Science.gov

Sample records for 82o south latitude

  1. South Mid-latitude Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    19 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows deep gullies cut into the wall of a south mid-latitude crater. Erosion has exposed layers in the upper wall of the crater; it is possible that groundwater seeping through a layer or layers in the wall led to the genesis of the gullies. The banked nature of the gully channels suggests that a liquid was involved.

    Location near: 35.5oS, 194.8oW Image width: width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  2. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees South., Longitude 330 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees S., longitude 330 degrees. Heavily cratered highlands dominate this view. Toward the lower right, a conspicuous light-colored circular depression marks the ancient large Hellas impact basin. Directly northeast of Hellas, several large ancient impacts dot the landscape, including Cassini, Schiaparelli, and Huygens. Several large outflow channels are located in the upper left-hand corner. The permanent, residual south polar ice cap is located near the bottom.

  3. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees South, Longitude 210 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees S., longitude 210 degrees. Toward the top, the lowland plains of Elysium and Utopia Planitiae are separated from the darker heavily cratered highlands by a broad escarpment. The far bottom left is marked by the large light-colored ancient Hellas impact basin. The permanent south polar residual ice cap is located near the bottom.

  4. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees South, Longitude 90 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees S., longitude 90 degrees. The top half is dominated by the Tharsis Montes volcanoes, the large Alba Patera shield volcano, the dark Chryse basin, and a vast canyon system, Valles Marineris. In the central part, a prominent physiographic feature, Thaumasia plateau, includes a complex array of small- and large-scale faults and ridges and ancient volcanoes. The large conspicuous Argyre basin, southeast of the Thaumasia plateau, contains a broad expanse of light-colored plains 800 km across. The permanent south polar ice cap is located near the bottom.

  5. Effect of Latitude and Seasonal Variation on Scrub Typhus, South Korea, 2001-2013.

    PubMed

    Jeung, Ye Sul; Kim, Choon-Mee; Yun, Na Ra; Kim, Seok-Won; Han, Mi Ah; Kim, Dong-Min

    2016-01-01

    In South Korea, scrub typhus is one of the most common rickettsial diseases. The number of scrub typhus patients has increased in South Korea, a total of 69,210 cases were reported from 2001 to 2013. The seasonality and relation of scrub typhus cases to latitude were analyzed in this article using data obtained from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System website of the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence of scrub typhus tended to increase in the later months of the year, especially in October-December. In general, lower latitudes were associated with a later peak incidence. Our results suggest for the first time that the monthly observed incidence tended to increase in the later months of the year as the latitude decreased, and on a yearly basis in Korea. PMID:26503283

  6. High Latitude Meridional Flow on the Sun May Explain North-South Polar Field Asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosak, Katie; Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David

    2012-01-01

    We measured the flows of magnetic elements on the Sun at very high latitudes by analyzing magnetic images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Mission. Magnetic maps constructed using a fixed, and north-south symmetric, meridional flow profile give weaker than observed polar fields in the North and stronger than observed polar fields in the South during the decline of Cycle 23 and rise of Cycle 24. Our measurements of the meridional flow at high latitudes indicate systematic north-south differences. In the fall of 2010 (when the North Pole was most visible), there was a strong flow in the North while in the spring of 2011 (when the South Pole was most visible) the flow there was weaker. With these results, we have a possible solution to this polar field asymmetry. The weaker flow in the South should keep the polar fields from becoming too strong while the stronger flow in the North should strengthen the field there. In order to gain a better understanding of the Solar Cycle and magnetic flux transport on the Sun, we need further observations and analyses of the Sun s polar regions in general and the polar meridional flow in particular.

  7. High Latitude Meridional Flow on the Sun May Explain North-South Polar Field Asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosak, Katie; Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David

    2012-01-01

    We measured the flows of magnetic elements on the Sun at very high latitudes by analyzing magnetic images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Mission. Magnetic maps constructed using a fixed, and north-south symmetric, meridional flow profile give weaker than observed polar fields in the North and stronger than observed polar fields in the South during the decline of Cycle 23 and rise of Cycle 24. Our measurements of the meridional flow at high latitudes indicate systematic north-south differences. There was a strong flow in the North while the flow in the South was weaker. With these results, we have a possible solution to the polar field asymmetry. The weaker flow in the South should keep the polar fields from becoming too strong while the stronger flow in the North should strengthen the field there. In order to gain a better understanding of the Solar Cycle and magnetic flux transport on the Sun, we need further observations and analyses of the Sun's polar regions in general and the polar meridonal flow in particular.

  8. High Latitude Meridional Flow on the Sun May Explain North-South Polar Field Asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosak, Katie; Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David

    2012-01-01

    We measured the flows of magnetic elements on the Sun at very high latitudes by analyzing magnetic images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Mission. Magnetic maps constructed using a fixed, and north ]south symmetric, meridional flow profile give weaker than observed polar fields in the North and stronger than observed polar fields in the South during the decline of Cycle 23 and rise of Cycle 24. Our measurements of the meridional flow at high latitudes indicate systematic north ]south differences. There was a strong flow in the North while the flow in the South was weaker. With these results, we have a possible solution to the polar field asymmetry. The weaker flow in the South should keep the polar fields from becoming too strong while the stronger flow in the North should strengthen the field there. In order to gain a better understanding of the Solar Cycle and magnetic flux transport on the Sun, we need further observations and analyses of the Sun fs polar regions in general and the polar meridional flow in particular

  9. Energetics of wave propagation leading to cold event in tropical latitudes of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Gabriela Viviana; Gan, Manoel Alonso; Piva, Everson Dal; Silveira, Virginia Piccinini

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a new vision on the cold and cool events that affect the tropical region of South America, considering the dynamics and the energetics of wave train propagation associated with these systems. Through a composite analysis of meridional winds at 300 hPa for cold (T < 0 °C) and cool (0 °C ≤ T ≤ 2.5 °C) air incursions affecting tropical latitudes and causing frost are studied. The cold events observed in tropical latitudes are associated with a single Rossby wave pattern propagating over the Pacific Ocean which drives the low level anticyclone from the southwest of the continent to low latitudes. This propagation involves a southern circulation due to the meridional wind penetration and consequently cold air advection causing temperatures to drop below 0 °C. During cool events a subtropical wave train propagating through the Pacific Ocean is observed, which merges before the event with a wave coming from the subpolar latitudes of the South Atlantic Ocean. The zonal propagation leads to the entrance of the anticyclone from the west of the continent, and it is strengthened together with the meridionaly extended cyclone located upstream. This configuration causes southerly wind advection over central-southeastern Brazil and consequently causes the temperature decrease. The energetics shows that the cold events kinetic energy maxima are more intense than those of cool events. For the cold events three maxima are observed, the first (K1) and the third (K3) maxima are developed by baroclinic conversion and ageostrophic flux convergence and the second one (K2) by ageostrophic flux convergence. For the cool events two maxima are found, the first maximum (K4) developed by baroclinic conversion and the second one by ageostrophic flux convergence.

  10. Symbiodinium spp. associated with high-latitude scleractinian corals from Jeju Island, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Palmas, S.; Denis, V.; Ribas-Deulofeu, L.; Loubeyres, M.; Woo, S.; Hwang, S. J.; Song, J. I.; Chen, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    Most studies on endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (genus Symbiodinium) associated with scleractinian corals focus on tropical and sub-tropical reefs. Their diversity in outlying, non-reef coral communities at high latitudes is still not fully documented. In this study, we analyzed the Symbiodinium diversity associated with five scleractinian species collected at eight sites around Jeju Island (South Korea, 33.4°N) between 5 and 15 m depth. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified internal transcribed spacer region 2 distinguished five Symbiodinium types. We observed a high level of specificity between host genera and Symbiodinium spp. despite existing in an environment with large seasonal oscillations in temperature and light. Psammocora albopicta and Psammocora profundacella were associated with C1 and Montipora millepora with C17. Alveopora japonica was associated exclusively with an unusual F-type, the only known clade F representative functionally important to a scleractinian coral. Oulastrea crispata was associated with Symbiodinium boreum (type D15), occasionally co-occurring with type C3 (in 4 % of specimens). In addition to increasing the knowledge of Symbiodinium diversity in high-latitude coral communities, this study constitutes an important baseline upon which the effects of projected environmental change in the near future can be assessed. A better understanding of high-latitude coral communities is critical for understanding how a warming planet will affect the tempo and mode of shifts in the composition of temperate marine communities.

  11. Tectonic-volcanic discontinuity at latitude 27° south Andean Range, associated with Nazca Plate Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ferran, O.; Baker, P. E.; Rex, D. C.

    1985-03-01

    The area investigated lies between latitude 26°40' and 27°15' south and longitude 69°30' and 68°30' west in the Andean Range. A combination of K-Ar dating, petrology, geochemistry and geophysical data has led to the recognition of an important change in the tectonic control of volcanic activity during the early Pliocene. Five volcanic cycles are recognized and grouped into two units according to tectonic control. The first unit comprises the following cycles; (a) La Coipa-Maricunga 23.0-15.7 Ma; (b) Pastillito 13.9-12.9 Ma; and (c) Wheelwright 8.84-6.14 Ma; representing a progression of active belts, striking N5°E, towards the east. The second group is represented by Pen¯as Biancas 4.90-2.64 Ma and Ojos del Salado 1.84-Recent (active) having a N65°E strike, extending over a distance of some 250 km in the high Andes. The volcanic rocks of both groups belong to the calc-alkali series ranging from andesitic basalt to andesite, dacite and rhyolite, though with significant variations in total alkali content. Changes in the orientation of the volcanic belt may be related to changes in the spreading rate of the Nazca Plate or to changes in the angle of subduction on either side of latitude 27°S i.e. along the latitude of the Easter Hot Line.

  12. Extraordinarily high coral cover on a nearshore, high-latitude reef in south-west Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. P.; Frisch, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Photographic line transects were used to quantify the benthic community at Hall Bank, a small, nearshore, high-latitude reef in south-west Australia. On one of the seven transects, the coral cover was 72.5% (mean = 52.6 ± 0.45%), which is the highest ever recorded coral cover at or beyond 32°S. There were no macro-algae, possibly due to the high density of herbivorous sea-urchins (mean = 5.0 ± 0.8 m-2). Fourteen species of scleractinian corals dominated the benthos, seven of which were from the family Faviidae. Given that Hall Bank is at the limit of environmental tolerance for reef formation, it represents a valuable research opportunity for understanding the factors that build and maintain coral reef biodiversity and resilience.

  13. North-South Asymmetries in Earth's Magnetic Field - Effects on High-Latitude Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Cnossen, I.; Milan, S. E.; Haaland, S. E.; Coxon, J.; Pedatella, N. M.; Förster, M.; Reistad, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The solar-wind magnetosphere interaction primarily occurs at altitudes where the dipole component of Earth's magnetic field is dominating. The disturbances that are created in this interaction propagate along magnetic field lines and interact with the ionosphere-thermosphere system. At ionospheric altitudes, the Earth's field deviates significantly from a dipole. North-South asymmetries in the magnetic field imply that the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (M-I-T) coupling is different in the two hemispheres. In this paper we review the primary differences in the magnetic field at polar latitudes, and the consequences that these have for the M-I-T coupling. We focus on two interhemispheric differences which are thought to have the strongest effects: 1) A difference in the offset between magnetic and geographic poles in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and 2) differences in the magnetic field strength at magnetically conjugate regions. These asymmetries lead to differences in plasma convection, neutral winds, total electron content, ion outflow, ionospheric currents and auroral precipitation.

  14. High- and low-latitude orbital forcing of early hominin habitats in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopley, Philip J.; Weedon, Graham P.; Marshall, Jim D.; Herries, Andy I. R.; Latham, Alf G.; Kuykendall, Kevin L.

    2007-04-01

    Reconstructions of African palaeoenvironments are essential for a full understanding of early hominin evolution, but they are often hampered by low-resolution or discontinuous climatic data. Here we present high-resolution oxygen ( δ18O) and carbon ( δ13C) isotope time series for the Pliocene/early Pleistocene (1.99 to 1.52 Ma) of South Africa, derived from the Buffalo Cave flowstone deposit. The δ18O data are dominated by variations at the orbital precession period (18-23 ka), as is typical for records of sub-tropical monsoon rainfall. The δ13C data indicate the proportion of savannah grasses (C 4 plants) compared to trees and shrubs (C 3 plants), and this signal is dominated by an obliquity periodicity (40 ka), commonly associated with high-latitude ice-sheet dynamics. A rapid increase in savannah grass proportions between 1.78 and 1.69 Ma coincides with a pulse in African mammal turnover, and lends support to an adaptive link between the appearance of African Homo erectus and the increasingly savannah-dominated environment.

  15. VHF coherent scatter radar observations of mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Lee, J.; Hwang, J.; Kil, H.; Park, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We examine the mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularity (FAI) activity during 2010-2011 by using the VHF coherent scatter radar data in Daejeon (36.2°N, 127.1°E; dip latitude 26.7°N), South Korea. The VHF radar has been operated since December 2009 and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the variability of the FAI activity with local time, season, solar flux, and magnetic activity. Our preliminary results during the solar minimum show that FAIs preferentially occur at post-sunset and pre-sunrise and during the June solstice. The seasonal variation of the FAI occurrence frequency is similar to that of the electron density irregularities observed by the C/NOFS satellite. For one event, we observed the association of the FAIs with a medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). Our study extends to the investigation of the correlations between the irregularities in the equatorial region and middle latitudes and between the conjugate F regions, and the causal linkage of the FAIs with the E-region perturbations. For this purpose, we analyze the VHF radar and C/NOFS data during 2010-2011.

  16. Palynological composition of a Lower Cretaceous South American tropical sequence: Climatic implications and diversity comparisons with other latitudes.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mejia-Velasquez, Paula J.; Dilcher, David L.; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Fortini, Lucas B.; Manchester, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study: Reconstruction of floristic patterns during the early diversification of angiosperms is impeded by the scarce fossil record, especially in tropical latitudes. Here we collected quantitative palynological data from a stratigraphic sequence in tropical South America to provide floristic and climatic insights into such tropical environments during the Early Cretaceous. Methods: We reconstructed the floristic composition of an Aptian-Albian tropical sequence from central Colombia using quantitative palynology (rarefied species richness and abundance) and used it to infer its predominant climatic conditions. Additionally, we compared our results with available quantitative data from three other sequences encompassing 70 floristic assemblages to determine latitudinal diversity patterns. Key results: Abundance of humidity indicators was higher than that of aridity indicators (61% vs. 10%). Additionally, we found an angiosperm latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) for the Aptian, but not for the Albian, and an inverted LDG of the overall diversity for the Albian. Angiosperm species turnover during the Albian, however, was higher in humid tropics. Conclusions: There were humid climates in northwestern South America during the Aptian-Albian interval contrary to the widespread aridity expected for the tropical belt. The Albian inverted overall LDG is produced by a faster increase in per-sample angiosperm and pteridophyte diversity in temperate latitudes. However, humid tropical sequences had higher rates of floristic turnover suggesting a higher degree of morphological variation than in temperate regions.

  17. From South to North: flowering phenological responses at different geographical latitudes in 12 European countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Barbara; Lehoczky, Annamária; Filzmoser, Peter; Templ, Matthias; Szentkirályi, Ferenc; Pongrácz, Rita; Ortner, Thomas; Mert, Can; Czúcz, Bálint

    2014-05-01

    Phenological sensitivity of plants strongly depends on regional climate variability, moreover it is also influenced by large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns. Plants in different environmental conditions (determined by geographical latitude and longitude, altitude, continentality) may show diverse responses to climate change. The first results of an international cooperation aiming at the analysis of plant phenological data along a latitudinal gradient over 12 European countries (Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Slovenia, Croatia, Hungary, Slovakia, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Finland) are presented. The spatio-temporal changes in the flowering onset dates of common lilac (Syringa vulgaris L.) during the period of 1970-2000 were analysed. To characterise the environmental conditions driving the phenological responses, climatic variables (atmospheric pressure, air temperature, precipitation) obtained from a gridded observational dataset (E-OBS 9.0) and time series of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index were used. Preliminary results for this particular species found a gradual advance of mean flowering onsets along latitudes from 40° N to 65° N, at the rate of -0.12 to -0.32 day/year. Significant zonal differences were found in these rates, which can be explained by the sensitivity of flowering to climatic conditions while moving from Mediterranen to boreal regions of Europe. Thus our results were coherent with most observations in the literature, that higher latitudes can exhibit more pronounced responses, particularly in case of spring phenological events.

  18. Vertical behavior and diet of albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) vary with latitude in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ashley J.; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J.; Evans, Karen J.; Hoyle, Simon D.; Dupoux, Cyndie; Vourey, Elodie; Dubosc, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) are an important upper tropic-level oceanic predator with a circum-global distribution. Little is known of the movements and diet of albacore tuna in the South Pacific Ocean and how variability in both might influence the vulnerability of albacore tuna to fisheries across their range. We coupled data derived from satellite-tagged albacore tuna with stomach samples collected from individuals at the same locations to characterize the vertical behavior, thermal and dietary habits of albacore tuna at tropical (New Caledonia and Tonga) and temperate (New Zealand) latitudes. A total of 18 pop-up satellite archival tags deployed on albacore tuna remained attached for 0-50 days. Position estimates, calculated from 11 tags, described short-term movements of predominantly less than 500 km, although one fish moved more than 1000 km over a period of 50 days. Vertical behavior and diet differed substantially between tropical and temperate latitudes. At tropical latitudes, albacore tuna showed a distinct diel pattern in vertical habitat use, occupying shallower, warmer waters above the mixed layer depth (MLD) at night, and deeper, cooler waters below the MLD during the day. In contrast, there was little evidence of a diel pattern of vertical behavior in albacore tuna at temperate latitudes, with fish limited to shallow waters above the MLD almost all of the time. Spatial patterns of species composition in stomach contents were consistent with vertical movement patterns, with significantly more deepwater prey species consumed in tropical waters than in temperate waters. Albacore in tropical waters also consumed significantly greater diversities of prey than in temperate waters, predominately preying on fish species, whereas those in temperate waters predominately preyed on crustacea. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of albacore is constrained either by thermal preferences with diet reflecting these preferences, by the vertical

  19. Macrobioerosion in Porites corals in subtropical northern South China Sea: a limiting factor for high-latitude reef framework development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianran; Li, Shu; Yu, Kefu

    2013-03-01

    Bioerosion is an important limiting factor in carbonate accretion and reef framework development; however, few studies have quantified the direct impact of macroborers on high-latitude coral communities, which are viewed as potential refuge during a period of global warming. In this study, internal macrobioerosion of Porites corals was examined at Daya Bay, subtropical northern South China Sea. The principal borers were the bivalve Lithophaga spp. and the sponges Cliona spp. and Cliothosa spp. (≥80 %), while sipunculid and polychaete worms and barnacles accounted for small amounts of bioerosion (≤20 %). Porites corals were heavily bioeroded in areas impacted by aquacultural and urban activities (10.34-27.55 %) compared with corals in relatively unpolluted areas (2.18-6.76 %). High levels of bioerosion, especially boring bivalve infestation, significantly weaken the corals and increase their susceptibility to dislodgement and fragmentation in typhoons, limiting accumulation of limestone framework. This study implies that carbonate accretion and reef development for high-latitude coral communities may be limited in future high-CO2 and eutrophication-stressed environments.

  20. Latitude 90 Degrees North to 90 Degrees South and Longitude -180 Degrees to 0 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The coordinates of the Lambert azimuthal equal area projection are latitude 90 degrees N. to 90 degrees S. and longitude -180 degrees to 0 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap of the Planum Boreum region, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs, is located at top. The upper part is marked by large depression, Isidis basin, which contains light-colored plains. The upper part also includes the light-colored smooth plains of Elysium Planitia and dark plains of Vastitas Borealis. Together, these form a vast expanse of contiguous plains. Toward the bottom, on the other hand, the southern hemisphere is almost entirely made up of heavily cratered highlands. Toward the bottom, a conspicuous, relatively bright circular depression marks the ancient large Hellas impact basin.

  1. Latitude 90 Degrees North to 90 Degrees South and Longitude 0 Degrees to 180 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The coordinates of the Lambert azimuthal equal area projection are latitude 90 degrees N. to 90 degrees S. and longitude 0 degree to 180 degrees. Both polar residual ice caps are seen at top and bottom. The central part is dominated by the four largest and youngest volcanoes on Mars--Olympus, Arsia, Pavonis, and Ascraeus Montes--and by a vast system of canyons several thousand kilometers long--Valles Marineris. Directly to the northeast of Valles Marineris, several large outflow channels terminate at a dark depression, Chryse basin. The lower-right corner is marked by the large Argyre basin, defined by an expanse of light-colored plains 800 km across.

  2. Early-Holocene Fire, Vegetation, and Climate Linkages in the Mid-Latitudes of Western North and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, C.; Bartlein, P.; Markgraf, V.; Bianchi, M.

    2005-12-01

    High-resolution fire history data from temperate forests of western North and South America permit examination of regional and hemispheric linkages between Holocene climate, fire, and ecosystem response. Both regions show striking differences in the seasonality of precipitation that influence fire regimes at present, and evidence from the paleorecord suggests that the intensity of these precipitation regimes was affected by large-scale changes in the climate system. At present, summer-dry areas in both hemispheres are dominated by subtropical high pressure systems, and subsidence in these areas suppresses summer precipitation. Summer-wet areas are influenced by onshore flow of moisture from the subtropical Pacific and Atlantic, and monsoonal precipitation increases convectional activity and fire activity east of the Rockies and Andes. In the western U.S., paleoenvironmental data, including vegetation, fire, and lake-level records, suggest that the summer-dry area became drier in the early Holocene with the expansion of the subtropical high-pressure system. Fire and pollen records from summer-wet areas, in contrast, are consistent with wetter-than-present conditions, presumably because summer insolation strengthened summer monsoonal circulation. The network of South American fire records show: (1) an abrupt increase in fire activity at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition at high-latitudes; (2) widespread fire activity and drought in the early Holocene despite the summer-insolation minimum; (3) north-south differences in fire activity in the mid-Holocene suggesting the onset of the current dipole climate, and (4) locally variable fire signals and a shift to smaller surface fires in the late Holocene consistent with cooler conditions and greater interannual variability. Widespread fire activity in southern South America in the early Holocene is consistent with recent model simulations that suggest warmer SSTs, a weakened pole-to-equator temperature gradient, and a

  3. Interannual variability in solar ultraviolet irradiance over decadal time scales at latitude 55 degrees south.

    PubMed

    Frederick, J E; Manner, V W; Booth, C R

    2001-12-01

    Ground-based measurements of solar UV spectral irradiance made from Ushuaia, Argentina at latitude 55 degrees S reveal a large degree of variability among corresponding months of different years over the period from September 1990 through April 1998. The magnitude and wavelength dependence of year-to-year changes in monthly spectral UV-B irradiation are consistent with expectations based on the behavior of column ozone and cloudiness. When combined with satellite measurements of column ozone, a regression model fit to the ground-based data set allows estimates of monthly UV-B irradiation over a time frame of two decades, 1978-1998, during several months of the year. Results show a general increase in ground-level irradiation at 305.0 nm from the end of the 1970s to the early 1990s during calendar months from September through December. This is followed by generally smaller irradiances through the middle to late 1990s for all months except November, where the increase continues through the end of the data record. The long-term variability in monthly irradiation over the time period studied is more complicated than can be described by a simple linear trend. PMID:11783932

  4. Geometrical analysis of structural data collected at high South latitude: A modular arithmetic method that addresses meridional convergence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siddoway, C.S.; Siddoway, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    The convergence of meridians toward the South Pole causes unique problems for geometrical comparison of structural geological and geophysical datasets from Antarctica. The true North reference direction ordinarily is used for measuring and reporting vector data (strike, trend) in Antarctica, as elsewhere. However, over a latitude distance of just 100 km at 85° South, the angular difference in the true North direction exceeds 10°. Consequently, when performing a regional tectonic analysis of vector data (strike, trend) for structures such as faults, dike arrays, or geophysical lineaments oriented with respect to North at different sites, it is necessary to rotate the data to a common reference direction. A modular arithmetic function, performed as a spreadsheet calculation, offers the means to unify data sets from sites having different longitude position, by rotation to a common reference direction. The function is SC ≡ SM + ∆L (mod 360), where SC = converted strike; SM = measured strike; ∆L = angle in degrees longitude between reference longitude and study site; and 360, the divisor, is the number of degrees in Earth’s circumference. The method is used to evaluate 1) paleomagnetic rotation of the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains with respect to the Transantarctic Mountains, and 2) orogenic curvature of the Ross Orogen

  5. Estimates of the North--South electric field component in the magnetotail low latitude boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Candidi, M.; Orsini, S.

    1981-06-01

    The measurements of 0/sup +/ ions drift velocity in the magnetotail boundary layer are used to infer the North--South E/sub z/ component of the local electric field. It is shown that E/sub z/ is generally a substantial component of the field and that it reverses its sign from the dawn to the dusk side of the northern magnetotail between X/sub SM/ = -15 R/sub E/ and X/sub SM/ = -23 R/sub E/.

  6. UV biological dosimetry and ozone correlations for sites with similar latitudes at North and South Hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Rampelotto, Pabulo; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Zanandrea, Ademilson; Barcellos da Rosa, Marcelo; Makita, Kazuo

    As consequence of the increase interest in the monitoring of the UV radiation due a reduction of ozone, efforts have been made to compare data from different physical instruments to follow the solar radiation at different sites around the Earth's surface. However, the UV monitoring still have a lack of a global standardization. To complement such data from physical dosimeters, various biosensors have been developed. The spore dosimetry, based in the inactivation of spores of Bacillus subtilis TKJ6312 (SID, Spore Inactivation Dose) fulfill the criterions stabilized to its utilization as a biosensor. Furthermore, as it has the most global coverage, being the same method used in all sites, it's an adequate tool for the global monitoring of the UV solar radiation. These values reflect indirectly the ozone levels, because the biosensor translate the activity of UV-levels on life systems, which is the exponential decay of the Bacillus subtilis TKJ6312 as a function of the UV-levels and consequently anti-correlated with atmospheric ozone concentrations. In this work, SID data from four sites: Punta Arenas - Chile (53.2° S), Santa Maria - Brazil (29.5° S), Tokyo - Japan (35.7° N) and Brussels - Belgium (50.9° N), covering middle and high latitudes in both hemispheres, were compared with ozone data from TOMS, for the period 1999-2004. For a best visualization of the correlations between the spores dosimetry data with ozone data, wavelets analysis were used as mathematical tool. Seasonal variations of SID have been observed and present higher values for the summers: 1,031±113 for Punta Arenas - Chile and 4,798±1,723 for São Martinho da Serra - Brazil, as well 1,280±336 and a 2,270±563 for Brussels - Belgium and Tokyo - Japan, respectively. The lower values of SID were observed for the winters: 42.5±13, 401±171, 44±21 and 156±49 for Punta Arenas, Santa Maria, Brussels and Tokyo, respectively. The maximal seasonal ratio between SID(max) and SID(min) was obtained

  7. Extant benthic foraminiferal assemblages used in palaeocological interpretations on a high-latitude coral reef, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayman, Stephanie; Mackay, Fiona; Schleyer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    South Africa's coral reefs are located at high latitude, but have high biodiversity and recreational value. Also being marginal, potentially they provide insight into future scenarios of global change for other sub-tropical and/or tropical reefs stimulated by human and climate change pressures. Sodwana Bay has a complex of reefs which are situated on a strongly wind-driven, high energy coastline also influenced significantly by the strong western boundary Agulhas Current. Our aim was to assess the impact of recent changes potentially due to climate change, on these reefs using foraminifera as a proxy for calcifying marine organisms. Limited foraminiferal research has been conducted in this region with none having a palaeoclimate focus. The palaeoclimate was analysed through the collection of three intact bioclastic sediment cores X, Y and Z, which were collected at a depth of 16m. Stable isotope data (δ18O and δ13C) together with down-core foraminiferal assemblage changes allowed for palaeocological interpretations. Sediment cores were collected adjacent to the most accessible part of the reef complex at Two-mile Reef, Sodwana Bay, with the concurrent collection of extant Large Benthic Foraminifera (LBF) using a spatial crossed design of different substrata and habitats. Symbiont bearing LBF showed distinct zonation across the reef and reef associated habitats, with discrete assemblages found in sediment habitats and coral rubble. Distributions of these organisms were influenced by sediment grain size characteristics (% fine sand, % medium sand and % gravel) as well as water chemistry parameters (pH, salinity, temperature and total alkalinity). The living LBF were found predominately on reef rubble. The marginal nature of these reefs was also corroborated through carbonate analysis of water parameters (winter mean ΩAr: 3.00 ±0.37SD; summer mean ΩAr: 3.54 ±0.36SD). Radiocarbon dating from core X provided a calendar age of AD 680-920 (BP 1270 - 1030

  8. Occurrence climatology of F region field-aligned irregularities in middle latitudes as observed by a 40.8 MHz coherent scatter radar in Daejeon, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tae-Yong; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kil, Hyosub; Lee, Young-Sook; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Jae-jin

    2015-11-01

    A new 40.8 MHz coherent scatter radar was built in Daejeon, South Korea (36.18°N, 127.14°E, dip latitude: 26.7°N) on 29 December 2009 and has since been monitoring the occurrence of field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the northern middle latitudes. We report on the occurrence climatology of the F region FAIs as observed by the Daejeon radar between 2010 and 2014. The F region FAIs preferentially occur around 250-350 km at 18:00-21:00 local time (postsunset FAI), around 350-450 km near midnight (nighttime FAI), around 250-350 km before sunrise (presunrise FAI), and around 160-300 km after 05:00 local time (postsunrise FAI). The occurrence rates of nighttime and presunrise FAIs are maximal during summer, though the occurrence rates of postsunset and postsunrise FAIs are maximal during the equinoxes. FAIs rarely occur during local winter. The occurrence rate of F region FAIs increases in concert with increases in solar activity. Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are known as an important source of the F region FAIs in middle latitudes. The high occurrence rate of the nighttime FAIs in local summer is consistent with the high occurrence rate of MSTIDs in that season. However, the dependence of the FAI activity on the solar cycle is inconsistent with the MSTID activity. The source of the F region FAIs in middle latitudes is an open question. Our report of different types of FAIs and their occurrence climatology may provide a useful reference for the identification of the source of the middle latitude FAIs.

  9. Exceptionally preserved lacustrine ostracods from the Middle Miocene of Antarctica: implications for high-latitude palaeoenvironment at 77° south

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark; Siveter, David J; Ashworth, Allan C; Wilby, Philip R; Horne, David J; Lewis, Adam R; Marchant, David R

    2008-01-01

    A newly discovered Konservat-Lagerstätte from the Middle Miocene of the western Olympus Range, Dry Valleys, Antarctica, yields cypridoidean ostracods complete with preserved body and appendages. This is the first record of three-dimensionally fossilized animal soft tissues from the continent. The ostracods are preserved in goethite, secondary after pyrite, representing a novel mode of exceptional preservation. They signal a high-latitude (greater than 77° south) lake setting (Palaeolake Boreas) viable for benthic animal colonization prior to 14 Myr ago. Their presence supports the notion of warmer, tundra-like environmental conditions persisting in the Dry Valleys until the Middle Miocene. PMID:18647723

  10. GPS derived spatial ionospheric total electron content variation over South-Indian latitudes during intense geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sampad K.; Gedam, Shirishkumar S.

    2012-10-01

    The geomagnetic storms are turbulence in geomagnetic field when interplanetary magnetic field driven by solar wind move southward and continue for extended period of time. Although these occur less frequently, but may energize ionospheric electrons and particles adversely affecting ground- and space-based electronic systems. Ionosphere at higher latitude is more prone to geomagnetic storms. Over lower latitude region like Indian sub-continent, the effect is less prominent but still can exhibit many distinctive effects like scintillations, equatorial ionization anomaly, fountain effect and equatorial electrojets. The increased numbers of free electrons in ionosphere introduce delays in global positioning system (GPS) satellite signals resulting in errors during GPS positioning. In a dual frequency GPS receiver, the line integral of free electron density along the pathway of signal through the ionosphere (i.e., Total Electron Content, TEC) can be measured. In this present paper, GPS observation data of three low latitude GPS stations in India located at Bangalore, Hyderabad and Mumbai during four severe geomagnetic storms from 2003-2005, are processed to measure ionospheric TEC during the events. The measured TEC at each of the station is compared with quietest days of the months to investigate its abnormal changes in responses to severe geomagnetic storms. The consequences of TEC variation is analyzed and correlated with interplanetary magnetic field (IMF-Bz), geomagnetic Kp and Dst-indices to study its behavioral changes during the storms. Eventually the aim of the study is to estimate the influence of ionospheric condition on GPS positioning to devise suitable method for accurate position measurements in the low latitude Indian region.

  11. Catalog of available clear mylar templates used to determine latitude and longitude of sample localities between the latitudes of 51 degrees 00' and 71 degrees 30' at the scale of 1:63,360 and between the latitude of 49 degrees 00'00" north or south at the scale of 1:250,000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.L.; VanTrump, George, Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The present use of electro-mechanical plotting of sample points can give rise to location errors, particularly when map scale changes are involved, unless careful control is maintained. The following catalog of computer-generated mylar templates, with plots of latitude and longitude (longitudes equidistant north to south), sufficient to cover the latitudes between 49?00'00'' and 71?30'00'' N. or S., will help facilitate the plotting of points when there is a map scale change for two different map scales (1:63,360 and 1:250,000). Using the template overlays (available as individual page numbers in Open-File Report 82-724--xerographic clear film overlays from U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Services Section, Branch of Distribution, USGS, Box 25425, Denver, Colorado 80225, telephone (303) 234-5888), the point plotted on a composite final copy may be checked against field maps and notes when only degrees latitude and longitude are given.

  12. Statistical characteristics of nighttime mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities observed by Daejeon VHF coherent scattering radar in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. Y.; Kwak, Y. S.; Kil, H.; Lee, Y.; Lee, W. K.; Park, Y. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report statistical characteristics of mid-latitude nighttime F-region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) based on more than three-year observations by Daejeon VHF coherent backscatter radar. This radar has built at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, dip lat. 26.7°N) in 2009 with 40.8 MHz operating frequency for continuous monitoring of the behavior of electron density irregularities in the middle latitude. By using long-term observations from January 2010 to December 2013, we obtained the annual, diurnal and seasonal characteristics of a variety of a percentage occurrence, signal-to-noise ratio, and Doppler velocities from the nighttime F-region irregularities over Korea peninsular. From almost four-year observations, the F-region nighttime irregularities occurred most frequently during post-sunset period. These nighttime irregularities usually appeared with occupying different height levels according to local time. This height variation of F-region FAIs was correlated with hmf2 of ionosonde in Icheon, South Korea. The irregularities were least active near the winter solstice and most active near summer solstice. From the annual occurrence variations, F-region nighttime irregularities seem to have tendency with solar activity.

  13. The magnitude and rapidity of the climate change marking the end of the Pleistocene in the mid-latitudes of South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashworth, A.C.; Hoganson, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The chi-squared test of independence and cluster analysis of Otsuka similarity coefficients of fossil beetle assemblages from the Chilean Lake Region in the mid-latitudes of South America support the following conclusions: (1) the mean summer temperature of the glacial climate was 4-5??C lower than today's climate; (2) the climatic change from glacial to interglacial mode was in a single step centered on about 14,000 yr B.P.; (3) the climatic change was rapid, and within 1500 years the biota of a moorland had been completely replaced by a biota of a rain forest; (4) by 12,500 yr B.P., the low elevation beetle fauna of the Chilean Lake Region was similar in composition to that of the present day; and (5) no reversal in the postglacial warming trend, equivalent in age to the Younger Dryas Stade, was detected. ?? 1993.

  14. North-South differences in the Earth's high-latitude upper atmosphere dynamics: Influence of solar activity and seasonal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Matthias; Cnossen, Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    Recent observations have shown that the upper thermospheric/ionospheric response to solar wind and IMF dependent drivers of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (M-I-T) system can be very dissimilar in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. We present statistical studies of the high-latitude upper thermospheric neutral wind circulation patterns obtained from almost a decade of measurements with an accelerometer on board the CHAMP spacecraft. The influence of the solar activity and the dependence on seasonal variations is analysed with respect to average cross-polar wind velocities and high-latitude neutral wind vorticity values. Using the Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere (CMIT) model, on the other hand, we simulated representative equinox as well as solstice intervals for low and high solar activity conditions. For the simulations, we used on the one hand side symmetric dipole and on the other realistic (IGRF) geomagnetic field configurations. The comparative survey of both the numerical simulation and the statistical observation results show some prominent asymmetries between the two hemispheres, which are caused by the different geographic-geomagnetic offsets and/or the different patterns of geomagnetic flux densities. The average cross-polar neutral wind velocities show a distinct seasonal variation with minimum values during the respective hemispheric winter solstice. The neutral wind vorticity values are generally larger in the Northern than the Southern Hemisphere, except for northern winter solstice conditions. The hemispheric differences become larger for higher solar activity and show a semidiurnal variation. In contrast, the spatial variance of the upper thermospheric neutral wind is usually considerably larger in the polar region of the Southern Hemisphere compared with the Northern, and the hemispheric difference shows a strong semidiurnal variation.

  15. North-south asymmetry of the amplitude of high-latitude Pc 3-5 pulsations: Observations at conjugate stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Akimasa; Olson, John V.; Morris, Ray J.; Fraser, Brian J.; Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2005-10-01

    The north-south asymmetry of the amplitude of ULF pulsations in the Pc 3-5 band is studied using magnetic field data from the magnetically conjugate stations at L ˜ 5.4: Kotzebue (KOT) in the northern hemisphere and Macquarie Island (MCQ) in the southern hemisphere. We obtained the following results for the northward (H) component of magnetic pulsations: (1) The north to south power ratio shows a maximum in the northern winter and a minimum in the northern summer. This "seasonal variation" is stronger at higher frequencies (Pc 3 and Pc 4 frequencies). (2) The north to south power ratio for the Pc 4 and Pc 5 frequency band is basically greater than 1.0 for all seasons. This "positive offset" is stronger at lower frequencies. The "seasonal variation" implies that the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves incident from the magnetosphere are more strongly shielded when the ionospheric conductivity is higher. The "positive offset" may result from the difference of the background magnetic field intensity between KOT and MCQ.

  16. Mapping Vesta Mid-Latitude Quadrangle V-12EW: Mapping the Edge of the South Polar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogenboom, T.; Schenk, P.; Williams, D. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Garry, W. B.; Yingst, R.; Buczkowski, D.; McCord, T. B.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; Gaskell, R. W.; Neukum, G.; Schmedemann, N.; Marchi, S.; Nathues, A.; Le Corre, L.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; White, O. L.; DeSanctis, C.; Filacchione, G.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the asteroid 4Vesta on July 15, 2011, and is now collecting imaging, spectroscopic, and elemental abundance data during its one-year orbital mission. As part of the geological analysis of the surface, a series of 15 quadrangle maps are being produced based on Framing Camera images (FC: spatial resolution: ~65 m/pixel) along with Visible & Infrared Spectrometer data (VIR: spatial resolution: ~180 m/pixel) obtained during the High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO). This poster presentation concentrates on our geologic analysis and mapping of quadrangle V-12EW. This quadrangle is dominated by the arcuate edge of the large 460+ km diameter south polar topographic feature first observed by HST (Thomas et al., 1997). Sparsely cratered, the portion of this feature covered in V-12EW is characterized by arcuate ridges and troughs forming a generalized arcuate pattern. Mapping of this terrain and the transition to areas to the north will be used to test whether this feature has an impact or other (e.g., internal) origin. We are also using FC stereo and VIR images to assess whether their are any compositional differences between this terrain and areas further to the north, and image data to evaluate the distribution and age of young impact craters within the map area. The authors acknowledge the support of the Dawn Science, Instrument and Operations Teams.

  17. Long-term community changes on a high-latitude coral reef in the Greater St Lucia Wetland Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, Michael H; Kruger, Alke; Celliers, Louis

    2008-03-01

    South African coral reefs are limited in size but, being marginal, provide a model for the study of many of the stresses to which these valuable systems are being subjected globally. Soft coral cover, comprising relatively few species, exceeds that of scleractinians over much of the reefs. The coral communities nevertheless attain a high biodiversity at this latitude on the East African coast. A long-term monitoring programme was initiated in 1993, entailing temperature logging and image analysis of high resolution photographs of fixed quadrats on representative reef. Sea temperatures rose by 0.15 degrees C p.a. at the site up to 2000 but have subsequently been decreasing by 0.07 degrees C p.a. Insignificant bleaching was encountered in the region during the 1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event, unlike elsewhere in East Africa, but quantifiable bleaching occurred during an extended period of warming in 2000. Peak temperatures on the South African reefs thus appear to have attained the coral bleaching threshold. While this has resulted in relatively little bleaching thus far, the increased temperatures appear to have had a deleterious effect on coral recruitment success as other anthropogenic influences on the reefs are minimal. Recruitment success diminished remarkably up to 2004 but appears again to be improving. Throughout, the corals have also manifested changes in community structure, involving an increase in hard coral cover and reduction in that of soft corals, resulting in a 5.5% drop in overall coral cover. These "silent" effects of temperature increase do not appear to have been reported elsewhere in the literature. PMID:18206178

  18. Hypothesis of homeothermy evolution on isolated South China Craton that moved from equator to cold north latitudes 250-200Myr ago.

    PubMed

    Kurbel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Based on avian and mammalian fossils found in the northeastern Chinese province of Liaoning and physiological traits linked to homeothermy, a hypothesis of evolution of homeothermic animals is proposed. It is based on the importance of muscle function in cold environment, as a strong selection pressure that favors endothermic metabolism during periods of cold climates. The presented hypothesis postulates that in progressively cooling environment, animals will develop thermal insulation, increased basal metabolism if food is available, and torpor when food is scarce. Since late Permian, Triassic and Cretaceous global temperatures were high, an exceptional place that gradually became cold was needed for the homeothermy evolution. South China Craton is here proposed as a plausible candidate for that role since it drifted across the Paleo-Tethys ocean, from equator to high northern latitudes in a journey that lasted from 250 to 200Myr ago. After this small continent collided with North China Craton some 200Myr ago, the already cold-adapted animals had spread to large, mostly empty spaces on the North China Craton, due to their evolutionary advantage of making active living in the cold environment. The most advantageous early homeothermic animals went further north to the cold Liaoning to start an oasis that delivered modern birds during next 50Myr. Modern mammals possibly evolved somewhere in the cold vicinity. This made Liaoning and similarly cold places the cradles of early birds and early mammals since for the following millions of years these places remained too cold for poikilotherms to enter and warm enough for homeotherms to dwell, until the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event and subsequent global cooling that diminished poikilotherms. Homeothermy was probably even more important as a survival advantage in cooler climates of Paleogene, when mammals and birds became dominant animals. This interpretation is probably supported by a recent report that a small

  19. Clear mylar templates used to measure latitude and longitude of sample localities at scales of 1:63,360 and 1:250,000 between the latitudes of 49 degrees and 71 degrees 30 minutes north or south

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.L.; VanTrump, George, Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Clear mylar overlay help expedite the recording of sample localities during both field and office work. These overlays allow for fast and accurate measurement of latitudes and longitudes. Presented here is a booklet computer-generated overlays at scales of 1:63,360 and 1:250,000 between the latitudes of 49?00'00'' N. or S. to 71?30'00'' N. or S. Copies of individual overlays are available from the U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Services Section, Branch of Distribution, USGS, Box 25425, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colo., 80225, telephone (303) 234-5888.

  20. High Latitude Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows polygonal patterned ground on a south high-latitude plain. The outlines of the polygons, like the craters and hills in this region, are somewhat enhanced by the presence of bright frost left over from the previous winter. On Earth, polygons at high latitudes would usually be attributed to the seasonal freezing and thawing cycles of ground ice. The origin of similar polygons on Mars is less certain, but might also be an indicator of ground ice.

    Location near: 75.3oS, 113.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  1. South High-latitude Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    1 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of gullies on a scarp in Lyell Crater.

    Location near: 69.7oS, 14.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  2. Mid-latitude Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    7 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes on the floor of a southern mid-latitude impact crater. Craters are commonly the site of sand dunes, as sand may become trapped in these topographic depressions. In this case, the winds responsible for the dunes generally blew from the south/southeast (bottom/lower right),

    Location near: 51.8oS, 105.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  3. Mid-latitude Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of south mid-latitude gullies on a crater wall. Gullies such as these may have formed by runoff of liquid water.

    Location near: 38.0oS, 167.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  4. High Latitude Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    21 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows polygon patterned ground in the south polar region near 82.0oS, 90.8oW. Polygons are fairly common at high latitudes in both martian hemispheres, but they do not occur everywhere. On Earth, features such as these would be good indicators of the presence and freeze-thaw cycles of ground ice. On Mars, the same might (emphasis on might) also be true. This image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left. Seasonal frost enhances the contrast in the scene; the darkest areas have advanced the farthest in the springtime defrosting process.

  5. Studies of IRAS sources at high galactic latitudes. I - Source counts at /b/greater than 60 deg and evidence for a north-south anisotropy of cosmological significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Walker, D.; Chester, T.; Soifer, T.; Fairclough, J.

    1986-01-01

    A study of the IRAS sky at b with an absolute value greater than 60 deg is conducted. Source counts at 12, 25, 60 and 100 microns are presented, and it is shown that emission from interstellar dust at 100 microns is localized to a few small areas of tathe galactic polar caps. At 12 and 25 microns, the sky is dominated by stars; at 60 and 100 microns, by galaxies. Comparison with the minisurvey source counts indicates the 12and 25-micron source denstiy is lower at the present latitude than at a latitude whereby the absolute value of b equals 10-40 deg. Due to the greatly reduced effects of emission from interstellar dust, the 100 micron survey reaches a factor 1.6 deeper in flux at the present latitude than the minisurvey. An anisotropy significant at the 4-sigma level was found between the north and south galactic polar caps at 60 and 100 microns, after exclusion of the Virgo cluster and of the few remaining areas significantly affected by interstellar-dust emission. It is suggested that this anisotropy represents a cosmologically significant anisotropy in the galaxy distribution. The scale of associated inhomogeneity is of the order of at least 100(50/H)Mpc.

  6. Latitude and pH driven trends in the molecular composition of DOM across a north south transect along the Yenisei River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Vanessa-Nina; Dittmar, Thorsten; Gaupp, Reinhard; Gleixner, Gerd

    2013-12-01

    We used electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) to identify the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected from different ecosystems along a transect crossing Siberia’s northern and middle Taiga. This information is urgently needed to help elucidate global carbon cycling and export through Russian rivers. In total, we analyzed DOM samples from eleven Yenisei tributaries and seven bogs. Freeze-dried and re-dissolved DOM was desalted via solid phase extraction (SPE) and eluted in methanol for ESI-FT-ICR-MS measurements. We recorded 15209 different masses and identified 7382 molecular formulae in the mass range between m/z = 150 and 800. We utilized the relative FT-ICR-MS signal intensities of 3384 molecular formulae above a conservatively set limit of detection and summarized the molecular characteristics for each measurement using ten magnitude-weighted parameters ((O/C)w, (H/C)w, (N/C)w, (DBE)w, (DBE/C)w, (DBE/O)w, (DBE-O)w, (C#)w, (MW)w and (AI)w) for redundancy analysis. Consequently, we revealed that the molecular composition of DOM depends mainly on pH and geographical latitude. After applying variation partitioning to the peak data, we isolated molecular formulae that were strongly positive or negatively correlated with latitude and pH. We used the chemical information from 13 parameters (C#, H#, N#, O#, O/C, H/C, DBE, DBE/C, DBE/O, AI, N/C, DBE-O and MW) to characterize the extracted molecular formulae. Using latitude along the gradient representing climatic variation, we found a higher abundance of smaller molecules, nitrogen-containing compounds and unsaturated Cdbnd C functionalities at higher latitudes. As possible reasons for the different molecular characteristics occurring along this gradient, we suggested that the decomposition was temperature dependent resulting to a higher abundance of non-degraded lignin-derived phenolic substances. We demonstrated that bog samples

  7. SNP variation with latitude: Analysis of the SNPforID 52-plex markers in north, mid-region and south Chilean populations.

    PubMed

    Moreno, F; Freire-Aradas, A; Phillips, C; Fondevila, M; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2014-05-01

    Chile is a disproportionately long and narrow country defined by the southern Andes and Pacific coastline where a level of genetic sub-structure resulting from distances of several thousand kilometers might be expected across the most distantly separated regions. Although STR databases created for the Chilean Legal Medical Service indicate an absence of sub-structure, such a characteristic requires further exploration when introducing additional forensic markers. Notably, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) have a much lower mutation rate than STRs and can show more stable distributions of genetic variation if population movement is restricted. In this study we evaluated 451 Chilean urban samples from the North, North-Central, Central, South-Central and South regions of Chile for the 52 SNPs of the SNPforID forensic identification panel to explore the underlying genetic structure of Chilean populations. Results reveal similar genetic distances between groups suggesting a single SNP database for the whole of Chile is appropriate. To further understand the genetic composition of Chilean populations that comprise the bulk of individuals with both European and Native American ancestries, ancestral membership proportions were evaluated and pairwise comparisons to other American populations were made. PMID:24680124

  8. An assemblage of mollusks associated with the high latitude scleractinian coral Alveopora japonica (Eguchi 1968) in Jeju Island, off the south coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noseworthy, Ronald G.; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Keshavmurthy, Shashank; Lee, Hee-Jung; Jeung, Hee-Do; Ju, Se-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bin; Jung, Sukgeun; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2016-03-01

    Corals reefs and communities support a wide range of flora and fauna. The complete richness and abundance of faunal communities in either coral reefs or communities is not fully understood. This is especially true for high-latitude coral communities. In this work, we carried out an analysis of an Alveopora japonica associated mollusk assemblage, in Jeju Island, Korea. A. japonica is one of the major coral species present in high abundance (88-155 colonies m-2), with a high recruitment rate (7.8 juvenile corals m-2 yr-1) in Jeju Island, and may serve as a habitat for other benthic organisms. In 2012, a total number of 579 A. japonica colonies with sizes ranging between 15.1-346.7 cm2 in the surface area were collected from a 1m× 10m quadrat installed at a depth of 10 m at Keumneung, on the northwest coast of Jeju Island. Numerous benthic invertebrates were found to be associated with A. japonica colonies. Twenty-seven bivalves and gastropods were identified, including a boring mytilid, Lithophaga curta, and an arcid, Barbatia stearnsi. A zonalgeographical examination of the distribution ranges of these mollusks revealed a majority of warmer water species. Our observations also showed that A. japonica may be providing a habitat to grazing gastropod, Turbo cornutus, and encrusting Spondylidae and Chamidae bivalves. A. japonica forms a coral carpet with a distinct assemblage of bivalves. It is thought that the presence of these mollusks species in the coral indicates its use as a nursery for juvenile species, a ready food supply of organic detritus, and a refuge from predators.

  9. High latitude pulsating aurorae revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Rosenberg, T.J. )

    1992-01-03

    Dayside auroral pulsations (10-40 s periods) have been studied for different levels of geomagnetic disturbance with N{sub 2}{sup +} 427.8 nm emission data obtained at South Pole station, Antarctica ({minus}74.2{degree} MLAT). The occurrence distribution exhibits a single peak at magnetic noon under geomagnetically quiet conditions (0 {le} Kp < 1). With increased Kp, the distribution shifts to earlier times, the peak occurring at 1000-1030 MLT for 1 {le} Kp < 4. At these higher Kp levels a secondary occurrence peak is evident in the afternoon sector between 1400 and 1600 MLT, occurring earlier as Kp increases. These results are compared with those obtained separately for pre-noon pulsations observed at Ny Alesund and post-noon pulsations observed at Ny Alesund and post-noon pulsations observed at Davis, northern and southern hemisphere sites at approximately the same magnetic latitude as South Pole. South Pole and Ny Alesund observe morning peaks at the same time and with a similar lack of Kp dependence; South Pole and Davis observe afternoon peaks with similar Kp dependence, though the peak occurs earlier at Davis. In contrast to the results from the earlier studies, the South Pole observations show larger pulsation amplitudes in the morning sector and significantly higher occurrence rates overall.

  10. Response of the mid-latitude D-region ionosphere to the total solar eclipse of 22 July 2009 studied using VLF signals in South Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, D. V.; Kwak, Y.-S.; Patra, A. K.; Maurya, A. K.; Singh, Rajesh; Park, S.-M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze VLF signals received at Busan to study the the D-region changes linked with the solar eclipse event of 22 July 2009 for very short (∼390 km) transmitter-receiver great circle path (TRGCP) during local noon time 00:36-03:13 UT (09:36-12:13 KST). The eclipse crossed south of Busan with a maximum obscuration of ∼84%. Observations clearly show a reduction of ∼6.2 dB in the VLF signal strength at the time of maximum solar obscuration (84% at 01:53 UT) as compared to those observed on the control days. Estimated values of change in Wait ionospheric parameters: reflection height (h‧) in km and inverse scale height parameter (β) in km-1 from Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) model during the maximum eclipse phase as compared to unperturbed ionosphere are 7 km and 0.055 km-1, respectively. Moreover, the D-region electron density estimated from model computation shows 95% depletion in electron density at the height of ∼71 km. The reflection height is found to increase by ∼7 km in the D-region during the eclipse as compared to those on the control days, implying a depletion in the Lyman-α flux by a factor of ∼7. The present observations are discussed in the light of current understanding on the solar eclipse induced D-region dynamics.

  11. Acoustic micronektonic distribution is structured by macroscale oceanographic processes across 20-50°S latitudes in the South-Western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béhagle, Nolwenn; Cotté, Cédric; Ryan, Tim E.; Gauthier, Olivier; Roudaut, Gildas; Brehmer, Patrice; Josse, Erwan; Cherel, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Micronekton constitutes the largest unexploited marine biomass worldwide. It is one of the most conspicuous and ecologically important components of the still poorly known mesopelagic ecosystem. Acoustic data were collected from both fishing and research vessels along 18 transects for a total of 47 682 linear kilometers to investigate large-scale distribution of micronekton over a long latitudinal gradient (20-50°S) and two contrasted seasons (summer and winter) in the South-Western Indian Ocean. Acoustic backscatter at 38 kHz was used as a proxy of mid-water organisms' abundance (0-800 m depth). Two consistent features were diel vertical migration of backscatters and vertical distribution of micronekton in three distinct layers, namely the surface (SL), intermediate (IL) and deep (DL) layers. Satellite remote sensing data was used to position oceanic fronts, and hence define water masses, from the tropical to low Antarctic zones. A key finding of this study was the significant correlation observed between abundance and distribution of acoustic backscatter and position relative to these front and water masses. Total backscatter peaked in the subtropical zone, with low abundances in the colder Polar Frontal Zone. The high overall abundances in subtropical waters resulted mainly from high backscatters in the IL and DL that contrasted with low SL values, especially during the day (2-11%). The warmer the waters, the higher SL backscatter was, with the highest absolute and relative (38-51% of the total abundance) values observed at night in the Tropical Zone and the lowest abundance in the Antarctic Zone. No significant seasonal pattern was found, but SL backscatters were very low in winter compared to summer in the Polar Frontal Zone. Moreover, the Northern winter shift of the fronts induced a Northern latitudinal shift of the peak in abundance from summer to winter. The present study highlights the value of building large acoustic databases collected from both

  12. Sr isotopic composition of gypsic paleosols as a proxy for Neogene forearc uplift in the South America - Nazca plate system at latitudes 19 to 22° S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, N. J.; Jordan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of uplift of a continental surface relative to sea level is challenging. The study area comprises the forearc associated with the South America - Nazca plate margin in northern Chile. The Coastal Cordillera (CdlC) is a mountain range 800 to 2300 m in elevation that ends abruptly to the west at the Pacific Ocean, terminated at a 400 m to 1700 m high scarp. The CdlC is formed mainly of Jurassic - Early Cretaceous igneous rocks, the remnants of a Mesozoic magmatic arc. To the east, the Central Depression (CD) is a forearc basin filled with Cenozoic sediments derived from the arc to the east. Arid to hyperarid climate conditions dominated throughout the Neogene. Profiles from rivers draining the CD and cutting through the CdlC are strongly suggestive that at least 1 km of relative surface uplift occurred since 10 Ma. Paleogeographic reconstructions of continental deposits, marine terraces and tilted originally horizontal depositional surfaces in the CdlC constrain surface uplift histories. However, we seek quantitative information about the magnitude as well as ages of uplift, so that numerical models of forearc geodynamics can be tested against uplift history. We are testing a new paleoaltimetry proxy based on the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of gypsum-rich paleosols. Published studies show that modern pedogenic gypsum in the study area is derived from two sources of distinguishable Sr isotopic values; salts precipitate from aerosols in persistent winter marine fogs and dust comes from the weathering of Andean rocks. It has been shown for modern soils that a transect from the coast to the Andes reveals a progressive decline in 87Sr/86Sr, corresponding to the mixing of marine aerosols and weathered dust. Below 1.5 km altitude, the marine signal diminishes as altitude rises. The low mass difference between 87Sr and 86Sr leads to little fractionation by environmental processes, which is ideal for studying the primary marine vs. Andean signal. Because the Neogene strata

  13. Tracer exchange between tropics and middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard; Douglass, Anne; Weaver, Clark

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between the tropics and middle latitudes is studied using a tracer emitted at 50 hPa along a great circle route between Los Angeles, USA and Sydney, Australia. Though designed to examine the impact of stratospheric aircraft, the study more generally addresses the transport between tropics and middle latitudes for a three month period from January through March 1989. The results show that air is transported from the tropics to middle latitudes by planetary scale and tropospheric cyclonic scale waves. Except for intrusions by these wave events, the tropics are substantially isolated throughout the lower stratosphere. These waves draw material out of the tropics which ends up in the middle latitude westerly jets, with little material entering the winter polar latitudes prior to the springtime transition. The summer Southern Hemisphere is characterized by tracer being drawn out in streamers that extend from north and west to south and east. The material in the tropics is zonally asymmetric. The material that reaches the troposphere comes down in the synoptic scale eddies and is concentrated in the middle latitude jet stream. These characteristics are similar to those observed during the dispersion of volcanic clouds.

  14. Characteristics of the E - and F -region field-aligned irregularities in middle latitudes: Initial results obtained from the Daejeon 40.8 MHz VHF radar in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Young-Sil; Yang, Tae-Yong; Kil, Hoysub; Phanikumar, D.; Heo, Bok-Haeng; Lee, Jae-Jin; Hwang, Junga; Choi, Seong-Hwan; Park, Young-Deuk; Choi, Ho-Seong

    2014-03-01

    We present preliminary observations of the field-aligned-irregularities (FAIs) in the E and F regions during the solar minimum (2009 - 2010) using the 40.8 MHz coherent backscatter radar at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude) in South Korea. The radar, which consists of 24 Yagi antennas, observes the FAIs using a single beam with a peak power of 24 kW. The radar has been continuously operated since December 2009. Depending on the manner of occurrence of the backscatter echoes, the E-region echoes are largely divided into two types: quasi-periodic (QP) and continuous echoes. Our observations show that the QP echoes occur frequently above an altitude of 105 km in the post-sunset period and continuous echoes occur preferentially around an altitude of 105 km in the post-sunrise period. QP echoes appear as striated discrete echoes for a period of about 10 - 20 min. The QP-type echoes occur more frequently than the continuoustype echoes do and the echo intensity of the QP type is stronger than that of the continuous type. In the F region, the FAIs occur at night at an altitude interval of 250 - 450 km. As time proceeds, the occurrence height of the FAIs gradually increases until early in the morning and then decreases. The duration of the F-region FAIs is typically a few hours at night, although, in rare cases, FAIs persist throughout the night or appear even after sunrise. We discuss the similarities and differences of the FAIs observed by the Daejeon radar in comparison with other radar observations.

  15. Latitude dependence of narrow bipolar pulse emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. R.; Esa, M. R. M.; Cooray, V.; Baharudin, Z. A.; Hettiarachchi, P.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative study on the occurrence of narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs) and other forms of lightning flashes across various geographical areas ranging from northern regions to the tropics. As the latitude decreased from Uppsala, Sweden (59.8°N) to South Malaysia (1.5°N), the percentage of NBP emissions relative to the total number of lightning flashes increased significantly from 0.13% to 12%. Occurrences of positive NBPs were more common than negative NBPs at all observed latitudes. However, as latitudes decreased, the negative NBP emissions increased significantly from 20% (Uppsala, Sweden) to 45% (South Malaysia). Factors involving mixed-phase region elevations and vertical extents of thundercloud tops are invoked to explain the observed results. These factors are fundamentally latitude dependent. Our results suggest that the NBP emission rate is not a useful measure to monitor thunderstorm severity because regular tropical thunderstorms, where relatively high NBP emissions occur, lack suitable conditions to become severe (i.e., there is modest convective available potential energy and a lack of baroclinity in such regions). Observations of significantly high negative NBP occurrences together with very rare occurrences of positive cloud-to-ground flashes and isolated breakdown pulses in tropical thunderstorms are indicative of a stronger negative screening layer magnitude and weaker lower positive charge region magnitude than those in northern regions.

  16. Transient magnetic field signatures at high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Sibeck, D.G. )

    1993-01-01

    We survey GOES 2/5/6 geosynchronous and Huancayo, Peru, ground magnetometer observations at the times of 70 transient (2-10 min) events recorded at South Pole Station, Antarctica. The simultaneous observations indicate that most South Pole events correspond to sudden sharp variations in the equatorial magnetospheric and low-latitude ground magnetic field. The exceptions occur when the South Pole events have weak amplitudes and/or Huancayo and GOES 2/5/6 are far from local noon. The corresponding features observed at GOES 5 and GOES 6 are generally similar, with a lag indicating antisunward motion. A similar antisunward motion may be inferred from the ground observations themselves. On a case-by-case and statistical basis, the characteristics of the events observed in South Pole ground magnetograms resemble those previously interpreted as sudden impulse and sudden storm commencement signatures at other high-latitude stations. These observations suggest that the transient events at South Pole form part of the magnetospheric and ionospheric response to a sudden change in the fraction of the solar wind dynamic pressure applied to the magnetosphere. 57 refs., 14 figs.

  17. Altitude latitude mapping of plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Liu, J.; Sinha, H.; Banerje, S.

    2007-12-01

    Plasma depletions, if generated at the geomagnetic equator, are expected to appear in the all sky images as dark bands extending pole ward. The all sky observations conducted from Kavalur (12.5¢ªN, 78.8¢ªE; 4.6¢ªN, geomagnetic), INDIA, but showed dark patches in 630.0 nm entering the imager field of view (FOV) from the northern edge in the post-sunset period. These patches gradually extended towards equator and became fully extended dark bands in the North-South direction by midnight. The series of such images appeared to be the airglow signatures of irregularities that are probably generated at off-equatorial latitudes and mapped to the lower or equatorial latitudes. Similar features were observed in several nights. This appearance of depletions as dark patches from the northern edge of the FOV is explained in this work

  18. Discovery of Temperate Latitude Clouds on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, H. G.; Bouchez, A. H.; Trujillo, C. A.; Schaller, E. L.; Brown, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Until now, all the clouds imaged in Titan's troposphere have been found at far southern latitudes (60°-90° south). The occurrence and location of these clouds is thought to be the result of convection driven by the maximum annual solar heating of Titan's surface, which occurs at summer solstice (2002 October) in this south polar region. We report the first observations of a new recurring type of tropospheric cloud feature, confined narrowly to ~40° south latitude, which cannot be explained by this simple insolation hypothesis. We propose two classes of formation scenario, one linked to surface geography and the other to seasonally evolving circulation, which will be easily distinguished with continued observations over the next few years. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (US), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), CNPq (Brazil), and CONICET (Argentina).

  19. Photosynthetically active sunlight at high southern latitudes.

    PubMed

    Frederick, John E; Liao, Yixiang

    2005-01-01

    A network of scanning spectroradiometers has acquired a multiyear database of visible solar irradiance, covering wavelengths from 400 to 600 nm, at four sites in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere, from 55 degrees S to 90 degrees S. Monthly irradiations computed from the hourly measurements reveal the character of the seasonal cycle and illustrate the role of cloudiness as functions of latitude. Near summer solstice, the combined influences of solar elevation and the duration of daylight would produce a monthly irradiation with little latitude dependence under clear skies. However, the attenuation associated with local cloudiness varies geographically, with the greatest effect at the most northern locations, Ushuaia, Argentina and Palmer Station on the Antarctic Peninsula. Near summer solstice, the South Pole experiences the largest monthly irradiation of the sites studied, where relatively clear skies contribute to this result. Scaling factors derived from radiative-transfer calculations combined with the measured 400-600 nm irradiances allow estimating irradiances integrated over the wavelength band 400-700 nm. This produces a climatology of photosynthetically active radiation for each month of the year at each site. PMID:15689179

  20. Latitude dependence of eddy variances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Bell, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The eddy variance of a meteorological field must tend to zero at high latitudes due solely to the nature of spherical polar coordinates. The zonal averaging operator defines a length scale: the circumference of the latitude circle. When the circumference of the latitude circle is greater than the correlation length of the field, the eddy variance from transient eddies is the result of differences between statistically independent regions. When the circumference is less than the correlation length, the eddy variance is computed from points that are well correlated with each other, and so is reduced. The expansion of a field into zonal Fourier components is also influenced by the use of spherical coordinates. As is well known, a phenomenon of fixed wavelength will have different zonal wavenumbers at different latitudes. Simple analytical examples of these effects are presented along with an observational example from satellite ozone data. It is found that geometrical effects can be important even in middle latitudes.

  1. Map of Martian Thorium at Mid-Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This gamma ray spectrometer map of the mid-latitude region of Mars is based on gamma-rays from the element thorium. Thorium is a naturally radioactive element that exists in rocks and soils in extremely small amounts. The region of highest thorium content, shown in red, is found in the northern part of Acidalia Planitia (50 degrees latitude, -30 degrees longitude). Areas of low thorium content, shown in blue, are spread widely across the planet with significant low abundances located to the north of Olympus Mons (near 55 degrees latitude, -155 degrees longitude), to the east of the Tharsis volcanoes (-10 degrees latitude, -80 degrees longitude) and to the south and east of Elysium Mons (20 degrees latitude, 160 degrees longitude). Contours of constant surface elevation are also shown. The long continuous contour line running from east to west marks the approximate separation of the younger lowlands in the north from the older highlands in the south.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The gamma ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona, Tucson. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colo., is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Study of the behavior of electron density of the lower ionosphere during absorption of the polar cap at latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere and the region of the South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendesdacosta, Aracy

    1991-04-01

    A study is presented of the effect of Solar Proton events (PCA's) that occurred from September 1967 to November 1974, on the phase and amplitude records of very low frequency (VLF) signals on NWC (Australia) - Sao Paulo (Brazil) propagation path, crossing the Southern Hemisphere auroral zone. Twenty five of more than a hundred events of different intensities that occurred in this period were studied and the most relevant ones were described in detail. Simultaneous analysis of transequatorial VLF propagation paths received in Sao Paulo and Curitiba (Brazil) showed also the significant contribution of the South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly to the ionization of the lower part of the ionospheric D-region during the PCA events. The outstanding results was the determination of day and nighttime electron density fitting exponential models to the data analyzed for two regions up to now poorly known: The Antarctic region and the South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly.

