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Sample records for 850nm vertical cavity

  1. Ultimate modulation bandwidth of 850 nm oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, M. A.; Blokhin, S. A.; Maleev, N. A.; Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Blokhin, A. A.; Zadiranov, Yu M.; Troshkov, S. I.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    Complex influence of photon lifetime (controlled by the mirror loss) and aperture size on the performance of 850 nm InGaAlAs oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with fully doped AlGaAs-based distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) was investigated. We find a tradeoff between photon lifetime and gain nonlinearity for maximizing the optical bandwidth, leading to the optimum aperture size close to 4-6 μm. In spite of the reduced photon lifetime (from 4 ps to 1 ps), the excess damping caused by the current-induced self-heating limits the ultimate modulation bandwidth for the given VCSELs design at 24-25 GHz. Further improvement in high frequency characteristics can be facilitated by decrease of the heat generation and improvement of the heat removal from the active region as well as by proper engineering of the scattering loss at the oxide aperture while keeping the low capacitance optimizing design of the oxide aperture.

  2. Accelerated aging of 28 Gb s-1 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with multiple thick oxide apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropp, J. R.; Steinle, G.; Schäfer, G.; Shchukin, V. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Turkiewicz, J. P.; Zoldak, M.

    2015-04-01

    850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with multiple thick oxide apertures suitable for temperature-insensitive error free transmission at 28 Gb s-1 are subjected to accelerated aging at high current densities and chip temperatures. The devices withstand a 20% power change test at a high current density (18 kA c{{m}-2}) at an ambient temperature of 120 {}^\\circ C for 2500 h. At 90-95 {}^\\circ C at this current density no degradation was observed up to 5000 h. We performed the studies at further elevated current densities and temperatures and define the acceleration factor as AF={{({{J}stress}/{{J}use})}8}exp [(1.3 eV/{{k}B})(1/{{T}use}-1/{{T}stress})]. The extrapolated lifetime for 20% power drop is estimated as 20 thousand years at 300 K at current density of 18 kA c{{m}-2} which is sufficient for 28 Gb s-1 error-free temperature-insensitive data transmission.

  3. 850-nm Zn-diffusion vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with with oxide-relief structure for high-speed and energy-efficient optical interconnects from very-short to medium (2km) reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Wei; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jason (Jyehong); Yang, Ying-Jay

    2015-03-01

    High-speed and "green" ~850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have lately attracted lots of attention due to their suitability for applications in optical interconnects (OIs). To further enhance the speed and its maximum allowable linking distance of VCSELs are two major trends to meet the requirement of OI in next generation data centers. Recently, by use of the advanced 850 nm VCSEL technique, data rate as high as 64 Gbit/sec over 57m and 20 Gbit/sec over 2km MMF transmission have been demonstrated, respectively. Here, we will review our recent work about 850 nm Zn-diffusion VCSELs with oxide-relief apertures to further enhance the above-mentioned performances. By using Zn-diffusion, we can not only reduce the device resistance but also manipulate the number of optical modes to benefit transmission. Combing such device, which has excellent single-mode (SMSR >30 dB) and high-power (~7mW) performance, with advanced modulation format (OFDM), record-high bit-rate-distance-product through MMF (2.3 km×28 Gbit/sec) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by selective etching away the oxide aperture inside Zn-diffusion VCSEL, significant enhancement of device speed, D-factor, and reliability can be observed. With such unique VCSEL structure, >40 Gbit/sec energy-efficient transmission over 100m MMF under extremely low-driving current density (<10kA/cm2) has been successfully demonstrated.

  4. Effect of the photon lifetime on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors and an oxide current aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, M. A.; Blokhin, S. A. Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Maleev, N. A.; Blokhin, A. A.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Nikitina, E. V.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of the photon lifetime in an optical microcavity on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and an oxide current aperture is studied. The photon lifetime in the microcavity is controlled by varying the upper DBR reflectance. It is found that the speed of VCSELs with a current-aperture diameter of 10 μm is mainly limited by the self-heating effect, despite an increase in the relaxation-oscillation damping coefficient with increasing photon lifetime in the microcavity. At the same time, the higher level of internal optical loss in lasers with a current-aperture diameter of 1.5 μm leads to dominance of the effect of relaxation-oscillation damping independently of the radiation output loss. In the case of devices with a current-aperture diameter of 5.5 μm, both mechanisms limiting the speed operate, which allow an increase in the VCSEL effective modulation frequency from 21 to 24 GHz as the photon lifetime decreases from 3.7 to 0.8 ps.

  5. Electrically-pumped 850-nm micromirror VECSELs.

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, Kent Martin; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Mar, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) combine high optical power and good beam quality in a device with surface-normal output. In this paper, we describe the design and operating characteristics of an electrically-pumped VECSEL that employs a wafer-scale fabrication process and operates at 850 nm. A curved micromirror output coupler is heterogeneously integrated with AlGaAs-based semiconductor material to form a compact and robust device. The structure relies on flip-chip bonding the processed epitaxial material to an aluminum nitride mount; this heatsink both dissipates thermal energy and permits high frequency modulation using coplanar traces that lead to the VECSEL mesa. Backside emission is employed, and laser operation at 850 nm is made possible by removing the entire GaAs substrate through selective wet etching. While substrate removal eliminates absorptive losses, it simultaneously compromises laser performance by increasing series resistance and degrading the spatial uniformity of current injection. Several aspects of the VECSEL design help to mitigate these issues, including the use of a novel current-spreading n type distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Additionally, VECSEL performance is improved through the use of a p-type DBR that is modified for low thermal resistance.

  6. High-speed 850 nm oxide-confined VCSELs for DATACOM applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutig, Alex; Blokhin, Sergey; Nadtochiy, Alexey M.; Fiol, Gerrit; Lott, James A.; Shchukin, Vitaly A.; Ledenstov, Nikolai N.; Bimberg, Dieter

    2010-02-01

    Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) are low cost and reliable light sources for high-speed local area and storage area network (LAN/SAN) optical fiber data communication systems and short-reach computer interconnects. The continuing rapid increase of serial transmission data rates driven by multi-core microprocessor's bandwidth upgrades cannot be sustained via conventional copper-based links as bit rates move beyond 10 Gbit/s and distances greater than 1 m. The intrinsic limitation of copper at high single-channel data rates facilitates the need to transition to optical fiberbased links at ever shorter distances. For LAN/SAN applications the 850 nm wavelength is standard. This same wavelength is also the standard for several other evolving short-reach application areas including Fibre Channel, CEI, USB, InfiniBand, and HDMI optical link systems. Herein we present our recent results on 850 nm oxide-confined VCSELs operating at data bit rates up to 40 Gbit/s. The low operational current density in the range of ~10 kA/cm2 ensures viable device reliability and long-term stability based on well-known industry certification specifications. Key VCSEL device parameters including the relaxation resonance frequency, damping, and parasitic cut-off frequency are determined for VCSELs with oxide-confined apertures of various diameters. We find that a parasitic cut-off frequency of 24-28 GHz limits the VCSEL's high speed operation at the highest optical modulation rates. We believe that with some effort the device parasitics can be further reduced such that current modulated VCSELs can be realized with larger than 30 GHz optical modulation bandwidth and reliable and practical operation beyond 40 Gbit/s.

  7. Dynamic Range of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers in Multimode Links

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.L.T.; Dalal, R.V.; Ram, R.J.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-07-07

    The authors report spurious free dynamic range measurements of 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers in short multimode links for radio frequency communication. For a 27m fiber link, the dynamic range at optimal bias was greater than 95dB-Hz{sup 2/3} for modulation frequencies between 1 and 5.5 GHz, which exceeds the requirements for antenna remoting in microcellular networks. In a free space link, they have measured the highest dynamic range in an 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser of 113dB-Hz{sup 2/3} at 900MHz. We have also investigated the effects of modal noise and differential mode delay on the dynamic range for longer lengths of fiber.

  8. Selectively oxidized vertical-cavity laser performance and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-02-01

    The authors discuss revolutionary performance advances in selectively oxidized vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), which have enabled low operating power laser diodes appropriate for aerospace applications. Incorporating buried oxide layers converted from AIGaAs layers within the laser cavity produces enhanced optical and electrical confinement enabling superior laser performance, such as high efficiency and modulation bandwidth. VCSELs also shown to be viable over varied environmental conditions such as ambient temperature and ionized radiation. The development of novel VCSEL technologies for advanced system applications is also described. Two dimensional individually addressable VCSEL arrays exhibit uniform threshold and operating characteristics. Bottom emitting 850 nm VCSEL arrays fabricated using wafer fusion are also reported.

  9. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lu; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-06-29

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 μm. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps. PMID:26191739

  10. Performance comparison of 850-nm and 1550-nm VCSELs exploiting OOK, OFDM, and 4-PAM over SMF/MMF links for low-cost optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karinou, Fotini; Deng, Lei; Lopez, Roberto Rodes; Prince, Kamau; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally compare the performance of two commercially available vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes (VCSELs), a multi-mode 850-nm and a single-mode 1550-nm, exploiting on-off keying/direct detection (OOK/DD), and orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK)/16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM) with direct detection, over SMF (100 m and 5 km) and MMF (100 m and 1 km) short-range links, for their potential application in low-cost rack-to-rack optical interconnects. Moreover, we assess the performance of quaternary-pulse amplitude modulation (4-PAM), for the 1550-nm transmitter over SMF and MMF links and we compare it to the data-rate equivalent NRZ-OOK. The extensive performance comparison under various transmission scenarios shows the superiority of 1550-nm single-mode VCSEL compared to its multi-mode 850-nm counterpart. Moreover, OFDM/DD and 4-PAM in conjunction with low-cost, inexpensive VCSELs as transmitters prove to be an enabling technology for next-generation WDM, point-to-point, short-reach, SMF/MMF optical interconnects and potential candidates to substitute NRZ-OOK. Nevertheless, the sensitivity requirements are higher in that case, whereas these advanced, spectrally-efficient modulation formats become severely degraded when transmitted over MMF links, especially, when employing the inexpensive 850-nm VCSELs as transmitter. Finally, we compare the performance of the point-to-point links under investigation to the performance of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)- based, scalable permutation switch fabric, the Optical Shared MemOry Supercomputer Interconnect System (OSMOSIS).

