interpretation, providing significant evidence that the case TT genotype is associated with NTDs (P=.02) but no evidence of a maternal TT genotypic effect (P=. 83). The log-linear model predicted that the risk of NTDs conferred by the case TT genotype is 1.61 (CI 1.06-2.46), consistent with the paramount importance of the case TT genotype in determining risk. There is no compelling evidence for more than a modest additional risk conferred by a maternal TT genotype. These results favor a biological model of MTHFR-related NTD pathogenesis in which suboptimal maternal folate status imposes biochemical stress on the developing embryo, a stress it is ill-equipped to tolerate if it has a TT genotype. PMID:10090889

  12. Association between -1082G/A, -819C/T, and -592C/A genetic polymorphisms in IL-10 and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Dong, Q Y; Liu, X M; Liang, C G; Du, W H; Wang, Y L; Li, W X; Gao, G Q

    2016-08-29

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common form of endocrine disease in humans; genetic factors are known to contribute to the development of this disease. In this case-control study, we investigated the relationship between the -1082G/A, -819C/T, and -592C/A polymorphisms in interleukin 10 (IL-10) and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 228) and control subjects (N = 240) were recruited from the Department of Endocrinology at the People's Hospital of Linyi City, between September 2013 and April 2015. The IL-10 -1082G/A, -819C/T, and -592C/A polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that patients carrying the AA genotype of IL-10 -592C/A were at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to those carrying the CC genotype [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.74; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-2.95]. In addition, individuals carrying the A allele of IL-10 -592C/A showed a 1.34-fold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to those carrying the C allele (adjusted OR = 1.34; 95%CI = 1.03- 1.75). There was no significant correlation between the IL-10 -1082G/ A and -819C/T polymorphisms and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, this study shows that the -1082G/A polymorphism of IL-10 contributes to the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and may be considered a biomarker for early screening of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Chinese population studied here.

  13. Tilting structures in inverse perovskites, M3TtO (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Tt = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb).

    PubMed

    Nuss, Jürgen; Mühle, Claus; Hayama, Kyouhei; Abdolazimi, Vahideh; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-06-01

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments were performed for a series of inverse perovskites, M3TtO (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu; Tt = tetrel element: Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) in the temperature range 500-50 K. For Tt = Sn, Pb, they crystallize as an 'ideal' perovskite-type structure (Pm3m, cP5); however, all of them show distinct anisotropies of the displacement ellipsoids of the M atoms at room temperature. This behavior vanishes on cooling for M = Ca, Sr, Eu, and the structures can be regarded as `ideal' cubic perovskites at 50 K. The anisotropies of the displacement ellipsoids are much more enhanced in the case of the Ba compounds. Finally, their structures undergo a phase transition at ∼ 150 K. They change from cubic to orthorhombic (Ibmm, oI20) upon cooling, with slightly tilted OBa6 octahedra, and bonding angles O-Ba-O ≃ 174° (100 K). For the larger Ba(2+) cations, the structural changes are in agreement with smaller tolerance factors (t) as defined by Goldschmidt. Similar structural behavior is observed for Ca3TtO. Smaller Tt(4-) anions (Si, Ge) introduce reduced tolerance factors. Both compounds Ca3SiO and Ca3GeO with cubic structures at 500 K, change into orthorhombic (Ibmm) at room temperature. Whereby, Ca3SiO is the only representative within the M3TtO family where three polymorphs can be found within the temperature range 500-50 K: Pm3m-Ibmm-Pbnm. They show tiny differences in the tilting of the OCa6 octahedra, expressed by O-Ca-O bond angles of 180° (500 K), ∼ 174° (295 K) and 170° (100 K). For larger M (Sr, Eu, Ba), together with smaller Tt (Si, Ge) atoms, pronounced tilting of the OM6 octahedra, and bonding angles of O-M-O ≃ 160° (295 K) are observed. They crystallize in the anti-GdFeO3 type of structure (Pbnm, oP20), and no phase transitions occur between 500 and 50 K. The observed phase transitions are all accompanied by multiple twinning, in terms of pseudo-merohedry or reticular pseudo-merohedry.

  14. Arabidopsis TT19 functions as a carrier to transport anthocyanin from the cytosol to tonoplasts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Li, Hong; Huang, Ji-Rong

    2012-03-01

    Anthocyanins are synthesized in the cytosolic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but dominantly accumulate in the vacuole. Little is known about how anthocyanins are transported from the ER to the vacuole. Here, we provide evidence supporting that Transparent Testa 19 (TT19), a glutathione S-transferase (GST), functions as a carrier to transport cyanidin and/or anthocyanins to the tonoplast. We identified a novel tt19 mutant (tt19-7), which barely accumulates anthocyanins but produces a 36% higher level of flavonol than the wild-type (WT), from ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenized seeds. Expressing TT19-fused green fluorescence protein (GFP) in tt19-7 rescues the mutant phenotype in defective anthocyanin biosynthesis, indicating that TT19-GFP is functional. We further showed that TT19-GFP is localized not only in the cytoplasm and nuclei, but also on the tonoplast. The membrane localization of TT19-GFP was further ascertained by immunoblot analysis. In vitro assay showed that the purified recombinant TT19 increases water solubility of cyanidin (Cya) and cyanidin-3-O-glycoside (C3G). Compared with C3G, Cya can dramatically quench the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of TT19 to much lower levels, indicating a higher affinity of TT19 to Cya than to C3G. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis also confirmed physical interaction between TT19 and C3G. Taken together, our data reveal molecular mechanism underlying TT19-mediated anthocyanin transportation.

  15. Effects of potassium iodide in concentrations of TSH, tT3 and tT4 in serum of subjects with sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Soto, Max Carlos

    2014-08-01

    The saturated potassium iodide solution (SSKI) as treatment for sporotrichosis may cause hypothyroidism by suppressing the synthesis of thyroid hormones (tT3 and tT4 ) and the iodine excess could lead to thyrotoxicosis. Evaluating the changes in serum levels of TSH, tT3 and tT4 in euthyroid patients with sporotrichosis treated with SSKI. For the selection of euthyroid patients, TSH, tT3 and tT4 concentrations were measured for those adults and children diagnosed with sporotrichosis. Each paediatric patient was administered SSKI orally in increasing doses of 2-20 drops/3 times/day and 4-40 drops/3 times/day in adults. Serum concentrations of TSH, tT3 and tT4 were measured 20 days after started the treatment and 15 days posttreatment. Eight euthyroid patients aged between 2 to 65 years old were included. After 20 days of treatment, two suffered subclinical hypothyroidism, one developed subclinical hyperthyroidism, and one hyperthyroxinaemia euthyroid. At 15 days posttreatment only four patients were evaluated and all serum levels of TSH, tT3 and tT4 were normal. Some euthyroid patients with sporotrichosis can develop hyperthyroidism or subclinical iodine-induced hypothyroidism, during the administration of 3 or 6 g SSKI/day.

  16. Observations of TT Ari requested in support of MOST observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-08-01

    Dr. Nikolaus Vogt (Universidad de Valparaiso, Chile) requested simultaneous photometry and spectroscopy of the novalike (VY Scl subtype) cataclysmic variable TT Ari in support of upcoming observations with the Canadian Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) satellite 2012 September 13 through October 20. The Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia of the Valparaiso University will carry out photometry with small telescopes in central Chile but the assistance of other observers, particularly in other latitudes and longitudes, is requested. The observations are being carried out to study superhump behavior, which is still not well understood despite the amount of research done in all classes of cataclysmic variables. TT Ari exibits superhumps - both positive (the superhump period is longer than the orbital period) and negative (the superhump period is shorter than the orbital period). While positive superhumps are thought probably to be the result of an eccentric configuration in the accretion disk, the mechanism for negative superhumps is not yet understood except that it may be related to the disk's being warped out of the orbital plane, leading to complex torque phenomena. TT Ari, one of the brightest cataclysmic variables, exhibits occasional fadings of several magnitudes, from its usual high-state (maximum) magnitude of ~10.5V to a low-state magnitude as faint as 16V. These fadings occur every 20-25 years, and last between 500 and 1000 days. According to observations in the AAVSO International Database, TT Ari is currently magnitude 10.5V. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details, particularly regarding goals of the campaign, and observing instructions.

  17. Comment on measuring the tt forward-backward asymmetry at ATLAS and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Arguin, Jean-Francois; Ligeti, Zoltan; Freytsis, Marat

    2011-10-01

    We suggest a new possibility for ATLAS and CMS to explore the tt forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron, by attempting to reconstruct tt events, with one of the tops decaying semileptonically in the central region (|{eta}|<2.5) and the other decaying hadronically in the forward region (|{eta}|>2.5). For several models which give comparable Tevatron signals, we study the charge asymmetry at the LHC as a function of cuts on |{eta}| and on the tt invariant mass, m{sub tt}. We show that there is an interesting complementarity between cuts on |{eta}| and m{sub tt} to suppress the dominant and symmetric gg{yields}tt rate, and different combinations of cuts enhance the distinguishing power between models. This complementarity is likely to hold in other new physics scenarios as well, which affect the tt cross section, so it motivates extending tt reconstruction to higher |{eta}|.

  18. Improved measurement of ttZ couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, U.; Juste, A.; Rainwater, D.; Orr, L.H.; /Rochester U.

    2005-12-01

    We consider QCD t{bar t}Z production at the LHC with Z {yields} {bar {nu}}{nu} and all-hadronic t{bar t} decays, i.e. pp {yields} p{sub T}b{bar b}+4 jets, as a tool to measure ttZ couplings. This channel has a significantly larger cross section than those where the Z boson decays leptonically. However, t{bar t}, b{bar b} + 4 jet, t{bar t}j and t{bar t}jj production give rise to potentially large backgrounds. We show that these processes can be suppressed to an acceptable level with suitable cuts, and find that adding the p{sub T} b{bar b} + 4 jet channel to the final states used in previous ttZ couplings analyses will improve the sensitivity by 10-60%. We also discuss how the measurement of the ttZ couplings may constrain Little Higgs models.

  19. TT Mutant Homozygote of Kruppel-like Factor 5 Is a Key Factor for Increasing Basal Metabolic Rate and Resting Metabolic Rate in Korean Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ran; Kwon, In-Su; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Lee, Myoungsook

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the contribution of genetic variations of KLF5 to basal metabolic rate (BMR) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) and the inhibition of obesity in Korean children. A variation of KLF5 (rs3782933) was genotyped in 62 Korean children. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we developed a model to predict BMR in children. We divided them into several groups; normal versus overweight by body mass index (BMI) and low BMR versus high BMR by BMR. There were no differences in the distributions of alleles and genotypes between each group. The genetic variation of KLF5 gene showed a significant correlation with several clinical factors, such as BMR, muscle, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and insulin. Children with the TT had significantly higher BMR than those with CC (p = 0.030). The highest muscle was observed in the children with TT compared with CC (p = 0.032). The insulin and C-peptide values were higher in children with TT than those with CC (p= 0.029 vs. p = 0.004, respectively). In linear regression analysis, BMI and muscle mass were correlated with BMR, whereas insulin and C-peptide were not associated with BMR. In the high-BMR group, we observed that higher muscle, fat mass, and C-peptide affect the increase of BMR in children with TT (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.018, respectively), while Rohrer's index could explain the usual decrease in BMR (adjust r(2) = 1.000, p < 0.001, respectively). We identified a novel association between TT of KLF5 rs3782933 and BMR in Korean children. We could make better use of the variation within KLF5 in a future clinical intervention study of obesity.

  20. On the direct quantification of celecoxib in commercial solid drugs using the TT-PIXE and TT-PIGE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsouli, B.; Zahraman, K.; Bejjani, A.; Assi, S.; El-Yazbi, F.; Roumié, M.

    2006-08-01

    The quantification of the active ingredient (AI) in drugs is a crucial and important step in the drug quality control process. This is usually performed by using wet chemical techniques like LC-MS, UV spectrophotometry and other appropriate organic analytical methods. In the case of an active ingredient contains specific heteroatoms (F, S, Cl, etc.,), elemental IBA technique can be explored for molecular quantification. IBA techniques permit the analysis of the sample under solid form, without any laborious sample preparation. This is an advantage when the number of sample is relatively large. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of the thick target PIXE (TT-PIXE) and the TT-PIGE techniques for rapid and accurate quantification of celecoxib in commercial drugs. The experimental aspects related to the quantification validity are presented and discussed.

  1. 48 CFR 819.7107 - Selection of Protégé firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS VA Mentor-Protégé Program 819.7107 Selection of Protégé firms... select from a broad base of SDVOSB or VOSB firms whose core competencies support VA's mission; and choose SDVOSB and/or VOSB protégés in addition to firms with whom they have established business...

  2. Synthesis, structure, and properties of four ternary compounds: CaSrTt, Tt=Si, Ge, Sn, Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shengfeng; Corbett, John D. . E-mail: jcorbett@iastate.edu

    2006-03-15

    The title compounds were synthesized and characterized by structural measurements and electronic structure calculations. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses established that they all have the orthorhombic inverse-PbCl{sub 2}-type structure (Pnma, Z=4, a=8.108(2), 8.124(2), 8.421(2), 8.509(2)A; b=4.944(1), 4.949(1), 5.168(1), 5.189(1)A; c=9.170(2), 9.184(2), 9.685(2), 9.740(2)A, respectively). The tetrel (Tt) atoms are situated in tricapped trigonal prisms of ordered Sr and Ca atoms in which the smaller Ca atoms play a distinctive role. The structure is distinguishable from the Co{sub 2}Si type by its more nearly ideal 6+3 (TCTP) environment about Tt rather than a higher coordination by cations. Other representations of the two structural types are also considered. Electronic band structure calculations suggest that the compounds are semiconductors, in agreement with literature data on their Ae{sub 2}Tt analogues.

  3. High pulse energy, high beam quality microsecond-pulse Ti:sapphire laser at 819.7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang; Guo, Chuan; Yu, Hai-Bo; Wang, Zhi-Min; Zuo, Jun-Wei; Xia, Yuan-Qin; Bian, Qi; Bo, Yong; Gao, Hong-Wei; Guo, Ya-Ding; Zhang, Sheng; Cui, Da-Fu; Peng, Qin-Jun; Xu, Zu-Yan

    2017-03-01

    In this letter, a high pulse energy and high beam quality 819.7 nm Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser is demonstrated. At incident pump energy of 774 mJ, the maximum output energy of 89 mJ at 819.7 nm with a pulse width of 100 μs is achieved at a repetition rate of 5 Hz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest pulse energy at 819.7 nm with pulse width of hundred microseconds for a Ti:sapphire laser. The beam quality factor M 2 is measured to be 1.18. This specific wavelength with the high pulse energy and high beam quality at 819.7 nm is a promising light source to create a polychromatic laser guide star together with a home-made 589 nm laser via exciting the sodium atoms in the mesospheric atmosphere.

  4. Searching for tt resonances at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, U.; Orr, L. H.

    2008-06-01

    Many new physics models predict resonances with masses in the TeV range which decay into a pair of top quarks. With its large cross section, tt production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers an excellent opportunity to search for such particles. We present a detailed study of the discovery potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider for Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of the gluon in bulk Randall-Sundrum (RS) models in the tt{yields}l{sup {+-}}{nu}bbqq{sup '} (l=e, {mu}) final state. We utilize final states with one or two tagged b-quarks, and two, three or four jets (including b-jets). Our calculations take into account the finite resolution of detectors, the energy loss due to b-quark decays, the expected reduced b-tagging at large tt invariant masses, and include the background originating from Wbb+jets, (Wb+Wb)+jets, W+jets, and single top+jets production. We derive semirealistic 5{sigma} discovery limits for nine different KK gluon scenarios, and compare them with those for KK gravitons, and a Z{sub H} boson in the Littlest Higgs model. We also analyze the capabilities of the LHC experiments to differentiate between individual KK gluon models and measure the couplings of KK gluons to quarks. We find that, for the parameters and models chosen, KK gluons with masses up to about 4 TeV can be discovered at the LHC. The ability of the LHC to discriminate between different bulk RS models, and to measure the couplings of the KK gluons is found to be highly model dependent.

  5. Impact of Interleukin-28B gene polymorphism (rs12979860) on Egyptian patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype-4.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, G H; Khalil, F A; El-Abaseri, T B; Attia, F M; El-Serafi, A T

    2014-01-09

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Interleukin (IL)-28B gene, namely rs12979860, could predict response to pegylated interferon-α-ribavirin (PR) therapy in hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV-1)-infected patients. A similar role was investigated in a case-control study conducted on 93 Egyptian patients chronically infected with HCV-4 in comparison to 22 individuals with spontaneous HCV clearance and 70 healthy volunteers. The homozygous C allele genotype (CC) was associated with sustained viral response (SVR) to therapy compared with the homozygous T allele genotype (TT) and the heterozygous genotype (CT). In the SVR group, the response rate was statistically significantly higher in CC genotypes (58.6%) compared with CT/TT (20.3%). There was no correlation between SVR patients' genotypes and early response to therapy or HCV baseline viral load. Our findings describe how IL-28B SNP genotyping may guide appropriate selection of HCV-4-infected patients for PR therapy.

  6. Analytical solution of tt¯ dilepton equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2006-03-01

    The top quark antiquark production system in the dilepton decay channel is described by a set of equations which is nonlinear in the unknown neutrino momenta. Its most precise and least time consuming solution is of major importance for measurements of top quark properties like the top quark mass and tt¯ spin correlations. The initial system of equations can be transformed into two polynomial equations with two unknowns by means of elementary algebraic operations. These two polynomials of multidegree two can be reduced to one univariate polynomial of degree four by means of resultants. The obtained quartic equation is solved analytically.

  7. Trash to Gas (TtG) Simulant Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, John D., II; Hintze, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Space exploration in outer earths orbit is a long-term commitment, where the reuse of discarded materials is a critical component for its success. The Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project under the NASA Advanced Exploration System Program is a project focused on technologies that reduce the amount of consumables that are needed to be sent into space, repurpose items sent to space, or convert wastes to commodities. In particular, Trash to Gas (TtG), part of the LRR project, is a novel space technology capable of converting raw elements from combustible waste including food waste and packaging, paper, wipes and towels, nitrile gloves, fecal matter, urine brine, maximum absorbency garments, and other organic wastes from human space exploration into useful gases. Trash to gas will ultimately reduce mission cost by producing a portion of important consumables in situ. This paper will discuss results of waste processing by steam reforming. Steam reforming is a thermochemical process developed as part of TtG, where waste is heated in the presence of oxygen and steam to produce carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane and water. The aim of this experiment is to investigate the processing of different waste simulants and their gaseous products. This will lay a foundation for understating and optimizing the production of useful gases for propulsion and recovery of water for life support.

  8. The TT, TB, EB and BB correlations in anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-08-01

    The ongoing and future experiments will measure the B-mode from different sky coverage and frequency bands, with the potential to reveal non-trivial features in polarization map. In this work we study the TT, TB, EB and BB correlations associated with the B-mode polarization of CMB map in models of charged anisotropic inflation. The model contains a chaotic-type large field complex inflaton which is charged under the U(1) gauge field. We calculate the statistical anisotropies generated in the power spectra of the curvature perturbation, the tensor perturbation and their cross-correlation. It is shown that the asymmetry in tensor power spectrum is a very sensitive probe of the gauge coupling. While the level of statistical anisotropy in temperature power spectrum can be small and satisfy the observational bounds, the interactions from the gauge coupling can induce large directional dependence in tensor modes. This will leave interesting anisotropic fingerprints in various correlations involving the B-mode polarization such as the TB cross-correlation which may be detected in upcoming Planck polarization data. In addition, the TT correlation receives an anisotropic contribution from the tensor sector which naturally decays after l ∼> 100. We expect that the mechanism of using tensor sector to induce asymmetry at low l to be generic which can also be applied to address other low l CMB anomalies.

  9. Persisting TT virus (TTV) genogroup 1 variants in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Szládek, G; Juhász, A; Asztalos, L; Szöke, K; Murvai, M; Szarka, K; Veress, G; Gergely, L; Kónya, J

    2003-05-01

    TT virus (TTV) genogroup 1 infection has an increased prevalence in solid organ transplant recipients. In this study, the presence of TTV in renal transplant recipients was examined by two PCR methods, one capable of detecting most TTV genotypes (UTR-PCR), the other specific to genogroup 1 (N22-PCR). The N22-PCR detected TTV in 57% (53/92) of the renal transplant patients and in 20% (13/66) of the healthy individuals, while the prevalence of TTV with the UTR-PCR was above 90% in both the control and the patient groups. The N22-PCR was used in longitudinal studies of 31 renal transplant recipients, these PCR products were sequenced and aligned. TTV status was not associated with the patients' age at transplantation, male to female ratio and the time lag between kidney transplantation and the TTV test. During the follow-up consistent TTV status was found in 26 patients, while two initially TTV positive patients converted to negative and three initially negative patients converted to positive. The TTV variants varied among the tested patients, but were the same in the consecutive samples of each patient, indicating that TTV infection was persistent in renal transplant recipients and novel infection occurred rarely in the post-transplant period.

  10. TT2NE: a novel algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Michaël; Orland, Henri

    2011-01-01

    We present TT2NE, a new algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. The method is based on a classification of RNA structures according to their topological genus. TT2NE is guaranteed to find the minimum free energy structure regardless of pseudoknot topology. This unique proficiency is obtained at the expense of the maximum length of sequences that can be treated, but comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms shows that TT2NE significantly improves the quality of predictions. Analysis of TT2NE's incorrect predictions sheds light on the need to study how sterical constraints limit the range of pseudoknotted structures that can be formed from a given sequence. An implementation of TT2NE on a public server can be found at http://ipht.cea.fr/rna/tt2ne.php. PMID:21593129

  11. Combining Wikis and JiTT to enhance critical thinking abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2012-02-01

    I report the combine use of Just in Time Teaching (JiTT) and Wikispaces (Wikis) in introductory level, calculus based, physics classes. Over the years, JiTT had been effectively used in teaching physics and some uses on Wikis were also reported in the recent years.ootnotetextH. Mohottala The Physics Teacher -- September 2011 -- Vol. 49, Issue 6 Wiki helps students, instructors and technology to interact with one another and JiTT boosts the self-confidence of students to tackle physics problems. Thus, the combine use of Wiki-JiTT is going to be a new experience for both instructors and students. In this experiment, I used Wikis as a platform for JiTT, and conventional JiTT was slightly altered to best fit the combination and to focus on enhancing critical thinking abilities in my students.

  12. TT virus (TTV)--etiologic agent of acute hepatitis?

    PubMed

    Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof; Modrzewska, Roma; Lyczak, Anna; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata; Rajtar, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    TT virus (TTV) was first isolated in 1997 from the patient with acute posttransfusion hepatitis. This fact led to the conclusion the virus was hepatotropic and could be considered as one of causative agents of acute hepatitis. However, later it was found in other human tissues and serological studies have revealed it is widespread. Multiple tropisms of TTV and the fact the virus is found in high rate of general population, are considered arguments for lack of medical significance of TTV in human pathology. Here we present a report of two cases of acute viral hepatitis in patients hospitalized at the Department of Infectious Diseases, Medical University of Lublin, in whom TTV-DNA was found in serum and serological and virological markers of common primary and secondary hepatotropic viruses were negative. The cases of acute hepatitis we present here should be treated as a preliminary report and the comment in the discussion about the real role of TTV in human pathology.

  13. Thermolabile MTHFR genotype and retinal vascular occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, M; Karabatzaki, M; Donoghue, C; Meleady, R; Mynett-Johnson, L; Mooney, D; Graham, I; Whitehead, A; Shields, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Raised levels of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) are associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. A thermolabile form of a pivotal enzyme in homocysteine metabolism, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), has been associated with vascular occlusive disease and raised tHcy levels. The relation between thermolabile MTHFR genotype, tHcy, and retinal vascular occlusive disease has not been determined.
METHODS—A retrospective case-control study involving hospital based controls and cases with retinal vascular occlusions in whom tHcy levels had been determined was undertaken. Genotyping for the MTHFR 677 C-T mutation that specifies the thermolabile form of the enzyme was performed by established methods in all subjects. The relation between homozygosity for thermolabile MTHFR genotype (TT), raised tHcy levels, and risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease was examined.
RESULTS—87 cases of retinal vascular occlusive disease (mean age 68.7 years) comprising 26 cases of retinal artery occlusion and 61 of retinal vein occlusion were compared with 87 controls (mean age 70.2 years). The TT genotype did not confer a significantly increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease. The mean tHcy level was significantly higher in the cases than in the controls (p<0.0001). Overall, and in both the cases and controls, the frequency of the TT genotype was higher in those with normal tHcy levels than in those with increased levels of tHcy. However, the TT genotype did not significantly alter the risk of increased tHcy levels in these patients.
CONCLUSIONS—The TT genotype is not associated with an increased risk of retinal vascular occlusive disease or increased tHcy levels in this group of elderly patients. In older patients, nutritional rather than genetic factors may be more important in increasing tHcy levels, a known risk factor for retinal vascular occlusive disease.

 PMID:11133719

  14. Species-Specific TT Viruses and Cross-Species Infection in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Masako; Tawara, Akio; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Itoh, Yukio; Hayasaka, Ikuo; Tsuda, Fumio; Tanaka, Takeshi; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mayumi, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    Viruses resembling human TT virus (TTV) were searched for in sera from nonhuman primates by PCR with primers deduced from well-conserved areas in the untranslated region. TTV DNA was detected in 102 (98%) of 104 chimpanzees, 9 (90%) of 10 Japanese macaques, 4 (100%) of 4 red-bellied tamarins, 5 (83%) of 6 cotton-top tamarins, and 5 (100%) of 5 douroucoulis tested. Analysis of the amplification products of 90 to 106 nucleotides revealed TTV DNA sequences specific for each species, with a decreasing similarity to human TTV in the order of chimpanzee, Japanese macaque, and tamarin/douroucouli TTVs. Full-length viral sequences were amplified by PCR with inverted nested primers deduced from the untranslated region of TTV DNA from each species. All animal TTVs were found to be circular with a genomic length at 3.5 to 3.8 kb, which was comparable to or slightly shorter than human TTV. Sequences closely similar to human TTV were determined by PCR with primers deduced from a coding region (N22 region) and were detected in 49 (47%) of the 104 chimpanzees; they were not found in any animals of the other species. Sequence analysis of the N22 region (222 to 225 nucleotides) of chimpanzee TTV DNAs disclosed four genetic groups that differed by 36.1 to 50.2% from one another; they were 35.0 to 52.8% divergent from any of the 16 genotypes of human TTV. Of the 104 chimpanzees, only 1 was viremic with human TTV of genotype 1a. It was among the 53 chimpanzees which had been used in transmission experiments with human hepatitis viruses. Antibody to TTV of genotype 1a was detected significantly more frequently in the chimpanzees that had been used in transmission experiments than in those that had not (8 of 28 [29%] and 3 of 35 [9%], respectively; P = 0.038). These results indicate that species-specific TTVs are prevalent in nonhuman primates and that human TTV can cross-infect chimpanzees. PMID:10627523

  15. Measurement of the Ratio σtt¯/σZ/γ*→ll and Precise Extraction of the tt¯ Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-07-01

    We report a measurement of the ratio of the tt¯ to Z/γ* production cross sections in s=1.96TeV pp¯ collisions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.6fb-1, collected by the CDF II detector. The tt¯ cross section ratio is measured using two complementary methods, a b-jet tagging measurement and a topological approach. By multiplying the ratios by the well-known theoretical Z/γ*→ll cross section predicted by the standard model, the extracted tt¯ cross sections are effectively insensitive to the uncertainty on luminosity. A best linear unbiased estimate is used to combine both measurements with the result σtt¯=7.70±0.52pb, for a top-quark mass of 172.5GeV/c2.

  16. Automatic delineation of geomorphological slope units with <tt>r.slopeunits v1.0tt> and their optimization for landslide susceptibility modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Marchesini, Ivan; Reichenbach, Paola; Rossi, Mauro; Ardizzone, Francesca; Fiorucci, Federica; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2016-11-01

    Automatic subdivision of landscapes into terrain units remains a challenge. Slope units are terrain units bounded by drainage and divide lines, but their use in hydrological and geomorphological studies is limited because of the lack of reliable software for their automatic delineation. We present the <tt>r.slopeunits> software for the automatic delineation of slope units, given a digital elevation model and a few input parameters. We further propose an approach for the selection of optimal parameters controlling the terrain subdivision for landslide susceptibility modeling. We tested the software and the optimization approach in central Italy, where terrain, landslide, and geo-environmental information was available. The software was capable of capturing the variability of the landscape and partitioning the study area into slope units suited for landslide susceptibility modeling and zonation. We expect <tt>r.slopeunits> to be used in different physiographical settings for the production of reliable and reproducible landslide susceptibility zonations.

  17. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... instructions with the TSC. A TT&L depositary must elect to be one or more of the following: (i) A collector depositary; (ii) A retainer depositary; (iii) An investor depositary. (2) A financial institution is not... until the TSC designates it as a TT&L depository....

  18. 31 CFR 203.5 - Designation of financial institutions as TT&L depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... instructions with the TSC. A TT&L depositary must elect to be one or more of the following: (i) A collector depositary; (ii) A retainer depositary; (iii) An investor depositary. (2) A financial institution is not... until the TSC designates it as a TT&L depository....

  19. Expression and characterization of hyperthermostable exo-polygalacturonase TtGH28 from Thermotoga thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene TtGH28 encoding a putative GH28 polygalacturonase from Pseudothermotoga thermarum DSM 5069 (Theth_0397, NCBI# AEH50492.1) was synthesized, expressed in E. coli, and characterized. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of gene product TtGH28 with other GH28 proteins whose structures and detai...

  20. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Kuniholm, Mark H.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R.; Peters, Marion G.; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B.; Strickler, Howard D.; Villacres, Maria C.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gange, Stephen J.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; O’Brien, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV–1 and HSV–2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV–2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV–1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV–2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV–1 or HSV–2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV–2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV–2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large

  1. Interferon Lambda 4 Genotype Is Not Associated with Recurrence of Oral or Genital Herpes.

    PubMed

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Kuniholm, Mark H; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Chen, Sabrina; Desai, Seema; Edlin, Brian R; Peters, Marion G; Plankey, Michael; Sharp, Gerald B; Strickler, Howard D; Villacres, Maria C; Quinn, Thomas C; Gange, Stephen J; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Greenblatt, Ruth M; O'Brien, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) genotype is associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and may play a role in other infections. IFN-λ4 protein is generated only in individuals who carry the IFNL4-ΔG allele. The IFNL4 rs12979860-T allele, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with IFNL4-ΔG, was recently reported to be associated with more frequent and severe oral herpes episodes. We investigated the association of IFNL4-ΔG/TT with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related outcomes among 2,192 African American and European American participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). WIHS is a prospective cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and at-risk women that began in 1994. This report includes follow-up through 2013. Available data included: HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies at study entry; bi-annually ascertained episodes of (self-reported) oral herpes, (self-reported) genital sores and (clinician-observed) genital ulcers; HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens. IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotyping was determined by TaqMan. We compared women with IFNL4-ΔG/ΔG or IFNL4-TT/ΔG genotypes (i.e., IFNL4-ΔG carriers) to those with the IFNL4-TT/TT genotype, adjusting for age, race and HIV status. For outcomes with repeated measurements, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 95% confidence interval [CI] and p-value were determined using a generalized estimating equations approach. Median participant age at enrollment was 36 years; 81% were African American, 74% were HIV-infected. Among 1,431 participants tested for antibodies, 72.8% were positive for HSV-1 and 79.0% were positive for HSV-2. We observed no association between IFNL4-ΔG/TT genotype and any outcome: HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody prevalence (p>0.1, all comparisons); oral herpes (aOR, 1.2; p = 0.35); genital sores (aOR, 1.0; p = 0.71); genital ulcers (aOR, 1.1; p = 0.53); detectable HSV-2 DNA in CVL (N = 322; aOR, 0.71; p = 0.49); HSV-2 DNA level (p = 0.68). In this large prospective study, IFNL4-ΔG/TT

  2. PHASES differential astrometry and the mutual inclination of the V819 Herculis triple star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, M. W.; Lane, B. F.; Konacki, M.; Burke, B. F.; Colavita, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Shao, M.

    2006-02-01

    V819 Herculis is a well-studied triple star system consisting of a "wide" pair with 5.5 year period, one component of which is a 2.2-day period eclipsing single-line spectroscopic binary. Differential astrometry measurements from the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) are presented and used to determine a relative inclination between the short- and long-period orbits of 23.6 ± 4.9 degrees. This represents only the sixth unambiguous determination of the mutual inclination of orbits in a hierarchical triple system. This result is combined with those for the other five systems for analysis of the observed distribution of mutual inclinations in nearby triple systems. It is found that this distribution is different than that which one would expect from random orientations with statistical significance at the 94% level; implications for studying the spatial distribution of angular momentum in star forming regions is discussed.

  3. TT Arietis: Unprecedented Switching From Negative to Positive Superhumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Apeltauer, T.; Chinarova, L. L.; Galis, R.; Hric, L.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Niarchos, P. G.; Novak, P.; Patkos, L.; Shakhovskoy, D. N.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    Results of the international observational campaign "TT Ari-98" are presented. Altogether 11 336 observations have been obtained in the "positive superhump" state during 18 runs in 6 observatories, partially in UBV, UBVR (switching filters). During one night, 1027 simultaneous UBVRI data have been obtained. No significant shifts between the times of extrema in different colors have been found. The asymmetry is 0.44±0.01 is present showing more abrupt brightness increase than a decrease. The smoothed U-B color varies from -0m.65 to - 0m. 86, whereas the B-V=0m. 03 is remarkably constant. Sometimes the maxima have larger amplitude and a sharp shape corresponding to areas with a duration of ˜ 5 minutes. One may note a significant decrease of the mean magnitude by 0m. 35 on JD 2251069. The moments of 21 maximum and 18 minima are listed. They correspond to the period for the 1997 data obtained by Skillman et al. (1998) showing no period change from one season to the next. The "test function - frequency" dependence in a double logarithmic scale has a linear trend in the range (90-370 c/d) and a very large slope 2.3-3.1 corresponding to QPOs rather than to the flickering.

  4. Pharmacogenomics of platinum-based chemotherapy response in NSCLC: a genotyping study and a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Zhan; Zou, Ting; Cui, Jiajia; Yin, Jiye; Zheng, Wei; Jiang, Wuzhong; Zhou, Honghao; Liu, Zhaoqian

    2016-01-01

    Published data showed inconsistent results about associations of extensively studied polymorphisms with platinum-based chemotherapy response. Our study aimed to provide reliable conclusions of these associations by detecting genotypes of the SNPs in a larger sample size and summarizing a comprehensive pooled analysis. 13 SNPs in 8 genes were genotyped in 1024 NSCLC patients by SequenomMassARRAY. 39 published studies and our study were included in meta-analysis. Patients with GA or GG genotypes of XRCC1 G1196 had better response than AA genotype carriers (Genotyping study: OR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.53-0.96, P = 0.028; Meta-analysis: OR = 0.74, 95%CI: 0.62-0.89, P = 0.001). Patients carrying CT or TT genotypes of XRCC1 C580T could be more sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy compared to patients with CC genotype (OR = 0.54, 95%CI: 0.37-0.80, P = 0.002). CC genotype of XRCC3 C18067T carriers showed more resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy when compared to those with CT or TT genotypes (OR = 0.69, 95%CI: 0.52-0.91, P = 0.009). Our study indicated that XRCC1 G1196A/C580T and XRCC3 C18067T should be paid attention for personalized platinum-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients. PMID:27248474

  5. The prevalence of TT virus and GB virus C/hepatitis G virus infection in individuals with raised liver enzymes but without HBV or HCV infection in Taiwan.