  3. Influence of anthropogenic activities on PAHs in sediments in a significant gulf of low-latitude developing regions, the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea: distribution, sources, inventory and probability risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingyang; Xue, Rui; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhang, Gan

    2015-01-15

    Fifteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 41 surface sediment samples and a sediment core (50 cm) from the Beibu Gulf, a significant low-latitude developing gulf, were analyzed. PAHs concentrations were 3.01-388 ng g(-)(1) (mean 95.5 ng g(-)(1)) in the surface sediments and 10.5-87.1 ng g(-)(1) (average 41.1 ng g(-)(1)) in the sediment core. Source apportionment indicated that PAHs were generated from coke production and vehicular emissions (39.4%), coal and biomass combustion (35.8%), and petrogenic sources (24.8%). PAHs were mainly concentrated in the industrialized and urbanized regions and the harbor, and were transported by atmospheric deposition to the marine matrix. The mass inventory (1.57-2.62t) and probability risk showed sediments here served as an important reservoir but low PAH risk. Different from oil and natural gas in developed regions, coal combustion has always been a significant energy consumption pattern in this developing region for the past 30 years (56 ± 5%). PMID:25467868

  4. Climate response to imposed solar radiation reductions in high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCracken, M. C.; Shin, H.-J.; Caldeira, K.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.

    2012-07-01

    Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are the primary contributor to the 0.8 °C increase in the global average temperature since the late 19th century, shortening cold seasons and lengthening warm seasons. The warming is amplified in polar regions, causing retreat of sea ice, snow cover, permafrost, mountain glaciers, and ice sheets, while also modifying mid-latitude weather, amplifying global sea level rise, and initiating high-latitude carbon feedbacks. Model simulations in which we reduced solar insolation over high latitudes not only cooled those regions, but also drew energy from lower latitudes, exerting a cooling influence over much of the hemisphere in which the reduction was imposed. Our simulations, which used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's CAM3.1 atmospheric model coupled to a slab ocean, indicated that, on a normalized basis, high-latitude reductions in absorbed solar radiation have a significantly larger cooling influence than equivalent solar reductions spread evenly over the Earth. This amplified influence occurred because high-latitude surface cooling preferentially increased sea ice fraction and, therefore, surface albedo, leading to a larger deficit in the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere than from an equivalent global reduction in solar radiation. Reductions in incoming solar radiation in one polar region (either north or south) resulted in increased poleward energy transport during that hemisphere's cold season and shifted the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) away from that pole, whereas equivalent reductions in both polar regions tended to leave the ITCZ approximately in place. Together, these results suggest that, until emissions reductions are sufficient to limit the warming influence of greenhouse gas concentrations, polar reductions in solar radiation, if they can be efficiently and effectively implemented, might, because of fewer undesirable side effects than for global solar radiation reductions

  5. Ionospheric signatures of cusp latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Rosenberg, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    Search coil magnetometer, riometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver data obtained at South Pole Station and McMurdo, Antarctica during selected days in March and April 1986 are compared. Narrow-band magnetic pulsations in the Pc 3 period range are observed simultaneously at both stations in the dayside sector during times of low IMF cone angle, but are considerably stronger at South Pole, which is located at a latitude near the nominal foot point of the dayside cusp/cleft region. Pulsations in auroral light at 427.8 nm wavelength are often observed with magnetic pulsations at South Pole, but such optical pulsations are not observed at McMurdo. The observations suggest that precipitating magnetosheathlike electrons at nominal dayside cleft latitudes are at times modulated with frequencies similar to those of upstream waves. These particles may play an important role, via modification of ionospheric currents and conductivities, in the transmission of upstream wave signals into the magnetosphere and in the generation of dayside high-latitude Pc 3 pulsations.

  6. Latitudes: new Indian transnational cinema.

    PubMed

    Villarejo, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This article examines films and video art that speak to conditions of exile and displacement, including the work of Mona Hatoum, Sonali Gulati, and Onir. It proposes the term "latitude" to interrogate the aesthetic and formal properties of these artworks, seeking to understand how lesbian and same-sex eroticism and identities are central to their efficacy. PMID:24972281

  7. Warming: mechanism and latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    flows distribution with respect the Earth's hemispheres in first caused by eccentric position of the Earth core with respect to the mantle (displaced in present geological epoch in direction to Brasil). Of course the asymmetric distribution of heat loss is a long-term phenomenon in the geological history. But in present epoch due to drift of the core to the North we must observe some increasing of the heat flow of the Northern hemisphere and decreasing of the heat flow of the Southern hemisphere. In reality mentioned changes of heat flows are contrast (asymmetrical) and can have general tendency of increasing heat flows in both hemispheres (due to activization of relative oscillations of the core and mantle relatively polar axis). Contrast secular warming of Northern and Southern hemispheres of the Earth in present epoch. Dependence of warming from latitude. And warm flows are asymmetrically, more intensively warm is redistributed in northern hemisphere of the Earth and less intensively in a southern hemisphere. From here it follows, that the phenomenon of more intensive warming up of northern hemisphere, rather than southern in present period should be observed. Data of climatic observations (in first temperature trends for various latitude belts). More detailed analysis shows, that the phenomenon of warming in different form is shown in various latitudinal belts of the Earth. This phenomenon is more clearly shown in latitudinal belts further situated on latitude from South Pole, i.e. in high northern latitudes. Really, the trend of increase of temperature in northern hemisphere is characterized by greater rate, than a trend of temperature in a southern hemisphere. And not only trend components of temperatures increase with increasing of latitudes from southern pole to northern pole, but also amplitudes of decade fluctuations of temperature in high northern breadthes are more bigger than in southern hemisphere. Thus again it is necessary to expect a contrast and

  8. High Latitude Mottling on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The familiar banded appearance of Jupiter at low and middle latitudes gradually gives way to a more mottled appearance at high latitudes in this striking true color image taken Dec. 13, 2000, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

    The intricate structures seen in the polar region are clouds of different chemical composition, height and thickness. Clouds are organized by winds, and the mottled appearance in the polar regions suggests more vortex-type motion and winds of less vigor at higher latitudes.

    The cause of this difference is not understood. One possible contributor is that the horizontal component of the Coriolis force, which arises from the planet's rotation and is responsible for curving the trajectories of ocean currents and winds on Earth, has its greatest effect at high latitudes and vanishes at the equator. This tends to create small, intense vortices at high latitudes on Jupiter. Another possibility may lie in that fact that Jupiter overall emits nearly as much of its own heat as it absorbs from the Sun, and this internal heat flux is very likely greater at the poles. This condition could lead to enhanced convection at the poles and more vortex-type structures. Further analysis of Cassini images, including analysis of sequences taken over a span of time, should help us understand the cause of equator-to-pole differences in cloud organization and evolution.

    By the time this picture was taken, Cassini had reached close enough to Jupiter to allow the spacecraft to return images with more detail than what's possible with the planetary camera on NASA's Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. The resolution here is 114 kilometers (71 miles) per pixel. This contrast-enhanced, edge-sharpened frame was composited from images take at different wavelengths with Cassini's narrow-angle camera, from a distance of 19 million kilometers (11.8 million miles). The spacecraft was in almost a direct line between the Sun and Jupiter, so the solar illumination on

  9. The Latitude, Longitude--Spell It Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a classroom exercise entitled, "Latitude, Longitude, Spell It" designed to reinforce the concepts of latitude and longitude. Teachers divide the class into teams, provide them with a map and latitude-longitude coordinate cards, and ask them to record cities found within a given radius of each coordinate. Includes necessary materials and…

  10. Map of Martian Silicon at Mid-Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This gamma ray spectrometer map of the mid-latitude region of Mars is based on gamma-rays from the element silicon. Silicon is one of the most abundant elements on the surface of both Mars and Earth (second only to oxygen). The most extensive region of highest silicon content, shown in red, is located in the high latitudes north of Tharsis (centered near 45 degrees latitude, -120 degrees longitude). The area of lowest silicon content, shown in blue, lies just to the east of the Hellas Basin (-45 degrees latitude, 90 degrees longitude). Contours of constant surface elevation are also shown. The long continuous contour line running from east to west marks the approximate separation of the younger lowlands in the north from the older highlands in the south.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The gamma ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona, Tucson. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colo., is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Tropical and mid-latitude forcing of continental Antarctic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, C. S. M.; Fogwill, C. J.; Klekociuk, A. R.; van Ommen, T. D.; Curran, M. A. J.; Moy, A. D.; Palmer, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Future changes in atmospheric circulation and associated modes of variability are a major source of uncertainty in climate projections. Nowhere is this issue more acute than across the mid-latitudes to high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (SH), which over the last few decades have experienced extreme and regionally variable trends in precipitation, ocean circulation and temperature, with major implications for Antarctic ice melt and surface mass balance. Unfortunately there is a relative dearth of observational data, limiting our understanding of the driving mechanism(s). Here we report a new 130-year annually resolved record of δD - a proxy for temperature - from the geographic South Pole where we find a significant influence from extratropical pressure anomalies which act as "gatekeepers" to the meridional exchange of air masses. Reanalysis of global atmospheric circulation suggests these pressure anomalies play a significant influence on mid- to high-latitude SH climate, modulated by the tropical Pacific Ocean. This work adds to a growing body of literature confirming the important roles of tropical and mid-latitude atmospheric circulation variability on Antarctic temperatures. Our findings suggest that future increasing tropical warmth will strengthen meridional circulation, exaggerating current trends, with potentially significant impacts on Antarctic surface mass balance.

  12. Ulysses solar wind plasma observations at high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, P.; Bame, S.J.; Barraclough, B.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ulysses reached its peak northerly heliolatitude of 80.2{degrees}N on July 31, 1995, and now is moving towards aphelion at 5.41 AU which it will reach in May, 1998. We summarize measurements from the solar wind plasma experiment, SWOOPS, emphasizing northern hemispheric observations but also providing southern and equatorial results for comparison. The solar wind momentum flux during Ulysses` fast pole-to- pole transit at solar minimum was significantly higher over the poles than at near-equatorial latitudes, suggesting a non-circular cross section for the heliosphere. Furthermore, modest asymmetries in the wind speed, density, and mass flux were observed between the two hemispheres during the fast latitude scan. The solar wind was faster and less dense in the north than in the south. These asymmetries persist in the most recent high- and mid-latitude data but are less pronounced. As of July 1, 1996 the northern fast solar wind has lacked any strong stream interactions or shocks and, although a comprehensive search has not yet been made, no CMEs have yet been identified during this interval. On the other hand, Alfv{acute e}nic, compressional, and pressure balanced features are abundant at high latitudes. The most recent data, at 4 AU and 32{degrees}N, has begun to show the effects of solar rotation modulated features in the form of recurrent compressed regions.

  13. DNA damage profiles induced by sunlight at different latitudes.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Yagura, Teiti; Makita, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; MacMahon, Ricardo Monreal; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-04-01

    Despite growing knowledge on the biological effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health and ecosystems, it is still difficult to predict the negative impacts of the increasing incidence of solar UV radiation in a scenario of global warming and climate changes. Hence, the development and application of DNA-based biological sensors to monitor the solar UV radiation under different environmental conditions is of increasing importance. With a mind to rendering a molecular view-point of the genotoxic impact of sunlight, field experiments were undertaken with a DNA-dosimeter system in parallel with physical photometry of solar UVB/UVA radiation, at various latitudes in South America. On applying biochemical and immunological approaches based on specific DNA-repair enzymes and antibodies, for evaluating sunlight-induced DNA damage profiles, it became clear that the genotoxic potential of sunlight does indeed vary according to latitude. Notwithstanding, while induction of oxidized DNA bases is directly dependent on an increase in latitude, the generation of 6-4PPs is inversely so, whereby the latter can be regarded as a biomolecular marker of UVB incidence. This molecular DNA lesion-pattern largely reflects the relative incidence of UVA and UVB energy at any specific latitude. Hereby is demonstrated the applicability of this DNA-based biosensor for additional, continuous field experiments, as a means of registering variations in the genotoxic impact of solar UV radiation. PMID:22674547

  14. Heliomagnetic latitude dependence of the heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. E.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.

    1995-06-01

    Previous studies have revealed systematic variations of the interplanetary magnetic field with heliographic latitude. Luhmann et al. (1987) modeled Pioneer Venus (PVO) and ISEE-3 observations by assuming an asymmetric dependence on heliolatitude with stronger fields in the northern hemisphere. In a subsequent study, using data from ISEE-3/ICE and IMP-8, Burton et al. (1990) found evidence for a similar asymmetry. However, neither model has been completely successful. The model derived from PVO/ICE observations agrees quite well near solar maximum but shows significant discrepancies during the descending phase of the solar cycle. The model derived from the ICE/IMP-8 comparison suffers from significant phase delays between the difference in field magnitude at the two spacecraft and their latitude difference. In an attempt to account for these phase shifts, the IMP-8 and ICE data have been reexamined in heliomagnetic coordinates which are defined by the orientation of the solar magnetic dipole. The latitude and longitude of the dipole inferred from the data have then been compared with those implicit in source surface calculations. The IMP/ICE correlations have been extended into the recent solar maximum and descending phase. Comparisons have also been carried out between IMP-8 and Ulysses as it traveled to -30 deg south heliographic latitude.

  15. Latitude measures of Jupiter in the 0.89 micron methane band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Jupiter has been photographed by the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in the 0.89 micron methane band since October 1968. A photometric evaluation of these photographs has not yet been carried out, but a visual study of this collection and a comparison with the color records has been made. This comparison, together with diameter and latitude measures of the methane records, shows that the albedos and latitudes of most features shown in 0.89 micron vary with time and the albedos and latitudes of most features shown in 0.89 micron vary with time and that there is no simple correlation between the visual color and/or intensity of a feature and its intensity in the methane band. The latitudes of the Red Spot and South Tropical Zone have remained unchanged, while those of the Equatorial Zone, North Tropical Zone, and South Polar Hood have changed. Measures of images taken near opposition show the polar diameter to be within 0.5% of the American Ephemeris Value, but the equatorial diameter as 1.3% smaller. Measures near quadrature suggest a phase defect 3.5 times greater in value than the American Ephemeris value. The large phase defect and bright South Polar Hood contribute to the circular appearance of Jupiter in methane. Latitude variations of the North edge of the South Polar Hood support the 1964 Munch and Younkin hypothesis that this feature is composed of frozen methane.

  16. Occurrence climatology of the electron density irregularities in the mid-latitude E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Kil, H.

    2013-12-01

    Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere interrupt the propagation of electromagnetic waves and are problematic for navigation and communication systems. For this practical importance, significant efforts have been made to establish information on the occurrence climatology of such irregularities, to understand the onset conditions of such irregularities, and to predict or avoid the impact of these irregularities on the society. While the irregularities occur in all latitudes, less attention has been paid to the irregularities in middle latitudes. This may be because the irregularities in middle latitudes are not as severe as those in other latitude regions. However, middle latitudes are also the place where various forms of irregularities occur. A 40.8 MHz VHF radar was built at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude) in South Korea aiming at continuous monitoring of the behavior of the middle-latitude electron density irregularities in the Far East Asian sector. The radar has been continuously operated by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) since December 2009. Using the Daejeon VHF radar data acquired since December 2009, we examine the occurrence types of the irregularities and the dependence of the irregularities on geophysical conditions (local time, altitude, season, solar cycle, and magnetic activity). These results can be used as a tool for investigating the onset conditions of the middle-latitude irregularities.

  17. Spatially resolved methane band photometry of Saturn. II - Cloud structure models at four latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Saturn's cloud vertical structures in the Equatorial Zone, South Equatorial Belt, and North and South Temperate Regions near + or - 30 deg latitudes are determined by means of an analysis of spatially resolved reflectivity measurements in the 6190, 7250, and 8996 A methane bands. Radiative transfer models are computed for a structure whose parameters are the methane column abundance in an aerosol-free layer at the top of the atmosphere, and the specific abundance of methane in a semiinfinite homogeneous gas-and-cloud mixture deep in the atmosphere. The structure for the South Equatorial Belt resembles that for the North Temperate Region. The level where unit cloud optical depth occurs in the South Temperate Region is deeper than the corresponding level at other latitudes. The differences between model parameters derived by means of different absorption bands are discussed.

  18. Do wintering Harlequin Ducks forage nocturnally at high latitudes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, D.J.; Esler, Daniel; Roby, D.D.; Jarvis, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    We monitored radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to determine whether nocturnal feeding was part of their foraging strategy during winter in south-central Alaska. Despite attributes of our study site (low ambient temperatures, harsh weather, short day length) and study species (small body size, high daytime foraging rates) that would be expected to favor nocturnal foraging, we found no evidence of nocturnal dive-feeding. Signals from eight radio-tagged Harlequin Ducks never exhibited signal loss due to diving during a total of 780 minutes of nocturnal monitoring. In contrast, the same eight birds exhibited signal loss during 62 ± 7% (SE) of 5-minute diurnal monitoring periods (total of 365 minutes of monitoring). Our results suggest that Harlequin Ducks in south-central Alaska face a stringent time constraint on daytime foraging during midwinter. Harlequin Ducks wintering at high latitudes, therefore, may be particularly sensitive to factors that increase foraging requirements or decrease foraging efficiency.

  19. The latitude dependencies of the solar wind. [of interplanetary magnetic field polarity and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, R. L.; Winge, C. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of spacecraft following the earth's orbit occurs within the solar latitude range of 7 deg 15 min N on approximately September 7 to 7 deg 15 min S on approximately March 6. The latitude dependencies so far detected within this range have shown that the photospheric dipole-like field of the sun makes very important contributions to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed near the ecliptic. Changes in geomagnetic activity from even to odd numbered 11-year solar cycles are related to changes in the sun's dipolar field. The north-south IMF component and meridional, nonradial flow are important to a complete understanding of steady-state solar wind dynamics. Coronal conditions must be latitude-dependent in a way that accounts for the observed latitude dependence of the velocity and density of the solar wind.

  20. Latitude measures of Jupiter in the 0.89-micron methane band.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Jupiter has been photographed by the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in the 0.89-micron methane band since October 1968. A photometric evaluation of these photographs has not yet been carried out, but a visual study of this collection and a comparison with the color records has been made. This comparison, together with diameter and latitude measures of the methane records, shows that the albedos and latitudes of most features shown at 0.89 micron vary with time and that there is no simple correlation between the visual color and/or intensity of a feature and its intensity in the methane band. The latitudes of the Red Spot and South Tropical Zone have remained unchanged, while those of the Equatorial Zone, North Tropical Zone, and South Polar Hood have changed.

  1. Latitude-for-Time Proxy for Climate Change in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laval, B.; Vagle, S.; Morrison, J.; Carmack, E.

    2014-12-01

    While the full interpretation of climate signals in lake systems requires an understanding of lake-specific physical forcing and response mechanisms, we propose that insight into the response of a lake at a specific latitude to climate change can be acquired by comparing the present conditions of a morphologically and dynamically similar lake at lower latitude. The latitude-for-time shift comes from swapping current latitudinal gradients of air temperature with predicted air temperature trends due to climate change. Of interest is the potential transition of a lake from one mictic state to another, with consequences to the resupply of nutrients to the euphotic zone, and to the phenology of spring and fall phytoplankton blooms. Here we compare the annual thermal histories in seven deep, intermontane lakes in western Canada along a north-south transect from 49o to 61o N, and use predicted trends in air temperature to estimate commensurate changes in duration of summer stratification period. While the actual response of lakes to climate change is likely to be much more complex, this simple model offers support that field observations in large lakes spanning the full range of present day climatic conditions offers a valuable tool for assessing the response of lake dynamics to climate warming.

  2. Mid-latitude afforestation shifts general circulation and tropical precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Abigail L. S.; Fung, Inez Y.; Chiang, John C. H.

    2012-01-01

    We show in climate model experiments that large-scale afforestation in northern mid-latitudes warms the Northern Hemisphere and alters global circulation patterns. An expansion of dark forests increases the absorption of solar energy and increases surface temperature, particularly in regions where the land surface is unable to compensate with latent heat flux due to water limitation. Atmospheric circulation redistributes the anomalous energy absorbed in the northern hemisphere, in particular toward the south, through altering the Hadley circulation, resulting in the northward displacement of the tropical rain bands. Precipitation decreases over parts of the Amazon basin affecting productivity and increases over the Sahel and Sahara regions in Africa. We find that the response of climate to afforestation in mid-latitudes is determined by the amount of soil moisture available to plants with the greatest warming found in water-limited regions. Mid-latitude afforestation is found to have a small impact on modeled global temperatures and on global CO2, but regional heating from the increase in forest cover is capable of driving unintended changes in circulation and precipitation. The ability of vegetation to affect remote circulation has implications for strategies for climate mitigation. PMID:22190490

  3. Recent Advances in Mid-latitude Ionosphere/Thermosphere Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael

    One of the original reasons for building a National Ionospheric Observatory (now the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center or NAIC) near Arecibo, Puerto Rico was the location, which is in the best behaved region of the ionosphere. At 30° magnetic latitude and 19° geographic latitude, it is well equatorward of the auroral and sub-auroral zones and poleward of the equatorial anomalies most of the time. The island thus has some of the best weather and space weather on the planet. However, similar to an occasional hurricane striking the island, the ionosphere overhead has occasional ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances. Some of these space weather phenomena, e.g., mesoscale TIDs and unstable sporadic E layers, are endemic to the region and, prior to the advent of airglow imagers and GPS networks, were difficult to visualize using radiowave data alone. Other weather events are caused by infringement on this zone from processes in more active weather regions. For example, neutral waves launched from the auroral oval (large scale TIDs) pass through the region; electric fields penetrate from the solar wind and create both plasma uplifts, causing positive ionospheric storms, and stormenhanced density plumes, coursing through the region. From the south, convective equatorial ionospheric storms create plasma bubbles that can reach mid-latitudes. Examples of data obtained during these phenomena, and possibly more, will be presented and discussed in light of our present understanding.

  4. Mid-latitude afforestation shifts general circulation and tropical precipitation.

    PubMed

    Swann, Abigail L S; Fung, Inez Y; Chiang, John C H

    2012-01-17

    We show in climate model experiments that large-scale afforestation in northern mid-latitudes warms the Northern Hemisphere and alters global circulation patterns. An expansion of dark forests increases the absorption of solar energy and increases surface temperature, particularly in regions where the land surface is unable to compensate with latent heat flux due to water limitation. Atmospheric circulation redistributes the anomalous energy absorbed in the northern hemisphere, in particular toward the south, through altering the Hadley circulation, resulting in the northward displacement of the tropical rain bands. Precipitation decreases over parts of the Amazon basin affecting productivity and increases over the Sahel and Sahara regions in Africa. We find that the response of climate to afforestation in mid-latitudes is determined by the amount of soil moisture available to plants with the greatest warming found in water-limited regions. Mid-latitude afforestation is found to have a small impact on modeled global temperatures and on global CO(2), but regional heating from the increase in forest cover is capable of driving unintended changes in circulation and precipitation. The ability of vegetation to affect remote circulation has implications for strategies for climate mitigation. PMID:22190490

  5. Flight phenology of male Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at different latitudes in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term trapping studies of the invasive moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) were conducted at various latitudes from Puerto Rico to South Carolina. Three flight periods per year were identified at the five temperate sties studied, which covered the majority of the insects’ mainland United States i...

  6. Higher latitude and lower solar radiation influence on anaphylaxis in Chilean children

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Morales, Pamela S.; Cerda, Jaime; Talesnik, Eduardo; González, Gilberto; Camargo, Carlos A.; Borzutzky, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest an association between higher latitude, a proxy of vitamin D (VD) status, and allergic diseases. Chile provides an ideal setting to study this association due to its latitude span and high rates of VD deficiency in southern regions. The aim of this study is to explore the associations of latitude and solar radiation with anaphylaxis admission rates. Methods We reviewed anaphylaxis admissions in Chile’s hospital discharge database between 2001 and 2010 and investigated associations with latitude and solar radiation. Results 2316 anaphylaxis admissions were registered. Median age of patients was 41 years; 53% were female. National anaphylaxis admission rate was 1.41 per 100,000 persons per year. We observed a strong north-south increasing gradient of anaphylaxis admissions (β 0.04, P=0.01), with increasing rates south of latitude 34°S. A significant association was also observed between solar radiation and anaphylaxis admissions (β −0.11, P=0.009). Latitude was associated with food-induced (β 0.05, P=0.02), but not drug-induced (β −0.002, P=0.27), anaphylaxis. The association between latitude and food-induced anaphylaxis was significant in children (β 0.01, P=0.006), but not adults (β 0.003, P=0.16). Anaphylaxis admissions were not associated with regional sociodemographic factors like poverty, rurality, educational level, ethnicity, or physician density. Conclusions Anaphylaxis admission rates in Chile are highest at higher latitudes and lower solar radiation, used as proxies of VD status. The associations appear driven by food-induced anaphylaxis. Our data support a possible role of VD deficiency as an etiological factor in the high anaphylaxis admission rates found in southern Chile. PMID:24628618

  7. Low-latitude ionospheric effects on SBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, J.; Sardón, E.; Sainz, A.; Ochoa, B.; Magdaleno, S.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS) provide augmentation to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) users in three areas: (1) broadcasting accurate corrections to GNSS satellite ephemeris, (2) providing a real-time empirical ionospheric model in the service area, and (3) providing integrity information in the form of estimates of the confidence of the ephemeris corrections and ionospheric delays. Ionospheric effects on SBAS are twofold: (a) the input data used by the SBAS will be affected by ionospheric effects, and (b) the more perturbed the ionosphere is, the more difficult it will be to provide accurate and reliable ionospheric information to the users. The ionosphere at low latitudes presents larger variability and more intense phenomena than at midlatitudes. Therefore, SBAS providing service to low-latitude regions will be more affected than those at other latitudes. From the different low-latitude ionospheric effects, this paper will focus on those having the largest impact on SBAS, which are total electron content temporal and spatial gradients, ionospheric scintillations, and depletions. This paper will present the impact of these effects on EGNOS (European Global Navigation Overlay System), the European SBAS. Although EGNOS can be considered as a midlatitude SBAS, it has to provide coverage down to rather low latitudes, so sometimes low-latitude ionospheric effects are observed in the EGNOS data. It will be shown how EGNOS performs under nominal conditions and how its performance is degraded when low-latitude ionospheric phenomena occur. Real EGNOS data affected by low-latitude ionospheric phenomena will be used.

  8. Anomalous variations of tropopause height in low latitude regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, T. K.; Narayana Rao, D.

    Successful attempts have been made in early 1990s to link the possible influence of equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial-oscillation QBO on tropopause dynamics at longer period scales leading ultimately to the evolution of strong El Nino events of global economic importance Gray et al 1992 GRL JMSJ As a result of this influence it is possible that the tropopause height may be increasing instead of decreasing with latitude from the equator in tropical regions during particular phase of QBO say westerly phase over the equator In the present work we report such observations using radiosonde data obtained from fourteen different tropical 30 N to 30 S radio-sounding stations located in the wide longitudinal zone of South East Asia South Pacific and Africa in the year 2004 The daily tropopause height determined at 00 00 and 12 00 hrs GMT is averaged for each month separately The tropopause height Cold Point Tropopause CPT is determined by noting the height of minimum temperature between 12 and 20 km It is observed further that the latitude variation of tropopause height in southern Hemisphere is much less when compared to that in the Northern Hemisphere The reason for this asymmetric characteristic of tropopause about the equator may be that greater fraction of the northern hemisphere is covered with land and it is ocean in the southern hemisphere Because of large variations in topography of the land and the associated thermal conductivity it is possible that convection activities of the

  9. Geographic control of Titan's mid-latitude clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, H. G.; Brown, M. E.; Schaller, E. L.; Bouchez, A. H.; Trujillo, C. A.

    2005-08-01

    Observations of tropospheric clouds (1-6) and the recent Huygens images of channels show that Titan has an active methane hydrological cycle. Titan's south polar clouds are now well known (3-5) and thought to be driven by small seasonal variations in surface temperature (3). The recent discovery (6) and continued observations (7) of significant cloud activity at 40oS latitude led to the suggestion that these mid-latitude clouds are the result of either seasonally evolving global circulation or surface geography (6). We report here further observations of Titan that clearly link the formation of the mid-latitude clouds to a region of Titan's surface centered at ˜350oW longitude, ˜40oS latitude. Analysis of the complete dataset does not support the earlier suggestion (6) that these clouds are a new phenomenon related to seasonal change. The strong link between geographic location and cloud formation along with the lack of evidence for seasonal change in the mid-latitude clouds leads to the conclusion that a geological mechanism is responsible for the formation of these clouds. We propose that geysers or cryovolcanism are sporadically active near ˜350oW longitude, ˜40oS latitude. The implied rate of volatile release would easily supply enough methane to balance the loss to photolytic chemistry in the upper atmosphere. 1. Griffith, C.A., Owen, T., Miller, G.A., Geballe, T., Nature 395, 575-578 (1998). 2. Griffith, C.A., Hall, J.L., Geballe, T.R., Science 290, 509-513 (2000). 3. Brown, M.E., Bouchez, A.H., Griffith, C.A., Nature 420, 795-797 (2002). 4. Roe, H.G., de Pater, I., Macintosh, B.A., McKay, C.P., ApJ 581, 1399-1406 (2002). 5. Bouchez, A.H., Brown, M.E., ApJ 618, L53-L56 (2005). 6. Roe, H.G., Bouchez, A.H., Trujillo, C.A., Schaller, E.L., Brown, M.E., ApJ 618, L49-L52 (2005). 7. Porco, C.C., et al., Nature 434, 159-168 (2005). HGR is supported by an NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship (NSF AST-0401559). ELS is supported by an NSF Graduate

  10. Arctic Amplification and Potential Mid-Latitude Weather Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing temperatures and other changes continued in the Arctic over the last decade, even though the rate of global warming has decreased in part due to a cool Pacific Ocean. Thus Arctic temperatures have increased at least 3 times the rate of mid-latitude temperatures. Credibility for persistent Arctic change comes from multiple indicators which are now available for multiple decades. Further, the spatial pattern of Arctic Amplification differs from patterns of natural variability. The role of the Arctic in the global climate system is based on multiple interacting feedbacks represented by these indicators as a causal basis for Arctic Amplification driven by modest global change. Many of these processes act on a regional basis and their non-linear interactions are not well captured by climate models. For example, future loss of sea ice due to increases in CO2 are demonstrated by these models but the rates of loss appear slow. It is reasonable to suspect that Arctic change which can produce the largest temperature anomalies on the planet and demonstrate recent extremes in the polar vortex could be linked to mid-latitude weather, especially as Arctic change will continue over the next decades. The meteorological community remains skeptical, however, in the sense of "not proven." Natural variability in chaotic atmospheric flow remains the main dynamic process, and it is difficult to determine whether Arctic forcing of a north-south linkage is emerging from the most recent period of Arctic change since 2007. Nonetheless, such a hypothesis is worthy of investigation, given the need to further understand Arctic dynamic atmospheric processes, and the potential for improving mid-latitude seasonal forecasts base on high-latitude forcing. Several AGU sessions and other forums over the next year (WWRP, IASC,CliC) address this issue, but the topic is not ready for a firm answer. The very level of controversy indicates the state of the science.

  11. Low Latitude Plasma Blobs: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Vitaly P.; Hegai, Valery V.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed activity in the study of local plasma density enhancements in the low latitude F region ionosphere (low latitude plasma blobs). Satellite, all-sky airglow imager, and radar measurements have identified the characteristics of these blobs, and their coupling to Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). New information related to blobs has also been obtained from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. In this paper, we briefly review experimental, theoretical and modeling studies related to low latitude plasma blobs.

  12. Jupiter's Temperatures--Broad Latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is one of the highest resolution images ever recorded of Jupiter's temperature field. It was obtained by NASA's Galileo mission, with its Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) experiment, during the seventh of its 10 orbits around Jupiter to date. This map, shown in the left panel, indicates the forces powering Jovian winds, and differentiates between areas of strongest upwelling and downwelling winds in the upper part of the atmosphere. A Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera color composite of this same region, taken within 10 hours of the PPR map, is shown in the right panel for the same region, as a reference to the visual clouds. An outline of the region mapped by the PPR is also shown.

    This atmospheric observation covered a broad latitude region, and it shows that the visually dark regions generally have warmer temperatures than the visually light ones, indicating that they are regions of downwelling, dry air which clear out cloud condensate particles. The 'little red spot' at the northernmost part of this image is colder than its surroundings, consistent with it being a region of upwelling and cooling gas. The smaller spots to its southeast (lower right) and other lighter spots in the HST image are all colder than their surroundings, consistent with regions of upwelling and cooling gas. The northern half of the brightest band in the map is brighter than the southern half, and it reveals some detailed structure, down to the 1900- kilometer (1200-mile) resolution of the PPR, which is not always readily correlated with variations of the visual cloud field.

    One surprise of this temperature map involved temperatures near the dark blue-gray feature in the map, an area like the one into which the Probe descended. While large regions of downwelling wind heat the local area elsewhere in Jupiter, this region of vigorous downwelling appears close to being thermally neutral. The drying, downwelling winds may be deeper in the atmosphere than sensed by the PPR

  13. Electrodynamics of the high-latitude mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of apparent large (V/m) electric fields within the mesosphere suggests that this region is more active electrically than originally suspected. High-latitude observations have been particularly productive in developing new concepts regarding mesospheric electrodynamics. Several high-latitude observations of large mesospheric fields have been made under both quiet and aurorally active conditions but always below heights where enhanced ionizing radiations could significantly penetrate. Two measurements from Andoya, Norway, have also produced an anticorrelation of horizontal electric field directions with neutral wind velocities, leading to the theoretical description of a newly defined mechanism for V/m electric field generation involving wind-induced separation of charged aerosols. Evidence for mesospheric aerosols and winds exists at all latitudes but is most evident at high latitudes during the appearance of noctilucent and/or polar mesospheric clouds.

  14. Active Latitude Oscillations Observed on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcik, A.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Clette, F.; Ozguc, A.; Rozelot, J.-P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate periodicities in the mean heliographic latitudes of sunspot groups, called active latitudes, for the past six complete solar cycles (1945 - 2008). For this purpose, the multitaper method and Morlet wavelet analysis were used. We found that solar rotation periodicities (26 - 38 days) are present in active latitudes of both hemispheres for all the investigated cycles (18 to 23). Both in the northern and southern hemispheres, active latitudes drifted toward the equator from the beginning to the end of each cycle and followed an oscillating path. These motions are well described by a second-order polynomial. There are no meaningful periods of between 55 and about 300 days in either hemisphere for all cycles. A periodicity of 300 to 370 days appears in both hemispheres for Cycle 23, in the northern hemisphere for Cycle 20, and in the southern hemisphere for Cycle 18.

  15. Characteristics of the Afternoon E-region Plasma Density Irregularities in Middle Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y. S.; Yang, T. Y.; Kil, H.; Otsuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In middle latitudes, radar probing of E-region ionospheric electron density irregularities has been carried out for several decades. However, no the afternoon (i.e., from noon to pre-sunset time) E-region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in middle latitude have been reported yet. On the other hand, a 40.8 MHz VHF radar operated continuously since December 2009 at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, 26.7°N dip latitude) in South Korea has often observed the E-region FAIs in the afternoon. In this presentation, therefore, we report firstly the afternoon observations of the mid-latitude E-region FAIs made by the Daejeon radar. We present the characteristics and statistical morphology of the mid-latitude afternoon E-region FAIs based on the continuous and long-term radar observations. And also, to investigate the afternoon E-region FAIs - Sporadic E (Es) relationship, the FAIs have been also compared with Es parameters based on observations made from an ionosonde located at Icheon (37.14°N, 127.54°E, 27.7°N dip latitude), which is 100 km north of Daejeon.

  16. Low Latitude Aurora: Index of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekli, M. R.; Aissani, D.; Chadou, I.

    2010-10-01

    Observations of aurora borealis at low latitudes are rare, and are clearly associated with high solar activity. In this paper, we analyze some details of the solar activity during the years 1769-1792. Moreover, we describe in detail three low latitude auroras. The first event was reported by ash-Shalati and observed in North Africa (1770 AD). The second and third events were reported by l'Abbé Mann and observed in Europe (1770 and 1777 AD).

  17. Meteor scatter radio communication at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, P. S.; Dickson, A. H.; Armstrong, M. H.

    1985-11-01

    A brief historical and physical description of the meteor burst communications (MBC) technique is given together with a discussion of the advantages of very high frequency MBC, with respect to conventional high frequency communication, when used at high latitudes. A recently deployed high latitude MBC propagation experiment, between Bodo in Norway and Wick in Scotland (UK) is described and some of the early data gathered at frequencies close to 40 MHz and 70 MHz is presented. A theoretical description of the effects of Polarisation Rotation in a linearly polarised MBC system is developed and it is shown that at 40 MHz Polarisation Rotation, due to excess D-region ionization may cause the system performance to differ from its ambient level. Corroborative experimental results, over a temperature latitude path, are presented. Based upon the early high latitude experimental results and on the theoretical calculations, it is suggested that frequencies close to 40 MHz, in common use in atemperate latitude linearly polarised MBC systems, are too low for high latitude operation.

  18. THE LATITUDE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ELEMENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X. E-mail: wangjx@nao.cas.cn

    2012-01-20

    With the unique data set from full-disk observations provided by Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in the interval embodying solar cycle 23, we have found that the cyclic variations of numbers and total flux of these small-scale magnetic elements covering fluxes of (2.9-32.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} Mx and (4.27-38.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx show anticorrelation and correlation with sunspots, respectively. In this study, the time-latitude distributions of these anticorrelated and correlated elements are analyzed. The following results are disclosed: (1) for the correlated elements, the cyclic variations of the total flux in low-latitude and middle-latitude regions show a longer duration of cyclic maximum phase than that of an active region (AR) in the corresponding latitude region; the total flux of these elements shows the accordant south-north asymmetry with that of AR; the time-latitude distribution of their number displays a similar butterfly diagram but with a latitude distribution that is twice as wide as that of sunspots. (2) For the anticorrelated elements, the time-latitude distribution of number shows a solar cycle variation different from the sunspot butterfly diagram; in each latitude, the distribution of anticorrelated elements always shows the anticorrelated variation with that of sunspots; during solar cycle 23, the average speed of the peak latitudinal migration for anticorrelated elements reaches 7.5 deg year{sup -1}, almost three times that for sunspots. These results seem to imply that the correlated elements are the debris of decayed sunspots, and the anticorrelated elements have a different source but are affected or modulated by sunspot magnetic field.

  19. The Latitude Distribution of Small-scale Magnetic Elements in Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    With the unique data set from full-disk observations provided by Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in the interval embodying solar cycle 23, we have found that the cyclic variations of numbers and total flux of these small-scale magnetic elements covering fluxes of (2.9-32.0) × 1018 Mx and (4.27-38.01) × 1019 Mx show anticorrelation and correlation with sunspots, respectively. In this study, the time-latitude distributions of these anticorrelated and correlated elements are analyzed. The following results are disclosed: (1) for the correlated elements, the cyclic variations of the total flux in low-latitude and middle-latitude regions show a longer duration of cyclic maximum phase than that of an active region (AR) in the corresponding latitude region; the total flux of these elements shows the accordant south-north asymmetry with that of AR; the time-latitude distribution of their number displays a similar butterfly diagram but with a latitude distribution that is twice as wide as that of sunspots. (2) For the anticorrelated elements, the time-latitude distribution of number shows a solar cycle variation different from the sunspot butterfly diagram; in each latitude, the distribution of anticorrelated elements always shows the anticorrelated variation with that of sunspots; during solar cycle 23, the average speed of the peak latitudinal migration for anticorrelated elements reaches 7.5 deg year-1, almost three times that for sunspots. These results seem to imply that the correlated elements are the debris of decayed sunspots, and the anticorrelated elements have a different source but are affected or modulated by sunspot magnetic field.

  20. High Latitude Dust in the Earth System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gasso, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; McKenna-Neuman, Cheryl; Mockford, Tom; Stewart, Helena; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2016-01-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (> or = 50degN and > or = 40degS) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 sq km and contribute at least 80-100 Tg/yr1 of dust to the Earth system (approx. 5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF THE SUN'S HIGH-LATITUDE MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rightmire-Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.; Kosak, Katie E-mail: david.hathaway@nasa.gov

    2012-12-10

    The meridional circulation at high latitudes is crucial to the buildup and reversal of the Sun's polar magnetic fields. Here, we characterize the axisymmetric flows by applying a magnetic feature cross-correlation procedure to high-resolution magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We focus on Carrington rotations 2096-2107 (2010 April to 2011 March)-the overlap interval between HMI and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI). HMI magnetograms averaged over 720 s are first mapped into heliographic coordinates. Strips from these maps are then cross-correlated to determine the distances in latitude and longitude that the magnetic element pattern has moved, thus providing meridional flow and differential rotation velocities for each rotation of the Sun. Flow velocities were averaged for the overlap interval and compared to results obtained from MDI data. This comparison indicates that these HMI images are rotated counterclockwise by 0.{sup 0}075 with respect to the Sun's rotation axis. The profiles indicate that HMI data can be used to reliably measure these axisymmetric flow velocities to at least within 5 Degree-Sign of the poles. Unlike the noisier MDI measurements, no evidence of a meridional flow counter-cell is seen in either hemisphere with the HMI measurements: poleward flow continues all the way to the poles. Slight north-south asymmetries are observed in the meridional flow. These asymmetries should contribute to the observed asymmetries in the polar fields and the timing of their reversals.

  2. SIMULATED FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES TOWARD HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Akahori, Takuya; Kim, Jongsoo; Ryu, Dongsu; Gaensler, B. M. E-mail: akahori@physics.usyd.edu.au E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr

    2013-04-20

    We study the Faraday rotation measure (RM) due to the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) toward high Galactic latitudes. The RM arises from the global, regular component as well as from the turbulent, random component of the GMF. We model the former based on observations and the latter using the data of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. For a large number of different GMF models, we produce mock RM maps around the Galactic poles and calculate various statistical quantities with the RM maps. We find that the observed medians of RMs toward the north and south Galactic poles, {approx}0.0 {+-} 0.5 rad m{sup -2} and {approx} + 6.3 {+-} 0.5 rad m{sup -2}, are difficult to explain with any of our many alternate GMF models. The standard deviation of observed RMs, {approx}9 rad m{sup -2}, is clearly larger than that of simulated RMs. The second-order structure function of observed RMs is substantially larger than that of simulated RMs, especially at small angular scales. We discuss other possible contributions to RM toward high Galactic latitudes. Besides observational errors and the intrinsic RM of background radio sources against which RM is observed, we suggest that the RM due to the intergalactic magnetic field may account for a substantial fraction of the observed RM. Finally, we note that reproducing the observed medians may require additional components or/and structures of the GMF that are not present in our models.

  3. Tropical and mid-latitude forcing of continental Antarctic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, C. S. M.; Fogwill, C. J.; Klekociuk, A.; van Ommen, T. D.; Curran, M. A. J.; Moy, A. D.; Palmer, J. G.

    2015-07-01

    Future changes in atmospheric circulation and associated modes of variability are a major source of uncertainty in climate projections. Nowhere is this issue more acute than across the mid- to high-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) which over the last few decades has experienced extreme and regional variable trends in precipitation, ocean circulation, and temperature, with major implications for Antarctic ice melt and surface mass balance. Unfortunately there is a relative dearth of observational data, limiting our understanding of the driving mechanism(s). Here we report a new 130-year annually-resolved record of δ D - a proxy for temperature - from the South Geographic Pole where we find a significant influence from extra-tropical pressure anomalies which act as "gatekeepers" to the meridional exchange of air masses. Reanalysis of global atmospheric circulation suggests these pressure anomalies play a considerably larger influence on mid- to high-latitude SH climate than hitherto believed, modulated by the tropical Pacific Ocean. Our findings suggest that future increasing tropical warmth will strengthen meridional circulation, exaggerating current trends, with potentially significant impacts on Antarctic surface mass balance.

  4. Map of Martian Potassium at Mid-Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This gamma ray spectrometer map of the mid-latitude region of Mars is based on gamma-rays from the element potassium. Potassium, having the chemical symbol K, is a naturally radioactive element and is a minor constituent of rocks on the surface of both Mars and Earth. The region of highest potassium content, shown in red, is concentrated in the northern part of Acidalia Planitia (centered near 55 degrees N, -30 degrees). Several areas of low potassium content, shown in blue, are distributed across the mid-latitudes, with two significant low concentrations, one associated with the Hellas Basin (centered near 35 degrees S, 70 degrees) and the other lying southeast of Elysium Mons (centered near 10 degrees N, 160 degrees). Contours of constant surface elevation are also shown. The long continuous line running from east to west marks the approximate separation of the younger lowlands in the north from the older highlands in the south.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The gamma ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona, Tucson. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. The Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network: The Initial Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, P. H.; Valladares, C. E.; Carrano, C.

    2009-05-01

    The Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) is a distributed observatory designed to provide regional coverage in South America and high-temporal resolution measurements to diagnose the initiation and development of plasma structures and the state and dynamics of the low latitude ionosphere. It combines inexpensive GPS receivers and state-of-the-art radars such as the Vertical Incidence Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR) ionosondes and magnetometers. This paper describes the characteristics of the LISN distributed observatory and discusses the results of the first two campaigns. LISN will be comprised of nearly 70 GPS receivers with the capability to measure Total Electron Content (TEC), amplitude and phase scintillation and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs). LISN will also include 5 ionosondes able to measure nighttime E-region densities and 5 collocated magnetometers that will be placed along the same magnetic meridian. The first campaign was dedicated to detect medium-scale (~100 km) TIDs and was conducted at Huancayo, Peru in July 2008 using 3 GPS receivers spaced by 4-5 km arranged in a triangular configuration. TEC data corresponding to 3 consecutive days indicate that the TIDs phase velocity was close to 120 m/s and directed northward during the early evening hours. The second campaign was conducted in February 2009 using 3 GPS receivers installed near Ancon and coordinated with the VIPIR ionosonde running in an interferometer mode. We will discuss the implications of these new results within the frame of the current theories of plasma bubble onset.

  6. Quiet time enhancements over African latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orford, Nicola; Katamzi, Zama; Buresova, Dalia

    2016-07-01

    F2 layer disturbances not related to geomagnetic activity are known as quiet time enhancements (QTEs). The phenomenon of QTEs has not yet been studied over African latitudes. We therefore explore the occurrence of QTEs over Africa in order to expand our knowledge on the behaviour of the ionosphere over this region. Several GPS stations in the middle to equatorial latitudes, during the solar minimum (2009) and near solar maximum (2013), are used. This data was examined for possible trends in variation with solar cycle, season and latitude as well as time of commencement of enhancements. Over the southern mid-latitude region of Africa we have observed that the QTEs are more likely to commence during the night in both solar minimum and maximum, however a slightly larger portion of daytime commencements during solar minimum than during solar maximum were observed. The total number of enhancements for the solar minimum period appears greater than during solar maximum. A seasonal trend is seen with the maximum number of enhancements occurring in summer during solar minimum and in winter during solar maximum. We explore further whether these trends are mirrored or different at low latitude/equatorial African regions.

  7. Warming increases plant biomass and reduces diversity across continents, latitudes, and species migration scenarios in experimental wetland communities.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Andrew H; Jensen, Kai; Schönfeldt, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric warming may influence plant productivity and diversity and induce poleward migration of species, altering communities across latitudes. Complicating the picture is that communities from different continents deviate in evolutionary histories, which may modify responses to warming and migration. We used experimental wetland plant communities grown from seed banks as model systems to determine whether effects of warming on biomass production and species richness are consistent across continents, latitudes, and migration scenarios. We collected soil samples from each of three tidal freshwater marshes in estuaries at three latitudes (north, middle, south) on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America. In one experiment, we exposed soil seed bank communities from each latitude and continent to ambient and elevated (+2.8 °C) temperatures in the greenhouse. In a second experiment, soil samples were mixed either within each estuary (limited migration) or among estuaries from different latitudes in each continent (complete migration). Seed bank communities of these migration scenarios were also exposed to ambient and elevated temperatures and contrasted with a no-migration treatment. In the first experiment, warming overall increased biomass (+16%) and decreased species richness (-14%) across latitudes in Europe and North America. Species richness and evenness of south-latitude communities were less affected by warming than those of middle and north latitudes. In the second experiment, warming also stimulated biomass and lowered species richness. In addition, complete migration led to increased species richness (+60% in North America, + 100% in Europe), but this higher diversity did not translate into increased biomass. Species responded idiosyncratically to warming, but Lythrum salicaria and Bidens sp. increased significantly in response to warming in both continents. These results reveal for the first time consistent impacts of warming on biomass and

  8. Temporal, latitude and altitude absorbed dose dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stozhkov, Y.; Svirzhevsky, N.; Bazilevskaya, G.

    The regular balloon measurements in the Earth's atmosphere are carried on at the Lebedev Physical Institute since 1957. The regular balloon flights have been made at the high latitude stations (near Murmansk - northern hemisphere and Mi ny -r Antarctica) and at the middle latitude (Moscow). Based on these long-term measurements as well as on the latitude data obtained in the several Soviet Antarctic expeditions the calculations of absorbed doses were fulfilled for altitudes of 10, 15, 20 and 30 km. The absorbed dose dependences on the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities and the phase of the 11-year solar cycle were found. The evaluation of the solar proton events and energetic electron precipitation contributions to the absorbed dose enhancements was made.

  9. A forward propagation model of GPS scintillations to characterize high latitude ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, K.; Bust, G. S.; Clauer, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Complex magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms result in high latitude irregularities that are difficult to characterize using only GPS scintillation measurements. GPS observations combined with physical parameters such as width, height of the irregularity etc. derived from modeling can be used to study the physics of these irregularities. We have recently developed a full 3D EM wave propagation model to simulate GPS scintillations in ionosphere. The model is applicable to high latitudes as it accounts for a more complicated geometry of magnetic field lines in high latitude regions. In this work, we present a parametric study to determine the sensitivity of the model towards different input parameters such as spectral index of the irregularity spectrum, outer scale of the irregularity, height, thickness and drift velocity of the irregularity etc. The parameters to which this model is most sensitive are determined from this study, and are focused on during our preliminary comparison with GPS scintillation data from 24 January 2012 storm from CASES GPS receiver on an AAL-PIP station at the South Pole, Antarctica. As a following step, we used our model and an inverse method for GPS scintillation observations from CASES and Novatel receivers at the South Pole in conjunction with ancillary observations from other instruments such as SuperDARN. We believe that such inverse method can be used to derive certain characteristics of the irregularity causing the scintillations and further achieve an improved understanding of the physics of these high latitude irregularities.

  10. Source effects in mid-latitude geomagnetic transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya Vargas, Jaime; Ritter, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of more than 10 yr of vertical magnetic transfer function (VTF) estimates obtained at 12 mid-latitude sites, located in different continents and tectonic settings, reveals significant temporal variations for a period range between approximately 250 and 2000 s. The most ubiquitous pattern is a seasonal modulation of the VTF element that relates the vertical to the horizontal north-south magnetic components (Tx), which shows a high peak around the June solstice (and a low peak around the December solstice) regardless of the location of the site. To quantify the influence of this source effect on the amplitude of VTFs, we modelled the temporal variations of VTFs using a function with dependence on season and magnetic activity indexes. The model shows that differences between VTF estimates obtained at seasonal peaks can reach 0.08 of Tx absolute values and that the effect increases with latitude and period. Seasonal variations are observed also in the VTF component relating vertical to horizontal east-west magnetic components (Ty), but here the pattern with respect to the geographic distribution is less clear. In addition to seasonal trends, we observe long-term modulations correlating with the 11-yr solar cycle at some sites. The influence of these external source effects should be taken into account, before attempting a geological interpretation of the VTFs. It can be misleading, for example, to combine or compare VTFs obtained from long-period geomagnetic data acquired at different seasons or years. An effective method to estimate and remove these source effects from VTFs is by comparison with temporal variations of VTFs from synchronously recorded data at sites located at similar latitude (<5° of difference) and longitude (<10° of difference). Source effects in temporal variations of VTFs can be identified as those patterns that exhibit similar amplitudes and significant correlation with the geomagnetic activity at all compared sites. We also provide a

  11. Relative Contributions of Heating and Momentum Forcing to High-Latitude Lower Thermospheric Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y. S.; Richmond, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    At high latitudes the thermospheric dynamics are gov­erned by various heat and momentum sources. Recently several modeling studies have been attempt­ed to understand the physical process that control the high-latitude lower thermospheric dynamics. Kwak and Richmond [2007] and Kwak et al. [2007] studied the momentum forcing bal­ance that are mainly responsible for maintaining the high-latitude lower thermospheric wind system by using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermo­sphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR TIE-GCM). Kwak and Richmond [2014] analyzed the divergence and vorticity of the high-latitude neutral wind field in the lower thermosphere during the south­ern summertime. In this study, we extend previous works by Kwak and Rich­mond [2007, 2014] and Kwak et al. [2007], which helped to better understand the physical processes maintaining thermospheric dynamics at high latitudes, and here perform a "term analysis of the potential vorticity equation" for the high-latitude neu­tral wind field in the lower thermosphere, on the basis of numerical simulations using the NCAR TIE-GCM. These analyses can provide insight into the relative strength of the heating and the momentum forcing responsible for driving rotational winds at the high-latitude lower thermosphere. The heating is the net heat including the heat transfer by downward molecular and eddy heat conduction, the absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ra­diation, auroral heating by particles, Joule dissipation of ionospheric currents, release of chemical energy by the atomic oxygen recombination, and radiative CO2, NO and O infrared emissions. The momentum forcing is associated with the viscous force and the frictional drag force from convecting ions.

  12. Investigating the Relationship between Latitude and Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivney-Burelle, Jean; McGivney, Raymond J.; McGivney, Katherine G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an engaging, data-gathering activity that allows students to explore relationships between latitude and average monthly temperatures of cities in the Western Hemisphere. This data-gathering activity covered interesting and important mathematical ground and engaged students from the start. While students searched for their…

  13. Higher Education in the High Latitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    2002-01-01

    Describes how colleges in 16 countries have joined in a network to serve the educational and research needs of the circumpolar region; the University of the Arctic is a band of high-latitude colleges which seeks to serve indigenous people and preserve a fragile environment. (EV)

  14. ULTRAVIOLET EXTINCTION AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, J. E. G.; Schiminovich, David

    2013-07-01

    In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust, we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer All-Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Explorer All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies, we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is {approx}10% and {approx}35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R{sub V} parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the interstellar medium.

  15. Latitude for the Observer of Ptolemy's Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    1999-12-01

    For centuries, researchers have claimed that substantial portions of Ptolemy's Almagest have been taken from Hipparchus in Rhodes (latitude 36.2 north). A substantial portion of these claims rest on the catalog of 1028 stars purported to be observed by Ptolemy in Alexandria (latitude 31.2 north). Various peculiarities is the star positions are inconclusive. However, aspects of the star catalog related to the visibility of stars near the horizon have not been treated with modern techniques. I have extensive experience in the heliacal rise, extinction angle, and the probability of detection (see Schaefer 1993, Vistas in Astronomy, 36, 311 for a review) all of which are critical to the problem. Also, I have been producing my own modern naked-eye star catalog so as to obtain practical knowledge of star visibility (especially near the southern horizon), completeness, and probability of detection. Also, I have determined the seasonal extinction coefficients (both median and best possible) for the eastern Mediterranean in ancient times based on 4000 in situ observations from 9 sites in modern and premodern times, measures of modern pollution components, and global models. Three criteria have been used to determine the latitude of the observer of the star catalog: First, the limiting magnitude (at the 50% level) as a function of declination can be compared against my model to derive the latitude. Second, the most southerly declination (at the 50% level) as a function of magnitude can also be compared against my model. For the first two criteria, quadrants are considered independently as well as individually to account for varying seasonal extinction and precession effects on the completeness of the traditional southern constellations. Third, the cataloged magnitudes are compared with modern magnitudes as a function of declination and compared with my extinction model for various latitudes.

  16. Ionospheric Response to the 2009 Sudden Stratospheric Warming over the Equatorial, Low- and Mid-Latitudes in American Sector.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagundes, P. R.; Goncharenko, L. P.; de Abreu, A. J.; Gende, M.; de Jesus, R.; Pezzopane, M.; Kavutarapu, V.; Coster, A. J.; Pillat, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere/thermosphere system is predominantly disturbed by waves (MSTIDs, tides, and planetary waves), which are generated in the lower atmosphere or in-situ, as well as electric fields and TIDs produced by geomagnetic storm and UV, EUV, and X-ray solar radiation. For many years, it was thought that, during geomagnetic quiet conditions, the equatorial and low-latitude F-layer was mainly perturbed by waves that were generated not far away from the observed location or electric fields generated by the Equatorial Electroject (EEJ). On the contrary, during geomagnetic storms when the energy sources are in high latitudes the waves (TIDs) travel a very long distance from high latitude to equatorial region and electric fields can be mapped via magnetic field lines. However, in the recent times an unexpected coupling between high latitude, mid- latitude, and equatorial/low latitudes was discovered during sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. All aspects involved in this process must be explored in order to improve our knowledge about the Earth´s atmosphere. The present study investigates the consequences of vertical coupling from lower to the upper atmosphere in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere in Southern Hemisphere during a major SSW event, which took place during January-February 2009 in the Northern Hemisphere. Using seventeen ground-based dual-frequency GPS stations and two ionosonde stations spanning from latitude 2.8oN to 53.8oS and from longitude 36.7oW to 67.8oW over the South American sector, it has been observed that the ionosphere was significantly disturbed by the SSW event from Equator to the mid-latitudes. Using one GPS station located in mid-latitude (South America sector) it is reported for the first time that the mid-latitude in southern hemisphere (American Sector) was disturbed by the SSW event in the Northern hemisphere. The VTEC at all 17 GPS and two ionosonde stations show significant deviations

  17. Comparative study of high-latitude, mid-latitude and low-latitude ionosphere on basis of local empirical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratovsky, K. G.; Shi, J. K.; Oinats, A. V.; Romanova, E. B.

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of the regular features of the high-, mid- and low-latitude ionosphere characteristics has been carried out using local empirical models. The local empirical models were derived from the manual scaled ionogram data recorded by DPS-4 Digisondes located at Norilsk (69 N, 88E), Irkutsk (52 N, 104E) and Hainan (19 N, 109E) for a 6-year period from December, 2002 to December, 2008. The technique used to build the local empirical model is described. Primary focuses are diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle variations of the peak electron density and the peak height under low solar activity and their changes with increasing solar activity. The main objective of the paper is to reveal both common and specific features of high-, mid- and low-latitude ionosphere. Based on earlier comparisons with the International Reference Ionosphere model, we analyze how the common and specific features are reproduced by this model.

  18. Naturally occurring allele diversity allows potato cultivation in northern latitudes.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Bjorn; Abelenda, José A; Gomez, María del Mar Carretero; Oortwijn, Marian; de Boer, Jan M; Kowitwanich, Krissana; Horvath, Beatrix M; van Eck, Herman J; Smaczniak, Cezary; Prat, Salomé; Visser, Richard G F; Bachem, Christian W B

    2013-03-14

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) originates from the Andes and evolved short-day-dependent tuber formation as a vegetative propagation strategy. Here we describe the identification of a central regulator underlying a major-effect quantitative trait locus for plant maturity and initiation of tuber development. We show that this gene belongs to the family of DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) transcription factors and regulates tuberization and plant life cycle length, by acting as a mediator between the circadian clock and the StSP6A mobile tuberization signal. We also show that natural allelic variants evade post-translational light regulation, allowing cultivation outside the geographical centre of origin of potato. Potato is a member of the Solanaceae family and is one of the world's most important food crops. This annual plant originates from the Andean regions of South America. Potato develops tubers from underground stems called stolons. Its equatorial origin makes potato essentially short-day dependent for tuberization and potato will not make tubers in the long-day conditions of spring and summer in the northern latitudes. When introduced in temperate zones, wild material will form tubers in the course of the autumnal shortening of day-length. Thus, one of the first selected traits in potato leading to a European potato type is likely to have been long-day acclimation for tuberization. Potato breeders can exploit the naturally occurring variation in tuberization onset and life cycle length, allowing varietal breeding for different latitudes, harvest times and markets. PMID:23467094

  19. Substorm electric fields at nightside low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.; Tomizawa, I.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    The convection electric field penetrates from the polar ionosphere to low latitude and drives the DP2 currents in the global ionosphere with an intensified equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The electric field often reverses its direction, that is, the overshielding occurs and causes the equatorial counterelectrojet (CEJ) during storm and substorms. In this paper we report that the overshielding electric field is detected by the HF Doppler sounders at low latitude on the nightside. We analyzed the Doppler frequency of the HF radio signals propagated over 120 km in Japan at frequencies of 5 and 8 MHz and compared with the equatorial EEJ/CEJ during the substorm expansion phase. We found that the overshielding electric field reaches around 2 mV/m during major substorms (AL <-1800 nT). Taking the geometrical attenuation into account, we estimate the equatorial electric field to be about 1.5 mV/m. We also found that the correlation coefficient was 0.94 between the overshielding electric field and eastward equatorial electrojet at YAP on the night side. The electric field drives the eastward electrojets in the equatorial ionosphere on the night side. It is to be noted that the overshielding electric field is observed on the nightside at low latitude during the major substorms, while the convection electric field is dominant during smaller size substorms, as the CEJ flows on the dayside. These results suggest that the overshielding electric field associated with the Region-2 field-aligned currents becomes dominant during substorms at low latitude on the nightside as well as on the dayside.

  20. Formation of High-Latitude Pedestal Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrobel, K. E.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Prior to and just after an impact on Mars, a small fraction of the total impact energy is directly coupled to the ambient atmosphere. A resulting hemispherical shock wave propagates outward leaving a signature that is dependent on initial atmospheric and surface conditions. Here we propose that the distinctive pedestal craters common at high latitudes on Mars are a direct consequence of extreme winds and elevated temperatures generated by this atmospheric blast.

  1. Spacecraft design project: High latitude communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josefson, Carl; Myers, Jack; Cloutier, Mike; Paluszek, Steve; Michael, Gerry; Hunter, Dan; Sakoda, Dan; Walters, Wes; Johnson, Dennis; Bauer, Terry

    1989-01-01

    The spacecraft design project was part of AE-4871, Advanced Spacecraft Design. The project was intended to provide experience in the design of all major components of a satellite. Each member of the class was given primary responsibility for a subsystem or design support function. Support was requested from the Naval Research Laboratory to augment the Naval Postgraduate School faculty. Analysis and design of each subsystem was done to the extent possible within the constraints of an eleven week quarter and the design facilities (hardware and software) available. The project team chose to evaluate the design of a high latitude communications satellite as representative of the design issues and tradeoffs necessary for a wide range of satellites. The High-Latitude Communications Satellite (HILACS) will provide a continuous UHF communications link between stations located north of the region covered by geosynchronous communications satellites, i.e., the area above approximately 60 N latitude. HILACS will also provide a communications link to stations below 60 N via a relay Net Control Station (NCS), which is located with access to both the HILACS and geosynchronous communications satellites. The communications payload will operate only for that portion of the orbit necessary to provide specified coverage.

  2. Recurrent pulsations in Saturn's high latitude magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Carbary, J. F.; Bunce, E. J.; Radioti, A.; Badman, S. V.; Pryor, W. R.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of about 6 h on Day 129, 2008, the UV imaging spectrograph (UVIS) on the Cassini spacecraft observed a repeated intensification and broadening of the high latitude auroral oval into the polar cap. This feature repeated at least 5 times with about a 1 h period, as it rotated in the direction of corotation, somewhat below the planetary rotation rate, such that it moved from noon to post-dusk, and from roughly 77° to 82° northern latitudes during the observing interval. The recurring UV observation was accompanied by pronounced ∼1 h pulsations in auroral hiss power, magnetic perturbations consistent with small-scale field aligned currents, and energetic ion conics and electrons beaming upward parallel to the local magnetic field at the spacecraft location. The magnetic field and particle events are in phase with the auroral hiss pulsation. This event, taken in the context of the more thoroughly documented auroral hiss and particle signatures (seen on many high latitude Cassini orbits), sheds light on the possible driving mechanisms, the most likely of which are magnetopause reconnection and/or Kelvin Helmholtz waves.

  3. CCD technique for longitude/latitude astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanović, G.; Gerstbach, G.; de Biasi, M. S.; Pejović, N.

    2003-10-01

    We report about CCD (Charge Coupled Device) experiments with the isntruments of astrometry and geodesy for the longitude and latitude determinations. At the Techn. University Vienna (TU Vienna), a mobile zenith camera "G1" was developed, based on CCD MX916 (Starlight Xpress) and F=20 cm photo optic. With Hipparcos/Tycho Catalogue, the first results show accuracy up to 0."5 for latitude/longitude. The PC-guided observations can be completed within 10 minutes. The camera G1 (near 4 kg) is used for astrogeodesy (geoid, Earth's crust, etc.). At the Belgrade Astronomical Observatory (AOB), the accuracy of (mean value of) latitude/longitude determinations can be a few 0."01 using zenith stars, Tycho-2 Catalogue and a ST-8 of SBIG (Santa Barbara Instrument Group) with zenith-telescope BLZ (D=11 cm, F=128.7 cm). The same equipment with PIP instrument (D=20 cm and F=457.7 cm, Punta Indio PZT, near La Plata) yields a little better accuracy than the BLZ's one. Both instruments, BLZ and PIP, where in the list of Bureau International de l'Heure - BIH. The mentioned instruments have acquired good possibilities for semi or full-automatic observations.

  4. The effect of latitude on the risk and seasonal variation in hip fracture in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Odén, Anders; Kanis, John A; McCloskey, Eugene V; Johansson, Helena

    2014-10-01

    Although the optimal requirement of vitamin D for skeletal health in the general community is controversial, vitamin D deficiency impairs bone mineralization and increases bone turnover via secondary hyperparathyroidism, thus accelerating bone loss and increasing fracture risk. Support for a role of vitamin D deficiency in the epidemiology of hip fracture is found in the seasonal variation of hip fracture incidence that is reported in several studies. If the association were causal, then the incidence and amplitude of the seasonal variation in hip fracture risk should vary by latitude. We addressed this hypothesis by examining the incidence of hip fracture in men and women aged 50 years or more from Sweden (latitudes 55 to 69°) between 1987 and 2009. In order to reduce double counting, only one fracture in a period of a year was counted per individual. Men contributed 104,888 fractures in 33,313,065 person years and women 264,362 fractures in 38,387,660 person years. The effects of season and latitude were examined by Poisson regression. As expected, hip fracture rates were higher in women than in men. After adjustment for age, season and population density, hip fracture incidence increased by 3.0% (95% CI: 2.7-3.2%) per degree increase in latitude for men and by 1.9% (95% CI: 1.8-2.1%) for women. There was a marked seasonal variation of hip fracture with the highest risk in February and lower by 37.5% in men and by 23.5% women during the summer. There were significant interactions of amplitude of the seasonal variation with latitude (p < 0.001 for both men and women), indicating that seasonal variation during the year was more pronounced in the north of Sweden than in the south. The associations found with latitude and season is consistent with a role of vitamin D in hip fracture causation. PMID:24715585

  5. Simultaneous measurement of aurora-related, irregular magnetic pulsations at northern and southern high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Arnoldy, R.L.; Rajashekar, R. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Engebretson, M.J. ); Rosenberg, T.J. ); Mende, S.B. )

    1987-11-01

    A dominant feature of high-latitude magnetic pulsations is large-amplitude irregular pulsations (Pi) which are closely correlated with the movement of the observing station under particle precipitation, producing the dayside auroral and the high-latitude expansion of nightside aurora. The dayside Pi-1 pulsation maximum centered about local magnetic noon has no strong seasonal dependence, indicating that the dayside aurora illuminates both hemispheres independent of the latitude of the subsolar point. The summer noon pulsation maximum has, however, a greater longitudinal extent than the winter noon maximum, as measured at 74{degree}-75{degree} invariant latitude. The nightside magnetic pulsations are bursts of Pi (PiB) having an average duration of 15 min. From Defense Meteorological Satellite Program photos the auroral forms related to the high-latitude PiB can be identified as the poleward discrete arc generally having a large longitudinal extent. If the auroral forms are very similar in both hemispheres, then the large longitudinal extent coupled with movement of the auroral could explain why 85% of the PiB events have onsets within 10 min at opposite hemisphere sites (South Pole, Antarctica, and Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland) separated in local magnetic time by about 1.5 hours. There is no seasonal dependence in the statistical occurrence of PiB, nor in its simultaneity in opposite hemispheres. Apparently, the seasonal distortion of the tail plasma sheet has little effect on the acceleration of high-latitude auroral beams. The actual several minute time difference in opposite hemisphere onsets of PiB is probably due to the westward/poleward motion of the longitudinally extended aurora.