  11. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  12. Progress and issues for high-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Kevin L.; Al-Omari, Ahmad N.

    2007-02-01

    Extrinsic electrical, thermal, and optical issues rather than intrinsic factors currently constrain the maximum bandwidth of directly modulated vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). Intrinsic limits based on resonance frequency, damping, and K-factor analysis are summarized. Previous reports are used to compare parasitic circuit values and electrical 3dB bandwidths and thermal resistances. A correlation between multimode operation and junction heating with bandwidth saturation is presented. The extrinsic factors motivate modified bottom-emitting structures with no electrical pads, small mesas, copper plated heatsinks, and uniform current injection. Selected results on high speed quantum well and quantum dot VCSELs at 850 nm, 980 nm, and 1070 nm are reviewed including small-signal 3dB frequencies up to 21.5 GHz and bit rates up to 30 Gb/s.

  13. Growth of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L.; Choquette, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    We present growth and characterization of visible and near-infrared vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include growth rate and composition control using an {ital in}{ital situ} normal-incidence reflectometer, comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire composition range, and optimization of ultra-high material uniformity. We also demonstrate our recent achievements of all-AlGaAs VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous- wave demonstration of 700-nm red VCSELs and high-efficiency and low- threshold voltage 850-nm VCSELs.

  14. Vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers with injection laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, D. L., Jr.; McInerney, J. G.; Raja, M. Y. A.; Schaus, C. F.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    1990-05-01

    Continuous-wave GaAs/GaAlAs edge-emitting diode lasers were used to pump GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/AlGaAs vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with resonant periodic gain (RPG) at room temperature. Pump threshold as low as 11 mW, output powers as high as 27 mW at 850 nm, and external differential quantum efficiencies of about 70 percent were observed in GaAs/AlGaAs surface -emitters; spectral brightness 22 times that of the pump laser was also observed. Output powers as high as 85 mW at 950 nm and differential quantum efficiencies of up to 58 percent were recorded for the InGaAs surface-emitting laser. This is the highest quasi-CW output power ever reported for any RPG VCSEL, and the first time such a device has been pumped using an injection laser diode.

  15. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  16. Articular cartilage optical properties in the spectral range 300--850 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Daniel W.; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Farrar, Stuart K.; Johnston, William M.; Litsky, Alan S.; Bertone, Alicia L.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of absolute total reflectance were recorded from weight-bearing (n equals 9) and nonweight-bearing (n equals 9) equine articular cartilage specimens from 300 to 850 nm using a spectrophotometer with integrating sphere attachment. Following correction of measured spectra for interfacial reflections and edge losses, Kubelka-Munk theory was applied to estimate absorption and scattering coefficient, 1D light intensity distribution, and light penetration depth. Kubelka-Munk absorption coefficients ranged from approximately 7 cm-1 at 330 nm to approximately 1 cm-1 at 850 nm. A localized absorption peak was noted at approximately 340 nm. Above 510 nm, weight-bearing cartilage demonstrated significantly higher absorption coefficients than nonweight-bearing tissue (paired t-test, p < 0.05). Kubelka-Munk scattering coefficients ranged from approximately 40 cm-1 at 360 nm to approximately 6 cm-1 at 850 nm. No statistical differences in scattering coefficient were noted between weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing tissue. Penetration depths predicted by Kubelka-Munk theory ranged from 0.6 mm at 350 nm to over 3 mm at 850 nm. Stronger absorption in weight-bearing cartilage compared to nonweight-bearing tissue resulted in lower light penetration depths in weight-bearing cartilage at all wavelengths longer than 510 nm.

  17. 25 Gbps 850 nm photodiode for emerging 100 Gb ethernet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhay; Rue, Jim; Becker, Don; Datta, Shubhashish; McFaul, Will

    2011-06-01

    The IEEE Std 802.3ba-2010 for 40 Gb and 100 Gb Ethernet was released in July, 2010. This standard will continue to evolve over the next several years. Two of the challenging transmit/receive architectures contained in this standard are the 100GBASE-LR4 (<10 km range) and 100GBASE-ER4 (<40 km range). Although presently envisioned for 1310 nm optical wavelengths, both of these 4 lane, 25.78 GBaud formats may be adopted for the impending 850 nm short reach optical backplane market, whose range is below 150 m. Driven by major computer server companies, such as IBM, HP and Oracle, the 850 nm Active Optical Cable (AOC) market is presently undergoing an increase of serial rates up to 25 Gbaud to enhance backplane interconnectivity. With AOCs up to 16 channels, the potential for up to 400 Gbps backhaul composite data rates will soon be possible. We report a 25 Gbps photodiode with quantum efficiency ~ 0.6 at 850 nm. This InGaAs/InP device was optimized for high quantum efficiency at 850 nm. When pigtailed with multimode fiber and integrated with an application-specific RF amplifier, the resultant photoreceiver will provide multiple functionalities for these 100 Gb Ethernet markets.

  18. Numerical modeling of vertical cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Hadley, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a diode laser whose optical cavity is formed by growing or depositing DBR mirror stacks that sandwich an active gain region. The resulting short cavity supports lasing into a single longitudinal mode normal to the wafer, making these devices ideal for a multitude of applications, ranging from high-speed communication to high-power sources (from 2D arrays). This report describes the development of a numerical VCSEL model, whose goal is to both further their understanding of these complex devices and provide a tool for accurate design and data analysis.

  19. Engineering high-performance vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Hou, H.Q.; Hietala, V.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The cw and high-speed performance of vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) are affected by both electrical and optical issues arising from the geometry and fabrication of these devices. Structures with low resistance semiconductor mirrors and Al-oxide confinement layers address these issues and have produced record performance including 50% power conversion efficiency and modulation bandwidths up to 20 GHz at small bias currents.

  20. Substrate-removed 850-nm RCLEDs and small core (63/125 um) plastic optical fibers for optical data communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coosemans, Thierry; Bockstaele, Ronny; Van Hove, An; Naessens, Kris; Derluyn, Joff; Vanwassenhove, Luc; Van Daele, Peter; Moerman, Ingrid; Baets, Roel G.

    2000-04-01

    Current developments in computer technology give rise to increasing data communication over relatively short distances at backplane- and inter MCM interconnect level. It is foreseen that electrical interconnect will not be able to accommodate the necessary data traffic in advanced data processing systems in the future and hence a bottleneck will be created. A potential remedy for this interconnect problem is the use of parallel optical datalinks. In this paper we propose small diameter step index plastic optical fiber ribbons in combination with high efficient resonant cavity LED's as a cheap and feasible option for these optical links. A design for such an optical link is presented with special attention for the optical pathway. Experimental results on the optical properties of the used POF are shown. We describe the development of RCLED's at 850 nm specially designed for efficient coupling into POF. We measured a RCLED to POF coupling efficiency up to 40%. Additionally we report on the technologies used for the fabrication and assembly of the optical pathways and finally some experiments were carried out on the first realized assemblies.

  1. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  2. Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers for communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorison, J. M.

    2000-12-01

    Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) are a novel type of laser in which the lasing light is emitted from the surface of the device, perpendicular to the gain layer, rather than from the edge of the laser, parallel to the gain layer. These lasers show interesting behavior, particularly involving mode dynamics and polarization. They show promising characteristics for use in communications applications but their behavior needs to be further understood before they can reach their potential. This chapter attempts to review VCSELs generally and discuss their use in communications systems.

  3. Impact of a large negative gain-to-cavity wavelength detuning on the performance of InGaAlAs oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Sergey A.; Bobrov, Mikhail A.; Maleev, Nikolai A.; Kuzmenkov, Alexander G.; Sakharov, Alexey V.; Blokhin, Alexey A.; Moser, Philip; Lott, James A.; Bimberg, Dieter; Ustinov, Viktor M.

    2015-03-01

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) based on the InGaAlAs-materials system on GaAs substrates are the key component for short-reach data and computer communications systems. Several different modulation schemes have been developed to realize high data bit rates based on various oxide-confined near-infrared VCSEL designs operated under direct current modulation. However, one open question to resolve is the optimal gain-to-cavity wavelength detuning to employ for temperature-stable high-speed performance. We investigate the static and dynamic characteristics of 850 nm high-speed oxide-confined VCSELs with different negative gain-to-cavity wavelength detunings. Our oxideconfined 850 nm VCSELs with a more common ~10 nm negative gain-to-cavity detuning demonstrate the conventional optical mode behavior with a classical single-resonance frequency response. With a larger (≥ 20 nm) negative detuning, our devices with large oxide-aperture size (>6 μm) show an anomalous start of lasing via higher order modes with a subsequent switching to lasing via the lowest order modes at higher currents. At intermediate currents, co-lasing via two types of transverse modes and a two-resonance modulation response is observed. The increase of operation temperature as well as the reduction in the oxide-aperture area resulted in classical lasing of index-guided VCSELs. The observed optical mode behavior can be attributed to the specific index guiding profile caused by the oxide-apertures, low internal optical losses, and the large gain-to-cavity detuning. Moreover, one can suggest that the complex shape of the modulation response results from the mode competition for the available gain during an interesting co-lasing operating regime.