    PubMed Central

    Dai, C. Y.; Yu, M. L.; Chang, W. Y.; Tseng, C. H.; Hou, C.; Lin, Z. Y.; Chen, S. C.; Hsieh, M. Y.; Wang, L. Y.; Tsai, J. F.; Chuang, W. L.

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of TT virus (TTV) and GB virus-C/hepatitis G virus (GBV-C/HGV) infection and the association with raised liver function tests in 546 Taiwanese with negative HBsAg, anti-HCV and HCV RNA was elucidated. They were tested for serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), GBV-C/HGV RNA, anti-envelope protein 2 antibody (anti-E2) and TTV DNA. Direct sequencing and phylogenetic analyses were performed on 58 isolates for TTV genotype determination. The prevalence of TTV DNA, GBV-C/HGV RNA, anti-E2 and over all GBV-C/HGV exposure was 24.9, 3.4, 8.2 and 11.1%, respectively. Using uni- and multi-variate analyses, male gender and TTV viremia were associated significantly with raised ALT values. Sixty-nine percent of TTV isolates were deduced to be TTV genotype 1 and they had significantly lower mean age than genotype non-1 isolates. In the population, raised ALT may be related to male gender and be attributable to TTV infection but not to GBV-C/HGV among individuals with no evidence of current HBV and HCV infection. TTV genotype 1 is the most prevalent genotype and associated with younger age. PMID:12403107

  6. Fine-mapping butyrophilin family genes revealed several polymorphisms influencing viral genotype selection in hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Ampuero, J; del Campo, J A; Rojas, L; García-Lozano, R J; Buti, M; Solá, R; Forns, X; Moreno-Otero, R; Andrade, R; Diago, M; Salmerón, J; Rodrigo, L; Pons, J A; Navarro, J M; Calleja, J L; García-Samaniego, J; García-Valdecasas, M; Rojas, Á; Millán, R; González-Escribano, M F; Romero-Gómez, M

    2015-01-01

    Host-viral genetic interaction has a key role in hepatitis C infection (HCV) and maybe in the viral selection. In a preliminary GWAS analysis, we identified BTN3A2 rs9104 to be associated with HCV genotype 1. Therefore, our aim was to determine the influence of BTN family on the selection of HCV genotype. We performed a fine-mapping analysis of BTN gene region in a cohort of chronic HCV infection (N=841), validating significant results in another independent chronic HCV infection cohort (N=637), according to selection of viral genotype. BTN3A2 rs9104, BTN3A2 rs733528, BTN2A1 rs6929846, BTN2A1 rs7763910 and BTN3A3 rs13220495 were associated with viral genotype selection. Interestingly, BTN3A2 rs9104 GG genotype was closely related to genotype 1 infection (80.7% (394/488) compared with genotype 3 infection (53.5% (23/43); P=0.0001) in patients harboring IL28B-CT/TT genotype, although this effect was not observed in IL28B-CC genotype. Similarly, BTN3A3 rs13220495 CC genotype was linked to genotype 3 infection (100% (32/32)) compared to genotype 1 (87.3% (137/157); P=0.028) in patients harboring IL28B-CC genotype, but did not in IL28B-CT/TT genotype. Genetic variants in the butyrophilin family genes may alter susceptibility to infection, selecting HCV genotype and influencing disease progression. BTN3A2 rs9104 was strongly associated with genotype 1 infection and the haplotype BTN3A3 rs13220495 CC+IL28B genotype CC was universal in patients with hepatitis C genotype 3a.

  7. Coordinate Regulation of Metabolite Glycosylation and Stress Hormone Biosynthesis by TT8 in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kiat, Lim Boon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites play a key role in coordinating ecology and defense strategies of plants. Diversity of these metabolites arises by conjugation of core structures with diverse chemical moieties, such as sugars in glycosylation. Active pools of phytohormones, including those involved in plant stress response, are also regulated by glycosylation. While much is known about the enzymes involved in glycosylation, we know little about their regulation or coordination with other processes. We characterized the flavonoid pathway transcription factor TRANSPARENT TESTA8 (TT8) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using an integrative omics strategy. This approach provides a systems-level understanding of the cellular machinery that is used to generate metabolite diversity by glycosylation. Metabolomics analysis of TT8 loss-of-function and inducible overexpression lines showed that TT8 coordinates glycosylation of not only flavonoids, but also nucleotides, thus implicating TT8 in regulating pools of activated nucleotide sugars. Transcriptome and promoter network analyses revealed that the TT8 regulome included sugar transporters, proteins involved in sugar binding and sequestration, and a number of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importantly, TT8 affects stress response, along with brassinosteroid and jasmonic acid biosynthesis, by directly binding to the promoters of key genes of these processes. This combined effect on metabolite glycosylation and stress hormones by TT8 inducible overexpression led to significant increase in tolerance toward multiple abiotic and biotic stresses. Conversely, loss of TT8 leads to increased sensitivity to these stresses. Thus, the transcription factor TT8 is an integrator of secondary metabolism and stress response. These findings provide novel approaches to improve broad-spectrum stress tolerance. PMID:27432888

  8. Assessment of IL-28: rs12979860 and rs8099917 Polymorphisms in a Cohort of Cuban Chronic HCV Genotype 1b Patients

    PubMed Central

    Palenzuela Gardón, Daniel; Guillen, Isabel Alicia; Fernández, Julio R.; Camacho, Hamlet; Estevez, Zurina Cinza; Dueñas, Santiago; Alvares-Lajonchere, Liz; Amador, Yalena; Martinez-Donato, Gillian; Han, Junsong; Zhang, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaona; Gao, Yang; Campaña, Juan Roca; Novoa, Lidia I.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant global public health problem with >185 million infections worldwide. A series of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified IL-28B polymorphisms as a predictor of sustained virologic response (SVR), as well as spontaneous clearance in chronic HCV genotype 1 patients. The objective of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of IL-28B rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms in Cuban chronic HCV patients. The study cohort included 73 chronic HCV patients treated with concomitant administration of CIGB-230 and nonpegylated IFN-α plus ribavirin (non-pegIFN-α/R) antiviral therapy. The genotype distribution of IL-28B rs12979860CC, -CT, and -TT was 29, 41, and 30%, respectively, and the distribution for rs8099917TT, -TG, and -GG was 63, 31, and 5%, respectively. The allele frequencies for rs12979860C and -T alleles were 51 and 49%, respectively, and for rs8099917G and -T alleles, the values were 21 and 79%, respectively. SVR rates were 55, 42, and 35% for rs12979860CC, -CT, and -TT, respectively, and 52, 30, and 25% for rs8099917TT, -GT, and -GG, respectively. The combined assessment of both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) resulted in 3 major genotypes (rs12979860CC/rs8099917TT, rs12979860CT/rs8099917TT, and rs12979860CT/rs8099917GG) with a frequency of 30.1, 21.9, and 20.5%, respectively. In patients with heterozygous variant rs12979860CT, the additional genotyping of rs8099917 contributed to increase the SVR rate. It is concluded that in Cuban HCV-infected patients, the responder homogeneous variant rs8099917TT is the most frequent genotype. The simultaneous genotyping of 2 IL-28B SNPs could improve the prediction of SVR contributing to better therapeutic decisions and treatment management. PMID:28058039

  9. Higher Tetanus Toxoid Immunity 2 Years After PsA-TT Introduction in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Nicole E.; Borrow, Ray; Berthe, Abdoulaye; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Dembélé, Awa Traoré Eps; Almond, Rachael; Frankland, Sarah; Patel, Sima; Wood, Daniel; Nascimento, Maria; Manigart, Olivier; Trotter, Caroline L.; Greenwood, Brian; Sow, Samba O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2010, mass vaccination with a then-new meningococcal A polysaccharide–tetanus toxoid protein conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, or MenAfriVac) was undertaken in 1- to 29-year-olds in Bamako, Mali. Whether vaccination with PsA-TT effectively boosts tetanus immunity in a population with heterogeneous baseline tetanus immunity is not known. We assessed the impact of PsA-TT on tetanus toxoid (TT) immunity by quantifying age- and sex-specific immunity prior to and 2 years after introduction. Methods. Using a household-based, age-stratified design, we randomly selected participants for a prevaccination serological survey in 2010 and a postvaccination survey in 2012. TT immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were quantified and geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) pre- and postvaccination among all age groups targeted for vaccination were compared. The probability of TT IgG levels ≥0.1 IU/mL (indicating short-term protection) and ≥1.0 IU/mL (indicating long-term protection) by age and sex was determined using logistic regression models. Results. Analysis of 793 prevaccination and 800 postvaccination sera indicated that while GMCs were low pre–PsA-TT, significantly higher GMCs in all age–sex strata were observed 2 years after PsA-TT introduction. The percentage with short-term immunity increased from 57.1% to 88.4% (31.3-point increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 26.6–36.0;, P < .0001) and with long-term immunity increased from 20.0% to 58.5% (38.5-point increase; 95% CI, 33.7–43.3; P < .0001) pre- and postvaccination. Conclusions. Significantly higher TT immunity was observed among vaccine-targeted age groups up to 2 years after Mali's PsA-TT mass vaccination campaign. Our results, combined with evidence from clinical trials, strongly suggest that conjugate vaccines containing TT such as PsA-TT should be considered bivalent vaccines because of their ability to boost tetanus immunity. PMID:26553691

  10. First measurement of the tt[over ] differential cross section dsigma/dM_{tt[over ]} in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-06-05

    We present a measurement of the tt[over ] differential cross section with respect to the tt[over ] invariant mass, dsigma/dM_{tt[over ]}, in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb;{-1} collected by the CDF II experiment. The tt[over ] invariant mass spectrum is sensitive to a variety of exotic particles decaying into tt[over ] pairs. The result is consistent with the standard model expectation, as modeled by PYTHIA with CTEQ5L parton distribution functions.

  11. One-Loop Helicity Amplitudes for tt Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, Simon; Sattler, Ralf; Yundin, Valery

    2011-04-01

    We present compact analytic expressions for all one-loop helicity amplitudes contributing to tt production at hadron colliders. Using recently developed generalized unitarity methods and a traditional Feynman based approach we produce a fast and flexible implementation.

  12. Calling Home in 2003: JPL Roadmap to Standardized TT&C Customer Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtik, S.; Berner, J.; Levesque, M.

    2000-01-01

    The telecommunications and Mission Operations Directorate (TMOD at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) provides tracking, telemetry and command (TT&C) services for execution of a broad spectrum of deep space missions.

  13. Combined genotype and haplotype distributions of MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shujun; Yang, Boyi; Zhi, Xueyuan; Wang, Yanxun; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C polymorphisms are, independently and/or in combination, associated with many disorders. However, data on the combined genotype and haplotype distributions of the 2 polymorphisms in Chinese population were limited. We recruited 13,473 adult women from 9 Chinese provinces, collected buccal cell samples, and determined genotypes, to estimate the combined genotype and haplotype distributions of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms. In the total sample, the 6 common combined genotypes were CT/AA (29.5%), TT/AA (21.9%), CC/AA (15.4%), CC/AC (14.9%), CT/AC (13.7%), and CC/CC (3.4%); the 3 frequent haplotypes were 677T-1298A (43.6%), 677C-1298A (37.9%), and 677C-1298C (17.6%). Importantly, we observed that there were 51 (0.4%) individuals with the CT/CC genotype, 92 (0.7%) with the TT/AC genotype, 17 (0.1%) with the TT/CC genotype, and that the frequency of the 677T-1298C haplotype was 0.9%. In addition, the prevalence of some combined genotypes and haplotypes varied among populations residing in different areas and even showed apparent geographical gradients. Further linkage disequilibrium analysis showed that the D’ and r2 values were 0.883 and 0.143, respectively. In summary, the findings of our study provide further strong evidence that the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms are usually in trans and occasionally in cis configurations. The frequencies of mutant genotype combinations were relatively higher in Chinese population than other populations, and showed geographical variations. These baseline data would be useful for future related studies and for developing health management programs. PMID:27902594

  14. Community Perspectives Associated With the African PsA-TT (MenAfriVac) Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Idoko, Olubukola T.; Diallo, Aldiouma; Sow, Samba O.; Hodgson, Abraham; Akinsola, Adebayo; Diarra, Bou; Haidara, Fadima Cheick; Ansah, Patrick Odum; Kampmann, Beate; Bouma, Enricke; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Enwere, Godwin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was established to address epidemic meningitis as a public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa and, to that end, worked to develop a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT. Methods. Experiences in 4 clinical trial sites are described. Culturally sensitive collaborative strategies were adopted to manage acceptable communication methods, peculiarities with the consent process, participant medical issues, community care, and death. Results. The clinical trials were completed successfully through community acceptance and active community collaboration. The trials also strengthened the capacities in the participating communities, and actively worked to resolve community problems. Conclusions. The understanding and integration of sociocultural realities of communities were major assets in the conduct and acceptance of these trials. MVP succeeded in these sites and provided a sound example for future clinical studies in Africa. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRTCN78147026 (PsA-TT 002); ISRCTN87739946 (PsA-TT 003); ISRCTN82484612 (PsA-TT 004); PACTR ATMR2010030001913177 (PsA-TT 006); and PACTR201110000328305 (PsA-TT 007). PMID:26553669

  15. 9th Transgenic Technology Meeting (TT2010) in Berlin, Germany: a meeting report.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Thomas L; Sobieszczuk, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The first Transgenic Technology (TT) Meeting was organized in 1999 by Johannes Wilbertz, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden as a regional meeting. The TT Meetings continued in this way, constantly gathering additional practitioners of transgenic methodologies until the breakthrough in 2005 when the 6th TT Meeting in Barcelona, Spain, hosted by Lluis Montoliu (Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Madrid, Spain), generated the momentum to establish the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). Since 2006, the ISTT has continued to promote the TT Meetings and provide its membership with a forum to discuss best practices and new methods in the field. The TT2010 Meeting was held at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (Berlin, Germany). Participation at the TT2010 Meeting exceeded the registration capacity and set a new attendance record. Session topics included methods for the generation of rat and mouse models of human disease, fundamental and advanced topics in rodent embryonic stem cells, and the newest transgenic technologies. Short presentations from selected abstracts were of especial interest. Roundtable discussions on transgenic facility establishment and cryoarchiving of mouse lines were favorably received. Students, technical staff, and professors participated in numerous discussions and came away with practical methods and new ideas for research.

  16. Novel Atlantic bottlenose dolphin parainfluenza virus TtPIV-1 clusters with bovine PIV-3 genotype B strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) is a common viral infection not only in humans, but many other species. Serological evidence suggests that nearly 100% of children in the United States have been infected with PIV-3 by five years of age. Similarly, in cattle PIV-3 is commonly associated with bovine re...

  17. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯Wmore » nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.« less

  18. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E. -E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. 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E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯W nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.

  19. The Association of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes with the Risk of Childhood Leukemia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Miao, Chia-En; Hsu, Yuan-Nian; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most prevalent type of pediatric cancer, the causes of which are likely to involve an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. To evaluate the effects of the genotypic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) on childhood ALL risk in Taiwan, two well-known polymorphic genotypes of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed to examine the extent of their associations with childhood ALL susceptibility and to discuss the MTHFR genotypic contribution to childhood ALL risk among different populations. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 266 patients with childhood ALL and an equal number of non-cancer controls recruited were genotyped utilizing PCR-RFLP methodology. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between childhood ALL and control groups. The CT and TT of MTHFR C677T genotypes were significantly more frequently found in controls than in childhood ALL patients (odds ratios=0.60 and 0.48, 95% confidence intervals=0.42–0.87 and 0.24–0.97, respectively). As for gender, the boys carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype conferred a lower odds ratio of 0.51 (95% confidence interval=0.32–0.81, P=0.0113) for childhood ALL. As for age, those equal to or greater than 3.5 years of age at onset of disease carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype were of lower risk (odds ratio= 0.43 and 95% confidence interval=0.26–0.71, P=0.0016). Conclusions Our results indicated that the MTHFR C677T T allele was a protective biomarker for childhood ALL in Taiwan, and the association was more significant in male patients and in patients 3.5 years of age or older at onset of disease. PMID:25793509

  20. Association Between the Interleukin-10-1082G/A, -592C/A, -819C/T Gene Polymorphism and HIV-1 Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Caixiao; Liu, Shujun; Liu, Shuxia; Li, Zhanzhan; Chen, Peng; Chen, Lizhang

    2017-01-01

    The Interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene polymorphism influences the pathogenesis and evolution of HIV-1 disease. Many studies in this regard have evaluated the association between this polymorphism and HIV-1 susceptibility, yet, the exact relationship between them remains ambiguous and contradictory. A systematic literature search was conducted and the found case-control studies assessing the association between IL-10-1082G/A, -592C/A, -819C/T gene polymorphism and HIV-1 susceptibility were analyzed. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by a fixed effect model. In general, no significant relationship was found between IL-10-1082G/A gene polymorphism and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection (A vs. G genotype model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.81-1.23, p = .775; GG vs. AA+AG model: OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.76-1.27, p = .867; GG+AG vs. AA model: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.70-1.35, p = .852; GG vs. AA model: OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.67-1.15, p = .348; AG vs. AA model: OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.67-1.37, p = .811; GG+AA vs. AG model: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.74-1.43, p = .886). IL-10-529C/A gene polymorphism might lead to a decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (A vs. G genotype model: OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.73-1.06, p = .166; GG vs. AA+AG model: OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.80-1.11, p = .447; GG+AG vs. AA model: OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.61-0.92, p = .005; GG vs. AA model: OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.57-0.93, p = .012; AG vs. AA model: OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.60-0.92, p = .0.007; GG+AA vs. AG model: OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 0.72-1.71, p = .641). IL-10-819C/T gene polymorphism might lead to an increased risk of HIV-1 infection (A vs. G genotype model: OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04-1.50, p = .019; GG vs. AA+AG model: OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 0.81-2.01, p = .278; GG+AG vs. AA model: OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.05-1.93, p = .023; GG vs

  1. Anomalous DD and TT yields relative to the DT yield in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Daniel T.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (DD), T(t,2n)4He (TT) and D(t,n)4He (DT) reactions have been conducted using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In these experiments, which were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility, absolute spectral measurements of the DD protons and TT neutrons were conducted and compared to neutron-time-of-flight measured DT-neutron yields. From these measurements, it is concluded that the DD yield is anomalously low and the TT yield is anomalously high relative to the DT yield, an effect that is enhanced with increasing ion temperature. These results can be explained by an enrichment of tritium in the core of an ICF implosion, which may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. In addition, the spectral measurements of the TT-neutron spectrum were conducted for the first time at reactant central-mass energies in the range of 15-30 keV. The results from these measurements indicate that the TT reaction proceeds primarily through the direct three-body reaction channel, producing a continuous TT-neutron spectrum in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. This work was conducted in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, M. J.-E. Manuel, H. G. Rinderknecht, N. Sinenian, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, P. B. Radha, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, D. P. McNabb, P. A. Amendt, R. N. Boyd, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann, Y. H. Kim, G. P. Grim and A. D. Bacher. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG03-03SF22691), LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974).

  2. Characterization of Biosurfactant Produced by Bacillus licheniformis TT42 Having Potential for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Harish; Nerurkar, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus licheniformis TT42 produced a low-molecular weight anionic biosurfactant that reduced the surface tension of water from 72 to 27 mN/m and the interfacial tension from 12 to 0.05 mN/m against crude oil. We have earlier reported significant enhancement in oil recovery in laboratory sand pack columns and core flood studies, by biosurfactant-TT42 compared to standard strain, Bacillus mojavensis JF2. In the context of this application of the biosurfactant-TT42, its characterization was deemed important. In the preliminary studies, the biosurfactant-TT42 was found to be functionally stable at under conditions of temperature, pH, and salinity generally prevalent in oil reservoirs. Furthermore, the purified biosurfactant-TT42 was found to have a CMC of 22 mg/l. A newly developed activity staining TLC method was used for the purification of biosurfactant-TT42. Structural characterization of biosurfactant-TT42 using TLC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), GC-MS, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF)/TOF suggested that it was a mixture of lipopeptide species, all having a common hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptide head with the sequence, Gln-Leu/Ileu-Leu/Ileu-Val-Asp-Leu/Ileu-Leu/Ileu linked to hydrophobic tails of different lengths of 3β-OH-fatty acids bearing 1043, 1057 and 1071 Da molecular weight, where 3β-OH-C19 fatty acid was predominant. This is the longest chain length of fatty acids reported in a lipopeptide.

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype, smoking habit, metastasis and oral cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Chia-Fang; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Tsou, Yung-An; Hua, Chun-Hung; Chang, Wen-Shin; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association and interaction of genotypic polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) with smoking habits and oral cancer in Taiwan. Two well-known polymorphic variants of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed in association with oral cancer risk, and their joint effects with individual smoking habits on oral cancer risk are discussed. In total, 620 oral cancer patients and 620 non-cancer controls in central Taiwan were recruited and genotyped. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between the oral cancer and control groups. The T allele of MTHFR C677T was significantly more frequently found in controls than in oral cancer patients. Joint effects of smoking and MTHFR C677T genotype significantly affected oral cancer susceptibility. The MTHFR C677T CT and TT genotypes in association with smoking conferred lower odds ratios of 0.66 and 0.54 (95% confidence interval=0.49-0.82 and 0.39-0.86), respectively. Those patients with MTHFR C677T CT and TT genotypes also had a lower risk of oral cancer metastasis. MTHFR C677T genotype may have joint effects with smoking on oral carcinogenesis, and may be a useful biomarker for prediction and prognosis of oral cancer.

  4. The association between end-stage diabetic nephropathy and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype with macroangiopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, G; Obayashi, H; Kamiuchi, K; Nakai, M; Kanatsuna, T; Yamaguchi, M; Tanaka, T; Shigeta, H; Fujii, M; Yoshikawa, T; Nakamura, N

    2003-05-01

    The T/T genotype of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677 T gene polymorphism is associated with elevated homocysteine levels and presumably with increased atherosclerotic risk. We evaluated the interaction between this gene polymorphism and end-stage diabetic nephropathy on the observed prevalence of macroangiopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677 C/T genotypes were determined in 174 type 2 diabetic patients: 80 with and 94 without renal failure due to diabetic nephropathy. In the patients with renal failure, the T/T genotype and T allele were significantly associated with macroangiopathy (T/T; 31 % vs. 2 %, P = 0.0001 T allele; 59 % vs. 29 %, P = 0.00014), whereas the associations were not significant in the patients without renal failure. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, age (10 years OR 4.05 [1.79 - 9.31], P < 0.0005) and 677 T allele (6.84 [2.12 - 22.05], P = 0.0013) were significantly associated with macroangiopathy in the patients with renal failure. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the 677 T/T genotype and T allele of MTHFR were significantly associated with macroangiopathy in type 2 diabetic patients with renal failure. The MTHFR 677 T allele, together with renal dysfunction due to diabetic nephropathy, could be a strong risk factor for atherosclerotic disease.

  5. Effect of BMAP-28 on human thyroid cancer TT cells is mediated by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DAQI; WAN, LANLAN; ZHANG, JINNAN; LIU, CHANG; SUN, HUI

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant endocrine tumor, with significant morbidity and mortality. Bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28) is a cathelicidin that is found in bovine neutrophils. In the present study, the effect and relative mechanism of BMAP-28 on the human thyroid cancer TT cell line in vitro and in vivo were investigated. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry and a TT-xenograft mouse model were used in this study. The data obtained indicated that BMAP-28 significantly inhibited the proliferation of the TT cells in vitro. In addition, the Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay detected that BMAP-28 induced apoptotic effects in the TT cells. Moreover, the expression of activated caspase-3 and -9 was upregulated at the transcriptional and translational levels. Simultaneously, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)3 and MMP9 was downregulated following BMAP-28 treatment. Finally, BMAP-28 significantly prevented the tumor growth in the TT-xenograft mouse model. These results indicated that BMAP-28 could be a potential agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26622900

  6. Common Data Format (CDF) New Time Variable CDF_TIME_TT2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Lal, N.; Liu, M. H.; McGuire, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Common Data Format (CDF.gsfc.nasa.gov, a project within the Space Physics Data Facility, SPDF.gsfc.nasa.gov) team has defined a new CDF data type, CDF_TIME_TT2000, to provide a standardized and well-defined time scheme for science data, so that data can be accurately compared across missions and used in the future (without misunderstanding and without requiring multiple software routines for conversion). CDF_TIME_TT2000 is defined as an 8-byte signed integer with a fixed time base of J2000 (Julian date 2451545.0 Terrestrial Time (TT) or 2000 January 1, 12h TT), in units and resolution of nanoseconds, and scaled in Terrestrial Time on the rotating Earth Geoid. Routines to convert between UTC and CDF_TIME_TT2000 are provided. This improves on the existing time variable types, CDF_EPOCH and CDF_EPOCH16, since they have undefined time systems (although usually assumed to be in UTC) and times during leap seconds are conflated with the next second. Support for CDF_EPOCH variables will continue, including optional new metadata attributes available for better describing the EPOCH times as used in each dataset. The upcoming CDF version 3.4 will also improve performance and security, with internal compression routines changed to packages with appropriate software licenses.

  7. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... high level of triglycerides in the blood, and atherosclerosis that develops at an early age. APOE genotyping ... and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis . People with these genotypes could be predisposed to ...

  8. Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT as risk factors of alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis, in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Mario; Pasta, Francesca; Pasta, Linda

    2015-08-15

    The thrombophilic genetic factors (THRGFs), PAI-1 4G-4G, MTHFR 677TT, V Leiden 506Q and Prothrombin 20210A, were studied as risk factors in 865 Caucasian patients with liver cirrhosis, consecutively enrolled from June 2008 to January 2014. A total of 582 HCV, 80 HBV, 94 alcohol, (82 with more than one etiologic factor) and 191 cryptogenic patients with liver cirrhosis had been consecutively enrolled; 243 patients showed portal vein thrombosis (PVT). At least one of the above THRGFs was present in 339/865 patients (39.2%). PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT were the most frequent THRGFs, statistically significant in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT: respectively 24 and 28, 50 and 73, and 65 and 83 (all chi-square tests>3.84, and p values<0.05). Two logistic regression analysis, using PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, as dependent variable, confirmed the independent significant relationship of these THRGFs with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and PVT. PAI 1 and MTHFR 677 genotypes, deviated from those expected in populations in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (all p values<0.05), in the subgroups of patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis and presence of PVT. Our study shows the pivotal role of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT in patients with alcohol, cryptogenic liver cirrhosis, and PVT, in a Caucasian population. In conclusion, thrombo and fibro-genetic mechanisms of PAI-1 4G-4G and MTHFR 677TT, could have a role in the development of liver cirrhosis, mainly in patients without HCV and HBV, and PVT.

  9. How to optimize HCV therapy in genotype 1 patients: predictors of response.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The advent of triple therapy (TT) with first-generation protease inhibitors boceprevir (BOC) and telaprevir (TVR) in addition to pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) has resulted in a significant improvement in the sustained virological response (SVR) rate and potentially in life years gained compared to dual therapy (DT), when treating naïve or treatment-experienced patients with genotype 1 (G1) chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This benefit is partly offset by the increased complexity of treatment, and the increased costs and risks of therapy, making it necessary to optimize the indications for TT. Naïve patients with mild fibrosis and the IL28B CC polymorphism and/or with a rapid virological response (RVR) to DT can still benefit from DT, while TT is preferable in all others. Phase 3 trials have clearly shown that a 1 log(10) decrease in HCVRNA after 4 weeks of DT associated with a favourable IL28B genotype and a low stage of fibrosis, and a pattern of previous response to DT in treatment-experienced patients are the strongest predictors of an SVR to TT. Moreover, an extended rapid virological response (eRVR) is associated with an SVR rate >90%, so that the overall duration of treatment can be shortened in a high proportion of patients. Further efforts to optimize the current TT regimens both by increasing efficacy and improving tolerance are still needed. Most important, in the future, treatment can probably be personalized based on data from post-marketing surveillance of TT providing information about patient groups that were underrepresented in phase 3 studies such as those with cirrhosis.

  10. Interaction of vitamin A supplementation level with ADH1C genotype on intramuscular fat in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Krone, K G; Ward, A K; Madder, K M; Hendrick, S; McKinnon, J J; Buchanan, F C

    2016-03-01

    Previously, the single nucleotide polymorphism in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1C c.-64T>C) was shown to have an association with intramuscular fat (IMF) in the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle when vitamin A was limited in finishing rations of beef steers. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum vitamin A supplementation level, in combination with ADH1C genotype, to increase IMF of the LT muscle. In total, 45 TT genotype, 45 CT and 27 CC Black Angus crossbred steers were backgrounded on a commercial ration containing 3360 IU vitamin A/kg dry matter (DM). During finishing, the steers were randomly assigned to one of three vitamin A treatments at 25%, 50% and 75% of the National Research Council recommendation of 2200 IU/kg DM. Treatments were administered via an oral bolus. Carcass quality was evaluated and a sample from the LT muscle was collected for analysis of IMF. A treatment×genotype interaction (P=0.04) was observed for IMF; TT steers on the 75% treatment had higher IMF relative to CT and CC steers on the same treatment. Western blot analysis showed that TT steers had higher (P=0.02) ADH1C protein expression in hepatic tissue. Previously, TT steers exhibited increased IMF when fed limited vitamin A. In the current study, the lack of variation in IMF between treatments and genotypes at the lower vitamin A treatment levels was likely due to the majority of the steers grading Canada AAA (USDA Choice). However, the western blot data supports that TT steers are expected to have higher IMF deposition, due to an increased production of ADH1C. The interaction between ADH1C genotype and vitamin A supplementation level has the potential for use in marker-assisted management programs to target niche markets based on increased marbling.

  11. A TT&C Performance Simulator for Space Exploration and Scientific Satellites - Architecture and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donà, G.; Faletra, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the TT&C performance simulator toolkit developed internally at Thales Alenia Space Italia (TAS-I) to support the design of TT&C subsystems for space exploration and scientific satellites. The simulator has a modular architecture and has been designed using a model-based approach using standard engineering tools such as MATLAB/SIMULINK and mission analysis tools (e.g. STK). The simulator is easily reconfigurable to fit different types of satellites, different mission requirements and different scenarios parameters. This paper provides a brief description of the simulator architecture together with two examples of applications used to demonstrate some of the simulator’s capabilities.

  12. Mutation rate and novel tt mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana induced by carbon ions.

    PubMed Central

    Shikazono, Naoya; Yokota, Yukihiko; Kitamura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana by carbon ions was carried out to investigate the mutational effect of ion particles in higher plants. Frequencies of embryonic lethals and chlorophyll-deficient mutants were found to be significantly higher after carbon-ion irradiation than after electron irradiation (11-fold and 7.8-fold per unit dose, respectively). To estimate the mutation rate of carbon ions, mutants with no pigments on leaves and stems (tt) and no trichomes on leaves (gl) were isolated at the M2 generation and subjected to analysis. Averaged segregation rate of the backcrossed mutants was 0.25, which suggested that large deletions reducing the viability of the gametophytes were not transmitted, if generated, in most cases. During the isolation of mutants, two new classes of flavonoid mutants (tt18, tt19) were isolated from carbon-ion-mutagenized M2 plants. From PCR and sequence analysis, two of the three tt18 mutant alleles were found to have a small deletion within the LDOX gene and the other was revealed to contain a rearrangement. Using the segregation rates, the mutation rate of carbon ions was estimated to be 17-fold higher than that of electrons. The isolation of novel mutants and the high mutation rate suggest that ion particles can be used as a valuable mutagen for plant genetics. PMID:12702688

  13. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT...

  14. 31 CFR 203.4 - Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Financial institution eligibility for designation as a TT&L depositary. 203.4 Section 203.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT...

  15. English-Spanish equivalence of the Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Elizabeth A; Kallen, Michael A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Ganschow, Pamela S; Garcia, Sofia F; Burns, James L

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased measurement instruments are needed to reliably estimate health literacy in diverse populations. The study aimed (a) to evaluate measurement equivalence of Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT) and (b) to compare Health LiTT scores between English- and Spanish-speaking individuals. Health LiTT and several patient-reported outcome instruments were completed by adult patients receiving care for type 2 diabetes at a safety net clinic. English-Spanish measurement equivalence was evaluated with an item response theory approach to differential item functioning (DIF) detection and impact. Health LiTT scores were compared by language using multivariable linear regression. Approximately equal numbers of English-speaking patients (n=146) and Spanish-speaking patients (n=149) with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. English participants were primarily non-Hispanic Black (65%); all Spanish participants were Hispanic. Six Health LiTT items were flagged for DIF. The Pearson correlation between unadjusted and DIF adjusted scores was 0.995; the mean difference of individual difference scores was 0.0005 (SD=0.0888). After adjusting for predisposing characteristics, enabling resources and need for care, Health LiTT scores were comparable for Spanish-speaking individuals versus English-speaking individuals. The effect of DIF items on Health LiTT scores appeared to be trivial. English-Spanish equivalence of Health LiTT will permit researchers to determine the independent effects of limited English proficiency and limited literacy.

  16. The Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Core Amino Acid 70 Substitution and Genotypes of Polymorphisms Near the IFNL3 Gene in Iranian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kadjbaf, Danesh; Keshvari, Maryam; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Pouryasin, Ali; Behnava, Bita; Salimi, Shima; Mehrnoush, Leila; Karimi Elizee, Pegah; Sharafi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    Background Molecular studies have demonstrated that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and host genetics play predictive roles in the management of patients infected with HCV. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the HCV genotype, core amino acid (aa) 70 substitution, and polymorphisms near the IFNL3 gene (including rs12979860 and rs8099917) among Iranian patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the molecular profiles of the HCV genotype, core aa 70 substitution, and rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms and plasma HCV RNA levels were determined in 429 CHC patients including 141 hemophilic, 84 thalassemic, and 204 non-hemophilic, non-thalassemic patients. Results The hepatitis C virus subtype 1a was the most common subtype in the study population. Core aa substitution Arg70Gln was strongly associated with cirrhosis (OR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.13 - 5.50; P = 0.020). Core aa 70 substitutions were more frequently observed in patients with the HCV subtype 1b than in patients with any other HCV subtypes (P < 0.001). Core aa 70 substitutions were also more common in patients with the rs12979860 TT genotype than in patients with non-TT genotypes (17.3% vs. 8.5%, P = 0.022) and also in rs8099917 non-TT genotypes than in the TT genotype (14.0% vs. 7.0%, P = 0.026). The HCV genotypes and rs8099917 polymorphisms were correlated in which HCV subtype 1b was in favor of rs8099917 GG and HCV subtype 3a favored rs8099917 TT (P = 0.021). Furthermore, the rs12979860 TT and rs8099917 GG genotypes showed significantly lower HCV RNA levels than the other genotypes (P < 0.001). Conclusions There is an as yet unexplained association between HCV and host parameters with unknown mechanisms in patients with chronic HCV infection. The assessments of core aa 70 substitution and polymorphisms near the IFNL3 gene could offer promising steps to improve the management of patients with HCV. PMID:27630727

  17. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  18. Existence of TT virus DNA and TTV-like mini virus DNA in infant cord blood: mother-to-neonatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroshi; Michitaka, Kojiro; Horiike, Norio; Kihana, Toshimasa; Yano, Mariko; Mori, Takashi; Onji, Morikazu

    2001-11-01

    The route of transmission of TT virus (TTV) was studied by examining the existence of TTV DNA in different body fluids from the new born infants and their mothers. A total of 52 pregnant women with normal serum alanine aminotransferase levels were enrolled in this study. TTV DNA was examined using a polymerase chain reaction method using Takahashi's primers which can detect all genotypes of TTV and Okamoto's primers which detect only some of the genotypes of TTV. TTV DNA was detected in the sera from 40/52 (77%), in the breast milk from 35/52 (67%), and in the amniotic fluid from 6/6 (100%) pregnant mothers using Takahashi's primers TTV DNA was also detected in the sera from 8 of 11 (73%) and in the cord blood from 25/52 (48%) new born infants using Takahashi's primers. However, TTV DNA was detected in only 5/52 maternal blood (10%) and 4/52 breast milk (8%) using Okamoto's primers. All samples positive for TTV DNA by Takahashi's primers, were also positive for TTV-like mini virus (TLMV) DNA. Our data suggest that intrauterine transmission or transmission via breast milk may contribute to maintaining the global TTV and TLMV reservoir.