  6. Breeding season of wolves, Canis lupus, in relation to latitude

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    A significant relationship was found between Wolf (Canis lupus) breeding dates and latitudes between 12 deg. and 80 deg. N, with Wolves breeding earlier at lower latitudes, probably because of differences in seasonality.

  7. Breeding season of Wolves, Canis lupus, in relation to latitude

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    A significant relationship was found between Wolf (Canis lupus) breeding dates and latitudes between 12?? and 80??N, with Wolves breeding earlier at lower latitudes, probably because of differences in seasonality.

  8. A high-latitude convective cloud feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, Dorian Schuyler

    Available data suggest that during the late Cretaceous and early Paleogene (˜100 to ˜35 million years ago) Earth had an "equable" climate: the equator to pole surface temperature difference and seasonal cycle in high-latitude surface temperature were both much smaller than they are today. The combination of much warmer high latitudes, particularly during winter, and only somewhat warmer tropics has traditionally been difficult to model in global climate models and to explain physically. In this thesis a positive feedback on high-latitude surface temperatures based on the onset of convection and convective clouds is proposed and investigated using a hierarchy of climate models. This feedback mechanism is based on an initial warming leading to destabilization of the high-latitude atmosphere to convection, causing convection, which results in convective clouds and increased atmospheric moisture, both of which trap outgoing longwave radiation and lead to further warming. It is also shown that this convective cloud feedback could be active in a future atmosphere with increased greenhouse gasses, increasing high-latitude climate uncertainty under global warming scenarios. A variety of climate models are used to understand the convective cloudfeedback in this thesis. Simple, analytical models are used in two chapters to understand more complex models and their underlying physics. A zonally-averaged, two-level model of the atmosphere without a seasonal cycle, but containing a hydrological cycle and parameterizations of convection, precipitation, and clouds, and a longwave radiation scheme that explicitly depends on CO 2, water vapor, and cloud fraction is constructed and used as an initial test of the feedback mechanism. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) single column model (SCAM), which contains state-of-the-art atmospheric physics parameterizations, high vertical resolution, a full seasonal cycle, a thermodynamic sea ice model, and a mixed layer ocean

  9. Geomagnetic Field Variation during CME Events at High Latitude in European Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Babita

    Geomagnetic Field Variation during CME Events at High Latitude in European Zone Babita Chandel, Shailendra Saini ,Sneha Yadav and A.K.Gwal Space Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal-462026, India Abstract: The concerning results, are the variation of Geomagnetic Field Component in European Zone during CME events. The geomagnetic events selected for this study occurred during 2003-2006, a period of declining phase of solar cycle 23rd at European zone (Tromso, Sodankyla and Rorvik with Geomagnetic Latitude 69.39o N and Long. 18.56o E, Geomagnetic Latitude 67.360o N and Long. 26.363o E and Geomagnetic Latitude 64.56o N and Long.10.59 o E). From this study it is observed that the strength of a geomagnetic storm depends on the interplanetary-magnetospheric coupling parameter VBz. Higher the value of VBz, higher will be the strength of geomagnetic storm. Magnitude of variation at Rorvik is more as compared to Tromso and magnitude of variation is more at Tromso as compared to Sodankyla. Variation in vertical component is less as compared to the north-south and east-west component. Geomagnetic field components shows the variation when either interplanetary magnetic field orientes southward or remains southward for few hours.

  10. Comparison of high-latitude and mid-latitude ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, L. A.; Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the F region electric field by the incoherent scatter technique have been made at Chatanika, Alaska (65.1 deg N, 147.5 deg W), and Millstone Hill, Massachusetts (42.6 deg N, 71.5 deg W), on July 18-19 and Aug. 7-8, 1973. Good correlation was observed in the time variation of the perpendicular electric field at the two stations. Magnetic conditions for these days were relatively quiet with some variations evident from the high-latitude magnetograms and the Chatanika radar, but no distinct effect appeared on the mid-latitude magnetograms. Since magnetospheric electric fields are thought to be the source of high-latitude electric fields such as those observed at Chatanika, the good correlation in the perpendicular electric field for the two stations indicates that the magnetospheric originated electric fields have an appreciable effect down to at least L equals 3.2.

  11. Evidence for Amazonian mid-latitude glaciation on Mars from impact crater asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Susan J.; Mangold, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    We find that crater slopes in the mid-latitudes of Mars have a marked north-south asymmetry, with the pole-facing slopes being shallower. We mapped impact craters in two southern hemisphere sites (Terra Cimmeria and Noachis Terra) and one northern hemisphere site (Acidalia Planitia) and used elevation data from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard Mars Express to find the maximum slope of impact crater walls in the four cardinal directions. Kreslavsky and Head (Kreslavsky, M.A., Head, J.W. [2003]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 30), using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) track data, also found that, in general, conjugate slopes are shallower in the pole-facing direction, but over a narrower (˜10°) and more constrained latitude band. They linked the asymmetry to active-layer formation (thaw) at high obliquity. However, Parsons and Nimmo (Parsons, R.A., Nimmo, F. [2009]. J. Geophys. Res. 114) studied crater asymmetry using MOLA gridded data and found no evidence of a relationship between crater asymmetry and latitude. Our work supports the observations of Kreslavsky and Head (Kreslavsky, M.A., Head, J.W. [2003]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 30), and shows that asymmetry is also found on conjugate crater slopes below the resolution of MOLA, over a wider latitude band than found in their work. We do not systematically find a sudden transition to asymmetric craters with latitude as expected for thaw-related processes, such as solifluction, gelifluction, or gully formation. The formation of gullies should produce the opposite sense of asymmetry to our observations, so cannot explain them despite the mid-latitude location and pole-facing preferences of gullies. We instead link this asymmetry to the deposition of ice-rich crater deposits, where the base of pole-facing slopes receive ten to hundreds of meters of additional net deposition, compared to equator-facing ones over the mid-latitudes. In support of this hypothesis we found that craters in Terra Cimmeria that have

  12. Mid-Latitude Sedimentary Rock: Spallanzani Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Although most of the best examples of layered sedimentary rock seen on Mars are found at equatorial and sub-tropical latitudes, a few locations seen at mid- and high-latitudes suggest that layered rocks are probably more common than we can actually see from orbit. One extremely good example of these 'atypical' layered rock exposures is found in the 72 km-diameter (45 miles) crater, Spallanzani (58.4oS, 273.5oW). Located southeast of Hellas Planitia, the crater is named for the 18th Century Italian biologist, Lazzaro Spallanzani (1729-1799). Picture A presents a composite of the best Viking orbiter image (VO2-504B55) of the region with 4 pictures obtained June 1999 through January 2001 by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). Each MOC narrow angle image is 3 km across. Taken in the MOC's 'survey mode,' all four images were acquired at roughly 12 meters (39 ft) per pixel. Picture B zooms-in on the portion of the composite image that includes the 4 MOC images (the 100%-size view is 20 m (66 ft) per pixel). Other craters in the region near Spallanzani show features--at Viking Orbiter scale--that are reminiscent of the layering seen in Spallanzani. Exactly what these layers are made of and how they came to be where we see them today are mysteries, but it is possible that they are similar to the materials seen in the many craters and chasms of the equatorial latitudes on Mars.

  13. Electrodynamics of the high latitude middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric electrodynamics is reviewed. The discovery of apparent large (V/m) electric fields within the mesosphere invites the possibility for this region to be electrically active. Observations of the V/m field were made at high latitudes even under active conditions, but always below heights where significant enhancements in electrical conductivity are found to occur. Two measurements at Andoya (Norway) show anticorrelation of horizontal field directions with wind directions, suggesting a mechanism which involves mechanical separation of charged aerosols. Reported evidence for such aerosols makes this concept more viable. Noctilucent clouds and mesospheric turbulence, and their influence on the local electrical environment are mentioned.

  14. Magnetic latitude effects in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winge, C. R., Jr.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The Weber-Davis model of the solar wind is generalized to include the effects of latitude. The principal assumptions of high electrical conductivity, rotational symmetry, the polytropic relation between pressure and density, and a flow-alined field in a system rotating with the sun, are retained. An approximate solution to the resulting equations for spherical boundary conditions at the base of the corona indicates a small component of latitudinal flow toward the solar poles at large distances from the sun as result of latitudinal magnetic forces.

  15. EGRET Sources at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1998-01-01

    During the period 15 March 1992 through 31 October 1997, 12 papers using ROSAT data, supported in part by this grant, were published in referred journals, and one paper was published in a conference proceedings. Their bibliographical references are listed in the Appendix, and the abstracts of these papers are given in the next 13 sections of this report. Finally, a summary of the work completed to date on the newest project, for which ROSAT data are still being received, is given in the section entitled "EGRET Sources at Intermediate Galactic Latitude".

  16. Modeling study of the mid-latitude ionospheric nighttime electron density enhancement by SAMI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Huba, J. D.; Saito, A.; Lin, C.; Liu, J. G.; Chang, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    The mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) is a feature that the nighttime electron density is larger than in the daytime around the mid-latitude ionosphere. This anomaly was first detected in the southern hemisphere five decades ago and reported in the northern hemisphere recently. Previous studies presented the electron density structure of MSNA by satellite observation data and found that MSNA is clearly seen at 300 km altitude during local summer around South American, European, and Northeast Asian regions. A three-dimensional self-consistent model, SAMI3 (Sami3 is Also a Model of the Ionosphere), with inputting neutral wind data from TIEGCM (Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model) model is used to simulate the MSNA feature and further discuss its mechanisms. The comparisons between observation data and the model simulation results suggest that the equatorial neutral winds play the most important role in the formation of MSNA.

  17. The role of latitude in mobilism debates.

    PubMed

    Irving, Edward

    2005-02-01

    In the early 1920s, the continental displacement theory of Wegener, latitude studies of Koppen and Wegener, and Argand's ideas on mountain building led to the first mobilistic paleogeography. In the 1930s and 1940s, many factors caused its general abandonment. Mobilism was revived in the 1950s and 1960s by measurements of long-term displacement of crustal blocks relative to each other (tectonic displacement) and to Earth's geographic pole (latitudinal displacement). Also, short-term or current displacements can now be measured. I briefly outline the categories of tectonic and current displacement and focus on latitudinal displacement. Integration of tectonic and latitudinal displacement in the early 1970s completed the new mobilistic paleogeography, in which the transformation of rock magnetization directions into paleopoles and latitudes and the finite rotation of spherical plates about pivot points play complementary roles; this new synthesis now provides a quantitative basis for studying long-term evolution of Earth's surface features and climate, the changing environments in which life evolves. PMID:15684058

  18. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  19. The role of latitude in mobilism debates

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Edward

    2005-01-01

    In the early 1920s, the continental displacement theory of Wegener, latitude studies of Köppen and Wegener, and Argand's ideas on mountain building led to the first mobilistic paleogeography. In the 1930s and 1940s, many factors caused its general abandonment. Mobilism was revived in the 1950s and 1960s by measurements of long-term displacement of crustal blocks relative to each other (tectonic displacement) and to Earth's geographic pole (latitudinal displacement). Also, short-term or current displacements can now be measured. I briefly outline the categories of tectonic and current displacement and focus on latitudinal displacement. Integration of tectonic and latitudinal displacement in the early 1970s completed the new mobilistic paleogeography, in which the transformation of rock magnetization directions into paleopoles and latitudes and the finite rotation of spherical plates about pivot points play complementary roles; this new synthesis now provides a quantitative basis for studying long-term evolution of Earth's surface features and climate, the changing environments in which life evolves. PMID:15684058

  20. Shabansky Orbits and High Latitude Chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, J. P.; Elkington, S. R.; Malaspina, D.; Spasojevic, M.

    2013-12-01

    High latitude chorus is a whistler-mode VLF emission that is observed on the dayside at high L-shells. Recent observations show presence of these waves in off- equatorial regions. In the presence of off-equatorial magnetic field minima, trapped par- ticles undergo so-called Shabansky orbits, which can lead to temperature anisotropies ooff the equator. Additionally, drift shell splitting (DSS) can produce anisotropies in a compressed dipole. We use a 3D particle tracing code in a tunable analytic compressed- dipole field to study the role of Shabansky orbits on generating a temperature anisotropy in relativistic electrons. By adjusting the dependence on L of the phase space density, we can distinguish between DSS and effects from Shabansky orbits. We use the computed anisotropy for both cases along with a cold plasma model to compute a linear convec- tive wave growth rate for waves in off-equatorial regions. By performing these simula- tions without energizing processes, we can definitively determine what roles Shabansky orbits DSS have in high latitude chorus wave growth. Comparisons of realistic field results with observations will be presented.

  1. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Peter M J; Affek, Hagit P; Ivany, Linda C; Houben, Alexander J P; Sijp, Willem P; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10-17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  2. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Affek, Hagit P.; Ivany, Linda C.; Houben, Alexander J. P.; Sijp, Willem P.; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10–17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  3. Paleogeographic implications of high latitude and middle latitude affinities of the ammonoid Uraloceras

    SciTech Connect

    Spinosa, C.; Gallegos, D.M. ); Nassichuk, W.W. ); Snyder, W.S.

    1991-02-01

    The ammonoid genus Uraloceras characterized a Lower Permian Boreal paleogeographic realm. Reported Lower Permian Pangaean uraloceras occurrences have a Boreal or high-latitude distribution. Additional Lower Permian occurrences in Alaska, dominated by Boreal species, are compatible with and reinforce the Boreal distribution of the genus. In contrast, a new Uraloceras species from Nevada and from the Yukon, as well as representatives of the genus form Nei Monggol, inhabited regions of lower latitudes. The latter ammonoid faunas, geographically and paleoecologically transitional between boreal and equatorial realms, include the genus Uraloceras as well as abundant other ammonoid taxa and representatives of equatorial perinitid ammonoids. The lower assemblage of Wrangellia terrane in eastern Alaska, consisting of the Lower Permian Mankomen Group (Slana Spur and Eagle Creek formations), contains abundant Uraloceras and Paragastrioceras of high-latitude affinities. Published paleomagnetic data indicate that the Nikolai Greenstone is of equatorial origin, with paleolatitudes 10 to 17{degree}. The Nikolai Greenstone seems to have a far-traveled history incompatible with ammonoid evidence suggesting cool-water setting on the Pangaean continental shelf. A reinterpretation for the origin of Wrangellia or its magnetic signature may be in order. Alternative hypotheses suggest that the Eagle Creek Uraloceras-Paragastrioceras Boreal fauna was scraped off the craton at higher latitudes (possible 30-45{degree}) and carried with Wrangellia to its present location.

  4. Time trends and latitude dependence of uveal and cutaneous malignant melanoma induced by solar radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moan, Johan; Cicarma, Emanuela; Setlow, Richard; Porojnicu, Alina C; Grant, William B

    2010-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of solar radiation in uveal melanoma etiology, the time and latitude dependency of the incidence rates of this melanoma type were studied in comparison with those of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Norway and several other countries with Caucasian populations were included. there is a marked north-south gradient of the incidence rates of CMM in Norway, with three times higher rates in the south than in the north. No such gradient is found for uveal melanoma. Similar findings have been published for CMM in other Caucasian populations, with the exception of Europe as a whole. In most populations the ratios of uveal melanoma incidence rates to those of CMM tend to decrease with increasing CMM rates. This is also true for Europe, in spite of the fact that in this region there is an inverse latitude gradient of CMM, with higher rates in the north than in the south. In Norway the incidence rates of CMM have increased until about 1990 but have been constant or even decreased (for young people) after that time, indicating constant or decreasing sun exposure. The uveal melanoma rates have been increasing after 1990. In most other populations the incidence rates of CMM have been increasing until recently while those of uveal melanoma have been decreasing. These data generally support the assumption that uveal melanomas are not generated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and that solar UV, via its role in vitamin D photosynthesis, may have a protective effect. PMID:21547141

  5. Time trends and latitude dependence of uveal and cutaneous malignant melanoma induced by solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moan, J.; Setlow, R.; Cicarma, E.; Porojnicu, A. C.; Grant, W. B.; Juzeniene, A.

    2010-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of solar radiation in uveal melanoma etiology, the time and latitude dependency of the incidence rates of this melanoma type were studied in comparison with those of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Norway and several other countries with Caucasian populations were included. There is a marked north - south gradient of the incidence rates of CMM in Norway, with three times higher rates in the south than in the north. No such gradient is found for uveal melanoma. Similar findings have been published for CMM in other Caucasian populations, with the exception of Europe as a whole. In most populations the ratios of uveal melanoma incidence rates to those of CMM tend to decrease with increasing CMM rates. This is also true for Europe, in spite of the fact that in this region there is an inverse latitude gradient of CMM, with higher rates in the north than in the south. In Norway the incidence rates of CMM have increased until about 1990 but have been constant, or even decreased (for young people) after that time, indicating constant or decreasing sun exposure. The uveal melanoma rates have been increasing after 1990. In most other populations the incidence rates of CMM have been increasing until recently while those of uveal melanoma have been decreasing. These data generally support the assumption that uveal melanomas are not generated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and that solar UV, via its role in vitamin D photosynthesis, may have a protective effect.

  6. Review of Ionospheric Scintillation Models and proposing a Novel Model for Characterizing High Latitude Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, K.; Bust, G. S.; Clauer, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The study of ionospheric scintillations of radio signal involves a problem of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in random media and has been a subject of interest for more than last 5 decades. Some of the representative works are by Booker et. al (1950), Ratcliffe (1956), Wernik and Liu (1975), Yeh and Liu (1982), Secan et. al (1995), Costa and Basu (2002), Rino and Carrano (2011). Many of the scintillation models employ a phase screen model introduced by Rino (1979). Beniguel and Hamel (2011) implemented a global ionospheric scintillation model for equatorial regions showing a good agreement of the model with measurements. Implementing these models in the study of ionospheric scintillations of radio signals at high latitudes could be challenging since the path of satellite signal to ground has a variable angle of incidence, in addition to the complicated geometry of magnetic field lines at high latitude and polar regions, and complex magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms creating the irregularities. We have developed a high fidelity 3-dimensional Global Positioning System Ionospheric Scintillation Model (3D-GPSISM) which is a full 3D EM wave propagation model to simulate GPS scintillations in high latitude ionosphere. The results from this model can form a basic framework on the use of inverse method to understand the physics of high latitude irregularities using GPS scintillations. We are using our model and an inverse method for selected scintillation observations during 2010 - 2013 from GPS receivers at South Pole, McMurdo and remote stations on Antarctica in conjunction with ancillary observations from SuperDARN, magnetometers, All Sky Imagers etc. We believe that such inverse method can be used to derive certain characteristics of the irregularity causing the scintillations and further achieve an improved understanding of the physics of high latitude irregularities.

  7. Interaction of mid-latitude air masses with the polar dome area during RACEPAC and NETCARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter; Koellner, Franziska; Kunkel, Daniel; Schneider, Johannes; Schulz, Christiane; Herber, Andreas; Borrmann, Stephan; Wendisch, Manfred; Ehrlich, Andre; Leaitch, Richard; Willis, Megan; Burkart, Julia; Thomas, Jennie; Abbatt, Jon

    2016-04-01

    We present aircraft based trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC (2014) and NETCARE (2014 and 2015) with the Polar 6 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) covering an area from 134°W to 17°W and 68°N to 83°N. We focus on cloud, aerosol and general transport processes of polluted air masses into the high Arctic. Based on CO and CO2 measurements and kinematic 10-day back trajectories as well as Flexpart particle dispersion modeling we analyze the transport regimes of mid-latitude air masses traveling to the high Arctic prevalent during spring (RACEPAC 2014, NETCARE 2015) and summer (NETCARE 2014). In general more northern parts of the high Arctic (Lat > 75°N) were relatively unaffected from mid-latitude air masses. In contrast, regions further south are influenced by air masses from Asia and Russia (eastern part of Canadian Arctic and European Arctic) as well as from North America (central and western parts of Canadian Arctic). The transition between the mostly isolated high Arctic and more southern regions indicated by tracer gradients is remarkably sharp. This allows for a chemical definition of the Polar dome based on the variability of CO and CO2 as a marker. Isentropic surfaces that slope from the surface to higher altitudes in the high Arctic form the polar dome that represents a transport barrier for mid-latitude air masses to enter the lower troposphere in the high Arctic. Synoptic-scale weather systems frequently disturb this transport barrier and foster the exchange between air masses from the mid-latitudes and polar regions. This can finally lead to enhanced pollution levels in the lower polar troposphere. Mid-latitude pollution plumes from biomass burning or flaring entering the polar dome area lead to an enhancement of 30% of the observed CO mixing ratio within the polar dome area.

  8. Ungulate Reproductive Parameters Track Satellite Observations of Plant Phenology across Latitude and Climatological Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, David C.; Sexton, Joseph O.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Bernales, Heather H.; Edwards, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of climatically-driven plant phenology on mammalian reproduction is one key to predicting species-specific demographic responses to climate change. Large ungulates face their greatest energetic demands from the later stages of pregnancy through weaning, and so in seasonal environments parturition dates should match periods of high primary productivity. Interannual variation in weather influences the quality and timing of forage availability, which can influence neonatal survival. Here, we evaluated macro-scale patterns in reproductive performance of a widely distributed ungulate (mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus) across contrasting climatological regimes using satellite-derived indices of primary productivity and plant phenology over eight degrees of latitude (890 km) in the American Southwest. The dataset comprised > 180,000 animal observations taken from 54 populations over eight years (2004–2011). Regionally, both the start and peak of growing season (“Start” and “Peak”, respectively) are negatively and significantly correlated with latitude, an unusual pattern stemming from a change in the dominance of spring snowmelt in the north to the influence of the North American Monsoon in the south. Corresponding to the timing and variation in both the Start and Peak, mule deer reproduction was latest, lowest, and most variable at lower latitudes where plant phenology is timed to the onset of monsoonal moisture. Parturition dates closely tracked the growing season across space, lagging behind the Start and preceding the Peak by 27 and 23 days, respectively. Mean juvenile production increased, and variation decreased, with increasing latitude. Temporally, juvenile production was best predicted by primary productivity during summer, which encompassed late pregnancy, parturition, and early lactation. Our findings offer a parsimonious explanation of two key reproductive parameters in ungulate demography, timing of parturition and mean annual production

  9. Ungulate Reproductive Parameters Track Satellite Observations of Plant Phenology across Latitude and Climatological Regimes.

    PubMed

    Stoner, David C; Sexton, Joseph O; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Bernales, Heather H; Edwards, Thomas C

    2016-01-01

    The effect of climatically-driven plant phenology on mammalian reproduction is one key to predicting species-specific demographic responses to climate change. Large ungulates face their greatest energetic demands from the later stages of pregnancy through weaning, and so in seasonal environments parturition dates should match periods of high primary productivity. Interannual variation in weather influences the quality and timing of forage availability, which can influence neonatal survival. Here, we evaluated macro-scale patterns in reproductive performance of a widely distributed ungulate (mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus) across contrasting climatological regimes using satellite-derived indices of primary productivity and plant phenology over eight degrees of latitude (890 km) in the American Southwest. The dataset comprised > 180,000 animal observations taken from 54 populations over eight years (2004-2011). Regionally, both the start and peak of growing season ("Start" and "Peak", respectively) are negatively and significantly correlated with latitude, an unusual pattern stemming from a change in the dominance of spring snowmelt in the north to the influence of the North American Monsoon in the south. Corresponding to the timing and variation in both the Start and Peak, mule deer reproduction was latest, lowest, and most variable at lower latitudes where plant phenology is timed to the onset of monsoonal moisture. Parturition dates closely tracked the growing season across space, lagging behind the Start and preceding the Peak by 27 and 23 days, respectively. Mean juvenile production increased, and variation decreased, with increasing latitude. Temporally, juvenile production was best predicted by primary productivity during summer, which encompassed late pregnancy, parturition, and early lactation. Our findings offer a parsimonious explanation of two key reproductive parameters in ungulate demography, timing of parturition and mean annual production, across

  10. Latitude Dependence of the Variations of Sunspot Group Numbers (SGN) and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, R. P.

    2008-06-01

    The 12-month running means of the conventional sunspot number Rz, the sunspot group numbers (SGN) and the frequency of occurrence of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) were examined for cycle 23 (1996 - 2006). For the whole disc, the SGN and Rz plots were almost identical. Hence, SGN could be used as a proxy for Rz, for which latitude data are not available. SGN values were used for 5° latitude belts 0° - 5°, 5° - 10°, 10° - 15°, 15° - 20°, 20° - 25°, 25° - 30° and > 30°, separately in each hemisphere north and south. Roughly, from latitudes 25° - 30° N to 20° - 25° N, the peaks seem to have occurred later for lower latitudes, from latitudes 20° - 25° N to 15° - 20° N, the peaks are stagnant or occur slightly earlier, and then from latitudes 15° - 20° N to 0° - 5° N, the peaks seem to have occurred again later for lower latitudes. Thus, some latitudinal migration is suggested, clearly in the northern hemisphere, not very clearly in the southern hemisphere, first to the equator in 1998, stagnant or slightly poleward in 1999, and then to the equator again from 2000 onwards, the latter reminiscent of the Maunder butterfly diagrams. Similar plots for CME occurrence frequency also showed multiple peaks (two or three) in almost all latitude belts, but the peaks were almost simultaneous at all latitudes, indicating no latitudinal migration. For similar latitude belts, SGN and CME plots were dissimilar in almost all latitude belts except 10° - 20° S. The CME plots had in general more peaks than the SGN plots, and the peaks of SGN often did not match with those of CME. In the CME data, it was noticed that whereas the values declined from 2002 to 2003, there was no further decline during 2003 - 2006 as one would have expected to occur during the declining phase of sunspots, where 2007 is almost a year of sunspot minimum. An inquiry at GSFC-NASA revealed that the person who creates the preliminary list was changed in 2004 and the new person picks out

  11. A high-latitude, low-latitude boundary layer model of the convection current system

    SciTech Connect

    Siscoe, G.L. ); Lotko, W.; Sonnerup, B.U.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Observations suggest that both the high- and low-latitude boundary layers contribute to magnetospheric convection, and that their contributions are linked. In the interpretation pursued here, the high-latitude boundary layer (HBL) generates the voltage while the low-latitude boundary layer (LBL) generates the current for the part of the convection electric circuit that closes through the ionosphere. This paper gives a model that joins the high- and low-latitude boundary layers consistently with the ionospheric Ohm's law. It describes an electric circuit linking both boundary layers, the region 1 Birkeland currents, and the ionospheric Pedersen closure currents. The model works by using the convection electric field that the ionosphere receives from the HBL to determine two boundary conditions to the equations that govern viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling. The result provides the needed self-consistent coupling between the two boundary layers and fully specifies the solution for the viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling equations. The solution shows that in providing the current required by the ionospheric Ohm's law, the LBL needs only a tenth of the voltage that spans the HBL. The solution also gives the latitude profiles of the ionospheric electric field, parallel currents, and parallel potential. It predicts that the plasma in the inner part of the LBL moves sunward instead of antisunward and that, as the transpolar potential decreases below about 40 kV, reverse polarity (region 0) currents appear at the poleward border of the region 1 currents. A possible problem with the model is its prediction of a thin boundary layer ({approximately}1000 km), whereas thicknesses inferred from satellite data tend to be greater.

  12. EGRET sources at intermediate galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the abstracts of four papers (using ROSAT data) that are submitted to refereed journals during the current reporting period. The papers are: (1) Extreme x-ray variability in the narrow-line QSO PHL 1092; (2) The Geminga pulsar (soft x-ray variability and an EUVE observation); (3) a broad-band x-ray study of the geminga pulsar; and (4) Classification of IRAS-selected x-ray galaxies in the ROSAT all-sky survey. The abstracts of these papers are given in the next four sections of this report, and their status is given in the Appendix. Finally, two new projects (De-identifying a non-AGN and EGRET sources at intermediate galactic latitude) for which ROSAT data were recently received are currently being studied under this grant. A summary of work in progress on these new projects is given in the last two sections of this report.

  13. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  14. High latitude electromagnetic plasma wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The principal types of electromagnetic plasma wave emission produced in the high latitude auroral regions are reviewed. Three types of radiation are described: auroral kilometric radiation, auroral hiss, and Z mode radiation. Auroral kilometric radiation is a very intense radio emission generated in the free space R-X mode by electrons associated with the formation of discrete auroral arcs in the local evening. Theories suggest that this radiation is an electron cyclotron resonance instability driven by an enhanced loss cone in the auroral acceleration region at altitudes of about 1 to 2 R sub E. Auroral hiss is a somewhat weaker whistler mode emission generated by low energy (100 eV to 10 keV) auroral electrons. The auroral hiss usually has a V shaped frequency time spectrum caused by a freqency dependent beaming of the whistler mode into a conical beam directed upward or downward along the magnetic field.

  15. Statistical studies of impulsive events at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Z. M.; Bering, E. A.; Benbrook, J. R.; Liao, B.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Wolfe, A. N.; Friis-Christensen, E.

    1995-01-01

    A statistical study has been made of the high-latitude impulsive events that were observed during the 1985-1986 South Pole Balloon Campaign. The events were selected by searching for unipolar pulses greater than or equal to 10 nT above background in the vertical component of the magnetic field on the ground and/or pedestal or 'W' shaped horizontal electric field perturbations greater than or equal to 10 mV/m in amplitude and accompanied by perturbations in the vertical electric field at balloon altitude. A main event list comprising 112 events was compiled from the 468 hours of data available. Three aspects of the events were examined: the solar wind conditions prior to the event, local time of observation, and intrinsic properties of the events. The local time distribution was obtained from the 112 entry main event list and was found to be nearly uniform across the dayside, with no midday gap. The event rate found using our low-amplitude selection criteria was 0.7 event/hr, comparable to expectations based on in situ studies of the magnetopause. A total of 42 events were found for which data were available from Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8. Of these events, 12 occurred when the Z(sub GSM) component (B(sub Z)) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was northward and 30 occurred when B(sub Z) was southward or fluctuating. Only three of the B(sub Z) northward cases and only five of the B(sub Z) southward cases were preceded by pressure pulses greater than 0.4 nPa in amplitude. Ten of the events were studied in detail by means of a model-fitting method discussed elsewhere. This method infers values of several parameters, including the total current flowing in a coaxial or monopole system and a two-dimensional dipole system. The intrinsic properties of the events showed that only approximately 10% of the total current contributed to momentum transfer to the high-latitude ionosphere, that the direction of the motion depended more on local time of

  16. Electrodynamics of ionospheric weather over low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil Ali

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic state of the ionosphere at low latitudes is largely controlled by electric fields originating from dynamo actions by atmospheric waves propagating from below and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction from above. These electric fields cause structuring of the ionosphere in wide ranging spatial and temporal scales that impact on space-based communication and navigation systems constituting an important segment of our technology-based day-to-day lives. The largest of the ionosphere structures, the equatorial ionization anomaly, with global maximum of plasma densities can cause propagation delays on the GNSS signals. The sunset electrodynamics is responsible for the generation of plasma bubble wide spectrum irregularities that can cause scintillation or even disruptions of satellite communication/navigation signals. Driven basically by upward propagating tides, these electric fields can suffer significant modulations from perturbation winds due to gravity waves, planetary/Kelvin waves, and non-migrating tides, as recent observational and modeling results have demonstrated. The changing state of the plasma distribution arising from these highly variable electric fields constitutes an important component of the ionospheric weather disturbances. Another, often dominating, component arises from solar disturbances when coronal mass ejection (CME) interaction with the earth's magnetosphere results in energy transport to low latitudes in the form of storm time prompt penetration electric fields and thermospheric disturbance winds. As a result, drastic modifications can occur in the form of layer restructuring (Es-, F3 layers etc.), large total electron content (TEC) enhancements, equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) latitudinal expansion/contraction, anomalous polarization electric fields/vertical drifts, enhanced growth/suppression of plasma structuring, etc. A brief review of our current understanding of the ionospheric weather variations and the

  17. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N.; Guo, Q. L.

    2014-05-01

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  18. High-latitude plasma convection during Northward IMF as derived from in-situ magnetospheric Cluster EDI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, M.; Haaland, S. E.; Paschmann, G.; Quinn, J. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we investigate statistical, systematic variations of the high-latitude convection cell structure during northward IMF. Using 1-min-averages of Cluster/EDI electron drift observations above the Northern and Southern polar cap areas for six and a half years (February 2001 till July 2007), and mapping the spatially distributed measurements to a common reference plane at ionospheric level in a magnetic latitude/MLT grid, we obtained regular drift patterns according to the various IMF conditions. We focus on the particular conditions during northward IMF, where lobe cells at magnetic latitudes >80° with opposite (sunward) convection over the central polar cap are a permanent feature in addition to the main convection cells at lower latitudes. They are due to reconnection processes at the magnetopause boundary poleward of the cusp regions. Mapped EDI data have a particular good coverage within the central part of the polar cap, so that these patterns and their dependence on various solar wind conditions are well verified in a statistical sense. On average, 4-cell convection pattern are shown as regular structures during periods of nearly northward IMF with the tendency of a small shift toward negative clock angles. The positions of these high-latitude convection foci are within 79° to 85° magnetic latitude and 09:00 15:00 MLT. The MLT positions are approximately symmetric ±2 h about 11:30 MLT, i.e. slightly offset from midday toward prenoon hours, while the maximum (minimum) potential of the high-latitude cells is at higher magnetic latitudes near their maximum potential difference at ≍-10° to -15° clock angle for the North (South) Hemisphere. With increasing clock angle distances from ≍IMFBz+, a gradual transition occurs from the 4-cell pattern via a 3-cell to the common 2-cell convection pattern, in the course of which one of the medium-scale high-latitude dayside cells diminishes and disappears while the other intensifies and merges with the

  19. Latitude and local time dependence of precipitated low energy electrons at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafsson, G.

    1972-01-01

    Data from particle detectors on board the satellite OGO-4 were used to study the precipitation of electrons in the energy range 0.7 to 24 keV. The latitude dependence of these particles in the local time region from midnight to dawn was investigated in detail. The analysis shows that the precipitation of particles of energies 2.3 to 24 keV is centered at an invariant latitude of about 68 deg at midnight with a clear shift in latitude with increasing local time and this shift is more pronounced for lower energies. The highest fluxes of particles in this energy interval are measured at midnight and they decrease rapidly with local time. The data in the energy range 2.3 to 24 keV support a theory where particles are injected in the midnight region from the tail gaining energy due to a betatron process and then drift eastwards in a combined electric and magnetic field. The main part of the electrons at 0.7 keV show a different behavior. They seem to undergo an acceleration process which is rather local, sometimes giving field aligned fluxes which may be super-imposed on the background precipitation.

  20. Solar Cycle Effects on Equatorial Electrojet Strength and Low Latitude Ionospheric Variability (P10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenadhari, B.; Alex, S.

    2006-11-01

    veena_iig@yahoo.co.in The most obvious indicators of the activity of a solar cycle are sunspots, flares, plages, and soon. These are intimately linked to the solar magnetic fields, heliospheric processes which exhibit complex but systematic variations. The changes in geomagnetic activity, as observed in the ground magnetic records follow systematic correspondence with the solar activity conditions. Thus the transient variations in the magnetic field get modified by differing solar conditions. Also the solar cycle influences the Earth causing changes in geomagnetic activity, the magnetosphere and the ionosphere. Daily variations in the ground magnetic field are produced by different current systems in the earth’s space environment flowing in the ionosphere and magnetosphere which has a strong dependence on latitude and longitude of the location. The north-south (Horizontal) configuration of the earth’s magnetic field over the equator is responsible for the narrow band of current system over the equatorial latitudes and is called the Equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and is a primary driver for Equatorial Ionization anomaly (EIA). Equatorial electric fields and plasma drifts play the fundamental roles on the morphology of the low latitude ionosphere and strongly vary during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed periods. Quantitative study is done to illustrate the development process of EEJ and its influence on ionospheric parameters. An attempt is also made to examine and discuss the response of the equatorial electrojet parameters to the fast varying conditions of solar wind and interplanetary parameters.

  1. Spatial characteristics of low-latitude Pc3-4 geomagnetic pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Ziesolleck, C.W.S.; Fraser, B.J.; Menk, F.W.; McNabb, P.W. )

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the generation mechanisms of low-latitude Pc-4 geomagnetic pulsations, data were obtained from a meridional chain of induction magnetometers spanning L values from 1.4 to 2.7 ([minus]30[degrees] to [minus]52[degrees] geomagnetic latitude). The spatial structure of Pc-4 signal parameters was examined by means of spectral, polarization and interstation phase analysis. The paper describes three typical individual events whose spectral, polarization and phase characteristics indicate the existence of field line resonances at low latitudes within the plasmasphere. The spatial phase structure shows a local minimum and indicates phase motion toward the resonance region. Resonance region widths of [Delta]L = 0.2 to [Delta]L = 0.8, corresponding to north-south ionospheric scale lengths of 250 and 1500 km or more, respectively, are seen. The coupling of field line resonances to global compressional modes is considered to be a likely generation mechanism of these pulsations. 49 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Characteristics of tropopause folds over Arctic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, T. Narayana; Kirkwood, S.

    2005-09-01

    Characteristics of tropopause folds over Arctic latitudes have been studied using VHF radar measurements supplemented by balloon measurements. The variation of the radar parameters during the passage of tropopause folds is discussed in detail. To our knowledge, these observations constitute the first spaced antenna (SA) radar measurements during the passage of tropopause folds. This allows us to compare the parameters detectable using this mode with those observed using other configurations, such as the Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique. In general, the structural characteristics, such as the slope of folds, seem to be similar at Arctic latitudes to that at midlatitudes; however, the height of the tropopause and the axis of the jet stream (and hence the folding) are found to be lower by 1-2 km than their counterparts in midlatitudes. In the case studies the radar-derived parameters, such as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and vertical shear of horizontal wind, clearly show the upper-air frontal zone. The frontal circulation, conceived from vertical velocity, including the warm conveyer belt flow and the dry intrusion, is clearly visible in the first case, whereas it is masked by high-amplitude mountain lee waves in the second case. Further, the frontal zone seems to be acting as a critical layer to mountain lee wave activity by absorbing/filtering the wave activity. The aspect angles derived from the present analysis agree well with those estimated by vertical beam spectral width but are small in comparison with those estimated by the power ratio method. The mean full correlation analysis (FCA) turbulent velocity is estimated using the ESRAD data obtained during the passage of 15 tropopause folds. The mean eddy diffusion coefficients, Kz, near the tropopause and in the upper portion of the fold, where strong turbulence is seen in case studies, are found to be 3.54 and 6.4 m2 s-1, respectively. Utilizing the mean Kz and the mean ozone gradient (obtained from

  3. Magnetospheric resonances at low and middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Huba, J. D.

    2015-09-01

    We present results from a numerical study of structure and dynamics of dispersive Alfvén waves in the near-Earth magnetosphere containing proton radiation belt (near L = 1.5 dipole magnetic shell). The interest in this problem is motivated by numerous observations of magnetic oscillations with frequencies in the range of 0.1-4.0 Hz detected on the ground at low and middle latitudes. In a number of studies these oscillations interpreted as shear Alfvén waves standing inside the so-called ionospheric Alfvén resonator. We present results from two-dimensional, time-dependent simulations of the reduced two-fluid MHD model performed in the dipole magnetic field geometry with the realistic parameters of the magnetospheric plasma. These simulations show that these pulsations can be produced by the fundamental mode of the global field line resonator, spanning the entire magnetic field line in the low or middle magnetosphere. Simulations also show that even the waves with the highest considered frequencies (2.44 Hz) are not trapped inside the ionospheric resonator. Therefore, if these waves will be generated by some ionospheric source, then they can reach the equatorial magnetosphere and interact with energetic protons in the proton radiation belt.

  4. Magnetospheric Resonances at Low and Middle Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Huba, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a numerical study of structure and dynamics of dispersive Alfven waves in the near-earth magnetosphere containing proton radiation belt (near L=1.5 dipole magnetic shell). The interest in this problem is motivated by numerous observations of magnetic oscillations with frequencies in the range of 0.1-4.0 Hz detected on the ground at low and middle latitudes. In a number of studies these oscillations interpreted as shear Alfven waves standing inside the so-called ionopspheric Alfven resonator (IAR). We present results from two-dimensional, time dependent simulations of the reduced two-fluid MHD model performed in the dipole magnetic field geometry with the realistic parameters of the magnetospheric plasma. These simulations show that these pulsations can be produced by the fundamental mode of the global field line resonator (FLR), spanning the entire magnetic field line in the low or middle magnetosphere. Simulations also show that even the waves with the highest considered frequencies (2.44 Hz) are not trapped inside the ionospheric resonator. Therefore, if these waves will be generated by some ionospheric source, then they can reach the equatorial magnetosphere and interact with energetic protons in the proton radiation belt.

  5. Relative humidities in mid-latitude contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, M.; Kübbeler, M.; Meyer, J.; Schiller, C.; Gayet, J.-F.; Fiebig, M.; Hamburger, Th.; Petzold, A. Minikin (4), A.; Schlager, H.; Voigt, Ch.

    2009-04-01

    Aircraft contrails frequently occur in the upper troposphere. They consist of ice particles having the potential to directly affect the Earth's climate. The frequency, life time, ice crystal size spectra and thus radiative properties of contrails depend strongly on the ambient distribution of the relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi). In air with RHi below 100% contrails are believed to be short-lived, while persistent contrails require an ambient RHi of at least 100% (Gao et al., 2006, Atmospheric Environment). During the mid-latitude aircraft experiments CONCERT 2008 (CONtrail and Cirrus ExpeRimenT, 6 flights), CIRRUS 2006 (1 flight) and PAZI 2003 ('PArtikel und ZIrren', 2 flights), RHi inside of contrails were measured using the high precision Fast In-situ Stratospheric lyman-alpha Hygrometer FISH. We present results from about 1 hour of observation time in 52 contrails during the 9 flights. The peak of the RHi frequency distribution is around 90%, i.e. most of the contrails are observed in subsaturated air. There is indication that the age of the contrails is much larger than expected, implying that, to date, the lifetime of contrails below 100% RHi is underestimated. Further analysis of the observations is needed to confirm/explain these results.

  6. Empirical models of high latitude electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Model cross sections of the high latitude dawn-dusk electric field based on OGO-6 data are presented for the signature profiles, most frequently encountered for both + and -Y orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Line integrals give a total potential of 76 keV in each case. To illustrate extremes, examples of model cross-sections with total potentials of 23 keV and 140 keV are also given. Model convection patterns are also presented utilizing OGO-6 data on boundary locations at other magnetic local times. When this information is combined with characteristic field geometries in the region of the Harang discontinuity, and is supplemented by data from Ba+ cloud motions in the polar cap, it becomes possible to construct realistic convection patterns on the nightside which deviate from the usual sun-aligned patterns. The observational models presented are of limited applicability as a consequence of the variability of observed distributions. These limitations are emphasized with particular attention given to several types of recurrent deviations which have not previously been discussed.

  7. Low latitude middle atmosphere ionization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassi, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Low latitude middle atmosphere ionization was studied with data obtained from three blunt conductivity probes and one Gerdien condenser. An investigation was conducted into the effects of various ionization sources in the 40 to 65 Km altitude range. An observed enhancement of positive ion conductivity taking place during the night can be explained by an atmsopheric effect, with cosmic rays being the only source of ionization only if the ion-ion recombination coefficient (alpha sub i) is small(10 to the -7 power cu cm/s) and varies greatly with altitude. More generally accepted values of alpha sub i ( approximately equal to 3x10 to the -7 power cu cm/s) require an additional source of ionization peaking at about 65 Km, and corresponding approximately to the integrated effect of an X-ray flux measured on a rocket flown in conjunction with the ionization measurements. The reasonable assumption of an alpha sub i which does not vary with altitude in the 50-70 Km range implies an even greater value alpha sub i and a more intense and harder X-ray spectrum.

  8. Bayesian Image Classification At High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgin, Claire E.; Eastwood, Steinar; Merchant, Chris J.

    2013-12-01

    The European Space Agency created the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) to maximize the usefulness of Earth Observations to climate science. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is an essential climate variable to which satellite observations make a crucial contribution, and is one of the projects within the CCI program. SST retrieval is dependent on successful cloud clearing and identification of clear-sky pixels over ocean. At high latitudes image classification is more difficult due to the presence of sea-ice. Newly formed ice has a temperature close to the freezing point of water and a dark surface making it difficult to distinguish from open ocean using data at visible and infrared wavelengths. Similarly, melt ponds on the sea-ice surface make image classification more difficult. We present here a three- way Bayesian classifier for the AATSR instrument classifying pixels as ‘clear-sky over ocean', ‘clear-sky over ice' or ‘cloud' using the 0.6, 1.6, 11 and 12 micron channels. We demonstrate the ability of the classifier to successfully identify sea-ice and consider the potential for generating an ice surface temperature record from AATSR which could be extended using data from SLSTR.

  9. Mountains and arid climates of middle latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Manabe, S.; Broccoli, A.J. )

    1990-01-12

    Simulations from a global climate model with and without orography have been used to investigate the role of mountains in maintaining extensive arid climates in middle latitudes of the Northern hemisphere. Dry climates similar to those observed were simulated over central Asia and western interior North America in the experiment with mountains, whereas relatively moist climates were simulated in these areas in the absence of orography. The experiments suggest that these interior regions are dry because general subsidence and relatively infrequent storm development occur upstream of orographically induced stationary wave troughs. Downstream of these troughs, precipitation-bearing storms develop frequently in association with strong jet streams. In contrast, both atmospheric circulation and precipitation were more zonally symmetric in the experiment without mountains. In addition, orography reduces the moisture transport into the continental interiors from nearby oceanic sources. The relative soil wetness of these regions in the experiment without mountains is consistent with paleoclimatic evidence of less aridity during the late Tertiary, before substantial uplift of the Rocky Mountains and Tibetan Plateau is believed to have occurred.

  10. Nighttime subvisual high-latitude auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Kornilov, I. A.; Kornilova, T. A.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Sandholt, P. E.; Lybekk, B.

    2008-10-01

    Special methods for processing TV images have been used to study the characteristics of nighttime auroras based on the observations at high-latitude observatories on Spitsbergen. Weak subvisual auroras (SVAs), originating 3°-4° north of brighter auroras in the auroral oval, have been detected in the interval 1900-0400 MLT. The average lifetime of SVAs is approximately 7 min, and the average velocity of the equatorward shift is ˜0.6 km/s. SVAs were observed during relatively quiet periods, when the IMF B z component is mainly positive. However, SVAs are not polar-cap auroras since they are oriented from east to west rather than toward the Sun. The optical observations indicate that the SVA intensity is 0.2-0.5 and 0.1-0.3 kR in the 630 and 557.7 nm emissions, respectively. The average ratio of the emission intensities ( I 5577/ I 6300) is about 0.5. According to the direct satellite observations, the SVA electron spectrum has a maximum at 0.4-1.0 keV. In this case the energy flux of precipitating electrons is approximately an order of magnitude as low as such a flux in brighter auroral arcs in the auroral oval.

  11. Latitude-correlated genetic polymorphisms: selection or gene flow?

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, B M; Jodice, C; Scozzari, R; Corbo, R M; Nahum, M; Pompei, F; Santachiara-Benerecetti, S A; Santolamazza, C; Morpurgo, G P; Modiano, G

    2000-08-01

    Latitude-correlated polymorphisms can be due to either selection-driven evolution or gene flow. To discriminate between them, we propose an approach that studies subpopulations springing from a single population that have lived for generations at different latitudes and have had a low genetic admixture. These requirements are fulfilled to a large extent by Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews. The original population lived at a latitude of 35 degrees N, where the Sephardis still live. The Ashkenazis, however, moved to a latitude of 50 degrees N, starting about 10 centuries ago. The present study examines 3 latitude-correlated polymorphisms: PGP, PGM1, and AHSG. We found that PGP*2 and AHSG*2 alleles most likely underwent selection-driven evolution, but that PGM1*ts allele was not similarly affected. Since temperature might have been considered a reasonable selective factor, we also studied a population living at >800 m above sea level from Aosta Valley (Italy). PMID:11048786

  12. Latitude: How American Astronomers Solved the Mystery of Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    First longitude, now latitude. From Latitude's title we cannot help thinking of Dava Sobel's recent bestseller, Longitude. I suppose it's unlikely to be such a moneymaker, but this delightful new book by Bill and Merri Sue Carter, a father and daughter team, is similar to Sobel's book. Both are physically small, with short chapters, which makes for a quick read. And both have a clear hero: John Harrison and his chronometers for longitude; and Seth Carlo Chandler Jr. and his almucantar for latitude. Both books eschew academic-style footnoting, although Latitude does list a few useful sources for each chapter and provides a comprehensive list of Chandler's astronomical publications. Chandler's name is known to most AGU members for its association with the 14-month wobble of the Earth's pole. He also discovered the slightly smaller annual wobble, and an argument can be made that he was the principal discoverer of polar motion, or latitude variation, in general.

  13. Differential migration and the link between winter latitude, timing of migration, and breeding in a songbird.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Bradley K; Newman, Amy E M; Turbek, Sheela P; Dossman, Bryant C; Hobson, Keith A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Mitchell, Greg W; Wheelwright, Nathaniel T; Norris, D Ryan

    2016-06-01

    Patterns of connectivity between breeding and wintering grounds can have important implications for individual fitness and population dynamics. Using light-level geolocators and stable hydrogen isotopes (δ(2)H) in feathers, we evaluated differential migration of Savannah sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis) breeding on Kent Island in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada in relation to sex, age, and body size. Based on geolocators recovered from 38 individuals between 2012 and 2014, the winter distribution was centered in North Carolina (median latitude 34°, range 26°-41°), with males overwintering, on average, approximately 275 km further north than females. Based on analyses of tail feather samples collected from 106 individuals from the same population between 2008 and 2012, males and adults had more negative δ(2)H values than females and juveniles, respectively, providing additional evidence that males wintered north of females and that adults wintered north of juveniles. Winter latitude and δ(2)H values within each sex were not found to be related to body size. From geolocator data, males returned to the breeding grounds, on average, 14 days earlier than females. For males, there was some evidence that arrival date on the breeding grounds was negatively correlated with winter latitude and that individuals which arrived earlier tended to breed earlier. Thus, benefits for males of early arrival on the breeding grounds may have contributed to their wintering farther north than females. Social dominance may also have contributed to age and sex differences in winter latitude, whereby dominant males and adults forced subordinate females and juveniles further south. PMID:26888571

  14. Long-term trends in the East Australian Current separation latitude and eddy driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetina-Heredia, P.; Roughan, M.; van Sebille, E.; Coleman, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    An observed warming of the Tasman Sea in recent decades has been linked to a poleward shift of the maximum wind stress curl, and a strengthening of the poleward flow along the coast of southeastern Australia. However, changes in the East Australian Current (EAC) separation latitude, as well as in the contribution of the EAC, the EAC extension and its eddy field to the total southward transport due to such a strengthening remain unknown. This study uses 30 years (1980-2010) of the Ocean Forecast for the Earth Simulator (OFES) sea surface height and velocity outputs to obtain a three decade long-time series of (i) the EAC separation latitude, (ii) the southward transport along the coast of southeastern Australia (28°S-39°S), and (iii) the southward transport across the EAC separation latitude. A Lagrangian approach is implemented and the spin parameter Ω is used to provide a quantitative distinction between the transports occurring outside and inside (cyclonic and anticyclonic) eddies. Significant positive trends of the low pass southward transports indicate that the intensification of the poleward flow has occurred both within the EAC and in the EAC extension. In addition, a significant increase in southward transport inside and outside eddies is found. Importantly, the contribution of eddy driven transport has a large temporal variability and shows a sharp increase from 2005 onward. Finally our results show that the EAC has not penetrated further south but it has separated more frequently at the southernmost latitudes within the region where it typically turns eastward.

  15. Longitudinal Variation and Waves in Jupiter's South Equatorial Wind Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, A. A.; Rogers, John H.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Choi, David; Allison, Michael; Adamoli, Gianluigi; Mettig, Hans-Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed study of the cloud features in the strong southern equatorial wind jet near 7.5 S planetographic latitude. To understand the apparent variations in average zonal wind jet velocity at this latitude [e.g.. 1,2,3], we have searched for variations iIi both feature latitude and velocity with longitude and time. In particular, we focused on the repetitive chevron-shaped dark spots visible on most dates and the more transient large anticyclonic system known as the South Equatorial Disturbance (SED). These small dark spots are interpreted as cloud holes, and are often used as material tracers of the wind field.

  16. Motion of the Heliospheric Termination Shock at High Heliographic Latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Aaron

    1995-01-01

    We expect the mean distance of the heliospheric termination shock to be greater (smaller) at polar latitudes than at equatorial latitudes, depending on whether the mean dynamic pressure of the solar wind is greater or smaller at high latitudes. The heliospheric termination shock is expected to move in response to variation in upstream solar wind conditions, so that at any particular instant the termination shock will resemble a distorted asymmetric balloon with some parts moving inward and others moving outward. If the shock is a gasdynamic or magnetohydrodynamic shock the results of the analysis depend only very weakly on the nature of the upstream disturbance; typical speeds of the disturbed shock are approximately 100 to 200 km/s. In the absence of a significant latitude gradient of the typical magnitude of solar wind disturbances typical motions of the disturbed shock at polar latitudes would be about twice as fast, due to the higher speed of the high-latitude wind. If the dynamics of the termination shock are dominated by acceleration of the anomalous component of the cosmic rays, the motion of the shock in response to a given disturbance is substantially slower than in the gasdynamic case. Conceivably, particle acceleration might be a less important effect at higher latitudes, and we envision the possibility of a termination shock that is dominated by particle acceleration at lower latitudes and is an MHD shock at high latitudes. In this event high latitude solar wind disturbances would produce substantially larger inward and outward motions of the shock in the polar regions.

  17. Common origin of positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and the geomagnetic activity effect at low latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Proelss, G.W. )

    1993-04-01

    The author looks for a correlation between two different atmospheric effects. They are a positive atmospheric storm (an anomalous increase in the F2 region ionization density), observed at middle latitudes, and the geomagnetic activity effect (the anomalous changes of temperature and gas density seen in the thermosphere), observed at low latitudes. A temporal correlation is sought to test the argument that both of these effects are the result of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TAD). A TAD is a pulselike atmospheric wave thought to be generated by substorm activity, and to propagate with high velocity (600 m/s) from polar latitudes toward equatorial latitudes. The author looks at data from five separate events correlating magnetic, ionospheric, and neutral atmospheric measurements. The conclusion is that there is a positive correlation between magnetic substorm activity at high latitudes, and positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and geomagnetic activity at low latitudes. The time correlations are consistent with high propagation speeds between these events. The author also presents arguments which indicate that the middle latitude positive ionospheric storms are not the result of electric field effects.

  18. Relationships of high-latitude geomagnetic variations to interplanetary plasma conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A. AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ ); Lanzerotti, L.J.; Maclennan, C.G.; Medford, L.V. )

    1987-01-01

    As an extension of the United States program at South Pole Station to study in detail the southern magnetospheric cusp region, the authors have initiated geomagnetic studies at Iqaluit (formerly Frobisher Bay), Baffin Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. This location is approximately geomagnetically conjugate to South Pole Station under quiet geomagnetic conditions. Both sites are just inside the equatorward boundary of the dayside magnetospheric cusps in their respective hemispheres. This research includes studies of the conjugacy of geometric activity at these high latitudes, studies of the conditions under which conjugacy breaks down, and the relationship of geomagnetic variations to energy sources in the interplanetary plasma. In both hemispheres, variations in the magnetic field are measured with fluxgate magnetometers over the range from 0.0 to approximately 0.5 hertz. The field variations are measured in three orthogonal components: Geomagnetic north-south (H-component), geomagnetic east-west (D-component), and vertical (V-component). The magnetic field data are analyzed using a number of statistical techniques, including power spectra analysis. Presented here are the results of a study of hourly power spectra computed for the the H-component magnetic field data acquired at both South Pole and Iqaluit for the 30-day interval 17 July to 15 August 1985. After computing the spectra, the geomagnetic power is calculated over several different bandwidths corresponding, roughly, to frequencies related to hydromagnetic waves in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  19. Carbon cycling in high-latitude ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alan; Frolking, Stephen; Holland, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    The carbon-rich soils and peatlands of high-latitude ecosystems could substantially influence atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and CH4 in a changing climate. Currently, cold, often waterlogged conditions retard decomposition, and release of carbon back to the atmosphere may be further slowed by physical protection of organic matter in permafrost. As a result, many northern ecosystems accumulate carbon over time (Billings et al., 1982; Poole and Miller, 1982), and although such rates of accumulation are low, thousands of years of development have left Arctic ecosystems with an extremely high soil carbon content; Schlesinger's (1984) average value of 20.4 kg C/m(sup 2) leads to a global estimate of 163 x 10(exp 15) g C. All GCM simulations of a doubled CO2 climate predict the greatest warming to occur in the polar regions (Dickinson, 1986; Mitchell, 1989). Given the extensive northern carbon pools and the strong sensitivity of decomposition processes to temperature, even a slight warming of the soil could dramatically alter the carbon balance of Arctic ecosystems. If warming accelerates rates of decomposition more than rates of primary production, a sizeable additional accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere could occur. Furthermore, CH4 produced in anaerobic soils and peatlands of the Arctic already composes a good percentage of the global efflux (Cicerone and Oremlund, 1988); if northern soils become warmer and wetter as a whole, CH4 emissions could dramatically rise. A robust understanding of the primary controls of carbon fluxes in Arctic ecosystems is critical. As a framework for a systematic examination of these controls, we discussed a conceptual model of regional-scale Arctic carbon turnover, including CH4 production, and based upon the Century soil organic matter model.

  20. Experimental investigation of mechanisms of mid-latitude ionosphere and geophysical fields perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Boris; Zetzer, Julius; Egorov, Dmitry

    The investigations are carried out to study mechanisms and channels of the mid-latitude ionosphere, near-Earth electric field and current perturbations, and their connection to high-latitude and magnetospheric events. The basis of these investigations is a measurement of the geophysical fields in the Geophysical Observatory Mikhnevo (54.9 N, 37,8 E) of the Institute of Geospheres Dynamics RAS situated at 80 km to the south from Moscow. The observatory includes a set of measuring complexes for radiophysics, magnetic, electrical, optic, infrasound, seismic, and other investigations. All of them are controlled by the united computer centre in the common scale of time. Our approach bases on well known conception that the main reasons of the mid-latitude perturbations are the processes in the auroral regions. But auroral phenomena impact on mid-latitudes by means of different physical mechanisms and agents of disturbances. Fortunately, they differ from each other in the time of their generation and velocities of their propagation. For example, the typical velocity of propagation of thermosphere winds is about 100 m/s, the acoustic gravity wave propagate with a velocity of about 400 m/s, and a prompt penetration of the magnetospheric electric field affects the mid-latitude practically instantly. If we can determine a time lag between the action of the perturbation source and mid-latitude ionosphere response, we can determine the velocity of perturbation propagation and recognize the dominating mechanisms and channels of disturbances. The important requirements for the organization of such investigation is a positioning of different measuring facilities in one place and organization of coordinated and synchronous registration of the ionosphere parameters and geophysical fields variations with high temporal resolution. The Mikhnevo observatory gives us such ability. As an indicator and marker of high latitude events (magnetic storms and substorms) we use AE-index. The

  1. Storm time electric field penetration observed at mid-latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Foster, J.C. ); Rich, F.J.; Swider, W. )

    1991-04-01

    During the height of the February 8-9, 1986, magnetic storm the Millstone Hill radar was in the evening local time sector (1600-2200 MLT). Radar observations indicate that high speed (>1,000 m s{sup {minus}1}) westward ion flow penetrated deeply below 50{degree} invariant latitude ({Lambda}) and persisted for 6 hours between 2100 UT on February 8 and 0300 UT on February 9. The double-peaked ion convection feature was pronounced throughout the period, and the separation in the dual maxima ranged from 4{degree} to 10{degree}. The latitude positions of the high-latitude ion drift peak and the convection reversal varied in unison. The low-latitude ion drift peak ({approximately}49{degree}{Lambda} or L =2.3) did not show significant universal time/magnetic local time (UT/MLT) variation in its latitude location but showed a decrease in magnitude during the initial recovery phase of the storm. Using simultaneous particle (30 eV-30 keV) precipitation data from the DMSP F6 and F7 satellites, the authors find the high-latitude ion drift peak to coincide with the boundary plasma sheet/central plasma sheet transition in the high ionospheric conductivity (>15 mho) region. The low-latitude ion drift peak lay between the equatorward edges of the electron and soft (< 1 keV) ion precipitation in the low conductivity region ({approximately}1 mho). A comparison between the low-altitude observations and simultaneous ring current observations from the high-altitude AMPTE satellite further suggests that the low-altitude ion drift peak is closely related to the maximum of the O{sup +} dominated ring current energy density in magnetic latitude. The low-latitude ion drift peak is the low-altitude signature of the electric field shielding effect associated with ring current penetration into the outer layer of the storm time plasmasphere.

  2. Ion temperature of low-latitude and mid-latitude topside ionosphere for high solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lei; Zhang, Donghe; Hao, Yongqiang; Xiao, Zuo

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) describes the day and night latitudinal variation of ion temperature at 430 km with two functions using AEROS satellite measurements. The ion temperature at this height as one of the boundary parameters is used to make the ion temperature profile represented by a Booker-function. Since the low-latitude and mid-latitude topside ionospheric ion temperature has been measured with the Ionopsheric Plasma and Elec-trodynamics Instrument (IPEI) onboard Rocsat-1 satellite at about 600 km during the high solar activity years from 2000 to 2002, a new boundary at 600 km can be set for the ion temperature modeling. The latitudinal variation of ion temperature could be approximated by Epstein family of functions for different local time sectors. Furthermore, the longitudinal and seasonal variations are also taken into account to decide the fitting parameters. Only the magnetic quiet time data (Kp <3) are used for the statistical study. The results are compared with IRI-2007 model. In addition, events when Kp >4 are also analyzed to feature the ion temperature characteristic during the magnetic disturbance time condition. Combined with the IPEI field-aligned ion flow velocities and the plasma temperatures measured by the Special Sensors-Ions, Electrons, and Scintillation (SSIES) thermal plasma analysis package on board the DMSP F13 and F15 satellites, several feasible ion heating and heat loss mechanisms are summarized to interpret the ion temperature crests and toughs for different local time sectors, seasonal and longitudinal variations.

  3. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  4. Testing IRI-PLAS STEC Calculations Performance for Different Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scidá, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Predicted values of slant total electron content (STEC) by IRI Plas have been compared to experimental data derived from Geostationary satellites for the North American sector and low latitude and equatorial regions. The results reveal that IRI-Plas gives good calculations for the North American sector and significant deviations for low latitude regions. The deviations can be due to the fact that IRI-Plas does not represent correctly the electron density topside profile and also the CCIR map, used by IRI for calculations, has much less data from equatorial and low latitude regions than to the North American sector where there is a higher density of sounding stations.

  5. Latitude dependence of co-rotating shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Energetic particle observations in the outer heliosphere (approx 12 A. U.) by the LECP instruments on the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft are discussed that show a definite latitude dependence of the number and intensity of particle enhancements produced by corotating interplanetary regions during an interval when no solar energetic particle events were observed. The particle enhancements are fewer in number and less intense at higher (approx 20 deg.) heliolatitudes. However, the similar spectral shapes of the accelerated particles at the two spacecraft indicate that the acceleration process is the same at the two latitudes, but less intense at the higher latitude.

  6. Quiet geomagnetic field representation for all days and latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.; Schiffmacher, E.R.; Arora, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a technique for obtaining the quiet-time geomagnetic field variation expected for all days of the year and distribution of latitudes from a limited set of selected quiet days within a year at a discrete set of locations. A data set of observatories near 75??E longitude was used as illustration. The method relies upon spatial smoothing of the decomposed spectral components. An evaluation of the fidelity of the resulting model shows correlation coefficients usually above 0.9 at the lower latitudes and near 0.7 at the higher latitudes with variations identified as dependent upon season and field element. -from Authors

  7. Effect of high latitude filtering on NWP skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay, E.; Takacs, L. L.; Hoffman, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    The high latitude filtering techniques commonly employed in global grid point models to eliminate the high frequency waves associated with the convergence of meridians, can introduce serious distortions which ultimately affect the solution at all latitudes. Experiments completed so far with the 4 deg x 5 deg, 9-level GLAS Fourth Order Model indicate that the high latitude filter currently in operation affects only minimally its forecasting skill. In one case, however, the use of pressure gradient filter significantly improved the forecast. Three day forecasts with the pressure gradient and operational filters are compared as are 5-day forecasts with no filter.

  8. Hydrated Sulfates in the Southern High Latitudes of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackiss, S. E.; Wray, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfates on Mars appear largely concentrated in sedimentary rocks dating to the Late Noachian or Hesperian [e.g., 1], but they are also abundant in Amazonian sand dunes around the north polar cap [2]. The gypsum in those dunes derives from the polar layered deposits [e.g., 3], where it may form when sunlight causes minor melting and weathering of embedded dust. We are investigating whether such processes might have also contributed to sulfate formation elsewhere, specifically in regions surrounding the south polar terrain. Our study regions to date include the Sisyphi Montes (20W-40E and 55-75S) and other mountainous areas near the Thyles Rupes (110-140E and 55-75S), the Ulyxis Rupes (150-180E and 55-70S), and Chamberlin Crater (110-150W and 55-75S). We searched for sulfates using the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). TRR3 images were evaluated using standard CRISM procedures, including the "volcano scan" atmospheric correction. We used spectral parameters to identify regions of interest, from which we extracted spectra, which we divided by spectrally neutral regions in the same scene to remove systematic artifacts. The resulting ratio spectra were visually compared to library spectra to identify possible hydrated mineral constituents. Some sulfates in the southern high latitudes appear localized to mountains of the Sisyphi Montes, which have been interpreted as volcanoes that erupted under a Hesperian ice sheet [4]. These sulfates might have formed via volcanic hydrothermal or acid fog alteration. We found that nearly 50% of the images on putative volcanoes in the Sisyphi Montes show a 1.9 μm absorption consistent with hydration. The percentage for images on the plains between volcanoes is actually higher; i.e., hydration is not unique to the volcanoes. Nevertheless, the three locations at which we found the strongest absorptions are all on volcanoes. In the Thyles Rupes region, 25% of the images on putative volcanoes are hydrated with

  9. View looking south from pavilion, showing south entrance house, south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking south from pavilion, showing south entrance house, south wing, and engine house - Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. The role of TIDs in the creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle-latitude F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. J.; Kil, H.; Kwak, Y. S.; Lee, W. K.; Tae-yong, Y.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    The creation of the electron density irregularities in the middle latitude F region is often interpreted in association with traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). However, the occurrence climatology of the irregularities is somewhat different from that of TIDs, and therefore, a different source of the irregularities may exist. In this study, we investigate the variability of the middle-latitude irregularities with local time, season, and solar cycle by analyzing the measurements of the ion density by the CHAMP (2001-2009) and Swarm (2014-2015) satellite observations. The occurrence climatology of the field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in middle latitude is also investigated with the VHF radar observations acquired since January 2010 at Daejeon in South Korea. The role of TIDs in the creation of the middle latitude irregularities and FAIs is investigated by comparing the their occurrence climatology with the climatology of TIDs. The conventional wisdom is that the activity of TID decreases with an increase of the solar activity. However, our preliminary results show that the occurrence rate of the FAI increases with an increase of the solar activity. The distribution of the irregularities derived from the analysis of the satellite observations may provide insight into the relationship between TIDs, FAIs, and irregularities.