  4. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, Maija; Kärhä, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off. PMID:20154756

  5. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  6. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Lear, Kevin L.; Awyoung, Adelbert; Choquette, Kent D.

    1999-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths.

  7. Towards high-frequency operation of polarization oscillations in spin vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Markus; Höpfner, Henning; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Compared to purely charge based devices, spintronic lasers offer promising perspectives for new superior device concepts. Especially vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with spin-polarization (spin-VCSELs) feature ultrafast spin and polarization dynamics. Oscillations in the circular polarization degree can be generated using pulsed spin-injection. The oscillations evolve due to the carrier-spin-photon system that is coupled for the linear modes in the VCSEL's cavity via the birefringence. The polarization oscillations are independent of the conventional relaxation oscillations and have the potential to exceed frequencies of 100 GHz. The oscillations are switchable and can be the basis for ultrafast directly modulated spin-VCSELs for, e.g., communication purposes. The polarization oscillation frequency is mainly determined by the birefringence. We show a method to tune the birefringence and thus the polarization oscillation frequency by adding mechanical strain to the substrate in the vicinity of the laser. We achieved first experimental results for high-frequency operation using 850 nm oxide-confined single-mode VCSELs. The results are compared with simulations using the spin-flip-model for high birefringence values.

  8. Injector Cavities Fabrication, Vertical Test Performance and Primary Cryomodule Design

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Clemens, William; Davis, G; Macha, Kurt; Overton, Roland; Spell, D.

    2015-09-01

    After the electromagnetic design and the mechanical design of a β=0.6, 2-cell elliptical SRF cavity, the cavity has been fabricated. Then both 2-cell and 7-cell cavities have been bench tuned to the target values of frequency, coupling external Q and field flatness. After buffer chemistry polishing (BCP) and high pressure rinses (HPR), Vertical 2K cavity test results have been satisfied the specifications and ready for the string assembly. We will report the cavity performance including Lorenz Force Detuning (LFD) and Higher Order Modes (HOM) damping data. Its integration with cavity tuners to the cryomodule design will be reported.

  9. Highly uniform and reproducible visible to near-infrared vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers grown by MOVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Choquette, K.D.; Hammons, B.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-01

    The authors present the growth and characterization of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) from visible to near-infrared wavelength grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include the control on growth rate and composition using an in situ normal-incidence reflectometer, optimization of ultra-high material uniformity, and comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire Al composition range. They will also demonstrate the recent achievements of selectively-oxidized VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous-wave demonstration of all-AlGaAs 700-nm red VCSELs, high-performance n-side up 850-nm VCSELs, and low threshold current and low-threshold voltage 1.06 {micro}m VCSELs using InGaAs/GaAsP strain-compensated quantum wells.

  10. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Awyoung, A.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-05-11

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device is disclosed. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths. 10 figs.

  11. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  12. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Richard P.; Lott, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors.

  13. Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

  14. Vertical-cavity in-plane heterostructures: Physics and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2015-11-02

    We show that in-plane (lateral) heterostructures realized in vertical cavities with high contrast grating reflectors can be used to significantly modify the anisotropic dispersion curvature, also interpreted as the photon effective mass. This design freedom enables exotic configurations of heterostructures and many interesting applications. The effects of the anisotropic photon effective mass on the mode confinement, mode spacing, and transverse modes are investigated. As a possible application, the method of boosting the speed of diode lasers by engineering the photon-photon resonance is discussed. Based on this platform, we propose a system of two laterally coupled cavities, which shows the breaking of parity-time symmetry in vertical cavity structures.

  15. Optimum conditions of the distributed bragg reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Su-Chang; Lee, Byung-Teak; An, Won-Chan; Kim, Dae-Kwang; Jang, In-Kyu; So, Jin-Su; Lee, Hyung-Joo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for a bottom reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes (Ir-LEDs) was developed and optimized. At an 850-nm wavelength, markedly improved reflection spectra were observed from DBRs consisting of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs materials. In addition, the reflection spectra of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs-based DBRs was found to increase with increasing difference between the high and the low refractive indices. At multiple layers of 10 pairs, maximal reflection spectra having about a 92% reflectivity were obtained from DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. At 20 pairs, however, outstanding reflection spectra having a higher reflectivity and broader width were clearly observed from DBRs consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As. Some incident light appears to have been absorbed and confined by the narrow bandgap of the GaAs material used in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. This fact could be supported by the decrease in the reflectivity of the shorter wavelength region in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. For this reason, a remarkable output power could be obtained from the 850-nm GaAs Ir-LED chip having a DBR consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As.

  16. Simultaneous amplification of terahertz difference frequencies by an injection-seeded semiconductor laser amplifier at 850 nm.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, S; Chen, P; Blake, G A; Pearson, J C; Pickett, H M

    1998-06-01

    Two-frequency operation of an 850 nm semiconductor optical amplifier was achieved by simultaneously injection seeding it with two diode lasers. The two frequencies could be independently amplified without strong interference when they were separated by more than 10 GHz, and the spectral purity was preserved by the amplification process. At frequency differences below 10 GHz, unbalanced two-frequency output was observed, which can be explained by a two-mode interaction driven by the refractive index modulation at the beat frequency. The laser system is suitable for the difference-frequency generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultra-fast photoconductors or nonlinear optical media. PMID:11542405

  17. Simultaneous amplification of terahertz difference frequencies by an injection-seeded semiconductor laser amplifier at 850 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuura, S.; Chen, P.; Blake, G. A.; Pearson, J. C.; Pickett, H. M.

    1998-01-01

    Two-frequency operation of an 850 nm semiconductor optical amplifier was achieved by simultaneously injection seeding it with two diode lasers. The two frequencies could be independently amplified without strong interference when they were separated by more than 10 GHz, and the spectral purity was preserved by the amplification process. At frequency differences below 10 GHz, unbalanced two-frequency output was observed, which can be explained by a two-mode interaction driven by the refractive index modulation at the beat frequency. The laser system is suitable for the difference-frequency generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultra-fast photoconductors or nonlinear optical media.

  18. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M; Bond, T; Behymer, E; Chang, A

    2010-02-23

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides. Resonances are observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors over 103 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  19. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  20. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.; Fasenfest, Benjamin J.; Behymer, Elaine M.

    2014-07-15

    Tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides are presented. Resonances can be observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides can satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors of over 10.sup.3 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  1. Vector cavity solitons in broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers.

    PubMed

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of two-dimensional vector cavity solitons in a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) under linearly polarized optical injection when varying optical injection linear polarization direction. The polarization of the cavity soliton is not the one of the optical injection as it acquires a distinct ellipticity. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by the spin-flip VCSEL model. Our findings open the road to polarization multiplexing when using cavity solitons in broad-area lasers as pixels in information technology. PMID:26847004

  2. Vector cavity solitons in broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of two-dimensional vector cavity solitons in a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) under linearly polarized optical injection when varying optical injection linear polarization direction. The polarization of the cavity soliton is not the one of the optical injection as it acquires a distinct ellipticity. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by the spin-flip VCSEL model. Our findings open the road to polarization multiplexing when using cavity solitons in broad-area lasers as pixels in information technology. PMID:26847004

  3. Cryogenic Infrastructure for Fermilab's Ilc Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  4. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-16

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  5. Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

    2011-03-28

    A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

  6. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  7. Dynamics of a vertical cavity quantum cascade phonon laser structure

    PubMed Central

    Maryam, W.; Akimov, A. V.; Campion, R. P.; Kent, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Driven primarily by scientific curiosity, but also by the potential applications of intense sources of coherent sound, researchers have targeted the phonon laser (saser) since the invention of the optical laser over 50 years ago. Here we fabricate a vertical cavity structure designed to operate as a saser oscillator device at a frequency of 325 GHz. It is based on a semiconductor superlattice gain medium, inside a multimode cavity between two acoustic Bragg reflectors. We measure the acoustic output of the device as a function of time after applying electrical pumping. The emission builds in intensity reaching a steady state on a timescale of order 0.1 μs. We show that the results are consistent with a model of the dynamics of a saser cavity exactly analogous to the models used for describing laser dynamics. We also obtain estimates for the gain coefficient, steady-state acoustic power output and efficiency of the device. PMID:23884078

  8. Spectroscopic refractive indices of monoclinic single crystal and ceramic Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) from 200 to 850 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Specht, Eliot D; Boatner, Lynn A; Singh, David J; Melcher, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    The four real values of the dielectric function tensor of the monoclinic crystal Lu2SiO5 or lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) have been determined using generalized ellipsometry from 200 to 850 nm. The three principal values are fit to the Sellmeier model, and they indicate that the band gap of LSO is less than ~9 eV. The off-diagonal element 12 is non-zero over the entire spectrum, but it is very close to zero for wavelengths longer than ~400 nm, indicating that structurally monoclinic LSO is nearly optically orthorhombic in this wavelength region. The spectroscopic dielectric functions of three isotropic ceramic LSO samples are presented, which are consistent with the dielectric functions of single-crystal LSO when the effects of porosity are included. As a comparison, the dielectric functions are also determined using relativistic electronic structure and optical calculations based on the recently developed potential functional of Tran and Blaha (Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009).)