  19. TT Ari: "Intermediate-High" Luminosity State Transition and Now Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J. N.; Andronov, I. L.; Kim, Y.; Cha, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    . We report on the presently continuing "outburst-like" event in TT Ari with an amplitude of 0.9m (R) and characteristic timescales dt/dm=15.87(11)days/mag (rise at JD 2453704-715) and dt/dm=4.95(7)days/mag (fall at HJD 2453721-724). TT Ari has been recently found to be out of the "positive superhump" state, which lasted from 1997 (Skillman et al. , 1998, ApJ, 503 L67; Andronov et al., 1999, AJ, 117, 574) to at least 2004 (Andronov, Ostrova & Burwitz 2004, VSNET-Campaign 1555, http://uavso.pochta.ru/TTAri), by Andronov, Gazeas & Niarchos (2005, VSNET-Campaign 1630, http://uavso.pochta.ru/ TTAri2005).

  20. Interferon λ 3 and 4 Genotyping Using High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis Suitable for Multiple Clinical Sample Types.

    PubMed

    Lamoury, François M J; Bartlett, Sofia; Jacka, Brendan; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grebely, Jason; Matthews, Gail V; Dore, Gregory J; Applegate, Tanya L

    2015-09-01

    Many people living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection will continue to rely on interferon-based regimens until effective strategies to minimize the cost of directly acting antivirals (DAAs) and to improve treatment access are implemented. Host single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to IFNL3 and IFNL4 are associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV, and pegylated interferon- and DAA-based treatment outcomes. We describe a simple and rapid genotyping method for IFNL rs12979860, rs8099917, and rs368234815 using high-resolution melting analysis for DNA extracted from whole blood, buffy coat, plasma, serum, and dried blood spots. This assay successfully detected all three polymorphisms on DNA extracted by the automated platform easyMAG from all samples when compared to sequenced amplicons. Analysis of 126 participants with recent HCV infection from the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C study demonstrated the prevalence of favorable single-nucleotide polymorphisms were 62%, 51%, and 45% for rs8099917 TT, rs12979860 CC, and rs368234815 TT/TT, respectively. The genotyping assay described here provides a rapid and affordable IFNL3 and IFNL4 genotyping method for a range of clinical sample types. Until global access to DAAs is achieved, IFNL3 and IFNL4 genotyping could identify those likely to clear naturally and in whom treatment could be delayed, or help prioritize DAA treatment to those less likely to respond to interferon-containing regimens.

  1. The $16,819 pay gap for newly trained physicians: the unexplained trend of men earning more than women.

    PubMed

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Richards, Michael R; Chou, Chiu-Fang; Gerber, Susan E

    2011-02-01

    Prior research has suggested that gender differences in physicians' salaries can be accounted for by the tendency of women to enter primary care fields and work fewer hours. However, in examining starting salaries by gender of physicians leaving residency programs in New York State during 1999-2008, we found a significant gender gap that cannot be explained by specialty choice, practice setting, work hours, or other characteristics. The unexplained trend toward diverging salaries appears to be a recent development that is growing over time. In 2008, male physicians newly trained in New York State made on average $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999.

  2. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to tt+jet Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmaier, S.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.

    2007-06-29

    We report on the calculation of the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the production of top-quark-top-antiquark pairs in association with a hard jet at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We present results for the tt+jet cross section and the forward-backward charge asymmetry. The corrections stabilize the leading-order prediction for the cross section. The charge asymmetry receives large corrections.

  3. Further Estimates of (T-T_{90}) Close to the Triple Point of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; de Podesta, M.; Sutton, G.; Stanger, L.; Rusby, R.; Harris, P.; Morantz, P.; Machin, G.

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in primary acoustic gas thermometry (AGT) have revealed significant differences between temperature measurements using the International Temperature Scale of 1990, T_{90}, and thermodynamic temperature, T. In 2015, we published estimates of the differences (T-T_{90}) from 118 K to 303 K, which showed interesting behavior in the region around the triple point of water, T_TPW=273.16 K. In that work, the T_{90} measurements below T_TPW used a different ensemble of capsule standard platinum resistance thermometers (SPRTs) than the T_{90} measurements above T_TPW. In this work, we extend our earlier measurements using the same ensemble of SPRTs above and below T_TPW, enabling a deeper analysis of the slope d(T-T_{90})/dT around T_TPW. In this article, we present the results of seven AGT isotherms in the temperature range 258 K to 323 K. The derived values of (T-T_{90}) have exceptionally low uncertainties and are in good agreement with our previous data and other AGT results. We present the values (T-T_{90}) alongside our previous estimates, with the resistance ratios W( T) from two SPRTs which have been used across the full range 118 K to 323 K. Additionally, our measurements show discontinuities in d(T-T_{90})/dT at T_TPW which are consistent with the slope discontinuity in the SPRT deviation functions. Since this discontinuity is by definition non-unique, and can take a range of values including zero, we suggest that mathematical representations of (T-T_{90}), such as those in the mise en pratique for the kelvin (Fellmuth et al. in Philos Trans R Soc A 374:20150037, 2016. doi: 10.1098/rsta.2015.0037), should have continuity of d(T-T_{90})/dT at T_TPW.

  4. Solvent hold tank sample results for MCU-15-815-816-817-818-819-820 November monthly sample

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F. F.; Jones, D. H.

    2016-01-25

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received one set of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples (MCU-15-815-816-817-818-819-820), pulled on 11/29/2015 for analysis. The samples were inspected, combined, and analyzed for composition. Chemical analysis of the composite sample MCU-15-815-816-817-818-819-820 indicated the TiDG, Isopar™L, and MaxCalix are at nominal levels. The modifier concentration is 3% below its nominal concentration. This analysis confirms the addition of TiDG, MaxCalix, and modifier to the solvent on November 28, 2015. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). No impurities were observed in the Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HNMR). However, up to 12.5 ± 3 micrograms of mercury per gram of solvent (or 10.4 μg/mL) was detected in this sample. The solids residues found at the bottom of the p-nut vial from sample MCU-15-815 were determined to be left-over pipe residues that were flushed into the sample and they were found to have no impact on the solvent purity or on the chemical and physical properties of the solvent. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.

  5. Public Health Impact After the Introduction of PsA-TT: The First 4 Years

    PubMed Central

    Diomandé, Fabien V. K.; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Daugla, Doumagoum M.; Novak, Ryan T.; Kristiansen, Paul A.; Collard, Jean-Marc; Gamougam, Kadidja; Kandolo, Denis; Mbakuliyemo, Nehemie; Mayer, Leonard; Stuart, James; Clark, Thomas; Tevi-Benissan, Carol; Perea, William A.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Marc LaForce, F.; Caugant, Dominique; Messonnier, Nancy; Walker, Oladapo; Greenwood, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background. During the first introduction of a group A meningococcal vaccine (PsA-TT) in 2010–2011 and its rollout from 2011 to 2013, >150 million eligible people, representing 12 hyperendemic meningitis countries, have been vaccinated. Methods. The new vaccine effectiveness evaluation framework was established by the World Health Organization and partners. Meningitis case-based surveillance was strengthened in PsA-TT first-introducer countries, and several evaluation studies were conducted to estimate the vaccination coverage and to measure the impact of vaccine introduction on meningococcal carriage and disease incidence. Results. PsA-TT implementation achieved high vaccination coverage, and results from studies conducted showed significant decrease of disease incidence as well as significant reduction of oropharyngeal carriage of group A meningococci in vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals, demonstrating the vaccine's ability to generate herd protection and prevent group A epidemics. Conclusions. Lessons learned from this experience provide useful insights in how to guide and better prepare for future new vaccine introductions in resource-limited settings. PMID:26553676

  6. Systematic synthesis of CCCCTA-based T-T filters using NAM expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongan; Cao, Rui

    2016-06-01

    In the light of nullor-mirror models for current-controlled current conveyor trans-conductance amplifier (CCCCTA), initiating the admittance matrices of the Tow-Thomas (T-T) filter, three different types of the T-T filter are synthesised by means of the nodal admittance matrix (NAM) expansion method. The type A filter, which employ one CCCCTA, one grounded resistor and two grounded capacitors, has eight different forms, the type B filter, which employ one CCCCTA, two grounded capacitors and a second-generation current-controlled conveyor (CCCII) or an second-generation inverting current-controlled conveyor (ICCCII) or an operational trans-conductance amplifier (OTA), has 64 different forms and the type C filter employing one CCCCTA and two grounded capacitors has eight different forms. In all, 80 voltage-mode/current-mode T-T filter circuits are obtained. Because of using canonic number components, the circuits are highly desirable from the viewpoint of IC fabrication and their parameters can be electronically tuned through tuning bias currents of CCCCTAs. The hand analysis and computer simulation results have been provided to support the synthesis method.

  7. Interleukin 28B.rs12979860 genotype does not affect hepatitis C viral load in Egyptians with genotype 4 chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Sayed F; Zakaria, Zainab; Allam, Walaa R; Hamdy, Shaimaa; Mahmoud, Mohamed A; Sobhy, Maha; Rewisha, Eman; Waked, Imam

    2015-11-01

    Several host and viral factors affect the natural history of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. Interleukin 28B (IL28B).rs12979860 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found to predict viral clearance with and without therapy. Subjects with the CC (favorable) genotype of IL28B.rs12979860 were more likely to spontaneously clear the infection and respond favorably to therapy. These data suggest that subjects with the "favorable" CC genotype might have a lower viral load when compared to those with the "unfavorable" TT genotype. Therefore, we examined the effect of IL28B.rs12979860 SNP on HCV viral load and clearance among HCV-infected Egyptians. This cross sectional study was conducted on 375 HCV antibody-positive subjects. Detection and quantification of HCV-RNA was determined by RT-PCR. IL28B.rs12979860 genotyping was performed using SYBR green real-time PCR and specific primers. Of 375 HCV-antibody positive subjects, 239 (63.7%) had chronic HCV infection while the remaining 136 (36.3%) subjects had spontaneously cleared the virus. The frequency of IL28-B CC, CT, and TT genotypes among spontaneous resolvers were 54.4%, 39.0%, and 6.6% while among the chronically infected subjects, they were 31.4%, 49.8%, and 18.8%, respectively. As expected, IL28 genotype predicted spontaneous HCV clearance (p < 0.001). The average HCV viral loads were 1.5 ± 0.69 x 10(6), 0.62 ± 0.11 x 10(6) and 0.51 ± 0.14 x 10(6) IU/ml among chronic subjects with the IL28B.rs12979860 CC, CT and TT genotypes, respectively (p > 0.05). In conclusion, our results show that IL28B.rs12979860 genotype does not affect viral load among chronic HCV infected Egyptians. These findings further confirm the complexity of viral host interactions in determining HCV infection outcome.

  8. Lack of association between the TNF-α-1031genotypes and generalized aggressive periodontitis disease.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, E; Aziziaram, Z; Yari, K; Bagheri Dehbaghi, M; Kahrizi, D; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Zargooshi, J; Ghadiri, K; Muhammadi, S; Kazemi, E; Moradi, M T; Shokrinia, M; Mohammadi, N

    2016-09-30

    Periodontal disease is one of the most prevalent inflammatory illnesses and is a main cause of tooth loss in human population. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) gene is one of pro-inflammatory cytokines which has important role in pathogenesis of periodontal disease. The main purpose of this study is to determine genotype abundance of TNF-α-1031 gene in both groups of patients and controls, and also investigation of relation of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) these genotypes with periodontal disease risk. DNA was extracted from blood tissue of 31 patients and 54 controls. The TNF-α-1031 polymorphism was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction- confronting two-pair primer (PCR-CTPP) method. In the GAP group, the frequencies of TT, TC and CC genotypes were 35.48%, 61.29 and 3.23%, respectively. In controls the frequencies of TT, TC and CC genotypes were 22.22%, 72.22%, and 5.56%, respectively. Results of this study showed that there was no significant association between TNF-α (-1031 T/C promoter) gene polymorphisms and the risk of generalized aggressive periodontitis disease.

  9. Caffeine and 3-km cycling performance: Effects of mouth rinsing, genotype, and time of day.

    PubMed

    Pataky, M W; Womack, C J; Saunders, M J; Goffe, J L; D'Lugos, A C; El-Sohemy, A; Luden, N D

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of caffeine mouth rinsing on 3-km cycling performance and determined whether caffeine mouth rinsing affects performance gains influenced by the CYP1A2 polymorphism. Thirty-eight recreational cyclists completed four simulated 3-km time trials (TT). Subjects ingested either 6 mg/kg BW of caffeine or placebo 1 h prior to each TT. Additionally, 25 mL of 1.14% caffeine or placebo solution were mouth rinsed before each TT. The treatments were Placebo, caffeine Ingestion, caffeine Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse. Subjects were genotyped and classified as AA homozygotes or AC heterozygotes for the rs762551 polymorphism of the CYP1A2 gene involved in caffeine metabolism. Magnitude-based inferences were used to evaluate treatment differences in mean power output based on a predetermined meaningful treatment effect of 1.0%. AC heterozygotes (4.1%) and AA homozygotes (3.4%) benefited from Ingestion+Rinse, but only AC performed better with Ingestion (6.0%). Additionally, Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse elicited better performance relative to Placebo among subjects that performed prior to 10:00 h (Early) compared with after 10:00 h (Late). The present study provides additional evidence of genotype and time of day factors that affect the ergogenic value of caffeine intake that may allow for more personalized caffeine intake strategies to maximize performance.

  10. Clinical significance of TT virus (TTV) infection in chronic hepatitis C patients with high dose interferon-alpha therapy in Taiwan: re-evaluated by using new set of TTV primers.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chia Yen; Yu, Ming Lung; Lin, Zu Yau; Chen, Shinn Cherng; Hsieh, Ming Yen; Lee, Li Po; Hou, Nei Jen; Hsieh, Ming Yuh; Wang, Liang Yen; Tsai, Jung Fa; Chuang, Wan Long; Chang, Wen Yu

    2003-10-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of TT virus (TTV) coinfection in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and influence of TTV viremia on hepatitis C virus (HCV) response to high dose interferon-alpha therapy in Taiwan were investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Total 102 HCV RNA-positive CHC patients were enrolled. TTV DNA (using polymerase chain reaction primers derived from 5' non-coding region and open reading frame 2), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), GB virus-C/hepatitis G virus (GBV-C/HGV) RNA, anti-E2 antibody, genotype and RNA levels of HCV were tested. RESULTS: The prevalence of TTV DNA was 51.0%. The mean age of TTV viremic CHC patients was significant higher than non-viremic ones (P<0.05). HCV sustained viral response (SVR) was achieved in 42 (41.2%) patients. Based on multivariate regression analyses, SVR were significantly associated with low pretreatment HCV RNA levels, HCV genotype non-1b and high pretreatment levels of ALT but not TTV viremia. CONCLUSIONS: TTV viremia is highly prevalent among Taiwanese CHC patients and related to increased ages. Neither severity of liver disease nor replication and genotype distribution of HCV was affected by concurrent TTV infection. With high HCV SVR rate associated with pretreatment HCV RNA and ALT levels and HCV genotype, TTV viremia did not influence the HCV response.

  11. T(t,2n)4He Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, Dennis; Bacher, Andy; Brune, Carl; Caggiano, Jac; Gatu-Johnson, Maria; Sayre, Dan; ICF Stellar Rates Team

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the T(t,2n)4He reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity tritium, gas-filled capsules in ICF implosions at the NIF and OMEGA facilities. Neutron spectra were measured using two instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) and the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer. The nTOF spectra represent a significant improvement in energy resolution and statistics over previous measurements, and afford the first definitive observation of a small, narrow peak starting at the 9.44 MeV endpoint resulting from sequential decay through the ground state of 5He at low reaction energies Ecm < 100 keV. However, most of the TT reaction produces a broad neutron spectrum from 0-9.5 MeV. To describe the spectrum, an R-matrix model that accounts for interferences from fermion symmetry and intermediate states has been developed. This model can describe the entire spectrum via sequential decay through l = 1 states in 5He, which differs from previous interpretations. Work is in collaboration with V. Yu Glebov, R. Hatarik, D. L. Bleuel, D. T. Casey, C. J. Cerjan, M. J. Eckart, R. J. Fortner, J. A. Frenje, G. P. Grim, C. Hagmann, J. P. Knauer, J. L. Kline, J. M. McNaney, J. M. Mintz, M. J. Moran, A. Nikroo, T. Phillips, J. E. Pino, B. A. Remington, D. P. Rowley, D. H. Schneider, V. A. Smalyuk, W. Stoeffl, R. E. Tipton, S. V. Weber, C. B. Yeamans, C. K. Li, M. J.-E. Manuel, D. D. Meyerhofer, R. D. Petrasso, P. B. Radha, T. C. Sangster, N. Sinenian, F. H. Seguin, and A. B. Zylstra.

  12. Stability of DNA duplexes containing GG, CC, AA, and TT mismatches.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirova, Anna; Beletskaya, Irina V; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2006-09-05

    We employed salt-dependent differential scanning calorimetric measurements to characterize the stability of six oligomeric DNA duplexes (5'-GCCGGAXTGCCGG-3'/5'-CCGGCAYTCCGGC-3') that contain in the central XY position the GC, AT, GG, CC, AA, or TT base pair. The heat-induced helix-to-coil transitions of all the duplexes are associated with positive changes in heat capacity, DeltaC(p), ranging from 0.43 to 0.53 kcal/mol. Positive values of DeltaC(p) result in strong temperature dependences of changes in enthalpy, DeltaH degrees, and entropy, DeltaS degrees , accompanying duplex melting and cause melting free energies, DeltaG degrees, to exhibit characteristically curved shapes. These observations suggest that DeltaC(p) needs to be carefully taken into account when the parameters of duplex stability are extrapolated to temperatures distant from the transition temperature, T(M). Comparison of the calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpies revealed that none of the duplexes studied in this work exhibits two-state melting. Within the context of the central AXT/TYA triplet, the thermal and thermodynamic stabilities of the duplexes in question change in the following order: GC > AT > GG > AA approximately TT > CC. Our estimates revealed that the thermodynamic impact of the GG, AA, and TT mismatches is confined within the central triplet. In contrast, the thermodynamic impact of the CC mismatch propagates into the adjacent helix domains and may involve 7-9 bp. We discuss implications of our results for understanding the origins of initial recognition of mismatched DNA sites by enzymes of the DNA repair machinery.

  13. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Andrew J.; West, Catharine M.; Risk, Janet M.; Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara; Crichton, Siobhan; Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn; Shaw, Richard J.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-{beta}1 gene (TGF-{beta}1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-{beta}1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7-19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-{beta}1 gene.

  14. Studies of the tt¯H production at 13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, Predrag

    2017-03-01

    The latest results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top quark-antiquark pair (tt¯H), where Higgs decays into photons, bottom quark-antiquark pair or leptons via WW, ZZ and ττ are presented. The analyses have been performed using the 13 TeV pp collisions data recorded by the CMS experiment in 2015 and part of 2016. The results are presented in the form of the best fit to the signal strength (μ = σ/σSM) measured with respect to the Standard Model prediction and its expected and observed 95% CL upper limits.

  15. Search for anomalous kinematics in tt dilepton events at CDF II.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dörr, C; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ehlers, J; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschhbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademachker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Trkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-07-08

    We report on a search for anomalous kinematics of tt dilepton events in pp collisions at square root of s=1.96 TeV using 193 pb(-1) of data collected with the CDF II detector. We developed a new a priori technique designed to isolate the subset in a data sample revealing the largest deviation from standard model (SM) expectations and to quantify the significance of this departure. In the four-variable space considered, no particular subset shows a significant discrepancy, and we find that the probability of obtaining a data sample less consistent with the SM than what is observed is 1.0%-4.5%.

  16. Swift and CBA Observations of TT Ari on 2009 October 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Koji; Patterson, Joe; Koff, Bob; Morelle, Etienne; Stein, William; Oksanen, Arto

    2009-10-01

    We observed the nova-like cataclysmic variable (CV) TT Ari, which is currently undergoing a fading episode, with Swift between 2009 October 16 01:31 UT and 09:02 UT. The X-ray telescope (XRT) was operated in photon counting mode and accumulated 4,400 s of good exposure during this interval. The UV/optical telescope (UVOT) was used with the U filter in imaging mode, with an integration time also of 4,400 s.

  17. Fetal and maternal MTHFR C677T genotype, maternal folate intake and the risk of nonsyndromic oral clefts.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, Cécile; Perret, Claire; Bahuau, Michel; Zhu, Huiping; Nelva, Agnès; Herman, Christine; Francannet, Christine; Robert-Gnansia, Elisabeth; Finnell, Richard H; Cordier, Sylvaine

    2007-02-01

    The association between maternal folate intake and risk of nonsyndromic oral clefts has been studied among many populations with conflicting results. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) plays a major role in folate metabolism, and several polymorphisms, including C677T, are common in European populations. Data from a French study (1998-2001) let us investigate the roles of maternal dietary folate intake and the MTHFR polymorphism and their interaction on the risk of cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate only (CP). We used both case-control (164 CL/P, 76 CP, 236 controls; 148, 59, 168 of whom, respectively, had an available genotype) and case-parent (143 CL/P and 56 CP families) study designs and distinguished the role of the child's genotype and maternally mediated effects on risks. This study observed a beneficial effect of mothers' dietary folate intake on their offspring's risk (odds ratio (OR)(< or = 230 microg/day) = ref; for CL/P, OR([230-314 microg/day]) = 0.56, 95% confidence interval = 0.3-0.9, OR(>314 microg/day) = 0.64, 0.4-1.1; for CP, OR([230-314 microg/day]) = 1.15, 0.6-2.2, OR(>314 microg/day) = 0.70, 0.3-1.4). We observed a reduced risk associated with the TT genotype of the child in the case-control analysis (OR(CC) = ref; for CL/P, OR(TT) = 0.54, 0.3-1.1; for CP, OR(TT) = 0.33, 0.1-1.0); this genotype, either fetal or maternal, was not statistically significant in the case-parent analysis. A frequency of TT genotype higher in our control group than previously reported in France can partly explain the risk reduction observed in case-control comparison. Interactions were not statistically significant. Stratified case-parent analysis showed, however, slight heterogeneity in the role of TT genotype according to folate intake. The modest sample size limits this study, which nonetheless provides new estimate of the possible impact of dietary folate intake and MTHFR polymorphism on oral clefts.

  18. The impact of serotonin transporter genotype on default network connectivity in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Peltier, Scott J; Bedoyan, Jirair K; Carrasco, Melisa; Welsh, Robert C; Martin, Donna M; Lord, Catherine; Monk, Christopher S

    2012-01-01

    Compared to healthy controls, individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have weaker posterior-anterior connectivity that strengthens less with age within the default network, a set of brain structures connected in the absence of a task and likely involved in social function. The serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotypes that result in lowered serotonin transporter expression are associated with social impairment in ASD. Additionally, in healthy controls, low expressing 5-HTTLPR genotypes are associated with weaker default network connectivity. However, in ASD, the effect of 5-HTTLPR on the default network is unknown. We hypothesized that 5-HTTLPR's influence on posterior-anterior default network connectivity strength as well as on age-related changes in connectivity differs in the ASD group versus controls. Youth with ASD and healthy controls, ages 8-19, underwent a resting fMRI acquisition. Connectivity was calculated by correlating the posterior hub of the default network with all voxels. Triallelic genotype was assessed via PCR and Sanger sequencing. A genotype-by-diagnosis interaction significantly predicted posterior-anterior connectivity, such that low expressing genotypes (S/S, S/LG, LG/LG) were associated with stronger connectivity than high expressing genotypes (LA/LA, S/LA, LA/LG) in the ASD group, but the converse was true for controls. Also, youth with ASD and low expressing genotypes had greater age-related increases in connectivity values compared to those with high expressing genotypes and controls in either genotype group. Our findings suggest that the cascade of events from genetic variation to brain function differs in ASD. Also, low expressing genotypes may represent a subtype within ASD.

  19. MTHFR C677T genotype influences the isotopic enrichment of one-carbon metabolites in folate-compromised men consuming d9-choline123

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Wang, Wei; Gregory, Jesse F; Malysheva, Olga; Brenna, J Thomas; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Caudill, Marie A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Homozygosity for the variant 677T allele in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene increases the requirement for folate and may alter the metabolic use of choline. The choline adequate intake is 550 mg/d for men, although the metabolic consequences of consuming extra choline are unclear. Objective: Deuterium-labeled choline (d9-choline) as tracer was used to determine the differential effects of the MTHFR C677T genotype and the effect of various choline intakes on the isotopic enrichment of choline derivatives in folate-compromised men. Design: Mexican American men with the MTHFR 677CC or 677TT genotype consumed a diet providing 300 mg choline/d plus supplemental choline chloride for total choline intakes of 550 (n = 11; 4 with 677CC and 7 with 677TT) or 1100 (n = 12; 4 with 677CC and 8 with 677TT) mg/d for 12 wk. During the last 3 wk, 15% of the total choline intake was provided as d9-choline. Results: Low but measurable enrichments of the choline metabolites were achieved, including that of d3-phosphatidylcholine (d3-PtdCho)—a metabolite produced in the de novo pathway via choline-derived methyl groups. Men with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had a higher urinary enrichment ratio of betaine to choline (P = 0.041), a higher urinary enrichment of sarcosine (P = 0.041), and a greater plasma enrichment ratio of d9-betaine to d9-PtdCho with the 1100 mg choline/d intake (P = 0.033). Conclusion: These data show for the first time in humans that choline itself is a source of methyl groups for de novo PtdCho biosynthesis and indicate that the MTHFR 677TT genotype favors the use of choline as a methyl donor. PMID:21123458

  20. QoS Provisioning for TT-TR Based OBS Ring Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Limei; Kim, Young-Chon; Tang, Wan; Youn, Chan-Hyun

    2011-06-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is one of the most promising switching technologies. This paper studies the efficient OBS ring network using the TT-TR based node architecture. The TT-TR based OBS ring network can use the network resources very efficiently, but the network performance is restricted due to the limited network resources. Moreover, different network demands have different network resource requirements. It is very important to satisfy their different requirements while using the limited network resources efficiently. In this paper, Quality of Service (QoS) provisioning mechanisms are studied to solve the above mentioned problems. Two kinds of network services, namely the real-time traffic and the best-effort traffic, are considered in this paper. The real-time service is delay-sensitive that should be transmitted in a real-time manner and cannot tolerate high transmission delay; while the best-effort traffic has no strict limitation in transmission delay or loss, but the best effort are made to improve their transmission reliability. According to their different servicing requirements, different QoS provisioning mechanisms are proposed to serve them in the OBS unidirectional and bidirectional ring networks, respectively. The proposed mechanisms are evaluated and analyzed through simulation. The simulation results show that even though the proposed mechanisms cannot get absolute zero-delay or zero-loss for real-time traffic or best-effort traffic, their different requirements for delay or loss are satisfied to some significant degree.

  1. Characterization of Truncated Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (ttNOX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Malone, Christine C.; Burk, Melissa; Moore, Blake P.; Achari, Aniruddha; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial, plant and animal cells possess novel surface proteins that exhibit both NADH oxidation (NOX) or hydroquinone and protein disulfide-thiol interchange. These enzymatic activities alternate to yield oscillating patterns wjth period lengths of approximately 24 minutes. The catalytic period of NOX proteins are temperature compensated and gravity responsive. We report the cloning, expression and characterization of truncated tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ttNOX), in which the membrane spanning region has been deleted. The cDNA (originated from HeLa cells) was cloned into pET-34b and pET-14b (Novagen) vectors for E. coli expression. Optimized expression and purification protocols yielded greater than 300mg per liter of culture with greater than 95% purity. Circular dichroism data was collected from a 2.7mg/ml solution in a 0.1mm cuvette with variable scanning using an Olis RSM CD spectrophotometer. The ellipticity values were scanned from 190 to 260nm. The spectra recorded have characteristics for alpha proteins with band maxima at 216nm and a possible shoulder at 212nm at 12OC and 250 C. Protein crystal screens are in progress and, to date, only small crystals have been observed. The regular periodic oscillatory change in the ttNOX protein is indicative of a possible time-keeping functional role. A single protein possessing alternating catalytic activities, with a potential biological clock function, is unprecedented and structural determination is paramount to understanding this role.

  2. Isomonodromy Aspects of the tt* Equations of Cecotti and Vafa II: Riemann-Hilbert Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Martin A.; Its, Alexander R.; Lin, Chang-Shou

    2015-05-01

    In Guest et al. (arXiv:1209.2045) (part I) we computed the Stokes data for the smooth solutions of the tt*-Toda equations whose existence we had previously established by p.d.e. methods. Here we formulate the existence problem as a Riemann-Hilbert problem, based on this Stokes data, and solve it under certain conditions (Theorem 5.4). In the process, we compute the connection matrix for all smooth solutions, thus completing the computation of the monodromy data (Theorem 5.5). We also give connection formulae relating the asymptotics at zero and infinity of all smooth solutions (Theorem 4.1), clarifying the region of validity of the formulae established earlier by Tracy and Widom. Finally, we resolve some conjectures of Cecotti and Vafa concerning the positivity of S + S t (where S is the Stokes matrix) and the unimodularity of the eigenvalues of the monodromy matrix (Theorem 5.6). In particular, we show that "unitarity implies regularity" for the tt*-Toda equations.

  3. The correlated X-ray and optical time variability of TT Arietis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, K. A.; Middleditch, J.; Grauer, A. D.; Horne, K.; Gomer, R.; Cordova, F. A.; Mason, K. O.

    1983-01-01

    The results of Einstein X-ray observation and simultaneous optical observations of the cataclysmic variable TT Arietis extending over several binary orbits are reported. Evidence is found for correlations between the X-ray and optical variability of TT Ari on three distinct time scales: the 3.3 hour variability that has been associated with the orbital period of the star, the about 1000 s time scale of the irregular flickering activity, and the time scale of quasi-coherent oscillations which have periods of order 10 s. There is a modulation of the X-ray flux with a period consistent with the orbital period of approximately 200 minutes, but there is no apparent modulation of the X-ray spectrum. The optical flux is modulated with a similar period and may lag the X-ray modulation by about 0.1 in phase. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a thermal bremsstrahlung plus Gaunt factor model. The results suggest that the hard X-ray emission may be produced in a corona above and below the inner accretion disk.

  4. Selective plugging strategy-based microbial-enhanced oil recovery using Bacillus licheniformis TT33.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Harish; Hingurao, Krushi; Desai, Anjana; Nerurkar, Anuradha

    2009-10-01

    The selective plugging strategy of microbial enhanced oil recovery involves the use of microbes that grow and produce exopolymeric substances, which block the high permeability zones of an oil reservoir, thus allowing the water to flow through the low permeability zones leading to increase in oil recovery. Bacillus licheniformis TT33, a hot water spring isolate, is facultatively anaerobic, halotolerant, and thermotolerant. It produces EPS as well as biosurfactant and has a biofilm-forming ability. The viscosity of its cell-free supernatant is 120 mPas at 28 degrees C. Its purified EPS contained 26% carbohydrate and 3% protein. Its biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of water from 72 to 34 mN/m. This strain gave 27.7+/-3.5% oil recovery in a sand pack column. Environmental scanning electron microscopy analysis showed bacterial growth and biofilm formation in the sand pack. Biochemical tests and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis confirmed that the oil recovery obtained in the sand pack column was due to Bacillus licheniformis TT33.

  5. TT and C - First TDRSS, Then Commercial GEO and Big LEO and Now through LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Dwayne; Bull, Barton; Grant, Charles; Streich, Ronald; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communications satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce Telemetry Tracking and Control (TT&C) costs of launch vehicles and Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) by reducing or eliminating ground infrastructure. Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia have successfully used commercial GEO & Big LEO communications satellites for Long Duration Balloon flight TT&C. In addition, TDRSS capability for these balloons has been developed by WFF for the Ultra Long Duration Balloons with the first test flight launch in January 2001 for one global circumnavigation at 120,000 feet altitude launched from Alice Springs. Australia. Numerous other low cost applications can new utilize the commercial LEO satellites for TT&C. The Flight Modern became a GSFC/WFF Advanced Range Technology Initiative (ARTI) in an effort to streamline TT&C capability to the user community at low cost. Phase I ground tests of The Flight Modem verified downlink communications quality of service and measured transmission latencies. These tests were completed last year, Phase II consisting of aircraft flight tests provide much of the data presented in this paper. Phase III of the Flight Modern baseline test program is a demonstration of the ruggedized version of the WFF Flight Modem flown on one sounding rocket launched from Sweden. Flights of opportunity have been and are being actively pursued with other centers, ranges and users at universities. The WFF goal is to reduce TT&C costs by providing a low cost COTS Flight Modem with a User Handbook containing system capability and limitation descriptions. Additionally, since data transmission is by packetized Internet Protocol (IP), data can be received and commands initialed from practically any location with no infrastructure. The WFF, like most ranges, has been using GPS receivers on sounding rockets and long duration balloons for several years

  6. Magnetic activity and hot Jupiters of young Suns: the weak-line T Tauri stars V819 Tau and V830 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Moutou, C.; Malo, L.; Grankin, K.; Vidotto, A. A.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M. M.; Herczeg, G.; Morin, J.; Fares, R.; Ménard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Doyon, R.; Takami, M.; Figueira, P.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; MaTYSSE Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTSs) V819 Tau and V830 Tau within the MaTYSSE (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets) programme, involving the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. At ≃3 Myr, both stars dissipated their discs recently and are interesting objects for probing star and planet formation. Profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines, whose rotational modulation we modelled using tomographic imaging, yielding brightness and magnetic maps for both stars. We find that the large-scale magnetic fields of V819 Tau and V830 Tau are mostly poloidal and can be approximated at large radii by 350-400 G dipoles tilted at ≃30° to the rotation axis. They are significantly weaker than the field of GQ Lup, an accreting classical T Tauri star (cTTS) with similar mass and age which can be used to compare the magnetic properties of wTTSs and cTTSs. The reconstructed brightness maps of both stars include cool spots and warm plages. Surface differential rotation is small, typically ≃4.4 times smaller than on the Sun, in agreement with previous results on wTTSs. Using our Doppler images to model the activity jitter and filter it out from the radial velocity (RV) curves, we obtain RV residuals with dispersions of 0.033 and 0.104 km s-1 for V819 Tau and V830 Tau, respectively. RV residuals suggest that a hot Jupiter may be orbiting V830 Tau, though additional data are needed to confirm this preliminary result. We find no evidence for close-in giant planet around V819 Tau.