  11. Assessment of Plio-Pleistocene Sea Surface Temperature Evolution Across Ocean Basins, Hemispheres, and Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, L.; Lawrence, K. T.; Mauriello, H.; Wilson, J.; Holte, L.

    2015-12-01

    New sea surface temperature (SST) records from the southern Pacific and southern Atlantic Oceans allow assessment of similarities and differences in climate evolution across ocean basins, hemispheres, and latitudes over the last 5 million years. Our high-resolution, alkenone-derived SST records from ODP Sites 1088 (South Atlantic, 41°S) and 1125 (South Pacific, 42°S) share strong structural similarities. When compared with SST records from the mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere, these records provide compelling evidence for broadly hemispherically symmetrical open-ocean temperature evolution in both ocean basins as tropical warm pools contracted over the Plio-Pleistocene. This symmetry in temperature evolution occurs despite strong asymmetries in the development of the cryosphere over this interval, which was marked by extensive northern hemisphere ice sheet growth. Parallel SST evolution across ocean basins and hemispheres suggests that on longterm (>105 yr) timescales, many regions of the world ocean are more sensitive to the global energy budget than to local or regional climate dynamics, although important exceptions include coastal upwelling zone SSTs, high latitude SSTs, and benthic δ18O. Our analysis further reveals that throughout the last 5 Ma, temperature evolution in the extra-tropical Pacific of both hemispheres is very similar to the evolution of SST in the eastern equatorial Pacific upwelling zone, revealing tight coupling between the growth of meridional and equatorial Pacific zonal temperature gradients over this interval as both the extra-tropics and the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue underwent cooling. Finally, while long term temperature evolution is broadly consistent across latitudes and ocean basins throughout the entire Plio-Pleistocene, we see evidence that climate coupling on orbital timescales strengthened significantly at 2.7 Ma, at which point obliquity-band coherence emerges among diverse SST records. We attribute this

  12. Ozone depletion events observed in the high latitude surface layer during the TOPSE aircraft program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, B. A.; Atlas, E. L.; Montzka, D. D.; Browell, E. V.; Cantrell, C. A.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Cinquini, L.; Coffey, M. T.; Emmons, L. K.; Cohen, R. C.; Deyoung, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Eisele, F. L.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Grahek, F. E.; Grant, W. B.; Hair, J. W.; Hannigan, J. W.; Heikes, B. J.; Lefer, B. L.; Mauldin, R. L.; Moody, J. L.; Shetter, R. E.; Snow, J. A.; Talbot, R. W.; Thornton, J. A.; Walega, J. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wert, B. P.; Wimmers, A. J.

    2003-02-01

    During the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) aircraft program, ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the high latitude surface layer were investigated using lidar and in situ instruments. Flight legs of 100 km or longer distance were flown 32 times at 30 m altitude over a variety of regions north of 58° between early February and late May 2000. ODEs were found on each flight over the Arctic Ocean but their occurrence was rare at more southern latitudes. However, large area events with depletion to over 2 km altitude in one case were found as far south as Baffin Bay and Hudson Bay and as late as 22 May. There is good evidence that these more southern events did not form in situ but were the result of export of ozone-depleted air from the surface layer of the Arctic Ocean. Surprisingly, relatively intact transport of ODEs occurred over distances of 900-2000 km and in some cases over rough terrain. Accumulation of constituents in the frozen surface over the dark winter period cannot be a strong prerequisite of ozone depletion since latitudes south of the Arctic Ocean would also experience a long dark period. Some process unique to the Arctic Ocean surface or its coastal regions remains unidentified for the release of ozone-depleting halogens. There was no correspondence between coarse surface features such as solid ice/snow, open leads, or polynyas with the occurrence of or intensity of ozone depletion over the Arctic or subarctic regions. Depletion events also occurred in the absence of long-range transport of relatively fresh "pollution" within the high latitude surface layer, at least in spring 2000. Direct measurements of halogen radicals were not made. However, the flights do provide detailed information on the vertical structure of the surface layer and, during the constant 30 m altitude legs, measurements of a variety of constituents including hydroxyl and peroxy radicals. A summary of the behavior of these constituents is made. The

  13. Ultraviolet spectrum of the sky background at different galactic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, A. M.; Severnyi, A. B.; Granitskii, L. V.; Hua, C. T.; Cruvellier, P.; Courtes, G.

    1982-12-01

    The intensity distributions of the sky background radiation in the 1100-1850 A range were measured in deep space (70,000-200,000 km from the earth) by the Prognoz-6 photoelectric spectrometer. Spectral distributions of UV background Ilambda, after subtraction of the stellar component, vary with galactic latitude in the range bII equals minus 58 to plus 27 deg. Ilambda decreases with increasing wavelength at high latitudes; the spectrum then becomes flat at intermediate latitudes, and there is a rapid decrease of Ilambda with lambda near and inside the Milky Way. The intensity I(lambda equals 1600) in the higher latitude range (the absolute value of bII higher than 30 deg) shows good correlation with soft X-ray brightness and neutral hydrogen (21-cm) density N(H I). However, there is appreciable UV emission near the galactic poles where N(H I) is approximately zero

  14. Low-Dimensional Chaos of High-Latitude Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-Xiu; Li, Ke-Jun

    2007-10-01

    The chaos of high-latitude solar activity has been investigated by determining the behavior of the monthly averaged polar facula counts obtained from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) on the basis of nonlinear dynamics theories and methods. It is found that the high-latitude solar activity is also governed by a low-dimensional chaotic attractor in both the northern and southern solar hemispheres, which is the same as that of the low-latitude solar activity. However, their maximal Lyapunov exponents are different, showing different strength of chaos. The maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE) of polar faculae in the southern solar hemisphere is about 0.0211 ± 0.0003 (month-1), which is nearly consistent with the low-latitude Wolf sunspot numbers, while the MLE in the northern one is approximately 0.0944 ± 0.0066 (month-1), which is obviously greater than the above two.

  15. Mapping high-latitude plasma convection with coherent HF radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Baker, K. B.; Villain, J.-P.; Hanuise, C.

    1989-01-01

    Several methods developed for mapping high-latitude plasma convection with a high-latitude HF radar are described, which utilize coherent backscatter from electron density irregularities at F-region altitudes to observe convective plasma motion. Several examples of two-dimensional convection-velocity maps are presented, showing instances of L-shell-aligned flow in the dusk sector, the reversal of convection near magnetic midnight, and counterstreaming in the dayside cleft.

  16. Dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on mirror latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on the mirror latitude for ions mirroring off the geomagnetic equator was re-computed using the improved hydrogen distribution models. The Chamberlain model was used to define the spatial distribution of the neutral hydrogen environment through which the ring current ions traverse. The resultant dependence of the charge exchange lifetime on mirror latitude is best fitted by the approximation that contains the charge exchange lifetime for equatorial particles.

  17. LION: A dynamic computer model for the low-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, J. A.; Pillat, V. G.; Fagundes, P. R.; Sahai, Y.; Pimenta, A. A.

    2007-11-01

    low-latitude ionosphere for a given longitudinal region, for different seasons, geophysical conditions and solar activity, at each instant of time, showing the time evolution of the low-latitude ionosphere, between about 20° north and south of the magnetic equator. This paper presents a detailed description of the mathematical model and illustrative computer results.

  18. How Strong is the Case for Proterozoic Low-Latitude Glaciation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. A.

    2004-05-01

    The most recent global compilations of paleomagnetic depositional latitudes for Proterozoic glaciogenic formations indicate a dominant mode near the paleo-equator (Evans 2000 AJS; Evans 2003 Tectonophysics). This result would therefore support either the snowball Earth or the large-obliquity hypotheses for Precambrian ice ages, but would reject the uniformitarian comparison to polar-temperate-restricted Phanerozoic glaciogenic deposits. The most reliable low-latitude results come from the Australian Marinoan succession, but a recent summary of these units has suggested that a glaciogenic origin is not yet demonstrated (Eyles and Januszczak 2004 Earth-Sci Reviews). It becomes useful, then, to review the global evidence for Proterozoic low-latitude glaciation. Eyles and Januszczak (ibid.) identified 13 Neoproterozoic deposits with "demonstrated" glacial influence. Among these, poor age constraints and lack of paleomagnetic data prohibit estimation of depositional paleolatitudes for the Fiq, Sturtian, Vreeland, Taoudeni, East Greenland, Port Askaig, and Zhengmuguan units. Moderate paleolatitudes are reasonably well supported for the South China, Gaskiers, Smalfjord, and Moelv units. Among the three remaining units, the Rapitan Group can be assigned a near-equatorial paleolatitude indirectly through use of the Galeros and Franklin-Natkusiak paleomagnetic results, as long as the Rapitan age lies within 750-720 Ma as generally expected. The Moonlight Valley Formation in northern Australia may be assigned a tropical paleolatitude according to high-quality paleomagnetic results from compellingly correlated Marinoan strata in southern Australia. Those strata, including the famous Elatina Formation, have yielded a robust paleomagnetic signature that is commonly interpreted to imply frigid climate (manifest in part by frost-wedge polygons) at near-equatorial latitudes. Concerns that the Neoproterozoic geomagnetic field was either nonaxial or nondipolar are valid in principle

  19. Cosmology with the WFIRST High Latitude Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    Cosmic acceleration is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades. Testing and distinguishing among possible explanations requires cosmological measurements of extremely high precision that probe the full history of cosmic expansion and structure growth. The WFIRST-AFTA mission, as described in the Science Definition Team (SDT) reports (Spergel 2013, 2015), has the ability to improve these measurements by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to the current state of the art, while simultaneously extending their redshift grasp, greatly improving control of systematic effects, and taking a unified approach to multiple probes that provide complementary physical information and cross-checks of cosmological results. We have assembled a team with the expertise and commitment needed to address the stringent challenges of the WFIRST dark energy program through the Project's formulation phase. After careful consideration, we have elected to address investigations A (Galaxy Redshift Survey) and C (Weak Lensing and Cluster Growth) of the WFIRST SIT NRA with a unified team, because the two investigations are tightly linked at both the technical level and the theoretical modeling level. The imaging and spectroscopic elements of the High Latitude Survey (HLS) will be realized as an integrated observing program, and they jointly impose requirements on instrument and telescope performance, operations, and data transfer. The methods for simulating and interpreting weak lensing and galaxy clustering observations largely overlap, and many members of our team have expertise in both areas. The team PI, Olivier Dore, is a cosmologist with a broad expertise in cosmic microwave background and large scale structures. Yun Wang and Chris Hirata will serve as Lead Co-Investigators for topics A and C, respectively. Many members of our team have been involved with the design and requirements of a dark energy space mission for a decade or more, including the Co-Chair and three

  20. High-Latitude Ionospheric Structuring at Kilometer Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bust, G. S.; Datta-Barua, S.; Su, Y.; Deshpande, K.; Hampton, D.

    2014-12-01

    Ionospheric observations in the polar and auroral zones have been made regularly with radar chains and optical imaging at larger spatio-temporal cadence. However, the observation of kilometer scale variations at sub-second cadence has not been practically realizable until recently. Quantifying the irregularities at these sizes and scales is necessary for an understanding of the dynamics leading to fine scale phenomena in the high latitude environment. We present measurements of kilometer-scale plasma variations made at the northern auroral zone using an array of specialized Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. These 6 CASES receivers (plus 1 from ASTRA, LLC) are sited at the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, and have been collecting data since late 2013. The array monitors for ionospheric scintillations, fluctuations in phase and amplitude of the GPS L-band signals received due to ionospheric variations. The array spans 2 km east-west and about 1 km north-south, with a variety of intermediate baseline lengths down to about 200 m. In addition to measuring amplitude and phase scintillation with the S4 and sigma_phi indices at 100-s cadence, these receivers also record 100 Hz raw power and phase measurements from GPS baseband signal processing. These low-rate data are publicly available for download through a web portal at http://apollo.tbc.iit.edu/~spaceweather/ with high rate available upon request. A detailed case study is presented from the December 8, 2013, 0300-0400 UT time period. During this period several interesting scintillation periods were observed. We use array cross-correlation processing methods to first estimate direct ground parameters of the array including a) estimate the 2D drift velocity on the ground; b) estimate a de-correlation (or turbulent) speed; and c) parameters of correlation elliptical coordinates (axial ratio and tilt angle). We then use these results and cross-correlation measurements to derive the ground 2D spatial spectrum of

  1. 77 FR 10800 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel ALTERNATE LATITUDE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... LATITUDE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime Administration, Department of Transportation... applicant the intended service of the vessel ALTERNATE LATITUDE is: Intended Commercial Use of...

  2. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 0 Degree N., Center Longitude 129 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the boundary between the lowland plains and characteristic Venusian highland terrain in Ovda Regio, the western part of the great equatorial highland called Aphrodite Terra. For a view of the highlands to the west, see PIA00309. PIA00311 shows the more complex highland boundary to the south of this area. The conical 'dimples' in the foreground are not real features, but artifacts resulting from erroneous altimeter measurements. Their size gives an idea of the horizontal resolution of the altimeter. The view is perpendicular to the northern boundary of Ovda. Whereas the foreground lowlands are made up of overlapping, relatively dark and unfractured lava flows, the highlands consist mainly of 'tessera terrain'. The tectonic pattern of the tesserae in this image is of intermediate complexity, consisting of east-west trending ridges cut by north-south fractures. Isolated areas in the lowlands (between the smoothest lava flows) contain similarly trending fractures and may be islands of tessera terrain. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1-00N129. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 1013 x 1013. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.41 -- 0.91. Vertical exaggeration: 50. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 225. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 500. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  3. EDITORIAL: Northern Hemisphere high latitude climate and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber

    2007-10-01

    funded projects (always with international participation) in the United States, Russian Federation, China, European Union, Japan, and Canada have been mutually united to explore the scientifically significant Northern Eurasian region. NEESPI scientists have been quite productive during the past two years (2005 2006) publishing more than 200 books, book chapters, and papers in refereed journals. NEESPI sessions at international conferences are open to everyone who works on environmental and climate change problems in Northern Eurasia and the circumpolar boreal zone. This thematic issue brings together articles from the authors who presented their latest results at the Annual Fall American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco (December 2006). The research letters in this issue are preceded by two editorial papers (Leptoukh et al and Sherstyukov et al) devoted to informational support of research in the NEESPI domain that is critical to the success of the Initiative. The following papers are quite diverse and are assembled into five groups devoted to studies of climate and hydrology, land cover and land use, the biogeochemical cycle and its feedbacks, the cryosphere, and human dimensions in the NEESPI domain and the circumpolar boreal zone. Focus on Northern Hemisphere High Latitude Climate and Environmental Change Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Editorials NASA NEESPI Data and Services Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Information Gregory Leptoukh, Ivan Csiszar, Peter Romanov, Suhung Shen, Tatiana Loboda and Irina Gerasimov NEESPI Science and Data Support Center for Hydrometeorological Information in Obninsk, Russia B G Sherstyukov, V N Razuvaev, O N Bulygina and P Ya Groisman Climate and hydrology Changes in the fabric of the Arctic's greenhouse blanket Jennifer A Francis and Elias Hunter Spatial variations of summer precipitation trends in South Korea, 1973 2005 Heejun

  4. South Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached ... red tide. At the same time, people came from across South Africa to gather the undersized creatures for food. The effects of the losses ...

  5. Space weather and myocardial infarction diseases at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey; Kleimenova, Natalia; Petrova, Palmira

    The relationship of the number of calls for the emergency medical care in Yakutsk (subauroral latitudes) in connection with myocardial infarction diseases during years near the maximum (1992) and minimum (1998) of the 11-year geomagnetic disturbance cycle to space weather parameters has been studied. It is found that at subauroral latitudes, the increase of geomagnetic activity, namely, the occurrence of night magnetospheric substorms, plays the important role in the exacerbation of myocardial infarctions. Substorms are accompanied by Pi1 irregular geomagnetic pulsations with periods of (0.5-3.0) Hz, coinciding with heart rhythms of a human being, thus, these waves can be a biotropic factor negatively influencing on the occurrence of myocardial infarctions. The comparison of seasonal change of the number of calls for emergency medical care to patients at subauroral latitudes with a simultaneous seasonal change of fatal endings because of an infarction at low latitudes (Bulgaria) has shown their essential difference. Thus, in Bulgaria the maximum of infarctions have been marked in winter, and minimum - in summer, and in Yakutsk a few maxima coinciding with the sharp and considerable increases of the level of the planetary geomagnetic disturbances have been observed. In this case, in Bulgaria the infarctions could be connected with availability of the Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations. Thus, the stable quasi-sinusoidal Pc1 pulsations can be a biotropic factor influencing on the development of myocardial infarctions at middle latitudes and the Pi1 irregular geomagnetic pulsations, which do not propagate to the lower latitudes, could be a biotropic factor at subauroral latitudes.

  6. Storm time plasma transport at middle and high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    Associated with the large-scale enhancement of the ionospheric convection electric field during disturbed geomagnetic conditions, solar-produced F region plasma is transported to and through the noontime cleft from a source region at middle and low latitudes in the afternoon sector. As a result of the offset between the geomagnetic and geographic poles, the afternoon sector region of strong sunward convection is shifted to increasingly lower geographic latitude throughout the interval between 12 UT and 24 UT. A snowplow effect occurs in which the convection cell continually encounters fresh corotating ionospheric plasma along its equatorward edge, producing a latitudinally narrow region of storm-enhanced plasma density (SED) and increased total electron content which is advected toward higher latitudes in the noon sector. The Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar regularly observes SED as a spatially continuous, large-scale feature spanning local times between noon and midnight and at latitudes between the polar cap and its mid- or low-latitude source region. For local times away from noon, the latitude of most probable SED occurrence moves equatorward by 6[degrees] for an increase of 2 in the Kp index. During strong disturbances the topside SED is observed to be convecting sunward at [approximately]750 m s[sup [minus]1] with a flux of 10[sup 14] m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. This feature accounts for the pronounced enhancement of ionospheric density near dusk at middle latitudes observed during the early stages of magnetic storms (called the dusk effect) and constitutes a source for the enhanced F region plasma observed in the polar cap during disturbed conditions. 34 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. High-latitude dust in the Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gassó, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; McKenna-Neuman, Cheryl; Mockford, Tom; Stewart, Helena; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2016-06-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (≥50°N and ≥40°S) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 km2 and contribute at least 80-100 Tg yr-1 of dust to the Earth system (~5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  8. Jupiter' high-latitude storms: a Little Red Spot tracked through a Jovian year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; Adamoli, G.; Mettig, H.-J.

    2011-02-01

    As well as the Great Red Spot, Jupiter sometimes presents one or more Little Red Spots (LRSs) in various latitudes. An LRS is often seen in the North North Temperate Zone (NNTZ), but the frequency and properties of these ovals have never been studied in detail. Here we review all our records of the red, white, and methane-bright anticyclonic ovals in the NNTZ. There is a simple conclusion: A single LRS, which we name NN-LRS-1, has persisted from 1993 to 2009. It has varied in colour between red and off-white, but has been methane-bright throughout these years. This now ranks among the most long-lived spots ever recorded on the planet. There is always at least one other oval in this latitude. This was a second methane-bright LRS from 1994-1997, and there was also a smaller LRS in 2006. The other ovals are all white; two have lasted for four years or more and were sometimes methane-bright; others have had shorter lives and were not. These results suggest that red colour, and the high-level haze that accompanies it, are correlated with the size and longevity of the oval. All these ovals have variable speeds, alternating irregularly between slow (~ 1°/month in System II longitude) and fast (~ 12°/month). The latitudes of the ovals range from 40 to 41.5°N, and correlate closely with their instantaneous speeds. However the larger, longer-lived ovals (especially the LRS) are centred systematically further south than the smaller white ovals, because they distort the retrograding jetstream more deeply. Similar behaviour in other domains on the planet explains how ovals of different sizes move with a single slow current while also being sensitive to the zonal speed gradient. An oval at 60°S shows very similar behaviour and has probably existed since 1994 or earlier.

  9. The association of hydrogen with sulfur on Mars across latitudes, longitudes, and compositional extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunatillake, Suniti; Wray, James J.; Gasnault, Olivier; McLennan, Scott M.; Deanne Rogers, A.; Squyres, Steven W.; Boynton, William V.; Skok, J. R.; Button, Nicole E.; Ojha, Lujendra

    2016-07-01

    Midlatitudinal hydrated sulfates on Mars may influence brine pH, atmospheric humidity, and collectively water activity. These factors affect the habitability of the planetary subsurface and the preservation of relict biomolecules. Regolith at grain sizes smaller than gravel, constituting the bulk of the Martian subsurface at regional scales, may be a primary repository of chemical alteration, mechanical alteration, and biosignatures. The Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer with hundreds of kilometers of lateral resolution and compositional sensitivity to decimeter depth provides unique insight into this component of the regolith, which we call soil. Advancing the globally compelling association between H2O and S established by our previous work, we characterize latitudinal variations in the association between H and S, as well as in the hydration state of soil. Represented by H2O:S molar ratios, the hydration state of candidate sulfates increases with latitude in the northern hemisphere. In contrast, hydration states generally decrease with latitude in the south. Furthermore, we observe that H2O concentration may affect the degree of sulfate hydration more than S concentration. Limited H2O availability in soil-atmosphere exchange and in subsurface recharge could explain such control exerted by H2O on salt hydration. Differences in soil thickness, ground ice table depths, atmospheric circulation, and insolation may contribute to hemispheric differences in the progression of hydration with latitude. Our observations support chemical association of H2O with S in the southern hemisphere as suggested by Karunatillake et al. (2014), including the possibility of Fe sulfates as a key mineral group.

  10. IMF dependence of high-latitude thermospheric wind pattern derived from CHAMP cross-track measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, M.; Rentz, S.; Köhler, W.; Liu, H.; Haaland, S. E.

    2008-06-01

    Neutral thermospheric wind pattern at high latitudes obtained from cross-track acceleration measurements of the CHAMP satellite above both North and South polar regions are statistically analyzed in their dependence on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction in the GSM y-z plane (clock angle). We compare this dependency with magnetospheric convection pattern obtained from the Cluster EDI plasma drift measurements under the same sorting conditions. The IMF-dependency shows some similarity with the corresponding high-latitude plasma convection insofar that the larger-scale convection cells, in particular the round-shaped dusk cell for ByIMF+ (ByIMF-) conditions at the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere, leave their marks on the dominant general transpolar wind circulation from the dayside to the nightside. The direction of the transpolar circulation is generally deflected toward a duskward flow, in particular in the evening to nighttime sector. The degree of deflection correlates with the IMF clock angle. It is larger for ByIMF+ than for ByIMF- and is systematically larger (~5°) and appear less structured at the Southern Hemisphere compared with the Northern. Thermospheric cross-polar wind amplitudes are largest for BzIMF-/ByIMF- conditions at the Northern Hemisphere, but for BzIMF-/ByIMF+ conditions at the Southern because the magnetospheric convection is in favour of largest wind accelerations over the polar cap under these conditions. The overall variance of the thermospheric wind magnitude at Southern high latitudes is larger than for the Northern. This is probably due to a larger "stirring effect" at the Southern Hemisphere because of the larger distance between the geographic and geomagnetic frameworks.

  11. Warming and extensive glacier recession at Southern Hemisphere middle latitudes during Heinrich Stadial 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, A. E.; Schaefer, J. M.; Denton, G. H.; Hall, B. L.; Lowell, T. V.; Porter, C. T.; Barrell, D. J.; Andersen, B. G.; Kaplan, M. R.; Koffman, T.; Lennon, J.; Rowan, A. V.; Finkel, R. C.; Rood, D.; Schwartz, R.; Vandergoes, M.; Plummer, M. A.; Brocklehurst, S. H.; Kelley, S. E.; Ladig, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    The termination of the last ice age featured a major reconfiguration of Earth's climate and cryosphere, yet the underlying causes of these massive changes continue to be debated. Documenting the spatial and temporal variations of atmospheric temperature during deglaciation can help discriminate among potential drivers. Here, we present 10Be surface-exposure chronologies and glaciological reconstructions of ice recession following the Last Glacial Maximum in the New Zealand Southern Alps and Patagonian Andes. Our field sites straddle opposite sides of the South Pacific and record climate changes near Southern Ocean fronts. Most of the deglacial warming in the Southern Alps and southern Andes occurred during the early part of the Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) of the North Atlantic region. We attribute southern mid-latitude warming and glacier recession during HS1 to a southward shift of the Subtropical and Subantarctic Fronts. Because these oceanic fronts are associated with the position of the westerly wind belt, our findings support the concept that a southward shift of Earth's wind belts accompanied the early parts of HS1 cooling in the North Atlantic, leading to major warming and deglaciation in southern middle latitudes.

  12. Vegetation controls on northern high latitude snow-albedo feedback: observations and CMIP5 model simulations.

    PubMed

    Loranty, Michael M; Berner, Logan T; Goetz, Scott J; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T

    2014-02-01

    The snow-masking effect of vegetation exerts strong control on albedo in northern high latitude ecosystems. Large-scale changes in the distribution and stature of vegetation in this region will thus have important feedbacks to climate. The snow-albedo feedback is controlled largely by the contrast between snow-covered and snow-free albedo (Δα), which influences predictions of future warming in coupled climate models, despite being poorly constrained at seasonal and century time scales. Here, we compare satellite observations and coupled climate model representations of albedo and tree cover for the boreal and Arctic region. Our analyses reveal consistent declines in albedo with increasing tree cover, occurring south of latitudinal tree line, that are poorly represented in coupled climate models. Observed relationships between albedo and tree cover differ substantially between snow-covered and snow-free periods, and among plant functional type. Tree cover in models varies widely but surprisingly does not correlate well with model albedo. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a relationship between tree cover and snow-albedo feedback that may be used to accurately constrain high latitude albedo feedbacks in coupled climate models under current and future vegetation distributions. PMID:24039000

  13. Arctic sea ice melt, the Polar vortex, and mid-latitude weather: Are they connected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihma, Timo; Overland, James; Francis, Jennifer; Hall, Richard; Hanna, Edward; Kim, Seong-Joong

    2015-04-01

    The potential of recent Arctic changes to influence broader hemispheric weather is a difficult and controversial topic with considerable skepticism, as time series of potential linkages are short (<10 years) and the signal-to-noise ratio relative to chaotic weather events is small. A way forward is through further understanding of potential atmospheric dynamic mechanisms. Although not definitive of change in a statistical or in a causality sense, the exceptionally warm Arctic winters since 2007 do contain increased variability according to some climate indices, with six negative (and two positive) Arctic Oscillation atmospheric circulation index events that created meridional flow reaching unusually far north and south. High pressure anomalies developed east of the Ural Mountains in Russia in response to sea-ice loss in the Barents/Kara Seas, which initiated eastward-propagating wave trains of high and low pressure that advected cold air over central and eastern Asia. Increased Greenland blocking and greater geopotential thickness related to low-level temperatures increases led to northerly meridional flow into eastern North America, inducing persistent cold periods. Arctic connections in Europe and western North America are less clear. The quantitative impact of potential Arctic change on mid-latitude weather will not be resolved within the foreseeable future, yet new approaches to high-latitude atmospheric dynamics can contribute to improved extended range forecasts as outlined by the WMO/Polar Prediction Program and other international activities.

  14. Low-Latitude Solar Wind During the Fall 1998 SOHO-Ulysses Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, G.; Suess, Steven T.; Biesecker, D.; Esser, R.; Gloeckler, G.; Zurbuchen, T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Fall 1998 SOlar-Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) - Ulysses quadrature occurred when Ulysses was at 5.2 AU, 17.4 deg South of the equator, and off the West line of the Sun. SOHO coronal observations, at heliocentric distances of a few solar radii, showed that the line through the solar center and Ulysses crossed, over the first days of observations, a dark, weakly emitting area and through the northern edge of a streamer complex during the second half of the quadrature campaign. Ulysses in situ observations showed this transition to correspond to a decrease from higher speed wind typical of coronal hole flow to low speed wind. Physical parameters (density, temperature, flow speed) of the low latitude coronal plasma sampled over the campaign are determined using constraints from what is the same plasma measured later in situ and simulating the intensities of the Hydrogen Lyman-alpha and OVI 1032 and 1037 Angstrom lines, measured by the Ultra Violet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO. The densities, temperatures and outflow speed are compared with the same characteristic flow parameters for high-latitude fast wind streams and typical slow solar wind.

  15. Simulation of the low latitude ionosphere response to disturbed winds and electric fields: Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas; Bailey, Graham; Bravo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Modeling the ionosphere during disturbed periods is one of the most challenging tasks due to the complexity of the phenomena that affect the electric fields and the thermosphere environment as whole. It is well known that depending on the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field disturbance electric fields (undershielding or overshielding) can penetrate from high to low latitudes causing significant disturbances in the electron density distribution and in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) development. Besides that, the large amount of energy deposited in the polar region during disturbed periods will be responsible for the generation of disturbed winds that will flow towards the equator where they produce a disturbance dynamo which also affects the EIA density distribution. The TIDs and TADs are also sources of disturbances that propagate at high velocity reaching the equator 2-3 hours after the beginning of the magnetic storm. In this work we use the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model at INPE (SUPIM-INPE), to simulate the drastic effects that were observed at the low latitude ionosphere in the Brazilian region during a very intense magnetic storm event. A few models are tested for the disturbed electric field and wind. The simulation results showed that the observations are better explained when considering a traveling waveform disturbance propagating from north to south at a velocity equal to 200 m/s.

  16. Observations and Modeling of the Nighttime Electron Density Enhancement in the Mid-latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Saito, A.; Lin, C.; Huba, J. D.; Liu, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we compare the observational data from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC and theoretical model results performed by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere) for studying the longitudinal structure of the Mid-latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (MSNA). In order to study the occurrence of the nighttime electron density enhancement, we defined MSNA index by the ratio of the difference of the nighttime and daytime electron densities. The observational results by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites show that there are three obvious nighttime electron density enhancement areas around South American, European, and Northeast Asian regions during local summer. The SAMI2 model can also successfully reproduce the ionospheric MSNA structure during local summer on both hemispheres, except for Northeast Asian region. This difference between observation and model simulation may be caused by the difference between the neutral wind model and the real winds. The physical mechanisms for the longitudinal structure of the MSNA are investigated in the different model conditions. Results show that the equatorward meridional neutral winds can drive the electron density up to a higher altitude along the magnetic field lines and the longer plasma production rate by solar EUV at higher latitudes in the summer time can provide the electron density source in the nighttime ionosphere. We concluded that the combination effect by the neutral wind and the plasma production rate play the important role of the MSNA longitudinal structure.

  17. Mean annual temperatures of mid-latitude regions derived from stable hydrogen isotopes of wood lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhäuser, Tobias; Greule, Markus; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Keppler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Tree rings are widely used climate archives providing annual resolutions on centennial to millennial timescales. Besides plant physiological parameters such as tree-ring width or maximum latewood density, stable isotope compositions (expressed as δ values) complement or even broaden the potential of the climate archive tree rings. A considerable wood constituent are ether-bonded methoxyl groups as part of lignin which can be used for stable hydrogen isotope studies. The δ²H value of the lignin methoxyl groups reflects the δ²H value of the tree source water as a result of a large uniform fractionation. Hence, this relation can be used to infer δ²H values of precipitation which are in temperate regions primarily controlled by temperature. Here, we measured δ²H values of lignin methoxyl groups (n = 111) of tree rings from various species collected along a ~3500 km north-south transect across Europe with mean annual temperatures (MAT) ranging from ‑4 to +17 °C. We found a significant linear correlation between δ²H values of the lignin methoxyl groups and MAT (R² = 0.81, p < 0.01). We used this relationship to predict MATs from randomly collected wood samples and found general agreement between predicted and observed MATs for the mid-latitudes on a global scale. Thus our results indicate that δ²H values of lignin methoxyl groups are a promising tool for mid-latitude temperature reconstruction of the Holocene.

  18. Monitoring, mapping and prediction of ionospheric scintillation over the Brazilian equatorial and low latitude regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Guedes, Fabio; de Paula, E. R.; de Rezende, L. F. C.; Stephany, S.; Kantor, I. J.; Muella, M. T. A. H.; Siqueira, P. M.; Correa, K. S.; Dutra, A. P.; Guedes, C.; Takahashi, H.; Silva, J. D. S.

    It is well known, today, that equatorial ionospheric scintillations affect performance of GPS receivers. Scintillation occurs when a radio wave crosses the ionosphere and suffers distortion in phase and amplitude. It also contributes to loss of lock of GPS receivers, resulting decrease of the number of available satellites and consequently yielding poor satellite geometry. Therefore, the required accuracy and positioning precision for aerial navigation are affected. Among other activities, EMBRACE, the space weather program of INPE, is monitoring and mapping the ionospheric scintillation over the South American equatorial and low latitude region in real time. This mapping is available in the internet by means of computer programs that retrieve data from a network of GPS receivers distributed in Brazil. These data are also being used to survey and predict the occurrence of ionospheric scintillation through data mining techniques.

  19. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F.; Johnston, S.; Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Ng, C.; Levin, L.; and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  20. An Absence of Fast Radio Bursts at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, E.; van Straten, W.; Johnston, S.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Bates, S. D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Levin, L.; Ng, C.; Possenti, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Tiburzi, C.; Thornton, D.

    2014-07-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (-15° latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  1. High-latitude upgrade to the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Bussey, R. M.; Fremouw, E. J.; Basu, S.

    1997-07-01

    The high-latitude sections of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) have been upgraded extensively, based on analysis of scintillation data from the Defense Nuclear Agency Wideband, HiLat, and Polar BEAR satellite-beacon experiments. Data collected at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland; Tromso, Norway; Fort Churchill, Canada; and Bellevue, Washington (United States) over a 4-year period were analyzed, and the results of these analyses were used to construct a completely new model for the behavior of the height-integrated irregularity-strength parameter (CkL) at high latitudes. The new high-latitude CkL model includes variations with sunspot number, geomagnetic activity (Kp), latitude, local time, longitude, and season. The new WBMOD CkL models (equatorial and high-latitude) have been implemented in a more versatile code, denoted SCINTMOD, which has the capability to generate a wide range of user-controlled maps of scintillation effects over large spatial areas. Examples of the types of graphical output that SCINTMOD can generate are presented.

  2. Spectral losses of high concentrator photovoltaic modules depending on latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Moya, Alberto; Fernández, Eduardo F.; Almonacid, Florencia; Mallick, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    High concentrator photovoltaic (HCPV) modules and systems are affected by changes on the incident solar spectrum. It is well known that among all the atmospheric parameters, the air mass has the largest impact on the spectral behavior of HCPV devices. The air mass can be considered as a geometrical parameter which depends entirely on the Sun's zenith angle (θ). Because of this, the yield of HCPV modules is affected by latitude. In this paper, a new method to estimate the gains/losses of energy due to the spectral impact has been introduced. Furthermore, the annual spectral losses depending on latitude have been calculated for several theoretical modules. For default values defined in the standard AM1.5d ASTM G-173-03 spectrum, results show that the spectral losses are almost independent of latitude for locations with low latitude values. Losses between 3% and 5% on the annual energy yield have been estimated for those areas. For high latitudes, the losses increase until they reach values between 10% and 14%. Results depend on the multi-junction solar cells and optical devices of the HCPV module considered.

  3. Polarization characteristics of hydromagnetic waves at low geomagnetic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Medford, L. V.; Maclennan, C. G.; Hasegawa, T.; Acuna, M. H.; Dolce, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A field campaign, using three magnetometer stations spaced in latitude around the equatorial magnetic field distance L approximately 1.9, was conducted in early 1979 to investigate the polarization characteristics of hydromagnetic waves at low geomagnetic latitudes. The magnetic pulsations are observed to have periods in the range approximately 20-25 s and to occur primarily in the local morning hours. Statistically, the polarizations at all three stations were predominantly left handed in the local morning hours and right handed in the local afternoon. At the highest-latitude station (L approximately 2) the orientation of the major axis of the polarization ellipse changed from a predominantly NW-SE direction in the local morning to a mixed NW-SE/NE-SW direction in the afternoon. These two statistical results are consistent with the excitation of the waves by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause. However, frequent changes in phase are often observed in the magnetic variations, which result in polarization variations on the time scale of minutes, a situation not readily reconcilable with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The existence of the waves at very low latitudes, furthermore, places constraints on the damping rate of externally excited surface waves inside the magnetosphere. We conclude that present theories for hydromagnetic waves in the geomagnetosphere cannot readily incorporate all of these low-latitude results.

  4. North-South Migration of West Coast Low Pressure Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, C. Barron

    1974-01-01

    Monthly maps of low pressure centers are presented here to attempt a concrete representation that may help students to understand the seasonal change from dry months to wet months along the mid-latitude west coast as a seasonal north-south migration of factors controlling rain and drought. (Author/JH)

  5. Why Huddle? Ecological Drivers of Chick Aggregations in Gentoo Penguins, Pygoscelis papua, across Latitudes

    PubMed Central

    Collen, Ben; Johnston, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aggregations of young animals are common in a range of endothermic and ectothermic species, yet the adaptive behavior may depend on social circumstance and local conditions. In penguins, many species form aggregations (aka. crèches) for a variety of purposes, whilst others have never been observed exhibiting this behavior. Those that do form aggregations do so for three known benefits: 1) reduced thermoregulatory requirements, 2) avoidance of unrelated-adult aggression, and 3) lower predation risk. In gentoo penguins, Pygoscelis papua, chick aggregations are known to form during the post-guard period, yet the cause of these aggregations is poorly understood. Here, for the first time, we study aggregation behavior in gentoo penguins, examining four study sites along a latitudinal gradient using time-lapse cameras to examine the adaptive benefit of aggregations to chicks. Our results support the idea that aggregations of gentoo chicks decrease an individual’s energetic expenditure when wet, cold conditions are present. However, we found significant differences in aggregation behavior between the lowest latitude site, Maiviken, South Georgia, and two of the higher latitude sites on the Antarctic Peninsula, suggesting this behavior may be colony specific. We provide strong evidence that more chicks aggregate and a larger number of aggregations occur on South Georgia, while the opposite occurs at Petermann Island in Antarctica. Future studies should evaluate multiple seabird colonies within one species before generalizing behaviors based on one location, and past studies may need to be re-evaluated to determine whether chick aggregation and other behaviors are in fact exhibited species-wide. PMID:26840252

  6. Why Huddle? Ecological Drivers of Chick Aggregations in Gentoo Penguins, Pygoscelis papua, across Latitudes.

    PubMed

    Black, Caitlin; Collen, Ben; Johnston, Daniel; Hart, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Aggregations of young animals are common in a range of endothermic and ectothermic species, yet the adaptive behavior may depend on social circumstance and local conditions. In penguins, many species form aggregations (aka. crèches) for a variety of purposes, whilst others have never been observed exhibiting this behavior. Those that do form aggregations do so for three known benefits: 1) reduced thermoregulatory requirements, 2) avoidance of unrelated-adult aggression, and 3) lower predation risk. In gentoo penguins, Pygoscelis papua, chick aggregations are known to form during the post-guard period, yet the cause of these aggregations is poorly understood. Here, for the first time, we study aggregation behavior in gentoo penguins, examining four study sites along a latitudinal gradient using time-lapse cameras to examine the adaptive benefit of aggregations to chicks. Our results support the idea that aggregations of gentoo chicks decrease an individual's energetic expenditure when wet, cold conditions are present. However, we found significant differences in aggregation behavior between the lowest latitude site, Maiviken, South Georgia, and two of the higher latitude sites on the Antarctic Peninsula, suggesting this behavior may be colony specific. We provide strong evidence that more chicks aggregate and a larger number of aggregations occur on South Georgia, while the opposite occurs at Petermann Island in Antarctica. Future studies should evaluate multiple seabird colonies within one species before generalizing behaviors based on one location, and past studies may need to be re-evaluated to determine whether chick aggregation and other behaviors are in fact exhibited species-wide. PMID:26840252

  7. Effects of Ozone and Cloud Cover on Surface Ultraviolet Radiation at High Southern Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Frederick, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    For over twenty years, the high latitude ozone depletion during austral springs and the increased surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation have caused concern due to the potential for negative biological and ecological effects. Since little long-term information on surface UV is available, the capability of assessing these effects has been limited. For a better understanding of the UV environment during springtime in the polar region, the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network was established in 1987 by the NSF Office of Polar Programs. Four out of the six sites, Ushuaia, Argentina (54°49'S, 68°19'W), Palmer Station, Antarctica (64°46'S, 64°03'W), McMurdo Station, Antarctica (77°51'S, 166°40'E), and South Pole Station, Antarctica (90°S), were at high southern latitudes. With the data at these four sites for over a decade (1990-2001), we were able to study the behavior of surface UV radiation in the south polar region, including the attenuation provided by total column ozone and cloud cover. To specify the effect of ozone on surface UV radiation, we used effective clear sky irradiances that were estimated from the actual measurements in a reference wavelength band from 342.5 to 347.5 nm throughout all years covered by the data. The effects of cloud cover can be obtained by taking ratios of measured UV irradiances to the corresponding effective clear sky values. We anticipate an upward trend in the surface UV irradiance in response to changes in total column ozone alone over the decadal time scale, and occasional abnormally large and small values due to the combined effects of variability in ozone and cloud cover. The latter case can be demonstrated by the fact that the monthly-integrated irradiance of UVB2 measured for October 1991 is actually 99.2% larger than the smallest value that was observed in October 1990.

  8. CORAL REEFS. Genomic determinants of coral heat tolerance across latitudes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Groves B; Davies, Sarah W; Aglyamova, Galina A; Meyer, Eli; Bay, Line K; Matz, Mikhail V

    2015-06-26

    As global warming continues, reef-building corals could avoid local population declines through "genetic rescue" involving exchange of heat-tolerant genotypes across latitudes, but only if latitudinal variation in thermal tolerance is heritable. Here, we show an up-to-10-fold increase in odds of survival of coral larvae under heat stress when their parents come from a warmer lower-latitude location. Elevated thermal tolerance was associated with heritable differences in expression of oxidative, extracellular, transport, and mitochondrial functions that indicated a lack of prior stress. Moreover, two genomic regions strongly responded to selection for thermal tolerance in interlatitudinal crosses. These results demonstrate that variation in coral thermal tolerance across latitudes has a strong genetic basis and could serve as raw material for natural selection. PMID:26113720

  9. Pc 3 pulsation eigenperiod determination at low latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Hattingh, S.K.F.; Sutcliffe, P.R. )

    1987-11-01

    A realistic method of calculating the eigenperiod of Pc 3 pulsations at low latitudes is discussed. Solution of the problem requires a magnetic field model and a model for the plasma distribution along the resonating field line. The calculated eigenperiods obtained using the dipole field model and the IGRF model are found to be similar. The inclusion of the F region O{sup +} in the plasma distribution noticeably affects the calculated eigenperiod at low latitudes. This effect decreases with increasing L value. Pulsation periods obtained from recordings made at four stations lying on a geomagnetic meridian demonstrate the importance of including O{sup +} in the plasma model if realistic periods are to be calculated at low latitudes.

  10. Sea Ice, High-Latitude Convection, and Equable Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.; Tziperman, E.

    2007-12-01

    It is argued that deep atmospheric convection might occur during winter in ice-free high-latitude oceans, and that the surface radiative warming effects of the clouds and water vapor associated with this winter convection could keep high-latitude oceans ice-free through polar night. In such an ice-free high-latitude ocean the annual-mean SST would be much higher and the seasonal cycle would be dramatically reduced - making potential implications for equable climates manifest. The constraints that atmospheric heat transport, ocean heat transport, and CO2 concentration place on this mechanism are established. These ideas are investigated using a column model with state-of-the-art atmospheric physics, high vertical resolution, a full seasonal cycle, a thermodynamic sea ice model, and a mixed layer ocean (the SCAM).

  11. Heliomagnetic latitude dependence of the heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. E.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Murphy, N.

    1996-07-01

    ICE and IMP-8 magnetic field data from 1984-1988 have been analyzed in a magnetic coordinate system defined by the orientation of the solar magnetic dipole. The heliomagnetic latitude dependence of the radial component of the magnetic field (Br) has then been investigated in a wide range of magnetic latitudes above and below the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Br reverses sign abruptly across the current sheet, consistent with the solar magnetic field models of Pneuman and Kopp [1971] and Wolfson [1985] but inconsistent with the source surface models [Hoeksema, 1986]. No evidence is found for an asymmetry in the magnetic field suggested by earlier studies of interplanetary magnetic field data [Luhmann, 1987, Burton, 1990]. A slight (~.03 nT per degree) latitude gradient has been found which is consistent with the MHD model of Pneuman and Kopp and the recent model of Zhao and Hoeksema [1995].

  12. The Progress of Solar Cycle 24 at High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altrock, R. C.

    2010-06-01

    The "extended" solar cycle 24 began in 1999 near 70° latitude, similarly to cycle 23 in 1989 and cycle 22 in 1979. The extended cycle is manifested by persistent Fe XIV coronal emission appearing near 70° latitude and slowly migrating towards the equator, merging with the latitudes of sunspots and active regions (the "butterfly diagram") after several years. Cycle 24 began its migration at a rate 40% slower than the previous two solar cycles, thus indicating the possibility of a peculiar cycle. However, the onset of the "Rush to the Poles" of polar crown prominences and their associated coronal emission, which has been a precursor to solar maximum in recent cycles (cf. Altrock 2003), has just been identified in the northern hemisphere. Peculiarly, this "rush" is leisurely, at only 50% of the rate in the previous two cycles. The properties of the current "Rush to the Poles" yields an estimate of 2013 or 2014 for solar maximum.

  13. Understanding the Relation between Attitude Involvement and Response Latitude Using Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Christopher J.; Withrow, Scott; Zickar, Michael J.; Wood, Nicole L.; Dalal, Dev K.; Bochinski, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Adapting the original latitude of acceptance concept to Likert-type surveys, response latitudes are defined as the range of graded response options a person is willing to endorse. Response latitudes were expected to relate to attitude involvement such that high involvement was linked to narrow latitudes (the result of selective, careful…

  14. THEORY OF SOLAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION AT HIGH LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Gilman, Peter A. E-mail: gilman@ucar.edu

    2012-02-10

    We build a hydrodynamic model for computing and understanding the Sun's large-scale high-latitude flows, including Coriolis forces, turbulent diffusion of momentum, and gyroscopic pumping. Side boundaries of the spherical 'polar cap', our computational domain, are located at latitudes {>=} 60 Degree-Sign . Implementing observed low-latitude flows as side boundary conditions, we solve the flow equations for a Cartesian analog of the polar cap. The key parameter that determines whether there are nodes in the high-latitude meridional flow is {epsilon} = 2{Omega}n{pi}H{sup 2}/{nu}, where {Omega} is the interior rotation rate, n is the radial wavenumber of the meridional flow, H is the depth of the convection zone, and {nu} is the turbulent viscosity. The smaller the {epsilon} (larger turbulent viscosity), the fewer the number of nodes in high latitudes. For all latitudes within the polar cap, we find three nodes for {nu} = 10{sup 12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, two for 10{sup 13}, and one or none for 10{sup 15} or higher. For {nu} near 10{sup 14} our model exhibits 'node merging': as the meridional flow speed is increased, two nodes cancel each other, leaving no nodes. On the other hand, for fixed flow speed at the boundary, as {nu} is increased the poleward-most node migrates to the pole and disappears, ultimately for high enough {nu} leaving no nodes. These results suggest that primary poleward surface meridional flow can extend from 60 Degree-Sign to the pole either by node merging or by node migration and disappearance.

  15. Statistics of the sodium layer parameters at low geographic latitude and its impact on adaptive-optics sodium laser guide star characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaoui, N.; Clemesha, B. R.; Holzlöhner, R.; Simonich, D. M.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Hackenberg, W.; Batista, P. P.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: To aid the design of laser guide star (LGS) assisted adaptive optics (AO) systems, we present an analysis of the statistics of the mesospheric sodium layer based on long-term observations (35 years). Methods: We analyze measurements of the Na-layer characteristics covering a long period (1973-2008), acquired at latitude 23degr south, in Stilde{a}o Josacute{e} dos Compos, Stilde{a}o Paulo, Brazil. We note that Paranal (Chile) is located at latitude 24degr south, approximately the same latitude as Stilde{a}o Paulo. Results: This study allowed us to assess the availability of LGS-assisted AO systems depending on the sodium layer properties. We also present an analysis of the LGSs spot elongation over the year, as well as the nocturnal and the seasonal variation in the mesospheric sodium layer parameters. Conclusions: The average values of the sodium layer parameters are 92.09 km for the centroid height, 11.37 km for the layer thickness, and 5×1013 m-2 for the column abundance. Assuming a laser of sufficient power to produce an adequate photon return flux for an AO system with a column abundance of 4× 1013 m-2, a telescope could observe at low geographic latitudes with the sodium LGS more than 250 days per year. Increasing this power by 20%, we could observe throughout the entire year.

  16. Latitude variation of recurrent fluxes in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Recurrent low energy (not less than 0.5 MeV) proton flux enhancements, reliable indicators of corotating plasma inteaction regions in interplanetary space, have been observed on the Voyager 1 and 2 and Pioneer 11 spacecraft in the heliographic latitude range 2 deg S to 23 deg N and the heliocentric radial range 11 to 20 AU. After a period of rather high correlation between fluxes at different latitudes in early 1983, distinct differences develop. The evolution of the fluxes appears to be related to the temporal and latitudinal dynamics of solar coronal holes, suggesting that information about the latitudinal structure of solar wind stream sources propagates to these distances.

  17. Effect of high latitude filtering on NWP skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay, E.; Hoffman, R.; Takacs, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the extent to which polar filtering may seriously affect the skill of latitude-longitude NWP models, such as the U.S. Navy's NOGAPS, or the GLAS fourth-order model. The limited experiments which have been completed to date with the 4 x 5-deg, 9-level version of the latter model indicate that the high latitude filter currently in operation affects its forecasting skill very little, with only one exception in which the use of the PG filter significantly improved forecasting.

  18. Relation Between Low Latitude Pc3 Magnetic Micropulsations and Solar Wind (P6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, I. A.

    2006-11-01

    iaaamphysics@yahoo.co.in iaaphysicsamu@yahoo.com.au Geomagnetic pulsations recorded on the ground are the signatures of the integrated signals from the magnetosphere. Pc3 Geomagnetic pulsations are quasi-sinusoidal variations in the Earth’s Magnetic field in the period range 10-45 seconds. The magnitude of these pulsations ranges from fraction of a nT (nano Tesla) to several nT. These pulsations can be observed in a number of ways. However the application of ground based magnetometer arrays has proven to be one of the most successful methods of studying the spatial structure of hydromagnetic waves in the Earth’s Magnetosphere. The solar wind provides the energy for the Earth’s magnetospheric processes. Pc3-5 geomagnetic pulsations can be generated either externally or internally with respect to the magnetosphere. The Pc3 studies undertaken in the past have been confined to middle and high latitudes. The spatial and temporal variations observed in Pc3 occurrence are of vital importance because they provide evidence which can be directly related to wave generation mechanisms both inside and external to the magnetosphere. At low latitudes (L < 3) wave energy predominates in the Pc3 band and the spatial characteristics of these pulsations have received little attention in the past. An array of four low latitude induction coil magnetometers was established in south-east Australia over a longitudinal range of 17 degrees at L=1.8 to 2.7 for carrying out the study of the effect of the solar wind velocity on these pulsations. Digital dynamic spectra showing Pc3 pulsation activity over a period of about six months have been used to evaluate Pc3 pulsation occurrence. Pc3 occurrence probability at low latitudes has been found to be dominant for the solar wind velocity in the range 400-700 Km/sec. The results suggest that solar wind controls Pc3 occurrence through a mechanism in which Pc3 wave energy is convected through the magnetosheath and coupled to the standing

  19. Solar terminator effects on middle- to low-latitude Pi2 pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imajo, Shun; Yoshikawa, Akimasa; Uozumi, Teiji; Ohtani, Shinichi; Nakamizo, Aoi; Demberel, Sodnomsambuu; Shevtsov, Boris Mikhailovich

    2016-08-01

    To clarify the effect of the dawn and dusk terminators on Pi2 pulsations, we statistically analyzed the longitudinal phase and amplitude structures of Pi2 pulsations at middle- to low-latitude stations (GMLat = 5.30°-46.18°) around both the dawn and dusk terminators. Although the H (north-south) component Pi2s were affected by neither the local time (LT) nor the terminator location (at 100 km altitude in the highly conducting E region), some features of the D (east-west) component Pi2s depended on the location of the terminator rather than the LT. The phase reversal of the D component occurred 0.5-1 h after sunrise and 1-2 h before sunset. These phase reversals can be attributed to a change in the contributing currents from field-aligned currents (FACs) on the nightside to the meridional ionospheric currents on the sunlit side of the terminator, and vice versa. The phase reversal of the dawn terminator was more frequent than that of the dusk terminator. The D-to- H amplitude ratio on the dawn side began to increase at sunrise, reaching a peak approximately 2 h after sunrise (the sunward side of the phase reversal region), whereas the ratio on the dusk side reached a peak at sunset (the antisunward side). The dawn-dusk asymmetric features suggest that the magnetic contribution of the nightside FAC relative to the meridional ionospheric current on the dusk side is stronger than that on the dawn side, indicating that the center of Pi2-associated FACs, which probably corresponds to the Pi2 energy source, tends to be shifted duskward on average. Different features and weak sunrise/sunset dependences at the middle-latitude station (Paratunka, GMLat = 46.18°) can be attributed to the larger annual variation in the sunrise/sunset time and a stronger magnetic effect because of closeness from FACs. The D-to- H amplitude ratio decreased with decreasing latitude, suggesting that the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the FACs in darkness and the meridional ionospheric

  20. Southern high latitude dune fields on Mars: Morphology, aeolian inactivity, and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenton, L.K.; Hayward, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    In a study area spanning the martian surface poleward of 50?? S., 1190 dune fields have been identified, mapped, and categorized based on dune field morphology. Dune fields in the study area span ??? 116400km2, leading to a global dune field coverage estimate of ???904000km2, far less than that found on Earth. Based on distinct morphological features, the dune fields were grouped into six different classes that vary in interpreted aeolian activity level from potentially active to relatively inactive and eroding. The six dune field classes occur in specific latitude zones, with a sequence of reduced activity and degradation progressing poleward. In particular, the first signs of stabilization appear at ???60?? S., which broadly corresponds to the edge of high concentrations of water-equivalent hydrogen content (observed by the Neutron Spectrometer) that have been interpreted as ground ice. This near-surface ground ice likely acts to reduce sand availability in the present climate state on Mars, stabilizing high latitude dunes and allowing erosional processes to change their morphology. As a result, climatic changes in the content of near-surface ground ice are likely to influence the level of dune activity. Spatial variation of dune field classes with longitude is significant, suggesting that local conditions play a major role in determining dune field activity level. Dune fields on the south polar layered terrain, for example, appear either potentially active or inactive, indicating that at least two generations of dune building have occurred on this surface. Many dune fields show signs of degradation mixed with crisp-brinked dunes, also suggesting that more than one generation of dune building has occurred since they originally formed. Dune fields superposed on early and late Amazonian surfaces provide potential upper age limits of ???100My on the south polar layered deposits and ???3Ga elsewhere at high latitudes. No craters are present on any identifiable dune

  1. Fish biodiversity and conservation in South America.

    PubMed

    Reis, R E; Albert, J S; Di Dario, F; Mincarone, M M; Petry, P; Rocha, L A

    2016-07-01

    The freshwater and marine fish faunas of South America are the most diverse on Earth, with current species richness estimates standing above 9100 species. In addition, over the last decade at least 100 species were described every year. There are currently about 5160 freshwater fish species, and the estimate for the freshwater fish fauna alone points to a final diversity between 8000 and 9000 species. South America also has c. 4000 species of marine fishes. The mega-diverse fish faunas of South America evolved over a period of >100 million years, with most lineages tracing origins to Gondwana and the adjacent Tethys Sea. This high diversity was in part maintained by escaping the mass extinctions and biotic turnovers associated with Cenozoic climate cooling, the formation of boreal and temperate zones at high latitudes and aridification in many places at equatorial latitudes. The fresh waters of the continent are divided into 13 basin complexes, large basins consolidated as a single unit plus historically connected adjacent coastal drainages, and smaller coastal basins grouped together on the basis of biogeographic criteria. Species diversity, endemism, noteworthy groups and state of knowledge of each basin complex are described. Marine habitats around South America, both coastal and oceanic, are also described in terms of fish diversity, endemism and state of knowledge. Because of extensive land use changes, hydroelectric damming, water divergence for irrigation, urbanization, sedimentation and overfishing 4-10% of all fish species in South America face some degree of extinction risk, mainly due to habitat loss and degradation. These figures suggest that the conservation status of South American freshwater fish faunas is better than in most other regions of the world, but the marine fishes are as threatened as elsewhere. Conserving the remarkable aquatic habitats and fishes of South America is a growing challenge in face of the rapid anthropogenic changes of the 21

  2. High latitude regulation of low latitude thermocline ventilation and planktic foraminifer populations across glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Philip F.; Norris, Richard D.

    2011-11-01

    One of the earliest discoveries in palaeoceanography was the observation in 1935 that the (sub)tropical planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii became absent or extremely rare in the Atlantic Ocean during glacials of the late Pleistocene. Yet a mechanistic explanation for G. menardii's extraordinary biogeographic behaviour has eluded palaeoceanographers for 75 years. Here we show that modern G. menardii, along with two other species that also suffer Atlantic population collapses during glacials, track poorly ventilated waters globally in their thermocline habitats. The ventilation states of low latitude thermoclines are 'set', to a first order, by intermediate water masses originating at high latitudes. In the modern Atlantic this control on low latitude thermocline ventilation is exerted by relatively poorly ventilated, southern-sourced Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) and sub-Antarctic Mode Water (SAMW). We suggest that the glacial Atlantic foraminifer population collapses were a consequence of a low latitude thermocline that was better ventilated during glacials than it is today, in line with geochemical evidence, and driven primarily by a well-ventilated, northern-sourced intermediate water mass. A ventilation mechanism driving the glacial population collapses is further supported by our new constraints on the precise timing of these species' Atlantic proliferation during the last deglaciation — occurring in parallel with a wholesale, bipolar reorganisation of the Atlantic's thermocline-to-abyssal overturning circulation. Our findings demonstrate that a bipolar seesaw in the formation of high latitude intermediate waters has played an important role in regulating the population dynamics of thermocline-dwelling plankton at lower latitudes.

  3. High-Latitude Plasma Convection from Cluster EDI Measurements: North-South Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Foerster, M.; Paschmann, G.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.

    2009-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that the ionospheric response to processes in the magnetosphere can be very dissimilar in the northern and southern hemispheres. In this paper we present a statistical study of ionospheric convection patterns obtained from 7 years of electric field observations from the Cluster mission. The results show some prominent asymmetries between the two hemispheres, but most of the differences can probably be attributed to ionospheric conductivities. The results also demonstrate that magnetospheric convection is not simply the result of processes in the magnetospheric boundaries and the magnetotail, but that it is modified and partly controlled by ionospheric effects.

  4. Oxygen isotopic compositions of Central Andean plutonic and volcanic rocks, latitudes 26°-29° south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longstaffe, Frederick J.; Clark, Alan H.; McNutt, Robert H.; Zentilli, Marcos

    1983-07-01

    Oxygen isotope data are reported for 27 igneous rocks of Mesozoic to Quaternary age from the Central Andes. 26-29°S. The plutonic rocks, and most of the volcanics, have δ18O values between 6.2 and 8.3‰. The whole-rock δ 18O values show a weak correlation with initial 87Sr/ 86Sr data. This O-Sr array differs from documented trends for calc-alkaline plutonic suites from California, Scotland and northern Italy, but overlaps with data for volcanic and plutonic rocks from Ecuador, northern Chile and southern Perú. The oxygen isotope results indicate that the magmas evolved without significant contamination from supracrustal rocks (e.g., rocks that experienced 18O enrichment during surficial weathering). The available O, Sr and Pb isotopic data for these rocks are best explained by magma generation in the upper mantle or lower crust. From the Late Mesozoic on, the 87Sr/ 86Sr values were modified at depth by isotopic exchange between the magma and a continually thickening crust of plutonic rocks of Late Precambrian to early Mesozoic age.

  5. Initiated by the south. South - South Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Parsons, J S

    1993-12-01

    The UNFPA Deputy Chief of the Asia and Pacific Division explains how relations between representatives of developing countries to the South have often been less than congenial and how efforts have been made to smooth the way for greater cooperation between neighbors in the region. President Soeharto of Indonesia at a G-15 submeeting of Non-Aligned Countries in Malaysia in 1990 made the first overtures to his peers. He offered to work more closely with other interested countries economically and in terms of technical assistance. Prime Minister Von Van Kiet of Vietnam took him up on his offer and visited the President in Indonesia in January 1992 to discuss family planning issues. The subsequent assistance rendered by Indonesia to Vietnam in developing its family planning program was unique in bilateral relations in the region in that it was initiated by the nonaligned countries without outside interference. The author thinks that the UNFPA should play a facilitating role financially and organizationally in what may be the beginning of a trend toward greater South-South cooperation. Any help which developing countries could render to other developing nations will certainly be appreciated in this period of waning resources from developed countries for international population programs. The author also argues that service quality in donor countries is likely to improve. PMID:12345389

  6. Redefining the Longitude/Latitude Experience with a Scaffolded Geocache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Thomas; Bozdin, Alec M.; Stanlick, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Latitude and longitude are foundational concepts for geography education, yet they are typically poorly understood by students and receive indifferent attention from instructors and publishers' materials. Social studies teachers can take advantage of increasingly ubiquitous geolocating devices such as Global Positions Systems (GPS) to provide…

  7. Earth-Sun Relationships: Latitude, Longitude and Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul F.

    High school students learn about the sun's effects on the earth by examining the concepts of latitude and longitude, seasons, and time. Each of these topics is treated in a separate, but similarly organized, unit. Relevant vocabulary is introduced, and complex terms are clarified with diagrams and illustrations. In the unit on time, potentially…

  8. Teaching Latitude and Longitude in the Upper Elementary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Peter C.; Gondesen, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the desirability of teaching latitude and longitude concepts to upper elementary students. Includes a four-lesson unit on the topics. Employs hurricane tracking information available from the National Hurricane Center. Provides a foundation for future lessons on Middle and North American geography. (SG)

  9. Programmed Latitude and Longitude, Special Publication Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Jean C.

    Designed to measure skills involving latitude and longitude, this is a self-administering linear program for junior-high geography students. Students progress through 59 pages of fill-in-the-blank items, accompanied by appropriate line drawings, for which the correct answers are given below each question. Following the method of programmed…

  10. A solar cycle timing predictor - The latitude of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1990-01-01

    A 'Spoerer butterfly' method is used to examine solar cycle 22. It is shown from the latitude of active regions that the cycle can now be expected to peak near November 1989 + or - 8 months, basically near the latter half of 1989.

  11. Bioerosion and carbonate mud production on high-latitude shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, George E.; Alan Fyfe, J.

    1988-11-01

    Low-latitude carbonate muds often are composed either of entire units of skeletons (e.g., algal muds) or of precipitates, whereas high-latitude carbonate muds are bioerosional or result from maceration. Bioerosion at high latitudes is most intense in the photic zone, particularly down to 25 m depth. Shelly substrata may be crushed, bitten, drilled, bored or scraped. Clionid sponges, endolithic algae, acmaeid gastropods and regular echinoids are the most significant agents. Clionids produce distinctive facetted carbonate silt chips when boring, which have been described from both high- and low-latitudes. Faecal pellets break down to yield mud-sized carbonate particles that are more irregular than those produced by maceration. Exhumed infaunal bivalves are often preferred to epifaunal organisms as substrata. Bioerosion occurs very rapidly; shells may be totally infested with boring algae in three months. A "moth-eaten" appearance therefore does not denote a relict grain. Reliable rates of fine sediment production are not yet available. The mud fraction of northwest European shelf sediment generally contains 10-20% CaCO 3, though an inshore and offshore belt with higher values may be identified. Some Holocene supratidal mud-flats exceed 50% CaCO 3. Much of the shelf represents a modern-day equivalent of the "calcareous shale" facies common in the geological record. Instances of synsedimentary cementation are not uncommon, particularly in association with heavily burrowed muds.

  12. The Brewer-Dobson circulation and higher latitude ozone changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde, Martin; Weber, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The Brewer-Dobson Circulation (BDC) plays a major role in ozone transport from the tropics to the poles and by that it governs the global distribution of total column ozone. Climate models predict a strengthening of the BDC in times of climate change. This would lead to an accelerated recovery of ozone abundance in higher latitudes. However so far there is no clear evidence of this strengthening. The strength of the BDC is dependent on wave forcing which slows the meridional winds and by that disturbs the geostrophic balance of Coriolis force and pressure gradient force. A good measure for the wave forcing is the eddy heat flux in 100hPa. It is highly correlated with changes in the total ozone columns of the polar regions and the tropic. Another major driver of the global ozone distribution is the photochemical destruction of ozone, due to ozone depleting substances (ODS) such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). A special case of this is the rapid depletion of ozone in the presence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These clouds build up inside the polar vortices, are highly temperature dependent and strengthen the efficiency of ODS. In order to analyse the evolution of the higher latitude ozone abundance as a function of dynamical changes and the change in the abundance of ODS it is necessary to quantify both effects separately. This work focusses on the influence of the mid-latitude 100hpa eddy heat flux on changes in ozone in higher latitudes.

  13. MID-LATITUDE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE BACKGROUND SULFATE CONCENTRATION IN RAINWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pH is not sufficient to characterize the acidity of precipitation, but rather its acid-base components must be described. he chemistry of natural emission sources as well as the mechanism of precipitation formation determine the chemistry of precipitation at mid-latitude, Nor...

  14. The diffuse interstellar bands and the Galactic latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Alan; Webster, Adrian

    1993-04-01

    Existing measurements of three of the diffuse interstellar bands are presented in a new way, in order to investigate how the relative strengths of different bands depend on the Galactic latitude of the stars in whose light they are seen. It is found that none of the three ratios of bandstrength amongst 4430, 5780, and 5797 A is constant, but all three are correlated with the modulus of the latitude. The abundance of the carrier of 4430 A relative to the others is found to be greatest at low latitude, while that of the carrier of 5797 A is greatest at high latitude. It is supposed that this dependence reflects a more basic dependence on height above and below the Galactic plane, the carrier of 4430 A evidently preferring conditions near the plane where the gas density is high and the carrier of 5797 A preferring the more tenuous gas further out. In terms of a recent theory in which the carriers are different hydrocarbon molecules and ions of the fullerane family, these results imply that, of the bands studied here, the carrier of 4430 A bears the most hydrogen atoms and that of 5797 A bears the fewest.