  9. Analysis and Design of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. F.

    2003-08-01

    A practical, hands-on guidebook for the efficient modeling of VCSELs Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) are a unique type of semiconductor laser whose optical output is vertically emitted from the surface as opposed to conventional edge-emitting semiconductor lasers. Complex in design and expensive to produce, VCSELs nevertheless represent an already widely used laser technology that promises to have even more significant applications in the future. Although the research has accelerated, there have been relatively few books written on this important topic. Analysis and Design of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers seeks to encapsulate this growing body of knowledge into a single, comprehensive reference that will be of equal value for both professionals and academics in the field. The author, a recognized expert in the field of VCSELs, attempts to clarify often conflicting assumptions in order to help readers achieve the simplest and most efficient VCSEL models for any given problem. Highlights of the text include: * A clear and comprehensive theoretical treatment of VCSELs * Detailed derivations for understanding the operational principles of VCSELs * Mathematical models for the investigation of electrical, optical, and thermal properties of VCSELs * Case studies on the mathematical modeling of VCSELs and the implementation of simulation programs

  10. High-speed modulation of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Armendariz, M.G.; Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes work on the development of high-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for multi-gigabit per second optical data communications applications (LDRD case number 3506.010). The program resulted in VCSELs that operate with an electrical bandwidth of 20 GHz along with a simultaneous conversion efficiency (DC to light) of about 20%. To achieve the large electrical bandwidth, conventional VCSELs were appropriately modified to reduce electrical parasitics and adapted for microwave probing for high-speed operation.

  11. Novel cavities and functionality in high-power highbrightness semiconductor vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessenius, Chris

    Ever since the first laser demonstration in 1960, applications for laser systems have increased to include diverse fields such as: national defense, biology and medicine, entertainment, imaging, and communications. In order to serve the growing demand, a wide range of laser types including solid-state, semiconductor, gas, and dye lasers have been developed. For most applications it is critical to have lasers with both high optical power and excellent beam quality. This has traditionally been difficult to simultaneously achieve in semiconductor lasers. In the mid 1990's, the advent of an optically pumped semiconductor vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) led to the demonstration of high (multi-watt) output power with near diffraction limited (TEM00) beam quality. Since that time VECSELs covering large wavelength regions have been developed. It is the objective of this dissertation to investigate and explore novel cavity designs which can lead to increased functionality in high power, high brightness VECSELs. Optically pumped VECSELs have previously demonstrated their potential for high power, high brightness operation. In addition, the "open" cavity design of this type of laser makes intracavity nonlinear frequency conversion, linewidth narrowing, and spectral tuning very efficient. By altering the external cavity design it is possible to add additional functionality to this already flexible design. In this dissertation, the history, theory, design, and fabrication are first presented as VECSEL performance relies heavily on the design and fabrication of the chip. Basic cavities such as the linear cavity and v-shaped cavity will be discussed, including the role they play in wavelength tuning, transverse mode profile, and mode stability. The development of a VECSEL for use as a sodium guide star laser is presented including the theory and simulation of intracavity frequency generation in a modified v-cavity. The results show agreement with theory

  12. Spectrally and temporally resolved laser emission from vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, M.; Gourley, P.L.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1992-12-31

    We have measured the laser emission spectra of several vertical cavity surface emitting lasers following pulsed laser excitation, with a time resolution of < 1 ps. Correlations between the observed pulse widths and cavity lifetimes were observed.

  13. Fabrication and performance of selectively oxidized vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Geib, K.M.; Figiel, J.J.; Hull, R.

    1995-11-01

    The authors report the high yield fabrication and reproducible performance of selectivity oxidized vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers. They show that liner oxidation rates of AlGaAs without an induction period allows reproducible fabrication of buried oxide current apertures within monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. The oxide layers do not induce obvious crystalline defects, and continuous wave operation in excess of 650 h has been obtained. The high yield fabrication enables relatively high laser performance over a wide wavelength span. They observe submilliamp threshold currents over a wavelength range of up to 75 nm, and power conversion efficiencies at 1 mW output power of greater than 20% over a 50-nm wavelength range.

  14. Oxide-Confined Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. L.; Li, L.; Zhong, J. C.; Zhao, Y. J.; Zeng, L. N.; Yan, C. L.

    Novel distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with 6-pair-GaAs/AlAs short period superlattice for the oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) are designed. They are for the VCSEL that emits at 840 nm and is grown with 34-period n-type mirrors, three-quantum-well active region, and 22-period p-type mirrors. In addition, a 35-nm-layer of Al0.98Ga0.02As was inserted in the top mirrors for being selectively oxidized. The maximum output power is more than 2 mW with low threshold current of about 2 mA. The fact that the device's threshold current in both CW and pulsed operation depends slightly on the operation temperature shows its higher characteristic temperature (T0).

  15. Low threshold planarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Geels, R.S.; Corzine, S.W.; Scott, J.W.; Young, D.B.; Coldren, L.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers have been fabricated utilizing a novel self-aligned process to provide planarized contacts. A single 80 {angstrom} In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As strained quantum well was used in the active region. Emission was at 963 nm. Threshold currents under continuous-wave room temperature operation of 1.1 mA, at 4.0 V bias, were measured for numerous 12 {times} 12 {mu}m square devices. Corresponding threshold current densities are 800 A/cm{sup 2} (600 A/cm{sup 2} for broad area devices). These are the lowest figures yet reported for this type of device. The effect of interface grading on mirror resistance was also investigated.

  16. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  17. Double photonic crystal vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorovitch, Pierre; Sciancalepore, Corrado; Bakir, Badhise Ben; Letartre, Xavier; Seassal, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The periodic patterning of the optical medium achieved through photonic crystal membranes (PCMs) can be employed for controlling the resonant coupling of external radiation continuum to above-the-light-line flat edges of the folded band structure in strongly corrugated waveguides, resulting in high reflectivity for an efficient quasi-3D light harnessing. Recently, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) emitting in C-band using a double set of one-dimensional Si/SiO2 photonic crystals as compact, flexible, and power efficient mirrors have been realized within a mass-scale fabrication paradigm by employing standard 200-mm microelectronics pilot lines. Conceived as the basic building block for photonics-on-silicon back-end integration of group III-V laser microsources, the extreme flexibility of the novel photonic architecture enables to perform a tailored modal selection of the optical cavity, including polarization and far-field control. It also offers a wide range of functionality, such as on-chip optical routing and a variety of efficient wavelength tuning-trimming schemes. Device compactness ensures a considerable reduction in the device footprint, power consumption, and parasitics. Furthermore, high fabrication yields obtained thanks to the state-of-the-art molecular wafer bonding of III-V alloys on silicon conjugate excellent device performances with cost-effective high-throughput production, indicating strong perspective industrial potential.

  18. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Robert P.; Olbright, Gregory R.; Lott, James A.; Schneider, Jr., Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  19. A vertical test system for China-ADS project injector II superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wei; He, Yuan; Wen, Liang-Hua; Li, Chun-Long; Xue, Zong-Heng; Song, Yu-Kun; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Gao, Zheng; Zhang, Cong; Sun, Lie-Peng; Yue, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; You, Zhi-Ming; Thomas, Joseph Powers(Tom Powers

    2014-05-01

    To test superconducting cavities, a vertical test system has been designed and set up at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system design is based on VCO-PLL hardware and the NI Labview software. The test of the HWR010#2 superconducting cavity shows that the function of this test system is satisfactory for testing the low frequency cavity.

  20. Time-dependent numerical simulation of vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Csanak, G.; So, L.L.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Campbell, M.

    1994-12-31

    To simulate vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), the authors are developing a three-dimensional, time-dependent field-gain model with absorption in bulk dielectric regions and gain in quantum well regions. Since the laser linewidth is narrow, the bulk absorption coefficient is assumed to be independent of frequency with a value determined by the material and the lattice temperature. In contrast, the frequency-dependent gain regions must be solved consistently in the time domain. Treatment of frequency-dependent media in a finite-difference time-domain code is computationally intensive. However, because the volume of the quantum well regions is small relative to the volume of the multilayer dielectric (MLD) mirror regions, the computational overhead is reasonable. A key issue is the calculation of the fields in the MLD mirror regions. Although computationally intensive, good agreement has been obtained between simulation results and matrix equation solutions for the reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, and bandwidth of MLD mirrors. The authors discuss the development and testing of the two-dimensional field-gain model. This field-gain model will be integrated with a carrier transport model to form the self-consistent laser code, VCSEL.

  1. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, R.P.; Esherick, P.; Jewell, J.L.; Lear, K.L.; Olbright, G.R.

    1997-04-29

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications. 9 figs.

  2. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Robert P.; Esherick, Peter; Jewell, Jack L.; Lear, Kevin L.; Olbright, Gregory R.

    1997-01-01

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications.

  3. Result of MHI 2-Cell Seamless Dumb-Bell Cavity Vertical Test

    SciTech Connect

    Okihira, K.; Hara, H.; Ikeda, N.; Inoue, F.; Sennyu, K.; Geng, Rongli; Rimmer, Robert A.; Kako, E.

    2014-12-01

    MHI have supplied several 9-cell cavities for STF (R&D of ILC project at KEK) and have been considering production method for stable quality and cost reduction, seamless dumb-bell cavity was one of them. We had fabricated a 2 cell seamless dumb-bell cavity for cost reduction and measured RF performance in collaboration with JLab, KEK and MHI. Surface treatment recipe for ILC was applied for MHI 2-cell cavity and vertical test was performed at JLab. The cavity reached Eacc=32.4MV/m after BCP and EP. Details of the result are reported.