  7. Chemical Characterization and Toxicologic Evaluation of Airborne Mixtures: The Chemical and Physical Characterization of XM819 Red Phosphorus Formulation and the Aerosol Produced by Its Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    Composite Infrared Spectre of XR-819 Wedge Plus . Unhardened Epon 828 ........ . ..... . . . 17 S Static 5urn Chamber . ................ 20 6 Aerosol... reflectance fourier transform Infrared spectra were recorded on a Digileb FTS-20C spectromete;. A sample of Epon 828 was received from Shell Chemical...are metal, glass and teflon to minimize artifactual contami- nation of the smoke products. The container has openings whereby air flow is regulated

  8. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  9. Impact of Interleukin 28B Genotype on the Virological Responses in Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aygen, Bilgehan; Yildiz, Orhan; Akhan, Sila; Gunal, Ozgur; Taheri, Serpil; Zararsiz, Gokmen; Sayan, Murat; Rustemoglu, Aydin; Altinok, Elif Sargin

    2014-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL) 28B single nucleotide polymorphisms may play a role in the clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV). We aimed to evaluate the treatment response of chronic HCV infection patients to pegile interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin treatment with regard to IL28B rs12979860 C/T polymorphism. Methods A total of 186 patients (mean age, 55.6 ± 10 years; 65.1% female) who underwent pegIFN and ribavirin treatment for chronic HCV infection were studied. We analyzed demographics, HCV genotype, baseline alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, histopathological data, viral load before treatment and at 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 weeks from the treatment start, and IL28B genotype. IL28B polymorphism was genotyped using polymerase chain reaction based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in all the subjects. Results One hundred forty-five (86.8%) patients were infected with viral genotype 1b, and 13.2% were infected with viral genotype 4. The rates of C/C, C/T, and T/T genotypes were 22.6%, 52.7%, and 24.7% respectively. The percentage of patients with a viral load over 400,000 IU/mL was higher in the C/T group (P = 0.020). Of the patients, 44.6% provided sustained virological response (SVR) to pegIFN and ribavirin combination treatment. The frequency of T allele was 41% in patients with SVR, whereas 59% patients provided no response (P < 0.001). SVR was obtained in 66.7%, 42.9%, and 28.3% of CC, CT, and TT groups (P = 0.001). The rates of rapid virological response (RVR), early virological response (EVR), end-of-treatment response (ETR), and SVR were higher in the CC group than other groups (P = 0.216, P < 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.001, respectively). The relapse and null response (NR) rates were higher in TT group and partial response rate (PR) was higher in CT group. Conclusions IL28B rs12979860 C/T gene polymorphism affects the response to antiviral treatment in the patients with chronic HCV genotypes 1b and 4 infections. PMID:27785282

  10. Omp85Tt from Thermus thermophilus HB27: an Ancestral Type of the Omp85 Protein Family▿

    PubMed Central

    Nesper, Jutta; Brosig, Alexander; Ringler, Philippe; Patel, Geetika J.; Müller, Shirley A.; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.; Boos, Winfried; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the Omp85 family are involved in the assembly of β-barrel outer membrane proteins or in the translocation of proteins across the outer membrane in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The cell envelope of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 is multilayered, including an outer membrane that is not well characterized. Neither the precise lipid composition nor much about integral membrane proteins is known. The genome of HB27 encodes one Omp85-like protein, Omp85Tt, representing an ancestral type of this family. We overexpressed Omp85Tt in T. thermophilus and purified it from the native outer membranes. In the presence of detergent, purified Omp85Tt existed mainly as a monomer, composed of two stable protease-resistant modules. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated predominantly β-sheet secondary structure. Electron microscopy of negatively stained lipid-embedded Omp85Tt revealed ring-like structures with a central cavity of ∼1.5 nm in diameter. Single-channel conductance recordings indicated that Omp85Tt forms ion channels with two different conducting states, characterized by conductances of ∼0.4 nS and ∼0.65 nS, respectively. PMID:18456816

  11. Omp85(Tt) from Thermus thermophilus HB27: an ancestral type of the Omp85 protein family.

    PubMed

    Nesper, Jutta; Brosig, Alexander; Ringler, Philippe; Patel, Geetika J; Müller, Shirley A; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H; Boos, Winfried; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2008-07-01

    Proteins belonging to the Omp85 family are involved in the assembly of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins or in the translocation of proteins across the outer membrane in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The cell envelope of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 is multilayered, including an outer membrane that is not well characterized. Neither the precise lipid composition nor much about integral membrane proteins is known. The genome of HB27 encodes one Omp85-like protein, Omp85(Tt), representing an ancestral type of this family. We overexpressed Omp85(Tt) in T. thermophilus and purified it from the native outer membranes. In the presence of detergent, purified Omp85(Tt) existed mainly as a monomer, composed of two stable protease-resistant modules. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure. Electron microscopy of negatively stained lipid-embedded Omp85(Tt) revealed ring-like structures with a central cavity of approximately 1.5 nm in diameter. Single-channel conductance recordings indicated that Omp85(Tt) forms ion channels with two different conducting states, characterized by conductances of approximately 0.4 nS and approximately 0.65 nS, respectively.

  12. Effects of 90-day feeding of transgenic Bt rice TT51 on the reproductive system in male rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Er Hui; Yu, Zhou; Hu, Jing; Xu, Hai Bin

    2013-12-01

    Rice is a staple food crop; however, the threat of pests leads to a serious decline in its output and quality. The CryAb/CryAc gene, encodes a synthetic fusion Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal protein, was introduced into rice MingHui63 to produce insect-resistant rice TT51. This study was undertaken to investigate potential unintended effects of TT51 on the reproductive system in male rats. Male rats were treated with diets containing 60% of either TT51 or MingHui63 by weight, nutritionally balanced to an AIN93G diet, for 90days. An additional negative control group of rats were fed with a rice-based AIN93G diet. Body weights, food intake, hematology, serum chemistry, serum hormone levels, sperm parameters and relative organ/body weights were measured, and gross as well as microscopic pathology were examined. No diet-related significant differences in the values of response variables were observed between rats that were fed with diet containing transgenic TT51, MingHui63 and the control in this 90-day feeding study. In addition, necropsy and histopathology examination indicated no treatment-related changes. The results from the present study indicated that TT51 does not appear to exert any effect on the reproductive system in male rats compared with MingHui63 or the control.

  13. Are effects of MTHFR (C677T) genotype on BMD confined to women with low folate and riboflavin intake? Analysis of food records from the Danish osteoporosis prevention study.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Tofteng, Charlotte Landbo; Stilgren, Lis; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Brixen, Kim; Mosekilde, Leif

    2005-03-01

    We have previously found BMD and fracture risk to be significantly associated with the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism in healthy postmenopausal women in the first years after menopause. Since then, other cohort studies have suggested that sufficient intake of riboflavin and/or folate may have the potential to prevent development of low BMD in women with the TT genotype. This could to some extent explain why this polymorphism is associated with low BMD or fracture in some study populations and not in others. It would also indicate that fractures associated with the TT genotype could be preventable by vitamin B supplementation. We have, therefore, reviewed baseline food record data from our original study to determine if BMD and fracture associations with the MTHFR genotype depended on the intake of folate, riboflavin, or other members of the vitamin B complex, associated with homocysteine metabolism. We analyzed genotype, BMD, and dietary records from 1700 healthy postmenopausal women who participated in the DOPS study. For the assessment of fracture risk, we used longitudinal observations from 854 women in the control group who remained compliant with their initial allocation of no treatment. Riboflavin intake was significantly correlated with femoral neck (FN) BMD in women with the TT genotype (r = 0.24, P < 0.01). FN and lumbar spine (LS) BMD were only associated with the MTHFR genotype in the lowest quartile of riboflavin intake. At the FN, similar threshold effects were shown for folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6. Among these vitamin B complex members, stepwise regression analysis identified riboflavin as the only significant predictor of FN BMD in the TT genotype. In conclusion, we confirm reports that BMD in the MTHFR TT genotype is only significantly reduced in the lowest quartile of riboflavin, B12, B6, and folate intake, at least at the time of menopause. Vitamin B supplementation would only be expected to benefit BMD in about 2% of the population, i

  14. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks or gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore » gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  16. Prevalence and genotypic variability of TTV in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Sherman, K E; Rouster, S D; Feinberg, J

    2001-11-01

    TT virus is a small, circular DNA virus, that has been associated with transfusion hepatitis. We sought to determine the prevalence of TT virus (TTV) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and to characterize the virus in terms of genotypic variability and in the relationship to CD4+, HIV viral loads, HCV/HIV coinfection, and ALT abnormalities. A cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected patients in the United States, including 86 HIV-positive subjects and 118 HIV-negative controls was performed. TTV was detected using a seminested PCR technique. Samples underwent cloning and sequence analysis and/or RFLP to determine genotype. Thirty-eight percent of HIV-positive patients had TTV infection versus 14.4% of patients within the matching cohort (P = 0.0009). The highest rate of TTV infection was in patients with concurrent HCV/HIV infection (54% vs 30%, P = 0.038). HIV-infected subjects with TTV had lower ALT levels than those without TTV (P = 0.036). Intravenous drug use was the leading factor associated with TTV positivity among HIV-positive subjects. Mixed genotypes were more common in those with HIV. Therefore, TTV prevalence, ALT levels, and genomic heterogeneity of TTV all seem to be altered in patients with HIV.

  17. Genotyping of IL-4 −590 (C>T) Gene in Iraqi Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Saddam H.

    2017-01-01

    This study is the first investigation in Iraq dealing with genotyping of IL-4 −590 (C>T) gene, especially in Iraqi patients with asthma. We studied forty-eight blood samples collected from patients with asthma and compared with age-matched 25 healthy individuals as controls. The polymorphism results of IL-4 −590 (C>T) gene by using amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS-PCR) showed the presence of C and T alleles and three genotypes (CC, CT, and TT). Interestingly the frequency of C allele and CC genotype was higher in patients with asthma in comparison with the same allele and genotype in control (P 1 × 10−6). This increase was associated with an increased risk factor of asthma (odds ratio [OR] 9.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.58–23.71). Genotypes analysis by using Hardy-Weinberg distribution showed no significant differences between patients with asthma and healthy subjects. In conclusion, the increasing risk of asthma was associated with C allele and the CC genotype and these are revealed as etiological fraction with risk by having this disease, while the T allele percentage ratio in controls was higher when it is compared with asthma patients suggesting that these alleles have a protective effect (preventive fraction). PMID:28386156

  18. TT Aurigae - A B-type semi-detached eclipsing binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachmann, A. A.; Popper, D. M.; Clausen, J. V.

    1986-07-01

    The Hamburg B, V photometry and Lick spectroscopic material on TT Aur are analyzed. In conjunction with the Wilson-Devinney program of light curve analysis, an iterative scheme is employed for matching the model to the photometric observations and the observed color index of the system in order to obtain temperatures and luminosities. The system is semidetached. The less massive, cooler component fills its Roche lobe. This component is the larger one, so that mass exchange has occurred, whereas Bell and Hilditch (1984) conclude it is the smaller. The color indices derived for the components correspond to spectral types B1 and B2.5. The mass of the hotter star, evaluated from the measured radial velocities, is significantly lower than for stars of similar temperatures with known masses. This apparent discrepancy can be reduced by estimated correction of the velocities for blending of the lines of the components.

  19. Curious Variables Experiment (CURVE). TT Bootis -- Superhump Period Change Pattern Confirmed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olech, A.; Cook, L. M.; Złoczewski, K.; Mularczyk, K.; Kêdzierski, P.; Udalski, A.; Wisniewski, M.

    2004-09-01

    We report extensive multi-station photometry of TT Boo during its June 2004 superoutburst. The amplitude of the superoutburst was about 5.5 mag and its length about 22 days. The star showed a small re-brightening starting around the 9th day of the superoutburst. During entire bright state we observed clear superhumps with amplitudes from 0.07 mag to 0.26 mag and a mean period of Psh=0.0779589(47) days (112.261+/-0.007 min). The period was not constant but decreased at the beginning and the end of superoutburst and increased in the middle phase. We argue that the complicated shape of the O-C diagram is caused by real period changes rather than by phase shifts. Combining the data from two superoutbursts, 1989 and 2004, allowed us to trace the birth of the late superhumps and we conclude that it is a rather quick process lasting about one day.

  20. Bounds on invisible Higgs boson decays extracted from LHC ttH production data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Khechadoorian, Zepyoor; Whiteson, Daniel; Tait, Tim M P

    2014-10-10

    We present an upper bound on the branching fraction of the Higgs boson to invisible particles by recasting a CMS Collaboration search for stop quarks decaying to tt + E(T)(miss). The observed (expected) bound, BF(H → inv.) < 0.40(0.65) at 95% C.L., is the strongest direct limit to date, benefiting from a downward fluctuation in the CMS data in that channel. In addition, we combine this new constraint with existing published constraints to give an observed (expected) bound of BF(H → inv.) < 0.40(0.40) at 95% C.L., and we show some of the implications for theories of dark matter which communicate through the Higgs portal.

  1. A novel MitoNEET ligand, TT01001, improves diabetes and ameliorates mitochondrial function in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takehiro; Yamamoto, Masashi; Amikura, Kazutoshi; Kato, Kozue; Serizawa, Takashi; Serizawa, Kanako; Akazawa, Daisuke; Aoki, Takumi; Kawai, Koji; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto; Kainoh, Mie

    2015-02-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane protein mitoNEET is a binding protein of the insulin sensitizer pioglitazone (5-[[4-[2-(5-ethylpyridin-2-yl)ethoxy]phenyl]methyl]-1,3-thiazolidine-2,4-dione) and is considered a novel target for the treatment of type II diabetes. Several small-molecule compounds have been identified as mitoNEET ligands using structure-based design or virtual docking studies. However, there are no reports about their therapeutic potential in animal models. Recently, we synthesized a novel small molecule, TT01001 [ethyl-4-(3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)thioureido)piperidine-1-carboxylate], designed on the basis of pioglitazone structure. In this study, we assessed the pharmacological properties of TT01001 in both in vitro and in vivo studies. We found that TT01001 bound to mitoNEET without peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation effect. In type II diabetes model db/db mice, TT01001 improved hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and glucose intolerance, and its efficacy was equivalent to that of pioglitazone, without the pioglitazone-associated weight gain. Mitochondrial complex II + III activity of the skeletal muscle was significantly increased in db/db mice. We found that TT01001 significantly suppressed the elevated activity of the complex II + III. These results suggest that TT01001 improved type II diabetes without causing weight gain and ameliorated mitochondrial function of db/db mice. This is the first study that demonstrates the effects of a mitoNEET ligand on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in an animal disease model. These findings support targeting mitoNEET as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type II diabetes.

  2. AutoTT: automated detection and analysis of T-tubule architecture in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ang; Song, Long-Sheng

    2014-06-17

    Cardiac transverse (T)-tubules provide a specialized structure for synchronization and stabilization of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release in healthy cardiomyocytes. The application of laser scanning confocal microscopy and the use of fluorescent lipophilic membrane dyes have boosted the discoveries that T-tubule remodeling is a significant factor contributing to cardiac contractile dysfunction. However, the analysis and quantification of the remodeling of T-tubules have been a challenge and remain inconsistent among different research laboratories. Fast Fourier transformation (FFT) is the major analysis method applied to calculate the spatial frequency spectrum, which is used to represent the regularity of T-tubule systems. However, this approach is flawed because the density of T-tubules as well as non-T-tubule signals in the images influence the spectrum power generated by FFT. Preprocessing of images and topological architecture extracting is necessary to remove non-T-tubule noise from the analysis. In addition, manual analysis of images is time consuming and prone to errors and investigator bias. Therefore, we developed AutoTT, an automated analysis program that incorporates image processing, morphological feature extraction, and FFT analysis of spectrum power. The underlying algorithm is implemented in MATLAB (The MathWorks, Natick, MA). The program outputs the densities of transversely oriented T-tubules and longitudinally oriented T-tubules, power spectrum of the overall T-tubule systems, and averaged spacing of T-tubules. We also combined the density and regularity of T-tubules to give an index of T-tubule integrity (TTint), which provides a global evaluation of T-tubule alterations. In summary, AutoTT provides a reliable, easy to use, and fast approach for analyzing myocyte T-tubules. This program can also be applied to measure the density and integrity of other cellular structures.

  3. Experiment-specific cosmic microwave background calculations made easier - Approximation formula for smoothed delta T/T windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    1993-01-01

    Simple and easy to implement elementary function approximations are introduced to the spectral window functions needed in calculations of model predictions of the cosmic microwave backgrond (CMB) anisotropy. These approximations allow the investigator to obtain model delta T/T predictions in terms of single integrals over the power spectrum of cosmological perturbations and to avoid the necessity of performing the additional integrations. The high accuracy of these approximations is demonstrated here for the CDM theory-based calculations of the expected delta T/T signal in several experiments searching for the CMB anisotropy.

  4. The Effects of Metallurgical Factors on PWSCC Crack Growth Rates in TT Alloy 690 in Simulated PWR Primary Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Watanabe, Masashi; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking growth rates (PWSCCGRs) in highly cold-worked thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 have been recently reported as exhibiting significant heat-to-heat variability. Authors hypothesized that these significant differences could be due to the metallurgical characteristics of each heat. In order to confirm this hypothesis, the effect of fundamental metallurgical characteristics on PWSCCGR measurements in cold-worked TT Alloy 690 has been investigated. The following new observations were made in this study: (1) Microcracks and voids were observed in or near eutectic crystals of grain boundary (GB) M23C6 carbides (primary carbides) after cold rolling, but were not observed before cold rolling. These primary carbides with microcracks and voids were observed in both lightly forged and as-cast and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat A) as well as in a cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat Y) that simulated the chemical composition and carbide banded structure of the material previously tested by Paraventi and Moshier. However, this was not observed in precipitated (secondary) M23C6 GB carbides in heavily forged and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 heat A and a cold-rolled commercial TT Alloy 690. (2) From microstructural analyses carried out on the various TT Alloy 690 test materials before and after cold rolling, the amount of eutectic crystals (primary carbides and nitrides) M23C6 and TiN depended on the chemical composition. In particular, the amount of M23C6 depended on the fabrication process. Microcracks and voids in or near the M23C6 and TiN precipitates were generated by the cold rolling process. (3) The PWSCCGRs observed in TT Alloy 690 were different for each heat and fabrication process. The PWSCCGR decreased with increasing Vickers hardness of each heat. However, for the same heats and fabrication processes, the PWSCCGR increased with increasing Vickers hardness due to cold work. Thus, the PWSCCGR must be affected not only by hardness (or

  5. Efavirenz and Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Relationship with CYP2B6 c.516G→T Genotype and Perturbed Blood-Brain Barrier Due to Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Fisher, Martin; Nelson, Mark; Winston, Alan; Else, Laura; Carr, Daniel F.; Taylor, Steven; Ustianowski, Andrew; Back, David; Pirmohamed, Munir; Solomon, Tom; Farrar, Jeremy; Törok, M. Estée; Khoo, Saye

    2016-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFZ) has been associated with neuropsychiatric side effects. Recently, the 8-hydroxy-EFZ (8OH-EFZ) metabolite has been shown to be a potent neurotoxin in vitro, inducing neuronal damage at concentrations of 3.3 ng/ml. EFZ induced similar neuronal damage at concentrations of 31.6 ng/ml. We investigated the effect of genotype and blood-brain barrier integrity on EFZ metabolite concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We measured CSF drug concentrations in subjects from two separate study populations: 47 subjects with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) coinfection in Vietnam receiving 800 mg EFZ with standard antituberculous treatment and 25 subjects from the PARTITION study in the United Kingdom without central nervous system infection receiving 600 mg EFZ. EFZ and metabolite concentrations in CSF and plasma were measured and compared with estimates of effectiveness and neurotoxicity from available published in vitro and in vivo data. The effect of the CYP2B6 c.516G→T genotype (GG genotype, fast EFV metabolizer status; GT genotype, intermediate EFV metabolizer status; TT genotype, slow EFV metabolizer status) was examined. The mean CSF concentrations of EFZ and 8OH-EFZ in the TBM group were 60.3 and 39.3 ng/ml, respectively, and those in the no-TBM group were 15.0 and 5.9 ng/ml, respectively. Plasma EFZ and 8OH-EFZ concentrations were similar between the two groups. CSF EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 76% of samples (GG genotype, 61%; GT genotype, 90%; TT genotype, 100%) in the TBM group and 13% of samples (GG genotype, 0%; GT genotype, 18%; TT genotype, 50%) in the no-TBM group. CSF 8OH-EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 98% of the TBM group and 87% of the no-TBM group; levels were independent of genotype but correlated with the CSF/plasma albumin ratio. Potentially neurotoxic concentrations of 8OH-EFZ are frequently observed in CSF independently of the CYP2B6 genotype, particularly in those

  6. Individual and Joint Associations of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Genotype and Plasma Homocysteine With Dyslipidemia in a Chinese Population With Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Li, Kang; Venners, Scott A; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Jiang, Shanqun; Weinstock, Justin; Wang, Binyan; Tang, Genfu; Xu, Xiping

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to examine the cross-sectional associations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase ( MTHFR) C677T genotype with dyslipidemia. A total of 231 patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension were enrolled from the Huoqiu and Yuexi communities in Anhui Province, China. Plasma tHcy levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Genotyping was performed by TaqMan allelic discrimination technique. Compared with MTHFR 677 CC + CT genotype carriers, TT genotype carriers had higher odds of hypercholesterolemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval (CI)]: 2.7 [1.4-5.2]; P = .004) and higher odds of abnormal low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 2.3 [1.1-4.8]; P = .030). The individuals with the TT genotype had higher concentrations of log(tHcy) than those with the 677 CC + CT genotype (adjusted β [standard error]: .2 [0.03]; P < .001). Patients with tHcy ≥ 10 μmol/L had significantly higher odds of hypercholesterolemia (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 2.4 [1.2-4.7]; P = .010). Furthermore, patients with both the TT genotype and the tHcy ≥ 10 μmol/L had the highest odds of hypercholesterolemia (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 4.1 [1.8-9.4]; P = .001) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 2.4 [1.0-6.0]; P = .064). This study suggests that both tHcy and the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism may be important determinants of the incidence of dyslipidemia in Chinese patients with essential hypertension. Further studies are needed to confirm the role of tHcy and the MTHFR C677T mutation in the development of dyslipidemia in a larger sample.

  7. Detection of TT virus (TTV) by three frequently-used PCR methods targeting different regions of viral genome in children with cryptogenic hepatitis, chronic B hepatitis and hbs carriers.

    PubMed

    Ergünay, Koray; Gürakan, Figen; Usta, Yusuf; Yüce, Aysel; Karabulut, Hasan Ozen Erdem; Ustaçelebi, Semsettin

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed so that three sensitive and widely-used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection of TT virus or Torque Teno virus (TTV) would be simultaneously applied to a large number of subjects to evaluate performances of the various PCR protocols with different genotype sensitivities. Sera were collected from 92 children admitted to Hacettepe University Ihsan Doğramaci Children's Hospital Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit (17 cryptogenic chronic hepatitis, 17 asymptomatic HBs carriers, 18 chronic HBV patients and 40 healthy children). TTV DNA was detected via nested N22, nested 3'-UTR and 5'-UTR PCRs for all samples. Differences in TTV D N A detection prevalences were n o t statistically significantbetween the study groups with all TTV DNA and liver enzyme levels. A significant agreement between PCR methods that target UTR was observed. TTV detection rate increased with age, suggesting a non-parenteral, environmental exposure to the virus for the study population.

  8. Influence of food groups on plasma total homocysteine for specific MTHFR C677T genotypes in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Xiang, Tianyuan; Wang, Weimin; Ma, Cong; Yang, Chao; Chen, Haixu

    2016-01-01

    1 Scope It has been demonstrated that a mutation of MTHFR C677T increases plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) concentration and decreases folate. Natural foods can improve Hcy levels, but the effect of certain foods remains undetermined. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between food groups and Hcy, and to explore the correlations between Hcy and dietary folate/vitamin (Vit) B12 for genotype‐specific population. 2 Methods and results A total of 4507 adults were enrolled in this study, all of whom underwent physical examinations and genotyping. A dietary recall questionnaire, which assessed the frequency (F) and quantity (Q) of food consumption, was completed by all. For the male CC group, after adjustment for age and BMI, fish (F) was negatively correlated with Hcy; for the male CT group, fish (F) and eggs (F) were negatively associated with Hcy, whereas cereal/wheat (Q) were positively correlated with Hcy; for the male TT group, fish (F), meat (Q), milk (F), and fruits/vegetables (Q) were negatively associated with Hcy, whereas sugar (Q) and salt (Q) were positively associated with Hcy. For the female CC group, fruits/vegetables (Q), eggs (F) and meat (F) were negatively correlated with Hcy, but soy (F) was positively correlated with Hcy; for the female CT group, eggs (F) and meat (Q) were negatively correlated with Hcy, whereas soy (F), fried foods (F) and salt (Q) were positively correlated with Hcy; for the female TT group, fish(F), eggs (F), and fruits/vegetables (F) were negatively associated with Hcy. Furthermore, we found that Hcy was more closely correlated with folate than with Vit B12 for males (CC, CT and TT) and female TT genotype. However, the correlation between Hcy and Vit B12 was stronger for the female CT/CC groups. 3 Conclusion Hcy levels were influenced by food groups to varying degrees, which were based on gender and MTHFR C677T genotypes. Hcy levels were more closely correlated with folate for males (CC, CT and TT) and the

  9. Performance and Value of IFN-Lambda3 and IFN-Lambda4 Genotyping in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) Genotype 2/3 in a Real World Setting

    PubMed Central

    Susser, Simone; Rogalska-Taranta, Magdalena; Petersen, Jörg; Böker, Klaus H. W.; Grigorian, Natalia; Link, Ralph; Naumann, Uwe; John, Christine; Lueth, Stefan; Malfertheiner, Peter; Manns, Michael P.; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Sarrazin, Christoph; Cornberg, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background SNPs near the interferon lambda (IFNL) 3 gene are predictors for sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype (GT) 1. In addition, a dinucleotide frame shift in ss469415590 was described, which generates IFNL4. In this study, we compared the role of IFNL4 variants with IFNL3-(rs12979860) and IFNL3-(rs8099917) on response to pegylated (PEG)-IFN and Ribavirin (RBV) in patients with chronic hepatitis C GT2/3. Methods We recruited 1006 patients with chronic hepatitis C and GT2/3 in a large German registry. A treatment with PEG-IFN and Ribavirin was started by 959 patients. We performed genotyping of IFNL3 (rs12979860, n = 726; rs8099917, n = 687) and of IFNL4 (ss469415590; n = 631). Results Both preferable IFNL3 genotypes were associated with RVR (both p<0.0001) rather than with SVR (rs12979860: p = 0.251; rs8099917: p = 0.447). Only RVR was linked to SVR in univariate and multivariate analyzes (both p<0.001). Concordance of genotyping in patients with available serum samples and EDTA blood samples (n = 259) was more than 96% for both IFNL3 SNPs. IFNL3-(rs12979860) correlated with IFNL4: 99.2% of patients with IFNL3-(rs12979860)-CC were IFNL4-(ss469415590)-TT/TT. IFNL3-(rs12979860)-CT was linked with IFNL4-(ss469415590)-TT/ΔG (98.0%) and IFNL3-(rs12979860)-TT was associated with IFNL4-(ss469415590)-ΔG/ΔG (97.6%). Conclusion IFNL3 genotyping from serum was highly efficient and can be used as an alternative if EDTA whole blood is not available. In Caucasian GT2/3 patients genotyping for INFL4-(ss469415590) does not lead to additional information for the decision-making process. Importantly, IFNL3 SNPs were not associated with SVR but with RVR. Even in the era of new direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies, IFNL3 testing may therefore still be considered for naïve GT2/3 patients to decide if dual Peg-IFN/RBV therapy is an option in resource limited regions. PMID:26699619

  10. Differential effect of IL10 and TNFα genotypes on determining susceptibility to discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, A; Lopez, P; Mozo, L; Gutierrez, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the possible involvement of functional interleukin 10 (IL10) and tumour necrosis α (TNFα) cytokine promoter polymorphisms on the susceptibility to discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus (DLE, SLE), and their associations with immunological features. Methods: Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the IL10 (–1082, –819, and –592) and TNFα (–308) genes were determined using allele specific probes in 248 lupus patients and 343 matched controls. To assess functional significance of genotypes, basal mRNA cytokine levels were quantified in 106 genotyped healthy controls by real time RT-PCR. Specific autoantibodies and cutaneous manifestations were analysed in SLE patients and associated with functional genotypes. Results: After analysing the distribution of IL10 and TNFα transcript levels according to promoter genotypes in healthy individuals, patients and controls were classified into functional single and combined genotypes according to the expected high or low constitutive cytokine production. High TNFα genotypes (–308AA or AG) were associated with SLE independently of IL10 alleles, whereas the risk of developing DLE and the prevalence of discoid lesion in SLE were higher in the high IL10/low TNFα producer group (–1082GG/–308GG). Cytokine interaction also influences the appearance of autoantibodies. Antibodies against Sm are prevalent among low producer patients for both cytokines, a genotype not associated with lupus incidence, whereas low IL10/high TNFα patients have the highest frequency of antibodies to SSa and SSb. Conclusions: IL10/TNFα interaction influences susceptibility to DLE and the appearance of specific autoantibodies in SLE patients, whereas high TNFα producer genotypes represent a significant risk factor for SLE. PMID:15800006

  11. Meningococcal Seroepidemiology 1 Year After the PsA-TT Mass Immunization Campaign in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Haoua; Yaro, Seydou; Kpoda, Hervé B. N.; Ouangraoua, Soumeya; Trotter, Caroline L.; Njanpop Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Martin, Catherine; Nwakamma, Ikenna; Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco; Gessner, Bradford D.; Borrow, Ray; Mueller, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A group A meningococcal (MenA) conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), was introduced in Burkina Faso via mass campaigns between September and December 2010, targeting the 1- to 29-year-old population. This study describes specific antibody titers in the general population 11 months later and compares them to preintroduction data obtained during 2008 using the same protocol. Methods. During October–November 2011, we recruited a representative sample of the population of urban Bobo-Dioulasso aged 6 months to 29 years, who underwent standardized interviews and blood draws. We assessed anti-MenA immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations (n = 200) and, using rabbit complement, serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titers against 2 group A strains: reference strain F8238 (SBAref) (n = 562) and strain 3125 (SBA3125) (n = 200). Results. Among the 562 participants, 481 (86%) were aged ≥23 months and had been eligible for the PsA-TT campaign. Among them, vaccine coverage was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82.7%–89.9%). Prevalence of putatively protective antibodies among vaccine-eligible age groups was 97.3% (95% CI, 95.9%–98.7%) for SBAref titers ≥128, 83.6% (95% CI, 77.6%–89.7%) for SBA3125 ≥128, and 84.2% (95% CI, 78.7%–89.7%) for anti-MenA IgG ≥2 µg/mL. Compared to the population aged 23 months to 29 years during 2008, geometric mean titers of SBAref were 7.59-fold higher during 2011, 51.88-fold for SBA3125, and 10.56-fold for IgG. Conclusions. This study shows high seroprevalence against group A meningococci in Burkina Faso following MenAfriVac introduction. Follow-up surveys will provide evidence on the persistence of population-level immunity and the optimal vaccination strategy for long-term control of MenA meningitis in the African meningitis belt. PMID:26553686

  12. Contribution of double strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to nasopharyngeal carcinoma risk in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Chin-Mu; Chang, Wen-Shin; Li, Chi-Yuan; Liu, Shih-Ping; Shen, Wu-Chung; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-02-28

    The DNA double strand break repair protein XRCC3 plays a central role in removing double strand breaks from the genome and defects in cellular repair capacity is closely related to human cancer initiation. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) susceptibility. In this hospital-based population research, the genotyping and analyzing of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 in a large Taiwanese population was performed. Totally, 176 NPC patients and 880 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped and analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. The results showed that there was a differential distribution among NPC and control subjects in the genotypic (P = 0.000488) and allelic (P = 0.0002) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the gene-environment interaction, we have firstly provided evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 CT and TT genotypes with individual smoking habits on increased NPC risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, interacts with smoking habit in increasing NPC risk, may be an early detection marker for NPC.

  13. Multi-disciplinary investigation of the tomb of Menna (TT69), Theban Necropolis, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Garcia-Moreno, Renata; Mathis, François; Leterme, Kerstin; Van Elslande, Elsa; Hocquet, François-Philippe; Rakkaa, Saïd; Laboury, Dimitri; Moens, Luc; Strivay, David; Hartwig, Melinda

    2009-08-01

    The archaeometrical survey of the tomb of Menna (TT69), which took place in November-December 2007, is part of the extended research program that aims to study and preserve this tomb in all its aspects. Menna was a high official who served as an overseer of Cadastral surveys during the reigns of pharaohs Tuthmosis IV and Amenhotep III (ca. 1419-1370 BC). The research team aimed to gather information, in a totally non-destructive way, on the materials used and the painting techniques. The technical examinations included photography with normal and raking light, macrophotography, ultra-violet (UV) fluorescence photography, and microscopy. On selected points X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was combined with diffuse reflectance UV-spectrometry, near infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The technical aspects as well as problems that are inherently associated with an interdisciplinary survey of this extent, are discussed. The project worked with a large team of people with different backgrounds and sensitive technical equipment. Working conditions were quite hostile, including elevated temperatures and dust hampering the examinations.

  14. EM Modeling of Far-Field Radiation Patterns for Antennas on the GMA-TT UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.

    2015-01-01

    To optimize communication with the Generic Modular Aircraft T-Tail (GMA-TT) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), electromagnetic (EM) simulations have been performed to predict the performance of two antenna types on the aircraft. Simulated far-field radiation patterns tell the amount of power radiated by the antennas and the aircraft together, taking into account blockage by the aircraft as well as radiation by conducting and dielectric portions of the aircraft. With a knowledge of the polarization and distance of the two communicating antennas, e.g. one on the UAV and one on the ground, and the transmitted signal strength, a calculation may be performed to find the strength of the signal travelling from one antenna to the other and to check that the transmitted signal meets the receiver system requirements for the designated range. In order to do this, the antenna frequency and polarization must be known for each antenna, in addition to its design and location. The permittivity, permeability, and geometry of the UAV components must also be known. The full-wave method of moments solution produces the appropriate dBi radiation pattern in which the received signal strength is calculated relative to that of an isotropic radiator.

  15. EM modeling of far-field radiation patterns for antennas on the GMA-TT UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.

    2015-05-01

    To optimize communication with the Generic Modular Aircraft T-Tail (GMA-TT) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), electromagnetic (EM) simulations have been performed to predict the performance of two antenna types on the aircraft. Simulated far-field radiation patterns tell the amount of power radiated by the antennas and the aircraft together, taking into account blockage by the aircraft as well as radiation by conducting and dielectric portions of the aircraft. With a knowledge of the polarization and distance of the two communicating antennas, e.g. one on the UAV and one on the ground, and the transmitted signal strength, a calculation may be performed to find the strength of the signal travelling from one antenna to the other and to check that the transmitted signal meets the receiver system requirements for the designated range. In order to do this, the antenna frequency and polarization must be known for each antenna, in addition to its design and location. The permittivity, permeability, and geometry of the UAV components must also be known. The full-wave method of moments solution produces the appropriate dBi radiation pattern in which the received signal strength is calculated relative to that of an isotropic radiator.

  16. Presence of TT virus DNA in bone marrow cells from hematologic patients.

    PubMed

    Fanci, R; De Santis, R; Zakrzewska, K; Paci, C; Azzi, A

    2004-04-01

    Recent observations suggest that TT virus (TTV), in addition to liver, may also infect bone marrow. In this study, bone marrow samples and sera from 33 patients with haematological disorders and sera from 16 healthy controls were investigated for TTV DNA presence. Altogether TTV DNA sequences were demonstrated in bone marrow cells of 84.84% of patients. Moreover TTV DNA was detected in sera from 72.72% of patients and from 93.75% of controls. N22 sequences amplified from bone marrow cells and serum of 3 patients were analysed, after cloning: all these isolates were of type 2c and 2 or 3 variants were present in each isolate. After single strand DNA degradation, replicative forms were detectable in BM cells. This finding, in addition to the detection of variants similar in the BM and in the serum of the same patient could suggest that BM is a site of TTV replication (or one of the sites) from which the virus is spread in blood.