  15. The Ionospheric Mid-Latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Chen, C.; Hsu, M.; Liu, C. H.; Liu, J. G.; Burns, A. G.; Wang, W.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents monthly variations of the mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) of the ionosphere for the first time by using global observations of the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C), NASA TIMED-GUVI, ground-based radars and GPS receiver network. The MSNA is characterized by greater nighttime (19:00 LT - 24:00 LT, or period of larger solar zenith angles) ionospheric electron density than that during daytime (08:00 - 18:00 LT, or period of smaller solar zenith angles) at middle latitudes during solstices. The anomaly shown in the southern hemisphere during December solstice was previously known as the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) occurring around the Antarctica and the nearby Pacific Ocean, while a WSA-like electron density structure also occurs in the northern hemisphere around June solstice. This study demonstrates that the anomalies occurred in both the northern and southern hemispheres share similar character of greater nighttime density. Moreover, the latitude-altitude cross-section plots of the electron density structure show very similar time-varying electron density evolutions of the MSNA. In both hemispheres, the anomalies with similar electron density characteristics and variations caused by the similar mechanism prompts us to name this phenomenon the mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly.

  16. Horizontal Shapes of Daytime Mid-latitude Sporadic-E Imaged by GPS Total Electron Content Observations in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Jun; Heki, Kosuke

    2016-04-01

    Sporadic-E (Es) is a thin densely ionized plasma patch whose occurrence is highly unpredictable. Since the discovery of Es, its two-dimensional (2-D) horizontal shape has long remained ambiguous due to the lack of appropriate observation instruments. Here in our study, 2-D imaging of mid-latitude sporadic-E (Es) is performed by using a dense array of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers in Japan. We used Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites and the densely distributed GNSS receiver network to conduct GPS total electron content (TEC) observations and mapped positive TEC anomalies caused by Es. We analyzed over 70 Es occurrences over Japan to reveal morphological characteristics of daytime mid-latitude Es. Their horizontal shapes are characterized by frontal structure typically elongated in the east-west (E-W) direction by ~100 km with the north-south (N-S) width of 10-30 km. Frontal structures are often found to include smaller-scale structures, which are quasi-periodically located plasma patches. These small-scale patches indicate the operation of shear instability, e.g., Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability, in the horizontal structuring of daytime mid-latitude Es. In addition, frontal structures are observed to migrate mainly northward in the morning and southward in the afternoon with speeds of 30-100 m/s, which may reflect the directions and velocities of neutral winds controlled by the atmospheric tides.

  17. Dichroplus vittatus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) follows the converse to Bergmann's rule although male morphological variability increases with latitude.

    PubMed

    Bidau, C J; Martí, D A

    2007-02-01

    Geographic body size variation was analysed in males and females of 19 populations of the South American grasshopper Dichroplus vittatus Bruner spanning 20 degrees of latitude and 2700 m of altitude. Using mean and maximum body length of each sex and factors obtained from principal components analyses of six morphometric linear characters it was shown that D. vittatus followed the converse to Bergmann's rule latitudinally but not altitudinally where no significant trends were observed. For males, variability of body size increased with latitude but not with altitude. Both types of trends were significantly correlated with mean annual temperature and minimum annual temperature (positive correlations), and two estimators of seasonality, the coefficients of variation of mean annual temperature (negative) and mean annual precipitation (positive). Some allometric relationships also showed geographic variation. It is suggested that the observed decrease in size with latitude together with the increase in morphological variability is a consequence of a number of factors: the shortening of the growing season southwards; the increasing seasonality and climatic unpredictability; and the fact that the species exhibits protandry which contributes to smaller and more variable size in males and smaller but more constant body size in females. PMID:17298684

  18. Potential impacts of wintertime soil moisture anomalies from agricultural irrigation at low latitudes on regional and global climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wey, Hao-Wei; Lo, Min-Hui; Lee, Shih-Yu; Yu, Jin-Yi; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic water management can change surface energy budgets and the water cycle. In this study, we focused on impacts of Asian low-latitude irrigation on regional and global climates during boreal wintertime. A state-of-the-art Earth system model is used to simulate the land-air interaction processes affected by irrigation and the consequent responses in atmospheric circulation. Perturbed experiments show that wet soil moisture anomalies at low latitudes can reduce the surface temperature on a continental scale through atmospheric feedback. The intensity of prevailing monsoon circulation becomes stronger because of larger land-sea thermal contrast. Furthermore, anomalous upper level convergence over South Asia and midlatitude climatic changes indicate tropical-extratropical teleconnections. The wintertime Aleutian low is deepened and an anomalous warm surface temperature is found in North America. Previous studies have noted this warming but left it unexplained, and we provide plausible mechanisms for these remote impacts coming from the irrigation over Asian low-latitude regions.

  19. Anaglyph, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Location: 15 degrees North to 60 degrees South latitude, 30 to 90 degrees West longitude Orientation: North toward the top, Mercator projection Image Data: shaded SRTM elevation model Original Data Resolution: SRTM 1 arcsecond (about 30 meters or 98 feet) Date Acquired: February 2000

  20. Mid-latitude composition of mars from thermal and epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Elphic, R. C.; Boynton, W. V.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Funsten, H. O.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Maurice, S.; McKinney, G. W.; Moore, K. R.; Tokar, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Epithermal neutron data acquired by Mars Odyssey have been analyzed to determine global maps of water-equivalent hydrogen abundance. By assuming that hydrogen was distributed uniformly with depth within the surface, a map of minimum water abundance was obtained. The addition of thermal neutrons to this analysis could provide information needed to determine water stratigraphy. For example, thermal and epithermal neutrons have been used together to determine the depth and abundance of waterequivalent hydrogen of a buried layer in the south polar region. Because the emission of thermal neutrons from the Martian surface is sensitive to absorption by elements other than hydrogen, analysis of stratigraphy requires that the abundance of these elements be known. For example, recently published studies of the south polar region assumed that the Mars Pathfinder mean soil composition is representative of the regional soil composition, This assumption is partially motivated by the fact that Mars appears to have a well-mixed global dust cover and that the Pathfinder soil composition is representative of the mean composition of the Martian surface. In this study, we have analyzed thermal and epithermal neutron data measured by the neutron spectrometer subsystem of the gamma ray spectrometer to determine the spatial distribution of the composition of elements other than hydrogen. We have restricted our analysis to mid-latitude regions for which we have corrected the neutron counting data for variations in atmospheric thickness.

  1. Upper-level circulation in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ray G.; Stramma, Lothar

    In this paper we present a literature survey of the South Atlantic's climate and its oceanic upper-layer circulation and meridional heat transport. The opening section deals with climate and is focused upon those elements having greatest oceanic relevance, i.e., distributions of atmospheric sea level pressure, the wind fields they produce, and the net surface energy fluxes. The various geostrophic currents comprising the upper-level general circulation are then reviewed in a manner organized around the subtropical gyre, beginning off southern Africa with the Agulhas Current Retroflection and then progressing to the Benguela Current, the equatorial current system and circulation in the Angola Basin, the large-scale variability adn interannual warmings at low latitudes, the Brazil Current, the South Atlantic Current, and finally to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current system in which the Falkland (Malvinas) Current is included. A summary of estimates of the meridional heat transport at various latitudes in the South Atlantic ends the survey.

  2. Cutoff latitude variation during solar proton events: Causes and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesse Tyssøy, H.; Stadsnes, J.

    2015-01-01

    accurately quantify the effect of solar proton events (SPEs) on the atmosphere requires a good estimate of the particle energy deposition in the middle atmosphere (60-100 km) and how the energy is distributed globally. Protons in the energy range 1-20 MeV, depositing their energy in the middle atmosphere, are subject to more complex dynamics with strong day-night asymmetries compared to higher-energy particles. Our study targets six SPEs from 2003 to 2012. By using measurements from the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector on all available Polar Orbit Environment Satellites (POES), we show that in the main phase of geomagnetic storms the dayside cutoff latitudes are pushed poleward, while the nightside cutoff latitudes have the opposite response, resulting in strong day-night asymmetries in the energy deposition. These features cannot be measured by the frequently used Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). Assuming that the protons impact the polar atmosphere homogeneously above a fixed nominal latitude boundary will therefore give a significant overestimate of the energy deposited in the middle atmosphere during SPEs. We discuss the magnetospheric mechanisms responsible for the local time response in the cutoff latitudes and provide a simple applicable parameterization which includes both dayside and nightside cutoff latitude variability using only the Dst, the northward component of the interplanetary magnetic field, and solar wind pressure. The parameterization is utilized on the GOES particle fluxes, and the resulting energy deposition successfully captures the day-night asymmetry in good agreement with the energy deposition predicted from the POES measurement.

  3. Energetic Particles at High Latitudes of the Heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ming

    2004-09-15

    Ulysses has by now made two complete out-of-ecliptic orbits around the sun. The first encounter of the solar poles occurred in 1994-1995, when the sun was near the minimum of its activity cycle, while the second one was in 2000-2001, when the sun was at solar maximum. To our surprise, energetic particles of all origins at high latitude are not much different from those we observe near the ecliptic for at least these two phases of solar cycle. The latitude gradients of galactic and anomalous cosmic rays are positive but small at the 1994-1995 solar minimum and almost zero at the 2000-2001 solar maximum, while temporal solar cycle variation dominates their flux variation at all latitudes. Solar energetic particles from all large gradual events can be seen at both Ulysses and Earth no matter how large their spatial separations from the solar event are, and the particle flux often reaches a uniform level in the entire inner heliosphere within a few days after event onset and remains so throughout the decay phase that can sometimes last over a month. Energetic particles accelerated by low-latitude CIRs can appear at high latitudes, far beyond the latitudinal range of CIRs. All these observations suggest that latitudinal transport of energetic particles is quite easy. In addition, because the average magnetic field is radial at the pole, The Ulysses observations indicate that parallel diffusion and drift in the radial direction need to be reduced at the poles relative to their equatorial values. To achieve such behaviors of particle transport, the heliospheric magnetic field needs a significant latitudinal component at the poles. A non-zero latitudinal magnetic field component can be produced by latitudinal motion of the magnetic field line in solar corona, which can be in form of either random walk suggested by Jokipii or large scale systematic motion suggested by Fisk.

  4. Ulysses at 50 deg south: Constant immersion in the high-speed solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.; Bame, S. J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gosling, J. T.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Mccomas, D. J.; Neugebauer, M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Wang, Y.-M.

    1994-01-01

    We present speed observations from the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment through 50 deg south latitude. The pronounced speed modulation arising from solar rotation and the tilt of the heliomagnetic current sheet has nearly disappeared. Ulysses is now observing wind speeds in the 700 to 800 km/s range, with a magnetic polarity indicating an origin in the large south polar coronal hole. The strong compressions, rarefractions, and shock waves previously seen have weakened or disappeared. Occasional coronal mass ejections characterized by low plasma density caused by radial expansion have been observed. The coronal configuration was simple and stable in 1993, indicating that the observed solar wind changes were caused by increasing spacecraft latitude. Trends in prevailing speed with increasing latitude support previous findings. A decrease in peak speed southward of 40 deg latitude may indicate that the fastest solar wind comes from the equatorial extensions of the polar coronal holes.

  5. Observations of TEC Depletions in South and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Pradipta, R.

    2014-12-01

    TEC values gathered with several networks of GPS receivers, which operated in South and Central America and the Caribbean region between 2010 and 2013, have been used to investigate the characteristics and morphology of TEC depletions that develop at these locations. In South America the TEC depletions are associated with low-latitude plasma bubbles. In Central America and the Caribbean region, we found that TEC depletions that occur during magnetically active conditions (Kp > 5o), persist for very long periods and sometimes remain even during afternoon hours. During quiet magnetic conditions, TEC depletions occur around the June solstice in Central America and during the December solstice in the Southern part of South America. We have also studied possible links between mid-latitude depletions and the formation of plasma bubbles at low latitudes. In addition, TEC measurements from North America have been utilized to determine the poleward extension of the mid-latitude depletions. These depletions do not appear to be related to auroral plasma processes or to storm enhanced densities (SED). We are studying the possibility that their initiation process is associated with the disturbance dynamo or the prompt penetrating electric field that develop during storm conditions.

  6. Radiocarbon Anomalies of Surface Waters in the Glacial-to-Deglacial Low-to-Mid-Latitude Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, M.; Balmer, S.; Mudelsee, M.

    2015-12-01

    14C reservoir ages of surface waters are crucial for dating marine sediment records of the last 40,000 yr. In the low-latitude Atlantic, time series of 14C reservoir ages were reconstructed for five sites using the 14C plateau-tuning technique and supplemented by a reservoir age record from southern mid-latitudes (Skinner et al., 2010). Results suggest small-scale spatial and short-term (multi-centennial-scale) changes in reservoir age over last glacial-to-deglacial times, thus modify previously assigned calendar age chronologies by up to 500-2500 yr. During late peak glacial, enhanced summer winds off South Brazil and strengthened southerly trades off Namibia induced local reservoir ages of up to 900-1100 yr, whereas surface water ages in the Cariaco lagoon fell close to zero, a result of dominant CO2 exchange with the atmosphere. Near 16.05 ka, reservoir ages dropped to a minimum of 170-420 yr all over the South Atlantic, possibly the response to an immediately preceding short-term major rise in atmospheric pCO2 and East Antarctic temperatures. Our 14C reservoir ages provide a first basis for systematic data-model comparisons. They largely confirm model-based estimates for the LGM (Butzin et al., 2012) that have been derived from changes in both atmospheric 14C concentration and reductions in AMOC. Deviations are constrained to coastal upwelling zones in part insufficiently resolved by numerical models.

  7. Spatio-temporal resolution of autumnal mid-latitude clouds on Titan as probes of waves and instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Young, T. M.; Mitchell, J.; Adamkovics, M.; Caballero, R.

    2013-12-01

    Since mid-2004, the Cassini spacecraft has provided images of clouds on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn. The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) captured images over a period of about 24 hours from Dec. 13 to 14, 2009, that show methane clouds in the troposphere concentrated in a band between 45 and 63 degrees south latitude, a streak-shaped mid-latitude cloud system extending across half the globe, traveling several hundred kilometers during the day-long period of observation. The sequence of images obtained throughout this flyby allowed us to create a movie of clouds moving across the moon's surface background. We present the analysis of this mid-latitude cloud system based on observations of the movie produced from the ISS mapped images and the three-dimensional Titan global circulation model (GCM) developed by the UCLA group [Mitchell et al. 2011], which exhibits streak features similar to those found in the Cassini data. The observed cloud features give us both spatial and temporal information that reveals how the clouds evolve in time, which is then compared to the GCM by evaluating the modeled time series on the same time scale as the observed cloud evolution. The atmosphere on Titan is quite barotropic since there is very little temperature difference from equator to pole, and although the altitude of these clouds is yet to be established, the model suggests that there is enough temperature gradient to drive a weakly unstable extratropical instability, similar to the baroclinic instability driving mid-latitude weather systems on Earth. The results of the simulations and the implications for Titan's atmospheric instabilities will be discussed.

  8. Pollution influences on atmospheric composition and chemistry at high northern latitudes: Boreal and California forest fire emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H. B.; Anderson, B. E.; Brune, W. H.; Cai, C.; Cohen, R. C.; Crawford, J. H.; Cubison, M. J.; Czech, E. P.; Emmons, L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Huey, G.; Jacob, D. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kaduwela, A.; Kondo, Y.; Mao, J.; Olson, J. R.; Sachse, G. W.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wisthaler, A.; The Arctas Science Team

    2010-11-01

    We analyze detailed atmospheric gas/aerosol composition data acquired during the 2008 NASA ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) airborne campaign performed at high northern latitudes in spring (ARCTAS-A) and summer (ARCTAS-B) and in California in summer (ARCTAS-CARB). Biomass burning influences were widespread throughout the ARCTAS campaign. MODIS data from 2000 to 2009 indicated that 2008 had the second largest fire counts over Siberia and a more normal Canadian boreal forest fire season. Near surface arctic air in spring contained strong anthropogenic signatures indicated by high sulfate. In both spring and summer most of the pollution plumes transported to the Arctic region were from Europe and Asia and were present in the mid to upper troposphere and contained a mix of forest fire and urban influences. The gas/aerosol composition of the high latitude troposphere was strongly perturbed at all altitudes in both spring and summer. The reactive nitrogen budget was balanced with PAN as the dominant component. Mean ozone concentrations in the high latitude troposphere were only minimally perturbed (<5 ppb), although many individual pollution plumes sampled in the mid to upper troposphere, and mixed with urban influences, contained elevated ozone (ΔO 3/ΔCO = 0.11 ± 0.09 v/v). Emission and optical characteristics of boreal and California wild fires were quantified and found to be broadly comparable. Greenhouse gas emission estimates derived from ARCTAS-CARB data for the South Coast Air Basin of California show good agreement with state inventories for CO 2 and N 2O but indicate substantially larger emissions of CH 4. Simulations by multiple models of transport and chemistry were found to be broadly consistent with observations with a tendency towards under prediction at high latitudes.

  9. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 0 Degree N., Center Longitude 77 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the boundary between the lowland plains and characteristic Venusian highland terrain in Ovda Regio, the western part of the great equatorial highland called Aphrodite Terra. For a view of the highlands just to the east, see PIA00310. The view is parallel to the northern boundary of Ovda. The black stripe in the foreground is not a data gap; the front part of the terrain has been 'dropped down' to show a topographic cross-section through the region. The conical 'hill' in the extreme upper right of the image is not a real feature, but an artifact resulting from a single erroneous altimeter measurement. Its size gives an idea of the horizontal resolution of the altimeter. Whereas the lowlands at left are made up of overlapping, relatively dark and unfractured lava flows, the highlands consist mainly of 'tessera terrain'. The tesserae in the center of the image consist mainly of ridges running nearly parallel to the highland boundary, whereas further south (to the right) the pattern is complicated by north-south trending fractures. Local depressions in the highlands, which have been partially filled in by smooth material, are visible in several places. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1- 00N077. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 824 x 520. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.67 -- 0.87. Vertical exaggeration: 40. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 165. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 520. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  10. Space Weather Studies Using the Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Pacheco, E.

    2014-12-01

    LISN is an array of small instruments that operates as a real-time distributed observatory to understand the complex day-to-day variability and the extreme state of disturbance that occurs in the South American low-latitude ionosphere nearly every day after sunset. The LISN observatory aims to forecast the initiation and transport of plasma bubbles across the South American continent. The occurrence of this type of plasma structures and their embedded irregularities poses a prominent natural hazard to communication, navigation and high precision pointing systems. As commercial and military aviation is increasingly reliant on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) any interruption due to ionospheric irregularities or errors due to large density gradients constitutes a serious threat to passengers and crew. Therefore, it is important to understand the conditions and sources that contribute to the formation of these irregularities. To achieve high quality regional nowcasts and forecasts, the LISN system was designed to include a dense coverage of the South American landmass with 47 GPS receivers, 5 flux-gate magnetometers distributed on 2 base lines and 3 Vertical Incidence Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR) ionosondes deployed along the same magnetic meridian that intersects the magnetic equator at 68° W. This presentation will provide a summary of recent instrument installations and new processing techniques that have been developed under the LISN project. We will also present the results of recent efforts to detect TIDs and TEC plasma depletions on a near real-time basis. We will describe a method to estimate the zonal velocity and tilt of the plasma bubbles/depletions by combining observations of TEC depletions acquired with adjacent receivers, making it possible to predict precisely their future locations.

  11. Changing climate cues differentially alter zooplankton dormancy dynamics across latitudes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Natalie T; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    In seasonal climates, dormancy is a common strategy that structures biodiversity and is necessary for the persistence of many species. Climate change will likely alter dormancy dynamics in zooplankton, the basis of aquatic food webs, by altering two important hatching cues: mean temperatures during the ice-free season, and mean day length when lakes become ice free. Theory suggests that these changes could alter diversity, hatchling abundances and phenology within lakes, and that these responses may diverge across latitudes due to differences in optimal hatching cues and strategies. To examine the role of temperature and day length on hatching dynamics, we collected sediment from 25 lakes across a 1800 km latitudinal gradient and exposed sediment samples to a factorial combination of two photoperiods (12 and 16 h) and two temperatures (8 and 12 °C) representative of historical southern (short photoperiod, warm) and northern (long photoperiod, cool) lake conditions. We tested whether sensitivity to these hatching cues varies by latitudinal origin and differs among taxa. Higher temperatures advanced phenology for all taxa, and these advances were greatest for cladocerans followed by copepods and rotifers. Although phenology differed among taxa, the effect of temperature did not vary with latitude. The latitudinal origin of the egg bank influenced egg abundance and hatchling abundance and diversity, with these latter effects varying with taxa, temperature and photoperiod. Copepod hatchling abundances peaked at mid-latitudes in the high temperature and long photoperiod treatments, whereas hatchling abundances of other zooplankton were greatest at low latitudes and high temperature. The overall diversity of crustacean zooplankton (copepods and cladocerans) also reflected distinct responses of each taxa to our treatments, with the greatest diversity occurring at mid-latitudes (~56 °N) in the shorter photoperiod treatment. Our results demonstrate that hatching cues

  12. Coupled land-ocean-atmosphere processes and South asian monsoon variability.

    PubMed

    Meehl, G A

    1994-10-14

    Results from a global coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model and a model with specified tropical convective heating anomalies show that the South Asian monsoon was an active part of the tropical biennial oscillation (TBO). Convective heating anomalies over Africa and the western Pacific Ocean associated with the TBO altered the simulated pattern of atmospheric circulation for the Northern Hemisphere winter mid-latitude over Asia. This alteration in the mid-latitude circulation maintained temperature anomalies over South Asia through winter and helped set up the land-sea temperature contrast for subsequent monsoon development. South Asian snow cover contributed to monsoon strength but was symptomatic of the larger scale alteration in the mid-latitude atmospheric circulation pattern. PMID:17771448

  13. South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of South Africa was acquired on May 14, 2000, by NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. The image was produced using a combination of the sensor's 250-m and 500-m resolution visible wavelength bands. As part of the opening ceremony to begin the joint U.S.-South Africa SAFARI Field Experiment, NASA presented print copies of this image as GIFts to Dr. Ben Ngubane, Minister of Arts, Science and Technology, and Honorable Advocate Ngoaka Ramathlodi, Premier of the Northern Province, South Africa. The area shown in this image encompasses seven capital cities and a number of the region's distinctive geological features can be seen clearly. Toward the northern (top) central part of the image, the browns and tans comprise the Kalahari Desert of southern Botswana. The Tropic of Capricorn runs right through the heart of the Kalahari and the Botswanan capital city of Gaborone sits on the Limpopo River, southeast of the Kalahari. Along the western coastline of the continent is the country of Namibia, where the Namib Desert is framed against the sea by the Kaokoveld Mountains. The Namibian capital of Windhoek is obscured by clouds. Looking closely in the center of the image, the Orange River can be seen running from east to west, demarcating the boundary between Namibia and South Africa. On the southwestern corner of the continent is the hook-like Cape of Good Hope peninsula and Cape Town, the parliamentary capital of South Africa. Running west to east away from Cape Town are the Great Karroo Mountains. The shadow in this image conveys a sense of the very steep grade of the cliffs along the southern coast of South Africa. Port Elizabeth sits on the southeasternmost point of South Africa, and a large phytoplankton bloom can be seen in the water about 100 miles east of there. Moving northward along the east coast, the Drakensberg Mountains are visible. The two small nations of Lesotho and Swaziland are in this region, completely

  14. Maritime User Requirements at High Latitudes - the MARENOR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlke, R.

    2014-12-01

    The ionosphere at high latitudes is characterised by a great variety of spatial and temporal variations that influence radio signals. In addition to navigation solutions that are based on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), satellite communication systems also suffer from ionospheric degradation. This is worsened by harsh weather conditions, insufficient coverage by geostationary satellites and the absence of land-based augmentation infrastructure. Climate change will lead to a decrease in sea ice extent and thus to an increased use of trans-polar shipping routes, presence of gas and oil industries in the High Arctic and higher focus on Search-and-Rescue (SAR) as well as sovereignty issues. These moments usually require navigation and communication solutions that are accurate and reliable. We describe requirements presented by industrial operators on and around Svalbard. In addition, we present the MARENOR project that aims on evaluating navigation and communication systems at high latitudes including first results

  15. An energy principle for high-latitude electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model for mid- and high-latitude electric fields and currents is constructed using Fourier analysis methods. A two-dimensional planar ionosphere with an enhanced conductivity auroral belt and field-aligned currents at the edges is employed. The postulate that the electric field and currents adjust self-consistently to minimize the global Joule dissipation rate defines a theoretical relation between the primary and secondary field-aligned currents. This so-called minimal dissipation configuration is examined using several input field-aligned current models, and graphical solutions for the electric field and ionospheric current are shown. A detailed discussion and interpretation of the solutions with relation to diverse observations and high-latitude phenomenology are included.

  16. Neutral winds above 200 km at high latitudes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meriwether, J. W.; Heppner, J. P.; Stolarik, J. D.; Wescott, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    Electrically neutral, luminous clouds are a by-product of chemical releases conducted to create barium ion clouds for the measurement of electric fields. Wind measurements provided by the motions of these clouds are particularly valuable in that the motions can be directly compared with convective ion drift motions to test the importance of ion drag forces. Motion from multiple releases between 200 and 300 km from 15 rockets launched from four high-latitude locations is analyzed in this paper. The observations in the evening and midnight hours at magnetic latitudes above 65 deg strongly suggest that in these regions ion drag is the dominant force in driving neutral winds between 200 and 300 km. In the morning sector, it is evident that neutral wind observations cannot be directly interpreted in terms of ion drag; other factors must be considered.

  17. Orbital control of low-latitude seasonality during the Eemian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, A.; Paul, A.; Nyberg, J.; Oba, T.; Lundberg, J.; Schrag, D.; Taggart, B.

    2003-01-01

    We used Sr/Ca and stable isotope data from well dated and preserved corals from the northeastern Caribbean to determine the seasonal environmental conditions for four continuous years during the Eemian, the last time the Earth was in a prolonged warm phase. We determined that the seasonal range in SST during the Eemian was 25??-30?? C. This is ???1-2?? larger than at present and caused primarily by winter cooling and, only to a small degree, by summer warming. As climate modeling studies indicate, the bias towards colder winters can be explained by changes in low latitude insolation induced by altered orbital parameters, modulated by atmospheric CO2 levels that were lower than today. Milankovitch forcing at higher latitudes was probably less important.

  18. High-Latitude Ionospheric Dynamics During Conditions of Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes operating during conditions of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), in situ measurements from the Dynamics Explorer-2 (low altitude) polar satellite and simultaneous observations from the auroral imager on the Dynamics Explorer-1 (high altitude) satellite were used to investigate the relationships between optical emissions, particle precipitation, and convective flows in the high-latitude ionosphere. Field aligned current and convective flow patterns during IMF north include polar cap arcs, the theta aurora or transpolar arc, and the 'horse-collar' aurora. The initial part of the study concentrated on the electrodynamics of auroral features in the horse-collar aurora, a contracted but thickened emission region in which the dawn and dusk portions can spread to very high latitudes, while the latter part focused on the evolution of one type of IMF north auroral pattern to another, specifically the quiet-time horse-collar pattern to a theta aurora.

  19. Vegetation Feedbacks Explain Recent High-latitude Summer Warming in Alaskan Arctic and Boreal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapin, F. S.; Beringer, J.; Copass, C.; Epstein, H.; Lloyd, A.; Lynch, A.; McGuire, A. D.; Sturm, M.

    2002-12-01

    Although General Circulation Models predict the observed winter and spring warming at high latitudes, there is no obvious physical mechanism in the climate system that can account for the significant increase in summer temperatures that has occurred at high latitudes during the past 30 years. We demonstrate that vegetation-induced feedbacks in snow properties and summer energy exchange with the atmosphere explain this recent summer warming. A combination of stand-age reconstructions, repeat photography, and satellite measures of vegetation greenness demonstrate an expansion of the distribution and an infilling of shrubs in moist tundra and of trees in forest tundra. These vegetation changes increase the depth and thermal resistance of the snow pack, causing a 3oC increase in winter soil temperature and an increase in winter decomposition and nutrient mineralization, which enhance plant growth. These vegetation changes also increase summer heat transport to the atmosphere by increasing radiation absorption (lower albedo) and the proportion of absorbed energy that is transferred to the atmosphere as sensible heat. The resulting increase in atmospheric heating, on a unit-area basis, is similar to effects of a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide or a 2% change in solar constant, such as occurred at the last glacial-interglacial boundary. Simulations with the regional climate model ARCSyM indicate that a change from shrubless tundra to shrub-dominated tundra on the North Slope of Alaska would increase July mean temperature by 1.5 to 3.5 degrees C, with the warming effects extending south into the boreal forest of interior Alaska. If these vegetation feedbacks to regional warming are widespread, as suggested by indigenous knowledge and the satellite record, they are of sufficient magnitude to explain the summer warming that has recently been observed in northern Alaska and other regions of the circumpolar Arctic.

  20. Study of the mid-latitude ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms in the European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berényi, Kitti Alexandra; Barta, Veronika; Kis, Arpad

    2016-07-01

    Geomagnetic storms affect the ionospheric regions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere through different physical and atmospheric processes. The phenomena that can be regarded as a result of these processes, generally is named as "ionospheric storm". The processes depend on altitude, segment of the day, the geomagnetic latitude and longitude, strength of solar activity and the type of the geomagnetic storm. We examine the data of ground-based radio wave ionosphere sounding measurements of European ionospheric stations (mainly the data of Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory) in order to determine how and to what extent a geomagnetic disturbance of a certain strength affects the mid-latitude ionospheric regions in winter and in summer. For our analysis we used disturbed time periods between November 2012 and June 2015. Our results show significant changing of the ionospheric F2 layer parameters on strongly disturbed days compared to quiet ones. We show that the critical frequencies (foF2) increase compared to their quiet day value when the ionospheric storm was positive. On the other hand, the critical frequencies become lower, when the storm was negative. In our analysis we determined the magnitude of these changes on the chosen days. For a more complete analysis we compare also the evolution of the F2 layer parameters of the European ionosonde stations on a North-South geographic longitude during a full storm duration. The results present the evolution of an ionospheric storm over a geographic meridian. Furthermore, we compared the two type of geomagnetic storms, namely the CME caused geomagnetic storm - the so-called Sudden impulse (Si) storms- and the HSS (High Speed Solar Wind Streams) caused geomagnetic storms -the so-called Gradual storms (Gs)- impact on the ionospheric F2-layer (foF2 parameter). The results show a significant difference between the effect of Si and of the Gs storms on the ionospheric F2-layer.

  1. Observations and modeling of the coupled latitude-altitude patterns of equatorial plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Zesta, Eftyhia; Shodhan, Sheela; Sultan, Peter J.; Doe, Richard; Sahai, Yogeshwar; Baumgardner, Jeffrey

    2005-09-01

    The equatorial ionosphere is host to the most dramatic and enigmatic plasma instability mechanism in the geospace environment. Equatorial spread F (ESF) was discovered in early ionosonde measurements and interpreted theoretically using Rayleigh-Taylor theory. Subsequent diagnostic and modeling advances have improved substantially our understanding of ESF onset and evolution and its associated effects on the ionosphere throughout the low-latitude domain. The degree to which ESF mechanisms penetrate into the lower midlatitudes is a topic of current study, a reverse of the familiar concept of high-to-low latitude coupling for space weather phenomena. Optical diagnostic systems, first ground based and now space based, reveal the presence of ESF structures via images of airglow depletions that are aligned in the approximately north-south direction spanning the geomagnetic equator. Ground-based all-sky camera systems used to capture the two-dimensional horizontal patterns of airglow depletions are the main source of observations showing that ESF processes intrude to midlatitudes in the L ˜ 1.5 domain. In this paper we review the process of mapping airglow depletions along geomagnetic field lines to the equatorial plane, hence defining the maximum apex heights achieved. A case study comparison of simultaneous radar backscatter data from Kwajalein with optical data from Wake Island, sites that share common magnetic meridians in the Pacific section, confirms the utility of the approach and its applicability to sites at other longitudes. Modeling studies based on buoyancy arguments using flux tube-integrated mean density values versus L shell apex heights show that instability-induced plasma depletions starting at F layer bottomside heights easily reach altitudes above 2000 km in the equatorial plane, implying that ESF intrusions to lower midlatitudes should be a relatively frequent occurrence.

  2. Quaternary sedimentation and diagenesis in a high-latitude reef, Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.R.; Collins, L.B. ); Wyrwoll, K.H.; Hatcher, B.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The Houtman Abrolhos reefs are located 80 km off the west coast of Australia between latitudes 28 and 29{degree} south. The islands are situated on three Pleistocene carbonate reef platforms which rise above the surrounding shelf. The modern coral reefs are close to the geographic limit for coral growth in the southern hemisphere and survive due to the presence of the Leeuwin current (a poleward-flowing warm stream). Two major shallow-water benthic communities coexist in the Abrolhos: a macroalgal-dominated community on the windward platform margins and a coral-dominated community on the leeward margins. These communities overlap-particularly in the platform lagoons, where competition between macroalgae and corals is intense. This interaction has been suggested as a major factor controlling the growth of cord reefs at high latitudes. The Holocene carbonate sediments lack nonskeletal components and are dominated by coral and coralline algal fragments with subordinate molluskan and echinoderm debris. The accumulations can be grouped into the following major facies: (1) coral framestone and coralline algal/serpulid boundstone, (2) submarine sand sheets, (3) subaerial coral storm ridges, (4-) peritidal to subtidal shingle and rubble veneers composed of dominantly coral debris, and (5) eolian dunes and beach sand. The Holocene sediment is a thin (< 2 m) veneer on the Pleistocene reef platform, which is emergent as small islands. The Pleistocene platform is composed of reef facies that can be directly related to the Holocene sediments. The platform is composed of framestone and boundstone facies (corals and coralline algal/serpulid facies), rudstones (submarine coral rubble facies), planar-bedded skeletal grainstones dipping 12-13{degree} (submarine sand sheet and peritidal shingle facies), and large 15-m-high eolianite dunes (eolian dune facies).

  3. Electron temperature measurements in mid-latitude sporadic E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, S. R.; Smith, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    By using rocket-borne Langmuir probes, electron temperature profiles have been obtained in five mid-latitude sporadic E layers. The data show the electron temperature within the layers to be lower than the electron temperature at the adjacent altitudes. This is consistent with the layers' being maintained by a vertical redistribution of ionization. The magnitude of the observed electron temperature variation is, however, larger than expected.

  4. Actividad de LOS Hoyos Coronales Solares de Baja Latitud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, S.; Mendoza, B.; Pirez-Enriquez, R.; Valdes-Galicia, J.

    1987-05-01

    Strong variations of the coronal holes of mid and low latitudes during the ascending and descending phase of the solar cycle have been observed by means of IPS records (the interplanetary scintillation of small diameter radio sources). This variations induce the propagation of disturbances in the interplanetary medium which produce the IPS and are also responsible of cosmic ray modulation. We suggest that the 11 years modulation is influenced by such a coronal hole behaviour.

  5. Probing high latitude ionospheric irregularities by GPS: Results and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krankowski, Andrzej; Shagimuratov, Irk; Ephishov, I. I.; Sieradzki, Rafal

    The GPS measurements of IGS network were used to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations at northern and southern high latitude ionosphere during severe geomagnetic disturbances of 22-28 July 2004. For the northern hemisphere we selected 20 GPS stations located higher than 55 degrees of Corrected Geomagnetic Latitude. For the southern hemisphere, Antarctic permanent GPS stations were used. Dual-frequency GPS measurements along individual satellite passes served as row data. As a measure a fluctuation activity the rate of TEC (ROT) was used, and fluctuation intensity was evaluated using ROTI index. Using daily GPS measurements from all the selected stations, the images of spatial and temporal behavior of TEC fluctuations (in Corrected Geomagnetic Coordinate and local geomagnetic time) were formed. Similarly to the auroral oval the images demonstrate an irregularities oval. The occurrence of irregularities oval relates with the auroral oval and polar caps. During the storm, TEC fluctuation activity and intensity essentially increased. The irregularities oval expands equatorward with increasing magnetic activity. As a whole, the dynamics of the irregularities ovals in both hemispheres are similar during the storm time, however we found some difference in development of TEC fluctuations between northern and southern ionosphere. They may be caused by seasonal features of excitation of irregularities at high latitude ionosphere. Daily pattern of the irregularities oval was controlled by the motion of the station location into auroral oval. Maximal intensity of TEC fluctuations took place over polar stations. The strong TEC fluctuations were associated with the polar patches. Their study showed that the existing high-latitude GPS stations can provide a permanent monitoring of the irregularities oval in near real-time.

  6. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees North, Longitude 30 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees N., longitude 30 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs, is located at the top. The central part is characterized by a dark depression, Chryse basin, where several large outflow channels terminate. The lower-left corner is marked by a vast system of canyons, Valles Marineris, which extends eastward for several thousand kilometers.

  7. High-latitude space weather monitoring in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulich, Th.

    2009-04-01

    Today, space weather is of important concern in many respects. Space weather phenomena are subject of extensive scientific research programmes and the consequences of space weather events are of great operational concern for a number of technologies including satellites, humans in space, and global positioning and communications. Due to the Earth's magnetic field, the high latitudes are most strongly affected by space weather phenomena. Naturally, monitoring and understanding of the high-latitude space environment is important for forecasting and modelling operational conditions. The Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO) was established as a magnetic observatory in 1913. With the sole exception of a year at the end of WWII, the record of geomagnetic field variations is continuous. Since the IGY in 1957, many other routine measurements have been added to the observatory's operations and today SGO is a highly versatile observatory. Here we will present examples of high-latitude space weather data from a selection of instruments including the Sodankylä ionosonde, the Finnish Riometer Chain, and the Tomography (GNSS) receiver chain. We invite collaboration and use of our data products. We will further outline the current EU Framework VII "Access to Research Infrastructures" project of SGO "LAPBIAT2."

  8. Electrodynamic structure of the morning high-latitude trough region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhamäki, H.; Aikio, A.; Voiculescu, M.; Juusola, L.; Nygrén, T.; Kuula, R.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the electrodynamics of a postmidnight, high-latitude ionospheric trough, observed with the European Incoherent Scatter radar in northern Scandinavia on 24-25 June 2003 around 22:00-02:30 UT during quiet conditions. The UHF radar made meridian scans with a 30 min cadence resulting in nine cross sections of ionospheric parameters. The F region electric field was also determined with the tristatic system. Ionospheric equivalent currents, calculated from ground magnetometer data, mostly show an electrojet-like current that is reasonably uniform in the longitudinal direction. Combined analysis of the conductances and equivalent current with a local Kamide-Richmond-Matsushita (KRM) method yields the ionospheric electric field and field-aligned current (FAC) in a 2-D (latitude-longitude) area around the radar. We conclude that the most likely scenario is one where the trough is initially created poleward of the auroral oval by downward FAC that evacuates the F region, but as the trough moves to lower latitudes during the early morning hours, it becomes colocated with the westward electrojet. There the electron density further decreases due to increased recombination caused by enhanced ion temperature, which in turn is brought about by a larger convection speed. Later in the morning the convection speed decreases and the trough is filled by increasing photoionization.

  9. Ionosphere Scintillation at Low and High Latitudes (Modelling vs Measurement)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béniguel, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    This paper will address the problem of scintillations characteristics, focusing on the parameters of interest for a navigation system. Those parameters are the probabilities of occurrence of simultaneous fading, the bubbles surface at IPP level, the cycle slips and the fades duration statistics. The scintillation characteristics obtained at low and high latitudes will be compared. These results correspond to the data analysis performed after the ESA Monitor ionosphere measurement campaign [1], [2]. A second aspect of the presentation will be the modelling aspect. It has been observed that the phase scintillation dominates at high latitudes while the intensity scintillation dominates at low latitudes. The way it can be reproduced and implemented in a propagation model (e.g. GISM model [3]) will be presented. Comparisons of measurements with results obtained by modelling will be presented on some typical scenarios. References [1] R. Prieto Cerdeira, Y. Beniguel, "The MONITOR project: architecture, data and products", Ionospheric Effects Symposium, Alexandria (Va), May 2011 [2] Y. Béniguel, R Orus-Perez , R. Prieto-Cerdeira , S. Schlueter , S. Scortan, A. Grosu "MONITOR 2: ionospheric monitoring network in support to SBAS and other GNSS and scientific purposes", IES Conference, Alexandria (Va), May 2015-05-22 [3] Y. Béniguel, P. Hamel, "A Global Ionosphere Scintillation Propagation Model for Equatorial Regions", Journal of Space Weather Space Climate, 1, (2011), doi: 10.1051/swsc/2011004

  10. High latitude TEC fluctuations and irregularity oval during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagimuratov, I. I.; Krankowski, A.; Ephishov, I.; Cherniak, Yu.; Wielgosz, P.; Zakharenkova, I.

    2012-06-01

    GPS measurements obtained by the global IGS network were used to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations in the northern and southern high-latitude ionosphere during severe geomagnetic storms. In the northern hemisphere, GPS stations located higher than 55N Corrected Geomagnetic Latitude (CGL) at different longitudes were selected. In the southern hemisphere, Antarctic permanent GPS stations were used. Dual-frequency GPS measurements for individual satellite passes served as raw data. As a measure of fluctuation activity the rate of TEC (ROT) was used, and the fluctuation intensity was evaluated using the ROTI index. Using daily GPS measurements from all selected stations, images of the spatial and temporal behavior of TEC fluctuations were formed (in Corrected Geomagnetic Coordinates—CGC and geomagnetic local time—GLT). Similarly to the auroral oval, these images demonstrate an irregularity oval. The occurrence of the irregularity oval relates to the auroral oval, cusp and polar cap. During a storm, the intensity of TEC fluctuations essentially increased. The irregularity oval expands equatorward with an increase of magnetic activity. The study showed that the existing high-latitude GPS stations can provide a permanent monitoring tool for the irregularity oval in near real-time. In this paper, the features of the development of phase fluctuations at the geomagnetic conjugate points, and inter-hemispheric differences and similarities during winter and summer conditions, are discussed.

  11. Mid-latitude lidar observations of large sporadic sodium layers

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.C.; Collins, R.L.; Gardner, C.S. )

    1989-07-01

    During the early morning of October 31, 1988 two large sporadic Na (Na{sub s}) layers were observed near the mesopause above Urbana, IL (40{degree}N, 88{degree}W) with a Na lidar system. The layers began forming near 102 km at 0026 LST and 0110 LST and moved downward with vertical velocities as high as 4 ms{sup {minus}1} before dissipating between 94 and 96 km. The duration of each layer was approximately 80 min. The layers were narrow ({approximately} 1 km FWHM) and dense with maximum densities approaching 7,800 cm{sup {minus}3}. The characteristics of these two Na{sub s} layers are very similar to those of similar phenomena observed recently at Andoya, Norway and Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Lidar observations of the mesospheric Na layer have been conducted routinely by several groups at mid-latitudes for almost 20 years. Although large Na{sub s} layers now appear to be relatively common at low- and high-latitudes, to our knowledge the two layers described in this letter are only the second observation of this puzzling phenomenon at mid-latitudes.

  12. Microphysical Ice Crystal Properties in Mid-Latitude Frontal Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlage, Romy; Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Minikin, Andreas; Weigel, Ralf; Molleker, Sergej; Klingebiel, Marcus; Borrmann, Stephan; Luebke, Anna; Krämer, Martina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schäfler, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds modulate the climate by reflection of shortwave solar radiation and trapping of longwave terrestrial radiation. Their net radiative effect can be positive or negative depending on atmospheric and cloud parameters including ice crystal number density, size and shape. Latter microphysical ice crystal properties have been measured during the mid-latitude cirrus mission ML-CIRRUS with a set of cloud instruments on the new research aircraft HALO. The mission took place in March/April 2014 with 16 flights in cirrus formed above Europe and the Atlantic. The ice clouds were encountered at altitudes from 7 to 14 km in the typical mid-latitude temperature range. A focus of the mission was the detection of frontal cirrus linked to warm conveyor belts (WCBs). Within WCBs, water vapor is transported in the warm sector of an extra-tropical cyclone from the humid boundary layer to the upper troposphere. Cirrus cloud formation can be triggered in the WCB outflow region at moderate updraft velocities and additionally at low updrafts within the high pressure system linked to the WCB. Due to their frequent occurrence, WCBs represent a major source for regions of ice supersaturation and cirrus formation in the mid-latitudes. Here, we use data from the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer with detection for POLarization (CAS-POL) and the Cloud Combination Probe (CCP), combining a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) and a greyscale Cloud Imaging Probe (CIPgs) to investigate the ice crystal distribution in the size range from 0.5 µm to 1 mm. We derive microphysical cirrus properties in mid-latitude warm front cirrus. Further, we investigate their variability and their dependence on temperature and relative humidity. Finally, we compare the microphysical properties of these frontal cirrus to cirrus clouds that formed at low updrafts within high pressure systems or at high updraft velocities in lee waves. We quantify statistically significant differences in cirrus properties formed in these

  13. Titan's Stratospheric Condensibles at High Northern Latitudes During Northern Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, R.; Achterberg, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) instrument on board Voyager 1 caught the first glimpse of an unidentified particulate feature in Titan's stratosphere that spectrally peaks at 221 per centimeter. Until recently, this feature that we have termed 'the haystack,' has been seen persistently at high northern latitudes with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument onboard Cassini, The strength of the haystack emission feature diminishes rapidly with season, becoming drastically reduced at high northern latitudes, as Titan transitions from northern winter into spring, In contrast to IRIS whose shortest wavenumber was 200 per centimeter, CIRS extends down to 10 per centimeter, thus revealing an entirely unexplored spectral region in which nitrile ices have numerous broad lattice vibration features, Unlike the haystack, which is only found at high northern latitudes during northern winter/early northern spring, this geometrically thin nitrile cloud pervades Titan's lower stratosphere, spectrally peaking at 160 per centimeter, and is almost global in extent spanning latitudes 85 N to 600 S, The inference of nitrile ices are consistent with the highly restricted altitude ranges over which these features are observed, and appear to be dominated by a mixture of HCN and HC3N, The narrow range in altitude over which the nitrile ices extend is unlike the haystack, whose vertical distribution is significantly broader, spanning roughly 70 kilometers in altitude in Titan's lower stratosphere, The nitrile clouds that CIRS observes are located in a dynamically stable region of Titan's atmosphere, whereas CH4 clouds, which ordinarily form in the troposphere, form in a more dynamically unstable region, where convective cloud systems tend to occur. In the unusual situation where Titan's tropopause cools significantly from the HASI 70.5K temperature minimum, CH4 should condense in Titan's lower stratosphere, just like the aforementioned nitrile clouds, although

  14. Spectral effects on latitude-tilt and vertical PV modules as affected by latitude, air mass, and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueymard, Christian A.

    2007-09-01

    Using the same SMARTS radiative code as for the development of improved reference spectra for PV rating, an analysis of the spectral sensitivity of specific PV technologies to varying air mass and other factors is presented. To the difference of previous studies, the approach taken here considers realistic atmospheric conditions, as measured at five North- American sites from widely different climatic zones. Two different PV applications (latitude-tilted flat-plates and vertical building-integrated modules) are showcased with seven possible materials, including a-Si, m-Si, and triple junctions. Considering the most frequent clear-sky conditions around the summer solstice at the selected sites, the Spectral Enhancement Factor (SEF) is calculated both for a fixed air mass (1.5) and daily-average spectral conditions. This analysis provides a preliminary assessment of how latitude, local climatic conditions, and PV geometry affect the relative merits of different technologies relatively to standard rating conditions. In particular, it is shown that, in summer, latitude-tilt PV modules experience bluer incident spectra than the reference spectrum, therefore favoring the a-Si modules (SEF > 1). For vertical-tilt PV systems, the SEF is generally lower than for latitude-tilt systems, with the notable exception of m- Si. When considering daily-average results, the effective SEF can become extremely low in the case of a-Si (down to 0.65) and moderately high for m-Si (up to 1.09). It is concluded that the effects of location, season, and PV material on the spectral effect needs to be investigated in detail, particularly for applications involving vertical building-integrated systems.

  15. South Korea.

    PubMed

    1991-04-01

    Background notes and statistics on South Korea are provided in the document. 98,500 sq. km. of diversified terrain are encompassed by the country, with a 1988 population of 43 million growing at the annual rate of 1%. The work force totals 17 million. South Korea claims a population comprised of Koreans with a small Chinese minority, 4 religious beliefs, and native Korean-speakers. 6 years of education are compulsory, with the country overall enjoying 98% literacy. The infant mortality rate is 6/1,000, while life expectancy is 67-73 years. 1990 estimated GNP was $224 billion, and was growing at the estimated rate of 9%. Per capita GNP was $5,500, while a 9% increase was reported in the consumer price index for 1990. Agriculture accounts for 9% of GNP, mining and manufacturing for 35%; 1990 international trade deficit totalled $5 billion. Additional data are provided on South Korea's people, government, economy, international affiliations, history, political conditions, principal government officials, foreign relations, and bilateral relations with the United States. South Korea has enjoyed remarkable economic growth over the past 25 years, and has grown to become a middle-ranking industrial power. Korea's bilateral trade surpluses with the United States of nearly $10 billion in 1987 and 1988 declined decisively in 1989 due to a variety of factors. Surplus remained, however, approximately $4 billion in 1990. Whether or not these declines are indicative of structural, lasting trends is not yet discernible. Long-term growth prospects remain good, Korea's ability to adapt to a more open democratic system playing an important role. PMID:12178031

  16. On the ionospheric impact of recent storm events on satellite-based augmentation systems in middle and low-latitude sectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Sparks, Lawrence; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Pi, Xiaoqing

    2003-01-01

    The Ionospheric correction algorithms have been characterized extensively for the mid-latitude region of the ionosphere where benign conditions usually exist. The United States Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) for civil aircraft navigation is focused primarily on the Conterminous United States (CONUS). Other Satellite-based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) include the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) and the Japanese Global Navigation Satellite System (MSAS). Researchers are facing a more serious challenge in addressing the ionospheric impact on navigation using SBAS in other parts of the world such as the South American region on India. At equatorial latitudes, geophysical conditions lead to the so-called Appleton-Hartree (equatorial) anomaly phenomenon, which results in significantly larger ionospheric range delays and range delay spatial gradients than is observed in the CONUS or European sectors. In this paper, we use GPS measurements of geomagnetic storm days to perform a quantitative assessment of WAAS-type ionospheric correction algorithms in other parts of the world such as the low-latitude Brazil and mid-latitude Europe. For the study, we access a world-wide network of 400+ dual frequency GPS receivers.

  17. 70. South El Paso St., 818820 (commercial), west and south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. South El Paso St., 818-820 (commercial), west and south facades, east side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  18. 6. South El Paso St., street view from 615 South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. South El Paso St., street view from 615 South El Paso Street showing west side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  19. 50. South El Paso St., 618620 (commercial), west and south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. South El Paso St., 618-620 (commercial), west and south facades, east side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  20. 55. South El Paso St., 719 (commercial), south and east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. South El Paso St., 719 (commercial), south and east facades, west side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  1. 43. South El Paso St., 623 (commercial), east and south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. South El Paso St., 623 (commercial), east and south facades, west side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  2. 137Cs in the western South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2007-09-01

    The 137Cs activities were determined for seawater samples from the East Caroline, Coral Sea, New Hebrides, South Fiji and Tasman Sea (two stations) Basins of the western South Pacific Ocean by gamma spectrometry using a low background Ge detector. The 137Cs activities ranged from 1.4 to 2.3 Bq m(-3) over the depth interval 0-250 m and decreased exponentially from the subsurface to 1000 m depth. The distribution profiles of 137Cs activity at these six western South Pacific Ocean stations did not differ from each other significantly. There was a remarkable difference for the vertical profiles of 137Cs activity between the East Caroline Basin station in this study and the GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections Study) station at the same latitude in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean; the 137Cs inventory over the depth interval 100-1000 m increased from 400+/-30 Bq m(-2) to 560+/-30 Bq m(-2) during the period from 1973 to 1992. The total 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean ranged from 850+/-70 Bq m(-2) in the Coral Sea Basin to 1270+/-90 Bq m(-2) in the South Fiji Basin. Higher 137Cs inventories were observed at middle latitude stations in the subtropical gyre than at low latitude stations. The 137Cs inventories were 1.9-4.5 times (2.9+/-0.7 on average) and 1.7-4.3 times (3.1+/-0.7 on average) higher than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout at the same latitude and that of the estimated 137Cs deposition density in 10 degrees latitude by 10 degrees longitude grid data obtained by Aoyama et al. [Aoyama M, Hirose K, Igarashi Y. Re-construction and updating our understanding on the global weapons tests 137Cs fallout. J Environ Monit 2006;8:431-438], respectively. The possible processes for higher 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout may be attributable to the inter-hemisphere dispersion of the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing 137Cs from

  3. North South Asymmetry of Zonal and Meridional Flows Determined From Ring Diagram Analysis of Gong ++ Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaatri, A.; Komm, R.; González Hernández, I.; Howe, R.; Corbard, T.

    2006-07-01

    We study the North South asymmetry of zonal and meridional components of horizontal, solar subsurface flows during the years 2001 2004, which cover the declining phase of solar cycle 23. We measure the horizontal flows from the near-surface layers to 16 Mm depth by analyzing 44 consecutive Carrington rotations of Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Doppler images with a ring-diagram analysis technique. The meridional flow and the errors of both flow components show an annual variation related to the B 0-angle variation, while the zonal flow is less affected by the B 0-angle variation. After correcting for this effect, the meridional flow is mainly poleward but it shows a counter cell close to the surface at high latitudes in both hemispheres. During the declining phase of the solar cycle, the meridional flow mainly increases with time at latitudes poleward of about 20˚, while it mainly decreases at more equatorward latitudes. The temporal variation of the zonal flow in both hemispheres is significantly correlated at latitudes less than about 20˚. The zonal flow is larger in the southern hemisphere than the northern one, and this North South asymmetry increases with depth. Details of the North South asymmetry of zonal and meridional flow reflect the North South asymmetry of the magnetic flux. The North South asymmetries of the flows show hints of a variation with the solar cycle.

  4. Determining the Current and Future Health of Low-Latitude Andean Glaciers Using an Equilibrium Line Altitude Model and Hypsometric Data from the Randolph Glacier Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, A.; MacAyeal, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Mountain glaciers have been described as the water towers of world, and for many populations in the low-latitude South American Andes, glacial runoff is vital for agricultural, industrial, and basic water needs. Previous studies of low-latitude Andean glaciers suggest a precarious future due to contemporary warming. These studies have looked at trends in freezing level heights or observations of contemporary retreat. However, regional-scale understanding of low-latitude glacial responses to present and future climate change is limited, in part due to incomplete information about the extent and elevation distribution of low-latitude glaciers. The recently published Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) (5.0) provides the necessary information about the size and elevation distribution of low-latitude glaciers to begin such studies. We determine the contemporary equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) for low-latitude Andean glaciers in the RGI, using a numerical energy balance ablation model driven with reanalysis and gridded data products. Contemporary ELAs tend to fall around the peak of the elevation histogram, with an exception being the southern-most outer tropical glaciers whose modeled ELAs tend to be higher than the elevation histogram for that region (see below figure). Also, we use the linear tends in temperature and precipitation from the contemporary climatology to extrapolate 21stcentury climate forcings. Modeled ELAs by the middle on the century are universally predicted to rise, with outer tropical ELAs rising more than the inner tropical glaciers. These trends continue through the end of the century. Finally, we explore how climate variables and parameters in our numerical model may vary for different warming scenarios from United Nation's IPCC AR5 report. We quantify the impacts of these changes on ELAs for various climate change trajectories. These results support previous work on the precarious future of low latitude Andean glaciers, while providing a richer

  5. Storm time heavy ion outflow at mid-latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Foster, J.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Local ionospheric observations with the Millstone Hill incoherent scatterradar reveal an upward ion bulk velocity in excess of 3 km s{sup {minus} 1} at 1,000 km altitude during the very large magnetic storm on February 8, 1986. The upward flux of O{sup +} ions exceeded 3 {times} 10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at 42{degree} geodetic latitude (55{degree} {Lambda}) for a 3-hour period around 18 MLT during the event. Frictinal ion heating with ion temperatures in excess of 4,000 K at 500 km altitude was observed by the radar in the vicinity of the ion outflow event. Satellite observations place the ion outflow event within a region of intense ion and electron precipitation on field lines associated with the storm-perturbed ring current. For a one-dimensional analysis of the observed plasma profiles, continuity considerations indicate a region of intense O{sup +} production (200 cm{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}) as well as significant upward acceleration (5-10 m s{sup {minus}2}) in the region between 600 km and 800 km altitude where the outflow approaches supersonic speed. Ionizing collisions involving fast backsplash neutral O atoms (Torr et al., 1974) produced by ring current heavy ion precipitation can provide sufficient upward momentum to account for the acceleration in the observed outflowing thermal O{sup +} fluxes. Alternatively, the outflow event can be explained in terms of a time-dependent diffusion process triggered by a sudden change in the frictional heating rate in the collision-dominated F region (St.-Maurice, 1989). The concurrence of rapid ion convection and energetic ring current precipitation is unique at mid-latitudes during intense magnetic storms. Under these conditions, the observations indicate that the mid-latitude ionosphere constitutes a significant source of upflowing thermal O{sup +} fluxes to the overlying magnetosphere.

  6. Models for the positive latitude e{-}e{+} annihilation feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ballmoos, P.; Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Knödlseder, J.

    2003-01-01

    Galactic maps of e-e+ annihilation radiation based on CGRO-OSSE, SMM and TGRS data have indicated the existence of an extended component at positive Galactic latitudes (l~ -2 deg, b~ 7 deg), in addition to the emission from the galactic bulge and disk (Purcell et al. \\cite{Purcell97}; Cheng et al. \\cite{Cheng97}; Milne et al. \\cite{Milne00}; Milne et al. \\cite{Milne01}). This Positive Latitude Enhancement (PLE) was first attributed to an ``annihilation fountain" in the Galactic center (Dermer & Skibo \\cite{Dermer97}) but has since been the object of several models. After discussing the observational evidence for the PLE, we investigate various models for the PLE: besides the scenarios proposed in the literature, we have introduced a number of models requiring relatively modest positron rates due to a local origin of the e-e+ emission (local galactic-, solar system-, earth- and spacecraft-environment origins). The various scenarios for the PLE are constrained in the light of the latest OSSE-SMM-TGRS data analysis results: we have looked at the possible positron production mechanisms as well as the annihilation conditions in the different physical environments (temperature and dust grain content) proposed for the positive-latitude region. By constraining those parameters, based on the recent limits for the line width and the positronium fraction, we found that some of the models can essentially be discarded. A number of other scenarios will have to await further measurements and maps, such as will be possible with INTEGRAL's SPI and IBIS instruments. We present a table/checklist of model-falsification criteria.

  7. Equatorial to Mid-Latitude Connections in Eastern Boundary Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strub, T.

    2002-12-01

    Over twenty years ago, Enfield and Allen (1980, J. Phys. Oceaogr., 10, 557-578) used tide-gauge sea level height data to show the connection between the equator and the mid-latitude coastal ocean in the eastern Pacific. Careful selection of tide gauges and quality control of the data allowed both seasonal and interannual time scales to be examined over a period of 24 years. Today, 10 years of TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data allow us to re-examine the seasonal and non-seasonal connections between the equator and higher latitudes in the eastern boundary currents (EBC's) along the coasts of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. We present the seasonal progressions in both basins and hemispheres, showing the low-to-high latitude development of the seasonal cycle and also the offshore propagation of annual Rossby waves. This brings out several general tendencies: 1) The signals are stronger in the Northern Hemisphere basins, due to the fact that the ITCZ is located north of the equator in both basins; 2) The signals are stronger in the NE Pacific than in any of the other basins; and 3) There is an annual signal of high sea surface height that propagates down both Southern Hemisphere EBC's in austral spring (September-November) as the SW trade winds weaken along the equator and the equatorial cold tongue collapses. This last feature is somewhat like an annual "El Ni¤o" effect and acts to suppress the onset of wind driven upwelling in the Peru-Chile and Benguela Current Systems.

  8. A mid-latitude ozone model for the US standard atmosphere, 1975 (summary)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, A. J.; Minzner, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A mid-latitude, Northern-Hemisphere model of the daytime ozone distribution in the troposphere, stratosphere, and lower mesosphere was constructed. Data from rocket soundings in the latitude range 45 deg N + or - 15 deg, results of balloon soundings at altitudes from 41 to 47 deg N, and latitude gradients from satellite ozone observations were combined to produce estimates of the annual mean ozone concentration and its variability at heights to 72 km for an effective latitude of 45 deg N. The model is a revision, for heights above 26 km, of the tentative Mid-Latitude Ozone Model.

  9. Ulysses solar wind plasma observations from peak southerly latitude through perihelion and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.L.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Goldstein, B.E.; Neugebauer, M.; Hammond, C.M.

    1996-07-01

    We present Ulysses solar wind plasma data from the peak southerly latitude of {minus}80.2{degree} through +64.9{degree} latitude on June 7, 1995. Ulysses encountered fast wind throughout this time except for a 43{degree} equatorial band. Mass flux was nearly constant with latitude, while speed (density) had positive (negative) poleward gradients. Momentum flux was highest at high latitudes, suggesting a latitudinal asymmetry in the heliopause cross section. Solar wind energy flux density was also highest at high latitudes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Ulysses solar wind plasma observations from peak southerly latitude through perihelion and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.L.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Goldstein, B.E.; Neugebauer, M.; Hammond, C.M.

    1995-09-01

    We present Ulysses solar wind plasma data from the peak southerly latitude of {minus}80.2{degrees} through +64.9{degrees} latitude on June 7, 1995. Ulysses encountered fast wind throughout this time except for a 43{degrees} band centered on the solar equator. Median mass flux was nearly constant with latitude, while speed and density had positive and negative poleward gradients, respectively. Solar wind momentum flux was highest at high latitudes, suggesting a latitudinal asymmetry in the heliopause cross section. Solar wind energy flux density was also highest at high latitudes.

  11. The brightest high-latitude 12-micron IRAS sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacking, P.; Beichman, C.; Chester, T.; Neugebauer, G.; Emerson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source catalog was searched for sources brighter than 28 Jy (0 mag) at 12 microns with absolute galactic latitude greater than 30 deg excluding the Large Magellanic Cloud. The search resulted in 269 sources, two of which are the galaxies NGC 1068 and M82. The remaining 267 sources are identified with, or have infrared color indices consistent with late-type stars some of which show evidence of circumstellar dust shells. Seven sources are previously uncataloged stars. K and M stars without circumstellar dust shells, M stars with circumstellar dust shells, and carbon stars occupy well-defined regions of infrared color-color diagrams.

  12. A computer model of high-latitude scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    The DNA Wideband satellite experiment provided extensive data on scintillation produced in high-altitude structured plasmas. A computer program, WBMOD, is being developed to summarize those data in an applications-oriented way. The program contains the phase-screen scattering theory of Rino and a morphological description of ionospheric irregularities (thus far only at auroral latitudes) based on Wideband observations. It permits a user to compute scintillation indices for both phase and intensity as a function of system operating parameters and solar-ionospheric disturbance level. Correction is made for multiple scatter, and the user may choose either one-way (communication) or two-way (radar) propagation.

  13. High-latitude dayside electric field and particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Johnstone, A. D.

    1973-01-01

    Two rockets carrying electric field and low energy particle instrumentation were launched near noon at 80 deg magnetic latitude. One flight encountered polar cap conditions only while the other traversed part of the polar cusp. Although weak particle precipitation was measured on both flights, bursts of intense magnetosheath-type electron fluxes were detected on the latter. Strong electric fields such as would result from anti-sunward convection were observed during both flights. The measurements are compared with results obtained by other types of space craft and interpreted in the light of those data.

  14. How Altitude and Latitude Control Dune Morphometry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Gall, A.; Hayes, A.; Ewing, R.; Janssen, M. A.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Encrenaz, P.

    2011-01-01

    Dune fields are one of the dominant landforms and represent the largest known organic reservoir on Titan. SAR-derived topography show that Titan's dune terrains tend to occupy the lowest altitude areas in equatorial regions occurring at mean elevations between approx.-400 and 0 m. In elevated dune terrains, there is a definite trend towards a smaller dune to interdune ratio, interpreted as due to limited sediment availability. A similar linear correlation is observed with latitude, suggesting that the quantity of windblown sand in the dune fields tends to decrease as one moves farther north. These findings place important constraints on Titan's geology and climate.

  15. Low latitude geomagnetic field line resonance: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, C.L.; Menk, F.W.; Fraser, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    The authors describe work to detect field line resonances, or the observation of Pc 3-5 geomagnetic pulsation events, at low latitude sites. These signals are extracted from ground based magnetometer arrays. The authors found one field line resonance structure in 5 weeks of data at L=1.8. At L=2.8 they were able to observe up to 4 harmonics concurrently. They compare these frequency spectra with the results of two different models of the plasma density in the lower ionosphere.

  16. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Proelss, G.W. ); Brace, L.H.; Mayr, H.G. ); Carignan, G.R.; Killeen, T.L. ); Klobuchar, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  17. Analytical model of ionospheric convection at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminov, M. G.; Kim, V. P.; Shubin, V. N.; Khegai, V. V.

    An analytical model of plasma convection in the subauroral ionosphere is developed, assuming that the electric shielding of the inner magnetosphere is controlled by polarization of the hot ion zone situated behind the inner boundary of the plasma sheet. It is shown that, at subauroral latitudes at night, the plasma drifts eastward, while during the day it shifts westward. Thus, in the predmidnight sector, the direction of convection in the subauroral ionosphere is opposite to that of auroral convection. In general, the electric field, with a strength of 10 mV/m, has a meridional direction.

  18. A survey of formaldehyde in high Galactic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heithausen, A.; Mebold, U.; De Vries, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of formaldehyde (H2CO) in four out of 15 CO-clouds observed in high Galactic latitudes is reported. For one of these a velocity-integrated formaldehyde map is presented. The clouds are clearly connected to CO clouds described by de Vries et al. (1986), to Lynds bright and dark nebulae (Lynds, 1963), and to the Galactic infrared cirrus (Low et al., 1984). The distribution of CO and H2CO clouds is compared. The depths of the l(10-11)H2CO lines show no correlation to the integrated J = l-0(C-12)O line intensities.

  19. Observations of plasma structure and transport at high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.J.; Buchau, J.

    1985-01-01

    Radio and optical diagnostics from the AFGL Airborne Ionospheric Observatory are used to study the structure and motion of regions of enhanced F-region density at high latitudes. Plasma flow can be tracked from the poleward edge of the dayside cusp, across the polar cap and into the nightside auroral zone. Simultaneous satellite amplitude and phase scintillation measurements define the degree of structuring or intensity of sub-kilometer ionospheric irregularities within these regions. The combined measurements are used to track large scale plasma flow, and to infer plasma source regions.

  20. Computer model of high-latitude scintillation. [WBMOD program

    SciTech Connect

    Fremouw, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The DNA Wideband satellite experiment provided extensive data on scintillation produced in high-altitude structured plasmas. A computer program, WBMOD, is being developed to summarize those data in an applications-oriented way. The program contains the phase-screen scattering theory of Rino and a morphological description of ionospheric irregularities (thus far only at auroral latitudes) based on Wideband observations. It permits a user to compute scintillation indices for both phase and intensity as a function of system operating parameters and solar-ionospheric disturbance level. Correction is made for multiple scatter, and the user may choose either one-way (communication) or two-way (radar) propagation.

  1. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees North, Longitude 150 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees N., longitude 150 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs and surrounded by the dark lowland plains of Vastitas Borealis, is located at the top. The right-central part is dominated by the Tharsis Montes volcanoes. The most prominent of the Tharsis Montes volcanoes is the largest known volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons. The light-colored lowland plains of Amazonis, Elysium, and Arcadia Planitiae lies north and west of Olympus Mons. The heavily cratered highlands dominate the lower one-third.