  4. III-Nitride Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, John T.

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have a long history of development in GaAs-based and InP-based systems, however III-nitride VCSELs research is still in its infancy. Yet, over the past several years we have made dramatic improvements in the lasing characteristics of these highly complex devices. Specifically, we have reduced the threshold current density from ˜100 kA/cm2 to ˜3 kA/cm2, while simultaneously increasing the output power from ˜10 muW to ˜550 muW. These developments have primarily come about by focusing on the aperture design and intracavity contact design for flip-chip dual dielectric DBR III-nitride VCSELs. We have carried out a number of studies developing an Al ion implanted aperture (IIA) and photoelectrochemically etched aperture (PECA), while simultaneously improving the quality of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts, and demonstrating the first III-nitride VCSEL with an n-GaN tunnel junction intracavity contact. Beyond these most notable research fronts, we have analyzed numerous other parameters, including epitaxial growth, flip-chip bonding, substrate removal, and more, bringing further improvement to III-nitride VCSEL performance and yield. This thesis aims to give a comprehensive discussion of the relevant underlying concepts for nonpolar VCSELs, while detailing our specific experimental advances. In Section 1, we give an overview of the applications of VCSELs generally, before describing some of the potential applications for III-nitride VCSELs. This is followed by a summary of the different material systems used to fabricate VCSELs, before going into detail on the basic design principles for developing III-nitride VCSELs. In Section 2, we outline the basic process and geometry for fabricating flip-chip nonpolar VCSELs with different aperture and intracavity contact designs. Finally, in Section 3 and 4, we delve into the experimental results achieved in the last several years, beginning with a discussion on

  5. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers with two active gain regions

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-05-20

    A new class of coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers has been developed. These lasers have multiple resonant cavities containing regions of active laser media, resulting in a multi-terminal laser component with a wide range of novel properties.

  6. The Infrared Spectrum of Uranium Hollow Cathode Lamps from 850 nm to 4000 nm: Wavenumbers and Line Identifications from Fourier Transform Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Lawler, James E.; Nave, Gillian; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2011-08-01

    We provide new measurements of wavenumbers and line identifications of 10, 100 U I and U II near-infrared (NIR) emission lines between 2500 cm-1 and 12, 000 cm-1 (4000-850 nm) using archival Fourier transform spectrometer spectra from the National Solar Observatory. This line list includes isolated uranium lines in the Y, J, H, K, and L bands (0.9-1.1 μm, 1.2-1.35 μm, 1.5-1.65 μm, 2.0-2.4 μm, and 3.0-4.0 μm, respectively), and provides six times as many calibration lines as thorium in the NIR spectral range. The line lists we provide enable inexpensive, commercially available uranium hollow cathode lamps to be used for high-precision wavelength calibration of existing and future high-resolution NIR spectrographs.

  7. Fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor. I. Dependence of refractive index of an autocatalytic reaction epoxy system at 850 nm on temperature and extent of cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai-Yuen; Afromowitz, Martin A.

    1995-09-01

    We discuss the behavior of the refractive index of a typical epoxy-aromatic diamine system. Near 850 nm the index of refraction is found to be largely controlled by the density of the epoxy. Models are derived to describe its dependence on temperature and extent of cure. Within the range of temperatures studied, the refractive index decreases linearly with increasing temperature. In addition, as the epoxy is cured, the refractive index increases linearly with conversion to the gel point. >From then on, shrinkage in the volume of the epoxy is restricted by local viscosity. Therefore the linear relationship between the refractive index and the extent of cure does not hold beyond the gel point.

  8. THE INFRARED SPECTRUM OF URANIUM HOLLOW CATHODE LAMPS FROM 850 nm to 4000 nm: WAVENUMBERS AND LINE IDENTIFICATIONS FROM FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Lawler, James E.; Nave, Gillian

    2011-08-01

    We provide new measurements of wavenumbers and line identifications of 10, 100 U I and U II near-infrared (NIR) emission lines between 2500 cm{sup -1} and 12, 000 cm{sup -1} (4000-850 nm) using archival Fourier transform spectrometer spectra from the National Solar Observatory. This line list includes isolated uranium lines in the Y, J, H, K, and L bands (0.9-1.1 {mu}m, 1.2-1.35 {mu}m, 1.5-1.65 {mu}m, 2.0-2.4 {mu}m, and 3.0-4.0 {mu}m, respectively), and provides six times as many calibration lines as thorium in the NIR spectral range. The line lists we provide enable inexpensive, commercially available uranium hollow cathode lamps to be used for high-precision wavelength calibration of existing and future high-resolution NIR spectrographs.

  9. 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating 9-cell cavity vertical test results

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Timergali; Cooper, Charles; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Harms, Elvin; Mitchell, Donald; Rowe, Allan; Solyak, Nikolay; Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich; /DESY

    2007-06-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam performance of the FLASH (TTF/DESY) facility [1]. In the frame of a collaborative agreement, Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. In addition, a second cryomodule with one cavity will be fabricated for installation in the Fermilab photo-injector, which will be upgraded for the ILC accelerator test facility. The first 9-cell Nb cavities were tested in a vertical setup and they didn't reach the designed accelerating gradient [2]. The main problem was a multipactor in the HOM couplers, which lead to overheating and quenching of the HOM couplers. New HOM couplers with improved design are integrated in the next 9-cell cavities. In this paper we present all results of the vertical tests.

  10. Polarization characteristics, control, and modulation of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Figiel, J.J.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Hagerott-Crawford, M.; Zolper, J.C.; Leibenguth, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    The gain-dependent polarization properties of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers and methods for polarization control and modulation are discussed. The partitioning of power between the two orthogonal eigen polarizations is shown to depend upon the relative spectral alignment of the nondegenerate polarization cavity resonances with the laser gain spectrum. A dominant polarization can thus be maintained by employing a blue-shifted offset of the peak laser gain relative to the cavity resonance wavelength. Alternatively, the polarization can be controlled through use of anisotropic transverse cavity geometries. The orthogonal eigen polarizations are also shown to enable polarization modulation. By exploiting polarization switching transitions in cruciform lasers, polarization modulation of the fundamental mode up to 50 MHz is demonstrated. At lower modulation frequencies, complementary digital polarized output or frequency doubling of the polarized output is obtained. Control and manipulation of vertical-cavity laser polarization may prove valuable for present and future applications.

  11. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsutani, A.; Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A.; Koyama, F.

    2015-08-17

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  12. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsutani, A.; Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A.; Koyama, F.

    2015-08-01

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  13. RF and Data Acquisition Systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF Cavity Vertical Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph P. Ozelis; Roger Nehring; Christiana Grenoble; Thomas J. Powers

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of a program to improve cavity performance reproducibility for the ILC. The RF system for this facility, using the classic combination of oscillator, phase detector/mixer, and loop amplifier to detect the resonant cavity frequency and lock onto the cavity, is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment. This software provides for amplitude and phase adjustment of incident RF power, and measures all relevant cavity power levels, cavity thermal environment parameters, as well as field emission-produced radiation. It also calculates the various cavity performance parameters and their associated errors. Performance during system commissioning and initial cavity tests will be presented.

  14. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  15. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  16. Optical amplification in Er{sup 3+}-doped transparent Ba{sub 2}NaNb{sub 5}O{sub 15} single crystal at 850 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Gonzalez, P.; Martin, I. R.; Lahoz, F.; Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Cavalli, E.

    2009-12-01

    Positive optical gain around 5 cm{sup -1} (approx21 dB/cm) has been observed in Er{sup 3+}-doped Ba{sub 2}NaNb{sub 5}O{sub 15} single crystal using a pump and probe experimental setup. High power laser pulses at 532 nm have been used as the pump source in order to strongly populate the {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}({sup 2}H{sub 11/2}) levels of the Er{sup 3+} ions due to ground state absorption. Low signal beam cw laser radiation at 850 nm has been used as the probe beam to stimulate the emission associated with the {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}({sup 2}H{sub 11/2})->{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} electronic transition of the Er{sup 3+} ions. The process has been modelized as a four level system, and its population has been analyzed and simulated in order to study the gain dynamics. Optical amplification of the probe signal has been observed during the first 60 mus, which represents a good agreement between the measured lifetime of the {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}({sup 2}H{sub 11/2}) levels and the reported simulation.

  17. RF and data acquisition systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF cavity vertical test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Nehring, Roger; Grenoble, Christiana; Powers, Thomas J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of its ILC program. The RF system for this facility is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Comprehensive data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment.

  18. Wafer bonded 1.55 mum vertical cavity laser arrays for wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Adil Mahmood

    Vertical cavity lasers in the 1.55 mum wavelength band are attractive sources for optical networks. Previous devices have been limited by low output power and poor thermal performance. In this work, novel wafer bonding techniques were developed to create high-performance 1.55 mum vertical cavity lasers and a new class of multiple wavelength vertical cavity laser arrays. Wafer bonding enables the integration of thermally conductive GaAs/AlGaAs mirrors and traditional InP/InGaAsP active regions. A superlattice barrier was used as a buffer layer during bonding to reduce the number of non-radiative recombination centers in the active region. The surface of these superlattice layers was patterned prior to bonding to define multiple wavelength cavities. Continuous-wave operation was achieved at temperatures up to 105°C. This is the highest reported lasing temperature for a 1.55 mum vertical cavity laser. Threshold currents of 0.8 mA were measured. The peak output power at 20°C was 0.7 mW. The peak output power at 80°C was 0.2 mW. Single-mode operation with a side-mode suppression ration in excess of 40 dB was observed for a 5 mum aperture device. Four-channel arrays were also fabricated. The wavelength span was 1509.1--1524.4 nm with channel spacing of approximately 5 nm. This is the first demonstration of an independently addressable, multiple-wavelength vertical cavity laser array at 1.55 mum. Threshold currents of 1.0 mA and peak output powers of 0.5 mW were measured for array elements. Thermal and optical crosstalk between array elements are negligible, due to the high thermal conductivity of the bottom mirror and large device pitch.

  19. Highly uniform and reproducible vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Chui, H.C.; Choquette, K.D.; Hammons, B.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Geib, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    We show that the uniformity of the lasing wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be as good as {plus_minus}0.3% across a entire 3 in. wafer in MOCVD growth with a similar run-to-run reproducibility.