  17. Whole genome response in guinea pigs infected with the high virulence strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis TT372

    PubMed Central

    Aiyaz, Mohamed; Bipin, Chand; Pantulwar, Vinay; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Shanley, Crystal A.; Ordway, Diane J; Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this study we conducted a microarray-based whole genomic analysis of gene expression in the lungs after exposure of guinea pigs to a low dose aerosol of the Atypical Beijing Western Cape TT372 strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, after harvesting lung tissues three weeks after infection at a time that effector immunity is starting to peak. The infection resulted in a very large up-regulation of multiple genes at this time, particularly in the context of a “chemokine storm” in the lungs. Overall gene expression was considerably reduced in animals that had been vaccinated with BCG two months earlier, but in both cases strong signatures featuring gamma interferon [IFNγ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNFα] were observed indicating the potent TH1 response in these animals. Even though their effects are not seen until later in the infection, even at this early time point gene expression patterns associated with the potential emergence of regulatory T cells were observed. Genes involving lung repair, response to oxidative stress, and cell trafficking were strongly expressed, but interesting these gene patterns differed substantially between the infected and vaccinated/infected groups of animals. Given the importance of this species as a relevant and cost-effective small animal model of tuberculosis, this approach has the potential to provide new information regarding the effects of vaccination on control of the disease process. PMID:25621360

  18. IgM-class antibodies to TT virus (TTV) in patients with acute TTV infection.

    PubMed

    Tsuda; Takahashi; Nishizawa; Akahane; Konishi; Yoshizawa; Okamoto

    2001-01-01

    TT virus (TTV) is a human circovirus with a single-stranded, circular DNA genome of 3.8 kb. A method was developed to detect IgM antibodies to TTV as a serological marker for the diagnosis of acute TTV infection. IgM antibodies in test sera were captured by a monoclonal antibody against IgM/µ on a solid support followed by binding of IgM with TTV derived from fecal extract of a TTV carrier. The presence of IgM-specific TTV particles was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using nucleic acids extracted from the solid support. Anti-TTV IgM was detected in sera from two patients with non-A to G post-transfusion hepatitis, who were positive for TTV DNA during weeks 10-21 and 12-17, respectively, following transfusion. The anti-TTV IgM was detectable after alanine transaminase levels were elevated and TTV DNA was detectable in the patients. The duration of the anti-TTV IgM was short-lived compared with anti-TTV IgG. Anti-TTV IgM was not detected in sera from any of 36 healthy individuals, with no detectable anti-TTV IgG or TTV DNA in their serum. These results indicate that anti-TTV IgM antibodies would be a useful marker to detect acute TTV infection.

  19. Influence of delta virus infection on the virologic status in Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis B virus genotype D.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Rabab; Abdo, Mahmoud; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Sabry, Dina; Atef, Mira; Ahmed, Rasha; Zayed, Naglaa

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) usually have an unfavorable clinical outcome in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients. In Egypt, data about epidemiology, the spectrum of disease, and impact of HDV on HBV infection are rare. To assess the prevalence, clinical and virological characteristics of HDV infection among Egyptian patients with chronic HBV. Adult patients with Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive were evaluated for the presence of HDV using anti HDV-IgG and HDV RNA by RT-PCR. Routine laboratory investigations, genotypes and subtypes for both HBV and HDV, abdominal sonography, and transient elastography (TE) were done. Liver biopsy was performed only in whenever indicated. One hundred and twenty-one treatment-naïve chronic HBV patients were included. Wild HBV genotype-D2 was found in 98.2% and 81.9% were HBeAg negative. Prevalence of HDV was 8.3% by anti-HDV IgG and 9.9% by RT-PCR. Wild HDV genotype-IIb was reported in 83.3%. HDV infection was more common in males, 90.9% of delta patients were HBeAg negative. Compared to the mono-infected HBV, concomitant HBV/HDV infection was not associated with more derangment in ALT nor advanced stage of fibrosis. 66.7% of HDV patients had significantly lower HBV-DNA level compared to the non-delta patients (P < 0.001). HDV is not uncommon in Egypt. HBV genotype-D was associated with HDV genotype-IIb. Delta infection was associated with negative HBeAg status, reduction of HBV replication, but neither influenced the clinical course nor increased significant liver damage risk.

  20. Genotype variability and haplotype profile of ABCB1 (MDR1) gene polymorphisms in Macedonian population.

    PubMed

    Naumovska, Zorica; Nestorovska, Aleksandra K; Sterjev, Zoran; Filipce, Ana; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Suturkova, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the most common ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein) polymorphisms in the population of R. Macedonia and compare the allele and haplotype frequencies with the global geographic data reported from different ethnic populations. The total of 107 healthy Macedonian individuals from the general population was included. Genotypes for the ABCB1 for three polymorphisms C1236T [rs1128503], G2677A/T [rs2032582] and C3435T [rs1045642] were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. Obtained allele frequencies for these three SNPs were similar to those observed in other European Caucasians. The detected genotype frequencies were 33.6% for 1236CC, 44.9% for 1236CT and 21.5% for 1236TT in exon 12; 32.7%, 44.9% and 22.4% for 2677GG, 2677GT and 2677GT consecutively in exon 21; and 25.2% for 3435CC, 52.3% for 3435CT and 22.5% for 3435TT in exon 26.Strong LD was observed in our study among all three SNPs with the highest association confirmed for C1236T and G2677T ((D'=0.859, r2=0.711). Eight different haplotypes were identified and the most prominent was the CGC haplotype (45.3%). Our study was the first to have documented the distribution of ABCB1 alleles, genotypes and haplotypes in the population of R. Macedonia. The obtained results can help in the prediction of different response to the drugs that are P-glycoprotein substrates. Additionally, in the era of individualized medicine the determination of the P-glycoprotein genotype might be a good predictive marker for determination of the subpopulations with higher risk to certain diseases.

  1. Genotype prevalence and allele frequencies of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation in two caste groups of India.

    PubMed

    Rai, V; Yadav, U; Kumar, P

    2012-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism in two caste group populations of eastern Uttar Pradesh. This mutation has been suggested to be positively associated with the risk of several congenital and multifactorial disorders. Frequency of mutant T allele differs in various ethnic and geographical populations of the world. MTHFR C677T mutation analysis was carried out by PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) method and the samples studied were randomly selected from the healthy individuals belonging to two caste populations. In Brahmin samples, genotype frequencies of CC, CT and TT were 0.727, 0.25 and 0.023 respectively whereas in Rajput samples, CC genotype was observed in 88 samples, CT genotype in 25 and TT genotype was found in 2 samples. Frequency of mutant T allele was found to be 0.147 in Brahmin and 0.126 in Rajput populations. The percentage of CT genotype and C allele were high in both the populations.

  2. Development of certified matrix-based reference material of genetically modified rice event TT51-1 for real-time PCR quantification.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hui; Quan, Sheng; Liu, Yinan; Shen, Ping; Yang, Litao

    2015-09-01

    In 2009, the genetically modified (GM) rice event TT51-1 with an engineered insect resistance trait became the first GM rice event to be granted certification for safe production in China, and its derivative lines Bt 63 and Huahui No.1 are expected to be commercialized soon. The development of certified reference material (CRM) for TT51-1 is necessary to monitor and inspect the TT51-1 event and its derivates. In this work, we developed four matrix-based TT51-1 rice CRMs (TT51-1a, TT51-1b, TT51-1c, and TT51-1d) with different TT51-1 mass fraction ratios by blending seed powders of homozygous TT51-1 and its recipient cultivar Minghui 63. The between-bottle homogeneity and the within-bottle homogeneity were tested, and good results were obtained. The potential degradation during transportation and shelf life were evaluated, and demonstrated an expiration period of at least 36 months. The characterization values of the four TT51-1 CRMs based on the mass fraction ratio were 1000.000 ± 51.430 g/kg, 49.940 ± 4.620 g/kg, 9.990 ± 1.110 g/kg, and 4.990 ± 0.620 g/kg, respectively. The characterization values based on the copy number ratio were certified by digital PCR analysis as 97.442 ± 5.253 %, 4.851 ± 0.486 %, 1.042 ± 0.135 %, and 0.556 ± 0.073 %, respectively. These results suggested that the TT51-1 matrix-based CRMs developed are of high quality and can be used as potential calibrators for TT51-1 GM rice inspection and monitoring.

  3. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  4. Responder Interferon λ Genotypes Are Associated With Higher Risk of Liver Fibrosis in HIV–Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Moqueet, Nasheed; Cooper, Curtis; Gill, John; Hull, Mark; Platt, Robert W.; Klein, Marina B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Liver fibrosis progresses faster in individuals coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Interferon λ3 (IFN-λ3) has both antiviral and proinflammatory properties. Genotypes at IFNL single-nucleotide proteins (SNPs; rs12979860CC and rs8099917TT) are linked to higher HCV clearance, potentially via rs8103142. We examined the relationship between IFN-λ genotypes and significant liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV coinfection. Methods. From the prospective Canadian Co-infection Cohort (n = 1423), HCV RNA–positive participants in whom IFN-λ genotypes were detected and who were free of fibrosis, end-stage liver disease, and chronic hepatitis B at baseline (n = 485) were included. Time to significant fibrosis (defined as an aspartate transaminase level to platelet count ratio index [APRI] of ≥1.5) by IFN-λ genotypes was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards, with adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, alcohol use, CD4+ T-cell count, HCV genotype, γ-glutamyl transferase level, and baseline APRI. Haplotype analysis was performed, with adjustment for ethnicity. Results. A total of 125 participants developed fibrosis over 1595 person-years (7.84 cases/100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.58–9.34 cases/100 person-years). Each genotype was associated with an increased fibrosis risk, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.37 (95% CI, .94–2.02) for rs12979860CC, 1.34 (95% CI, .91–1.97) for rs8103142TT, and 1.79 (95% CI, 1.24–2.57) for rs8099917TT. Haplotype TCT was also linked with a higher risk (hazard ratio, 1.14 [95% CI, .73–1.77]). Conclusions. IFN-λ SNPs rs12979860, rs8099917, and rs81013142 were individually linked to higher rates of fibrosis in individuals with HIV-HCV coinfection. IFN-λ genotypes may be useful to target HCV treatments to people who are at higher risk of liver disease. PMID:26984148

  5. Development of a TT Virus DNA Quantification System Using Real-Time Detection PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takanobu; Mizokami, Masashi; Mukaide, Motokazu; Orito, Etsuro; Ohno, Tomoyoshi; Nakano, Tatsunori; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kato, Hideaki; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Ueda, Ryuzo; Hirashima, Noboru; Shimamatsu, Kazuhide; Kage, Masayoshi; Kojiro, Masamichi

    2000-01-01

    Although TT virus (TTV) was isolated from a cryptogenic posttransfusion hepatitis patient, its pathogenic role remains unclear. It has been reported that the majority of the healthy population is infected with TTV. To elucidate the differences between TTV infection in patients with liver diseases and TTV infection in the healthy population, a quantification system was developed. TTV DNA was quantified by a real-time detection PCR (RTD-PCR) assay on an ABI Prism 7700 sequence detector. With this system, TTV DNA was quantified in 78 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients (63 with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] levels and 15 with normal ALT levels) and in 70 voluntary blood donors (BDs). The quantification range was 2.08 to 7.35 log copies/ml. The intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation were 0.37 to 6.33% and 0.60 to 7.07%, respectively. The mean serum TTV DNA levels in the HCV-infected patients with both elevated and normal ALT levels and BDs were 3.69 ± 0.89, 3.45 ± 0.76, and 3.45 ± 0.67 log copies/ml, respectively. Comparison of the serum TTV DNA levels among the HCV-infected patients revealed that they were not related to the serum ALT and HCV core protein levels or to the histopathological score on liver biopsy. This study showed that (i) the RTD-PCR assay for the detection of TTV was accurate and had a high degree of sensitivity, (ii) the mean serum TTV DNA level was similar among HCV-infected patients, irrespective of their ALT level, and also among BDs, and (iii) a high serum TTV DNA level does not affect the serum ALT and HCV levels or liver damage in HCV-infected patients. PMID:10618070

  6. [Investigation of TT virus-DNA in multitransfused children and healthy children].

    PubMed

    Yarar, Coşkun; Bör, Ozcan; Us, Tercan; Akgün, Yurdanur; Akgün, Necat A

    2005-01-01

    TT virus (TTV) is a naked, single stranded DNA virus, which has been discovered in the serum of a patient with posttransfusion hepatitis of unknown etiology. TTV is widespread in the population, however, the mode of its transmission is unclear. This study was conducted to search for TTV-DNA positivity rates and its relationship with the clinical outcomes of recipients who underwent multiple blood or blood product transfusion, together with healthy children. TTV-DNA was investigated in 52 multitransfused pediatric patients (age range: 3 mnths - 17.5 yrs, mean age: 9.2 +/- 5.7 years) and 18 healthy children (age range: 1 mnth - 16.5 yrs, mean age: 8.1 +/- 4.9 years), by qualitative in-house semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the primers NG059, NG061 and NG063, generated from ORF1 region of the viral genome. TTV-DNA was found positive in 30.8% of multitransfused, and 16.7% of healthy children. The differences of TTV-DNA positivity rates between the multitransfused and control groups, and ALT values between the patients with positive and negative TTV-DNA, were statistically insignificant (p>0.05). As a result, no relationship was detected between TTV positivity and hepatitis, although there was a statistically insignificant increase of TTV-DNA positivity in multitransfused children. However, since the primers of ORF1 N22 region used in our PCR method did not have enough sensitivity for the detection of TTV-DNA, it has been concluded that more sensitive primers such as UTR primers, should be used for more reliable evaluation of the results.

  7. Nitrogen Speciation in Metamorphic Diamond Provides Constraints on T-t Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartigny, P.

    2005-12-01

    Nitrogen content and speciation in diamond can be determined using micro-infrared spectroscopy provided that the sample is bigger than 60-80 microns. Available data show that metamorphic diamonds are characterized by high amounts of structurally bound nitrogen (70% have N-contents > 3500 ppm) compared with diamonds formed in other contexts (99.5% have N-contents < 3500 ppm). This criterion can be used to recognize metamorphic diamonds (and thus new UHP provinces) anywhere on Earth, even far away from HP areas where UHP indicators would usually be searched. So far, metamorphic diamonds have been detected in Northern Canada (Cartigny et al., 2004) but their search remained unsuccessful in Australia. The four main nitrogen-bearing defects are interrelated by a second-order diffusion process, i.e. longer residence times, higher temperatures and/or N-contents leading the initial single N-atoms to cluster into an increasing number of N-atoms (Evans and Qi, 1982). Due to their rather short residence time (of several Ma) at rather low temperatures (<1100°C), metamorphic diamonds are predicted to contain - and it is observed -significant amount of single N atoms (Type Ib diamonds). According to the temperature/time dependence of the nitrogen diffusion, tight constraints can be placed on available T-t paths. Up to now, N-aggregation state was only roughly used and residence times were calculated assuming constant temperatures (Finnie et al. 1995; De Corte et al., 1998). More precise modeling shows that nitrogen aggregation of Kokchetav diamonds is compatible with diamond crystallization at temperature <1025°C and <1000°C with exhumation rates of 5 and 10cm/year respectively. Another important implication is that nitrogen speciation is not compatible with crystallization temperatures higher than 1050°C.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VRI light curves of TT Her (Terrell+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, D.; Nelson, R. H.

    2016-04-01

    In April of 2005, 2006, and 2007 R.H.N. took a total of nine medium resolution (reciprocal dispersion=10Å/mm, R=10000) spectra at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) in Victoria, BC using the 1.8m Plaskett Telescope. The exposure time was usually 1hr and the spectral coverage was approximately 5000-5260Å. The log of the spectroscopic observations is given in Table1. Photometric observations in the VRCIC photometric passbands were undertaken by R.H.N. at his private observatory in Prince George, BC, Canada in May and June of 2008. A total of 392 frames in V, 413 in RC, and 393 in IC were taken. Standard reduction techniques (bias subtraction, dark subtraction, and flat-fielding) were done and aperture photometry performed. Differential photometry was then performed with GSC 1525-0805 (V=9.82+/-0.03 and B-V=0.72+/-0.03 from the Tycho-2 catalog; Hog et al. 2000, cat. I/259) as the comparison star and GSC 1525-0939 (V=11.73+/-0.07 and B-V=0.82+/-0.07 from Data Release 7 of the APASS survey; Henden et al., 2012JAVSO..40..430H; see DR9 in Henden et al. 2016, cat. II/336) as the check star. No variation in the comparison and check stars greater than 0.01mag was detected, and the precision of the differential magnitudes for TT Her was about 0.005mag in each filter. The instrumental magnitude differences are given in Table2. (2 data files).

  9. Possible pathogenic nature of the recently discovered TT virus: does it play a role in autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    PubMed

    Gergely, Peter; Perl, Andras; Poór, Gyula

    2006-11-01

    Pathogenesis of viral origin has long been suggested in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Beside the well-defined virus induced transient or chronic rheumatic diseases often resembling systemic autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, viruses can contribute to disease pathogenesis by several different pathomechanisms. TT virus is a recently discovered virus of extremely high genetic diversity which commonly infects humans. Despite accumulated evidence on the biological characteristics of TTV, its pathogenicity is still in question; many consider TTV as a harmless endosymbiont. The recent paper overviews the biology of TT virus and investigates the hypothesis that TTV might have a causative role in human diseases with special attention to the possibility that TTV might trigger autoimmunity in rheumatic disorders.

  10. A novel Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR based assay for genotyping SNP rs12303764(G/T) of human Unc-51 like kinase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Rohit; Duseja, Ajay; Changotra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    Various case-control studies have shown association of single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) in ULK1 with crohn's disease. The techniques used in these studies were time consuming, complicated and require sophisticated/expensive instruments. Therefore, in order to overcome these problems, we have developed a new, rapid and cost effective Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR assay to genotype single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) of ULK1 gene. We manually designed allele specific primers. DNA fragment amplified using outer primers was sequenced to obtain samples with known genotypes (GG, GT and TT) for further use in the development of T-ARMS-PCR assay. Amplification conditions were optimized for parameters; annealing temperature, Taq DNA polymerase and primers. The developed T-ARMS-PCR assay was applied to genotype one hundred samples from healthy individuals. Genotyping results of 10 DNA samples from healthy individuals for rs12303764(G/T) by T-ARMS-PCR assay and sequencing were concordant. The newly developed assay was further applied to genotype samples from 100 healthy individuals of North Indian origin. Genotype frequencies were 9, 34 and 57 % for GG, GT and TT, respectively. Allele frequencies were 0.26 and 0.74 for G and T, respectively. The allele frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium (p = 0.2443). T-ARMS-PCR assay developed in our laboratory for genotyping rs12303764 (G/T) of ULK1 gene is time saving and cost-effective as compared to the available methods. Furthermore, this is the first study reporting allelic and genotype frequencies of ULK1 rs12303764 (G/T) variants in North Indian population.

  11. High-resolution melting analysis for detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism and the genotype of the myostatin gene in warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Priscila B S; Garbade, Petra; Natalini, Cláudio C; Pires, Ananda R; Tisotti, Tainor M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop a high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect the g.66493737C>T polymorphism in the myostatin gene (MSTN) and determine the frequency of 3 previously defined g.66493737 genotypes (T/T, T/C, and C/C) in warmblood horses. SAMPLES Blood samples from 23 horses. PROCEDURES From each blood sample, DNA was extracted and analyzed by standard PCR methods and an HRM assay to determine the MSTN genotype. Three protocols (standard protocol, protocol in which a high-salt solution was added to the reaction mixture before the first melting cycle, and protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture before analysis) for the HRM assay were designed and compared. Genotype results determined by the HRM protocol that generated the most consistent melting curves were compared with those determined by sequencing. RESULTS The HRM protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture generated the most consistent melting curves. The genotypes of the g.66493737C>T polymorphism were determined for 22 horses (16 by HRM analysis and 20 by sequencing); 14, 7, and 1 had the T/T, T/C, and C/C genotypes, respectively. The genotype determined by HRM analysis agreed with that determined by sequencing for 14 of 16 horses. The frequency of alleles T and C was 79.5% and 20.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM analysis may be a faster and more economical alternative than PCR methods for genotyping. Genotyping results might be useful as predictors of athletic performance for horses.

  12. Fat mass- and obesity-associated genotype, dietary intakes and anthropometric measures in European adults: the Food4Me study.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; San-Cristobal, Rodrigo; Forster, Hannah; O'Donovan, Clare B; Woolhead, Clara; Marsaux, Cyril F M; Macready, Anna L; Fallaize, Rosalind; Kolossa, Silvia; Tsirigoti, Lydia; Lambrinou, Christina P; Moschonis, George; Godlewska, Magdalena; Surwiłło, Agnieszka; Drevon, Christian A; Manios, Yannis; Traczyk, Iwona; Gibney, Eileen R; Brennan, Lorraine; Walsh, Marianne C; Lovegrove, Julie A; Martinez, J Alfredo; Saris, Wim H M; Daniel, Hannelore; Gibney, Mike; Mathers, John C

    2016-02-14

    The interplay between the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene variants and diet has been implicated in the development of obesity. The aim of the present analysis was to investigate associations between FTO genotype, dietary intakes and anthropometrics among European adults. Participants in the Food4Me randomised controlled trial were genotyped for FTO genotype (rs9939609) and their dietary intakes, and diet quality scores (Healthy Eating Index and PREDIMED-based Mediterranean diet score) were estimated from FFQ. Relationships between FTO genotype, diet and anthropometrics (weight, waist circumference (WC) and BMI) were evaluated at baseline. European adults with the FTO risk genotype had greater WC (AA v. TT: +1·4 cm; P=0·003) and BMI (+0·9 kg/m2; P=0·001) than individuals with no risk alleles. Subjects with the lowest fried food consumption and two copies of the FTO risk variant had on average 1·4 kg/m2 greater BMI (Ptrend=0·028) and 3·1 cm greater WC (Ptrend=0·045) compared with individuals with no copies of the risk allele and with the lowest fried food consumption. However, there was no evidence of interactions between FTO genotype and dietary intakes on BMI and WC, and thus further research is required to confirm or refute these findings.

  13. AN EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM GENOTYPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of 11 previously described species differentiation and genotyping PCR protocols for detection of Cryptosporidium parasites. Genomic DNA from three species of Crytosporidium parasites (genotype 1 and genotype 2 of C. parvum, C. muris, a...

  14. Use of the SAMe-TT2R2 Score to Predict Good Anticoagulation Control with Warfarin in Chinese Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Relationship to Ischemic Stroke Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pak Hei; Hai, Jo Jo; Chan, Esther W.; Li, Wen Hua; Tse, Hung Fat; Wong, Ian C. K.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Siu, Chung Wah

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of warfarin therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) depends on the time in therapeutic range (TTR). We aimed to assess the predictive ability of SAMe-TT2R2 score in Chinese AF patients on warfarin, whose TTR is notoriously poor. Methods and Results This is a single-centre retrospective study. Patients with non-valvular AF on warfarin diagnosed between 1997 and 2011 were stratified according to SAMe-TT2R2 score, and TTR was calculated using Rosendaal method. The predictive power of SAMe-TT2R2 scores for good TTR i.e. >70% was assessed. We included 1,428 Chinese patients (mean age 76.2±8.7 years, 47.5% male) with non-valvular AF on warfarin. The mean and median TTR were 38.2±24.4% and 38.8% (interquartile range: 17.9% and 56.2%) respectively. TTR decreased progressively with increasing SAMe-TT2R2 score (p = 0.016). When the cut-off value of SAMe-TT2R2 score was set to 2, the sensitivity and specificity to predict TTR<70% were 85.7% and 17.8%, respectively. The corresponding positive and negative predictive values were 10.1% and 92.0%. After a mean follow-up of 4.7±3.6 years, 338 patients developed an ischemic stroke (4.96%/year). Patients with TTR≥70% had a lower annual risk of ischemic stroke of 3.67%/year compared with than those with TTR<70% (5.13%/year)(p = 0.08). Patients with SAMe-TT2R2 score ≤2 had the lowest risk of annual risk of ischemic stroke (3.49%/year) compared with those with SAMe-TT2R2 score = 3 (4.56%/year), and those with SAMe-TT2R2 score ≥4 (6.41%/year)(p<0.001). There was also a non-significant trend towards more intracranial hemorrhage with increasing SAMe-TT2R2 score. Conclusions The SAMe-TT2R2 score correlates well with TTR in Chinese AF patients, with a score >2 having high sensitivity and negative predictive values for poor TTR. Ischemic stroke risk increased progressively with increasing SAMe-TT2R2 score, consistent with poorer TTRs at high SAMe-TT2R2 scores. PMID:27010633

  15. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility.

  16. Population-Level Persistence of Immunity 2 Years After the PsA-TT Mass-Vaccination Campaign in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Nicole E.; Borrow, Ray; Berthe, Abdoulaye; Dembélé, Awa Traoré Eps; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Townsend, Kelly; Boukary, Rahamatou M.; Mabey, Lesley; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Sow, Samba O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2010, Africa's first preventive meningococcal mass vaccination campaign was launched using a newly developed Neisseria meningitidis group A (NmA) polysaccharide–tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), designed specifically for the meningitis belt. Given PsA-TT's recent introduction, the duration of protection against meningococcal group A is unknown. Methods. We conducted a household-based, age-stratified seroprevalence survey in Bamako, Mali, in 2012, 2 years after the vaccination campaign targeted all 1- to 29-year-olds. Randomly selected participants who had been eligible for PsA-TT provided a blood sample and responded to a questionnaire. Sera were analyzed to assess NmA-specific serum bactericidal antibody titers using rabbit complement (rSBA) and NmA-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proportion of participants putatively protected and the age group- and sex-specific rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) and IgG geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were determined. Results. Two years postvaccination, nearly all of the 800 participants (99.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 98.3%–99.7%) maintained NmA-specific rSBA titers ≥8, the accepted threshold for protection; 98.6% (95% CI, 97.8%–99.4%) had titers ≥128, and 89.5% (95% CI, 87.4%–91.6%) had titers ≥1024. The rSBA GMTs were significantly higher in females than in males aged <18 years at vaccination (P < .0001). NmA-specific IgG levels ≥2 µg/mL were found in 88.5% (95% CI, 86.3%–90.7%) of participants. Conclusions. Two years after PsA-TT introduction, a very high proportion of the population targeted for vaccination maintains high antibody titers against NmA. Assessing the duration of protection provided by PsA-TT is a priority for implementing evidence-based vaccination strategies. Representative, population-based seroprevalence studies complement clinical trials and provide this key evidence. PMID:26553687

  17. Genotyping and Mutation Pattern in the Overlapping MHR Region of HBV Isolates in Southern Khorasan, Eastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ziaee, Masood; Javanmard, Davod; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza; Hasan Namaei, Mohammad; Azarkar, Ghodsiyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus, with 8 known distinct genotypes, is one of the most serious health problems which results to liver injuries. The surface gene of Hepatitis B virus completely overlaps with the polymerase gene. Mutations in the RT gene result in changes in the overlapping hepatitis B surface antigen. Objectives The present study aimed to evaluate the genotypes and prevalence of mutations in a segment of S and RT gene in HBV isolates in Southern Khorasan, Iran. Methods This was a population-based study comprising 5,235 randomized samples for HBV screening. A nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was followed by direct sequencing, and the sequences blast with present sequences of NCBI database for genotyping. Alignment and phylogenic analysis was performed using MEGA-6 software, and mutation pattern of this segment was finally surveyed in Bioedit software. Results The mean age was 39.07 ± 14.04 years, with 52.2% female and 47.8% male. All isolates belonged to HBV genotype D, sub-genotype D1. The most amino acid substitutions of surface protein were Q129H (34.42%) and A168V (8.2%), other escape mutants observed in this study were P127L/T, S117G, T125M, S143L, D144E and E164D. In the RT gene, Q149K was the most frequently identified amino acid substitution (9.83%), followed by L122F (8.19%), N118D/T (6.55%), L157M (4.91%), and H124Y (3.27%). Conclusions This finding represents an ongoing dominancy of HBV genotype D in Eastern Iran, corresponding to other parts of Iran. There were a lot of variations in the S gene leading to an escape mutation, some of which affected the corresponding area of the RT region. PMID:27882062

  18. Association between dietary intake of folate, vitamin B6, B12 & MTHFR, MTR Genotype and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Weiwei, Zheng; Liping, Chen; Dequan, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective: we conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between dietary folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 intake, MTHFR and MTR genotype, and breast cancer risk. Methods: Genotyping for MTHFR C677T and A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms were performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PCR-RFLP) method. The intake of folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 were calculated by each food item from questionnaire. Results: Subjects with breast cancer tended to have more first-degree relatives (χ2=30.77, P<0.001) and have high intake of folate (t=2.42, P=0.008) and Vitamin B6 (t=2.94, P=0.002). Compared to the reference group, women with MTHFR 677 TT genotype and T allele had a significantly increased risk of breast cancer, with ORs (95%CI) of 1.8(1.08-2.27) and 1.39(1.02-1.92), respectively. For those who had folate intake<450 ug/day, MTHFR 667TT genotype was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer (OR=2.45, 95% CI=1.09-5.82, P=0.02). Similarly, subjects with Vitamin B6 intake<0.84 mg/day and MTHFR 667T allele genotype was correlated with a marginally increased risk of breast cancer. A significant interaction was observed between MTHFR C667T polymorphism and folate intake on the risk of breast cancer (P for interaction was 0.025). Conclusion: This case-control study found a significant association between MTHFR C667T polymorphism, folate intake and vitamin B6 and breast cancer risk, and a significant interaction was observed between MTHFR C667T polymorphism and folate intake on the risk of breast cancer. PMID:24639841

  19. Tremor in School-Aged Children: A Cross-Sectional Study of Tremor in 819 Boys and Girls in Burgos, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Cubo, Esther; Trejo-Gabriel-Galán, José M.; Villaverde, Vanesa Ausín; Benito, Vanesa Delgado; Velasco, Sara Sáez; Vicente, Jesús Macarrón; Guevara, José Cordero; Benito-León, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Background Mild hand tremor occurs in most normal adults. There are no surveys of the prevalence or clinical correlates of such tremor among children. Methods A cross-sectional study of tics, tremor and other neurological disorders was conducted in Spanish children; thus, 819 schoolchildren in Burgos, Spain, drew Archimedes spirals with each hand. Tremor in spirals was rated (0–2) by a blinded neurologist and an overall tremor rating (0–4) was assigned. Results The mean age was 10.9 ± 3.1 years. A tremor rating of 1 (mild tremor) was present in either hand in 424 (51.7%) children, and in both hands in 88 (10.7%) children. Higher tremor ratings were very uncommon. The overall tremor rating was higher in boys than girls (1.31 ± 0.41 vs. 1.22 ± 0.34, p = 0.002) and correlated weakly yet significantly with age (ρ = 0.09, p = 0.01). Within subjects, the left hand spiral rating was greater than the right (p < 0.001). Conclusions In this cross-sectional study of 819 Spanish schoolchildren, mild tremor was commonly observed. As in adults, males had more tremor than females, tremor scores increased with age, and tremor scores were higher in the left than right arm, demonstrating that these clinical correlations seem to be more broadly generalizable to children. The functional significance of tremor in children, particularly as it relates to handwriting proficiency, deserves additional scrutiny. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21894047

  20. MSTN genotypes in Thoroughbred horses influence skeletal muscle gene expression and racetrack performance.

    PubMed

    McGivney, Beatrice A; Browne, John A; Fonseca, Rita G; Katz, Lisa M; Machugh, David E; Whiston, Ronan; Hill, Emmeline W

    2012-12-01

    Myostatin, encoded by the MSTN gene, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily that regulates skeletal muscle development. A MSTN SNP significantly associated with Thoroughbred horse racing phenotypes has recently been identified as well as significant reductions in Thoroughbred skeletal muscle gene expression for three transcripts 400-1500 base pairs downstream of the MSTN gene following a period of training. Together, these findings indicate that MSTN genotypes may influence MSTN gene expression. To investigate this, MSTN mRNA expression was measured in biopsies from the middle gluteal muscle from 60 untrained yearling Thoroughbreds (C/C, n = 15; C/T, n = 28; T/T, n = 17) using two independent real-time qRT-PCR assays. MSTN gene expression was also evaluated in a subset (N = 33) of these animals using samples collected after a ten-month period of training. A significant association was observed between genotype and mRNA abundance for the untrained horses (assay I, P = 0.0237; assay II, P = 0.003559), with the C/C cohort having the highest MSTN mRNA levels, the T/T group the lowest levels and the C/T group intermediate levels. Following training, there was a significant decrease in MSTN mRNA (-3.35-fold; P = 6.9 × 10(-7) ), which was most apparent for the C/C cohort (-5.88-fold, P = 0.001). These data demonstrate the tight relationship between phenotype, genotype and gene expression at the MSTN gene in Thoroughbred racehorses.

  1. Topical delivery of DNA oligonucleotide to induce p53 generation in the skin via thymidine dinucleotide (pTT)-encapsulated liposomal carrier

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Transcription factor p53 has a powerful tumor suppressing function that is associated with many cancers. Since the molecular weight of p53 is 53 kDa, it is difficult to transport across cell membranes. Thymidine dinucleotide (pTT) is an oligonucleotide that can activate the p53 transcription factor and trigger the signal transduction cascade. However, the negative charge and high water solubility of pTT limit its transport through cellular membranes, thereby preventing it from reaching its target in the nucleus. A suitable delivery carrier for pTT is currently not available. Objective The purpose of this study was to employ a nanoscale liposomal carrier to resolve the delivery problem, and increase the bioavailability and efficiency of pTT. Methodology The approach was to employ liposomes to deliver pTT and then evaluate the particle size and zeta potential by laser light scattering (LLS), and permeation properties of pTT in vitro in a Franz diffusion assembly, and in vivo in a murine model using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We found that dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) combined with cholesterol 3 sulfate (C3S) were the best ingredients to achieve an average desired vehicle size of 133.6 ± 2.8 nm, a polydispersity index (PDI, representing the distribution of particle sizes) of 0.437, and a zeta potential of −93.3 ± 1.88. An in vitro penetration study showed that the liposomal carrier was superior to the free form of pTT at 2–24 hours. CLSM study observed that the penetration depth of pTT reached the upper epidermis and potential of penetration maintained up to 24 hours. Conclusion These preliminary data demonstrate that nanosized DOPE/C3S liposomes can be exploited as a potential carrier of drugs for topical use in treating skin diseases. PMID:22267922

  2. Spin polarisation of tt¯γγ production at NLO+PS with GoSam interfaced to MadGraph5_aMC@NLO

    DOE PAGES

    van Deurzen, Hans; Frederix, Rikkert; Hirschi, Valentin; ...

    2016-04-22

    Here, we present an interface between the multipurpose Monte Carlo tool MadGraph5_aMC@NLO and the automated amplitude generator GoSam. As a first application of this novel framework, we compute the NLO corrections to pp→ tt¯H and pp→ tt¯γγ matched to a parton shower. In the phenomenological analyses of these processes, we focus our attention on observables which are sensitive to the polarisation of the top quarks.