  2. Ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proelss, G. W.; Brace, L. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Carignan, G. R.; Killeen, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to classify ionospheric storm effects at subauroral latitudes according to their presumed origin. The storm of December 7/8, 1982, serves as an example. It is investigated using ionosonde, electron content, and DE 2 satellite data. The following effects are distinguished: (1) positive storm effects caused by traveling atmospheric disturbances, (2) positive storm effects caused by changes in the large-scale thermospheric wind circulation, (3) positive storm effects caused by the expansion of the polar ionization enhancement, (4) negative storm effects caused by perturbations of the neutral gas composition, and (5) negative storm effects caused by the equatorward displacement of the trough region.

  3. Double-peaked sodium layers at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Zahn, U.; Goldberg, R. A.; Stegman, J.; Witt, G.

    1989-01-01

    Na lidar observations indicate that at high latitudes in summer the neutral Na layer frequently attains a double-peaked structure. The main layer with a maximum near 90 km altitude is supplemented by a secondary, narrow layer near 95 km altitude. Results are presented concerning secondary sodium layers. It appears likely that the formation of secondary Na layers observed frequently above the lidar site is not solely a 'sodium phenomenon', but part of a more comprehensive layering process for metal atoms and ions. Na(+)/Na density ratios close to 0.5 near the peaks of both the main and secondary layers are derived.

  4. Can evolutionary constraints explain the rarity of nitrogen-fixing trees in high-latitude forests?

    PubMed

    Menge, Duncan N L; Crews, Timothy E

    2016-09-01

    Contents 1195 I. 1195 II. 1196 III. 1196 IV. 1200 1200 References 1200 SUMMARY: The rarity of symbiotic nitrogen (N)-fixing trees in temperate and boreal ('high-latitude') forests is curious. One explanation - the evolutionary constraints hypothesis - posits that high-latitude N-fixing trees are rare because few have evolved. Here, we consider traits necessary for high-latitude N-fixing trees. We then use recent developments in trait evolution to estimate that > 2000 and > 500 species could have evolved from low-latitude N-fixing trees and high-latitude N-fixing herbs, respectively. Evolution of N-fixing from nonfixing trees is an unlikely source of diversity. Dispersal limitation seems unlikely to limit high-latitude N-fixer diversity. The greater number of N-fixing species predicted to evolve than currently inhabit high-latitude forests suggests a greater role for ecological than evolutionary constraints. PMID:27411210

  5. Preliminary albedo map of the south polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devaucouleurs, G.; Roth, J.; Mulholand, C.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary albedo map of the Martian south polar region in stereographic projection was prepared mainly from mission test video system (MTVS) prints before rectified and gridded prints were received, but some adjustments were made to conform with a semi-controlled photomosaic. Wherever possible, use also was made of crater coordinates. Two versions of the map are presented: one with a coordinate grid overlay and one without it. The precision of the coordinates is generally within 1 deg in latitude and the corresponding are in longitude. The maps show both the albedo markings and, with subdued contrast, the craters and topographic features that are necessary to locate the former. The map covers the range of latitudes from - 65 deg to the south pole.

  6. STS-56 ESC Earth observation of New Zealand (South Island)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 electronic still camera (ESC) Earth observation image shows New Zealand (South Island) as recorded on the 45th orbit of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Westport is easily delineated in the image, which was recorded by the Hand-held, Earth-oriented, Real-time, Cooperative, User-friendly, Location-targeting and Environmental System (HERCULES). HERCULES is a device that makes it simple for shuttle crewmembers to take pictures of Earth as they merely point a modified 35mm camera and shoot any interesting feature, whose latitude and longitude are automatically determined in real-time. Center coordinates are 41.836 degrees south latitude and 171.641 degrees east longitude. (300mm lens, no filter). Digital file name is ESC07007.IMG.

  7. Monitoring atmospheric dust spring activity at high southern latitudes on Mars using OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douté, S.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a monitoring of the atmospheric dust in the south polar region during spring of Martian year 27. Our goal is to contribute to identifying the regions where the dust concentration in the atmosphere shows specific temporal patterns, for instance high, variable, and on the rise due to lifting or transport mechanisms. This identification is performed in relation with the seasonal ice regression. Based on a phenomenological examination of the previous results, hypothesis regarding the origin of aerosol activity of the southern polar region is proposed. This is of paramount importance since local dust storms generated in this region sometimes grow to global proportions. The imaging spectrometer OMEGA on board Mars Express has acquired the most comprehensive set of observations to date in the near-infrared (0.93-5.1 μm) of the southern high latitudes of Mars from mid-winter solstice (Ls=110°, December 2004) to the end of the recession at Ls=320° (November 2005). We use two complementary methods in order to retrieve the optical depth of the atmospheric dust at a reference wavelength of 1 μm. The methods are independently operated for pixels showing mineral surfaces on the one hand and the seasonal cap on the other hand. They are applied on a time series of OMEGA images acquired between LS=220° and LS=280° . As a result the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is mapped and binned at a spatial resolution of 1.0° pixel-1 and with a mean period of AOD sampling ranging from less than two sols for latitudes higher than 80°S to approximately six sols at latitudes in the interval 65-75°S. We then generate and interpret time series of orthographic mosaics depicting the spatio-temporal distribution of the seasonal mean values, the variance and the local time dependence of the AOD. In particular we suspect that two mechanisms play a major role for lifting and transporting efficiently mineral particles and create dust events or storms: (i) nighttime katabatic

  8. Venus - Crater distributions at low northern latitudes and in the southern hemisphere from new Arecibo observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.; Stacy, N. J. S.; Hine, A. A.

    1990-01-01

    Arecibo high resolution radar data covering approximately 23 percent of the surface of Venus were analyzed for circular features with crater-like appearances. Overlapping Venera 15/16 radar data, with its more normal to the surface viewing geometry, was used to verify crater diameters measured from the Arecibo data. A comparison of the diameter-frequency distribution of the possible impact features in the Arecibo data for northern latitudes south of 40 deg N and for the southern hemisphere with the distribution from the Venera 15/16 data for the northernmost quarter of the planet indicated similar distributions for large crater-like features with diameters greater than approximately 30 km, but a deficiency of smaller craters in the Arecibo data. One possible process responsible for the density differences of small craters is a difference in the rate of volcanic resurfacing. An increase in the resurfacing rate of approximately 50 percent would explain the lower density of small craters in the area covered by the Arecibo data compared with the Venera data, but would not account for the differences being confined to the less than 30 km crater diameter range.

  9. A solar wind-based model of geomagnetic field fluctuations at a mid-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, S. I.; Cilliers, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous quasi-DC currents known as geomagnetically induced currents (GIC), produced in electric power network infrastructure during geomagnetic storms, pose a risk to reliable power transmission and network integrity. The prediction of a geomagnetic field-derived proxy to GIC provides an attractive mitigation technique that does not require changes to network hardware. In this paper we present the development of two artificial neural network based models tasked with predicting variations in the X (northward) and Y (eastward) components of the geomagnetic field at Hermanus, South Africa, with only solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parameters as input. The models are developed by iteratively selecting the best set of solar wind parameters to predict the fluctuations in X and Y. To predict the variation in X, IMF magnitude, solar wind speed, fluctuation in solar wind proton density and a IMF-BZ derived parameter are selected. To predict the variation in Y, IMF-BZ , solar wind speed, and fluctuation in IMF magnitude are selected. The difference between the sets of selected input parameters are explained by the dependence of eastward perturbations in geomagnetic field at middle latitudes on field aligned currents. Model performance is evaluated during three storms in 2012. The onset and main phases of storms are fairly accurately predicted, but in cases where prolonged southward IMF coincides with solar wind parameters that are slowly varying the model fails to predict the observed fluctuations.

  10. Effects of clouds on the surface shortwave radiation at a rural inland mid-latitude site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro, Vanda; Costa, Maria João; Silva, Ana Maria; Bortoli, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    Seven years (2003-2010) of measured shortwave (SW) irradiances were used to obtain estimates of the 10 min averaged effective cloud optical thickness (ECOT) and of the shortwave cloud radiative effect (CRESW) at the surface in a mid-latitude site (Évora - south of Portugal), and its seasonal variability is presented. The ECOT, obtained using transmittance measurements at 415 nm, was compared with the correspondent MODIS cloud optical thickness (MODIS COT) for non-precipitating water clouds and cloud fractions higher than 0.25. This comparison showed that the ECOT represents well the cloud optical thickness over the study area. The CRESW, determined for two SW broadband ranges (300-1100 nm; 285-2800 nm), was normalized (NCRESW) and related with the obtained ECOT. A logarithmic relation between NCRESW and ECOT was found for both SW ranges, presenting lower dispersion for overcast-sky situations than for partially cloudy-sky situations. The NCRESW efficiency (NCRESW per unit of ECOT) was also related with the ECOT for overcast-sky conditions. The relation found is parameterized by a power law function showing that NCRESW efficiency decreases as the ECOT increases, approaching one for ECOT values higher than about 50.

  11. Ecoclimate Teleconnections: The Large-Scale Impacts of Changes in Mid-Latitude Tree Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, A. L. S.; Fung, I. Y.; Chiang, J. C. H.

    2014-12-01

    We show in climate model experiments that large-scale afforestation in northern mid-latitudes warms the Northern Hemisphere and alters global circulation patterns both in the present day and the mid-Holocene. An expansion of dark forests increases the absorption of solar energy and increases surface temperature, particularly in regions where the land surface is unable to compensate with latent heat flux due to water limitation. Atmospheric circulation redistributes the anomalous energy absorbed in the northern hemisphere, in particular toward the south, through altering the Hadley circulation, resulting in the northward displacement of the tropical rain bands. Precipitation decreases over parts of the Amazon basin affecting productivity and increases over the Sahel and Sahara regions in Africa. We demonstrate that the remote and local forcing of atmospheric circulation by vegetation can lead to different dynamical patterns with consequences for precipitation across the globe. These ecoclimate teleconnections represent the linkages between the land surface in different regions of the globe and by inference show that proxy records of plant cover represent not only the response of vegetation to local climate but also that vegetation's influence on global climate patterns. The ability of vegetation to affect remote circulation also has implications for strategies for climate mitigation.

  12. Low-latitude Pi2 pulsations during intervals of quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp≤1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.-J.; Kim, K.-H.; Jun, C.-W.; Takahashi, K.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, E.; Jin, H.; Seon, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Hwang, J.

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that Pi2 pulsations can be excited under extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp=0). However, there have been few comprehensive reports of Pi2 pulsations in such a near ground state magnetosphere. To understand the characteristics of quiet-time Pi2 pulsations, we statistically examined Pi2 events observed on the nightside between 1800 and 0600 local time at the low-latitude Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) station in South Korea. We chose year 2008 for analysis because geomagnetic activity was unusually low in that year. A total of 982 Pi2 events were identified when Kp≤1. About 80% of the Pi2 pulsations had a period between 110 and 300 s, which significantly differs from the conventional Pi2 period from 40 to 150 s. Comparing Pi2 periods and solar wind conditions, we found that Pi2 periods decrease with increasing solar wind speed, consistent with the result of Troitskaya (1967). The observed wave properties are discussed in terms of plasmaspheric resonance, which has been proposed for Pi2 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere. We also found that Pi2 pulsations occur quasi-periodically with a repetition period of ˜23-38 min. We will discuss what determines such a recurrence time of Pi2 pulsations under quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  13. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 0 Degree N., Center Longitude 163 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the impact crater Markham, named after the English aviator Beryl Markham (The crater was briefly known unofficially as Franklin; the earlier name was not approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Astronomical Union). Markham, with a diameter of 71 km, is one of more than 400 Venusian craters whose formation triggered the outflow of highly fluid materials. Such outflows are thought to consist of mixtures of melted and fractured rock, and studies of their lobate margins and surface roughnesses suggest that they behave like a cross between lava flows and debris flows on Earth. The flow from this crater's ejecta traversed a slope of extremely low gradient (less than 0.1 degree) for 450 km, leaving an extremely rough, radar-bright surface. The ground-hugging nature of the flow is indicated by its being diverted by the foreground hill, which is less than 200 m high. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1- 00N163. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 473 x 360. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.80 -- 0.95. Vertical exaggeration: 200. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 300. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 500. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  14. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 45 Degrees N., Center Longitude 350 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows part of Sedna Planitia and illustrates a common phenomenon of the lowland plains of Venus: one of many overlapping lava flows that make up the plains has been deflected by low-relief hills. Differing radar brightness among the flows reflects mostly differences in roughness. In this area, the most recent lava flows characteristically have somewhat lower emissivities (indicated here by the green color) and higher SAR brightness than the ridges they embay. Fracture patterns typical of 'tessera terrain' (a major component of Venusian highlands) can be seen on the ridge at the right. A 15-km impact crater at the right is surrounded by a dark splotch thought to have been formed by the transmission of shock energy to the surface by the atmosphere during the impact. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1-45N350. Resolution of SAR image (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 540 x 540. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.80 -- 0.88. Vertical exaggeration: 200. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 140. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 275. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  15. The ultraviolet radiation environment of high southern latitudes: springtime behavior over a decadal timescale.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yixiang; Frederick, John E

    2005-01-01

    Four spectroradiometers located at latitudes from 55 degrees to 90 degrees S conducted near-continuous measurements of ground-level solar ultraviolet irradiance from 1990 through 2001. The behavior during months from October through December is of special interest because this period includes the springtime loss in column ozone and the naturally large irradiances of early summer. Monthly integrated irradiances using biological weightings for erythema and damage to DNA show a distortion of the normal annual cycle in irradiance, with enhanced values occurring in October and November. In some cases, these irradiances exceed those near summer solstice in December. Changes in local cloudiness and column ozone both contribute significantly to interannual variability in erythemal irradiance. This is particularly the case at Palmer Station, near 65 degrees S, where the monthly integrated erythemal irradiance in November 1997 was more than double that observed 5 years earlier. In general, at sites on the Antarctic continent, interannual variability in monthly integrated erythemal irradiance is greatest in November, when the observation for any given year can fall 40% above or below the multiyear mean. Near the tip of South America, interannual variability is approximately half that seen in Antarctica. PMID:15646997

  16. Influence of South America orography on summertime precipitation in Southeastern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junquas, C.; Li, L.; Vera, C. S.; Le Treut, H.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-06-01

    Impacts of the main South American orographic structures (the Andes, the Brazilian Plateau and the Guiana shield) on the regional climate and associated global teleconnection are investigated through numerical experiments in which some of these features are suppressed. Simulations are performed with a ``two-way nesting'' system coupling interactively the regional and global versions of the LMDZ4 atmospheric general circulation model. At regional scale, the simulations confirm previous studies, showing that both the Andes and the Brazilian Plateau exert a control on the position and strength of the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ), mainly through their impact on the low-level jet and the coastal branch of the subtropical anticyclones. The northern topography of South America appears to be crucial to determine the leading mode of rainfall variability in eastern South America, which manifests itself as a dipole-like pattern between Southeastern South America and the SACZ region. The suppression of South America orography also shows global-scale effects, corresponding to an adjustment of the global circulation system. Changes in atmospheric circulation and precipitation are found in remote areas on the globe, being the consequences of various teleconnection mechanisms. When the Brazilian Plateau and the Andes are suppressed, there is a decrease of precipitation in the SACZ region, associated with a weakening of the large-scale ascendance. Changes are described in terms of anomalies in the Walker circulation, meridional displacements of the mid-latitude jet stream, Southern annular mode anomalies and modifications of Rossby wave train teleconnection processes.

  17. South Africa.

    PubMed

    1985-05-01

    The 1983 population of South Africa was estimated at 31.1 million, with an annual growth rate of 2.5% (0.8% for whites, 1.8% for blacks and "coloreds," 1.8% for Asians, and 2.8% for Africans). The infant mortality rate was 14.9/1000 live births among whites, 80.6/1000 among blacks and coloreds, and 25.3/1000 among Asians. Life expectancy was 70 years for whites, 59 years for blacks and coloreds, 66 years for Asians, and 55 years for Africans. Racial discrimination has become increasingly institutionalized in South Africa since the ruling National Party came to power in 1948. The policy of apartheid calls for separate political institutions for the 4 major racial groups in the population. Africans are considered citizens of the homelands to which their tribal group is assigned, not permanent citizens of the country. Coloreds and Asians are considered citizens and given some political expression. The new political system envisions broad consensus among whites, coloreds, and Indians, and a parliamentary committee is considering possible abolition of laws against multiracial political activity. The work force totals 11 million, 30% of whom are engaged in agriculture, 29% are employed in industry and commerce, 34% work in the services sector, and 7% work in mining. The GNP in 1983 totalled US$75.5 billion and the GDP stood at US$73.2 billion. Per capita GNP was US$5239. PMID:12178120

  18. Seedling mortality from litterfall increases with decreasing latitude.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Len N

    2016-02-01

    Global patterns in ecology need to be identified and interpreted if macroecological processes are to be fully understood. Facilitating effects on seedlings such as that of nurse plants and competitive effects such as allelopathy have been well recognized but the importance of plants acting as killers through physical damage by the litterfall they produce has received relatively little attention. Here I examine latitudinal patterns of physical disturbance to seedlings (microdisturbance) due to litterfall and discuss the macroecological implications in light of current research. Analyses of results from published studies show that both the risk of litterfall disturbance, as measured using artificial model seedlings, and the proportion of seedling mortalities due to litterfall decrease significantly with increasing latitude. Patterns of microdisturbance appear to be driven by the dynamic interaction between macro-litterfall, safe sites with protective overhead vegetation, topography, and animal activity. However, we are informed on this subject by few studies. There is evidence, again from a limited number of studies, for considerable spatial heterogeneity in microdisturbance intensity and for seedling resilience to litterfall damage to differ substantially among species. Therefore, differential survival among microsites may produce regeneration niche diversity. However, more focused studies are required across a range of forest types and latitudes before these results can be generalized. Therefore, there is fertile ground for researchers to use comparable multifactorial methods to investigate the implications of microdisturbance at macro-ecological scales. PMID:27145626

  19. Ulysses observations of auroral hiss at high Jovian latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Macdowall, R. J.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Stone, R. G.; Kellogg, P. J.; Lin, N.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Canu, P.; Bame, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    During the Ulysses flyby of Jupiter, a whistler-mode emission was periodically detected by the unified Radio and Plasma wave (URAP) experiment during intervals when the spacecraft extended to high magnetic latitudes. The signal was detected between the local electron plasma frequency and lower hybrid resonance and appears as a funnel-shaped structure on frequency-versus-time spectrograms; these characteristics are very reminiscent of whistler-mode auroral hiss observed at high latitudes at Earth. Ray tracing of the emission occurrences suggests the emission source is on magnetic field lines extending out to at least 65 R(sub J). This location associates the emission with the boundary between open and closed field lines -- not the Io torus. The emission radiates about 10(exp 7) W of power. Consequently, the auroral input power derived from the solar wind to drive the emission is believed to be 10(exp 10-12) W (or about 1% of the energy associated with Io torus electrical processes).

  20. Low-latitude field-aligned currents deduced by Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    ESA's constellation mission Swarm was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The three satellites are orbiting the Earth at 470 km and 520 km altitude. The lower pair Swarm-A and C is flying side-by-side separated by only 1.4° in latitude. Magnetic field readings of this pair are used to determine for the first time field-aligned currents (FAC) uniquely in the ionosphere. Of particular interest for this presentation are FACs at low and equatorial latitudes. Indications for several of such current systems have been deduced from CHAMP observations. Examples to be studied are meridional and vertical currents driven by the F-region dynamo. They are expected to show opposite polarities between noon and sunset. Likewise there are FACs expected to balance the electric potential differences between the foci of the Sq current vortices in the two hemispheres, which should be most prominent during solstice seasons. Another example is the FAC associated with equatorial plasma bubbles. They are expected to flow along the walls of the electron density depleted volume. Due to the limited amount of suitable Swarm data we will focus on June solstice and September equinox 2014 for this presentation.

  1. Structure of High Latitude Currents in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltberger, M.; Rigler, E. J.; Merkin, V.; Lyon, J. G.

    2016-07-01

    Using three resolutions of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere-ionosphere model (LFM) and the Weimer 2005 empirical model we examine the structure of the high latitude field-aligned current patterns. Each resolution was run for the entire Whole Heliosphere Interval which contained two high speed solar wind streams and modest interplanetary magnetic field strengths. Average states of the field-aligned current (FAC) patterns for 8 interplanetary magnetic field clock angle directions are computed using data from these runs. Generally speaking the patterns obtained agree well with results obtained from the Weimer 2005 computing using the solar wind and IMF conditions that correspond to each bin. As the simulation resolution increases the currents become more intense and narrow. A machine learning analysis of the FAC patterns shows that the ratio of Region 1 (R1) to Region 2 (R2) currents decreases as the simulation resolution increases. This brings the simulation results into better agreement with observational predictions and the Weimer 2005 model results. The increase in R2 current strengths also results in the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) pattern being concentrated in higher latitudes. Current-voltage relationships between the R1 and CPCP are quite similar at the higher resolution indicating the simulation is converging on a common solution. We conclude that LFM simulations are capable of reproducing the statistical features of FAC patterns.

  2. INTERMEDIATE-VELOCITY MOLECULAR GAS AT HIGH NORTHERN GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Magnani, Loris; Smith, Allison J.

    2010-10-20

    We surveyed the CO(1-0) transition in 16 regions at Galactic latitudes >45{sup 0} which contain compact dust cores less than half a degree in size with E(B - V) values {approx} 0.1 mag. We discovered three new intermediate-velocity molecular clouds and two high-latitude molecular clouds with more typical local standard of rest velocity ({approx}0 km s{sup -1}). The three intermediate-velocity molecular clouds (detected in CO emission in 11 lines of sight) nearly double the number of previously known, CO-emitting clouds. In order to detect the CO(1-0) line, N(H{sub 2}) values of at least 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} are necessary, implying that the molecular/atomic fraction of these objects is significant and is in contrast to the primarily atomic lines of sight with log N(H{sub 2}) < 17.3 detected in absorption by FUSE. The three molecular clouds are projected on and likely associated with a previously known intermediate-velocity H I feature known as the Intermediate Velocity Spur that may extend to the Galactic halo.

  3. Evapotranspiration Cycles in a High Latitude Agroecosystem: Potential Warming Role.

    PubMed

    Ruairuen, Watcharee; Fochesatto, Gilberto J; Sparrow, Elena B; Schnabel, William; Zhang, Mingchu; Kim, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    As the acreages of agricultural lands increase, changes in surface energetics and evapotranspiration (ET) rates may arise consequently affecting regional climate regimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate summertime ET dynamics and surface energy processes in a subarctic agricultural farm in Interior Alaska. The study includes micrometeorological and hydrological data. Results covering the period from June to September 2012 and 2013 indicated consistent energy fractions: LE/Rnet (67%), G/Rnet (6%), H/Rnet (27%) where LE is latent heat flux, Rnet is the surface net radiation, G is ground heat flux and H is the sensible heat flux. Additionally actual surface evapotranspiration from potential evaporation was found to be in the range of 59 to 66%. After comparing these rates with those of most prominent high latitude ecosystems it is argued here that if agroecosystem in high latitudes become an emerging feature in the land-use, the regional surface energy balance will significantly shift in comparison to existing Arctic natural ecosystems. PMID:26368123

  4. Population differences in finger-length ratios: ethnicity or latitude?

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; McFadden, Dennis; Medland, Sarah E; Martin, Nicholas G

    2006-12-01

    The relative length of the second and fourth fingers (the 2D:4D ratio) has been taken to be an indicator of prenatal exposure to testosterone, and hence possibly relevant to sexual orientation and other sex-differentiated behaviors. Studies have reported a difference in this ratio between Caucasian males in Britain and in the U.S.: higher average 2D:4D ratios were obtained in Britain. This raises the question of whether differences among different Caucasian gene pools were responsible or whether some environmental variable associated with latitude might be involved (e.g., exposure to sunlight or different day-length patterns). This question was explored by examining 2D:4D ratios for an Australian adolescent sample. The Australians were predominantly of British ancestry, but lived at distances from the equator more like those of the U.S. studies. The Australian 2D:4D ratios resembled those in Britain rather than those in the U.S., tending to exclude hypotheses related to latitude and making differences in gene pools a plausible explanation. PMID:16688484

  5. The interchange instability in high-latitude plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, P.K.; Huba, J.D. )

    1987-04-01

    The stability of high-latitude plasma density enhancements (blobs) is analyzed with regard to the interchange mode (driven by neutral wind or equilibrium transverse electric field acting on the density gradient at the walls of the blobs). The effects arising from the finite parallel length of the blobs along the magnetic field lines are included in the analysis. Plasma regions of differing collisionalities, to which the blobs extend in altitude, are considered. The authors find that the finite parallel blob size results in a modest reduction in the growth rates of the small ({approx lt}1 km) and intermediate (1-10 km) scale sizes but severely reduces the growth rates for the large scale sizes (> 10 km) for the observed parallel blob lengths ({approximately}300-600 km). Further, it is found that the instability growth rates show a moderate reduction at higher altitudes (where ion-inertial effects may be dominant over the ion-neutral collisional effects). Thus the E{times} B instability is considered a plausible candidate for the scintillation-causing irregularities (1-10 km) associated with the high-latitude blobs.

  6. Interchange instability in high-latitude plasma blobs. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, P.K.; Huba, J.D.

    1986-12-30

    The stability of high-latitude plasma-density enhancements (blobs) is analyzed with regard to the interchange model (driven by a neutral wind or transverse electric field acting on the density gradient at the walls of the blobs). The effects arising from the finite parallel length of the blobs along the magnetic field lines are included in the analysis. Plasma regions of differing collisionalities, to which the blobs extend in altitude, are considered. It was found that the finite-parallel blob size results in a modest reduction in the growth rates of the small somewhat < 1 km) and intermediate (1-10 km) scale sizes, but severely reduces the growth rates, for the large scale sizes (> 10 kms) for the observed parallel blob lengths (approx. 300-600 kms). Further, it is found that the instability growth rates show a moderate reduction at higher altitudes (where ion-inertial effects may be dominant over the ion-neutral collisional effects). Thus, the E x B instability is considered a plausible candidate for the scintillation causing irregularities (1-10 kms) associated with the high-latitude blobs.

  7. Evapotranspiration Cycles in a High Latitude Agroecosystem: Potential Warming Role

    PubMed Central

    Ruairuen, Watcharee

    2015-01-01

    As the acreages of agricultural lands increase, changes in surface energetics and evapotranspiration (ET) rates may arise consequently affecting regional climate regimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate summertime ET dynamics and surface energy processes in a subarctic agricultural farm in Interior Alaska. The study includes micrometeorological and hydrological data. Results covering the period from June to September 2012 and 2013 indicated consistent energy fractions: LE/Rnet (67%), G/Rnet (6%), H/Rnet (27%) where LE is latent heat flux, Rnet is the surface net radiation, G is ground heat flux and H is the sensible heat flux. Additionally actual surface evapotranspiration from potential evaporation was found to be in the range of 59 to 66%. After comparing these rates with those of most prominent high latitude ecosystems it is argued here that if agroecosystem in high latitudes become an emerging feature in the land-use, the regional surface energy balance will significantly shift in comparison to existing Arctic natural ecosystems. PMID:26368123

  8. Geomagnetic response to IMF and solar wind over different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Waheed, Malik Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In this paper a study on the response of geomagnetic field characteristics to the solar wind variation during three solar cycles (SC 21, SC 22, SC 23) have been conducted in a long term scale. The difference in the response of two different latitudinal characteristic indices has been investigated. For the purpose we have considered the high latitude index AE and the mid-latitude aa index and both gives the knowledge about the perturbations in the geomagnetic field conditions. Eventually we can infer the idea about the ionospheric current system changes in response to the solar wind conditions. The variation found in the AE and aa indices have been found to follow a 11 year cycle as similar to the sunspot variation. Also the correlation between the annual means of the solar wind parameters velocity V, magnetic filed B and the composite parameters BV and BV ^{2 } have been calculated . A difference was found between the correlations obtained for the AE and aa indices. We could also see that the difference in correlation follows a cyclic pattern i.e. the large difference is found during the solar maxima while a small difference is observed during the minima.

  9. Springtime photochemistry at northern mid and high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhang; Ridley, Brian; Fried, Alan; Cantrell, Christopher; Davis, Douglas; Chen, Gao; Snow, Julie; Heikes, Brian; Talbot, Robert; Dibb, Jack; Flocke, Frank; Weinheimer, Andrew; Blake, Nicola; Blake, Donald; Shetter, Richard; Lefer, Barry; Atlas, Elliot; Coffey, Michael; Walega, Jim; Wert, Brian

    2003-02-01

    Physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0-8 km were measured during the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) experiments from February to May 2000 at mid (40°-60°N) and high latitudes (60°-80°N). The observations were analyzed using a diel steady state box model to examine HOx and O3 photochemistry during the spring transition period. The radical chemistry is driven primarily by photolysis of O3 and the subsequent reaction of O(1D) and H2O, the rate of which increases rapidly during spring. Unlike in other tropospheric experiments, observed H2O2 concentrations are a factor of 2-10 lower than those simulated by the model. The required scavenging timescale to reconcile the model overestimates shows a rapid seasonal decrease down to 0.5-1 day in May, which cannot be explained by known mechanisms. This loss of H2O2 implies a large loss of HOx resulting in decreases in O3 production (10-20%) and OH concentrations (20-30%). Photolysis of CH2O, either transported into the region or produced by unknown chemical pathways, appears to provide a significant HOx source at 6-8 km at high latitudes. The rapid increase of in situ O3 production in spring is fueled by concurrent increases of the primary HOx production and NO concentrations. Long-lived reactive nitrogen species continue to accumulate at mid and high latitudes in spring. There is a net loss of NOx to HNO3 and PAN throughout the spring, suggesting that these long-term NOx reservoirs do not provide a net source for NOx in the region. In situ O3 chemical loss is dominated by the reaction of O3 and HO2, and not that of O(1D) and H2O. At midlatitudes, there is net in situ chemical production of O3 from February to May. The lower free troposphere (1-4 km) is a region of significant net O3 production. The net production peaks in April coinciding with the observed peak of column O3 (0-8 km). The net in situ O3 production at midlatitudes can explain much of the observed column O3

  10. High plant diversity in Eocene South America: Evidence from Patagonia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilf, P.; Cuneo, N.R.; Johnson, K.R.; Hicks, J.F.; Wing, S.L.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Tropical South America has the highest plant diversity of any region today, but this richness is usually characterized as a geologically recent development (Neogene or Pleistocene). From caldera-lake beds exposed at Laguna del Hunco in Patagonia, Argentina, paleolatitude ???47??S, we report 102 leaf species. Radioisotopic and paleomagnetic analyses indicate that the flora was deposited 52 million years ago, the time of the early Eocene climatic optimum, when tropical plant taxa and warm, equable climates reached middle latitudes of both hemispheres. Adjusted for sample size, observed richness exceeds that of any other Eocene leaf flora, supporting an ancient history of high plant diversity in warm areas of South America.

  11. Antarctic-type blue whale calls recorded at low latitudes in the Indian and eastern Pacific Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Kathleen M.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Tolstoy, Maya; Chapp, Emily; Mellinger, David K.; Moore, Sue E.

    2004-10-01

    Blue whales, Balaenoptera musculus, were once abundant around the Antarctic during the austral summer, but intensive whaling during the first half of the 20th century reduced their numbers by over 99%. Although interannual variability of blue whale occurrence on the Antarctic feeding grounds was documented by whalers, little was known about where the whales spent the winter months. Antarctic blue whales produce calls that are distinct from those produced by blue whales elsewhere in the world. To investigate potential winter migratory destinations of Antarctic blue whales, we examined acoustic data for these signals from two low-latitude locales: the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean. Antarctic-type blue whale calls were detected on hydrophones in both regions during the austral autumn and winter (May-September), with peak detections in July. Calls occurred over relatively brief periods in both oceans, suggesting that there may be only a few animals migrating so far north and/or producing calls. Antarctic blue whales appear to use both the Indian and eastern Pacific Oceans concurrently, indicating that there is not a single migratory destination. Acoustic data from the South Atlantic and from mid-latitudes in the Indian or Pacific Oceans are needed for a more global understanding of migratory patterns and destinations of Antarctic blue whales.

  12. Plasma density undulations correlated with thermospheric neutral mass density in the daytime low-latitude to midlatitude topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Lühr, Hermann; Nishioka, Michi; Kwak, Young-Sil

    2015-08-01

    Plasma density undulations in the dayside low-latitude/midlatitude ionospheric F region were often attributed to thermospheric gravity waves (TGWs). However, the relationship between the former and the latter has been at best indirectly evidenced. In this study we investigate daytime fluctuations in neutral mass density (ρ) and plasma density (ne) measured onboard CHAMP from 2001 to 2010. A significant amount of daytime fluctuations in ne is strongly correlated with in situ fluctuations of ρ, which we term "TGW-related ne fluctuations." The TGW-related ne fluctuations are (1) stronger in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere and (2) strongest in the South American sector during June solstice months. These climatological features are in general agreement with those of TGWs reported previously, especially at midlatitudes. On the other hand, the relative amplitude of TGW-related ne fluctuations does not depend strongly on solar activity.

  13. Ionospheric Irregularities at High Latitudes During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms: Simultaneous Observations of Magnetic Field Perturbations and GPS Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Deshpande, K.; Clauer, C. R.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Humphreys, T. E.; Kim, L.; Lessard, M.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Zachariah, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    Plasma instability in the ionosphere is often observed as disturbance and distortion of the amplitude and phase of radio signals, which are known as ionospheric scintillations. High-latitude ionospheric plasma, closely connected to solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics, produce very dynamic and short-lived GPS scintillations, making it challenging to characterize them. This study reports simultaneous observations of geomagnetic pulsations and GPS signal scintillations during geomagnetic storms and substorms using a newly designed Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) installed at the South Pole. A statistical investigation of the AAL-PIP data recorded from January through May 2012 is presented to study local time distribution of scintillation events and a correlation between GPS scintillation and magnetic field perturbations. This report discusses a possible connection between magnetic field perturbations associated with the ionospheric currents and the creation of plasma instability by examining relative contribution of storm/substorm activity to ionospheric irregularities.

  14. Recent low-latitude freeze thaw on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, David P.

    2007-07-01

    Outside polar latitudes, features corresponding to surface thaw have yet to be identified on Mars. The youthful gully landforms observed at mid-high latitude [Malin, M., Edgett, K., 2000. Science 288, 2330-2335] are the nearest candidate, but the source (and nature) of the gully carving agent remains controversial [e.g., Musselwhite, D.S., Swindle, T.D., Lunine, J.I., 2001. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 1283-1285; Mellon, M.T., Phillips, R.J., 2001. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 1-15; Knauth, L.P., Burt, D.M., 2002. Icarus 158, 267-271; Costard, F., Forget, F., Mangold, N., Peulvast, J.P., 2002. Science 295, 110-113; Christensen, P.R., 2003. Nature 422, 45-48; Treiman, A.H., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. 108]. At higher obliquity than the present epoch, near-surface ground ice should be present globally [Mellon, M.T., Jakosky, B.M., 1995. J. Geophys. Res. 100 (E6), 11781-11799], populated by condensation of atmospheric water vapour in the top few metres of the regolith, or emplaced as dusty ice sheets reaching down towards the equator. The latitudinal restriction of these gullies to regions poleward of ±30° appears to argue against a thaw component to their formation—since ground ice is present and stable at all latitudes at high obliquity, the current (low) obliquity regime should result in ground ice thaw at low latitudes, where insolation and daytime temperatures are currently greatest, and this is not observed. A previously undescribed meltwater sequence in the Cerberus plains, at 20° N/187° E, shows that comparable, but much more continuous, and mappable melting and surface runoff have occurred in the geologically recent past at near-equatorial latitudes on Mars. Polygonal ground in the Cerberus plains is seen by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) to suffer sequential, regional-scale volatile-loss consistent with thaw of near-surface ground ice under periglacial conditions. This degradation is continuously sampled by a single MOC strip, showing an icy

  15. Latitude dependency of solar flare index-temperature relation occuring over middle and high latitudes of Atlantic-Eurasian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcik, A.; Özgüç, A.; Rozelot, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    By applying multitaper methods and Pearson test on the surface air temperature and flare index used as a proxy data for possible solar sources of climate-forcing, we investigated the signature of these variables on middle and high latitudes of the Atlantic-Eurasian region (Turkey, Finland, Romania, Ukraine, Cyprus, Israel, Lithuania, and European part of Russia). We considered the temperature and flare index data for the period ranging from January 1975 to the end of December 2005, which covers almost three solar cycles, 21st, 22nd, and 23rd.We found significant correlations between solar activity and surface air temperature over the 50-60° and 60-70° zones for cycle 22, and for cycle 23, over the 30-40°, 40-50°, and 50-60° zones.The most pronounced power peaks for surface air temperature found by multitaper method are around 1.2, 1.7, and 2.5 years which were reported earlier for some solar activity indicators. These results support the suggestion that there is signature of solar activity effect on surface air temperature of mid-latitudes.

  16. Tropical influence on boreal summer mid-latitude stationary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hervé; Bielli, S.; Cassou, C.; Déqué, M.; Hall, N. M. J.; Tyteca, S.; Voldoire, A.

    2011-11-01

    While organized tropical convection is a well-known source of extratropical planetary waves, state-of-the-art climate models still show serious deficiencies in simulating accurately the atmospheric response to tropical sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies and the associated teleconnections. In the present study, the remote influence of the tropical atmospheric circulation is evaluated in ensembles of global boreal summer simulations in which the Arpege-Climat atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) is nudged towards 6-h reanalyses. The nudging is applied either in the whole tropical band or in a regional summer monsoon domain. Sensitivity tests to the experimental design are first conducted using prescribed climatological SST. They show that the tropical relaxation does not improve the zonal mean extratropical climatology but does lead to a significantly improved representation of the mid-latitude stationary waves in both hemispheres. Low-pass filtering of the relaxation fields has no major effect on the model response, suggesting that high-frequency tropical variability is not responsible for extratropical biases. Dividing the nudging strength by a factor 10 only decreases the magnitude of the response. Model errors in each monsoon domain contribute to deficiencies in the model's mid-latitude climatology, although an exaggerated large-scale subsidence in the central equatorial Pacific appears as the main source of errors for the representation of stationary waves in the Arpege-Climat model. Case studies are then conducted using either climatological or observed SST. The focus is first on summer 2003 characterized by a strong and persistent anticyclonic anomaly over western Europe. This pattern is more realistic in nudging experiments than in simulations only driven by observed SST, especially when the nudging domain is centred over Central America. Other case studies also show a significant tropical forcing of the summer mid-latitude stationary waves and

  17. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Vertical plasma drift data measured at a mid-latitude ionospheric station Pruhonice (50.0 ° N, 14.6 ° E) were collected and analysed for the year 2006, a year of low solar and geomagnetic activity. Hence these data provide insight into the drift behaviour during quiet conditions. The following typical diurnal trend is evident: a significant decay to negative values (downward peak) at dawn; generally less pronounced downward peak at dusk hours. Magnitude of the downward drift varies during the year. Typically it reaches values about 20 ms-1 at dawn hours and 10 ms-1 at dusk hours. Maximum dawn magnitude of about 40 ms-1 has been detected in August. During daytime the vertical drifts increases from the initial small downward drifts to zero drift around noon and to small upward drifts in the afternoon. Night-time drift values display large variability around a near zero vertical drift average. There is a significant trend to larger downward drift values near dawn and a less pronounced decrease of the afternoon upward vertical drifts near sunset. Two regular downward peaks of the drift associated with the dawn and dusk are general characteristics of the analysed data throughout the year 2006. Their seasonal course corresponds to the seasonal course of the sunrise and sunset. The duration of prevailing negative drift velocities forming these peaks and thus the influence of the dawn/dusk on the drift velocity is mostly 1.5-3 h. The dawn effect on vertical drift tends to be larger than the effect of the dusk. The observed magnitude of the sunrise and sunset peaks show significant annual course. The highest variability of the magnitude is seen during winter. High variability is detected till March equinox and again after September equinox. Around solstice, both peaks reaches lowest values. After that, the magnitudes of the drift velocity increase smoothly till maxima in summer (August). The vertical drift velocity course is smooth between June solstice and September

  18. Solar transients disturbing the terrestrial magnetic environment at higher latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Parvaiz A.; Tripathi, Sharad C.; Troshichev, O. A.; Waheed, Malik A.; Aslam, A. M.; Gwal, A. K.

    2014-02-01

    Geomagnetic field variations during five major Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events of solar cycle 23 have been investigated in the present study. The SEP events of 1 October 2001, 4 November 2001, 22 November 2001, 21 April 2002 and 14 May 2005 have been selected to study the geomagnetic field variations at two high-latitude stations, Thule (77.5∘ N, 69.2∘ W) and Resolute Bay (74.4∘ E, 94.5∘ W) of the northern polar cap. We have used the GOES proton flux in seven different energy channels (0.8-4 MeV, 4-9 MeV, 9-15 MeV, 15-40 MeV, 40-80 MeV, 80-165 MeV, 165-500 MeV). All the proton events were associated with geoeffective or Earth directed CMEs that caused intense geomagnetic storms in response to geospace. We have taken high-latitude indices, AE and PC, under consideration and found fairly good correlation of these with the ground magnetic field records during the five proton events. The departures of the H component during the events were calculated from the quietest day of the month for each event and have been represented as Δ H THL and Δ H RES for Thule and Resolute Bay, respectively. The correspondence of spectral index, inferred from event integrated spectra, with ground magnetic signatures Δ H THL and Δ H RES along with Dst and PC indices have been brought out. From the correlation analysis we found a very strong correlation to exist between the geomagnetic field variation (Δ Hs) and high-latitude indices AE and PC. To find the association of geomagnetic storm intensity with proton flux characteristics we derived the correspondence between the spectral indices and geomagnetic field variations (Δ Hs) along with the Dst and AE index. We found a strong correlation (0.88) to exist between the spectral indices and Δ Hs and also between spectral indices and AE and PC.

  19. Climatology of GNSS ionospheric scintillation at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spogli, L.; Alfonsi, L.; de Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.; Aquino, M.; Dodson, A.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2009-12-01

    Under perturbed conditions caused by intense solar wind magnetosphere coupling, the ionosphere may become highly turbulent and irregularities, typically enhancements or depletions of the electron density embedded in the ambient ionosphere, can form. Such irregularities cause diffraction effects, mainly due to the random fluctuations of the refractive index of the ionosphere, on the satellites signals passing through them and consequent perturbations may cause GNSS navigation errors and outages, abruptly corrupting its performance. Due to the morphology of the geomagnetic field, whose lines are almost vertical at high latitude, polar areas are characterized by the presence of significant ionospheric irregularities having scale sizes ranging from hundreds of kilometers down to a few centimeters and with highly dynamic structures. The understanding of the effect of such phenomena is important, not only in preparation for the next solar cycle (24), whose maximum is expected in 2012, but also for a deeper comprehension of the dynamics of the high-latitude ionosphere. We analyze the fluctuations in the carrier frequency of the radio waves received on the ground, commonly referred to as ionospheric amplitude and phase scintillations, to investigate the physical processes causing them. The phase scintillations on GNSS signals are likely caused by ionospheric irregularities of scale size of hundreds of meters to few kilometers. The amplitude scintillations on GNSS signals are caused by ionospheric irregularities of scale size smaller than the Fresnel radius, which is of the order of hundreds of meters for GNSS signals, typically embedded into the patches. The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG) of the University of Nottingham manage the same kind of GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor) receivers over the European high and mid latitude regions and over Antarctica. The

  20. Determining the extent and characterizing coral reef habitats of the northern latitudes of the Florida Reef Tract (Martin County).

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian K; Gilliam, David S

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has recently been implicated in poleward shifts of many tropical species including corals; thus attention focused on higher-latitude coral communities is warranted to investigate possible range expansions and ecosystem shifts due to global warming. As the northern extension of the Florida Reef Tract (FRT), the third-largest barrier reef ecosystem in the world, southeast Florida (25-27° N latitude) is a prime region to study such effects. Most of the shallow-water FRT benthic habitats have been mapped, however minimal data and limited knowledge exist about the coral reef communities of its northernmost reaches off Martin County. First benthic habitat mapping was conducted using newly acquired high resolution LIDAR bathymetry and aerial photography where possible to map the spatial extent of coral reef habitats. Quantitative data were collected to characterize benthic cover and stony coral demographics and a comprehensive accuracy assessment was performed. The data were then analyzed in a habitat biogeography context to determine if a new coral reef ecosystem region designation was warranted. Of the 374 km(2) seafloor mapped, 95.2% was Sand, 4.1% was Coral Reef and Colonized Pavement, and 0.7% was Other Delineations. Map accuracy assessment yielded an overall accuracy of 94.9% once adjusted for known map marginal proportions. Cluster analysis of cross-shelf habitat type and widths indicated that the benthic habitats were different than those further south and warranted designation of a new coral reef ecosystem region. Unlike the FRT further south, coral communities were dominated by cold-water tolerant species and LIDAR morphology indicated no evidence of historic reef growth during warmer climates. Present-day hydrographic conditions may be inhibiting poleward expansion of coral communities along Florida. This study provides new information on the benthic community composition of the northern FRT, serving as a baseline for future community shift and

  1. High-latitude forcing of diatom productivity in the southern Agulhas Plateau during the past 350 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, O. E.; Kim, J.-H.; Bárcena, M. A.; Hall, I. R.; Zahn, R.; Schneider, R.

    2015-02-01

    The hydrography of the Indian-Atlantic Ocean gateway has been connected to high-latitude climate dynamics by oceanic and atmospheric teleconnections on orbital and suborbital timescales. A wealth of sedimentary records aiming at reconstructing the late Pleistocene paleoceanography around the southern African continent has been devoted to understanding these linkages. Most of the records are, however, clustered close to the southern South African tip, with comparatively less attention devoted to areas under the direct influence of frontal zones of the Southern Ocean/South Atlantic. Here we present data of the composition and concentration of the diatom assemblage together with bulk biogenic content and the alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) variations for the past 350 kyr in the marine sediment core MD02-2588 (approximately 41°S, 26°E) recovered from the southern Agulhas Plateau. Variations in biosiliceous productivity show a varying degree of coupling with Southern Hemisphere paleoclimate records following a glacial-interglacial cyclicity. Ecologically well-constrained groups of diatoms record the glacial-interglacial changes in water masses dynamics, nutrient availability, and stratification of the upper ocean. The good match between the glacial maxima of total diatoms concentration, Chaetoceros spores abundance, and opal content with the maximum seasonal cover of Antarctic ice and the atmospheric dust records points to a dominant Southern Hemisphere forcing of diatom production. Suborbital variability of SST suggests rapid latitudinal migrations of the Subtropical Front and associated water masses over the southern Agulhas Plateau, following millennial contractions and expansions of the subtropical gyres. Warmings of the upper ocean over site MD02-2588 during terminations IV to I occurred earlier than that in the Antarctic Vostok, which is indicative of a Northern Hemisphere lead. Our multiparameter reconstruction highlights how high-latitude

  2. Determining the Extent and Characterizing Coral Reef Habitats of the Northern Latitudes of the Florida Reef Tract (Martin County)

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Brian K.; Gilliam, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has recently been implicated in poleward shifts of many tropical species including corals; thus attention focused on higher-latitude coral communities is warranted to investigate possible range expansions and ecosystem shifts due to global warming. As the northern extension of the Florida Reef Tract (FRT), the third-largest barrier reef ecosystem in the world, southeast Florida (25–27° N latitude) is a prime region to study such effects. Most of the shallow-water FRT benthic habitats have been mapped, however minimal data and limited knowledge exist about the coral reef communities of its northernmost reaches off Martin County. First benthic habitat mapping was conducted using newly acquired high resolution LIDAR bathymetry and aerial photography where possible to map the spatial extent of coral reef habitats. Quantitative data were collected to characterize benthic cover and stony coral demographics and a comprehensive accuracy assessment was performed. The data were then analyzed in a habitat biogeography context to determine if a new coral reef ecosystem region designation was warranted. Of the 374 km2 seafloor mapped, 95.2% was Sand, 4.1% was Coral Reef and Colonized Pavement, and 0.7% was Other Delineations. Map accuracy assessment yielded an overall accuracy of 94.9% once adjusted for known map marginal proportions. Cluster analysis of cross-shelf habitat type and widths indicated that the benthic habitats were different than those further south and warranted designation of a new coral reef ecosystem region. Unlike the FRT further south, coral communities were dominated by cold-water tolerant species and LIDAR morphology indicated no evidence of historic reef growth during warmer climates. Present-day hydrographic conditions may be inhibiting poleward expansion of coral communities along Florida. This study provides new information on the benthic community composition of the northern FRT, serving as a baseline for future community shift and

  3. Ulysses observations of energetic ions over the south pole of the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, T. R.; Bothmer, V.; Marsden, R. G.; Trattner, K. J.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1996-07-20

    We present here observations of energetic ions during the following phases of the Ulysses prime mission: the first south polar pass, the low-latitude pass and part of the first north polar pass. Peaks are observed in the energetic ion intensity which recur either once per solar rotation during the ascent to high southern latitudes, or twice per rotation during the low latitude pass. The intensity of the peaks also rises with each major solar event, decaying slowly thereafter over a period of several rotations. The peaks are observed up to {approx}70 deg. during the ascent to high southern latitudes, but not seen again until around 45 deg. during the descent, this asymmetry most likely being caused by a decrease in the number of solar events.

  4. Ulysses at 50{degrees} south: Constant immersion in the high-speed solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.L.; Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Balogh, A.; Goldstein, B.E.; Neugebauer, M.; Hoeksema, J.T.; Sheeley, N.R. Jr.; Wang, Y.M.

    1994-06-15

    The authors present speed observations from the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment through 50{degrees} south latitude. The pronounced speed modulation arising from solar rotation and the tilt of the heliomagnetic current sheet has nearly disappeared. Ulysses is now observing wind speeds in the 700 to 800 km s{sup {minus}1} range, with a magnetic polarity indicating an origin in the large south polar coronal hole. The strong compressions, rarefactions, and shock waves previously seen have weakened or disappeared. Occasional coronal mass ejections characterized by low plasma density caused by radial expansion have been observed. The coronal configuration was simple and stable in 1993, indicating that the observed solar wind changes were caused by increasing latitude support previous findings. A decrease in peak speed southward of 40{degrees} latitude may indicate that the fastest solar wind comes from the equatorial extensions of the polar coronal holes. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Ionospheric signatures of cusp-latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Arnoldy, R.L. )

    1988-01-01

    It has been well established that many of the disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere, such as auroral substorms, are a response to variations in the solar wind that continually sweeps from the Sun past the Earth and other planets. Studies over the past several years, most recently reviewed by Odera (1986) and Arnoldy at el. (1988), have shown that Pc 3 pulsations, a class of ultra-low-frequency waves in the Earth's magnetic field with periods between 15 and 40 seconds, are also directly related to activity in the solar wind just upstream of the Earth. The authors present in this report new observations from South Pole Station, Antarctica, which during certain hours every day is located under the nominal position of the magnetospheric cleft/cusp region. There has been ample evidence that plasmas from interplanetary space can penetrate to ionospheric altitudes in the cusp region. Two earlier papers based on South Pole data noted that large-amplitude, narrowband Pc 3 magnetic pulsations occurred at South Pole Station near local magnetic noon when the interplanetary magnetic field was aligned near the Earth-Sun direction (low interplanetary magnetic field cone angle). They have now found evidence of these pulsations in data from other South Pole instruments as well.

  6. Diversity and distribution patterns in high southern latitude sponges.

    PubMed

    Downey, Rachel V; Griffiths, Huw J; Linse, Katrin; Janussen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Sponges play a key role in Antarctic marine benthic community structure and dynamics and are often a dominant component of many Southern Ocean benthic communities. Understanding the drivers of sponge distribution in Antarctica enables us to understand many of general benthic biodiversity patterns in the region. The sponges of the Antarctic and neighbouring oceanographic regions were assessed for species richness and biogeographic patterns using over 8,800 distribution records. Species-rich regions include the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands, South Georgia, Eastern Weddell Sea, Kerguelen Plateau, Falkland Islands and north New Zealand. Sampling intensity varied greatly within the study area, with sampling hotspots found at the Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia, north New Zealand and Tierra del Fuego, with limited sampling in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas in the Southern Ocean. In contrast to previous studies we found that eurybathy and circumpolar distributions are important but not dominant characteristics in Antarctic sponges. Overall Antarctic sponge species endemism is ∼43%, with a higher level for the class Hexactinellida (68%). Endemism levels are lower than previous estimates, but still indicate the importance of the Polar Front in isolating the Southern Ocean fauna. Nineteen distinct sponge distribution patterns were found, ranging from regional endemics to cosmopolitan species. A single, distinct Antarctic demosponge fauna is found to encompass all areas within the Polar Front, and the sub-Antarctic regions of the Kerguelen Plateau and Macquarie Island. Biogeographical analyses indicate stronger faunal links between Antarctica and South America, with little evidence of links between Antarctica and South Africa, Southern Australia or New Zealand. We conclude that the biogeographic and species distribution patterns observed are largely driven by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the timing of past continent connectivity. PMID

  7. Diversity and Distribution Patterns in High Southern Latitude Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Rachel V.; Griffiths, Huw J.; Linse, Katrin; Janussen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Sponges play a key role in Antarctic marine benthic community structure and dynamics and are often a dominant component of many Southern Ocean benthic communities. Understanding the drivers of sponge distribution in Antarctica enables us to understand many of general benthic biodiversity patterns in the region. The sponges of the Antarctic and neighbouring oceanographic regions were assessed for species richness and biogeographic patterns using over 8,800 distribution records. Species-rich regions include the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland Islands, South Georgia, Eastern Weddell Sea, Kerguelen Plateau, Falkland Islands and north New Zealand. Sampling intensity varied greatly within the study area, with sampling hotspots found at the Antarctic Peninsula, South Georgia, north New Zealand and Tierra del Fuego, with limited sampling in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas in the Southern Ocean. In contrast to previous studies we found that eurybathy and circumpolar distributions are important but not dominant characteristics in Antarctic sponges. Overall Antarctic sponge species endemism is ∼43%, with a higher level for the class Hexactinellida (68%). Endemism levels are lower than previous estimates, but still indicate the importance of the Polar Front in isolating the Southern Ocean fauna. Nineteen distinct sponge distribution patterns were found, ranging from regional endemics to cosmopolitan species. A single, distinct Antarctic demosponge fauna is found to encompass all areas within the Polar Front, and the sub-Antarctic regions of the Kerguelen Plateau and Macquarie Island. Biogeographical analyses indicate stronger faunal links between Antarctica and South America, with little evidence of links between Antarctica and South Africa, Southern Australia or New Zealand. We conclude that the biogeographic and species distribution patterns observed are largely driven by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the timing of past continent connectivity. PMID

  8. A mathematical model of the middle and high latitude ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    A time-dependent three-dimensional model of the middle and high latitude ionosphere is described. The density distributions of six ion species NO(+), O(2+), N(2+), O(+), N(+), He(+), and the electron and ion temperatures are obtained from a numerical solution of the appropriate continuity, momentum, and energy equations. The equations are solved as a function of height for an inclined magnetic field at E and F region altitudes. The three-dimensional nature of the model is obtained by following flux tubes of plasma as they convect or corotate through a moving neutral atmosphere. The model takes account of field-aligned diffusion, cross-field electrodynamic drifts, thermospheric winds, polar wind escape, energy-dependent chemical reactions, neutral composition changes, ion production due to solar EUV radiation and auroral precipitation, thermal conduction, diffusion-thermal heat flow and local heating and cooling processes. The model also takes account of the offset between the geomagnetic and geographic poles.

  9. Rotational effects on convection simulated at different latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, Pentti; Tuominen, Ilkka; Brandenburg, Axel; Nordlund, Ake; Stein, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    We simulate numerically convection inside the solar convection zone under the influence of rotation at different latitudes. The computational domain is a small rectangular box with stress-free upper and lower boundaries, and with periodicity assumed in the lateral directions. We study the transport of angular momentum, which is important for the generation of differential rotation. The sign and the latitudinal dependence of the horizontal Reynolds stress component turn out to be in good agreement with correlation measurements of sunspot proper motions and with predictions from the theory of the Lambda effect. We also investigate the other components of the Reynolds stress as well as the eddy heat flux tensor, both of which are needed in mean field models of differential rotation.

  10. Stratospheric flights with large polyethylene baloons from equatorial latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redkar, R. T.

    Starting with average 50% success for stratospheric balloon flights during 1959-1969 and attaining 100% success during 1972-1973, the success record dropped to 50% during 1974-1979. Through a critical analysis of 59 flights made from Hyderabad and 21 flights made from other equatorial bases, revised design criteria were proposed for balloons to be flown from equatorial latitudes, which were accepted by M/s Winzen International, Inc. (WII), U.S.A. and have again raised the success record to 93% for 15 flights made since April 1980. A revised analysis for 71 flights made from 1965 to 1984 has been presented. Stratospheric circulation over Hyderabad indicating predominance of easterlies with mesospheric westerlies descending occasionally into stratosphere has been discussed.

  11. CONDITIONED ANALYSIS OF HIGH-LATITUDE SOLAR WIND INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amicis, R.; Consolini, G.; Bavassano, B.; Bruno, R.

    2012-08-10

    The solar wind is a turbulent medium displaying intermittency. Its intermittent features have been widely documented and studied, showing how the intermittent character is different in fast and slow wind. In this paper, a statistical conditioned analysis of the solar wind intermittency for a period of high-latitude fast solar wind is presented. In particular, the intermittent features are investigated as a function of the Alfvenic degree of fluctuations at a given scale. The results show that the main contribution to solar wind intermittency is due to non-Alfvenic structures, while Alfvenic increments are found to be characterized by a smaller level of intermittency than the previous ones. Furthermore, the lifetime statistics of Alfvenic periods are discussed in terms of a multiscale texture of randomly oriented flux tubes.

  12. A CCD survey for faint high-latitude carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Paul J.; Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Cook, Kem H.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a wide-area CCD survey to search for faint high-latitude carbon (FHLC) stars. Carbon giants provide excellent probes of the structure and kinematics of the outer Galactic halo. We use two-color photometric selection with large-format CCDs to cover 52 sq deg of sky to a depth of about V = 18. Of 94 faint C star candidates from our own CCD survey, one highly ranked V = 17 candidate was found to have a strong carbon and CN bands. We estimate that, to a depth of V = 18, the surface density of FHLC stars is 0.02 deg(exp -2). An updated FHLC sample is used to constrain halo kinematic and structural parameters. Although larger samples are needed, the effective radius of FHLC giants, assuming a de Vancouleurs law distribution, is larger than that for Galactic globular clusters.

  13. High latitude equivalent current systems during extremely quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, G.; Chen, A. J.; Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Kawasaki, K.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic perturbation patterns in the polar cap and auroral zone regions are obtained for extremely quiet days using two different techniques. It is shown that the form of the equivalent current flow pattern is extremely sensitive to the level of quietness, and that even so-called quiet days are at times disturbed by substorm activity. Certain characteristic equivalent flow not typically observed during substorms is noted in the polar cap, and this flow appears to be associated with effects of polar cap perturbations discussed by Svalgaard (1973). A region of equatorward flow at high latitudes near the dawn meridian, appears to be Hall current driven by an eastward electric field. The dayside sub-auroral zone is dominated by the Sq-current system, while the nightside shows no significant current flow in the absence of substorm activity.

  14. VELOCITY SPECTRUM FOR H I AT HIGH LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Chepurnov, A.; Lazarian, A.; Stanimirovic, S.; Heiles, Carl; Peek, J. E. G.

    2010-05-10

    In this paper, we present the results of the statistical analysis of high-latitude H I turbulence in the Milky Way. We have observed H I in the 21 cm line, obtained with the Arecibo{sup 3} L-Band Feed Array receiver at the Arecibo radio telescope. For recovering velocity statistics, we have used the velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS) technique. In our analysis, we have used direct fitting of the VCS model, as its asymptotic regimes are questionable for Arecibo's resolution, given the restrictions from thermal smoothing of the turbulent line. We have obtained a velocity spectral index of 3.87 {+-} 0.11, an injection scale of 140 {+-} 80 pc, and an H I cold phase temperature of 52 {+-} 11 K. The spectral index is steeper than the Kolmogorov index and can be interpreted as being due to shock-dominated turbulence.

  15. Anisotropy of high-latitude nighttime F region irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.C.; Rino, C.L.; Owen, J.; Tsunoda, R.T.

    1982-12-01

    The anisotropy of intermediate-scale, F region irregularities in the nighttime auroral zone is described. The study is based upon spaced-receiver phase scintillation measurements made with the Wideband satellite at Poker Flat, Alaska. A systematic dependence of irregularity anisotropy with local time and magnetic latitude is observed, suggesting convective control. Sheetlike irregularities are confined to the zone of east-west drift near the equatorward boundary of the auroral zone, and at the flow reversal, or Harang discontinuity, the cross-field extension of the sheets is reduced. The extension of rodlike irregularities, which are observed poleward of the zonal convection boundary, also shows apparent convection dominance. Mechanisms for convection control of the anisotropy are discussed.

  16. High-latitude irregularity spectra deduced from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wernik, A.W.; Gola, M.; Liu, C.H.; Franke, S.J. Illinois Univ., Urbana )

    1990-10-01

    High-latitude scintillation data show that the strength and spectral index of intensity scintillation are dependent on the propagation geometry. It is shown here that anisotropic irregularity spectra, with different indices along and across the magnetic field, lead to geometrical effects similar to those observed. In general, the spectrum along the magnetic field is steeper than that across the field, and the difference is more pronounced for nighttime conditions. Spectral anisotropy can be interpreted as a size-dependent irregularity anisotropy. It is found that large-scale irregularities in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere are almost isotropic, while small-scale irregularities are anisotropic and considerably more so at night than during the day. It is shown that anisotropic irregularity spectra could account for the observed scintillation and in situ temporal spectra with frequency-dependent slope. 26 refs.

  17. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees North, Longitude 270 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees N., longitude 270 degrees. The north polar residual ice cap of the Planum Boreum region, which is cut by spiral-patterned troughs, is located at top. The upper part is marked by a large depression, Isidis basin, which contains light-colored plains. The upper part also includes the light-colored smooth plains of Elysium Planitia and dark plains of Vastitas Borealis. Together, these form a vast expanse of contiguous plains. Toward the bottom, on the other hand, the southern hemisphere is almost entirely made up of heavily cratered highlands. At bottom left, a conspicuous, relatively bright circular depression marks the ancient large Hellas impact basin.

  18. Theoretical predictions of latitude dependencies in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winge, C. R., Jr.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented which were obtained with the Winge-Coleman model for theoretical predictions of latitudinal dependencies in the solar wind. A first-order expansion is described which allows analysis of first-order latitudinal variations in the coronal boundary conditions and results in a second-order partial differential equation for the perturbation stream function. Latitudinal dependencies are analytically separated out in the form of Legendre polynomials and their derivative, and are reduced to the solution of radial differential equations. This analysis is shown to supply an estimate of how large the coronal variation in latitude must be to produce an 11 km/sec/deg gradient in the radial velocity of the solar wind, assuming steady-state processes.

  19. First order latitude effects in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winge, C. R., Jr.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The Weber-Davis model of the solar wind is generalized to include the effects of latitude. The principal assumptions of perfect electrical conductivity, rotational symmetry, a polytropic relation between pressure and density, and a flow aligned magnetic field in a system rotating with the Sun, are retained. The original three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flow problem is reduced to a two dimensional hydrodynamic flow problem. The solution at 1 Au is most sensitive to a latitudinal dependence in the coronal boundary temperature and least sensitive to a latitudinal dependence in the magnetic field magnitude. A solution obtained for an approximate dipolar variation in the coronal magnetic field magnitude predicts that the latitudinal flow is initially toward the equator due to magnetic channeling; however, this effect is rapidly overcome and the latitudinal flow at 1 Au is toward the pole and not significantly different from the solution for constant boundary conditions.

  20. Electron density distributions in the high-latitude magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1988-01-01

    Electron density profiles were constructed to study the plasma density depletions in the nightside auroral zone and the density variations with increasing altitude in the polar cap, using electric field spectrum measurements from the plasma wave instrument on DE-1. Sharply defined regions of depleted plasma densities were commonly observed on nightside auroral field lines, in which electron densities were strongly depleted in relation to the adjacent plasmaspheric and polar densities, forming a low-density cavity at about 70 deg invariant latitude. A correlation was found between low auroral plasma densities, upflowing ion distributions, and an energetic precipitating electron population, indicating that electron density depletions in the nightside auroral zone are directly associated with auroral acceleration processes.

  1. Accentuation of suicides but not homicides with rising latitudes of Greenland in the sunny months

    PubMed Central

    Björkstén, Karin S; Kripke, Daniel F; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Seasonal variation in suicides has been shown in many countries. We assessed the seasonality and the variation with latitude in suicides and homicides, and the impact of alcohol on the seasonality in suicides. Methods Official computerized registers on causes of death in all Greenland during 1968–2002 were used. Sales data on beer from one of the major food store chains for July 2005–June 2006 were examined. Seasonal variation was assessed by Rayleigh's test for circular distributions. Results There were a total of 1351 suicides and 308 homicides. The suicides rate varied from 4.2/100 000 person-years in 1971 to 128.4/100 000 person-years in 1987. The homicide rate varied from 2.1/100000 person-years in 1969–1970 to 34.8/100 000 person-years in 1988. Out of the 1351 suicides, 80.5% were committed by men and 19.5% by women. Median age was 25 years (n = 1351; Range 11–84 years). Violent methods of suicide were used in 95% of all cases (n = 1286). Out of the 308 homicide victims, 61% were men and 39% were women, and 13% were killed in multiple homicide events. There was a significant seasonal variation with peaks in June and troughs in the winter in all suicide cases (n = 1351, r = 0.07; Z = 7.58, p < 0.001), in violent suicides (n = 1286; r = 0.07; Z = 6.97; p < 0,001), in suicides in men (n = 1087; r = 0.07; Z = 5.39; p < 0.002) , and in women (n = 264; r = 0.10; Z = 2.36; p < 0.05), but not in homicides nor in consumption of beer. There was a bi-phasic seasonal variation in suicide victims where an alcohol-related condition was included in the death certificate Suicides were more concentrated in the summer months north of the Arctic Circle (n = 577, r = 0.09, Z = 4.45, p < 0.01) than south of it (n = 769, r = 0.07, Z = 3.76, p < 0.002) and most concentrated in North Greenland (n = 33; r = 0.35; Z = 4.11; p < 0.01), where 48% of suicides occurred during the period of constant light. When including astronomical twilight in the constant light period

  2. An Equatorial Spread F Plume Observed Over a Mid Latitude Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, J. L.; Martinis, C. R.; Mendillo, M.; Wroten, J.; Coster, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    A moderate (Kp~6, Dst ~120nT) magnetic storm occurred on June 1, 2013. This storm had the usual effect of expanding the auroral zone and enhancing the ring current that subsequently led to the appearance of a Stable Auroral Red (SAR) arc and 6300A diffuse aurora at mid lattitudes. Boston University Center for Space Physics operates an all-sky imaging system at the McDonald Observatory , Fort Davis, Texas(30.67N, 104.02W) one of a network of nine such instruments around the globe. The McDonald instrument views the sky at 5 wavelengths (5577A, 5893A, 6300A, 6950A, and 6050A) at a caidence of ~2 minutes per filter. The 6300A images from this site usually show patterns in the airglow due to the passage of MSTID's, but on June 1 an extraordinary event occurred. At the northern edge of the field of view, the diffuse aurora and a SAR arc are seen, while from the zenith to the south the optical signature of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), a depeletion in the airglow in the regions of plasma turbulence, is seen. This is the first time an ESF plume has been positivley identified in the airglow data from this site or from any site with such a high (~40 deg.) magnetic latitude. GPS TEC measurements, taken from a number of stations near McDonald, confirm the idenity of the airglow depletion as ESF. Why a moderate geomagnetic disturbance would lead to such dramatic ionospheric perturbations remains to be determined. Known factors contributing to the explanation envolve a combination of several factors. The timing of the storm was such that the maximum rate of change in Dst (indicating the penetration of electric fields into the low latitude ionosphere) happened near sunset at the magnetic equator on the magnetic meridian of Mcdonald Obs. In addition, the sunset terminator was nearly aligned with this magnetic meridian. Both of these conditions are favorable for an ESF plume to develop. The penetration electric fields due to the storm further enhanced the growth rate pushing the plume

  3. Singular Plasma Disturbance in the Low-Latitude F Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Heelis, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here a new phenomenon characterized by unusual patterns of ion drifts inside ion density depletion regions observed by the AE-E satellite in the low-latitude F region. In about 30 depletions, vertical ion drift relative to the background was upward on the western sides, downward on the eastern sides, and zero near the middle where the density depletion was greatest. These drift characteristics are distinct from those observed in plasma bubble depletions. The structures reported here were observed on circular orbits below 300 km altitude and had density depletions of up to 2 orders of magnitude or more below the ambient ion density. The upward and downward drift excursions were up to 200 m/s relative to the background. Almost all these structures were observed over oceans or near coasts and largely between +/- 10 deg and +/- 30 deg clip latitude. The structures were observed mostly as isolated, single depletion regions with the majority of them about 250 km wide in the east-west direction. They occurred during quiet magnetic conditions with near-equal occurrence frequencies in the premidnight and postmidnight periods. The characteristic density and drift signatures indicate westward propagating disturbances in which the bottomside F layer is first lifted and then returned back to its original position, leaving the ionosphere undisturbed after the disturbance passes by. The estimated speed of these disturbances is of the order of 200 m/s. These unique solitary plasma disturbances, which we designate as singular plasma disturbances, are associated with a propagating source of E x B drift, not driven by neutral perturbations at the altitude of observation.