  20. Transverse Mode Structure and Pattern Formation in Oxide Confined Vertical Cavity Semiconductor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hegarty, S.P.; Hou, H.Q.; Huyet, G.; McInerney, J.G.; Porta, P.

    1999-07-06

    We analyze the transverse profiles of oxide-confined vertical cavity laser diodes as a function of aperture size. For small apertures we demonstrate that thermal lensing can be the dominant effect in determining the transverse resonator properties. We also analyze pattern formation in lasers with large apertures where we observe the appearance of tilted waves.

  1. Transverse Mode Dynamics and Ultrafast Modulation of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show that multiple transverse mode dynamics of VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers) can be utilized to generate ultrafast intensity modulation at a frequency over 100 GHz, much higher than the relaxation oscillation frequency. Such multimode beating can be greatly enhanced by taking laser output from part of the output facet.

  2. Estimation of anisotropy coefficient and total attenuation of swine liver at 850 nm based on a goniometric technique: influence of sample thickness.

    PubMed

    Saccomandi, P; Vogel, V; Bazrafshan, B; Schena, E; Vogl, T J; Silvestri, S; Mäntele, W

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of optical properties of biologic tissue is crucial for theoretical modeling of laser treatments in medicine. Tissue highly absorbs and scatters the light between 650 nm and 1300 nm, where the laser provides therapeutic effects. Among other properties, the characteristic of biological tissues to scatter the light traveling trough, is described by the anisotropy coefficient (g). The relationship between g and the distribution of the scattered light at different angles is described by Henyey-Greenstein phase function. The measurement of angular distribution of scattered light is performed by the goniometric technique. This paper describes the estimation of g and attenuation coefficient, μt, of swine liver at 850 nm, performed by an ad hoc designed goniometric-based system, where a spectrometer measures intensities of scattered light at fixed angles (0°, 30°, 45°, 60, 120°, 135° and 150°). Both one-term and two-term Henyey-Greenstein phase function have been employed to estimate anisotropy coefficient for forward (gfs) and backward scattering (gbs). Measurements are performed on samples of two thicknesses (60 um and 30 urn) to investigate the influence of this factor on g, and repeated 6 times for each thickness. The estimated values of gfs were 0.947 and 0.951 for thickness of 60 μm and 30 μm, respectively; the estimations of gfs were -0.498 and -0.270 for thickness of 60 μm and 30 μm, respectively. Moreover, μt of liver has been estimated (i.e., 90±20 cm(1)), through Lambert-Beer equation. The comparison of our results with data reported in literature encourages the use of the ad hoc designed tool for performing experiments on other tissue, and at other wavelengths. PMID:25571198

  3. 850 nm single mode VCSEL-based 25Gx16 transmitter/receiver boards for parallel signal transmission over 1 km of multimode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropp, J.-R.; Shchukin, V. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Schaefer, G.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Wu, Bo; Shaofeng, Qiu; Yanan, Ma; Zhiyong, Feng; Turkiewicz, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    We manufacture and compare parallel optical transceiver and receiver assemblies on test boards for parallel data transmission over multimode fiber using single mode (SM) and multimode (MM) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays. VCSELs, GaAs PIN photodetector arrays, commercially-available 12 channel VCSEL driver arrays and 12 channel limiting amplifier arrays were assembled into multi-channel transceiver and receiver assemblies on testboards designed to operate up to 16 channels and coupled to multimode fiber ribbon through industrial connectors. MM VCSEL arrays easily allow 25 Gb/s error-free data transmission over 100m of OM4 fiber with only a minor penalty in the sensitivity (0.5 dB). As opposite increasing the distance to 150-200 m causes a strong increase in the noise level making the error free transmission at 200 m impossible. Using of single mode SM VCSEL arrays allows error-free 25 Gbit/s NRZ PRBS 215-1 transmission over 1 km distances over OM4 fiber and above 600 m over OM3 fiber. In a different set of experiments PAM4 transmission up to 50 Gbit/s using SM VCSEL arrays is studied.

  4. Close to 100 Gbps discrete multitone transmission over 100m of multimode fiber using a single transverse mode 850nm VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Zhou, Xian; Ma, Yanan; Luo, Jun; Zhong, Kangping; Qiu, Shaofeng; Feng, Zhiyong; Luo, Yazhi; Agustin, Mikel; Ledentsov, Nikolay; Kropp, Joerg; Shchukin, Vitaly; Ledentsov, Nikolay N.; Eddie, Iain; Chao, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Discrete Multitone Transmission (DMT) transmission over standard multimode fiber (MMF) using high-speed single (SM) and multimode (MM) Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) is studied. Transmission speed in the range of 72Gbps to 82Gbps over 300m -100m distances of OM4 fiber is realized, respectively, at Bit-Error-Ratio (BER) <5e-3 and the received optical power of only -5dBm. Such BER condition requires only 7% overhead for the conversion to error-free operation using single Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem forward error correction (BCH-FEC) coding and decoding. SM VCSEL is demonstrated to provide a much higher data transmission capacity over MMF. For 100m MMF transmission SM VCSEL allows 82Gbps as compared to MM VCSEL resulting in only 34Gbps at the same power (-5dBm). Furthermore, MM VCSEL link at 0dBm is still restricted at 100m distance by 63Gbps while SM VCSEL can exceed 100Gbps at such power levels. We believe that with further improvement in SM VCSELs and fiber coupling >100Gbps data transmission over >300m MMF distances at the BER levels matching the industry standards will become possible.

  5. Modeling of optically controlled reflective bistability in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, L.

    2015-05-01

    Bistability switching between two optical signals has been studied theoretically utilizing the concept of cross absorption modulation in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber (VCSSA). The probe beam is fixed at a wavelength other than the low power cavity resonance wavelength, which exhibits bistable characteristic by controlling the power of a pump beam (λpump≠λprobe). The cavity nonlinear effects that arises simultaneously from the excitonic absorption bleaching, and the carrier induced nonlinear index change has been considered in the model. The high power absorption in the active region introduces thermal effects within the nonlinear cavity due to which the effective cavity length changes. This leads to a red-shift of the cavity resonance wavelength, which results a change in phase of the optical fields within the cavity. In the simulation, the phase-change due to this resonance shifting is considered to be constant over time, and it assumes the value corresponding to the maximum input power. Further, an initial phase detuning of the probe beam has been considered to investigate its effect on switching. It is observed from the simulated results that, the output of the probe beam exhibits either clockwise or counter-clockwise bistability, depending on its initial phase detuning.

  6. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  7. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOEpatents

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  8. Parity time-symmetric vertical cavities: intrinsically single-mode regime in longitudinal direction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh F; Kulishov, Mykola; Kress, Bernard

    2016-07-25

    We explore a new class of distributed feedback (DFB) structures that employ the recently-developed concept of parity-time (PT) symmetry in optics. We show that, based on PT-symmetric pure reflective volume gratings, a vertical surface-emitting cavity can be constructed. We provide a detailed analysis of the threshold conditions as well as the wavelength and angular spectral characteristics using the Kogelnik coupled-wave approximation, backed up by an exact solution of the Helmholtz equation. We show that such a PT-symmetric cavity can be configured to support one and only one longitudinal mode, leading to inherently single-mode lasing. PMID:27464163

  9. Extracting photon periodic orbits from spontaneous emission spectra in laterally confined vertically emitted cavities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Fu; Yu, Yan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Jen; Chiang, Po-Yi; Su, Kuan-Wei; Huang, Kai-Feng

    2010-08-15

    We report our observation of the signature of photon periodic orbits in the spontaneous emission spectra of large-aperture vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The high-resolution measurement clearly demonstrates that over a thousand cavity modes with a narrow linewidth can be perfectly exhibited in the spontaneous emission spectrum just below the lasing threshold. The Fourier-transformed spectrum is analyzed to confirm that the spontaneous emission spectra of large-aperture VCSELs can be exploited to analogously investigate the energy spectra of the 2D quantum billiards. PMID:20717436

  10. Control of light polarization using optically spin-injected vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Frougier, J. Jaffrès, H.; Deranlot, C.; George, J.-M.; Baili, G.; Dolfi, D.; Alouini, M.; Sagnes, I.; Garnache, A.

    2013-12-16

    We fabricated and characterized an optically pumped (100)-oriented InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum well Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL). The structure is designed to allow the integration of a Metal-Tunnel-Junction ferromagnetic spin-injector for future electrical injection. We report here the control at room temperature of the electromagnetic field polarization using optical spin injection in the active medium of the VECSEL. The switching between two highly circular polarization states had been demonstrated using an M-shaped extended cavity in multi-modes lasing. This result witnesses an efficient spin-injection in the active medium of the LASER.

  11. Mode selectivity study of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Seurin, J.; Chuang, S.L.; Babic, D.I.; Corzine, S.W.; Tan, M.; Barnes, D.C.; Tiouririne, T.N.

    1998-08-01

    Mode selectivity of an air-post index-guided vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structure operating at 1550 nm is investigated using a full-vector Maxwell-equation solver with a finite-difference time-domain method. The resonance wavelengths, quality factors, and spatial field distributions are calculated for the three lowest-order modes. Transverse-mode competition is quantitatively described as a function of the cavity size and the pillar etch depth. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Design parameters and commissioning of vertical inserts used for testing the XFEL superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffran, J.; Bozhko, Y.; Petersen, B.; Meissner, D.; Chorowski, M.; Polinski, J.

    2014-01-29

    The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2015 on, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The superconducting XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with more than 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF). This paper gives an overview of the design parameters and the commissioning of the vertical insert, used in two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall. The Insert serves as a holder for 4 nine-cell cavities. This gives the possibility to cool down 4 cavities to 2K in parallel and, consequently, to reduce the testing time. The following RF measurement, selected as quality check, will be done separately for each cavity. Afterwards the cavities will be warmed up again and will be sent to the accelerator module assembly.