  3. Evaluation of High Resolution Melting for MTHFR C677T Genotyping in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuying; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Hui; Dong, Rui; Yang, Xiaomeng; Liu, Yi; Ma, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Background High resolution melting (HRM) is a simple, flexible and low-cost mutation screening technique. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encoding a critical enzyme, potentially affects susceptibility to some congenital defects like congenital heart disease (CHD). We evaluate the performance of HRM for genotyping of the MTHFR gene C677T locus in CHD cases and healthy controls of Chinese Han population. Methods A total of 315 blood samples from 147 CHD patients (male72, female 75) and 168 healthy controls (male 92, female 76) were enrolled in the study. HRM was utilized to genotype MTHFR C677T locus of all the samples. The results were compared to that of PCR-RFLP and Sanger sequencing. The association of the MTHFR C677T genotypes and the risk of CHD was analyzed using odds ratio with their 95% confidence interval (CIs) from unconditional logistic regression. Results All the samples were successfully genotyped by HRM within 1 hour and 30 minutes while at least 6 hours were needed for PCR-RFLP and sequencing. The genotypes of MTHFR C677T CC, CT, and TT were 9.52%, 49.66%, and 40.82% in CHD group but 29.17%, 50% and 20.83% in control group, which were identical using both methods of HRM and PCR-RFLP, demonstrating the sensitivity and specificity of HRM were all 100%. Conclusion MTHFR C677T is a potential risk factor for CHD in our local residents of Shandong province in China. HRM is a fast, sensitive, specific and reliable method for clinical application of genotyping. PMID:26990189

  4. Interferon lambda genotype and low serum LDL cholesterol levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Josephine H.; Lao, Xiang Qian; Tillmann, Hans L.; Rowell, Jennifer; Patel, Keyur; Thompson, Alexander; Suchindran, Sunil; Muir, Andrew J.; Guyton, John R.; Gardner, Stephen D.; McHutchison, John G.; McCarthy, Jeanette J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, genetic polymorphisms occurring in the interferon lambda gene region were associated with response to interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C infection. Both infection with the hepatitis C virus and interferon therapy are associated with decreased serum cholesterol and high cholesterol has been associated with increased likelihood to respond to interferon. We sought to determine if the interferon lambda gene variant was also associated with serum lipid levels in chronic hepatitis C patients. We compared genotypes of the rs12979860 polymorphism, located proximal to the IL28 gene, with serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels in 746 subjects with chronic HCV infection, not currently undergoing treatment, using multivariable analysis of variance. Results Levels of total cholesterol (p=6.0×10-4), apolipoprotein B (p=1.3×10-6) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p=8.9×10-10) were significantly higher in subjects carrying the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype compared to those with the CT or TT genotype. Levels of triglycerides (p=0.03), apolipoprotein A-I (p=0.06) and apolipoprotein E (p=0.01) were slightly lower in the rs12979860 CC genotype group, while levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.78) and apolipoprotein C-III (p=0.74) did not vary by rs12979860 genotype. Conclusions Our results suggest that low levels of LDL cholesterol in chronic hepatitis C patients may be a marker of host endogenous interferon response to hepatitis C and that subjects with the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype may have a lower endogenous interferon response to the virus. PMID:20235331

  5. Lithium-stuffed diamond polytype Zn-Tt structures (Tt = Sn, Ge): the two lithium-zinc-tetrelides Li3Zn2Sn4 and Li2ZnGe3.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, Saskia; Fässler, Thomas F

    2013-03-18

    In view of the search for alternative structures for Li ion battery materials and electron-poor framework semiconductors for thermoelectric applications, the systems Li-Zn-Tt with Tt = Ge or Sn were investigated. Li3Zn2Sn4 and Li2ZnGe3 were obtained by high-temperature syntheses from the elements. The crystal structures of both phases were determined with single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods and the electronic structure of Li3Zn2Sn4 was analyzed by means of DFT calculations (TB-LMTO-ASA). Both phases show diamond polytype analogous Zn-Tt networks with tetrahedrally four-coordinated Zn and Tt atoms. The new phase Li3Zn2Sn4 crystallizes in space group P6(3)/mmc (No. 194) with lattice parameters a = 4.528(1) Å and c = 22.119(2) Å. Zn and Sn atoms are fully ordered on three sites that constitute a 6H diamond polytype like network. Li2ZnGe3 is also described in space group P6(3)/mmc (No. 194) with lattice parameters a = 4.167(1) Å and c = 6.754(1) Å. The Zn-Ge substructure is a hexagonal diamond (2H polytype) like network. The existence of such a Ge-rich Li-Zn-Ge phase has already been reported, but a full structure determination has not yet been published. No indication for an ordering of Zn and Ge atoms on different sites could be deduced from the X-ray diffraction data. Band structure calculations for Li3Zn2Sn4 indicate that the phase is metallic, with the Fermi level at the flank of a pseudogap in the density of states curve. The topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) shows covalent Sn-Sn bonding and lone pair like valence basins for the Sn atoms. Concerning the appearance of the lone pair like ELF basins, a strong influence of the basis set for Li that is employed in the calculations is found.

  6. Characterization of murine pituitary-derived cell lines Tpit/F1, Tpit/E and TtT/GF.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Ueharu, Hiroki; Nishimura, Naoto; Tsuda, Mitsuyoshi; Yako, Hideji; Chen, Mo; Mitsuishi, Hideo; Sano, Yoshiya; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary is an important endocrine tissue of the vertebrate that produces and secretes many hormones. Accumulating data suggest that several types of cells compose the pituitary, and there is growing interest in elucidating the origin of these cell types and their roles in pituitary organogenesis. Therein, the histogenous cell line is an extremely valuable experimental tool for investigating the function of derived tissue. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles by microarray analysis and real-time PCR for murine pituitary tumor-derived non-hormone-producing cell lines TtT/GF, Tpit/F1 and Tpit/E. Several genes are characteristically expressed in each cell line: Abcg2, Nestin, Prrx1, Prrx2, CD34, Eng, Cspg4 (Ng2), S100β and nNos in TtT/GF; Cxcl12, Raldh1, Msx1 and Twist1 in Tpit/F1; and Cxadr, Sox9, Cdh1, EpCAM and Krt8 in Tpit/E. Ultimately, we came to the following conclusions: TtT/GF cells show the most differentiated state, and may have some properties of the pituitary vascular endothelial cell and/or pericyte. Tpit/F1 cells show the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes with stemness still in a transiting state. Tpit/E cells have a phenotype of epithelial cells and are the most immature cells in the progression of differentiation or in the initial endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, these three cell lines must be useful model cell lines for investigating pituitary stem/progenitor cells as well as organogenesis.

  7. Characterization of Murine Pituitary-Derived Cell Lines Tpit/F1, Tpit/E and TtT/GF

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, Saishu; HIGUCHI, Masashi; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIMURA, Naoto; TSUDA, Mitsuyoshi; YAKO, Hideji; CHEN, Mo; MITSUISHI, Hideo; SANO, Yoshiya; KATO, Takako; KATO, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary is an important endocrine tissue of the vertebrate that produces and secretes many hormones. Accumulating data suggest that several types of cells compose the pituitary, and there is growing interest in elucidating the origin of these cell types and their roles in pituitary organogenesis. Therein, the histogenous cell line is an extremely valuable experimental tool for investigating the function of derived tissue. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles by microarray analysis and real-time PCR for murine pituitary tumor-derived non-hormone-producing cell lines TtT/GF, Tpit/F1 and Tpit/E. Several genes are characteristically expressed in each cell line: Abcg2, Nestin, Prrx1, Prrx2, CD34, Eng, Cspg4 (Ng2), S100β and nNos in TtT/GF; Cxcl12, Raldh1, Msx1 and Twist1 in Tpit/F1; and Cxadr, Sox9, Cdh1, EpCAM and Krt8 in Tpit/E. Ultimately, we came to the following conclusions: TtT/GF cells show the most differentiated state, and may have some properties of the pituitary vascular endothelial cell and/or pericyte. Tpit/F1 cells show the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes with stemness still in a transiting state. Tpit/E cells have a phenotype of epithelial cells and are the most immature cells in the progression of differentiation or in the initial endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, these three cell lines must be useful model cell lines for investigating pituitary stem/progenitor cells as well as organogenesis. PMID:24881870

  8. Telemetry Tracking & Control (TT&C) - First TDRSS, then Commercial GEO & Big LEO and Now Through LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Dwayne R.; Streich, Ron G.; Bull, Barton; Grant, Chuck; Power, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communication satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce Telemetry, Tracking and Control (TT&C) costs of launch vehicles, Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), Research Balloons and spacecraft by reducing or eliminating ground infrastructure. Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC\\WFF) have successfully used commercial Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Big LEO communications satellites for Long Duration Balloon Flight TT&C. The Flight Modem is a GSFC\\WFF Advanced Range Technology initiative (ARTI) designed to streamline TT&C capability in the user community of these scientific data gathering platforms at low cost. Making use of existing LEO satellites and adapting and ruggedized commercially available components; two-way, over the horizon communications may be established with these vehicles at great savings due to reduced infrastructure. Initially planned as a means for permitting GPS data for tracking and recovery of sounding rocket and balloon payloads, expectations are that the bandwidth can soon be expanded to allow more comprehensive data transfer. The system architecture which integrates antennas, GPS receiver, commercial satellite packet data modem and a single board computer with custom software is described and technical challenges are discussed along with the plan for their resolution. A three-phase testing and development plan is outlined and the current results are reported. Results and status of ongoing flight tests on aircraft and sounding rockets are reported. Future applications on these platforms and the potential for satellite support are discussed along with an analysis of cost effectiveness of this method vs. other tracking and data transmission schemes.

  9. Multi-proxy approach for palaeoclimate reconstruction using a loess-palaeosol sequence from Süttő , Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Christine; Königer, Paul; Ostertag-Henning, Christian; Scheeder, Georg; Novothny, Ágnes; Horváth, Erzsébet; Wacha, Lara; Techmer, Astrid; Frechen, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    The loess-palaeosol sequence at Süttő , Hungary contains a high-resolution terrestrial archive of palaeoenvironmental changes. The sequence is about 20 m thick and overlies travertine which was dated using Uranium-series to 235-314 ka (Sierralta et al., in press). Imbedded with the loess are two greyish stratified horizons, three brownish steppe-like soils and a pedocomplex composed of a reddish-brown palaeosol covered by a chernozem. Detailed dating studies were carried out (Novothny et al, 2009, Novothny et al., in press) revealing more or less continuous sedimentation from marine isotope stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 2. High-resolution grain size and magnetic susceptibility data exist (Novothny et al., in prep.) which allow for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. In addition to those data sets we analysed the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of bulk carbonate, carbonate nodules, and organic material in order to get further insight into palaeoprecipitation and palaeoclimatic conditions. To strengthen the interpretation based on isotopic data, we examined biomarkers derived from land plants (long-chain n-alkanes) for both loess and palaeosols to add information on the vegetation changes. We will discuss the new results in comparison with the published data sets and highlight inherent problems of the individual approaches. Novothny, A., Frechen, M., Horváth, E., Wacha, L., Rolf, C., in prep. High resolution grain size and magnetic susceptibility record of the last glacial cycles in the Süttő loess section, Hungary. Quaternary International. Novothny, A., Frechen, M., Horváth, E., Krbetschek, M., Tsukamoto, S., in press. Infrared stimulated luminescence and radiofluorescence dating of aeolian sediments from Hungary. Quaternary Geochronology, doi:10.1016/j.quageo.2009.05.002. Novothny, A., Frechen, M., Horváth, E., Bradák, B., Oches, E. A., McCoy, W. D., Stevens, T., 2009a. Luminescence and amino acid racemisation chronology of the loess-paleosol sequence

  10. L-Methylfolate supplementation in a child with autism and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase, enzyme gene C677TT allele.

    PubMed

    Siscoe, Kim S; Lohr, W David

    2017-03-07

    Errors in folate metabolism may play a role in the pathology of autism spectrum disorders because of increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. We report a case where L-methylfolate supplementation improved symptoms of aggression and disruptive behavior in a child with autism who tested positive for the C677TT allele of the methyltetrahydrofolate reductase enzyme gene. To our knowledge, this is the first report of L-methylfolate administration in this situation. Further controlled studies of L-methylfolate in this population are warranted.

  11. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z Cross Sections using Proton-Proton Collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen

    A measurement of the production cross sections of top quark pairs in association with a W or Z boson is presented. The measurement uses 20.3 fb-1 of data from proton-proton collisions at &sqrt;s = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Four different final states are considered: two opposite-sign leptons, two same-sign leptons, three leptons, and four leptons. The t t¯W and t t¯Z cross sections are simultaneously extracted using a maximum likelihood fit over all the final states. The t t¯Z cross section is measured to be 176+58-52 fb, corresponding to a signal significance of 4.2σ. The t t¯W cross section is measured to be 369+100-91 fb, corresponding to a signal significance of 5.0σ. The results are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.

  12. SNP genotypes of olfactory receptor genes associated with olfactory ability in German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Geng, G-J; Zhang, W; Cui, L; Zhang, H-X; Zheng, J-L

    2016-04-01

    To find out the relationship between SNP genotypes of canine olfactory receptor genes and olfactory ability, 28 males and 20 females from German Shepherd dogs in police service were scored by odor detection tests and analyzed using the Beckman GenomeLab SNPstream. The representative 22 SNP loci from the exonic regions of 12 olfactory receptor genes were investigated, and three kinds of odor (human, ice drug and trinitrotoluene) were detected. The results showed that the SNP genotypes at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR2K2-like:c.518G>A, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci had a statistically significant effect on the scenting abilities (P < 0.001). The kind of odor influenced the performances of the dogs (P < 0.001). In addition, there were interactions between genotype and the kind of odor at the following loci: OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A (P < 0.001). The dogs with genotype CC at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, genotype AA at the OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, genotype TT at the OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and genotype GG at the OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci did better at detecting the ice drug. We concluded that there was linkage between certain SNP genotypes and the olfactory ability of dogs and that SNP genotypes might be useful in determining dogs' scenting potential.

  13. Transformation with TT8 and HB12 RNAi Constructs in Model Forage (Medicago sativa, Alfalfa) Affects Carbohydrate Structure and Metabolic Characteristics in Ruminant Livestock Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Zhang, Yonggen; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-11-04

    Lignin, a phenylpropanoid polymer present in secondary cell walls, has a negative impact on feed digestibility. TT8 and HB12 genes were shown to have low expression levels in low-lignin tissues of alfalfa, but to date, there has been no study on the effect of down-regulation of these two genes in alfalfa on nutrient chemical profiles and availability in ruminant livestock systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of transformation of alfalfa with TT8 and HB12 RNAi constructs on carbohydrate (CHO) structure and CHO nutritive value in ruminant livestock systems. The results showed that transformation with TT8 and HB12 RNAi constructs reduced rumen, rapidly degraded CHO fractions (RDCA4, P = 0.06; RDCB1, P < 0.01) and totally degraded CHO fraction (TRDCHO, P = 0.08). Both HB12 and TT8 populations had significantly higher in vitro digestibility of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) at 30 h of incubation (ivNDF30) compared to the control (P < 0.01). The TT8 populations had highest ivDM30 and ivNDF240. Transformation of alfalfa with TT8 and HB12 RNAi constructs induced molecular structure changes. Different CHO functional groups had different sensitivities and different responses to the transformation. The CHO molecular structure changes induced by the transformation were associated with predicted CHO availability. Compared with HB12 RNAi, transformation with TT8 RNAi could improve forage quality by increasing the availability of both NDF and DM. Further study is needed on the relationship between the transformation-induced structure changes at a molecular level and nutrient utilization in ruminant livestock systems when lignification is much higher.

  14. Forbidden Transitions in the Microwave Rotational Spectrum of the Tt Conformer of the N-Propanol Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazimova, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    A search for forbidden transitions was made in the microwave rotational spectrum of the Tt conformer of the propanol molecule (n-CH3CH2CH2OH) in the region of 37.0-78.0 GHz. The n-CH3CH2CH2OH molecule has a plane of symmetry containing μb and μa components of the dipole moment (μc = 0). On account of centrifugal distortion an induced component of the dipole moment μa, perpendicular to the symmetry plane of the molecule and leading to the appearance of previously forbidden rotational transitions, appears in such molecules. Forbidden "centrifugal transitions" of this type were found in the microwave rotational spectrum of the Tt conformer of the n-CH3CH2CH2OH molecule. The spectrum was analyzed by means of the Watson A-reduction rotational Hamiltonian. Sixty four forbidden μc transitions with rotational quantum numbers of up to J = 37 inclusive were identified.

  15. New Evaluation of T-T_{2000} from 0.02 K to 1 K by Independent Thermodynamic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engert, J.; Kirste, A.; Shibahara, A.; Casey, A.; Levitin, L. V.; Saunders, J.; Hahtela, O.; Kemppinen, A.; Mykkänen, E.; Prunnila, M.; Gunnarsson, D.; Roschier, L.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on the results achieved within the European Metrology Research Programme project "Implementing the new kelvin—InK" in the low-temperature range below 1 K. One of the main objectives of the InK project was the determination of new thermodynamic temperature data for comparison with the Provisional Low Temperature Scale 2000 (PLTS-2000), to provide reliable T-T_{2000} values. To this end, we have investigated three different types of primary thermometers: the current sensing noise thermometer, the primary magnetic field fluctuation thermometer and the Coulomb blockade thermometer. Based on a thorough investigation of the thermometers, detailed uncertainty budgets were established for the measurement of thermodynamic temperatures. Direct comparison measurements between all thermometers demonstrate the agreement of temperature measurements within less than 1 %. Our new T-T_{2000} data confirm the correctness of the PLTS-2000 in the temperature range from 20 mK up to about 700 mK with relative combined standard uncertainties better than 0.62 %.

  16. Population samples and genotyping technology.

    PubMed

    Mack, S J; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Single, R M; Meyer, D; Hill, J; Dron, H A; Jani, A J; Thomson, G; Erlich, H A

    2007-04-01

    The 14th International HLA (human leukocyte antigen) Immunogenetics Workshop (14th-IHIWS) Biostatistics and Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity project continues the population sampling, genotype data generation, and biostatistic analyses of the 13th International Histocompatibility Workshop Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity Component, with the overall goal of further characterizing global HLA allele and haplotype diversity and better describing the relationships between major histocompatibility complex diversity, geography, linguistics, and population history. Since the 13th Workshop, new investigators have and continue to be recruited to the project and new high-resolution class I and class II genotype data are being generated for 112 population samples from around the world.

  17. Genotype imputation via matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K.; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  18. Simian TT virus (s-TTV) infection in patients with liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Yoko; Aiba, Naoto; Tran, Huy Thien Tuan; Ding, Xin; Hayashi, Shigeki; Arakawa, Yasuyuki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Abe, Kenji

    2003-02-01

    Recently, we identified TTV isolates from nonhuman primates and named them simian TTV (s-TTV). To investigate the prevalence of s-TTV in humans, we examined sera from healthy individuals and patients with liver diseases in Japan for the presence of s-TTV DNA by PCR assay. s-TTV DNA was determined by nested PCR using s-TTV-specific primers designed from untranslated region of s-TTV genome. s-TTV DNA sequence was detected in three of 200 (1.5%) healthy adults but none of 48 infants without liver disease. On the other hand, s-TTV DNA was detected in 30 of 287 (10.5%) Japanese patients with liver disease. s-TTV coinfection with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus were present in 16.7 and 30% of these patients, respectively, while 53.3% of patients were positive for s-TTV alone. Nucleotide sequence analyses in 20 patients confirmed that these PCR products were derived from s-TTV genome sequences and nearly 85% identical to those of s-TTV prototypes from chimpanzees. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all s-TTV isolates from humans were distinguished clearly from the human TTV isolates. Furthermore, s-TTV in humans was classified into two different genotypes as well as simians. Our results indicate that generally 10.5% of Japanese patients with liver diseases were infected with s-TTV. The routes of s-TTV transmission from animal to human require clarification.

  19. Genotype networks in metabolic reaction spaces

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A metabolic genotype comprises all chemical reactions an organism can catalyze via enzymes encoded in its genome. A genotype is viable in a given environment if it is capable of producing all biomass components the organism needs to survive and reproduce. Previous work has focused on the properties of individual genotypes while little is known about how genome-scale metabolic networks with a given function can vary in their reaction content. Results We here characterize spaces of such genotypes. Specifically, we study metabolic genotypes whose phenotype is viability in minimal chemical environments that differ in their sole carbon sources. We show that regardless of the number of reactions in a metabolic genotype, the genotypes of a given phenotype typically form vast, connected, and unstructured sets -- genotype networks -- that nearly span the whole of genotype space. The robustness of metabolic phenotypes to random reaction removal in such spaces has a narrow distribution with a high mean. Different carbon sources differ in the number of metabolic genotypes in their genotype network; this number decreases as a genotype is required to be viable on increasing numbers of carbon sources, but much less than if metabolic reactions were used independently across different chemical environments. Conclusions Our work shows that phenotype-preserving genotype networks have generic organizational properties and that these properties are insensitive to the number of reactions in metabolic genotypes. PMID:20302636

  20. Transforming Microbial Genotyping: A Robotic Pipeline for Genotyping Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Vimalkumar; Murphy, Ronan A.; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of < €25 per strain. Since developing this pipeline, >200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost. PMID:23144721

  1. Meningococcal groups C and Y and haemophilus B tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT; MenHibrix(®)): a review.

    PubMed

    Perry, Caroline M

    2013-05-01

    The meningococcal groups C and Y and Haemophilus b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) contains Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C and Y capsular polysaccharide antigens, and Hib capsular polysaccharide [polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP)]. The HibMenCY-TT vaccine is available in the USA for use as active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by N. meningitidis serogroups C (MenC) and Y (MenY), and Hib in children 6 weeks-18 months of age. HibMenCY-TT is the first meningococcal vaccine available for use in the USA that can be administered to infants as young as 6 weeks of age. In a randomized, controlled, phase III clinical trial, the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, administered to infants at 2, 4, 6 and 12-15 months of age, was immunogenic against MenC and MenY, and met the prespecified criteria for immunogenicity. Anti-PRP antibodies, which have been shown to correlate with protection against Hib invasive disease, were also induced in the infants who received the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, with induced levels of this antibody noninferior to those occurring in the control group of infants who received a Hib tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine at 2, 4, and 6 months and a single dose of Hib conjugated to N. meningitidis outer membrane protein at 12-15 months. In several randomized, controlled clinical trials, HibMenCY-TT was coadministered with vaccines that are routinely administered to infants and toddlers in the USA. These vaccines included: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B (recombinant) and inactivated poliovirus vaccine combined; 7-valent Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide conjugate vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella vaccine; and varicella vaccine. Coadministration of these vaccines did not interfere with the immunogenicity of the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. Similarly, immune responses to the coadministered vaccines were not affected by the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. The tolerability profile of the HibMenCY-TT

  2. Vacuolar protein sorting protein 13A, TtVPS13A, localizes to the tetrahymena thermophila phagosome membrane and is required for efficient phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Haresha S; Cowan, Ann E; Klobutcher, Lawrence A

    2011-09-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting 13 (VPS13) proteins have been studied in a number of organisms, and mutations in VPS13 genes have been implicated in two human genetic disorders, but the function of these proteins is poorly understood. The TtVPS13A protein was previously identified in a mass spectrometry analysis of the Tetrahymena thermophila phagosome proteome (M. E. Jacobs et al., Eukaryot. Cell 5:1990-2000, 2006), suggesting that it is involved in phagocytosis. In this study, we analyzed the structure of the macronuclear TtVPS13A gene, which was found to be composed of 17 exons spanning 12.5 kb and was predicted to encode a protein of 3,475 amino acids (aa). A strain expressing a TtVPS13A-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was constructed, and the protein was found to associate with the phagosome membrane during the entire cycle of phagocytosis. In addition, Tetrahymena cells with a TtVPS13A knockout mutation displayed impaired phagocytosis. Specifically, they grew slowly under conditions where phagocytosis is essential, they formed few phagosomes, and the digestion of phagosomal contents was delayed compared to wild-type cells. Overall, these results provide evidence that the TtVPS13A protein is required for efficient phagocytosis.

  3. Gene silencing of BnTT10 family genes causes retarded pigmentation and lignin reduction in the seed coat of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Lu, Kun; Qu, Cunmin; Liang, Ying; Wang, Rui; Chai, Yourong; Li, Jiana

    2013-01-01

    Yellow-seed (i.e., yellow seed coat) is one of the most important agronomic traits of Brassica plants, which is correlated with seed oil and meal qualities. Previous studies on the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis and Brassica species, proposed that the seed-color trait is correlative to flavonoid and lignin biosynthesis, at the molecular level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the oxidative polymerization of flavonoid and biosynthesis of lignin has been demonstrated to be catalyzed by laccase 15, a functional enzyme encoded by the AtTT10 gene. In this study, eight Brassica TT10 genes (three from B. napus, three from B. rapa and two from B. oleracea) were isolated and their roles in flavonoid oxidation/polymerization and lignin biosynthesis were investigated. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, these genes could be divided into two groups with obvious structural and functional differentiation. Expression studies showed that Brassica TT10 genes are active in developing seeds, but with differential expression patterns in yellow- and black-seeded near-isogenic lines. For functional analyses, three black-seeded B. napus cultivars were chosen for transgenic studies. Transgenic B. napus plants expressing antisense TT10 constructs exhibited retarded pigmentation in the seed coat. Chemical composition analysis revealed increased levels of soluble proanthocyanidins, and decreased extractable lignin in the seed coats of these transgenic plants compared with that of the controls. These findings indicate a role for the Brassica TT10 genes in proanthocyanidin polymerization and lignin biosynthesis, as well as seed coat pigmentation in B. napus.

  4. Genotyping with TaqMAMA.

    PubMed

    Li, Baohui; Kadura, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Watson, David E

    2004-02-01

    TaqMAMA combines the quantitative strengths of TaqMan with the allele-specific PCR of MAMA. In this article we develop TaqMAMA as a technique for screening human DNA samples for known genetic polymorphisms. In the first set of experiments, plasmids that model all types of genetic polymorphisms were used to understand the relationship between TaqMAMA primer/template mismatches and their strength of allelic discrimination. These data can be used to improve allelic discrimination of other primer extension genotyping methodologies through directed use of nucleotide mismatches. We used the data to derive a guide for TaqMAMA primer design and DNA strand selection for TaqMAMA genotyping assays. The guide was then used to develop assays for 11 known and novel human genetic polymorphisms. Genotypes were assigned quickly and accurately in all cases. TaqMAMA genotyping assays require minimal development time, have a high probability of success, produce reliable data that are straightforward to analyze, and are very cost-competitive.

  5. [Population health surveillance of the general population living near Turin (Northern Italy) incinerator (SPoTT): methodology of the study].

    PubMed

    Bena, Antonella; Chiusolo, Monica; Orengia, Manuela; Cadum, Ennio; Farina, Elena; Musmeci, Loredana; Procopio, Enrico; Salamina, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Si intende qui descrivere il sistema di sorveglianza sugli effetti sulla salute (SpoTT) dell'inquinamento ambientale nelle aree circostanti l'inceneritore di Torino. SPoTT ha 3 linee di attività: 1. monitoraggio epidemiologico degli effetti a breve termine attraverso analisi temporali e misura della correlazione tra livelli giornalieri di emissioni dell'impianto e andamento degli eventi individuati dagli archivi dei dimessi (SDO), di pronto soccorso e di mortalità; sono coinvolti coloro che nel 2013-2018 risiedevano nell'area di ricaduta delle emissioni; 2. sorveglianza epidemiologica degli effetti a lungo termine, stimando tassi standardizzati di mortalità e morbosità; a ogni soggetto è attribuito il valore stimato di esposizione cumulato nel tempo caratteristico della residenza anagrafica; le informazioni sulla salute sono reperite dagli archivi SDO, di mortalità e dai certificati di assistenza al parto; sono studiati due decenni pre-post l'avvio dell'impianto: 2003-2012 e 2013-2022; 3. monitoraggio biologico con misurazione pre-post di metalli, PCDD/F, PCB, OH-IPA; sono coinvolti 196 residenti esposti e 196 di controllo di 35-69 anni, campionati a caso dalle anagrafi comunali; sono effettuate misure di funzionalità endocrina e respiratoria, pressione arteriosa, rischio cardiovascolare; l'esposizione cumulativa sarà stimata per ciascuna persona campionata integrando l'indirizzo di residenza, il tempo di permanenza in ciascun indirizzo e i dati ricavati dai modelli di ricaduta; sarà costituita una biobanca per future indagini di laboratorio; sono coinvolti anche 20 allevatori e i lavoratori dell'impianto. Una quarta linea di attività, non descritta in questo articolo, riguarda il monitoraggio della salute dei lavoratori addetti all'impianto. SPoTT è il primo studio in Italia su inceneritori e salute che adotta un disegno di studio longitudinale di adeguata potenza sia per i residenti sia per i lavoratori. I primi risultati sono attesi nel corso del 2016.

  6. Retreatment efficacy and predictors of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir to HCV genotype 1 in Japan.

    PubMed

    Akuta, Norio; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Fujiyama, Shunichiro; Kawamura, Yusuke; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Mariko; Saitoh, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Arase, Yasuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2017-02-01

    Predictors of treatment efficacy with ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir as direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimen for HCV infection are still unclear. Retreatment efficacy of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir for failures to prior DAA regimens, including NS5A inhibitors, are also unknown because resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in NS5A have been shown to persist up to the long-term of post-treatment. One hundred seventy-five patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection, without decompensated liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, were evaluated SVR12 by ledipasvir 90 mg plus sofosbuvir 400 mg once-daily for 12 weeks. Overall, SVR12 were 92%, based on intention to treat analysis. In failures to daclatasvir plus asunaprevir, SVR12 were 71%. The study using ultra-deep sequencing showed that ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir was effective to one case of failures to daclatasvir plus asunaprevir with multidrug RAVs (triple mutation in NS3-D168/NS5A-L31/NS5A-Y93). Multivariate analysis identified FIB4 index (<3.25), IL28B rs8099917 (TT type), and NS5A-L31 (Wild type) as significant determinants of SVR12. SVR12 rates in patients with three factors of poor response (RAVs Positive, IL28B non-TT, and FIB4 index ≥3.25) simultaneously were significantly lower than those of the other patients. Prediction of response to therapy based on combination of three predictors had high sensitivity and positive predictive values. In conclusions, this study indicated the favorable efficacy of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir for HCV genotype 1 infection, including multidrug RAVs in Japan. Treatment efficacy could be predicted by the combination of viral and host factors. J. Med. Virol. 89:284-290, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  8. A TET2 rs3733609 C/T genotype is associated with predisposition to the myeloproliferative neoplasms harboring JAK2V617F and confers a proliferative potential on erythroid lineages

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-hui; Sun, Nan-nan; Yin, Ya-fei; Liu, Su-fang; Liu, Xiao-liu; Peng, Hong-ling; Dai, Chong-wen; Xu, Yun-xiao; Deng, Ming-yang; Luo, Yun-ya; Zheng, Wen-li; Zhang, Guang-sen

    2016-01-01

    Common germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at JAK2 locus have been associated with Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). And, the germline sequence variant rs2736100 C in TERT is related to risk of MPN, suggesting a complex association between SNPs and the pathogenesis of MPN. Our previous study (unpublished data) showed that there was a high frequency distribution in rs3733609 C/T genotype at Ten-Eleven Translocation 2 (TET2) locus in one Chinese familial primary myelofibrosis. In the present study, we evaluate the role and clinical significance of rs3733609 C/T genotype in JAK2V617F-positive sporadic MPN (n = 181). TET2 rs3733609 C/T genotype had a higher incidence (13.81%; 25/181) in JAK2V617F-positive sporadic MPN patients than that in normal controls (n = 236) (6.35%; 15/236), which was predisposing to MPN (odds ratio(OR) = 2.361; P = 0.01). MPN patients with rs3733609 C/T genotype had increased leukocyte and platelets counts, elevated hemoglobin concentration in comparison with T/T genotype. Thrombotic events were more common in MPN patients with rs3733609 C/T than those with T/T genotype (P < 0.01). We confirmed that rs3733609 C/T genotype downregulated TET2 mRNA transcription, and the mechanism may be involved in a disruption of the interaction between CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPA) and TET2 rs3733609 C/T locus.TET2 rs3733609 C/T genotype stimulated the erythroid hematopoiesis in MPN patients. Altogether, we found a novel hereditary susceptible factor-TET2 rs3733609 C/T variant for the development of MPN, suggesting the variant may be partially responsible for the pathogenesis and accumulation of MPN. PMID:26843622

  9. Spin Correlation in tt¯ Production from pp¯ Collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Akimov, V.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bean, A.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, W.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Juste, A.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lu, J. G.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sculli, J.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, X. F.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Tarazi, J.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2000-07-01

    The D0 collaboration has performed a study of spin correlation in tt¯ production for the process tt¯-->bW+b¯W-, where the W bosons decay to eν or μν. A sample of six events was collected during an exposure of the D0 detector to an integrated luminosity of approximately 125 pb-1 of s = 1.8 TeV pp¯ collisions. The standard model (SM) predicts that the short lifetime of the top quark ensures the transmission of any spin information at production to the tt¯ decay products. The degree of spin correlation is characterized by a correlation coefficient κ. We find that κ>-0.25 at the 68% confidence level, in agreement with the SM prediction of κ = 0.88.

  10. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at s=7TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cerny, K.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Davids, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Riedl, C.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. 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Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Jo, H. Y.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. 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G.; Gallinaro, M.; Musella, P.; Pela, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Diez Pardos, C.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. 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A.; D'Enterria, D.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Nesvold, E.; Nguyen, M.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Spiropulu, M.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Chen, Z.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Aguilo, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Go, A.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. 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W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Miceli, T.; Nelson, R.; Pellett, D.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, A.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lueking, L.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Evdokimov, O.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Chung, K.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Lae, C. K.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Radicci, V.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Peterman, A.; Rossato, K.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Jindal, P.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-06-01

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(ℓνℓ)(τhντ)bb¯, (ℓ=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0fb-1 for the electron channel and 2.2fb-1 for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at s=7TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi)pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  11. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; ...

    2012-06-19

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(lνl)(τhντ)bb¯, (l=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb⁻¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb⁻¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  12. 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C polymorphisms: genotype frequency and association with homocysteine and folate levels in middle-southern Italian adults.

    PubMed

    Zappacosta, Bruno; Graziano, Mirella; Persichilli, Silvia; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo; Iacoviello, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Two genetic polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (C677T and A1298C) can influence the plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels, especially in the presence of an inadequate folate status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequencies of C677T and of A1298C MTHFR polymorphisms and their correlation with Hcy and serum folate concentrations in a population of blood donors living in a region of middle-southern Italy (the Molise Region). One hundred ninety seven blood donors were studied for total plasma Hcy, serum folate and C677T and A1298C MTHFR genotypes. The frequency of C677T genotypes was 20.8% (CC), 49.8% (CT) and 29.4% (TT); for the A1298C genotypes: 48.7% (AA), 43.7% (AC) and 7.6% (CC). Hcy and serum folate concentrations were significantly different among genotypes of the C677T polymorphism (CC versus CT versus TT: <0.0001 both for Hcy and folate), with Hcy values increasing, and serum folate decreasing, from CC to TT subjects. Regarding to A1298C polymorphism, the difference among genotypes (AA versus AC versus CC; p: 0.026 for Hcy and 0.014 for serum folate), showed an opposite trend for both parameters, with Hcy higher in the wild-type and lower in the homozygotes and serum folate higher in CC than in AA subjects. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of MTHFR allele associated with high level of Hcy and low levels of folate in an Italian southern population.

  13. Distribution of TT virus (TTV), TTV-like minivirus, and related viruses in humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Thom, K; Morrison, C; Lewis, J C M; Simmonds, P

    2003-02-15

    TT virus (TTV) and TTV-like minivirus (TLMV) are small DNA viruses with single-stranded, closed circular, antisense genomes infecting man. Despite their extreme sequence heterogeneity (>50%), a highly conserved region in the untranslated region (UTR) allows both viruses to be amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). TTV/TLMV infection was detected in 88 of 100 human plasma samples; amplified sequences were differentiated into TTV and TLMV by analysis of melting profiles, showing that both viruses were similarly prevalent. PCR with UTR primers also detected frequent infection with TTV/TLMV-related viruses in a wide range of apes (chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, gibbons) and African monkey species (mangabeys, drills, mandrills). These findings support the hypothesis for the co-evolution of TTV-like viruses with their hosts over the period of primate speciation, potentially analogous to the evolution of primate herpesviruses.