  4. On the surface composition of Triton's southern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, B. J.; Young, L. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Olkin, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of an investigation to determine the longitudinal (zonal) distributions and temporal evolution of ices on the surface of Triton. Between 2002 and 2014, we obtained 63 nights of near-infrared (0.67-2.55 μ m) spectra using the SpeX instrument at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Triton has spectral features in this wavelength region from N2, CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O. Absorption features of ethane (C2H6) and 13CO are coincident at 2.405 μ m, a feature that we detect in our spectra. We calculated the integrated band area (or fractional band depth in the case of H2O) in each nightly average spectrum, constructed longitudinal distributions, and quantified temporal evolution for each of the chosen absorption bands. The volatile ices (N2, CO, CH4) show significant variability over one Triton rotation and have well-constrained longitudes of peak absorption. The non-volatile ices (CO2, H2O) show poorly-constrained peak longitudes and little variability. The longitudinal distribution of the 2.405 μ m band shows little variability over one Triton rotation and is 97 ± 44 ° and 92 ± 44 ° out of phase with the 1.58 μ m and 2.35 μ m CO bands, respectively. This evidence indicates that the 2.405 μ m band is due to absorption from non-volatile ethane. CH4 absorption increased over the period of the observations while absorption from all other ices showed no statistically significant change. We conclude from these results that the southern latitudes of Triton are currently dominated by non-volatile ices and as the sub-solar latitude migrates northwards, a larger quantity of volatile ice is coming into view.

  5. Improved fire radiative energy estimation in high latitude ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchiorre, A.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists, land managers, and policy makers are facing new challenges as fire regimes are evolving as a result of climate change (Westerling et al. 2006). In high latitudes fires are increasing in number and size as temperatures increase and precipitation decreases (Kasischke and Turetsky 2006). Peatlands, like the large complexes in the Alaskan tundra, are burning more frequently and severely as a result of these changes, releasing large amounts of greenhouse gases. Remotely sensed data are routinely used to monitor the location of active fires and the extent of burned areas, but they are not sensitive to the depth of the organic soil layer combusted, resulting in underestimation of peatland greenhouse gas emissions when employing the conventional 'bottom up' approach (Seiler and Crutzen 1980). An alternative approach would be the direct estimation of the biomass burned from the energy released by the fire (Fire Radiative Energy, FRE) (Wooster et al. 2003). Previous works (Boschetti and Roy 2009; Kumar et al. 2011) showed that the sampling interval of polar orbiting satellite systems severely limits the accuracy of the FRE in tropical ecosystems (up to four overpasses a day with MODIS), but because of the convergence of the orbits, more observations are available at higher latitudes. In this work, we used a combination of MODIS thermal data and Landsat optical data for the estimation of biomass burned in peatland ecosystems. First, the global MODIS active fire detection algorithm (Giglio et al. 2003) was modified, adapting the temperature thresholds to maximize the number of detections in boreal regions. Then, following the approach proposed by Boschetti and Roy (2009), the FRP point estimations were interpolated in time and space to cover the full temporal and spatial extent of the burned area, mapped with Landsat5 TM data. The methodology was tested on a large burned area in Alaska, and the results compared to published field measurements (Turetsky et al. 2011).

  6. Implementing high-latitude biogeochemical processes into Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Kleinen, Thomas; Cresto-Aleina, Fabio; Kloster, Silvia; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Projections of future climate changes suggest that air temperatures in the Arctic could rise to the levels unprecedented in the last million years. Sensitivity of carbon storages on land and shelves to climate change of that scale is highly uncertain. Earth System models (ESMs), consisting of atmosphere, ocean, land, and cryosphere components are the main tools to understand interactions between carbon cycle and climate. However, ESM representation of ecological and biogeochemical processes in the Arctic is extremely simplistic. For example, all ESMs agree that tree cover in the future warming scenarios will move northwards to the Arctic coast, but they ignore interactions between vegetation, permafrost, and disturbances such as fires, which are critical for vegetation dynamics in this region. Improving modeling of interactions between model components and their evaluation against growing observational evidence is a promising research area. The first attempts to account for the permafrost carbon dynamics in the ESM framework suggest that CO2 and CH4 emissions from high-latitude regions in the 21st century are relatively small, but they become much more significant afterwards due to committed climate changes. Therefore, extension of ESM simulations beyond 2100 is essential to estimate a proper scale of frozen carbon pool response to human-induced climate change. Additionally, inclusion of sub-sea permafrost component into ESMs is an active research area that brings together terrestrial and marine biogeochemical communities, as well as geologists analyzing climate proxies on glacial timescales. Another challenging aspect of biogeochemical interactions in Arctic is an extreme land surface heterogeneity. A mixture of wetlands, lakes, and vegetation-covered surfaces on fine local scale is not properly reflected in the model structure. A promising approach of dealing with scaling gaps in modeling high-latitude biogeochemical processes in ESMs will be presented.

  7. Satellite-based Wetland Mapping in High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, C. A.; Sheng, Y.; Smith, L. C.; Li, J.; Lyons, E.; Hinkel, K. M.; Winston, B.

    2008-12-01

    The flat terrain with poor drainage in high-latitude regions yields excessive wetlands characterized by saturated soil and riparian vegetation. These wetlands have long been recognized for their importance in the global carbon and hydrological cycles and continue to receive substantial attention. As a part of our NASA THP (Terrestrial Hydrology Program) project to assess recent terrestrial water storage change in Arctic lakes and wetlands, this paper addresses wetland mapping using remote sensing. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) have been widely used in wetland mapping to quantify vegetation and underlying surface water. However, the performance of such indices is limited by the "mixed pixel" effect due to the fact that a wetland pixel comprises of mixed spectral responses of water and vegetation. Hence, we propose to estimate the abundance of each of these surface materials within a pixel through a spectral unmixing approach. The general assumption in spectral unmixing is that the observed pixel spectrum is a linear combination of several endmembers denoting pure material spectra available in existing spectral libraries. The limited and poor availability of ground truth in regional-scale research however prohibits the use of library spectra, necessitating the use of unsupervised spectral unmixing techniques. The proposed research applies independent component analysis (ICA) to perform a non-orthogonal linear transformation of the multi-spectral Landsat images for an unsupervised spectral unmixing to obtain water and vegetation abundances, which are crucial to wetland mapping. The method is highly efficient with a high-level of replicability and automation. Performance of the proposed approach is evaluated quantitatively, and a high accuracy is achieved in high-latitude wetland mapping.

  8. Speciation, Ecological Opportunity, and Latitude (American Society of Naturalists Address).

    PubMed

    Schluter, Dolph

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses to explain the greater numbers of species in the tropics than the temperate zone include greater age and area, higher temperature and metabolic rates, and greater ecological opportunity. These ideas make contrasting predictions about the relationship between speciation processes and latitude, which I elaborate and evaluate. Available data suggest that per capita speciation rates are currently highest in the temperate zone and that diversification rates (speciation minus extinction) are similar between latitudes. In contrast, clades whose oldest analyzed dates precede the Eocene thermal maximum, when the extent of the tropics was much greater than today, tend to show highest speciation and diversification rates in the tropics. These findings are consistent with age and area, which is alone among hypotheses in predicting a time trend. Higher recent speciation rates in the temperate zone than the tropics suggest an additional response to high ecological opportunity associated with low species diversity. These broad patterns are compelling but provide limited insights into underlying mechanisms, arguing that studies of speciation processes along the latitudinal gradient will be vital. Using threespine stickleback in depauperate northern lakes as an example, I show how high ecological opportunity can lead to rapid speciation. The results support a role for ecological opportunity in speciation, but its importance in the evolution of the latitudinal gradient remains uncertain. I conclude that per capita evolutionary rates are no longer higher in the tropics than the temperate zone. Nevertheless, the vast numbers of species that have already accumulated in the tropics ensure that total rate of species production remains highest there. Thus, tropical evolutionary momentum helps to perpetuate the steep latitudinal biodiversity gradient. PMID:26814593

  9. Recent low-latitude freeze thaw on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, David P.

    2007-07-01

    Outside polar latitudes, features corresponding to surface thaw have yet to be identified on Mars. The youthful gully landforms observed at mid-high latitude [Malin, M., Edgett, K., 2000. Science 288, 2330-2335] are the nearest candidate, but the source (and nature) of the gully carving agent remains controversial [e.g., Musselwhite, D.S., Swindle, T.D., Lunine, J.I., 2001. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 1283-1285; Mellon, M.T., Phillips, R.J., 2001. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 1-15; Knauth, L.P., Burt, D.M., 2002. Icarus 158, 267-271; Costard, F., Forget, F., Mangold, N., Peulvast, J.P., 2002. Science 295, 110-113; Christensen, P.R., 2003. Nature 422, 45-48; Treiman, A.H., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. 108]. At higher obliquity than the present epoch, near-surface ground ice should be present globally [Mellon, M.T., Jakosky, B.M., 1995. J. Geophys. Res. 100 (E6), 11781-11799], populated by condensation of atmospheric water vapour in the top few metres of the regolith, or emplaced as dusty ice sheets reaching down towards the equator. The latitudinal restriction of these gullies to regions poleward of ±30° appears to argue against a thaw component to their formation—since ground ice is present and stable at all latitudes at high obliquity, the current (low) obliquity regime should result in ground ice thaw at low latitudes, where insolation and daytime temperatures are currently greatest, and this is not observed. A previously undescribed meltwater sequence in the Cerberus plains, at 20° N/187° E, shows that comparable, but much more continuous, and mappable melting and surface runoff have occurred in the geologically recent past at near-equatorial latitudes on Mars. Polygonal ground in the Cerberus plains is seen by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) to suffer sequential, regional-scale volatile-loss consistent with thaw of near-surface ground ice under periglacial conditions. This degradation is continuously sampled by a single MOC strip, showing an icy

  10. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: onset latitude dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Wild, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2008-12-01

    Using data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) we investigate the ionospheric convection response to magnetospheric substorms. Substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, and were then grouped according to the magnetic latitude of their onset. A superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection patterns for each latitude group was then performed using radar data for the interval 60 minutes before onset to 90 minutes after. It is found that lower latitude onset substorms are associated with generally more enhanced convection than the higher latitude substorms, although they suffer from the most significant localised suppression of the flow in the midnight sector during the expansion phase. On the other hand, the higher-latitude events are associated with a significant and rapid increase in the nightside convection following substorm onset. These results suggest differences in the electrodynamics associated with substorms occurring at different latitudes.

  11. Precipitation correlation between convective available potential energy, convective inhibition and saturation fraction in middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkiđija, Sanda; Fuchs, Željka

    2013-04-01

    Saturation fraction (SF), convective inhibition (CIN) and convective available potential energy (CAPE) are discussed to see with which of these parameters' precipitation rate is better correlated in the middle latitudes. The study is based on measurements from 20 European stations for the period of 1972-2009. We also use the results of the Global Forecasting System (GFS) model to see how mentioned parameters behave in numerical models. Our research results indicate that CAPE is not a good measure of precipitation rate for all latitudes, although, in model results, CAPE and precipitation rate are found to be better correlated for middle latitudes then in higher latitudes and tropical regions. The best correlation with precipitation rate in middle latitudes is one with SF. Our results suggest that moisture is underestimated in numerical models for middle latitudes and encourage further work in including SF or similar parameter into precipitation parameterization in addition to the current one.

  12. Low- and mid-latitude ionospheric electric fields during the January 1984 GISMOS campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, B. G.; Kelley, M. C.; Senior, C.; De La Beaujardiere, O.; Lepping, R.

    1990-01-01

    The electrical coupling between the high-, middle-, and low-latitude ionospheres during January 17-19, 1984 is examined, using interplanetary and high-latitude magnetic field data together with F region plasma drift measurements from the EISCAT, Sondre Stromfjord, Millstone Hill, Saint-Santin, Arecibo, and Jicamarca incoherent scatter radars. The penetration both the zonal and meridional electric field components of high-latitude origin into the low-latitude and the equatorial ionospheres are studied. The observations in the postmidnight sector are used to compare the longitudinal variations of the zonal perturbation electric field with predictions made from global convection models. The results show that the meridional electric field perturbations are considerably more attenuated with decreasing latitude than the zonal fluctuations. It is concluded that variations in the meridional electric field at low latitudes are largely due to dynamo effects.

  13. Multi-spacecraft observations of heliographic latitude-longitude structure in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, E. J., Jr.; Smith, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    The heliographic latitude-longitude structure of high speed solar winds observed prior to the maximum of sunspot cycle 20 is investigated by multi-spacecraft comparisons. It is shown that differences in solar wind structures are due to two different kinds of spatial structures. One structure is found to be consistent with the simultaneous existence of a single, broad stream at latitudes above 7 deg N and a series of narrow streams at lower latitudes, while the other is consistent with the existence of a latitudinally sloping stream boundary near the solar equator. For latitude separations less than 3.5 deg, cross-correlations of Explorer-Mariner velocities show only previously reported systematic increases in velocity with latitude, and for latitude separations from 3.5 to 6.2 deg, differences in high speed streams shift in longitude and/or amplitude are also identified on a timescale of one solar rotation.

  14. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D in African-origin populations at varying latitudes challenges the construct of a physiologic norm123

    PubMed Central

    Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon A; Camacho, Pauline; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence; Lambert, Estelle V; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Aloia, John; Tayo, Bamidele; Dugas, Lara R; Cooper, Richard S; Luke, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The vitamin D–endocrine system is thought to play a role in physiologic processes that range from mineral metabolism to immune function. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is the accepted biomarker for vitamin D status. Skin color is a key determinant of circulating 25(OH)D concentrations, and genes responsible for melanin content have been shown to be under strong evolutionary selection in populations living in temperate zones. Little is known about the effect of latitude on mean concentrations of 25(OH)D in dark-skinned populations. Objective: The objective was to describe the distribution of 25(OH)D and its subcomponents in 5 population samples of African origin from the United States, Jamaica, Ghana, South Africa, and the Seychelles. Design: Participants were drawn from the Modeling of the Epidemiologic Transition Study, a cross-sectional observational study in 2500 adults, ages 25–45 y, enrolled between January 2010 and December 2011. Five hundred participants, ∼50% of whom were female, were enrolled in each of 5 study sites: Chicago, IL (latitude: 41°N); Kingston, Jamaica (17°N); Kumasi, Ghana (6°N); Victoria, Seychelles (4°S); and Cape Town, South Africa (34°S). All participants had an ancestry primarily of African origin; participants from the Seychelles trace their history to East Africa. Results: A negative correlation between 25(OH)D and distance from the equator was observed across population samples. The frequency distribution of 25(OH)D in Ghana was almost perfectly normal (Gaussian), with progressively lower means and increasing skewness observed at higher latitudes. Conclusions: It is widely assumed that lighter skin color in populations outside the tropics resulted from positive selection, driven in part by the relation between sun exposure, skin melanin content, and 25(OH)D production. Our findings show that robust compensatory mechanisms exist that create tolerance for wide variation in circulating concentrations of 25(OH

  15. A two-dimensional array study of low-latitude PC 5 geomagnetic pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Ziesolleck, C.W.S.; Chamalaun, F.H.

    1993-08-01

    The authors report a study of Pc 5 wave activity made using the Australia Wide Array of Geomagnetic Stations, to study such wave activity at low latitudes. They filtered the signals to look at polarization properties. They found little frequency variation across the latitude or longitude range sampled. There was a general amplitude decrease toward lower latitudes, a variation in the polarization on a daily basis, and phase variations across the array.

  16. [South] Yemen.

    PubMed

    1989-12-01

    Yemen has an area of 112,000 square miles, the terrain is mountainous in the interior, and has a flat and sandy coast. The climate is extremely hot with little rainfall. 2.2 million is the population level with an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The ethnic background is Arab, the religion is Islam and the language is Arabic. 50 years is the average life expectancy and the infant mortality rate is 142/1000. The labor force is 42% agriculture, fisheries, industry and commerce 31%, and services 27%. A republic formed in 1967, the government has a constitution approved in 1978. They have 1 party, the Yemeni Socialist Party with a executive presidium, a supreme people's council and a federal high court. Natural resources include oil and fish, and agricultural products are cotton, hides, skins, and coffee. In 1962 the Federation of South Arabia was formed and a treaty was signed in 1959 for independence by 1968. There was much turmoil from 1967 until 1986 when Haydar Bakr Al-Attus gained power, and there are still strong internal rivalries. The economy has been concentrated in the city of Aden, and with the loss of tourist trade in 1967, and closing of the British base, it has declined by more than 20% by 1968. Attempts are being made to build roads, fisheries, villages, a power plant, and agriculture and irrigation projects. PMID:12178022

  17. Additional measurements of the high-latitude sunspot rotation rate /Research note/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D. A.; Takushi, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    Sunspot rotation rate measurements at high sunspot latitudes are reported for the period 1966-68, based on ten spots at latitudes greater than about 28 deg from H-alpha patrol records for this period. A sidereal rotation rate of 13.70 + or - 0.07 deg/day was found on the average, at 31.05 + or - 0.01 deg. Taken together, the full set of measurements in this latitude regime yield a rotation rate that is in excellent agreement with the result derived by Newton and Nunn (1951) from recurrent spots at lower latitudes throughout the six cycles from 1878 to 1944.

  18. Additional measurements of the high-latitude sunspot rotation rate /Research note/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, D. A.; Takushi, J. T.

    1981-10-01

    Sunspot rotation rate measurements at high sunspot latitudes are reported for the period 1966-68, based on ten spots at latitudes greater than about 28 deg from H-alpha patrol records for this period. A sidereal rotation rate of 13.70 + or - 0.07 deg/day was found on the average, at 31.05 + or - 0.01 deg. Taken together, the full set of measurements in this latitude regime yield a rotation rate that is in excellent agreement with the result derived by Newton and Nunn (1951) from recurrent spots at lower latitudes throughout the six cycles from 1878 to 1944.

  19. Determination of solar proton fluxes and energies at high solar latitudes by UV radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The latitudinal variation of the solar proton flux and energy causes a density increase at high solar latitudes of the neutral gas penetrating the heliosphere. Measurements of the neutral density by UV resonance radiation observations from interplanetary spacecraft thus permit deductions on the dependence of the solar proton flux on heliographic latitude. Using both the results of Mariner 10 measurements and of other off-ecliptic solar wind observations, the values of the solar proton fluxes and energies at polar heliographic latitudes are determined for several cases of interest. The Mariner 10 analysis, together with IPS results, indicate a significant decrease of the solar proton flux at polar latitudes.

  20. Equatorial Forcing of Annual SSH Signals off Western South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strub, P. T.; Matano, R. P.; James, C.; Palma, E. D.

    2007-05-01

    Results from previous modeling studies have shown that equatorial signals (ENSO) affect the interannual variability of the coastal ocean off western North America (the California Current). The specific case of the 1997- 98 El Niño is well documented with respect to the movement of the high sea surface height (SSH) signal from the equator to the California Current, using altimeter data. On the other hand, the annual cycle of SSH and circulation off western North America is thought to be controlled by the regional winds and heat fluxes at mid- latitudes. Off western South America (in the Humboldt Current), the connection between mid-latitude and equatorial coastal ocean is more direct than in the Northern Hemisphere. Both inter-annual and intra-seasonal signals at mid-latitudes (20°-30°S) have been traced to the equator. More recently, a semi- annual component of the seasonal cycle of the thermocline depth off northern Chile has been identified and hypothesized to originate at lower latitudes. In this study we use altimeter SSH and numerical models of the oceanic circulation off western South America to investigate the influence of equatorial dynamics on the annual cycle at mid-latitudes. A basin-scale numerical model of the circulation and SSH, forced by NCEP surface winds, is used to force regional models of ocean circulation off Peru and Chile, with boundary conditions that either include or exclude the basin-scale model's equatorial signals. Differences between the circulation off Peru and Chile under the two types of boundary conditions quantify the degree to which the seasonal cycles are controlled by distant forcing. In particular, a deep signal with a peak in austral winter appears to be driven by remote sensing, as is a shallow signal with a peak in austral summer. Altimeter and in situ data are used to verify the results.

  1. Effects of the intense geomagnetic storm of September-October 2012 on the equatorial, low- and mid-latitude F region in the American and African sector during the unusual 24th solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, R.; Fagundes, P. R.; Coster, A.; Bolaji, O. S.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; de Abreu, A. J.; Venkatesh, K.; Gende, M.; Abalde, J. R.; Sumod, S. G.

    2016-02-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the response of the ionospheric F layer in the American and African sectors during the intense geomagnetic storm which occurred on 30 September-01 October 2012. In this work, we used observations from a chain of 20 GPS stations in the equatorial, low- and mid-latitude regions in the American and African sectors. Also, in this study ionospheric sounding data obtained during 29th September to 2nd October, 2012 at Jicamarca (JIC), Peru, São Luis (SL), Fortaleza (FZ), Brazil, and Port Stanley (PST), are presented. On the night of 30 September-01 October, in the main and recovery phase, the h´F variations showed an unusual uplifting of the F region at equatorial (JIC, SL and FZ) and mid- (PST) latitude stations related with the propagations of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) generated by Joule heating at auroral regions. On 30 September, the VTEC variations and foF2 observations at mid-latitude stations (American sector) showed a long-duration positive ionospheric storm (over 6 h of enhancement) associated with large-scale wind circulations and equatorward neutral winds. Also, on 01 October, a long-duration positive ionospheric storm was observed at equatorial, low- and mid- latitude stations in the African sector, related with the large-scale wind circulations and equatorward neutral winds. On 01 and 02 October, positive ionospheric storms were observed at equatorial, low- and mid-latitude stations in the American sector, possibly associated with the TIDs and an equatorward neutral wind. Also, on 01 October negative ionospheric storms were observed at equatorial, low- and mid-latitude regions in the American sector, probably associated with the changes in the O/N2 ratio. On the night of 30 September-01 October, ionospheric plasma bubbles were observed at equatorial, low- and mid- latitude stations in the South American sector, possibly associated with the occurrence of geomagnetic storm.

  2. Evidence for slow periglacial mass wasting in the southern mid-latitudes, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Andreas; Reiss, Dennis; Conway, Susan; Hauber, Ernst; Hiesinger, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Solifluction is a common mass-wasting process in permafrost regions on Earth. The main solifluction processes include frost creep, and/or gelifluction [Matsuoka, 2001]. On Earth solifluction lobes are strong indicators of past or present freeze-thaw activity and represent a potentially useful source of paleoclimatic information [Åkerman, 2005]. Previously, well-preserved small-scale lobes lobes have been reported in the northern mid-and-high latitudes on Mars by several authors [Balme et al., 2013 and references therein]. Based on morphology and integrated landform analysis [Gallagher et al., 2011; Gallagher and Balme, 2011], morphometry and Earth-analogues [Johnsson et al., 2012] the proposed mechanism is by solifluction. By implication, this suggests active-layer formation and consequently transient liquid water close to the surface at repeated times in the recent climate history on Mars, which is contrary to modeling [Kreslavsky et al., 2008]. In this study we extend our search to the latitude band 40°S and 80°S on Mars. Like the northern counterparts, the observed small-scale lobes show striking similarities to solifluction lobes on Earth and they are typically located in a context associated with thermal contraction polygons and gullies. The small-scale lobes are tens to hundreds of meters wide with well-defined lobe fronts (risers). The risers are in the order of decimeters to a few meters (<5m) high. Individual lobes overlap or occur as sheet-like landforms. They are restricted to crater walls and hillslopes and are not confined to valley topography. They lack attributes typically associated with creep/deformation of ice or ice-rich debris such as crevasses, compression ridges and furrows. Hence they are morphologically different from glacial landforms such as Viscous Flow Features [Milliken et al., 2003] and Lobate Debris Aprons [e.g. Mangold 2003]. Previously, small-scale lobes have only been observed at a few sites in the south using Mars Orbiter

  3. Variability of Sea Surface Temperature Response to Tropical Cyclones along the NEC Bifurcation Latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, I.; Villanoy, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The east of the Philippines serves as an entry point to an annual average of 20 tropical cyclones. The ocean is dynamic where the North Equatorial Current (NEC) bifurcates into the Kurushio Current to the north and Mindanao Current to the south. The displacement and intensity of NEC bifurcation in the region varies seasonally and interannually driven by local monsoons and ENSO. The variability of the NEC bifurcation latitude may alter the origins of the Kuroshio and modify the sea surface temperature field, which can alter the strength of the typhoons and upper ocean response. This paper aims to characterize the variability of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Response to Tropical Cyclones along with the NEC Bifurcation latitude using daily merged product of the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E), Sea Surface Height (SSH) and SSH Anomaly (SSHA) from AVISO and background climatological D26 (depth of 26 °C) and T100 (depth integrated temperature up to 100 meters) from ARGO profiles and CTD data from WOA09 from 2003 to 2012. SSH measurements from this period were used as a proxy for determining the bifurcation latitude (YB). Characteristics of the meridional distribution from 0° to 30°N of D26 is homogenous along 10-15°N. Monthly mean D26 along 10-15°N, 125-145°E shows high correlation with YB . Variations of the D26 and T100 showed deepening and warming along with YB. Two regions were derived from meridional distribution of T100 namely BSouth (<15°N) where background climatological condition is warm all throughout the year with deep D26 and BNorth (>15°N), where background climatological condition is shallow (D26) and varies seasonally. These regions where used to compare variability with respect to SST recovery time and the SST maximum change (ΔSSTmax) along with other factors such as TCs translation speed (TS) and intensity based on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Results showed that in both regions SST Recovery

  4. Certain regularities of geomagnetic and Baric fields at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansurov, S. M.; Mansurov, G. S.; Mansurova, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a relation between the variations of magnetic field at earth's surface in near-pole regions and the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field is considered as the evidence of the influence of the solar wind with its magnetic field on the processes proceeding in the magnetosphere. Two peculiarities between geomagnetic and interplanetary fields are discussed in detail: the north-south and spring-autumn asymmetry.

  5. Possible influence of western North Pacific monsoon on TC activity in mid-latitudes of East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ki-Seon; Cha, Yumi; Kim, Hae-Dong; Kang, Sung-Dae

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the correlation between tropical cyclone (TC) frequency and the Western North Pacific monsoon index (WNPMI), which have both been influential in East Asia's mid-latitude regions during the summer season over the past 37 years (1977-2013). A high positive correlation existed between these two variables, which was not reduced even if El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) years were excluded. To determine the cause of this positive correlation, the highest (positive WNPMI phase) and lowest WNPMIs (negative WNPMI phase) during a nine-year period were selected to analyze the mean difference between them, excluding ENSO years. In the positive WNPMI phase, TCs were mainly generated in the eastern seas of the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific, passing through the East China Sea and moving northward toward Korea and Japan. In the negative phase, TCs were mainly generated in the western seas of the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific, passing through the South China Sea and moving westward toward China's southern regions. Therefore, TC intensity in the positive phase was stronger due to the acquisition of sufficient energy from the sea while moving a long distance up to East Asia's mid-latitude. Additionally, TCs occurred more in the positive phase. Regarding the difference of the two phases between the 850 and 500-hPa streamlines, anomalous cyclones were strengthened in the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific, whereas anomalous anticyclones were strengthened in East Asia's mid-latitude regions. Due to these two anomalous pressure systems, anomalous southeasterlies developed in East Asia's mid-latitude regions, which played a role in the anomalous steering flows that moved TCs into these regions. Furthermore, due to the anomalous cyclones that developed in the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific, more TCs could be generated in the positive phase. Both the lower and upper tropospheric layers had warm anomalies

  6. High latitude hydrological changes during the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Srinath; Pagani, Mark; Huber, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy

    2014-10-01

    -enriched signals at the base of the event, including (1) intense local drying and cooling leading to evaporative 2H-enrichment; (2) changes in frequency/intensity of storm events and its impact on high latitude amount effects; and (3) changes in low-latitude temperatures. Evidence for hydrological shifts at the base of both hyperthermals suggests that hydrological change or the factors promoting hydrological change played a role in triggering the release of greenhouse gases. Generation of similar high-resolution isotopic- and temperature records at other latitudes is crucial for understanding the causal links between temperature and hydrological changes and may help constrain the source and mechanism of carbon release that triggered the early Eocene hyperthermals.

  7. Distance to northern high-latitude HI shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.

    2012-09-01

    Context. A detailed three-dimensional (3D) distribution of interstellar matter in the solar neighborhood is increasingly necessary. It would allow a more realistic computation of photons and cosmic rays propagation, which is of prime importance for microwave and gamma-ray background emission interpretation, as well as a better understanding of the chain of phenomena that gave rise to the main local structures. Aims: As part of a 3D mapping program, we aim at assigning a precise distance to the high-latitude HI gas, in particular the northern part (b ≥ 55°) of the shell associated with the conspicuous radio continuum Loop I. This shell is thought to be the expanding boundary of an interstellar bubble inflated and recently reheated by the strong stellar winds of the nearby Scorpius-Centaurus OB associations. Methods: We recorded high-resolution spectra of 30 A-type target stars located at various distances in the direction of the northern part of Loop I. Interstellar neutral sodium and singly ionized calcium absorptions (NaI 5889-5895 and CaII K-H 3934-3968 Å) are modeled and compared with the HI emission spectra from the LAB Survey. Results: About two-thirds of our stellar spectra possess narrow interstellar lines, while the remaining spectra show no absorption at all. Narrow lines are located at the velocity of the main, low-velocity Loop 1 HI shell ([-6, +1] km s-1 in the LSR). Using Hipparcos distances to the target stars, we show that the closest boundary of the b ≥ + 70° part of this low-velocity Loop I arch is located at of 98 ± 6 pc. The corresponding interval for the lower-latitude part (55 ≤ b ≤ 70°) is 95-157 pc. However, since the two structures are apparently connected, the lower limit is more likely. At variance with this shell, the second HI structure (b ≥ +85°), which is characterized by LSR Doppler velocities centered at -30 km s-1, is NOT detected in any of the optical spectra. It is located beyond 200 parsecs or totally depleted in

  8. How the effects of winds and electric fields in F2-layer storms vary with latitude and longitude - A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, M.; He, X.-Q.; Rishbeth, H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of thermospheric winds and electric fields on the ionospheric F2-layer are controlled by the geometry of the magnetic field, and so vary with latitude and longitude. A simple model of the daytime F2-layer is adopted and the effects at midlatitudes (25-65 deg geographic) of three processes that accompany geomagnetic storms: (1) thermospheric changes due to auroral heating; (2) equatorward winds that tend to cancel the quiet-day poleward winds; and (3) the penetration of magnetospheric electric fields are studied. At +/- 65 deg, the effects of heating and electric fields are strongest in the longitudes toward which the geomagnetic dipole is tilted, i.e., the North American and the South Indian Ocean sectors. Because of the proximity of the geomagnetic equator to the East Asian and South American sectors, the reverse is true at +/- 25 deg.

  9. Trends in column ozone based on TOMS data - Dependence on month, latitude, and longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Xufeng; Frederick, John E.; Stein, Michael L.; Tiao, George C.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of the TOMS satellite column ozone data in latitudes 70 deg S-70 deg N from November 1978 to May 1990, a statistical model is used to estimate the trends in ozone as a function of latitude, longitude, and month. The trends in the TOMS ozone data are highly seasonal and dependent on location. Near the equator, the estimated monthly trends are not significantly different from zero. For high latitudes, most of the estimated monthly trends are negative. In January, February, and March, there are some positive trend estimates in the western hemisphere around latitude 60 deg N. The most negative trends for these three months also appear in the high latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Starting in June, more negative trends appear in the latitudes 50 deg S-70 deg S than the trends in the rest of the world considered. A large depletion develops during the spring time (September to November) in the southern high-latitude region, and the area of peak ozone decline is moving eastward during the period. The largest negative trends (about -29 percent per decade) for the area considered in this study appear in October around the latitude 70 deg S and longitudes 20 deg W-100 deg W region. For the northern hemisphere, the year-round trend estimates for latitudes 30 deg N-70 deg N range from -0.96 percent to -7.43 percent per decade. In the latitudes 30 deg N-50 deg N, the winter trend estimates are more negative than those for the summer and the fall. However, this pattern did not hold for latitudes 50 deg N-70 deg N.

  10. Autonomous, continuously recording broadband seismic stations at high-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B.; Parker, T.; Bonnett, B.; Tytgat, G.; Anderson, K.; Fowler, J.

    2009-04-01

    IRIS PASSCAL is in the third year of an NSF funded development and acquisition effort to establish a pool of cold-hardened seismic stations specifically for high-latitude broadband deployments. We have two complete years of field trials and have successfully recorded continuous seismic data during both years with data recovery rates of ~90%. Our design is premised on a 2W autonomous system recording to local media, capable of lasting two years without service. The system is composed of four new design elements: a heavily insulated station enclosure; a state-of-health (SOH) Iridium modem; a light weight, easily deployed solar panel mount; and a power system that includes power switching between primary (Lithium Thionyl Chloride) and secondary batteries. The station enclosures have proved most critical in keeping our data acquisition systems operating within manufacturer specifications and primary batteries within a 50-70% efficiency range. Enclosures with 2.5cm-thick vacuum panels and 5cm of foam insulation have kept interior enclosure temperatures 25-30°C above background (typically below -50°C). This austral summer we are deploying version three of our enclosures. Significant changes in the design include thicker vacuum panels (5cm), more robust construction, and simplified cable routing. An important aspect of our station design is easy installation and minimal weight. To simplify installation our station enclosures are packed with datalogger, SOH communications and batteries in the lab or base camp, so that access to the internal components is not necessary at the remote site. Bulkhead connectors allow a user to fully interact with the system without ever having to open the enclosure. Solar panel mounts are also fully constructed prior to deployment. Once on site, digging two large holes (one for the enclosure and one for the broadband seismometer) and constructing the site takes roughly 2 hours. A station designed to record continuously for 12-14 months is

  11. Paleoclimate records at high latitude in Arctic during the Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salpin, Marie; Schnyder, Johann; Baudin, François; Suan, Guillaume; Labrousse, Loïc; Popescu, Speranta; Suc, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Paleoclimate records at high latitude in Arctic during the Paleogene SALPIN Marie1,2, SCHNYDER Johann1,2, BAUDIN François1,2, SUAN Guillaume3, LABROUSSE Loïc1,2, POPESCU Speranta4, SUC Jean-Pierre1,4 1: Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7193, Institut des Sciences de la Terre Paris (iSTeP), F 75005, Paris, France 2: CNRS, UMR 7193, Institut des Sciences de la Terre Paris (iSTeP), F 75005 Paris, France 3: UCB Lyon 1, UMR 5276, LGLTPE, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France 4: GEOBIOSTRATDATA.CONSULTING, 385 Route du Mas Rillier 69140 Rillieux la Pape, France The Paleogene is a period of important variations of the Earth climate system either in warming or cooling. The climatic optima of the Paleogene have been recognized both in continental and marine environment. This study focus on high latitudes of the northern hemisphere, in the Arctic Basin. The basin has had an influence on the Cenozoic global climate change according to its polar position. Is there a specific behaviour of the Arctic Basin with respect to global climatic stimuli? Are there possible mechanisms of coupling/decoupling of its dynamics with respect to the global ocean? To answer these questions a unique collection of sedimentary series of Paleogene age interval has been assembled from the Laurentian margin in Northern Yukon (Canada) and from the Siberian margin (New Siberian Islands). Selected continental successions of Paleocene-Eocene age were used to study the response of the Arctic system to known global events, e.g. the climatic optima of the Paleogene (the so-called PETM, ETM2 or the Azolla events). Two sections of Paleocene-Eocene age were sampled near the Mackenzie delta, the so-called Coal Mine (CoMi) and Caribou Hills (CaH) sections. The aim of the study is to precise the climatic fluctuations and to characterise the source rock potential of the basin, eventually linked to the warming events. This study is based on data of multi-proxy analyses: mineralogy on bulk and clay

  12. Exposed Ice in the Northern Mid-Latitudes of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    2007-01-01

    Ice-Rich Layer: Polygonal features with dimensions of approximately 100 meters, bounded by cracks, are commonly observed on the martian northern plains. These features are generally attributed to thermal cracking of ice-rich sediments, in direct analogy to polygons in terrestrial polar regions. We mapped polygons in the northern mid-latitudes (30 to 65 N) using MOC and HiRISE images. Polygons are scattered across the northern plains, with a particular concentration in western Utopia Planitia. This region largely overlaps the Late Amazonian Astapus Colles unit, characterized by polygonal terrain and nested pits consistent with periglacial and thermokarst origins. Bright and Dark Polygonal Cracks: An examination of all MOC images (1997 through 2003) covering the study area demonstrated that, at latitudes of 55 to 65 N, most of the imaged polygons show bright bounding cracks. We interpret these bright cracks as exposed ice. Between 40 and 55 N, most of the imaged polygons show dark bounding cracks. These are interpreted as polygons from which the exposed ice has been removed by sublimation. The long-term stability limit for exposed ice, even in deep cracks, apparently lies near 55 N. Bright and Dark Spots: Many HiRISE and MOC frames showing polygons in the northern plains also show small numbers of bright and dark spots, particularly in western Utopia Planitia. Many of the spots are closely associated with collapse features suggestive of thermokarst. The spots range from tens to approximately 100 meters in diameter. The bright spots are interpreted as exposed ice, due to their prevalence on terrain mapped as ice rich. The dark spots are interpreted as former bright spots, which have darkened as the exposed ice is lost by sublimation. The bright spots may be the martian equivalents of pingos, ice-cored mounds found in periglacial regions on Earth. Terrestrial pingos from which the ice core has melted often collapse to form depressions similar to the martian dark spots

  13. Interhemispheric differences and solar cycle effects of the high-latitude ionospheric convection patterns deduced from Cluster EDI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Matthias; Haaland, Stein

    2015-04-01

    Here, we present a study of ionospheric convection at high latitudes that is based on satellite measurements of the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) on-board the Cluster satellites, which were obtained over a full solar cycle (2001-2013). The mapped drift measurements are covering both hemispheres and a variety of different solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The large amount of data allows us to perform more detailed statistical studies. We show that flow patterns and polar cap potentials can differ between the two hemispheres on statistical average for a given IMF orientation. In particular, during southward directed IMF conditions, and thus enhanced energy input from the solar wind, we find that the southern polar cap has a higher cross polar cap potential. We also find persistent north-south asymmetries which cannot be explained by external drivers alone. Much of these asymmetries can probably be explained by significant differences in the strength and configuration of the geomagnetic field between the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. Since the ionosphere is magnetically connected to the magnetosphere, this difference will also be reflected in the magnetosphere in the form of different feedback from the two hemispheres. Consequently, local ionospheric conditions and the geomagnetic field configuration are important for north-south asymmetries in large regions of geospace. The average convection is higher during periods with high solar activity. Although local ionospheric conditions may play a role, we mainly attribute this to higher geomagnetic activity due to enhanced solar wind - magnetosphere interactions.

  14. South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 May 2004 This image was collected February 29, 2004 during the end of southern summer season. The local time at the location of the image was about 2 pm. The image shows an area in the South Polar region.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -84.7, Longitude 9.3 East (350.7 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet

  15. Radiation characteristics of quasi-periodic radio bursts in the Jovian high-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Morioka, Akira; Nozawa, Hiromasa

    2008-12-01

    Ulysses had a "distant encounter" with Jupiter in February 2004. The spacecraft passed from north to south, and it observed Jovian radio waves from high to low latitudes (from +80° to +10°) for few months during its encounter. In this study, we present a statistical investigation of the occurrence characteristics of Jovian quasi-periodic bursts, using spectral data from the unified radio and plasma wave experiment (URAP) onboard Ulysses. The latitudinal distribution of quasi-periodic bursts is derived for the first time. The analysis suggested that the bursts can be roughly categorized into two types: one having periods shorter than 30 min and one with periods longer than 30 min, which is consistent with the results of the previous analysis of data from Ulysses' first Jovian flyby [MacDowall, R.J., Kaiser, M.L., Desch, M.D., Farrell, W.M., Hess, R.A., Stone, R.G., 1993. Quasi-periodic Jovian radio bursts: observations from the Ulysses radio and plasma wave. Experiment. Planet. Space Sci. 41, 1059-1072]. It is also suggested that the groups of quasi-periodic bursts showed a dependence on the Jovian longitude of the sub-solar point, which means that these burst groups are triggered during a particular rotational phase of the planet. Maps of the occurrence probability of these quasi-periodic bursts also showed a unique CML/MLAT dependence. We performed a 3D ray tracing analysis of the quasi-periodic burst emission to learn more about the source distribution. The results suggest that the longitudinal distribution of the occurrence probability depends on the rotational phase. The source region of quasi-periodic bursts seems to be located at an altitude between 0.4 and 1.4 Rj above the polar cap region ( L>30).

  16. Comparison of auroral latitude convection to central polar cap convection. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Amata, E.

    2013-12-01

    The SuperDARN radar at McMurdo station has been providing convection observations in the central polar cap since January 2010. The Antarctic magnetic pole lies in the center of the radar field of view at about 1000 km range, which is optimum for convection observations. A new pair of SuperDARN radars was constructed in the Antarctic summer of 2012/2013, which add highly complimentary fields of view. The radars, one located at the Italian station at Dome-C, and one located at the US South Pole Station, are directed into a region directly equatorward of the McMurdo field of view. The radars came on line in late January 2013 and are producing excellent convection observations. This paper presents initial results combining the three radar's convection observations. Intervals when the IMF clock angle was between 135 and 225 for periods of more than an hour were selected for study. Just under 50 hours of observations met this criteria since the radars began operation. Convection vectors were formed using the standard SuperDARN algorithm [Ruohoniemi and Baker, 1998] and the auroral-zone flows were compared to those in the central polar cap. Central polar cap flows are typically spatially uniform though highly variable in time, even though the lower latitude observations were spatially structured. The central polar cap average flow velocity is less than 500 m/s, though it often exceeds 1000 m/s. Conditions that lead to the high-speed flow are presented. In addition, correlation with the IMF and solar wind are presented. At times the correlation exceeds 80% while at others it is near zero.

  17. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 45 Degrees N., Center Longitude 11 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows part of the lowland plains in Sedna Planitia. Circular depressions with associated fracture patterns called 'coronae' are apparently unique to the lowlands of Venus, and tend to occur in linear clusters along the planet's major tectonic belts. Coronae differ greatly in size and detailed morphology: the central depression may or may not lie below the surrounding plains, and may or may not be surrounded by a raised rim or a moat outside the rim. The corona shown here is relatively small (100 km in diameter and 1 km deep) and is of the subtype known as an 'arachnoid' because of the spider-like configuration of concentric (body) and radial (legs) fractures. Coronae are thought to be caused by localized 'hot spot' magmatic activity in Venus' subsurface. Intrusion of magma into the crust first pushes up the surface, after which cooling and contraction create the central depression and generate a pattern of concentric fractures. In some cases, lava may be extruded onto the surface. The fractured ridge at the left is classified as a 'nova' or 'stellate fracture center' and is believed to represent an early phase of corona formation, in which subsidence due to cooling has not yet created the central depression, and the fracture pattern is still entirely radial. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1-45N011. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 439 x 474. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.82 -- 0.88. Vertical exaggeration: 100. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 150. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 600. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  18. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 15 Degrees S., Center Longitude 129 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows the boundary between the lowland plains and characteristic Venusian highland terrain in Ovda Regio, the western part of the great equatorial highland called Aphrodite Terra. For a view of the simpler lowland-highland boundary to the north, see PIA00310. The view is oblique to the southern boundary of Ovda. Whereas the lowlands to the right are made up of overlapping, relatively dark and smooth lava flows decorated with a system of parallel fractures, the highlands consist mainly of 'tessera terrain' with a complex pattern of intersecting sets of subparallel fractures and ridges. Notable here is the deep rift valley that transects the highlands in the center of the image. Such canyons are common where Venus' global network of tectonic belts traverses the highlands. A small 'island' of tessera terrain in the background shares the low emissivity (indicated by the blue color) of the larger surrounding tesserae. The larger, lower 'island' in the foreground has a much higher emissivity (shown in red), either because it lies at a slightly lower elevation or because of its age and origin. It appears to be a corona PIA00307. To the east of the region shown, the rift system forms a chain of moats linking numerous large and prominent coronae. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1-15S129. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 1125 x 1125. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.50 - - 0.89. Vertical exaggeration: 20. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 150. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 1200. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  19. Perspective View of Venus (Center Latitude 15 Degrees N., Center Longitude 77 Degrees E.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This perspective view of Venus, generated by computer from Magellan data and color-coded with emissivity, shows part of the lowlands to the north of Ovda Regio. The prominent topographic feature is a shield volcano, one of many distinct types of volcanic features on Venus. The volcano, with its partially breached summit caldera and central dome, bears a superficial resemblance to Mount St. Helens in this strongly vertically exaggerated view. In reality, it is roughly 700 km across, comparable to Olympus Mons on Mars, although it is only 2 km high. The extremely low, broad shape of the volcano probably results from the eruption of highly fluid lava such as basalt, combined with Venus' high surface temperature. Individual lava flows can be seen on the righthand side of the volcano, which has a slope of less than half a degree. The rugged area at the extreme right is part of a fracture zone that appears to extend under the volcano and may have provided a path by which lava was erupted. The cone-shaped hill in the foreground is an artifact caused by a single erroneous altimeter measurement; its size gives an indication of the horizontal resolution of the altimetry map. Magellan MIDR quadrangle* containing this image: C1-15N077. Image resolution (m): 225. Size of region shown (E-W x N-S, in km): 851 x 878. Range of emissivities from violet to red: 0.74 -- 0.84. Vertical exaggeration: 100. Azimuth of viewpoint (deg clockwise from East): 135. Elevation of viewpoint (km): 300. *Quadrangle name indicates approximate center latitude (N=north, S=south) and center longitude (East).

  20. Modelled glacier equilibrium line altitudes during the mid-Holocene in the southern mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, C.; Rojas, M.; Anderson, B. M.; Mackintosh, A. N.; Sagredo, E.; Moreno, P. I.

    2015-11-01

    Glacier behaviour during the mid-Holocene (MH, 6000 years BP) in the Southern Hemisphere provides observational data to constrain our understanding of the origin and propagation of palaeoclimate signals. In this study we examine the climatic forcing of glacier response in the MH by evaluating modelled glacier equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) and climatic conditions during the MH compared with pre-industrial time (PI, year 1750). We focus on the middle latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, specifically Patagonia and the South Island of New Zealand. Climate conditions for the MH were obtained from PMIP2 model simulations, which in turn were used to force a simple glacier mass balance model to simulate changes in ELA. In Patagonia, the models simulate colder conditions during the MH in austral summer (-0.2 °C), autumn (-0.5 °C), and winter (-0.4), and warmer temperatures (0.2 °C) during spring. In the Southern Alps the models show colder MH conditions in autumn (-0.7 °C) and winter (-0.4 °C), warmer conditions in spring (0.3 °C), and no significant change in summer temperature. Precipitation does not show significant changes but exhibits a seasonal shift, with less precipitation from April to September and more precipitation from October to April during the MH in both regions. The mass balance model simulates a climatic ELA that is 15-33 m lower during the MH compared with PI conditions. We suggest that the main causes of this difference are driven mainly by colder temperatures associated with the MH simulation. Differences in temperature have a dual effect on glacier mass balance: (i) less energy is available for ablation during summer and early autumn and (ii) lower temperatures cause more precipitation to fall as snow rather than rain in late autumn and winter, resulting in more accumulation and higher surface albedo. For these reasons, we postulate that the modelled ELA changes, although small, may help to explain larger glacier extents observed by 6000

  1. Impact of Solar Proton Events on High Latitude Ionospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the ionospheric response to the solar protons which are accelerated to different energies (MeV-GeV) and thought to be originated at the solar atmosphere during the various energetic phenomena knows as solar transients viz. Solar Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). These transients are believed to be a manifestation of same energy release processes from a highly complex condition in the magnetic field configuration on the solar surface. We have taken six solar proton events (SPE) of solar cycle 23rd for analysis in the various energy bands of the protons. In order to find the ionospheric responses to these incoming solar protons ionospheric total electron content (TEC) is taken as the characteristic parameter. We have taken the data observed by GOES satellites which provides the data for different energy channels (0.8-4 MeV, 4-9 MeV, 9-15 MeV, 15-40 MeV, 40-80 MeV, 80-165 MeV, and 165-500 MeV). The enhancement in peak TEC (∆TEC) was then obtained for the high latitude station Davis (Lat-68.35, Lon 77.58). To find the association of this enhancement with proton flux characteristics we derived the correspondence between spectral indices and ∆TEC. We obtained a strong correlation (0.84) to exist between the spectral indices and ∆TEC.

  2. Ectotherm thermal stress and specialization across altitude and latitude.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lauren B; Miller, Ethan F; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2013-10-01

    Gradients of air temperature, radiation, and other climatic factors change systematically but differently with altitude and latitude. We explore how these factors combine to produce altitudinal and latitudinal patterns of body temperature, thermal stress, and seasonal overlap that differ markedly from patterns based solely on air temperature. We use biophysical models to estimate body temperature as a function of an organism's phenotype and environmental conditions (air and surface temperatures and radiation). Using grasshoppers as a case study, we compare mean body temperatures and the incidence of thermal extremes along altitudinal gradients both under past and current climates. Organisms at high elevation can experience frequent thermal stress despite generally cooler air temperatures due to high levels of solar radiation. Incidences of thermal stress have increased more rapidly than have increases in mean conditions due to recent climate change. Increases in air temperature have coincided with shifts in cloudiness and solar radiation, which can exacerbate shifts in body temperature. We compare altitudinal thermal gradients and their seasonality between tropical and temperate mountains to ask whether mountain passes pose a greater physiological barrier in the tropics (Janzen's hypothesis). We find that considering body temperature rather than air temperature generally increases the amount of overlap in thermal conditions along gradients in elevation and thus decreases the physiological barrier posed by tropical mountains. Our analysis highlights the limitations of predicting thermal stress based solely on air temperatures, and the importance of considering how phenotypes influence body temperatures. PMID:23620253

  3. Latitude-Dependent Temperature Variations at the Solar Limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivian, M. D.; Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P.; Zahid, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    We use observations from the solar aspect sensor of RHESSI to characterize the latitude dependence of the temperature of the photosphere at the solar limb. Previous observations have suggested the presence of a polar temperature excess as large as 1.5 K. The RHESSI observations, made with a rotating telescope in space, have great advantages in the rejection of systematic errors in the very precise photometry required for such an observation. This photometry is differential, i.e. relative to a mean limb-darkening function. The data base consists of about 1,000 images per day from linear CCDs with 1.73 arc sec square pixels, observing a narrow band (12nm FWHM) at 670 nm. Each image shows a chord crossing the disk at a different location as the spacecraft rotates and precesses around its average solar pointing. We fit an average limb-darkening function and reassemble the residuals into synoptic maps of differential intensity variations as function of position angle. We further mask these images against SOHO/EIT 284A images in order to eliminate magnetic regions. The analysis establishes a limit on the quadrupole dependence of temperature (brightness) on position angle of 0.04 +/- 0.02 K. This results in a possible correction of our precise measurement of the solar oblateness which is smaller than its rms error of 0.14 mas.

  4. Equatorial and Low-Latitudes Ionospheric Reaction to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoli Candido, C. M.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Paula, E. R.; Takahashi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons are responsible for ionizing the terrestrial atmosphere and create the ionosphere. During solar flares, a fast increase in the electron density at different altitude regions takes place due to the abrupt enhance of the X-ray and EUV fluxes reaching Earth. With these changes in the ionosphere, radio communication and navigation can be drastically affected. The magnitudes of these Space Weather events can be related to the X-ray peak brightness and duration, which drive the intensity of the ionosphere response when the associated electromagnetic wave hit the sunlit side of the Earth's atmosphere. Other aspects defining these changes in a particular region are the local time, the solar zenith angle, and the position of the flare in the solar disc for each event. In order to improve the understand of radio signal degradation and loss in the Brazilian sector due to solar abrupt electromagnetic emissions, total electron content (TEC) data obtained by a GPS network formed by tents of dual-frequency receivers spread all over Brazilian territory were analyzed. It was observed different ionospheric local changes during several X-ray events identified by GOES satellite regarding the 0.1-0.8 nm range, and some case studies were ponder for a more detailed analysis of these effects. Considering the results, we have made an estimation of the ionospheric disturbances range for a particular event with great chance to affect space based communications in the equatorial and low-latitude regions.

  5. The single event upset environment for avionics at high latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.J.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L. . Space and Communications Dept.); Johansson, K.; Pettersson, H. ); Farren, J. . Harwell Lab.)

    1994-12-01

    Modern avionic systems for civil and military applications are becoming increasingly reliant upon embedded microprocessors and associated memory devices. The phenomenon of single event upset (SEU) is well known in space systems and designers have generally been careful to use SEU tolerant devices or to implement error detection and correction (EDAC) techniques where appropriate. In the past, avionics designers have had no reason to consider SEU effects but is clear that the more prevalent use of memory devices combined with increasing levels of IC integration will make SEU mitigation an important design consideration for future avionic systems. To this end, it is necessary to work towards producing models of the avionics SEU environment which will permit system designers to choose components and EDAC techniques which are based on predictions of SEU rates correct to much better than an order of magnitude. Measurements of the high latitude SEU environment at avionics altitude have been made on board a commercial airliner. Results are compared with models of primary and secondary cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrons. Ground based SEU tests of static RAMs are used to predict rates in flight.

  6. Modelling the low-latitude boundary layer with reconnection entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, P.; Holzer, T. E.; Russell, C. T.; Wang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a one-dimensional Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) model for northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The boundary layer in this model is uniform in the direction normal to the magnetopause, a 'plateau-type' boundary layer. The boundary layer motion is decoupled from the magnetosheath motion and driven by the plasma pressure associated with the incoming solar wind plasma near local noon, which has become entrained on closed field lines as a result of reconnection in the cusp region. Dissipation in the ionosphere at the feet of the boundary layer field lines opposes this motion. There are two physical solutions for the model. In one, the boundary layer reaches a terminal velocity in the tail as the boundary layer plasma effectively joins the solar wind flow. In the other solution, the flow is nearly stopped in the far tail. In combination with other mechanisms, this latter solution may correspond to the case in which the boundary layer plasma participates in magnetospheric convection and returns sunward. The density, velocity, and thickness as functions of distance from local noon are studied, assuming that the magnetopause hasa elliptical shape and the magnetospheric field is dipolar.

  7. Latitude, elevational climatic zonation and speciation in New World vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Kozak, Kenneth H; Gómez, Juan Pablo; Parra, Juan Luis; McCain, Christy M; Bowie, Rauri C K; Carnaval, Ana C; Moritz, Craig; Rahbek, Carsten; Roberts, Trina E; Sanders, Nathan J; Schneider, Christopher J; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Zamudio, Kelly R; Graham, Catherine H

    2012-01-01

    Many biodiversity hotspots are located in montane regions, especially in the tropics. A possible explanation for this pattern is that the narrow thermal tolerances of tropical species and greater climatic stratification of tropical mountains create more opportunities for climate-associated parapatric or allopatric speciation in the tropics relative to the temperate zone. However, it is unclear whether a general relationship exists among latitude, climatic zonation and the ecology of speciation. Recent taxon-specific studies obtained different results regarding the role of climate in speciation in tropical versus temperate areas. Here, we quantify overlap in the climatic distributions of 93 pairs of sister species of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles restricted to either the New World tropics or to the Northern temperate zone. We show that elevational ranges of tropical- and temperate-zone species do not differ from one another, yet the temperature range experienced by species in the temperate zone is greater than for those in the tropics. Moreover, tropical sister species tend to exhibit greater similarity in their climatic distributions than temperate sister species. This pattern suggests that evolutionary conservatism in the thermal niches of tropical taxa, coupled with the greater thermal zonation of tropical mountains, may result in increased opportunities for allopatric isolation, speciation and the accumulation of species in tropical montane regions. Our study exemplifies the power of combining phylogenetic and spatial datasets of global climatic variation to explore evolutionary (rather than purely ecological) explanations for the high biodiversity of tropical montane regions. PMID:21632626

  8. IRAS galaxies at low galactic and high supergalactic latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, M.W.; Lu, N.Y.; Houck, J.R.; Salpeter, E.E.; Lewis, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Based on IR colors, 371 IRAS point sources with absolute value of b = 2-16 deg (b = galactic latitude) were selected for study at H I 21 cm as potential galaxies: 25 percent (93) of these sources are galaxies with redshifts less than 8000 km/s based on H I spectra. Most of the detected galaxies are at redshifts between 2000 and 7500 km/s. Fifty-five of these lie in an area about 40 deg away from the junction of the Pisces-Perseus and Lynx-Ursa Major superclusters, and show a distribution of systemic velocities very similar to these superclusters. There is an enhanced density of galaxies near 6000 km/s with galactic longitude l about 40 deg and b about 0 deg. The two regions surveyed, centered at l about 192 deg and l about 54 deg, lie outside the plane of the Local Supercluster and do not show any preference for galaxies with low velocity widths. 16 references.

  9. IRAS galaxies at low galactic and high supergalactic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, M. W.; Lu, N. Y.; Houck, J. R.; Salpeter, E. E.; Lewis, B. M.

    1988-01-01

    Based on IR colors, 371 IRAS point sources with absolute value of b = 2-16 deg (b = galactic latitude) were selected for study at H I 21 cm as potential galaxies: 25 percent (93) of these sources are galaxies with redshifts less than 8000 km/s based on H I spectra. Most of the detected galaxies are at redshifts between 2000 and 7500 km/s. Fifty-five of these lie in an area about 40 deg away from the junction of the Pisces-Perseus and Lynx-Ursa Major superclusters, and show a distribution of systemic velocities very similar to these superclusters. There is an enhanced density of galaxies near 6000 km/s with galactic longitude l about 40 deg and b about 0 deg. The two regions surveyed, centered at l about 192 deg and l about 54 deg, lie outside the plane of the Local Supercluster and do not show any preference for galaxies with low velocity widths.

  10. Sun position calculator (SPC) for Landsat imagery with geodetic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Jeong C.

    2015-12-01

    Landsat imagery comes with sun position information such as azimuth and sun elevation, but they are available only at the center of a scene. To aid in the use of Landsat imagery for various solar radiation applications such as topographic correction, solar power, urban heat island, agriculture, climate and vegetation, it is necessary to calculate the sun position information at every pixel. This research developed a PC application that creates sun position data layers in ArcGIS at every pixel in a Landsat scene. The SPC program is composed of two major routines - converting universal transverse Mercator (UTM) projection coordinates to geographic longitudes and latitudes, and calculating sun position information based on the Meeus' routine. For the latter, an innovative method was also implemented to account for the Earth's flattening on an ellipsoid. The Meeus routine implemented in this research showed about 0.2‧ of mean absolute difference from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Position Algorithm (SPA) routine when solar zenith and azimuth angles were tested with every 30 min data at four city locations (Fairbanks, Atlanta, Sydney and Rio Grande) on June 30, 2014. The Meeus routine was about ten times faster than the SPA routine. Professionals who need the Sun's position information for Landsat imagery will benefit from the SPC application.

  11. Low Latitude Pulsations Associated with Different Phases of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, J.; Vankayala, R. C.; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, G.; Thomas, N.

    2014-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm lot of free energy is available in the magnetosphere and this energy can act as feeder to electromagnetic waves in different frequency bands. A classical geomagnetic storm consists mainly of four phases i.e. SSC (Sudden Storm commencement), initial Phase, main phase and recovery phase. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of electromagnetic waves in ULF (ultra low frequency) band associated with different phases of geomagnetic storms. Electromagnetic waves in ULF band (Period~ 10-100s) in the Earth's magnetosphere are generally termed as geomagnetic pulsations. A detailed statistical analysis has been performed over ten years of geomagnetic data from low latitude ground stations in Indian and Japanese sectors. The study reveals that storms in general, are accompanied with continuous pulsations of different frequency bands during different phases. In particular, the main phase of 91 % of intense storms was accompanied with pulsations in Pc5 band (frequency~ 2-7 mHz). However, the occurrence of these pulsations was less frequent during main phase of weak to moderate storms. Further, the amplitude of these pulsations increased with the intensity of storm.

  12. Boulder movement at high northern latitudes of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orloff, T.; Kreslavsky, M.; Asphaug, E.; Korteniemi, J.

    2011-11-01

    We examine a narrow latitudinal band (60°N-70°N) on Mars to place constraints on the seasonally averaged velocity Q of boulder movements over patterned ground. These latitudes comprise a region of the northern lowlands where patterned ground covers nearly every surface. Here boulders meters in diameter are consistently found to be concentrated at or near the cracks that define the polygonal networks, indicating a mobilization process. Because impact craters are the source for many boulders, we can use craters and their degradation to estimate the time scales for boulder movement. We study and catalog 1018 degraded impact craters (100 m < D < 1 km) in 55 High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images. We find that crater degradation occurs on a time scale <˜1 Ma, which is too recent for melting-related mechanisms in a past, warmer epoch. Clustering of boulders occurs at a time scale of a few Ma or shorter, which means that boulders on 5-20 m diameter polygons move at seasonal velocities Q ˜1-10 μm/yr or faster.

  13. Global marine bacterial diversity peaks at high latitudes in winter

    PubMed Central

    Ladau, Joshua; Sharpton, Thomas J; Finucane, Mariel M; Jospin, Guillaume; Kembel, Steven W; O'Dwyer, James; Koeppel, Alexander F; Green, Jessica L; Pollard, Katherine S

    2013-01-01

    Genomic approaches to characterizing bacterial communities are revealing significant differences in diversity and composition between environments. But bacterial distributions have not been mapped at a global scale. Although current community surveys are way too sparse to map global diversity patterns directly, there is now sufficient data to fit accurate models of how bacterial distributions vary across different environments and to make global scale maps from these models. We apply this approach to map the global distributions of bacteria in marine surface waters. Our spatially and temporally explicit predictions suggest that bacterial diversity peaks in temperate latitudes across the world's oceans. These global peaks are seasonal, occurring 6 months apart in the two hemispheres, in the boreal and austral winters. This pattern is quite different from the tropical, seasonally consistent diversity patterns observed for most macroorganisms. However, like other marine organisms, surface water bacteria are particularly diverse in regions of high human environmental impacts on the oceans. Our maps provide the first picture of bacterial distributions at a global scale and suggest important differences between the diversity patterns of bacteria compared with other organisms. PMID:23514781

  14. High-latitude circulation in giant planet magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southwood, D. J.; Chané, E.

    2016-06-01

    We follow-up the proposal by Cowley et al. (2004) that the plasma circulation in the magnetospheres of the giant planets is a combination of two cycles or circulation systems. The Vasyliunas cycle transports heavy material ionized deep within the magnetosphere eventually to loss in the magnetotail. The second cycle is driven by magnetic reconnection between the planetary and the solar wind magnetic fields (the Dungey cycle) and is found on flux tubes poleward of those of the Vasyliunas cycle. We examine features of the Dungey system, particularly what occurs out of the equatorial plane. The Dungey cycle requires reconnection on the dayside, and we suggest that at the giant planets the dayside reconnection occurs preferentially in the morning sector. Second, we suggest that most of the solar wind material that enters through reconnection on to open flux tubes on the dayside never gets trapped on closed field lines but makes less than one circuit of the planet and exits down tail. In its passage to the nightside, the streaming ex-solar wind material is accelerated centrifugally by the planetary rotation primarily along the field; thus, in the tail it will appear very like a planetary wind. The escaping wind will be found on the edges of the tail plasma sheet, and reports of light ion streams in the tail are likely due to this source. The paper concludes with a discussion of high-latitude circulation in the absence of reconnection between the solar wind and planetary field.

  15. The role of superthermal electrons in high latitude ionospheric outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glocer, A.; Khazanov, G. V.; Liemohn, M. W.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    It is well accepted that the ionosphere is a critical source of plasma for the magnetosphere, providing O+, H+, and He+ which can have wide ranging consequences for the space environment system. Changing ion composition affects magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere, the ring current, and the wave environment which is important for high energy radiation belt electrons. Of the myriad of mechanisms that are important in determining the ionospheric outflow solution at high latitudes, we focus on the role of superthermal electron populations. It has been demonstrated in multiple studies that even small concentrations of superthermal electrons can have a dramatic effect on the outflow solution. In this presentation, we present simulation results using our Polar Wind Outflow Model (PWOM) and our SuperThermal Electron Transport (STET) code. We describe recent results on superthermal electrons role in defining the quiet time solar wind solution with comparisons to observations. We also discuss preliminary results that combine the PWOM and STET codes for a more comprehensive treatment of the impact of superthermal electrons.

  16. Habitable periglacial landscapes in martian mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, M.; Wagner, D.; Hauber, E.; de Vera, J.-P.; Schirrmeister, L.

    2012-05-01

    Subsurface permafrost environments on Mars are considered to be zones where extant life could have survived. For the identification of possible habitats it is important to understand periglacial landscape evolution and related subsurface and environmental conditions. Many landforms that are interpreted to be related to ground ice are located in the martian mid-latitudinal belts. This paper summarizes the insights gained from studies of terrestrial analogs to permafrost landforms on Mars. The potential habitability of martian mid-latitude periglacial landscapes is exemplarily deduced for one such landscape, that of Utopia Planitia, by a review and discussion of environmental conditions influencing periglacial landscape evolution. Based on recent calculations of the astronomical forcing of climate changes, specific climate periods are identified within the last 10 Ma when thaw processes and liquid water were probably important for the development of permafrost geomorphology. No periods could be identified within the last 4 Ma which met the suggested threshold criteria for liquid water and habitable conditions. Implications of past and present environmental conditions such as temperature variations, ground-ice conditions, and liquid water activity are discussed with respect to the potential survival of highly-specialized microorganisms known from terrestrial permafrost. We conclude that possible habitable subsurface niches might have been developed in close relation to specific permafrost landform morphology on Mars. These would have probably been dominated by lithoautotrophic microorganisms (i.e. methanogenic archaea).