  13. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I-V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson-Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  14. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Song; Wu, Andy T.; Lu, Xiangyang; Rimmer, Robert A.; Lin, Lin; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, John D.; Gao, Jie

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I–V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson–Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  15. Integration of diffractive lenses with addressable vertical-cavity laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Du, T.C.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Carson, R.F.; Lear, K.L.; Kilcoyne, S.P.; Schneider, R.P.; Zolper, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    An optical interconnection system is being developed to provide vertical, digital data channels for stacked multichip modules. A key component of the system is an array of individually addressable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with diffractive lenses integrated into the substrate to control beam divergence and direction. The lenses were fabricated by direct-write e-beam lithography and reactive ion beam etching into the GaAs substrate. Preliminary device performance data and the design and fabrication issues are discussed.

  16. Effective index model predicts modal frequencies of vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    SERKLAND,DARWIN K.; HADLEY,G. RONALD; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; GEIB,KENT M.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-04-18

    Previously, an effective index optical model was introduced for the analysis of lateral waveguiding effects in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. The authors show that the resultant transverse equation is almost identical to the one typically obtained in the analysis of dielectric waveguide problems, such as a step-index optical fiber. The solution to the transverse equation yields the lateral dependence of the optical field and, as is recognized in this paper, the discrete frequencies of the microcavity modes. As an example, they apply this technique to the analysis of vertical-cavity lasers that contain thin-oxide apertures. The model intuitively explains the experimental data and makes quantitative predictions in good agreement with a highly accurate numerical model.

  17. Simulation of Optical Resonators for Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (vcsel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Mohy S.; Hassen, Mahmoud F. M.; El-Nozahey, Adel M.; Hafez, Alaa S.; Metry, Samer F.

    2010-04-01

    Simulation and modeling of the reflectivity and transmissivity of the multilayer DBR of VCSEL, as well as inside the active region quantum well are analyzed using the characteristic matrix method. The electric field intensity distributions inside such vertical-cavity structure are calculated. A software program under MATLAB environment is constructed for the simulation. This study was performed for two specific Bragg wavelengths 980 nm and 370 nm for achieving a resonant periodic gain (RPG)

  18. High-speed modulation, wavelength, and mode control in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledentsov, Nikolay N.; Kropp, Jörg-R.; Shchukin, Vitaly A.; Steinle, Gunther; Ledentsov, Nikolay N.; Turkiewicz, Jarek P.; Wu, Bo; Qiu, Shaofeng; Ma, Yanan; Feng, Zhiyong; Burger, Sven; Schmidt, Frank; Caspar, Christoph; Freund, Ronald; Choquette, Kent D.

    2015-03-01

    We address demands and challenges for GaAs-based Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) in data communication. High speed modulation (~50Gb/s) at a high reliability can be realized with a proper VCSEL design providing a high differential gain. In cases where extreme temperatures are required electrooptic modulation in duo- cavity VCSELs can be applied as the modulation speed and the differential gain are decoupled. Single mode operation of VCSELs is necessary to counteract the chromatic dispersion of glass fibers and extend distances to above 1 km while using standard multimode fibers. Oxide layer engineering or using of photonic crystals can be applied. Parallel error-free 25Gb/s transmission over OM3 and OM4 multimode fiber (~0.5 and 1 km, respectively) is realized in large aperture oxide-engineered VCSEL arrays. Passive cavity VCSELs with gain medium placed in the bottom DBR and the upper part made of dielectric materials a complete temperature insensitivity of the emission wavelength can be realized. Engineering of the oxide aperture region enables near field vertical cavity lasers. Such devices can operate in a high- order transverse mode with an effective mode angle beyond the angle of the total internal reflection at the semiconductor-air interface. Near filed coupling to optical fibers and waveguides becomes possible in this case.

  19. Delayed feedback control of cavity solitons in a broad area vertical cavity surface emitting laser with saturable absorbtion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, S. V.; Schelte, C.; Tlidi, M.; Panajotov, K.

    2016-04-01

    We are interested in spatio-temporal dynamics of cavity solitons (CSs) in a transverse section of a broad area vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with saturable absorbtion subjected to time-delayed optical feedback. In the absence of delayed feedback, a single branch of localized solutions appears in the parameter space. However, in the presence of the delayed feedback, multistability of CS solutions emerges; The branches of CSs fill the surface of the "solution tube" in the parameter space, which is filled densely with increasing delay time. Further, our study reveals that the multistability of stationary solutions is caused by a delayed-induced phase bifurcation of CSs. Furthermore, it was shown that stability properties of CSs strongly depend on the delayed feedback parameters. In particular, the thresholds of the drift and phase bifurcations as well as corresponding bifurcation diagrams are obtained by a combination of analytical and numerical continuation methods. It turns out that both thresholds tend to zero in the limit of large delay times. In addition, we demonstrate that the presence of the delayed optical feedback can induce Andronov-Hopf bifurcation and a period doubling route to chaos. Moreover, a coupling between this bifurcation scenario with aforementioned delay-induced multistability leads to a complex spatio-temporal behavior of the system in question. The results of analytical bifurcation analysis are in agreement with those obtained by direct numerical integration of the model equation.

  20. Many body effects in the temperature dependence of threshold in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Corzine, S.W.; Young, D.B.; Coldren, L.A.

    1995-05-08

    The temperature dependence of the threshold in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is investigated. Comparison of theory with experiment indicates that many-body Coulomb interactions play an important role.

  1. Design and commissioning of vertical test cryostats for XFEL superconducting cavities measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Duda, P.; Bozhko, Y.; Petersen, B.; Schaffran, J.

    2014-01-29

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), now under construction at DESY in Hamburg, will make an extensive use of 1.3 GHz superconducting cavities aimed at accelerating the electrons to the energy of 17.5 GeV. The cavities will be operated at 2 K with the use of saturated HeII. Prior to their assembly in accelerator cryomodules, the RF performance of the cavities will be cold-tested in two dedicated vertical cryostats. Each cryostat allows a simultaneous testing of 4 cavities mounted on a dedicated insert. The cryostats are equipped with external lines allowing their supply with liquid helium and further conversion of the helium into superfluid He II. The paper describes the test stand flow scheme, the technical key elements, including a recuperative heat exchanger, and the cold commissioning. The thermodynamic analysis of the cryostat cool down and steady-state operation is given. A Second Law of Thermodynamics based theoretical model of the heat exchanger performance, and the model experimental validation, is presented.

  2. Optimizing electrically pumped vertical extended cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers (E-VECSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, John G.; Mooradian, Aram

    2011-03-01

    The future evolution of photonics, for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from established optical telecommunications to emerging opportunities such as biotechnology, reprographics and projection displays, will depend on availability of compact, rugged, efficient and inexpensive lasers which deliver high power, good beam quality, excellent wavelength stability, low noise and long lifetime in the near infrared and visible regions. This combination is not readily available from either of the traditional classes of semiconductor laser, edge-emitters and vertical cavity surface emitters (VCSELs). Here we describe a novel class of laser based on geometry similar to VCSELs but controlled by an extended coupled cavity. These devices are scalable to high powers while maintaining fundamental spatial mode performance, a feature that is essential to efficient coupling into a single mode optical fibre or waveguide, or long range propagation in free space. They are also ideally suited to mode locking, gain-switching and intracavity frequency conversion, among other applications.

  3. GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers with periodic gain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kenjo; Kozuka, Yugo; Ikeyama, Kazuki; Horikawa, Kosuke; Furuta, Takashi; Akagi, Takanobu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Iwaya, Motoaki; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    We have achieved room-temperature CW operations of GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) with periodic gain structures (PGSs). The PGS-VCSEL consisted of 4.5λ-thick optical cavity length and two GaInN 5-quantum-well (QW) active regions separated with a Mg-doped GaN intermediate layer. The uniform carrier injection into the two active regions was also investigated using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). It is found that the use of an optimum Mg concentration in the intermediate layers improves the uniform carrier injection in the two active regions. From these results, we realized the CW operation of VCSELs with PGSs grown on AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). The VCSEL under CW operation showed a threshold current density of 16.5 kA/cm2 and its operation wavelength was 409.9 nm.

  4. 1-W antimonide-based vertical external cavity surface emitting laser operating at 2-microm.

    PubMed

    Härkönen, A; Guina, M; Okhotnikov, O; Rößner, K; Hümmer, M; Lehnhardt, T; Müller, M; Forchel, A; Fischer, M

    2006-07-10

    We report a high-power optically pumped semiconductor vertical external cavity surface emitting laser operating at 2-mum wavelength. The gain material consisted of 15 GaInSb quantum-wells placed within a three-lambda GaSb cavity and grown on the top of an 18-pairs AlAsSb/GaSb Bragg reflector. For thermal management we have used a transparent diamond heat spreader bonded on the top of the structure. When cooled down to 5 degrees C, the laser emitted up to 1 W of optical power in a nearly diffraction-limited Gaussian beam demonstrating the high potential of antimonide material for VECSEL fabrication. PMID:19516826

  5. Over 10 Watt, collinear blue and green vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukowski, Michal L.; Hessenius, Chris; Meyer, Jason T.; Fallahi, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    A high power, two color, collinear, blue and green vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) is demonstrated. Two different InGaAs/GaAs VECSEL chips operating with gain centers near 970 nm and 1070 nm are used to make two separate V-folded laser cavities. Two critically phase-matched intracavity lithium triborate nonlinear crystals are used to generate blue and green outputs which are then combined in a polarizing beam splitter. This results in a single beam which contains over 10 watts of combined blue and green output power. This concept can be expanded upon by adding a red output for the creation of a high power, white laser source.