  14. Incidence and clinical implication of TT virus in patients with hepatitis and its frequency in blood donors in India

    PubMed Central

    Magu, S.K.; Kalghatgi, A.T.; Bhagat, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion Transmitted Virus (TTV), also known as Torque Teno Virus is a new novel viral agent which appears to correlate with some acute and chronic hepatitis cases and may produce liver damage under specific circumstances. Aim of this study was to detect TT virus by real-time PCR, study its clinical implications and effects of its co-infection in HBV and HCV chronic liver diseases. Methods The study population comprised 50 acute hepatitis, 50 chronic hepatitis patients and 100 voluntary blood donors. All samples were tested for serum bilirubin, AST, ALT and alkaline phosphatase levels and for all available viral markers for hepatitis. The detection of TT viral genome was carried out by real-time PCR using TTV sequences as reported by Takahashi et al with modifications on the basis of database of the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank (GenBank accession no. AB008394). Result Serum was positive for TTV in 72% of volunteer blood donors, 77.4% (24/31) of hepatitis A cases, 87.6% (36/41) of HBV-positive, 77% (10/13) of HCV-positive, and 92.8% (13/14) of non-B, non-C cases. Co-infection of TTV with other hepatitis viruses was detected in some patients. Conclusion TTV is a frequent virus detected in patients with various types of viral hepatitis, in cases of hepatitis without obvious viral agent, and from the healthy population in India. Rate of TTV was found to be significantly higher (92.8%) for Non A–E hepatitis group. PMID:26663961

  15. The epidemiology of TT virus (TTV) infection in a hepatitis C and B virus hyperendemic area of southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Dai, C Y; Yu, M L; Chuang, W L; Lu, S N; Wang, J H; Huang, J F; Hou, C; Chen, S C; Lin, Z Y; Hsieh, M Y; Wang, L Y; Tsai, J F; Chang, W Y

    2000-10-01

    TT virus (TTV) is a newly isolated DNA virus from the serum of a patient with posttransfusion hepatitis of unknown etiology in 1997. To evaluate the clinical and molecular characteristics of TT virus (TTV) in a hepatitis C virus (HCV) and B (HBV) hyperendemic area (Masago), 200 residents were enrolled in the study. The sera were tested for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), HCV RNA and GB virus C/Hepatitis G virus (HGV) RNA, TTV DNA, HBsAg, anti-HCV and antibodies to HGV E2-protein (anti-E2). TTV DNA was positive in 99 of the 200 sera with a prevalence rate of 49.5%. The prevalence of HBsAg, anti-HCV, HCV RNA, HGV RNA, anti-E2 and HGV exposure (defined as positive for serum HGV RNA and/or anti-E2) was 38.9%, 69.5%, 64.5%, 17.0%, 25.5% and 39.5%, respectively. Neither clinical nor virological factors were associated with TTV viremia. The rate of ALT abnormality was significantly elevated in HCV RNA-positive (34.9%) than -negative (7.0%) residents (p < 0.001). HCV viremia was the only factor significantly associated with ALT elevation by multiple logistic regression (odds ratio: 6.96; 95% C.I.: 2.60-18.7). We concluded that in this HCV/HBV hyperendemic area, the prevalence of TTV DNA was high. No significant clinical factor was observed to be associated with TTV infection. TTV infection is not related to abnormal ALT levels and ALT abnormality was mainly attributable to HCV but not TTV, HBV or HGV infection.

  16. Invasive genotypes are opportunistic specialists not general purpose genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Drown, Devin M; Levri, Edward P; Dybdahl, Mark F

    2011-01-01

    It is not clear which forms of plasticity in fitness-related traits are associated with invasive species. On one hand, it may be better to have a robust performance across environments. On the other, it may be beneficial to take advantage of limited favorable conditions. We chose to study a worldwide invasive species, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, and compare the plasticity of life-history traits of a sample of invasive genotypes to a sample of ancestral-range genotypes. We examined the responses to salinity in this freshwater snail because it varies spatially and temporally in the introduced range and contributes to variation in fitness in our system. We used a recently developed statistical method that quantifies aspects of differences in the shape among reaction norms. We found that the invasive lineages survived and reproduced with an increased probability at the higher salinities, and were superior to ancestral-range lineages in only two traits related to reproduction. Moreover, we found that in terms of traits related to growth, the invasive lineages have a performance optimum that is shifted to higher salinities than the ancestral-range lineages as well as having a narrower niche breadth. Contrary to the prediction of the general purpose genotype hypothesis, we found that invasive lineages tended to be opportunistic specialists. PMID:25567958

  17. Allelic and genotype frequencies of catechol-O-methyltransferase (Val158Met) and CYP2D6*10 (Pro34Ser) single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Baclig, Michael O; Predicala, Rey Z; Mapua, Cynthia A; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky P; Daroy, Maria Luisa G; Natividad, Filipinas F; Javier, Francis O

    2012-01-01

    A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the allelic and genotype frequencies in the genes encoding for catechol-O-methyltransferase and CYP2D6*10 among healthy volunteers and patients clinically diagnosed with cancer pain. PCR-RFLP was used to identify COMT and CYP2D6*10 genotypes. Allelic frequencies among healthy volunteer Filipinos were 0.83 and 0.17 for the COMT Val and COMT Met alleles, respectively. Calculated frequencies in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were 73% for COMT Val/Val, 26% for COMT Val/Met, and 1% for COMT Met/Met genotype. For CYP2D6*10, allelic frequencies in HWE among volunteers were 0.46 for the C allele and 0.54 for the T allele. Twenty percent were identified as homozygous for the wild-type C/C genotype, 56% were identified as heterozygous for the C/T genotype, and 24% were identified as homozygous for the T/T variant genotype. No significant differences in COMT and CYP2D6*10 allele frequencies between cancer patients and healthy volunteers were noted. Our data demonstrated that the allele frequencies of COMT and CYP2D6*10 in the Filipino healthy volunteers were similar with other Asians but markedly different from Caucasian populations. PMID:22724048

  18. Allelic and genotype frequencies of catechol-O-methyltransferase (Val158Met) and CYP2D6*10 (Pro34Ser) single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Baclig, Michael O; Predicala, Rey Z; Mapua, Cynthia A; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky P; Daroy, Maria Luisa G; Natividad, Filipinas F; Javier, Francis O

    2012-01-01

    A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the allelic and genotype frequencies in the genes encoding for catechol-O-methyltransferase and CYP2D6*10 among healthy volunteers and patients clinically diagnosed with cancer pain. PCR-RFLP was used to identify COMT and CYP2D6*10 genotypes. Allelic frequencies among healthy volunteer Filipinos were 0.83 and 0.17 for the COMT Val and COMT Met alleles, respectively. Calculated frequencies in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were 73% for COMT Val/Val, 26% for COMT Val/Met, and 1% for COMT Met/Met genotype. For CYP2D6*10, allelic frequencies in HWE among volunteers were 0.46 for the C allele and 0.54 for the T allele. Twenty percent were identified as homozygous for the wild-type C/C genotype, 56% were identified as heterozygous for the C/T genotype, and 24% were identified as homozygous for the T/T variant genotype. No significant differences in COMT and CYP2D6*10 allele frequencies between cancer patients and healthy volunteers were noted. Our data demonstrated that the allele frequencies of COMT and CYP2D6*10 in the Filipino healthy volunteers were similar with other Asians but markedly different from Caucasian populations.

  19. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-08-05

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability.

  20. Evaluation of rep-PCR/DiversiLab versus PFGE and spa typing in genotyping methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Aguadero, V; González Velasco, C; Vindel, A; Gonzalez Velasco, M; Moreno, J J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the 'gold standard' for genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); however, the DiversiLab (DL) system, based on rep-PCR, is faster, simpler and could be better adapted to daily routine hospital work. We genotyped 100 MRSA isolates using PFGE, DL, and spa typing, and evaluated the discriminatory power of each technique and the correlation between them by Simpson's index(SI) and adjusted Rand coefficient (ARI), respectively. The isolates were from clinical samples from eight hospitals in Extremadura (Spain) during 2010. DL separated the 100 MRSA into 18 patterns, with 69% of the isolates grouped into four predominant patterns. spa typing reported 17 spa types, classifying 69% of MRSA into two major types (t067 and t002). PFGE revealed the existence of 27 patterns, gathering 54% of MRSA into three pulse types (E8a, E7a and E7b). SI values were 0.819, 0.726, 0.887 and 0.460 for DL, spa typing, PFGE and CC-BURP, respectively. ARI values of DL over PFGE, spa typing and CC-BURP were 0.151, 0.321 and 0.071, respectively. DL has less discriminatory power than PFGE but more than spa typing. The concordance of DL with PFGE is low, primarily because DL does not discriminate between the three predominant MRSA pulse types in our environment.

  1. Endothelin Type A Receptor Genotype is a Determinant of Quantitative Traits of Metabolic Syndrome in Asian Hypertensive Families: A SAPPHIRe Study

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Low-Tone; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Ting, Chih-Tai; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Masaki, Kamal; Grove, John; Quertermous, Thomas; Juan, Chi-Chung; Lin, Ming-Wei; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Chen, Yii-Der I.

    2013-01-01

    Co-heritability of hypertension and insulin resistance (IR) within families not only implies genetic susceptibility may be responsible for these complex traits but also suggests a rational that biological candidate genes for hypertension may serve as markers for features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Thus we determined whether the T323C polymorphism (rs5333) of endothelin type A (ETA) receptor, a predominant receptor evoking potent vasoconstrictive action of endothelin-1, contributes to susceptibility to IR-associated hypertension in 1694 subjects of Chinese and Japanese origins. Blood pressures (BPs) and biochemistries were measured. Fasting insulin level, insulin-resistance homeostasis model assessment (HOMAIR) score, and area under curve of insulin concentration (AUCINS) were selected for assessing insulin sensitivity. Genotypes were obtained by methods of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Foremost findings were that minor allele frequency of the T323C polymorphism was noticeable lower in our overall Asian subjects compared to multi-national population reported in gene database; moreover both the genotypic and allelic frequencies of the polymorphism were significantly different between the two ethnic groups we studied. The genotype distributions at TT/TC/CC were 65, 31, 4% in Chinese and 51, 41, 8% in Japanese, respectively (p < 0.0001). Additionally, carriers of the C homozygote revealed characteristics of IR, namely significantly higher levels of fasting insulin, HOMAIR score, and AUCINS at 29.3, 35.3, and 39.3%, respectively, when compared to their counterparts with TT/TC genotypes in Chinese. Meanwhile, the CC genotype was associated with a higher level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol in Japanese. No association of the polymorphism with BP was observed. This study demonstrated for the first time that T323C polymorphism of ETA receptor gene was associated with an adverse insulin response in Chinese and a

  2. Association of IL28B Polymorphisms With the Response to Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin Combined Therapy in Polish Patients Infected With HCV Genotype 1 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawlowska, Magorzata; Tretyn, Andrzej; Halota, Waldemar; Tyczyno, Magorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Dybowska, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Background Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near interleukin-28B (IL-28B) gene were shown to be highly associated with treatment response (SVR) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. There is limited data about the role of single and combined IL-28B polymorphisms in HCV-infected Polish population. Objectives This study's aim was to determine predictability of three IL-28B gene polymorphisms and other known prognostic factors on the treatment response in HCV genotype 1 and 4 infected Polish patients. The effect of IL-28B polymorphisms on therapy was also compared with other known prognostic factors. Patients and Methods We genotyped IL-28B polymorphisms (rs12979860, rs12980275 and rs8099917) by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay in a group of 293 patients from which a selected cohort of 174 treatment-naiev patients underwent treatment. Results We showed that rs12979860 CC [odds ratio (OR) = 4.6, P < 0.001], rs12980275 AA (OR = 2.9, P = 0.002) and rs8099917 TT (OR = 2.2, P = 0.016) genotypes were associated with successful treatment compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT, rs12980275 AG-GG and rs8099917 TG-GG, respectively. Patients bearing of IL-28B profile including the three favourable genotypes do not have much chance of a recovery (OR = 3.4, P = 0.002). Except for IL-28B polymorphisms, there was no association of SVR with any other pretreatment clinical data in analyzed group. The correlation of SNPs with other host and viral factors revealed association of favorable genotypes of IL-28B markers with high levels of alanine aminotransferase and baseline HCV viral load. Conclusions IL-28B polymorphisms were the strongest pretreatment predictors of response to pegylated interferon and ribavirin in Polish patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 and 4. This study confirm the strongest impact of IL-28B rs12979860 on SVR, nevertheless rs12980275 AA seems to be more important than rs8099917

  3. Interleukin-28B rs12979860 C allele: Protective against advanced fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Matthew T; George, Jacob; Dore, Gregory J; Leung, Reynold; Button, Peter; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Grawford, Darrell H G; Siebert, William; Weltman, Martin D; Cheng, Wendy S C; Roberts, Stuart K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: While genetic polymorphisms upstream of the interleukin-28B(IL28B) gene are associated with necroinflammatory activity grade in chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection, any association with fibrosis is less definitive. Pretreatment liver biopsies in a cohort of treatment-naïve patients with HCV-1 were analyzed to evaluate associations between liver histology, and the rs12979860 and rs8099917 IL28B single nucleotide polymorphisms.Methods: Two hundred sixty-six patients with HCV-1 infection and pretreatment liver biopsy were tested for the rs12979860 and rs8099917 single nucleotide polymorphisms.Predictors of advanced fibrosis (METAVIR F3/4) and high activity grade (A2/3) were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis.Results: Forty-four patients (16.5%) had advanced fibrosis and 141 patients (53.0%) high activity grade. Prevalence of rs12979860 IL28B genotype was: CC 45.7%, CT 42.7%, and TT 11.6%. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis was lower in those with IL28B CC genotype compared with those without (11.0% vs 21.3%; P = 0.03), with an increasing number of Talleles associated with a higher frequency of advanced fibrosis: CC 11.0%, CT 18.0%, TT33.3% (P = 0.01). Predictors of advanced fibrosis on multivariate analysis were platelet count (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97–0.99; P < 0.0001), high activity grade (OR 5.68, 95% CI% 1.86–17.32; P = 0.002), IL28B rs12979860 CC genotype(OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.14–0.93; P = 0.03), and aspartate aminotransferase (OR 1.02,95% CI 1.00–1.03; P = 0.046). No association was found between rs8099917 IL28B genotype and liver histology.Conclusions: IL28B rs12979860 CC genotype appears to be independently associated with a lower prevalence of advanced fibrosis stage in HCV-1 infection. This association warrants further evaluation.

  4. Association between dietary intake of folate and MTHFR and MTR genotype with risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    He, J M; Pu, Y D; Wu, Y J; Qin, R; Zhang, Q J; Sun, Y S; Zheng, W W; Chen, L P

    2014-10-31

    We investigated the association between dietary intake of folate, vitamin B6, and the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype with breast cancer. A matched case-control study was conducted, and 413 patients with newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed breast cancer and 436 controls were recruited. Folate intake, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 levels were calculated, and the MTHFR C677T and A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Breast cancer cases were generally older, older at first live birth, and younger at menarche, had a higher body mass index, were smokers, had higher energy intake, and more first-degree relatives with breast cancer as well as more live births compared to controls. With respect to energy intake, we found that higher energy intake were more likely to increase the risk of breast cancer. The MTHFR 667TT genotype was associated with a moderately increased risk of breast cancer when compared with the CC genotype, and a significant odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval, CI) was found (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.06-2.73). Individuals carrying T allele were associated with higher risk of breast cancer when compared with C allele (OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.06-1.70). We did not find a significant effect of the MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G on the risk of breast cancer. We did not find any association between folate intake and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms. In conclusion, we found that the MTHFR C667T polymorphism is associated with the risk of breast cancer, indicating that this genotype plays a role in breast cancer development.

  5. Silencing of BnTT1 family genes affects seed flavonoid biosynthesis and alters seed fatty acid composition in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jianping; Lu, Xiaochun; Yin, Nengwen; Ma, Lijuan; Lu, Jing; Liu, Xue; Li, Jiana; Lu, Jun; Lei, Bo; Wang, Rui; Chai, Yourong

    2017-01-01

    TRANSPARENT TESTA1 (TT1) is a zinc finger protein that contains a WIP domain. It plays important roles in controlling differentiation and pigmentation of the seed coat endothelium, and can affect the expression of early biosynthetic genes and late biosynthetic genes of flavonoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Brassica napus (AACC, 2n=38), the functions of BnTT1 genes remain unknown and few studies have focused on their roles in fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis. In this study, BnTT1 family genes were silenced by RNA interference, which resulted in yellow rapeseed, abnormal testa development (a much thinner testa), decreased seed weight, and altered seed FA composition in B. napus. High-throughput sequencing of genes differentially expressed between developing transgenic B. napus and wild-type seeds revealed altered expression of numerous genes involved in flavonoid and FA biosynthesis. As a consequence of this altered expression, we detected a marked decrease of oleic acid (C18:1) and notable increases of linoleic acid (C18:2) and α-linolenic acid (C18:3) in mature transgenic B. napus seeds by gas chromatography and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Meanwhile, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed reduced accumulation of flavonoids in transgenic seeds. Therefore, we propose that BnTT1s are involved in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis, and may also play a role in FA biosynthesis in B. napus.

  6. Discovery and characterization of RecA protein of thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 that increases specificity of a PCR-based DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Aleksandra; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Plotka, Magdalena; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2014-07-20

    The recA gene of newly discovered Thermus thermophilus MAT72 phage Tt72 (Myoviridae) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The 1020-bp gene codes for a 339-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 38,155 which shows 38.7% positional identity to the E. coli RecA protein. When expressed in E. coli, the Tt72 recA gene did not confer the ability to complement the ultraviolet light (254nm) sensitivity of an E. coli recA mutant. Tt72 RecA protein has been purified with good yield to catalytic and electrophoretic homogeneity using a three-step chromatography procedure. Biochemical characterization indicated that the protein can pair and promote ATP-dependent strand exchange reaction resulting in formation of a heteroduplex DNA at 60°C under conditions otherwise optimal for E. coli RecA. When the Tt72 RecA protein was included in a standard PCR-based DNA amplification reaction, the specificity of the PCR assays was significantly improved by eliminating non-specific products.

  7. Characterization of a Wheat Breeders' Array suitable for high-throughput SNP genotyping of global accessions of hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Allen, Alexandra M; Winfield, Mark O; Burridge, Amanda J; Downie, Rowena C; Benbow, Harriet R; Barker, Gary L A; Wilkinson, Paul A; Coghill, Jane; Waterfall, Christy; Davassi, Alessandro; Scopes, Geoff; Pirani, Ali; Webster, Teresa; Brew, Fiona; Bloor, Claire; Griffiths, Simon; Bentley, Alison R; Alda, Mark; Jack, Peter; Phillips, Andrew L; Edwards, Keith J

    2017-03-01

    Targeted selection and inbreeding have resulted in a lack of genetic diversity in elite hexaploid bread wheat accessions. Reduced diversity can be a limiting factor in the breeding of high yielding varieties and crucially can mean reduced resilience in the face of changing climate and resource pressures. Recent technological advances have enabled the development of molecular markers for use in the assessment and utilization of genetic diversity in hexaploid wheat. Starting with a large collection of 819 571 previously characterized wheat markers, here we describe the identification of 35 143 single nucleotide polymorphism-based markers, which are highly suited to the genotyping of elite hexaploid wheat accessions. To assess their suitability, the markers have been validated using a commercial high-density Affymetrix Axiom(®) genotyping array (the Wheat Breeders' Array), in a high-throughput 384 microplate configuration, to characterize a diverse global collection of wheat accessions including landraces and elite lines derived from commercial breeding communities. We demonstrate that the Wheat Breeders' Array is also suitable for generating high-density genetic maps of previously uncharacterized populations and for characterizing novel genetic diversity produced by mutagenesis. To facilitate the use of the array by the wheat community, the markers, the associated sequence and the genotype information have been made available through the interactive web site 'CerealsDB'.

  8. Human Infant Memory B Cell and CD4+ T Cell Responses to HibMenCY-TT Glyco-Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fuery, Angela; Richmond, Peter C.; Currie, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Carrier-specific T cell and polysaccharide-specific B cell memory responses are not well characterised in infants following glyco-conjugate vaccination. We aimed to determine if the number of Meningococcal (Men) C- and Y- specific memory B cells and; number and quality of Tetanus Toxoid (TT) carrier-specific memory CD4+ T cells are associated with polysaccharide-specific IgG post HibMenCY-TT vaccination. Healthy infants received HibMenCY-TT vaccine at 2, 4 and 6 months with a booster at 12 months. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and polysaccharide-specific memory B cells enumerated using ELISpot. TT-specific memory CD4+ T cells were detected and phenotyped based on CD154 expression and intracellular TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ expression following stimulation. Functional polysaccharide-specific IgG titres were measured using the serum bactericidal activity (SBA) assay. Polysaccharide-specific Men C- but not Men Y- specific memory B cell frequencies pre-boost (12 months) were significantly associated with post-boost (13 months) SBA titres. Regression analysis showed no association between memory B cell frequencies post-priming (at 6 or 7 months) and SBA at 12 months or 13 months. TT-specific CD4+ T cells were detected at frequencies between 0.001 and 0.112 as a percentage of CD3+ T cells, but their numbers were not associated with SBA titres. There were significant negative associations between SBA titres at M13 and cytokine expression at M7 and M12. Conclusion: Induction of persistent polysaccharide-specific memory B cells prior to boosting is an important determinant of secondary IgG responses in infants. However, polysaccharide-specific functional IgG responses appear to be independent of the number and quality of circulating carrier-specific CD4+ T cells after priming. PMID:26191794

  9. HBV genotype F: natural history and treatment.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Sebastián; Galdame, Omar A; Gadano, Adrián C

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the HBV genome revealed the existence of 10 genotypes, named A-J. Evidence of the influence of the different genotypes in the natural history and treatment response to nucleoside/nucleotide analogues or interferon-based regimens is scant. HBV genotype F is one of the most prevalent circulating genotypes in South America and the Arctic Circle. Since most of the available information on HBV is from Asia, the US and Europe, it reflects their predominant genotypes: A, B, C and D. To date, the evidence is not fully confirmed, but it appears that genotype F chronic hepatitis B is associated with a more aggressive course of liver disease, reflected by higher histological indexes, a higher risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma and a higher rate of liver-related mortality. In terms of treatment response, the available data is, unfortunately, even more limited; however, what data is available suggests acceptable and similar response rates to pegylated interferon-α2a in genotype F compared to genotype A. Response rates to nucleoside/nucleotide analogues is not influenced by genotype. The review of this limited data sheds light on the necessity to conduct further studies in South America and the Arctic Circle in order to better understand the different aspects of HBV genotype F, especially in relation to treatment response.

  10. Association of IL28B rs8099917 genotype and female sex with spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus infection: a Japanese cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ikezaki, Hiroaki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Hiramine, Satoshi; Ura, Kazuya; Mitsumoto-Kaseida, Fujiko; Takayama, Koji; Shimizu, Motohiro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Eiichi; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Murata, Masayuki; Hayashi, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious global health problem. Previous studies have suggested that the interleukin 28B (IL28B) rs8099917 genotype is related to spontaneous clearance of HCV in Caucasian populations. Our objective was to investigate the association of the IL28B rs8099917 genotype with spontaneous clearance of HCV by community-dwelling Japanese. A cross-sectional community-based population study of 993 Japanese residents was conducted. Based on anti-HCV antibody and HCV RNA levels, 50 subjects were assigned to the spontaneous-clearance group, 155 to the chronic-infection group, and 788 to the control group. Logistic regression analysis was done to examine the roles of the IL28B rs8099917 genotype and sex. To analyze the interactions between these factors, an "IL28B rs809991 genotype × sex" interaction term was included in the multivariate analysis. Significantly more subjects in the spontaneous-clearance group than in the chronic-infection group had the favorable IL28B rs8099917 genotype and were female. Multivariate logistic regression analysis extracted the favorable IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype (odds ratio [OR] 9.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.16-40.83, P = 0.003) and female sex (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.16-4.45, P = 0.017) as factors contributing to the spontaneous clearance of HCV. No significant interaction was found between the IL28B rs8099917 genotype and sex (P for interaction = 0.428). Both the favorable IL28B rs8099917 genotype and female sex were associated with the spontaneous clearance of HCV in this Japanese population.

  11. Evaluation of the modifying effects of unfavourable genotypes on classical clinical risk factors for ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Szolnoki, Z; Somogyvari, F; Kondacs, A; Szabo, M; Fodor, L; Bene, J; Melegh, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Ischaemic stroke is a frequent heterogeneous multifactorial disease that is affected by a number of genetic mutations and environmental factors. We hypothesised the clinical importance of the interactions between common, unfavourable genetic mutations and clinical risk factors in the development of ischaemic stroke. Methods: The Factor V Leiden G1691A (Leiden V), the prothrombin G20210A, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR C677T) mutations, the angiotensin converting enzyme I/D (ACE I/D), and apolipoprotein allele e4 (APO e4) genotypes were examined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in 867 ischaemic stroke patients and 743 healthy controls. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the roles of the co-occurrences of the clinical risk factors and common genetic mutations in ischaemic stroke. Results: The Leiden V mutation in combination with hypertension or diabetes mellitus increased the risk of ischaemic stroke. We found synergistic effects between the ACE D/D and MTHFR 677TT genotypes and drinking or smoking. The presence of the APO e4 greatly facilitated the unfavourable effects of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, or drinking on the incidence of ischaemic stroke. Conclusion: In certain combinations, pairing of common unfavourable genetic factors, which alone confer only minor or non-significant risk, with clinical risk factors can greatly increase the susceptibility to ischaemic stroke. PMID:14638877

  12. Improved performance of polymer solar cells using PBDTT-F-TT:PC71BM blend film as active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Yue; Gao, Xiumin; Lu, Xinmiao; Xin, Qing; Lin, Jun; Zhao, Jufeng

    2016-07-01

    A detailed study of high-efficiency polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on a low bandgap polymer PBDTT-F-TT and PC71BM as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. By using 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) as solvent additive to control the morphology of active layer and comparing different device architecture to optimize the optical field distribution, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the resulted devices can be reached as high as 9.34%. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of DIO and device geometry on photovoltaic performance. It was found that the addition of DIO can significantly improve the nanoscale morphology and increased electron mobility in the BHJ layer. The inverted device architecture was chosen because the results from optical modeling shows that it offers better optical field distribution and exciton generation profile. Based on these results, a low-temperature processed ZnO was finally introduced as an electron transport layer to facility the fabrication on flexible substrates and showed comparable performance with the device based on conventional ZnO interlayer prepared by sol-gel process.

  13. Effects of dissolved hydrogen on general corrosion behavior and oxide films of alloy 690TT in PWR primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Lee, Eun-Hee; Hur, Do Haeng

    2017-03-01

    The effect of dissolved hydrogen (DH) on the general corrosion behavior and oxide films of Alloy 690TT is investigated in simulated primary water at 330 °C. With increasing DH, the structure of oxide film significantly changed and the corrosion rate decreased. At DH = 5 cm3/kg H2O, the oxide layer was thick, and consisted of outer Ni oxide layer and inner Cr2O3 layer. Under the conditions of DH = 35 and 100 cm3/kg H2O, the oxide films grew thinner and composed of outer polyhedral spinel oxide particles such as NiCr2O4 or NiCrFeO4 and an intermediate metallic Ni-rich layer, with inner Cr2O3 layer. The general corrosion rate significantly decreased by about 72% as DH concentration increased from 5 to 35 cm3/kg H2O. In the range of 35-65 cm3/kg H2O, the corrosion rate slightly decreased with increasing DH concentration. However, no further changes were observed in the range of 65-100 cm3/kg H2O.

  14. A revised chronology for the Grotte Vaufrey (Dordogne, France) based on TT-OSL dating of sedimentary quartz.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Marion; Mercier, Norbert; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Texier, Jean-Pierre; Delpech, Françoise

    2014-10-01

    Grotte Vaufrey, located in the Dordogne region of southwestern France, is well known for its substantial archaeological sequence containing a succession of Acheulean and Mousterian occupations. While over the last thirty years numerous studies have attempted to outline a detailed chronostratigraphy for this important sequence, the failure to employ a common chronological framework has complicated its interpretation. Here, we aim to resolve these inconsistencies by providing a new chronology for the site based on luminescence dating. To this end, thermally-transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dates were obtained from eight sediment samples distributed throughout the sequence, which, when combined with already available chronological information, produce a new chronostratigraphic model for the site. Our results demonstrate that the Typical Mousterian extends from MIS 7 to MIS 5, while the earliest Acheulean occupation could be associated with MIS 8 and may date to as early as MIS 10. When compared with other regional sequences, the Acheulean levels from the Grotte Vaufrey provide evidence for one of the earliest hominin occupations in southwestern France.

  15. TT virus (TTV) loads associated with different peripheral blood cell types and evidence for TTV replication in activated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Maggi, F; Fornai, C; Zaccaro, L; Morrica, A; Vatteroni, M L; Isola, P; Marchi, S; Ricchiuti, A; Pistello, M; Bendinelli, M

    2001-06-01

    TT virus (TTV) loads associated with the peripheral blood cells of seven patients known to carry the virus in plasma were investigated by real-time PCR. Whereas red cells/platelets were uniformly negative, six and four patients yielded positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, respectively, but viral titres were generally low. Fractionation of PBMCs into monocyte- and B, T4, and T8 lymphocyte-enriched subpopulations showed no pattern in the viral loads that might suggest the preferential association of TTV to one or more specific cell types. TTV-negative PBMCs absorbed measurable amounts of virus when incubated with infected plasma at 4 degrees C. Furthermore, cultures of TTV-negative phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated PBMCs exposed in vitro to virus-positive plasma and faecal extracts released considerable levels of infectious TTV into the supernatant fluid and the same was true for TTV-positive stimulated PBMCs. These results indicate that, whereas freshly harvested resting PBMCs seem to produce little, if any TTV, stimulated PBMCs actively replicate the virus.

  16. A search for resonant production of tt pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp collision data at √s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt pairs. A benchmark modelmore » of leptophobic Z' → tt is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  17. Correlation between Genetic Variations and Serum Level of Interleukin 28B with Virus Genotypes and Disease Progression in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Al-Anazi, Mashael; Abdo, Ayman A.; Sanai, Faisal M.; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alswat, Khalid A.; Al-Ashgar, Hamad I.; Khan, Mohammed Q.; Khalaf, Nisreen; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that polymorphisms near the interleukin-28B (IL-28B) gene could predict the response to Peg-IFN-a/RBV combination therapy in HCV-infected patients. The aim of the study was to correlate the serum level of IL28B in HCV-infected patients with virus genotype/subgenotype and disease progression. IL28B serum level was detected and variations at five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL28B gene region were genotyped and analyzed. The variation of IL28B genetic polymorphisms was found to be strongly associated with HCV infection when healthy control group was compared to HCV-infected patients with all P values <0.0001. Functional analysis revealed that subjects carrying rs8099917-GG genotype had higher serum level of IL28B than those with GT or TT genotypes (P = 0.04). Also, patients who were presented with cirrhosis (Cirr) only or with cirrhosis plus hepatocellular carcinoma (Cirr+HCC) had higher levels of serum IL28B when compared to chronic HCV-infected patients (P = 0.005 and 0.003, resp.). No significant association was found when serum levels of IL28B were compared to virus genotypes/subgenotypes. This study indicates that variation at SNP rs8099917 could predict the serum levels of IL28B in HCV-infected patients. Furthermore, IL28B serum level may serve as a useful marker for the development of HCV-associated sequelae. PMID:25811035

  18. Prospective Universal Application of Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Genotyping To Characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates for Fast Identification of Clustered and Orphan Cases▿

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Rodriguez, Noelia; Martínez-Lirola, Miguel; Sánchez, M. Luisa; Herranz, Marta; Peñafiel, Teresa; Bonillo, Magdalena del Carmen; Gonzalez-Rivera, Milagros; Martínez, Juan; Cabezas, Teresa; Diez-García, Luis Felipe; Bouza, Emilio; García de Viedma, Darío

    2009-01-01

    The use of molecular tools for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in epidemiological surveys in order to identify clustered and orphan strains requires faster response times than those offered by the reference method, IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping. A method based on PCR, the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) genotyping technique, is an option for fast fingerprinting of M. tuberculosis, although precise evaluations of correlation between MIRU-VNTR and RFLP findings in population-based studies in different contexts are required before the methods are switched. In this study, we evaluated MIRU-VNTR genotyping (with a set of 15 loci [MIRU-15]) in parallel to RFLP genotyping in a 39-month universal population-based study in a challenging setting with a high proportion of immigrants. For 81.9% (281/343) of the M. tuberculosis isolates, both RFLP and MIRU-VNTR types were obtained. The percentages of clustered cases were 39.9% (112/281) and 43.1% (121/281) for RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, and the numbers of clusters identified were 42 and 45, respectively. For 85.4% of the cases, the RFLP and MIRU-15 results were concordant, identifying the same cases as clustered and orphan (kappa, 0.7). However, for the remaining 14.6% of the cases, discrepancies were observed: 16 of the cases clustered by RFLP analysis were identified as orphan by MIRU-15 analysis, and 25 cases identified as orphan by RFLP analysis were clustered by MIRU-15 analysis. When discrepant cases showing subtle genotypic differences were tolerated, the discrepancies fell from 14.6% to 8.6%. Epidemiological links were found for 83.8% of the cases clustered by both RFLP and MIRU-15 analyses, whereas for the cases clustered by RFLP or MIRU-VNTR analysis alone, links were identified for only 30.8% or 38.9% of the cases, respectively. The latter group of cases mainly comprised isolates that could also have been clustered

  19. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  20. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  1. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  2. Coxiella burnetii Genotypes in Iberian Wildlife.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, David; Hagen, Ferry; Tilburg, Jeroen J H C; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    To investigate if Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, genotypes circulating in wildlife are associated with those infecting livestock and humans, multiple-locus variable number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA-6-marker) was carried out over C. burnetii obtained from red deer (Cervus elaphus), Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), black rat (Rattus rattus), and wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus). MLVA typing was performed by using six variable loci in C. burnetii: Ms23, Ms24, Ms27, Ms28, Ms33, and Ms34. The C. burnetii cooperative database from MLVABank 5.0 was employed to compare genotypes found in this study with 344 isolates of diverse origin. Twenty-two genotypes from wildlife and two genotypes from domestic goats were identified. Some MLVA genotypes identified in wildlife or in farmed game clustered with genotypes of human Q fever clinical cases, supporting the idea that humans and wildlife share C. burnetii genotypes. The major part of genotypes identified in coexisting red deer and rabbits clustered according to their host of origin, suggesting host specificity for particular C. burnetii genotypes. These findings provide important insights to understand the epidemiology of C. burnetii at the wildlife-livestock-human interface.

  3. Hydrogen Impurity Effects. A5Tt3 Intermetallic Compounds between A=Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu and Tt=Si, Ge, Sn with Cr 5B 3-like Structures that are Stable Both as Binary and as Ternary Hydride and Fluoride Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon-Escamilla, E. Alejandro; Corbett, John D.