  17. Coordinated observations of high-latitude ionospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Valladares, C.E.; Weber, E.J.; Buchau, J.

    1988-01-01

    A coordinated data set comprised of scintillation, ionosonde, incoherent scatter radar and optical measurements obtained on two nights during the CEDAR/WITS campaign of February, 1988 was selected for the study of two distinct classes of high latitude plasma turbulence. Under IMP Bz northward conditions, the polar cap arc detected by the all-sky imaging photometer (ASIP) in this phase of low solar activity (SSN=40) was found to be associated with a total electron content enhancement of only 2x10 to the 16th power/sq. m and weak amplitude scintillations (S sub 4 about = 0.35) at 250 MHz. The photometer and scintillation measurements indicated that in addition to the dawn to dusk motion of 200/ms in the inertial frame, there existed enhanced plasma motion of about 400/ms along the arc. The second data set conforming to IMF Bz southward condition showed the existence of ionization patches in the polar cap and their anti-sunward motion towards the auroral oval. The polar cap patches detected deep within the polar cap with electron contents as large as 10x10 to the 16th power/sq. m caused 15 dB scintillations at 250 MHz. These patches detected close to the auroral oval also caused strong scintillations which indicated that the patches get continually structured during their convection through the winter polar cap.

  18. Inner Plasma Structure of the Low-Latitude Reconnection Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Q.-H.; Dunlop, M. W.; Lockwood, M.; Lavraud, B.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Hasegawa, H.; Yang, H. -G.; Liu, R. -Y.; Hu, H. -Q.; Zhang, B. -C.; Pu, Z. -Y.; Yang, Z. -W.; Wang, J.; Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Berchem, J.; Constantinescu, D.; Volwerk, M.; Frey, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Shen, C.; Shi, J. -K.; Sibeck, D.; Escoubet, P.; Wild, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We report a clear transition through a reconnection layer at the low-latitude magnetopause which shows a complete traversal across all reconnected field lines during northwestward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The associated plasma populations confirm details of the electron and ion mixing and the time history and acceleration through the current layer. This case has low magnetic shear with a strong guide field and the reconnection layer contains a single density depletion layer on the magnetosheath side which we suggest results from nearly field-aligned magnetosheath flows. Within the reconnection boundary layer, there are two plasma boundaries, close to the inferred separatrices on the magnetosphere and magnetosheath sides (Ssp and Ssh) and two boundaries associated with the Alfvén waves (or Rotational Discontinuities, RDsp and RDsh). The data are consistent with these being launched from the reconnection site and the plasma distributions are well ordered and suggestive of the time elapsed since reconnection of the field lines observed. In each sub-layer between the boundaries the plasma distribution is different and is centered around the current sheet, responsible for magnetosheath acceleration. We show evidence for a velocity dispersion effect in the electron anisotropy that is consistent with the time elapsed since reconnection. In addition, new evidence is presented for the occurrence of partial reflection of magnetosheath electrons at the magnetopause current layer.

  19. Environmental conditions for alternative tree cover states in high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abis, Beniamino; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Previous analysis of the vegetation cover from remote sensing revealed the existence of three alternative modes in the frequency distribution of boreal tree cover: a sparsely vegetated treeless state, a savanna-like state, and a forest state. Identifying which are the regions subject to multimodality, and assessing which are the main factors underlying their existence, is important to project future change of natural vegetation cover and its effect on climate. We study the impact on the forest cover fraction distribution of seven globally-observed environmental factors: mean annual rainfall, mean minimum temperature, growing degree days above 0, permafrost distribution, soil moisture, wildfire occurrence frequency, and thawing depth. Through the use of generalised additive models, regression trees, and conditional histograms, we find that the main factors determining the forest distribution in high latitudes are: permafrost distribution, mean annual rainfall, mean minimum temperature, soil moisture, and wildfire frequency. Additionally, we find differences between regions within the boreal area, such as Eurasia, Eastern North America, and Western North America. Furthermore, using a classification based on these factors, we show the existence and location of alternative tree cover states under the same climate conditions in the boreal region. These are areas of potential interest for a more detailed analysis of land-atmosphere interactions.

  20. Comparing ionospheric models with mid-latitude ionosonde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ubaidi, Najat M. R.

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this research work is to validate the ionospheric models (IRI and CHIU) to assess its suitability and usefulness as an operational tool. The ionospheric model is a computer model designed to predict the state of the global ionosphere for 24 h. The scope was limited to conduct comparisons between the predicted F2 layer critical frequencies (f0F2) against observed ionosonde data. The ionospheric prediction model (IPM) was designed to predict by using monthly median sunspot number, while the observation data are taken from two digital ionospheric sounding stations (Okinawa, 26.28N, 127.8E and Wakkanai, 45.38N, 141.66E) which lies within the mid-latitude region of the globe. Analysis of the f0F2 data from stations for year (2001) with high solar activity and year (2004) with low solar activity, four months (March, June, September and December) chosen based primarily on data availability. From results it seen that the ratio between monthly median predicted and observed f0F2 values for each model used in this research work and for the chosen months was nonlinear with local time, so the empirical formula for applying correction factors were determined, these formula can be used to correct the error occurred in predicted f0F2 value.

  1. Low-latitude Ionospheric Heating during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenzing, J.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Qian, L.; Haaser, R. A.; Burrell, A. G.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Simoes, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    The advent of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) represents a leap forward in our capability to measure rapidly changing transient events on the sun. SDO measurements are paired with the comprehensive low latitude measurements of the ionosphere and thermosphere provided by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite and state-of-the-art general circulation models to discuss the coupling between the terrestrial upper atmosphere and solar radiation. Here we discuss ionospheric heating as detected by the Coupled Ion-Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) instrument suite on the C/NOFS satellite during solar flares. Also discusses is the necessity of decoupling the heating due to increased EUV irradiance and that due to geomagnetic storms, which sometimes occur with flares. Increases in both the ion temperature and ion density in the subsolar topside ionosphere are detected within 77 minutes of the 23 Jan 2012 M-class flare, and the observed results are compared with the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) using the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) as an input.

  2. The CH fraction of carbon stars at high Galactic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Aruna; Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Shantikumar, N. S.

    2010-02-01

    CH stars form a distinct class of objects with characteristic properties like iron deficiency, enrichment of carbon and overabundance of heavy elements. These properties can provide strong observational constraints for the theoretical computation of nucleosynthesis at low metallicity. An important issue is the relative surface density of CH stars, which can provide valuable input to our understanding of the role of low- to intermediate-mass stars in early Galactic chemical evolution. Spectroscopic characterization provides an effective way of identifying CH stars. The present analysis aims at a quantitative assessment of the fraction of CH stars in a sample using a set of spectral classification criteria. The sample consists of 92 objects selected from a collection of candidate faint high-latitude carbon stars from the Hamburg/ESO survey. Medium-resolution (λ/δλ ~ 1300) spectra for these objects were obtained using the Optomechanics Research (OMR) spectrograph at the Vainu Bappu Observatory (VBO), Kavalur and the Himalaya Faint Object Spectrograph (HFOSC) at the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT), Indian Astronomical Observatory, Hanle, during 2007-2009, spanning a wavelength range 3800-6800Å. Spectral analysis shows 36 of the 92 objects to be potential CH stars; combined with our earlier studies this implies ~37 per cent (of 243 objects) as the CH fraction. We present spectral descriptions of the newly identified CH star candidates. Estimated effective temperatures, 12C/13C isotopic ratios and their locations on the two-colour J - H versus H - K plot are used to support their identification.

  3. Paleoclimatic significance of high-latitude loess deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Beget, J.E.

    1992-03-01

    Loess deposits reflect changing environmental conditions in terrestrial regions, and contain long paleoclimatic records analogous to those found in marine sediments, lacustrine sediments, and ice sheets. Alaskan loess was deposited at rates of ca. 0.05-0.5 mm yr-l during the last 2-3 x 106 years; loess deposits contain some of the longest and most complete proxy climate records yet found. New analytical methods are used to reconstruct changes in climate and atmospheric regime including wind intensity, storminess, temperature, and precipitation. Loess also contains a history of permafrost and paleosol formation, volcanic eruptions, and paleoecologic changes in high latitude regions, as well as Quaternary fossils and early man sites and artifacts. Time-series analysis of proxy climate data from loess supports the astronomic model of climate change, although some transient climate events recorded in loess records are too short to be explained by orbital insolation forcing, and may instead correlate with rapid, short-term changes in atmospheric C02 and CH4 content.

  4. 12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM PAVILION, SHOWING SOUTH ENTRANCE HOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM PAVILION, SHOWING SOUTH ENTRANCE HOUSE, SOUTH WING, AND ENGINE HOUSE - Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. GPS derived ionospheric TEC response to geomagnetic storm on 24 August 2005 at Indian low latitude stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    Results pertaining to the response of the low latitude ionosphere to a major geomagnetic storm that occurred on 24 August 2005 are presented. The dual frequency GPS data have been analyzed to retrieve vertical total electron content at two Indian low latitude stations (IGS stations) Hyderabad (Geographic latitude 17°20‧N, Geographic longitude 78°30‧E, Geomagnetic latitude 8.65°N) and Bangalore (Geographic latitude 12°58‧N, Geographic longitude 77°33‧E, Geomagnetic latitude 4.58°N). These results show variation of GPS derived total electron content (TEC) due to geomagnetic storm effect, local low latitude electrodynamics response to penetration of high latitude convection electric field and effect of modified fountain effect on GPS-TEC in low latitude zone.

  6. "Michael Jackson World Tour:" Maps and Globes--Latitude and Longitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benscoter, Gloria Dee

    1988-01-01

    Presents a mapping activity which helps students understand the purpose of latitude and longitude lines. Gives students an opportunity to use longitude and latitude in a meaningful way by asking them to plan a world concert tour for a rock star. Includes a reproducible activity page. (LS)

  7. Decision latitude and workload demand: implications for full and partial absenteeism.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Silvana K; French, Michael T; Zarkin, Gary A; Omachonu, Vincent K

    2002-01-01

    This research examined the relative importance of two components of job stress--decision latitude and workload demand--on employee absenteeism. The analysis was based on confidential self-reported data from employees at two worksites, which were collected in three independent cross-sections beginning in 1995. The negative binomial technique was used to estimate the effects of decision latitude and workload demand on employee attendance, while controlling for employee demographics and other workplace characteristics. Estimation results show that high decision latitude was negatively and significantly related to number of full days absent from work (full absenteeism) and number of days arriving late to work or leaving work early (partial absenteeism). Conversely, the coefficient estimates for low decision latitude were positive in every model and significantly related to partial absenteeism. Low workload demand was negatively and significantly related to partial absenteeism, but not full days absent. The interaction effects of decision latitude and workload demand on absenteeism were not statistically significant. Several recent studies have estimated a significant relationship between decision latitude, workload demand, and medical problems such as cardiovascular disease. The current findings suggest that decision latitude and workload demand are also related to workplace attendance. Employers and occupational hygienists should consider decision latitude and workload demand as a means to improve workplace productivity and employee health. PMID:12325290

  8. Latitude-Dependence of Median Grain Size in the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M.; Kim, S. S.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Park, S. M.; Sim, C. K.; Jin, H.; Min, K. W.

    2015-11-01

    We conducted polarimetric observations of the Moon and constructed a grain size map of the lunar regolith. The grain size is found to be larger at higher latitude. This is thought to be a result of reduced space weathering effects at high latitudes.

  9. Comments on slow latitude variations and secular motion of the Earth's pole.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsun', A. A.; Yatskiv, Ya. S.

    Re-reduced latitude and time observations based on the HIPPARCOS frame were analysed in connection with the problem of existence of secular polar motion. It is shown that there are large non-polar variations of mean latitudes and longitudes which could hamper the determination of secular polar motion.

  10. Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics and water/energy exchange at high latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, A.D.; Wirth, C.; Apps, M.; Beringer, J.; Clein, J.; Epstein, H.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Bhatti, J.; Chapin, F. S., III; De Groot, B.; Efremov, D.; Eugster, W.; Fukuda, M.; Gower, T.; Hinzman, L.; Huntley, B.; Jia, G.J.; Kasischke, E.; Melillo, J.; Romanovsky, V.; Shvidenko, A.; Vaganov, E.; Walker, D.

    2002-01-01

    The responses of high latitude ecosystems to global change involve complex interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water and energy exchange. These responses may have important consequences for the earth system. In this study, we evaluated how vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange are related to environmental variation spanned by the network of the IGBP high latitude transects. While the most notable feature of the high latitude transects is that they generally span temperature gradients from southern to northern latitudes, there are substantial differences in temperature among the transects. Also, along each transect temperature co-varies with precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation, which are also variable among the transects. Both climate and disturbance interact to influence latitudinal patterns of vegetation and soil carbon storage among the transects, and vegetation distribution appears to interact with climate to determine exchanges of heat and moisture in high latitudes. Despite limitations imposed by the data we assembled, the analyses in this study have taken an important step toward clarifying the complexity of interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange in high latitude regions. This study reveals the need to conduct coordinated global change studies in high latitudes to further elucidate how interactions among climate, disturbance, and vegetation distribution influence carbon dynamics and water and energy exchange in high latitudes.

  11. Energetic particles and coronal mass ejections in the high latitude heliosphere: Ulysses-LET observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bothmer, V.; Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Trattner, K. J.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Uchida, Y.; Hudson, H. S.

    1996-07-20

    We have investigated energetic ions of non-corotating nature in the high latitude heliosphere. Major particle events were observed by Ulysses up to latitudes of 60 deg. S. All were associated with passage of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) over the spacecraft. The relationship of these events with solar activity was investigated using Yohkoh soft X-ray images.

  12. Coronal mass ejections in the solar wind at high solar latitudes: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, Jack T.

    1994-01-01

    Ulysses provided the first direct measurements of coronal mass ejections (CME's) in the solar wind at high heliographic latitudes. An overview of new results from the plasma experiment on Ulysses and magnetic field measurements, during the spacecraft's first excursion to high solar latitudes are summarized. A striking aspect of the high-latitude CME's observed is that they all had high speeds, with the overall average speed being 730 km/sec. A new class of forward-reverse shock pairs, associated with expansion of CME's was discovered at high latitudes. Of six certain CME's observed at high latitudes, three have associated shock pairs of this nature. Combined Ulysses and Yohkoh observations suggest that the flux rope topology characteristic of some CME's results from reconnection within the legs of neighboring magnetic loops embedded within the escaping CME's.

  13. Spörer's law and relationship between the latitude and amplitude parameters of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. G.; Miletsky, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The equatorward drift of average sunspot latitudes (Spörer's law) and its relationship with other characteristics of the 11-year solar cycle are analyzed. The notion of cycle latitude phase (CLP) is introduced, which is calculated from behavior of average sunspot latitudes. The latter are shown to be expressed, with known accuracy, as a universal monotonic decreasing function of the CLP and to be independent of the cycle strength. The same applies to the latitudinal drift velocity of the sunspot generating zone. The shifts in the CLP reference times relative to the cycle minima are, on the contrary, well correlated with the amplitudes of the corresponding cycles. Solar activity in the declining phase of the solar cycle is found to be tightly related to the average sunspot latitude and CLP. The relationships found in the study can be used to reconstruct average sunspot latitudes in the pre-Greenwich epoch based on the available information on cycle amplitudes.

  14. Latitude-dependent sensitivity to stationary perturbations in simple climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmun, H.; Cahalan, R. F.; North, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The steady-state zonally averaged climate is perturbed by adding a latitude-dependent heat source to an energy balance equation of the simplified Budyko-Sellers type. The latitude of the ice edge, which is attached to an isotherm, becomes dependent on the strength of the perturbation. This dependence is given in terms of the well-known iceline-solar constant relation, and the latitude dependence of the perturbed temperature field is then uniquely determined. The exact analytical solution is linearized and expressed in terms of a superposition of line sources at various latitudes. The main features are: (1) The total temperature response is a sum of the direct effect of the perturbation and an indirect ice-albedo effect proportional to the solar ice-edge sensitivity; and (2) the indirect feedback effect produces an enhanced response in polar latitudes.

  15. Coronal mass ejections in the solar wind at high solar latitudes: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1994-10-01

    Ulysses has provided the first direct measurements of coronal mass ejections, CMES, in the solar wind at high heliographic latitudes. This paper provides an overview of new and unexpected results from the plasma experiment on Ulysses, supplemented with magnetic field measurements, during the spacecraft`s first excursion to high solar latitudes. A striking aspect of the high-latitude CMEs observed is that they all had high speeds, with the overall average speed being 730 km s{sup {minus}1}. A new class of forward-reverse shock pairs, associated with expansion of CMES, has been discovered at high latitudes. Of six certain CMEs observed at high latitudes, three have associated shock pairs of this nature. Combined Ulysses and Yohkoh observations suggest that the flux rope topology characteristic of some CMEs results from reconnection within the legs of neighboring magnetic loops embedded within the escaping CMES.

  16. IMF Dependence of High-Latitude Thermospheric Wind Pattern Derived from CHAMP Cross-Track Accelerometer Data and the Corresponding Magnetospheric Convection from Cluster EDI Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, Matthias; Haaland, Stein E.; Rentz, Stefanie; Liu, Huixin

    Neutral thermospheric wind pattern at high latitudes obtained from cross-track acceleration measurements of the CHAMP satellite above both North and South polar regions are statistically analyzed in their dependence on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) direction in the GSM y-z plane (clock angle). We compare this dependency with magnetospheric convection pattern using 1-min-averages of Cluster/EDI electric drift observations and the same IMF and solar wind sorting conditions. The spatially distributed Cluster/EDI measurements are mapped to a the common reference level at ionospheric F-region heights in a magnetic latitude/MLT grid. We obtained both regular thermospheric wind and plasma drift pattern according to the various IMF conditions. The IMF-dependency shows some similarity with the corresponding high-latitude plasma convection insofar that the larger-scale convection cells, in particular the round-shaped dusk cell for IMF By+ (By-) conditions at the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere, leave their marks on the dominant general transpolar wind circulation from the dayside to the nightside. The direction of the transpolar circulation is generally deflected toward a duskward flow, in particular in the evening to nighttime sector. The degree of deflection correlates with the IMF clock angle. It is larger for IMF By+ than for Byand is systematically larger (about 5 deg) and appear less structured at the Southern Hemisphere compared with the Northern. Thermospheric cross-polar wind amplitudes are largest for IMF Bz-/Byconditions (corresponding to sector 5) at the Northern Hemisphere, but for IMF Bz-/By+ conditions (sector 3) at the Southern because the magnetospheric convection is in favour of largest wind accelerations over the polar cap under these conditions. The overall variance of the thermospheric wind magnitude at Southern high latitudes is larger than for the Northern. This is probably due to a larger "stirring effect" at the Southern Hemisphere because

  17. North-south asymmetry of eolian features in Martian polar regions - Analysis based on crater-related wind markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.

    1981-01-01

    Crater-related wind markers in the north and south polar regions of Mars are analyzed in a study of possible north-south asymmetries in wind activity. Features including crater splotches and associated streaks, and depositional, erosional, frost and frost-sediment streaks were identified and analyzed as wind direction indicators on Viking Orbiter and Mariner 9 images of areas poleward of + or - 40 deg latitude. The wind streaks reveal eolian activity at present to be strongest in the north in winter and in the south in spring, due to the hemispherical asymmetry in climate. The alignment of the more massive intercrater dune fields with the presently strongest wind may reflect a longer-term asymmetry in spring flows, as the reorientation times of the dunes exceeded the period of climate asymmetry cycles. Finally, a wider distribution of dune latitudes in the southern polar region is noted to be suggestive of the greater effectiveness of windflow from the south pole.

  18. Last Glacial Maximum in South America: Proxies and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainer, I.; Ledru, M. P.; Clauzet, G.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Brady, E.

    2003-04-01

    The lack of paleo proxies to define Full Glacial conditions in South America (see COHMAP 1988) prevented accurate climatic reconstitution until recently. It is believed that full glacial climates throughout South America were cooler than today by about 5°C with moisture patterns showing distinct regional differences.Results show that from Equator to pole, four areas can be characterized from lacustrine records, travertine and speleothems analysis: the first region, between 0 and 25°S latitude, recorded a hiatus in sedimentation with an absence of organic matter deposition in all lowland records, while the Andes Amazonian-moisture-dependant-forests were drastically reduced and showed the set up of an open vegetation. Climates were defined as drier than today with less precipitation and reduction in soil moisture supply. On the other hand, observations on travertines on the northeastern coastal area of the state of Bahia (also at low latitudes) certify a climate more humid than today. South of 25°S, in the temperate regions of northern Patagonia, lake levels were higher than today, snow precipitation in the Southern Bolivia increased with an accompanying increase in speleothems formations in southern Brazil. This was interpreted as being associated with moister and cooler climates than today in this area. At higher latitudes the low lake-levels recorded, indicate an arid climate. These observations based on paleodata are compared to the analysis from simulation results of the Paleoclimate version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research coupled climate system model (PALEO CCSM) for the Last Glacial Maximum and present day. Analysis of the LGM wind simulation for the tropical Atlantic show that the convergence zone does not extend all the way into the continent. This prevents moisture inflow into the adjacent continental area (equatorial NE Brazil). Paleo proxies results, as explained above, are consistent with this scenario. At higher latitudes (south of 50

  19. Frequency variations of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions: A possible new ground-based diagnostic of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, J.; Engebretson, M.; Arnoldy, R.; Inan, U.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic pulsations and quasi-periodic (QP) amplitude modulations of ELF-VLF waves at Pc 3-4 frequencies (15-50 mHz) are commonly observed simultaneously in cusp-latitude data. The naturally occurring ELF-VLF emissions are believed to be modulated within the magnetosphere by the compressional component of geomagnetic pulsations formed external to the magnetosphere. The authors have examined data from South Pole Station (L {approximately} 14) to determine the occurrence and characteristics of QP emissions. On the basis of 14 months of data during 1987 and 1988 they found that QP emissions typically appeared in both the 0.5-1 kHz and 1-2 kHz receiver channels at South Pole Station and ocassionally in the 2-4 kHz channel. The QP emission frequency appeared to depend on solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, and the months near fall equinox in both 1987 and 1988 showed a significant increase in the percentage of QP emissions only in the lowest-frequency channel. The authors present a model consistent with these variations in which high-latitude (nonequatorial) magnetic field minima near the magnetopause play a major role, because the field magnitude governs both the frequency of ELF-VLF emissions and the whistler mode propagation cutoffs. Because the field in these regions will be strongly influenced by solar wind and IMF parameters, variations in the frequency of such emissions may be useful in providing ground-based diagnostics of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere. 32 refs., 13 figs.

  20. On the latitude dependence of drift velocity of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukutake, Takesi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi

    2016-08-01

    There is an apparent difference in the westward drift between the geomagnetic main field and its time derivative, secular variation. The drift velocity of the main field is about 0.2°/year, definitely lower than that of the secular variation, 0.3°/year. The drift velocity of the main field appears to change with latitude, being low at high latitudes and higher at low latitudes, whereas the velocity of the secular variation is nearly constant irrespective of latitude. This paper examines what causes this difference by adopting the drifting and standing field model that assumes the geomagnetic field consists of the field steadily drifting westwards and the field remaining at nearly the same location. In this study, we confirm that the existence of the non-drifting standing field significantly affects the estimate of the drift velocity of the total field (i.e., the main field), and makes it slower than that of the secular variation. The drifting field is intense in low latitudes with its maximum at the equator, while the standing field dominates in higher latitudes. As a consequence, reduction of the apparent drifting velocity of the total field by the standing field is conspicuous in higher latitudes and less so in low latitudes. This creates the observed latitudinal structure of the drift velocity of the main field. On the other hand, the drift velocity of the secular variation is less affected by existence of the standing field, and mostly reflects the velocity of the drifting field that is almost constant with latitude. The velocity of the secular variation thus becomes almost uniform independent of latitude. The observed difference between the main field and the secular variation is naturally derived from the drifting and standing field model. This implies that physical mechanisms to generate the drifting and standing fields can be considered independently.

  1. Polarization analysis of Pc 1 geomagnetic pulsations at multi-point ground observations at middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Shevtsov, B. M.

    2008-12-01

    Pc 1 geomagnetic pulsations propagate from the high-latitude source region to middle latitudes in the ionosphere. The high-latitude source region links to the magnetosphere where ion cyclotron instability occurs around the plasmapause. Since Pc 1 pulsation observed by ground magnetometers at middle latitudes can be a mixture of waves from several high-latitude source regions, the polarization analysis of Pc 1 pulsations enables us to understand the spatial structure and time variations of the high-latitude source region. In order to investigate spectral and propagation characteristics of the Pc 1 at mid-latitudes, we have installed three induction magnetometers at Paratunka (PTK, 53.0N, 158.2E, magnetic latitude (MLAT): 45.8N), Moshiri (MSR, 44.4N, 142.3E, MLAT: 35.7N) and Sata (STA, 31.0N, 130.7E, MLAT: 22.0N). The observations with a 64-Hz sample recording have been started on July 5, 2007, at MSR, on August 21, 2007, at PTK, and on September 5, 2007, at STA and will be started at Magadan (MGD, 59.7N, 151.0E, MLAT: 50.6N) on November 2008. Polarization analysis with these multi-point data indicates that the Pc 1 polarization directions on November 11, 2007 depend on frequency with a difference of ~30 degree. For December 17, 2007 event, the polarization angle varies in time for ~30 deg/hour. These facts may indicate either the structure and motion of the high-latitude Pc 1 source region or the effects of the duct propagations in the inhomogeneous ionosphere. In this presentation, we also show the statistical results of these polarization analyses using 1-year data of middle latitude Pc 1 observations.

  2. High-Resolution South Polar Cap Mosaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The layered terrains of the polar regions of Mars are among the most exotic planetary landscapes in our Solar System. The layers exposed in the south polar residual cap, vividly shown in the top view, are thought to contain detailed records of Mars' climate history over the last 100 million years or so. The materials that comprise the south polar layers may include frozen carbon dioxide, water ice, and fine dust. The bottom picture shows complex erosional patterns that have developed on the south polar cap, perhaps by a combination of sublimation, wind erosion, and ground-collapse. Because the south polar terrains are so strange and new to human eyes, no one (yet) has entirely adequate explanations as to what is being seen.

    These images were acquired by the Mars Orbiter Camera aboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during the southern spring season in October 1999. Each of these two pictures is a mosaic of many individual MOC images acquired at about 12 m/pixel scale that completely cover the highest latitude (87oS) visible to MOC on each orbital pass over the polar region. Both mosaics cover areas of about 10 x 4 kilometers (6.2 x 2.5 miles) near 87oS, 10oW in the central region of the permanent--or residual--south polar cap. They show features at the scale of a small house. Sunlight illuminates each scene from the left.'Gaps' at the upper and lower right of the second mosaic, above, are areas that were not covered by MOC in October 1999.

  3. 137Cs inventory in semi-isolated basins of the western South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Wang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    The main introduction routes of 137Cs into the Pacific Ocean are worldwide global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and close-in fallout from U. S. tests conducted on the Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. The objectives of this study are to measure the 137Cs activities in water columns of the western South Pacific Ocean and to discuss the processes controlling the 137Cs inventory. The 137Cs activities were determined for seawater samples from the East Caroline, Coral Sea, New Hebrides, South Fiji and Tasman Sea Basins of the western South Pacific Ocean. The 137Cs activities in surface waters ranged from 1.7 Bq m- 3 in the Tasman Sea Basin to 2.3 Bq m-3 in the East Caroline Basin. The latitudinal 137Cs distributions in surface waters showed the opposite trend to the expected deposition density from global fallout. The distribution profiles of 137Cs activity at these six western South Pacific Ocean stations did not differ from each other significantly. The total 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean ranged from 850 Bq m-2 in the Coral Sea Basin to 1270 Bq m-2 in the South Fiji Basin. Higher 137Cs inventories were observed at middle latitude stations in the subtropical gyre than at low latitude stations. The 137Cs inventories were 1.9 - 4.5 times higher than that of the expected deposition density of atmospheric global fallout at the same latitude. The possible sources of excess 137Cs inventories in the western South Pacific Ocean might be attributable to both the inter-hemisphere dispersion of the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing 137Cs from the northern stratosphere to the southern one and its subsequent deposition, and water- bearing transport of 137Cs from the North Pacific Ocean to the South Pacific.

  4. Exposed Ice in the Northern Mid-Latitudes of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C. C.

    2007-12-01

    Ice-Rich Layer: Polygonal features with dimensions of approximately 100 meters, bounded by cracks, are commonly observed on the martian northern plains. These features are generally attributed to thermal cracking of ice-rich sediments, in direct analogy to polygons in terrestrial polar regions [1,2]. We mapped polygons in the northern mid-latitudes (30 to 65 N) using MOC and HiRISE images [3]. Polygons are scattered across the northern plains, with a particular concentration in western Utopia Planitia. This region largely overlaps the Late Amazonian Astapus Colles unit, characterized by polygonal terrain and nested pits consistent with periglacial and thermokarst origins [4]. Bright and Dark Polygonal Cracks: An examination of all MOC images (1997 through 2003) covering the study area demonstrated that, at latitudes of 55 to 65 N, most of the imaged polygons show bright bounding cracks. We interpret these bright cracks as exposed ice. Between 40 and 55 N, most of the imaged polygons show dark bounding cracks [5]. These are interpreted as polygons from which the exposed ice has been removed by sublimation. The long-term stability limit for exposed ice, even in deep cracks, apparently lies near 55 N. Bright and Dark Spots: Many HiRISE and MOC frames showing polygons in the northern plains also show small numbers of bright and dark spots, particularly in western Utopia Planitia. Many of the spots are closely associated with collapse features suggestive of thermokarst. The spots range from tens to approximately 100 meters in diameter. The bright spots are interpreted as exposed ice, due to their prevalence on terrain mapped as ice rich. The dark spots are interpreted as former bright spots, which have darkened as the exposed ice is lost by sublimation. The bright spots may be the martian equivalents of pingos, ice-cored mounds found in periglacial regions on Earth [6,7,8,9, 10]. Terrestrial pingos from which the ice core has melted often collapse to form depressions

  5. Low-latitude Coronal Holes during Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M.; Cranmer, S.; Kohl, J.

    Analyses of in situ observations have shown that some small coronal holes are sources of slow solar wind near solar maximum when polar coronal holes become smaller and disappear. However, not all coronal holes at solar maximum produce slow wind. The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard SOHO has been used to observe large low-latitude coronal holes during solar maximum that produced fast solar wind. UVCS observations show that large equatorial holes at solar maximum have plasma properties that seem to bridge the gap between solar minimum polar coronal holes and streamers. The ion kinetic temperatures in equatorial holes are about 2 times larger than those in a solar minimum equatorial streamer, and about a factor of 2 smaller than those in polar coronal holes above 2 R . The outflow speeds for the large equatorial holes observed by UVCS are only about 100 km s-1 , a factor of 4 smaller than those in polar holes, at 3 R . However, in situ data corresponding to these equatorial coronal holes showed asymptotic wind speeds of 600-700 km s-1 . These wind speeds are similar to those observed over polar coronal holes at solar minimum. In contrast to the polar coronal holes, the bulk of the solar wind acceleration in large equatorial coronal holes at solar maximum must occur above 3 R . Thus, the combination of spectroscopic measurements in the extended corona, where the primary solar wind acceleration occurs, and in situ measurements made in the solar wind can be used to obtain the solar wind acceleration as a function of heliocentric distance. These observations provide detailed empirical constraints for theoretical models and may be key to understanding how the various types of solar wind plasma are heated and accelerated. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  6. On the Frozen Soil Scheme for High Latitude Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, A.; Sushama, L.

    2014-12-01

    Regional and global climate model simulated streamflows for high-latitude regions show systematic biases, particularly in the timing and magnitude of spring peak flows. Though these biases could be related to the snow water equivalent and spring temperature biases in models, a good part of these biases is due to the unaccounted effects of non-uniform infiltration capacity of the frozen ground and other related processes. In this paper, the frozen scheme in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which is used in the Canadian regional and global climate models, is modified to include fractional permeable area, supercooled liquid water and a new formulation for hydraulic conductivity. Interflow is also included in these experiments presented in this study to better explain the steamflows after snow melt season. The impact of these modifications on the regional hydrology, particularly streamflow, is assessed by comparing three simulations, performed with the original and two modified versions of CLASS, driven by atmospheric forcing data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data (ERA-Interim), for the 1990-2001 period, over a northeast Canadian domain. The two modified versions of CLASS differ in the soil hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations, with one version being based on formulations from a previous study and the other one is newly proposed. Results suggest statistically significant decreases in infiltration for the simulation with the new hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations and fractional permeable area concept, compared to the original version of CLASS, which is also reflected in the increased spring surface runoff and streamflows in this simulation with modified CLASS, over most of the study domain. The simulated spring peaks and their timing in this simulation is also in better agreement to those observed.

  7. Sponge bioerosion accelerated by ocean acidification across species and latitudes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisshak, M.; Schönberg, C. H. L.; Form, A.; Freiwald, A.

    2014-06-01

    In many marine biogeographic realms, bioeroding sponges dominate the internal bioerosion of calcareous substrates such as mollusc beds and coral reef framework. They biochemically dissolve part of the carbonate and liberate so-called sponge chips, a process that is expected to be facilitated and accelerated in a more acidic environment inherent to the present global change. The bioerosion capacity of the demosponge Cliona celata Grant, 1826 in subfossil oyster shells was assessed via alkalinity anomaly technique based on 4 days of experimental exposure to three different levels of carbon dioxide partial pressure ( pCO2) at ambient temperature in the cold-temperate waters of Helgoland Island, North Sea. The rate of chemical bioerosion at present-day pCO2 was quantified with 0.08-0.1 kg m-2 year-1. Chemical bioerosion was positively correlated with increasing pCO2, with rates more than doubling at carbon dioxide levels predicted for the end of the twenty-first century, clearly confirming that C. celata bioerosion can be expected to be enhanced with progressing ocean acidification (OA). Together with previously published experimental evidence, the present results suggest that OA accelerates sponge bioerosion (1) across latitudes and biogeographic areas, (2) independent of sponge growth form, and (3) for species with or without photosymbionts alike. A general increase in sponge bioerosion with advancing OA can be expected to have a significant impact on global carbonate (re)cycling and may result in widespread negative effects, e.g. on the stability of wild and farmed shellfish populations, as well as calcareous framework builders in tropical and cold-water coral reef ecosystems.

  8. Controlling high-latitude Southern Ocean convection in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stössel, Achim; Notz, Dirk; Haumann, F. Alexander; Haak, Helmuth; Jungclaus, Johann; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2015-02-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) generally suffer from a poor simulation of the High-Latitude Southern Ocean (HLSO). Here we aim at a better understanding of the shortcomings by investigating the sensitivity of the HLSO to the external freshwater flux and the horizontal resolution in forced and coupled simulations with the Max-Planck-Institute Ocean Model (MPIOM). Forced experiments reveal an immediate reduction of open-ocean convection with additional freshwater input. The latter leads to a remarkably realistic simulation of the distinct water-mass structure in the central Weddell Sea featuring a temperature maximum of +0.5 °C at 250 m depth. Similar, but more modest improvements occur over a time span of 40 years after switching from a forced to a coupled simulation with an eddy-resolving version of MPIOM. The switch is accompanied with pronounced changes of the external freshwater flux and the wind field, as well as a more realistic heat flux due to coupling. Similar to the forced freshwater-flux experiments, a heat reservoir develops at depth, which in turn decreases the vertically integrated density of the HLSO and reduces the Antarctic Circumpolar Current to rather realistic values. Coupling with a higher resolution version of the atmosphere model (ECHAM6) yields distinct improvements of the HLSO water-mass structure and sea-ice cover. While the coupled simulations reveal a realistic amount of Antarctic runoff, its distribution appears too concentrated along the coast. Spreading the runoff over a wider region, as suggested in earlier studies to mimic the effect of freshwater transport through icebergs, also leads to noticeable improvements of the HLSO water-mass properties, predominantly along the coast. This suggests that the spread of the runoff improves the representation of Antarctic Bottom Water formation through enhanced near-boundary convection rather than weakened open-ocean convection.

  9. Classical astrometry longitude and latitude determination by using CCD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanović, G.; de Biasi, M. S.; Gerstbach, G.

    At the AOB, it is the zenith-telescope (D=11 cm, F=128.7 cm, denoted by BLZ in the list of Bureau International de l'Heure - BIH), and at Punta Indio (near La Plata) it is the photographic zenith tube (D=20 cm, F=457.7 cm, denoted by PIP in the list of BIH). At the AOB there is a CCD camera ST-8 of Santa Barbara Instrument Group (SBIG) with 1530×1020 number of pixels, 9×9 microns pixel size and 13.8×9.2 mm array dimension. We did some investigations about the possibilities for longitude (λ) and latitude (φ) determinations by using ST-8 with BLZ and PIP, and our predicted level of accuracy is few 0."01 from one CCD zenith stars processing with Tycho-2 Catalogue. Also, astro-geodesy has got new practicability with the CCDs (to reach a good accuracy of geoid determination via astro-geodesy λ and φ observations). At the TU Wien there is the CCD MX916 of Starlight Xpress (with 752×580 pixels, 11×12 microns, 8.7×6.5 mm active area). Our predicted level of accuracy for λ and φ measurements is few 0."1 from one CCD MX916 processing of zenith stars, with small optic (20 cm focus length because of not stable, but mobile instrument) and Tycho-2. A transportable zenith camera with CCD is under development at the TU Wien for astro-geodesy subjects.

  10. HIGH ECLIPTIC LATITUDE SURVEY FOR SMALL MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Terai, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Jun; Itoh, Yoichi

    2013-11-01

    Main-belt asteroids have been continuously colliding with one another since they were formed. Their size distribution is primarily determined by the size dependence of asteroid strength against catastrophic impacts. The strength scaling law as a function of body size could depend on collision velocity, but the relationship remains unknown, especially under hypervelocity collisions comparable to 10 km s{sup –1}. We present a wide-field imaging survey at an ecliptic latitude of about 25° for investigating the size distribution of small main-belt asteroids that have highly inclined orbits. The analysis technique allowing for efficient asteroid detections and high-accuracy photometric measurements provides sufficient sample data to estimate the size distribution of sub-kilometer asteroids with inclinations larger than 14°. The best-fit power-law slopes of the cumulative size distribution are 1.25 ± 0.03 in the diameter range of 0.6-1.0 km and 1.84 ± 0.27 in 1.0-3.0 km. We provide a simple size distribution model that takes into consideration the oscillations of the power-law slope due to the transition from the gravity-scaled regime to the strength-scaled regime. We find that the high-inclination population has a shallow slope of the primary components of the size distribution compared to the low-inclination populations. The asteroid population exposed to hypervelocity impacts undergoes collisional processes where large bodies have a higher disruptive strength and longer lifespan relative to tiny bodies than the ecliptic asteroids.

  11. Crossing latitudes--long-distance tracking of an apex predator.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luciana C; Thums, Michele; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Vianna, Gabriel M S; Stevens, John; McAuley, Rory; Meekan, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) are apex predators occurring in most tropical and warm temperate marine ecosystems, but we know relatively little of their patterns of residency and movement over large spatial and temporal scales. We deployed satellite tags on eleven tiger sharks off the north-western coast of Western Australia and used the Brownian Bridge kernel method to calculate home ranges and analyse movement behaviour. One individual recorded one of the largest geographical ranges of movement ever reported for the species, travelling over 4000 km during 517 days of monitoring. Tags on the remainder of the sharks reported for shorter periods (7-191 days). Most of these sharks had restricted movements and long-term (30-188 days) residency in coastal waters in the vicinity of the area where they were tagged. Core home range areas of sharks varied greatly from 1166.9 to 634,944 km2. Tiger sharks spent most of their time in water temperatures between 23°-26°C but experienced temperatures ranging from 6°C to 33°C. One shark displayed seasonal movements among three distinct home range cores spread along most of the coast of Western Australia and generalized linear models showed that this individual had different patterns of temperature and depth occupancy in each region of the coast, with the highest probability of residency occurring in the shallowest areas of the coast with water temperatures above 23°C. These results suggest that tiger sharks can migrate over very large distances and across latitudes ranging from tropical to the cool temperate waters. Such extensive long-term movements may be a key element influencing the connectivity of populations within and among ocean basins. PMID:25671609

  12. High-latitude geomagnetic disturbances during ascending solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitso, Pyry; Tanskanen, Eija; Stolle, Claudia; Berthou Lauritsen, Nynne; Matzka, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    High-latitude regions are very convenient for study of several space weather phenomena such as substorms. Large geographic coverage as well as long time series of data are essential due to the global nature of space weather and the long duration of solar cycles. We will examine geomagnetic activity in Greenland from magnetic field measurements taken by DTU (Technical University of Denmark) magnetometers during the years 2010 to 2014. The study uses data from 13 magnetometer stations located on the east coast of Greenland and one located on the west coast. The original measurements are in one second resolution, thus the amount of data is quite large. Magnetic field H component (positive direction towards the magnetic north) was used throughout the study. Data processing will be described from calibration of original measurements to plotting of long time series. Calibration consists of determining the quiet hour of a given day and reducing the average of that hour from all the time steps of the day. This normalizes the measurements and allows for better comparison between different time steps. In addition to the full time line of measurements, daily, monthly and yearly averages will be provided for all stations. Differential calculations on the change of the H component will also be made available for the duration of the full data set. Envelope curve plots will be presented for duration of the time line. Geomagnetic conditions during winter and summer will be compared to examine seasonal variation. Finally the measured activity will be compared to NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) issued geomagnetic space weather alerts from 2010 to 2014. Calculations and plotting of measurement data were done with MATLAB. M_map toolbox was used for plotting of maps featured in the study (http://www2.ocgy.ubc.ca/~rich/map.html). The study was conducted as a part of the ReSoLVE (Research on Solar Long-term Variability and Effects) Center of Excellence.

  13. Two dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a high latitude braided river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, E.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are a fundamental resource to physical, ecologic and human systems, yet quantification of river flow in high-latitude environments remains limited due to the prevalence of complex morphologies, remote locations and sparse in situ monitoring equipment. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing technology allow us to address questions such as: How well can two-dimensional models simulate a flood wave in a highly 3-dimensional braided river environment, and how does the structure of such a flood wave differ from flow down a similar-sized single-channel river? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate flood waves, discharge, water surface height, and velocity measurements over a ~70 km reach of the Tanana River in Alaska. In order to use LISFLOOD-FP a digital elevation model (DEM) fused with detailed bathymetric data is required. During summer 2013, we surveyed 220,000 bathymetric points along the study reach using an echo sounder system connected to a high-precision GPS unit. The measurements are interpolated to a smooth bathymetric surface, using Topo to Raster interpolation, and combined with an existing five meter DEM (Alaska IfSAR) to create a seamless river terrain model. Flood waves are simulated using varying complexities in model solvers, then compared to gauge records and water logger data to assess major sources of model uncertainty. Velocity and flow direction maps are also assessed and quantified for detailed analysis of braided channel flow. The most accurate model output occurs with using the full two-dimensional model structure, and major inaccuracies appear to be related to DEM quality and roughness values. Future work will intercompare model outputs with extensive ground measurements and new data from AirSWOT, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  14. Study of the low latitude ionospheric turbulence observed by DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Lefeuvre, F.; Parrot, M.

    Following previous works from Molchanov et al 2002a 2002b 2004a 2004b and Hobara et al 2005 data bases dedicated to the systematic analysis of the power and spectral indices of the electric field have been elaborated Two data bases are considered one for the survey mode and the other for the burst mode For the survey mode estimations of the turbulence parameters are performed from the 8 first Fourier components of the averaged power spectra 0-150 Hz frequency band A single slope power law model f - alpha is assumed A quality factor allows to test that hypothesis For the burst mode the power spectra are derived from the waveforms One and two slope models are systematically tested Results are presented and the possibility to use these data bases for correlation with seismic activity is discussed Y Hobara F Lefeuvre M Parrot and O A Molchanov Low-latitude ionospheric turbulence observed by Aureol-3 satellite Annales Geophysicae 23 1259--1270 2005 Molchanov O A Hayakawa M Afonin V V Akentieva O A and Mareev E A Possible influence of seismicity by gravity waves on ionospheric equatorial anomaly from data of IK-24 satellite 1 Search for idea of seismo-ionosphere coupling Seismo Electromagnetics Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling edited by Hayakawa M and Molchanov O A TERRAPUB Tokyo 275--285 2002a Molchanov O A Hayakawa M Afonin V V Akentieva O A Mareev E A and Trakhtengerts V Yu Possible influence of seismicity by gravity waves on ionospheric

  15. Under-Ice Operations with AUVS in High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J.; Kaminski, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010 and 2011, ISE Explorer Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), built for Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), were deployed to Canada's high Arctic. The mission was to undertake under-ice bathymetric surveys supporting Canada's submission under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). During these deployments several under-ice records were broken and several new technologies were demonstrated. The NRCan AUV is a 5000 meter depth rated vehicle, with several innovative additions to make it suitable for arctic survey work. Most notable are a depth rated variable ballast system, a 1300 Hz long-range homing system, and under-ice charging and data transfer capabilities. The Explorer's range was extended to approximately 450 km by adding a hull section to accommodate extra batteries. The scientific payload onboard included a Seabird SBE49 Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensor, Knudsen singlebeam echosounder, and a Kongsberg Simrad EM2000 multibeam echosounder. In 2010, operations were conducted from an ice camp near Borden Island (78°14'N, 112°39'W) operating through an ice hole. Following several test missions, the AUV spent 10 days surveying under ice before being successfully recovered. In total, close to 1100 km of under-ice survey was undertaken at depths to 3160 meters. A further set of operations was carried out in August and September 2011 from the Canadian Icebreaker CCGS Louis St. Laurent operating with the American Icebreaker USCGS Healy. Here the operations were much further north to latitudes of 88°30' N and to depths of 3500 meters. In this paper, the 2010 ice camp and the 2011 icebreaker missions are described, with an outline of technology developments that were undertaken, the preparations that were necessary for the success of the missions and finally, the outcome of the missions themselves.

  16. South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; view northwest - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  17. On the relationship between extreme and mean values in total ozone and atmospheric dynamics and volcanic eruptions at mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holawe, F.; Rieder, H. E.; Frossard, L.; Ribatet, M.; Maeder, J. A.; Staehelin, J.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.; Weihs, P.

    2011-12-01

    " together with the state of the AAO leads to a suppression of the Mt. Pinatubo signal at Southern mid-latitudes. The Southern polar vortex was shifted towards the Antarctic Peninsula and the Southern parts of South America in 1991, the first year of the Pinatubo eruption, which might explain the negative coefficient estimates found in this region. In the following years (1992-93) the Southern ozone "collar" was displaced and richer than normal, which can be related to the negative mode of the AAO and its relation to the wave activity in tropical regions leading to a strengthening of the Lagrangian mean circulation and thereby to enhanced transport of ozone from the tropics to extra-tropics and to a strong blocking/separation between the vortex and "collar" area.

  18. Ionospheric F2 layer responses to total solar eclipses at low and mid-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekoya, B. J.; Chukwuma, V. U.

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we presented ionospheric F2 responses to total solar eclipses on the basis of the data obtained from five (5) equatorial/low-latitude and twenty-seven (27) mid-latitude ionosonde stations, which are within the obscuration percentage of 50-100% of the path of the total solar eclipses progression. Statistically, the diurnal changes in the F2 layer peak height hmF2 and electron density NmF2, as well as the latitudinal and hemispheric dependence and the contribution of both magnetic and solar activities during the eclipse window were investigated. The estimation of the solar ionizing radiation that remains unmasked during the eclipse window was as well carried out. Plasma diffusion processes dominate the F2 region plasma, and determine the height at which the F2 peak formed at mid-latitude. The electron density decreased during the eclipse window, closely following the variation in the local solar radiation at the mid-latitude. However, at equatorial/low-latitude, the plasma distribution during total solar eclipse depends on combine effect of solar radiation and the background nighttime ionospheric irregularities mechanism. The uncertainty level of the estimated solar ionizing radiation was <±0.3 at mid-latitude and greater±0.3 at equatorial/low-latitude. Their correlation ranges from (0.42-0.99). The ionospheric F2 layer eclipse effect is latitudinal and hemispheric dependent. The effect is largest at mid-latitude and relatively small at equatorial/low-latitudes. It is more pronounced at the equator, and decreases toward the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) region. The better correlation of 0.5840 and 0.6435 between geographic latitude and E(t) and electron density justifies the latitudinal relationship. The increase in percentage deviation of electron density increases with latitude and delay time (∆T) in the northern hemisphere of the mid-latitude. Conversely, in the southern hemisphere the percentage deviation decreases with an increase in

  19. Comparison Between North and South Near Polar Regions of Mars from HEND/Odyssey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V.; Boynton, W. V.; Hamara, D. K.; Shinohara, C.; Saunders, R. S.; Drake, D.

    2003-01-01

    It is known that North and South near polar regions are affected by global redistribution of atmospheric CO2. The maximal thickness of CO2 snow depth may be as high as 1 m at latitudes close to martian poles. It explains why neutron flux above martian poles significantly varies from summer to winter seasons. It occurs because CO2 frost hides upper surface layer from the orbit observations. This fact was used to estimate thickness of CO2 deposit at different latitudes. Here we suggest to make comparison between martian near polar regions in both ways as in terms of subsurface regolith structure as in terms of distribution of CO2 deposits.

  20. Comparative sequence stratigraphy of low-latitude versus high-latitude lacustrine rift basins: Seismic data examples from the East African and Baikal rifts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholz, C.A.; Moore, T.C., Jr.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Golmshtok, A. Ja; Klitgord, Kim D.; Kurotchkin, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Lakes Baikal, Malawi and Tanganyika are the world's three largest rift valley lakes and are the classic modem examples of lacustrine rift basins. All the rift lakes are segmented into half-graben basins, and seismic reflection datasets reveal how this segmentation controls the filling of the rift basins through time. In the early stages of rifting, basins are fed primarily by flexural margin and axial margin drainage systems. At the climax of syn-rift sedimentation, however, when the basins are deeply subsided, almost all the margins are walled off by rift shoulder uplifts, and sediment flux into the basins is concentrated at accommodation zone and axial margin river deltas. Flexural margin unconformities are commonplace in the tropical lakes but less so in high-latitude Lake Baikal. Lake levels are extremely dynamic in the tropical lakes and in low-latitude systems in general because of the predominance of evaporation in the hydrologic cycle in those systems. Evaporation is minimized in relation to inflow in the high-latitude Lake Baikal and in most high-latitude systems, and consequently, major sequence boundaries tend to be tectonically controlled in that type of system. The acoustic stratigraphies of the tropical lakes are dominated by high-frequency and high-amplitude lake level shifts, whereas in high-latitude Lake Baikal, stratigraphic cycles are dominated by tectonism and sediment-supply variations.

  1. Ionospheric and magnetic signatures of a high speed solar wind in low latitudes on 13 October 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migoya-Orue, Y. O.; Azzouzi, I.; Coisson, P.; Amory Mazaudier, C.; Fleury, R.; Radicella, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the impact of a fast solar wind on the ionosphere, in low latitudes, on 13 October 2012. On that day, the high speed solar wind reached the Earth around 16:00UT, during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm which started around 00:00UT. The solar wind speed was determined to be 580km/s, on the same day, around 17:00UT. Its impact was observed in low and equatorial latitudes, in Africa and in Eastern South America, on the F layer and on the geomagnetic field variations. Through the analysis of magnetic indices, ionosonde characteristics and the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field, we found that the 13 October 2012 event exhibited a local impact, affecting the observatories situated in a longitude sector between 315°E and 45°E. Particularly, the F layer in Africa (observed by the ionosonde at Ascension Island) did not present any lift, and there was a delay for approximately two hours of the ascent of the F layer in America (the ionosonde at Fortaleza). In this case, there was an evident inhibition on the development of spread F at the time of the Pre Reversal Enhancement (PRE) in Africa and Eastern America, while the ionograms of the days before and after presented clear spread F traces. The disturbances of the ionospheric equivalent electric current (Diono) deduced from the variations of the geomagnetic field at M'Bour near Dakar (Africa) and at Kourou (Eastern America) exhibited on the dayside, an anti Sq current which is signature of the influence of the Disturbance Dynamo Electric Field (DDEF).

  2. 7. South El Paso St., South El Paso St., 101103 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. South El Paso St., South El Paso St., 101-103 (Grand Hotel), east (front) and north facades, west side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  3. 19. South El Paso St., 405411 (commercial), east facades, south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. South El Paso St., 405-411 (commercial), east facades, south facade of 400 visible, west side of street - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  4. Modeling the above and below ground carbon and nitrogen stocks in northern high latitude terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElMasri, B.; Jain, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is expected to cause warming in the northern high latitudes, but it is still uncertain what the respond of the northern high latitudes ecosystem will be to such warming. One of the biggest scientific questions is to determine whether northern high latitude ecosystem are or will act as a terrestrial carbon sink or source. Therefore, it is essential to understand and quantify the biogeochemical cycle of the northern high latitude ecosystems in order to predict their respond to climate change. Using a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) with its coupled carbon-nitrogen cycle, we provide a detail quantification of the carbon and nitrogen in the vegetation pools and the soil carbon for the northern high latitude ecosystems. We focus on soil carbon and vegetation carbon and nitrogen, though we provide results for gross primary production (GPP), autotrophic respiration (Ra), net primary production (NPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and heterotrophic respiration (Rh). In addition, we examine the effect of nitrogen limitation on the carbon fluxes and soil carbon. We present the results for several flux tower sites representative of the tundra and the boreal ecosystems as well as for the northern high latitude region. Our results provide a comprehensive assessment of below and above ground carbon and nitrogen pools in the northern high latitude and the model calibrated parameters can be used to improve the results of other land surface models.

  5. Does greater thermal plasticity facilitate range expansion of an invasive terrestrial anuran into higher latitudes?

    PubMed Central

    Winwood-Smith, Hugh S.; Alton, Lesley A.; Franklin, Craig E.; White, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature has pervasive effects on physiological processes and is critical in setting species distribution limits. Since invading Australia, cane toads have spread rapidly across low latitudes, but slowly into higher latitudes. Low temperature is the likely factor limiting high-latitude advancement. Several previous attempts have been made to predict future cane toad distributions in Australia, but understanding the potential contribution of phenotypic plasticity and adaptation to future range expansion remains challenging. Previous research demonstrates the considerable thermal metabolic plasticity of the cane toad, but suggests limited thermal plasticity of locomotor performance. Additionally, the oxygen-limited thermal tolerance hypothesis predicts that reduced aerobic scope sets thermal limits for ectotherm performance. Metabolic plasticity, locomotor performance and aerobic scope are therefore predicted targets of natural selection as cane toads invade colder regions. We measured these traits at temperatures of 10, 15, 22.5 and 30°C in low- and high-latitude toads acclimated to 15 and 30°C, to test the hypothesis that cane toads have adapted to cooler temperatures. High-latitude toads show increased metabolic plasticity and higher resting metabolic rates at lower temperatures. Burst locomotor performance was worse for high-latitude toads. Other traits showed no regional differences. We conclude that increased metabolic plasticity may facilitate invasion into higher latitudes by maintaining critical physiological functions at lower temperatures. PMID:27293695

  6. A computer program for converting rectangular coordinates to latitude-longitude coordinates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, A.T.

    1989-01-01

    A computer program was developed for converting the coordinates of any rectangular grid on a map to coordinates on a grid that is parallel to lines of equal latitude and longitude. Using this program in conjunction with groundwater flow models, the user can extract data and results from models with varying grid orientations and place these data into grid structure that is oriented parallel to lines of equal latitude and longitude. All cells in the rectangular grid must have equal dimensions, and all cells in the latitude-longitude grid measure one minute by one minute. This program is applicable if the map used shows lines of equal latitude as arcs and lines of equal longitude as straight lines and assumes that the Earth 's surface can be approximated as a sphere. The program user enters the row number , column number, and latitude and longitude of the midpoint of the cell for three test cells on the rectangular grid. The latitude and longitude of boundaries of the rectangular grid also are entered. By solving sets of simultaneous linear equations, the program calculates coefficients that are used for making the conversion. As an option in the program, the user may build a groundwater model file based on a grid that is parallel to lines of equal latitude and longitude. The program reads a data file based on the rectangular coordinates and automatically forms the new data file. (USGS)

  7. Latitude distribution of track and field elite athletes in China mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Zhang; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Cui, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Yang; Jin, Hua

    2006-01-01

    The civilization theories prevailed among people are the theories paying attention to the geographical factors. In this paper, the latitude distribution of track and field elite athletes in China mainland has been studied in terms of the biological effects of sunlight. The China mainland is divided into seven latitude zones according to the absolute latitude value so that the larger the zone number is, the larger the distance from the Equator. The elite athletes are classified into speed-type, jump-type, strength-type and endurance-type so that the latitude distribution can be discussed in terms of exercise physiology. The latitude distribution shows that the elite athletes of speed-type or jump-type prefer to the zones of low latitude, and the elite athletes of strength-type or endurance-type prefer to the zones of high latitude. These phenomena can be understood by the effects of sunlight on exercise physiological index such as skeletal muscle fibre types.

  8. The mesoscale precipitation distribution in mid-latitude continental regions: observational uncertainty and evaluation of 25-km global model simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidale, P. L.; Schiemann, R.; Demory, M. E.; Roberts, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-latitude precipitation over land exhibits a high degree of variability due to the complex interaction of governing atmospheric processes with coastlines, the heterogeneous land surface, and orography. General circulation models (GCMs) have traditionally shown limited ability in capturing variability in the mesoscale range (here ~50-500 km), due to their low resolution. Recent advances in resolution have provided ensembles of multidecadal climate simulations with GCMs using ~25 km grid spacing. Here, we assess this class of GCM simulations, from the UPSCALE (UK on PrACE - weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk) campaign. Increased model resolution also poses new challenges to the observational datasets used to evaluate models. Global gridded data products (e.g. from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project, GPCP) are invaluable for assessing large-scale precipitation features, but may not sufficiently resolve mesoscale structures. In the absence of alternative estimates, the intercomparison of specialised, regional observational datasets may be the only way to gain insight into the uncertainties associated with these observations. We focus on three mid-latitude continental regions where gridded precipitation observations based on higher-density gauge networks are available, complementing the global data sets: Europe (with a particular emphasis on the Alps), South and East Asia, and the continental US. Additional motivation, and opportunity, arises from continuing efforts to quantify the components of the global radiation budget and water cycle. Recent estimates based on radiation measurements suggest that the global mean precipitation/evaporation may be up to 10 Wm-2 (about 0.35 mm day-1) larger than the estimate obtained from GPCP. While the main part of this discrepancy is thought to be due to the underestimation of remotely-sensed ocean precipitation, there is also considerable uncertainty about 'unobserved' precipitation

  9. GRAND MINIMA AND NORTH-SOUTH ASYMMETRY OF SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olemskoy, S. V.; Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2013-11-01

    A solar-type dynamo model in a spherical shell is developed with allowance for random dependence of the poloidal field generation mechanism on time and latitude. The model shows repeatable epochs of a strongly decreased amplitude of magnetic cycles similar to the Maunder minimum of solar activity. Random dependence of dynamo parameters on latitude breaks the equatorial symmetry of generated fields. The model shows the correlation of the occurrence of grand minima with deviations in the dynamo field from dipolar parity. An increased north-south asymmetry of magnetic activity can, therefore, be an indicator of transitions to grand minima. Qualitative interpretation of this correlation is suggested. Statistics of grand minima in the model are close to the Poisson random process, indicating that the onset of a grand minimum is statistically independent of preceding minima.

  10. Latinos in the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily Elliott, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue contains five articles about the growing Latino population in the South and its impact on communities, particularly in rural areas. "Social Capital of Mexican Communities in the South" (Ruben Hernandez-Leon, Victor Zuniga) argues that, to understand and advocate for Mexican newcomer communities in the South, scholars,…

  11. On an energy-latitude dispersion pattern of ion precipitation potentially associated with magnetospheric EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Ni, B.; Yue, C.; Jiang, F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-10-01

    Ion precipitation mechanisms are usually energy dependent and contingent upon magnetospheric/ionospheric locations. Therefore, the pattern of energy-latitude dependence of ion precipitation boundaries seen by low Earth orbit satellites can be implicative of the mechanism(s) underlying the precipitation. The pitch angle scattering of ions led by the field line curvature, a well-recognized mechanism of ion precipitation in the central plasma sheet (CPS), leads to one common pattern of energy-latitude dispersion, in that the ion precipitation flux diminishes at higher (lower) latitudes for protons with lower (higher) energies. In this study, we introduce one other systematically existing pattern of energy-latitude dispersion of ion precipitation, in that the lower energy ion precipitation extends to lower latitude than the higher-energy ion precipitation. Via investigating such a "reversed" energy-latitude dispersion pattern, we explore possible mechanisms of ion precipitation other than the field line curvature scattering. We demonstrate via theories and simulations that the H-band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave is capable of preferentially scattering keV protons in the CPS and potentially leads to the reversed energy-latitude dispersion of proton precipitation. We then present detailed event analyses and provide support to a linkage between the EMIC waves in the equatorial CPS and ion precipitation events with reversed energy-latitude dispersion. We also discuss the role of ion acceleration in the topside ionosphere which, together with the CPS ion population, may result in a variety of energy-latitude distributions of the overall ion precipitation.

  12. In situ measurements constraining the role of sulphate aerosols in mid-latitude ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Tin, P.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Toohey, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    In situ measurements of stratospheric sulphate aerosol, reactive nitrogen and chlorine concentrations at middle latitudes confirm the importance of aerosol surface reactions that convert active nitrogen to a less active, reservoir form. This makes mid-latitude stratospheric ozone less vulnerable to active nitrogen and more vulnerable to chlorine species. The effect of aerosol reactions on active nitrogen depends on gas phase reaction rates, so that increases in aerosol concentration following volcanic eruptions will have only a limited effect on ozone depletion at these latitudes.

  13. Variability of Winter Air Temperature in Mid-Latitude Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Bungato, D.; Cierniewski, J.; Jusem, J. C.; Przybylak, R.; Schubert, S.; Starr, D.; Walczewski, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report extreme winter/early-spring air temperature (hereinafter temperature) anomalies in mid-latitude Europe, and to discuss the underlying forcing to these interannual fluctuations. Warm advection from the North Atlantic in late winter controls the surface-air temperature, as indicated by the substantial correlation between the speed of the surface southwesterlies over the eastern North Atlantic (quantified by a specific Index Ina) and the 2-meter level air temperatures (hereinafter Ts) over Europe, 45-60 deg N, in winter. In mid-March and subsequently, the correlation drops drastically (quite often it is negative). This change in the relationship between Ts and Ina marks a transition in the control of the surface-air temperature: absorption of insolation replaces the warm advection as the dominant control. This forcing by maritime-air advection in winter was demonstrated in a previous publication, and is re-examined here in conjunction with extreme fluctuations of temperatures in Europe. We analyze here the interannual variability at its extreme by comparing warm-winter/early-spring of 1989/90 with the opposite scenario in 1995/96. For these two December-to-March periods the differences in the monthly mean temperature in Warsaw and Torun, Poland, range above 10 C. Short-term (shorter than a month) fluctuations of the temperature are likewise very strong. We conduct pentad-by-pentad analysis of the surface-maximum air temperature (hereinafter Tmax), in a selected location, examining the dependence on Ina. The increased cloudiness and higher amounts of total precipitable water, corollary effects to the warm low-level advection. in the 1989/90 winter, enhance the positive temperature anomalies. The analysis of the ocean surface winds is based on the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) dataset; ascent rates, and over land wind data are from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF); maps of 2-m temperature, cloud

  14. Northern high latitude climate variability of the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Heather J.

    This work explores the causes of northern high-latitude climate variations over the last millennium, and industrial and future periods. Attribution studies are performed on a suite of global climate simulations, and four historical reconstructions of Greenland surface temperatures and precipitation (two of which are new to this work). The simulations followed the protocols of the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project 3 and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5. At least half of the multi-decadal variability in simulated Greenland climate variations over the last millennium is reproduced by a linear, empirically-generated model including terms for volcanic emissions, solar insolation changes (including total solar irradiance and orbital components) and an index associated with latitudinal shifts in the North Atlantic jet. Empirical model parameters are obtained by regressing simulated Greenland temperatures and precipitation against time series for each of the response variables. Greenhouse gas radiative forcing changes are unimportant to simulated Greenland conditions over the last millennium, although they dominate after the mid-20th century. Most of the historical Greenland climate reconstructions are restricted to the industrial period, due to a lack of spatially-comprehensive climate records. They exhibit substantial differences in the timing, phasing and amplitudes of past climate variations, due to regional sensitivities in the source data and the reconstruction methodologies. Reconstructions indicate that Greenland temperatures did not begin to follow hemispheric greenhouse gas warming patterns until the mid-1990s. This discrepancy indicates either that the warming hiatus was associated with internal climate variability, or that the simulations are missing processes important to Greenland climate. For example, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols are not captured in the climate model employed here. All of the external climate forcings

  15. Exchange across the shelf break at high southern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinck, J. M.; Dinniman, M. S.

    2010-05-01

    Exchange of water across the Antarctic shelf break has considerable scientific and societal importance due to its effects on circulation and biology of the region, conversion of water masses as part of the global overturning circulation and basal melt of glacial ice and the consequent effect on sea level rise. The focus in this paper is the onshore transport of warm, oceanic Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW); export of dense water from these shelves is equally important, but has been the focus of other recent papers and will not be considered here. A variety of physical mechanisms are described which could play a role in this onshore flux. The relative importance of some processes are evaluated by simple calculations. A numerical model for the Ross Sea continental shelf is used as an example of a more comprehensive evaluation of the details of cross-shelf break exchange. In order for an ocean circulation model to simulate these processes at high southern latitudes, it needs to have high spatial resolution, realistic geometry and bathymetry. Grid spacing smaller than the first baroclinic radius of deformation (a few km) is required to adequately represent the circulation. Because of flow-topography interactions, bathymetry needs to be represented at these same small scales. Atmospheric conditions used to force these circulation models also need to be known at a similar small spatial resolution (a few km) in order to represent orographically controlled winds (coastal jets) and katabatic winds. Significantly, time variability of surface winds strongly influences the structure of the mixed layer. Daily, if not more frequent, surface fluxes must be imposed for a realistic surface mixed layer. Sea ice and ice shelves are important components of the coastal circulation. Ice isolates the ocean from exchange with the atmosphere, especially in the winter. Melting and freezing of both sea ice and glacial ice influence salinity and thereby the character of shelf water. These water

  16. Exchange across the shelf break at high southern latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinck, J. M.; Dinniman, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Exchange of water across the Antarctic shelf break has considerable scientific and societal importance due to its effects on circulation and biology of the region, conversion of water masses as part of the global overturning circulation and basal melt of glacial ice and the consequent effect on sea level rise. The focus in this paper is the onshore transport of warm, oceanic Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW); export of dense water from these shelves is equally important, but has been the focus of other recent papers and will not be considered here. A variety of physical mechanisms are described which could play a role in this onshore flux. The relative importance of some processes are evaluated by simple calculations. A numerical model for the Ross Sea continental shelf is used as an example of a more comprehensive evaluation of the details of cross-shelf break exchange. In order for an ocean circulation model simulate these processes at high southern latitudes, it needs to have high spatial resoluti