    2001-06-01

    All of the binary systems Ca, Sr, Ba, or Eu (A) with Tt (tetrel)=Si or Ge as well as Sr-Sn form both binary Cr5B3-type A5Tt3 phases and the corresponding ternary hydrides with stuffed Cr5B3- (Ca5Sn3F-) type structures. All of those tested, Ca-Si, Ba-Si, Ca-Ge, also yield the isotypic A5Tt3Fx phases. The tetragonal structures of Ca5Si3, Ca5Si3F0.42, Sr5Si3, Eu5Si3Hx, Ca5Ge3, Ca5Ge3Hx, Ca5Ge3F0.66(I4/mcm, No. 140) and of Ba5Si3F0.16 (P4/ncc, Ba5Si3-type) were refined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The interstitial H, F atoms are bound in a constricted tetrahedral (A2+)4 cavity in the Cr5B3-type heavy atom structure, which can be described ideally as (A2+)5(Tt2)6-(Tt)4-. Many of 14 previous reports of the phases reported here were apparently hydrides according to lattice constant differences or, for Sr5Si3, the fractional coordinates of Sr2 about the tetrahedral site. An articulated model is developed that allows description of the relationship between the dimensions of the tetrahedral interstitial site and the cation cavity about Tt2 and for some matrix effects in this structure type. The model suggests limitations on the stability of these binary A5Tt3 compounds for the heavier tetrels, as observed. The resistivities of Ca5Ge3 and Ca5Ge3Hx are both characteristic of poor metals, and Pauli-like magnetic susceptibilities are exhibited by Ca5Ge3, Ca5Ge3Hx, Ca5Ge3F0.66, Sr5Ge3, and Sr5Sn3. The characteristic ideal Tt6-2 dimers are evidently not realistic descriptions for these phases; rather at least some of the π*4 electrons in the dimers are delocalized in a conduction band. This effect appears to be greater in two europium salts. Bond lengths of dimers in the Ca-Si and Ca-Ge families appear to shorten slightly in three instances of their oxidation to form the hydride or the fluoride, as might be expected.

  4. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis.

  5. Subpart TT Training Presentations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  6. Modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the cataclysmic variable TT Ari and evaluation of the system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, K. V.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Nikolaeva, E. A.; Borisov, N. V.

    2010-11-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the TT Ari system, which is well known from published IUE and optical photometric observations, was modeled by a steady-state accretion α-disc around a white dwarf. Parameters of the system were derived from time-resolved optical spectral observations in the bright state that we obtained in Sep. 1998. The radial velocity semiamplitude of the white dwarf (33.8+/-2.5 km s-1) and corresponding mass function (f(M) = 5.5+/-1.2×10-4 Msolar) were derived from the motion of the emission components of Balmer lines. The mass ratio q(~0.315) was evaluated from the fractional period excess of the superhump period over the orbital period ɛ(~0.085), and a secondary mass range (0.18-0.38 Msolar) was estimated from the orbital period. Therefore, the white dwarf mass range is 0.57-1.2 Msolar and the inclination angle of the system to the line of sight is 17-22.5 degrees. The adopted distance to the system is 335+/-50 pc. To fit the observed SED it is necessary to add a thermal spectrum with T~11600 K and luminosity ~0.4 Ld to the accretion disc spectrum. This combined spectrum successfully describes the observed Balmer lines absorption components. Formally the best fit of the HeI 4471 line gives minimum masses of the components (MRD = 0.18 Msolar and (MWD = 0.57 Msolar), with the corresponding inclination angle i = 22.°1 and mass-accretion rate M = 2.6×1017 g s-1.

  7. Natural history of the TT virus infection through follow-up of TTV DNA-positive multiple-transfused patients.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, J J; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Lefrère, F; Kanfer, A; Mariotti, M; Lerable, J; Thauvin, M; Lefèvre, G; Rouger, P; Girot, R

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about the natural history and the pathogenicity of the TT virus (TTV). We present our findings of a cross-sectional study based on the TTV DNA screening of 173 multiple-transfused patients and a longitudinal study based on the follow-up of TTV DNA-positive patients. Overall, 48 patients (27.7%) tested positive for TTV DNA. The influence of the number of blood donor exposures on the prevalence of blood-borne viral infection indicates that TTV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and an RNA virus known as GB virus C/hepatitis G virus (GBV-C/HGV) share a parenteral transmission, but that TTV, in contrast to the 2 other viruses, is also transmitted by at least another efficient means. The patients having a well-defined date of TTV infection were positive for TTV DNA during a mean period of 3.1 years. A chronic infection was observed in 31 cases (86%). TTV carriage appeared clinically benign in all patients. No clinical evidence of a disease potentially linked to the TTV infection was observed in patients with TTV DNA carriage over several years. The majority of TTV carriers had no biochemical evidence of liver disease. The prevalence of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level was higher in the TTV DNA-positive group, even in the absence of HCV infection, but the observed peaks of ALT level were most often transient and very mild. The prevalence of TTV DNA observed in blood recipients is consistent with that of TTV infection observed in blood donors. TTV infection frequently tends to persist. (Blood. 2000;95:347-351)

  8. The properties of thickness-twist (TT) wave modes in a rotated Y-cut quartz plate with a functionally graded material top layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Qian, Zhenghua; Li, Nian; Sarraf, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of thickness-twist (TT) wave modes of an AT-cut quartz crystal plate resonator for measurement of material parameters, such as stiffness, density and material gradient, of a functionally graded material (FGM) layer on its surface, whose material property varies exponentially in thickness direction. A theoretical analysis of dispersion relations for TT waves is presented using Mindlin's plate theory, with displacement mode shapes plotted, and the existence of face-shear (FS) wave modes discussed. Through numerical examples, the effects of material parameters (stiffness, density and material gradient) on dispersion curves, cutoff frequencies and mode shapes are thoroughly examined, which can act as a theoretical reference for measurements of unknown properties of FGM layer.

  9. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at 7 TeV in lepton+jets events using b-quark jet identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Maes, J.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Devroede, O.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Wickens, J.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; McCartin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; Cortina Gil, E.; de Favereau de Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; da Costa, E. M.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Mateev, M.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Lelas, K.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Wyslouch, B.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Mikami, Y.; van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Mohr, N.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Ata, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Erdmann, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Bontenackels, M.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Giffels, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heydhausen, D.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Thomas, M.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katkov, I.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Olzem, J.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Raval, A.; Rosin, M.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Bauer, J.; Berger, J.; Buege, V.; Chwalek, T.; de Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Renz, M.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Zhukov, V.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Stiliaris, E.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Jain, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, S.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, D.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Saha, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pierro, G. A.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Grandi, C.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; de Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; de Cosa, A.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. 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R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Henderson, C.; Bose, T.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Avetisyan, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chou, J. P.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Cox, P. 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K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., III; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Wan, Z.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Everaerts, P.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; de Benedetti, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Gregoire, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Zennamo, J.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Boeriu, O.; Chasco, M.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gu, J.; Hill, C.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Jones, J.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; de Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Jindal, P.; Parashar, N.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Orbaker, D.; Petrillo, G.; Sakumoto, W.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Duggan, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Patel, R.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Gurrola, A.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Issah, M.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Bellinger, J. N.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Palmonari, F.; Reeder, D.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2011-11-01

    A new measurement of the inclusive production cross section for pp→tt¯ is performed at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36pb-1, and is based on the final state with one isolated, high transverse momentum muon or electron, missing transverse energy, and hadronic jets. The tt¯ content of the selected events is enhanced by requiring the presence of at least one jet consistent with b-quark hadronization. The measured cross section is 150±9(stat)±17(syst)±6(lumi)pb and is in agreement with higher-order QCD calculations. The combination of this measurement with a previous CMS result based on dileptons gives 154±17(stat+syst)±6(lumi)pb.

  10. Measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McFarlane, M; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-08-25

    We present a measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV using 318 pb(-1) of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select tt[over ] decays into the final states enu+jets and mu nu+ jets, in which at least one b quark from the t-quark decays is identified using a secondary vertex-finding algorithm. Assuming a top quark mass of 178 GeV/c2, we measure a cross section of 8.7 +/- 0.9(stat)(-0.9)+1.1(syst) pb. We also report the first observation of tt[over ] with significance greater than 5sigma in the subsample in which both b quarks are identified, corresponding to a cross section of 10.1(-1.4)+1.6(stat)(-1.3)+2.0(syst) pb.

  11. Measurement of the tt production cross section in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV using dilepton events.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobano, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgui, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes de Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nignamov, T; Nodulman, L; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shears, T; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Takaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2004-10-01

    We report a measurement of the tt production cross section using dilepton events with jets and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Using a 197+/-12 pb(-1) data sample recorded by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab, we use two complementary techniques to select candidate events. We compare the number of observed events and selected kinematical distributions with the predictions of the standard model and find good agreement. The combined result of the two techniques yields a tt production cross section of 7.0(+2.4)(-2.1)(stat)+1.6-1.1(syst)+/-0.4(lum) pb.

  12. Measurement of the tt[over] production cross section in pp[over] collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-05-16

    We measure the tt[over] production cross section in pp[over] collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV in the lepton + jets channel. Two complementary methods discriminate between signal and background: b tagging and a kinematic likelihood discriminant. Based on 0.9 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we measure sigma(tt[over])=7.62+/-0.85 pb, assuming the current world average m(t)=172.6 GeV. We compare our cross section measurement with theory predictions to determine a value for the top-quark mass of 170+/-7 GeV.

  13. Importance of SPP1 genotype as a covariate in clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Luca; Piva, Luisa; Barp, Andrea; Taglia, Antonella; Picillo, Esther; Vasco, Gessica; Pane, Marika; Previtali, Stefano C.; Torrente, Yvan; Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Chiara Motta, Maria; Grieco, Gaetano S.; Napolitano, Sara; Magri, Francesca; D'Amico, Adele; Astrea, Guja; Messina, Sonia; Sframeli, Maria; Luca Vita, Gian; Boffi, Patrizia; Mongini, Tiziana; Ferlini, Alessandra; Gualandi, Francesca; Soraru', Gianni; Ermani, Mario; Vita, Giuseppe; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Minetti, Carlo; Bruno, Claudio; Mercuri, Eugenio; Politano, Luisa; Angelini, Corrado; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test the effect of the single nucleotide polymorphism −66 T>G (rs28357094) in the osteopontin gene (SPP1) on functional measures over 12 months in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: This study was conducted on a cohort of ambulatory patients with DMD from a network of Italian neuromuscular centers, evaluated longitudinally with the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) and the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) at study entry and after 12 months. Genotype at rs28357094 was determined after completion of the clinical evaluations. Patients were stratified in 2 groups according to a dominant model (TT homozygotes vs TG heterozygotes and GG homozygotes) and clinical data were retrospectively compared between groups. Results: Eighty patients were selected (age 4.1–19.3 years; mean 8.3 ± 2.7 SD). There were no differences in age or steroid treatment between the 2 subgroups. Paired t test showed a significant difference in both NSAA (p = 0.013) and 6MWT (p = 0.03) between baseline and follow-up after 12 months in patients with DMD carrying the G allele. The difference was not significant in the T subgroup. The analysis of covariance using age and baseline values as covariate and SPP1 genotype as fixed effect showed that these parameters are significantly correlated with the 12-month values. Conclusions: These data provide evidence of the role of SPP1 genotype as a disease modifier in DMD and support its relevance in the selection of homogeneous groups of patients for future clinical trials. PMID:22744661

  14. Using genotypic information to reduce disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this presentation is to provide a cursory overview of how genotypic data may be utilized by veterinarians in the future. Genotypic information is accumulating at a rapid pace. This information may reveal deleterious genes, quantitative trait loci, and genetic predisposition for a ...

  15. Estimating Genotype- and Environment-Specific Heritabilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advantages of computing genotype- and environment-specific heritabilities are discussed. A statistical approach is used in which logvariances of both genotype by environment interaction and error are modeled as random variables. Resulting estimators of variances are weighted averages of a pool...

  16. Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore cattle was evaluated in different scenarios of lower density (LD) chips, imputation methods and sets of animals to have their genotypes imputed. Twelve commercial and virtual custom LD chips with densities varying from 7K to 75K SNPs were tested. Customized L...

  17. Active Surveillance for Adverse Events After a Mass Vaccination Campaign With a Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PsA-TT) in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Vannice, Kirsten S.; Keita, Modibo; Sow, Samba O.; Durbin, Anna P.; Omer, Saad B.; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Yaméogo, Téné M.; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Sacko, Massambou; Diomandé, Fabien V. K.; Halsey, Neal A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The monovalent meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, MenAfriVac) was developed for use in the “meningitis belt” of sub-Saharan Africa. Mali was 1 of 3 countries selected for early introduction. As this is a new vaccine, postlicensure surveillance is particularly important to identify and characterize possible safety issues. Methods. The national vaccination campaign was phased from September 2010 to November 2011. We conducted postlicensure safety surveillance for PsA-TT in 40 government clinics from southern Mali serving approximately 400 000 people 1–29 years of age. We conducted analyses with individual-level data and population-level data, and we calculated rates of adverse events using the conditional exact test, a modified vaccine cohort risk interval method, and a modified self-controlled case series method for each outcome of interest, including 18 prespecified adverse events and 18 syndromic categories. Results. An increased rate of clinic visits for fever within 3 days after vaccination was found using multiple methods for all age groups. Although other signals were found with some methods, complete assessment of all other prespecified outcomes and syndromic categories did not reveal that PsA-TT was consistently associated with any other health problem. Conclusions. No new safety concerns were identified in this study. These results are consistent with prelicensure data and other studies indicating that PsA-TT is safe. The approach presented could serve as a model for future active postlicensure vaccine safety monitoring associated with large-scale immunization campaigns in low-income countries. PMID:26553680

  18. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 can elicit dose- and time-dependent immune priming in Galleria mellonella larvae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong; Lv, Yingying; Li, Mei; Wang, Jia; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we primed Galleria mellonella larvae by haemocoel injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 to determine whether bacterial LPS can induce enhanced immune protection (recently called immune priming). We also analyzed the relationship between changes in the levels of innate immune elements and the degree of enhanced immune protection in the larvae at designated time points after priming. The larvae that received experimental doses (20.0, 10.0 and 5.0μg per larva) of LPS demonstrated increased resistance against lethal challenge with P. luminescens TT01; the degree and period of protection correlated positively with the priming dose. These results indicated that the P. luminescens TT01 LPS could induce typical immune priming in G. mellonella. Moreover, the levels of innate immune parameters (i.e. haemocyte density, phagocytosis, haemocyte encapsulation ability, and antibacterial activity of cell-free haemolymph) and endogenous enzyme activities (i.e. acid phosphatase, ACP; alkaline phosphatase, AKP; superoxide dismutase, SOD and lysozyme, LSZ) were significantly increased following priming of the larvae with LPS, whereas the activities of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) were significantly decreased. All of the parameters examined changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that G. mellonella larvae could modulate their immune responses based on different doses of LPS used for priming, and that priming phenomenon in G. mellonella larvae elicited by LPS was mediated by the innate immune elements and enzyme activity.

  19. Meningococcal quadrivalent tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT, Nimenrix™): A review of its immunogenicity, safety, co-administration, and antibody persistence

    PubMed Central

    Assaf-Casals, Aia; Dbaibo, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Meningococcal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with reported epidemics and outbreaks in different parts of the world. Despite the availability of antimicrobial therapy, challenges remain in early recognition and prevention of disease. Several vaccines have been developed to date aiming at preventing disease spread. Discussion: MenACWY-TT (Nimenrix™) has been extensively studied for use in different age groups. Phase II and III randomized trials have demonstrated its immunogenicity when administered in children aged 1 year and older, adolescents and adults. It has an acceptable safety profile with minor adverse events comparable to other vaccines. Follow up studies have shown persistence of protective antibodies up to three years. MenACWY-TT was safely and effectively co-administered with different recommended vaccines. Conclusion: MenACWY-TT is a safe and immunogenic vaccine that can be used to protect against these four serogroups in individuals older than 1 year of age. PMID:26900984

  20. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV using soft electron b-tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV using a data sample corresponding to 1.7fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We reconstruct tt¯ events in the lepton+jets channel, consisting of eν+jets and μν+jets final states. The dominant background is the production of W bosons in association with multiple jets. To suppress this background, we identify electrons from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor jets (“soft electron tags”). From a sample of 2196 candidate events, we obtain 120 tagged events with a background expectation of 51±3 events, corresponding to a cross section of σtt¯=7.8±2.4(stat)±1.6(syst)±0.5(lumi)pb. We assume a top-quark mass of 175GeV/c2. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section with soft electron tags in run II of the Tevatron.

  1. Toward fully automated genotyping: genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution.

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, M W; Lancia, G; Ng, S K

    1995-01-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA)n repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. PMID:7485172

  2. Ascaris: development of selected genotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weidong; Yuan, Keng; Peng, Guohua; Qiu, Lin; Dai, Zhifang; Yuan, Fang; Hu, Yinying; Hu, Ningyan

    2012-05-01

    Using nucleotide variation in the first internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA, five different genotypes (designated G1-G5) have been identified and the preponderance of genotype G1 in humans and of genotype G3 in pigs led to the proposal that parasites bearing the two genotypes have an affinity for a particular host species. A subsequent study using eggs of genotype G1 from humans and G3 from pigs to infect pigs and mice indicated that there is a significant difference in the ability to infect and establish as larvae in mice and as adults in pigs between the two genotypes. Extending previous investigations, the present study investigated whether there are differences in development as designated by egg hatching, larvae migration and distribution in the mice between the Ascaris strains with known genotypes. Ascaris eggs of genotypes G1 (predominating in human-derived worms) and G3 (predominating in pig-derived worms) were used to infect C57BL/6 mice orally. Eggs/larvae were examined from the small and large intestines, thoracic and abdominal cavities, peripheral blood, livers and lungs at intervals of 2h until 12h post-infection, then periodically until 34 days of infection. Results showed distinct differences in egg hatching (the timing and location of hatching, and the numbers hatched), and in larvae migration and distribution (the means and constituent ratios, the time of peak recovery, and larvae reappearing in intestines) between the two strains. The results can explain the findings of significantly higher larval recovery of genotype G1 than G3 in the mice, and may shed some enlightenment to understand the difference in host affiliation of Ascaris of different genotypes.

  3. High-Throughput Genotyping with TaqMan Allelic Discrimination and Allele-Specific Genotyping Assays.

    PubMed

    Heissl, Angelika; Arbeithuber, Barbara; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Real-time PCR-based genotyping methods, such as TaqMan allelic discrimination assays and allele-specific genotyping, are particularly useful when screening a handful of single nucleotide polymorphisms in hundreds of samples; either derived from different individuals, tissues, or pre-amplified DNA. Although real-time PCR-based methods such as TaqMan are well-established, alternative methods, like allele-specific genotyping, are powerful alternatives, especially for genotyping short tandem repeat (STR) length polymorphisms. Here, we describe all relevant aspects when developing an assay for a new SNP or STR using either TaqMan or allele-specific genotyping, respectively, such as primer and probe design, optimization of reaction conditions, the experimental procedure for typing hundreds of samples, and finally the data evaluation. Our goal is to provide a guideline for developing genotyping assays using these two approaches that render reliable and reproducible genotype calls involving minimal optimization.

  4. Effect of reference population size and available ancestor genotypes on imputation of Mexican Holstein genotypes.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, A; Ruiz-Lopez, F J; Wiggans, G R; Van Tassell, C P; Montaldo, H H

    2015-05-01

    The effects of reference population size and the availability of information from genotyped ancestors on the accuracy of imputation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were investigated for Mexican Holstein cattle. Three scenarios for reference population size were examined: (1) a local population of 2,011 genotyped Mexican Holsteins, (2) animals in scenario 1 plus 866 Holsteins in the US genotype database (GDB) with genotyped Mexican daughters, and (3) animals in scenario 1 and all US GDB Holsteins (338,073). Genotypes from 4 chip densities (2 low density, 1 mid density, and 1 high density) were imputed using findhap (version 3) to the 45,195 markers on the mid-density chip. Imputation success was determined by comparing the numbers of SNP with 1 or 2 alleles missing and the numbers of differently predicted SNP (conflicts) among the 3 scenarios. Imputation accuracy improved as chip density and numbers of genotyped ancestors increased, and the percentage of SNP with 1 missing allele was greater than that for 2 missing alleles for all scenarios. The largest numbers of conflicts were found between scenarios 1 and 3. The inclusion of information from direct ancestors (dam or sire) with US GDB genotypes in the imputation of Mexican Holstein genotypes increased imputation accuracy by 1 percentage point for low-density genotypes and by 0.5 percentage points for high-density genotypes, which was about half the gain found with information from all US GDB Holsteins. A larger reference population and the availability of genotyped ancestors improved imputation; animals with genotyped parents in a large reference population had higher imputation accuracy than those with no or few genotyped relatives in a small reference population. For small local populations, including genotypes from other related populations can aid in improving imputation accuracy.

  5. Effect of a serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA–TT) on serogroup A meningococcal meningitis and carriage in Chad: a community study

    PubMed Central

    Daugla, DM; Gami, JP; Gamougam, K; Naibei, N; Mbainadji, L; Narbé, M; Toralta, J; Kodbesse, B; Ngadoua, C; Coldiron, ME; Fermon, F; Page, A-L; Djingarey, MH; Hugonnet, S; Harrison, OB; Rebbetts, LS; Tekletsion, Y; Watkins, ER; Hill, D; Caugant, DA; Chandramohan, D; Hassan-King, M; Manigart, O; Nascimento, M; Woukeu, A; Trotter, C; Stuart, JM; Maiden, MCJ; Greenwood, BM

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background A serogroup A meningococcal polysaccharide–tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA–TT, MenAfriVac) was licensed in India in 2009, and pre-qualified by WHO in 2010, on the basis of its safety and immunogenicity. This vaccine is now being deployed across the African meningitis belt. We studied the effect of PsA–TT on meningococcal meningitis and carriage in Chad during a serogroup A meningococcal meningitis epidemic. Methods We obtained data for the incidence of meningitis before and after vaccination from national records between January, 2009, and June, 2012. In 2012, surveillance was enhanced in regions where vaccination with PsA–TT had been undertaken in 2011, and in one district where a reactive vaccination campaign in response to an outbreak of meningitis was undertaken. Meningococcal carriage was studied in an age-stratified sample of residents aged 1–29 years of a rural area roughly 13–15 and 2–4 months before and 4–6 months after vaccination. Meningococci obtained from cerebrospinal fluid or oropharyngeal swabs were characterised by conventional microbiological and molecular methods. Findings Roughly 1·8 million individuals aged 1–29 years received one dose of PsA–TT during a vaccination campaign in three regions of Chad in and around the capital N'Djamena during 10 days in December, 2011. The incidence of meningitis during the 2012 meningitis season in these three regions was 2·48 per 100 000 (57 cases in the 2·3 million population), whereas in regions without mass vaccination, incidence was 43·8 per 100 000 (3809 cases per 8·7 million population), a 94% difference in crude incidence (p<0·0001), and an incidence rate ratio of 0·096 (95% CI 0·046–0·198). Despite enhanced surveillance, no case of serogroup A meningococcal meningitis was reported in the three vaccinated regions. 32 serogroup A carriers were identified in 4278 age-stratified individuals (0·75%) living in a rural area near the capital 2–4

  6. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  7. ALG: automated genotype calling of Luminex assays.

    PubMed

    Bourgey, Mathieu; Lariviere, Mathieu; Richer, Chantal; Sinnett, Daniel

    2011-05-06

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most commonly used polymorphic markers in genetics studies. Among the different platforms for SNP genotyping, Luminex is one of the less exploited mainly due to the lack of a robust (semi-automated and replicable) freely available genotype calling software. Here we describe a clustering algorithm that provides automated SNP calls for Luminex genotyping assays. We genotyped 3 SNPs in a cohort of 330 childhood leukemia patients, 200 parents of patient and 325 healthy individuals and used the Automated Luminex Genotyping (ALG) algorithm for SNP calling. ALG genotypes were called twice to test for reproducibility and were compared to sequencing data to test for accuracy. Globally, this analysis demonstrates the accuracy (99.6%) of the method, its reproducibility (99.8%) and the low level of no genotyping calls (3.4%). The high efficiency of the method proves that ALG is a suitable alternative to the current commercial software. ALG is semi-automated, and provides numerical measures of confidence for each SNP called, as well as an effective graphical plot. Moreover ALG can be used either through a graphical user interface, requiring no specific informatics knowledge, or through command line with access to the open source code. The ALG software has been implemented in R and is freely available for non-commercial use either at http://alg.sourceforge.net or by request to mathieu.bourgey@umontreal.ca.

  8. Oxidative stress-related genotypes, fruit and vegetable consumption and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulin; Ambrosone, Christine B; McCullough, Marjorie J; Ahn, Jiyoung; Stevens, Victoria L; Thun, Michael J; Hong, Chi-Chen

    2009-05-01

    Dietary antioxidants may interact with endogenous sources of pro- and antioxidants to impact breast cancer risk. A nested case-control study of postmenopausal women (505 cases and 502 controls) from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort was conducted to examine the interaction between oxidative stress-related genes and level of vegetable and fruit intake on breast cancer risk. Genetic variations in catalase (CAT) (C-262T), myeloperoxidase (MPO) (G-463A), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) (G894T) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) [(GT)(n) dinucleotide length polymorphism] were not associated with breast cancer risk. Women carrying the low-risk CAT CC [odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-1.11], NOS3 TT (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.26-1.12, P-trend = 0.10) or HO-1 S allele and MM genotype (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.37-0.55), however, were found to be at non-significantly reduced breast cancer risk among those with high vegetable and fruit intake (> or = median; P-interactions = 0.04 for CAT, P = 0.005 for NOS3 and P = 0.07 for HO-1). Furthermore, those with > or = 4 putative low-risk alleles in total had significantly reduced risk (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.32-0.88, P-interaction = 0.006) compared with those with < or = 2 low-risk alleles. In contrast, among women with low vegetable and fruit intake (< median), the low-risk CAT CC (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 0.89-1.99), NOS3 TT (OR = 2.93, 95% CI = 1.38-6.22) and MPO AA (OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 0.73-5.95) genotypes appeared to be associated with raised breast cancer risk, with significantly increased risks observed in those with > or = 4 low-risk alleles compared with participants with < or = 2 low-risk alleles (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05-2.99, P-interaction = 0.006). Our results support the hypothesis that there are joint effects of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants.

  9. A cross-sectional study to find out the relationship of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotype with plasma levels of folate and total homocysteine by daily folate intake in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Nana; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-01-01

    In those with the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677TT genotype, enzyme activity is lowered. Therefore, these individuals might require an increased intake of folate to maintain or control blood levels of plasma folate or total homocysteine (tHcy). We examined associations of dietary folate intake with fasting plasma folate and total homocysteine (tHcy) according to genotype among 554 Japanese (207 men and 347 women aged 39-89 y) recruited in 2009. Intake of folate was estimated with a food frequency questionnaire. The MTHFR polymorphism was genotyped by a polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers. The log-transformed concentration of folate or tHcy was regressed on energy-adjusted folate intake in a linear regression analysis. Higher folate intake was associated with higher plasma folate among those with the CC (β=0.165, p=0.066) or CT (β=0.248, p<0.001) genotypes, and with lower tHcy levels only among those with the CC (β=-0.141, p=0.013) genotype. Plasma folate was significantly and inversely associated with tHcy, irrespective of MTHFR genotype. When the analysis was restricted to those with tHcy levels higher than the reference range (≥13.5 nmol/mL, n=20), these significant associations were not found. The interaction between folate intake or plasma folate and genotype was not significant in any analysis. In conclusion, dietary folate intake was positively associated with plasma folate among those with the CC or CT genotypes and inversely associated with tHcy among those with the CC genotype, but the associations were not clear among those with higher levels of tHcy.

  10. Measurements of the top-quark mass and the tt cross section in the hadronic τ+jets decay channel at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-11-09

    We present the first direct measurement of the top-quark mass using tt events decaying in the hadronic τ+jets decay channel. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb(-1) collected by the CDF II detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the tt cross section, σ(tt), and the top-quark mass, M(top). We extract M(top) from a likelihood based on per-event probabilities calculated with leading-order signal and background matrix elements. We measure σ(tt) = 8.8 ± 3.3(stat) ± 2.2(syst) pb and M(top) = 172.7 ± 9.3(stat) ± 3.7(syst) GeV/c(2).

  11. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jet from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.

  12. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jetmore » from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.« less

  13. HPV genotypes concordance between sex partners.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, M; Mottolese, M; Marandino, F; Carosi, M; Diodoro, M G; Sentinelli, S; Visca, P; Rollo, F; Mariani, L; Vocaturo, G; Sindico, R; Di Giannuario, D; Perrone Donnorso, R; Pellicciotta, M; Vocaturo, A

    2007-12-01

    The HPV genotype concordance in the sexual couples could support the sexual viral transmission of HPV infection. The present study contains a case-report of a stable Italian sex couple harbouring the same five HPV genotypes in their genital samples. The female partner, affected by vulvar condilomatosis, evidenced positivity in her cervicovaginal scraping with high risk HPV DNA Hybrid Capture 2 test and was negative at liquid-based performed Pap Test and at colposcopic examination. The male partner was clinically healthy regarding his external genitalia. In both male and female genital scrapings, the following HPV genotypes were detected by means of a PCR-based assay: 6, 16, 53, 73 and 84. This considerably high genotype concordance does not appear to be casual and supports, in our opinion, the hypothesis that genital HPV types are sexually transmitted agents

  14. Rapid Genotyping of Swine Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Polly W.Y.; Wong, Chloe K.S.; Li, Olive T.W.; Chan, Kwok Hung; Cheung, Chung Lam; Ma, Edward S.; Webby, Richard J.; Guan, Yi; Peiris, Joseph S. Malik

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus highlighted the need for enhanced surveillance of swine influenza viruses. We used real-time reverse–transcription PCR–based genotyping and found that this rapid and simple genotyping method may identify reassortants derived from viruses of Eurasian avian-like, triple reassortant-like, and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus lineages. PMID:21470462

  15. Putative IL-10 Low Producer Genotypes Are Associated with a Favourable Etanercept Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schotte, Heiko; Schlüter, Bernhard; Schmidt, Hartmut; Gaubitz, Markus; Drynda, Susanne; Kekow, Jörn; Willeke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Outcome predictors of biologic therapeutic drugs like TNF inhibitors are of interest since side effects like serious infections or malignancy cannot be completely ruled out. Response rates are heterogeneous. The present study addressed the question whether in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter genotypes with potential relevance for IL-10 production capacity are associated with response to long-term treatment with etanercept. Caucasian RA patients that, according to the EULAR criteria, responded well (n = 25), moderately (n = 17) or not (n = 8) to etanercept therapy (median 36 months, range 4-52), and 160 matched controls were genotyped for the IL-10 promoter SNPs -2849 G>A (rs6703630), -1082 G>A (rs1800896), -819 C>T (rs1800871) and -592 C>A (rs1800872). Haplotypes were reconstructed via mathematic model and tested for associations with disease susceptibility and therapy response. We identified the four predominant haplotypes AGCC, GATA, GGCC, and GACC in almost equal distribution. Patients that responded well carried the putative IL-10 low producer allele -2849 A or the haplotypes AGCC and GATA (RR 2.1 and 4.0, respectively; 95% CI 1.1-4.0 and 1.1-14.8), whereas an unfavourable response was associated with carriage of the putative high producer haplotype GGCC (RR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3). No significant associations of alleles or haplotypes with disease susceptibility were observed. In RA, a low IL-10 production which is genetically determined rather by haplotypes than by SNPs may favour the response to etanercept treatment. Iatrogenic blockade of TNF may reveal proinflammatory effects of its endogeneous antagonist IL-10. Further studies are needed to correlate these genetic findings to direct cytokine measurements.

  16. Monitoring coyote population dynamics by genotyping faeces.

    PubMed

    Prugh, L R; Ritland, C E; Arthur, S M; Krebs, C J

    2005-04-01

    Reliable population estimates are necessary for effective conservation and management, and faecal genotyping has been used successfully to estimate the population size of several elusive mammalian species. Information such as changes in population size over time and survival rates, however, are often more useful for conservation biology than single population estimates. We evaluated the use of faecal genotyping as a tool for monitoring long-term population dynamics, using coyotes (Canis latrans) in the Alaska Range as a case study. We obtained 544 genotypes from 56 coyotes over 3 years (2000-2002). Tissue samples from all 15 radio-collared coyotes in our study area had > or = 1 matching faecal genotypes. We used flexible maximum-likelihood models to study coyote population dynamics, and we tested model performance against radio telemetry data. The staple prey of coyotes, snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus), dramatically declined during this study, and the coyote population declined nearly two-fold with a 1(1/2)-year time lag. Survival rates declined the year after hares crashed but recovered the following year. We conclude that long-term monitoring of elusive species using faecal genotyping is feasible and can provide data that are useful for wildlife conservation and management. We highlight some drawbacks of standard open-population models, such as low precision and the requirement of discrete sampling intervals, and we suggest that the development of open models designed for continuously collected data would enhance the utility of faecal genotyping as a monitoring tool.

  17. Biphasic Effect of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on Anterior Pituitary Folliculostellate TtT/GF Cell Coupling, and Connexin 43 Expression and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Vitale, M L; Barry, A

    2015-10-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a mitogenic and differentiating cytokine. In the anterior pituitary, folliculostellate (FS) cells constitute the major source of bFGF. bFGF affects endocrine cell proliferation and secretion in the anterior pituitary. In addition, bFGF increases its own expression by acting directly on FS cells. FS cell Cx43-mediated gap junction intercellular communication allows the establishment of an intrapituitary network for the transmission of information. In the present study, we assessed how bFGF regulates FS cell coupling. Time course studies were carried out on the FS cell line TtT/GF. Short-term bFGF treatment induced a transient cell uncoupling and the phosphorylation in Ser368 of membrane-bound Cx43 without modifying Cx43 levels. We demonstrated the involvement of the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform α in the phosphorylation of Cx43 in S368. Moreover, we showed that bFGF induced PKCα activation by stimulating its expression, phosphorylation and association with the plasma membrane. The long-term incubation with bFGF increased TtT/GF cell coupling, total Cx43 levels and Cx43 accumulation at the cell membrane of cytoplasmic projections. The Cx43 level increase was a result of the stimulation of Cx43 gene transcription as mediated by the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 signalling pathway. Taken together, the data show that bFGF modulates TtT/GF cell coupling by activating different pathways that lead to opposite effects on Cx43 phosphorylation and expression depending on the duration of the exposure of the cells to bFGF. A short-term bFGF exposure reduces cell-to-cell communication as a mean of desynchronising FS cells. By contrast, long-term exposure to bFGF enhances cell-to-cell communication and facilitates coordination among FS cells.

  18. The fully synthetic MAG-Tn3 therapeutic vaccine containing the tetanus toxoid-derived TT830-844 universal epitope provides anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Laubreton, Daphné; Bay, Sylvie; Sedlik, Christine; Artaud, Cécile; Ganneau, Christelle; Dériaud, Edith; Viel, Sophie; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Amigorena, Sebastian; Gérard, Catherine; Lo-Man, Richard; Leclerc, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Malignant transformations are often associated with aberrant glycosylation processes that lead to the expression of new carbohydrate antigens at the surface of tumor cells. Of these carbohydrate antigens, the Tn antigen is particularly highly expressed in many carcinomas, especially in breast carcinoma. We designed MAG-Tn3, a fully synthetic vaccine based on three consecutive Tn moieties that are O-linked to a CD4+ T cell epitope, to induce anti-Tn antibody responses that could be helpful for therapeutic vaccination against cancer. To ensure broad coverage within the human population, the tetanus toxoid-derived peptide TT830-844 was selected as a T-helper epitope because it can bind to various HLA-DRB molecules. We showed that the MAG-Tn3 vaccine, which was formulated with the GSK proprietary immunostimulant AS15 and designed for human cancer therapy, is able to induce an anti-Tn antibody response in mice of various H-2 haplotypes, and this response correlates with the ability to induce a specific T cell response against the TT830-844 peptide. The universality of the TT830-844 peptide was extended to new H-2 and HLA-DRB molecules that were capable of binding this T cell epitope. Finally, the MAG-Tn3 vaccine was able to induce anti-Tn antibody responses in cynomolgus monkeys, which targeted Tn-expressing tumor cells and mediated tumor cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, MAG-Tn3 is a highly promising anticancer vaccine that is currently under evaluation in a phase I clinical trial.

  19. Searches for new physics using the tt¯ invariant mass distribution in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Staykova, Z; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Dildick, S; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; 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