  6. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Antonio; Javaloyes, Julien

    2015-12-14

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding.

  7. Advances in commercial, mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempler, Nils; Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Hamilton, Craig J.; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2016-03-01

    In launching the Dragonfly, M Squared Lasers has successfully commercialized recent advances in mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting laser technologies operating between 920 nm - 1050 nm. This paper will describe the latest advances in the development of a new generation of Dragonfly lasers. The improved system has been engineered to utilise low-cost semiconductor gain media and integrated diode pumping, whilst exhibiting minimal footprint, diffraction limited beam quality and low intrinsic noise. Early experiments have resulted in pulses with 540mW of average output power and 150fs of duration at 200MHz pulse repetition frequency.

  8. On the measurement of the thermal impedance in vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hader, J.; Wang, T.-L.; Moloney, J. V.; Heinen, B.; Koch, M.; Koch, S. W.; Kunert, B.; Stolz, W.

    2013-04-01

    A detailed and systematic analysis of the loss mechanisms in vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers is presented with the goal to correctly determine the amount of pump power that is converted to heat. With this input, the accuracy of a recently proposed method for measuring the thermal impedance based on roll-over characteristics is shown to be very high for devices with and without dielectric coating. Potential errors arising from non-heating losses can be determined by performing experiments with different out-coupling mirrors.

  9. High-contrast grating reflectors for 980 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebski, M.; Kuzior, O.; Wasiak, M.; Szerling, A.; Wójcik-Jedlińska, A.; Pałka, N.; Dems, M.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, Z. J.; Wang, Q. J.; Zhang, D. H.; Czyszanowski, T.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents results of computer simulation of 1D monolithic high refractive index contrast grating (MHCG) reflector also called surface grating reflector (SGR). We analyzed optical properties of the GaAs reflector designed for 980 nm wavelength with respect to the grating parameters variation. We also determined the electric field patterns after reflection from the structure in several cases of parameters variation. We show that thanks to the scalability and design simplicity, proposed design is a promising candidate for simple, next generation vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting from ultra-violet to infrared.

  10. Investigation of vertical cavity surface emitting laser dynamics for neuromorphic photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, A.; Schires, K.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    We report an approach based upon vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) to reproduce optically different behaviors exhibited by biological neurons but on a much faster timescale. The technique proposed is based on the polarization switching and nonlinear dynamics induced in a single VCSEL under polarized optical injection. The particular attributes of VCSELs and the simple experimental configuration used in this work offer prospects of fast, reconfigurable processing elements with excellent fan-out and scaling potentials for use in future computational paradigms and artificial neural networks.

  11. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharthi, S. S.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  12. Optical Phased Array Antennas using Coupled Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl H.; Rojas, Roberto A.; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    High data rate communication links are needed to meet the needs of NASA as well as other organizations to develop space-based optical communication systems. These systems must be robust to high radiation environments, reliable, and operate over a wide temperature range. Highly desirable features include beam steering capability, reconfigurability, low power consumption, and small aperture size. Optical communication links, using coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser radiating elements are promising candidates for the transmit portion of these communication links. In this talk we describe a mission scenario, and how the antenna requirements are derived from the mission needs. We describe a potential architecture for this type of antenna, and outline the advantages and drawbacks of this approach relative to competing technologies. The technology we are proposing used coupled arrays of 1550 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for transmission. The feasibility of coupling these arrays together, to form coherent high-power beams that can be modulated at data rates exceeding 1 Gbps, will be explored. We will propose an architecture that enables electronic beam steering, thus mitigating the need for ancillary acquisition, tracking and beam pointing equipment such as needed for current optical communicatin systems. The beam-steering capability we are proposing also opens the possibility of using this technology for inter-satellite communicatin links, and satellite-to-surface links.

  13. Temperature-insensitive vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and method for fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Chow, W.W.; Choquette, K.D.; Gourley, P.L.

    1998-01-27

    A temperature-insensitive vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and method for fabrication thereof are disclosed. The temperature-insensitive VCSEL comprises a quantum-well active region within a resonant cavity, the active region having a gain spectrum with a high-order subband (n {>=} 2) contribution thereto for broadening and flattening the gain spectrum, thereby substantially reducing any variation in operating characteristics of the VCSEL over a temperature range of interest. The method for forming the temperature-insensitive VCSEL comprises the steps of providing a substrate and forming a plurality of layers thereon for providing first and second distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror stacks with an active region sandwiched therebetween, the active region including at least one quantum-well layer providing a gain spectrum having a high-order subband (n {>=} 2) gain contribution, and the DBR mirror stacks having predetermined layer compositions and thicknesses for providing a cavity resonance within a predetermined wavelength range substantially overlapping the gain spectrum. 12 figs.

  14. Temperature-insensitive vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and method for fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Weng W.; Choquette, Kent D.; Gourley, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    A temperature-insensitive vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and method for fabrication thereof. The temperature-insensitive VCSEL comprises a quantum-well active region within a resonant cavity, the active region having a gain spectrum with a high-order subband (n.gtoreq.2) contribution thereto for broadening and flattening the gain spectrum, thereby substantially reducing any variation in operating characteristics of the VCSEL over a temperature range of interest. The method for forming the temperature-insensitive VCSEL comprises the steps of providing a substrate and forming a plurality of layers thereon for providing first and second distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror stacks with an active region sandwiched therebetween, the active region including at least one quantum-well layer providing a gain spectrum having a high-order subband (n.gtoreq.2) gain contribution, and the DBR mirror stacks having predetermined layer compositions and thicknesses for providing a cavity resonance within a predetermined wavelength range substantially overlapping the gain spectrum.

  15. Femtosecond high-power quantum dot vertical external cavity surface emitting laser.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Martin; Sieber, Oliver D; Wittwer, Valentin J; Krestnikov, Igor L; Livshits, Daniil A; Barbarin, Yohan; Südmeyer, Thomas; Keller, Ursula

    2011-04-25

    We report on the first femtosecond vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) exceeding 1 W of average output power. The VECSEL is optically pumped, based on self-assembled InAs quantum dot (QD) gain layers, cooled efficiently using a thin disk geometry and passively modelocked with a fast quantum dot semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). We developed a novel gain structure with a flat group delay dispersion (GDD) of ± 10 fs2 over a range of 30 nm around the designed operation wavelength of 960 nm. This amount of GDD is several orders of magnitude lower compared to standard designs. Furthermore, we used an optimized positioning scheme of 63 QD gain layers to broaden and flatten the spectral gain. For stable and self-starting pulse formation, we have employed a QD-SESAM with a fast absorption recovery time of around 500 fs. We have achieved 1 W of average output power with 784-fs pulse duration at a repetition rate of 5.4 GHz. The QD-SESAM and the QD-VECSEL are operated with similar cavity mode areas, which is beneficial for higher repetition rates and the integration of both elements into a modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser (MIXSEL). PMID:21643061

  16. Status and future of GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feezell, Daniel F.

    2015-03-01

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) offer distinct advantages over conventional edge-emitting lasers, including lower power consumption, single-longitudinal-mode operation, circularly symmetric output beams, waferlevel testing, and the ability to form densely packed, two-dimensional arrays. High-performance GaN-based VCSELs are well suited for applications in high-density optical data storage, high-resolution printing, lighting, displays, projectors, miniature atomic clocks, and chemical/biological sensing. Thus far, the performance of these devices has been limited by challenges associated with the formation of high-reflectance distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), optical mode confinement, carrier transport, lateral current spreading, polarization-related electric fields, and cavity-length control. This manuscript discusses the state-of-the-art results for electrically injected GaN-based VCSELs and reviews approaches to overcome the key challenges currently preventing higher performance devices. The manuscript also describes the development of nonpolar GaN-based VCSELs on free-standing GaN. Nonpolar orientations exhibit anisotropic optical gain within the quantum well plane and uniquely enable VCSELs with a well-defined and stable polarization state. In addition, a detailed description of a band-gap-selective photoelectrochemical etching (BGS PECE) process for substrate removal and fine cavity length control on free-standing GaN substrates is provided.

  17. Time-dependent model for vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.; Csanak, G.; Hotchkiss, R.; Snell, C.

    1995-03-01

    Two models have been developed to simulate a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The first model is a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of Maxwell`s equations, with frequency-independent bulk dielectric and absorption coefficients. These bulk coefficients depend upon the material, lattice temperature, and carrier concentration. This field model is coupled with a frequency-dependent gain model that describes the quantum well regions in the time domain. Treatment of frequency-dependent media in a finite-difference time-domain code is computationally intensive. On the other hand, because the volume of the active region is small relative to the volume of the distributed laser cavity, the computational overhead is reasonable. A semi-empirical transport model is used to describe the bulk transport, which drives the quantum well transport. In addition, the semi-empirical model provides a spatial distribution for the lattice temperature and carrier concentrations. The second model is a three-dimensional solution of Maxwell`s equations. The three-dimensional model can be used for cold-cavity calculations. The two-dimensional code generates the dielectric and absorption coefficients assuming azimuthal symmetry, providing the initial conditions for the three-dimensional calculation.

  18. Vertical cavity lasing from melt-grown crystals of cyano-substituted thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Yanagi, Hisao; Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu; Sasaki, Fumio

    2015-10-19

    Vertical-cavity organic lasers are fabricated with melt-grown crystals of a cyano-substituted thiophene-phenylene co-oligomer. Due to lying molecular orientation, surface-emitting lasing is achieved even in the half-cavity crystal grown on a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) under optical pumping at room temperature. Anticrossing splits in angle-resolved photoluminescence spectra suggest the formation of exciton-polaritons between the cavity photons and the confined Frenkel excitons. By constructing the full-cavity structure sandwiched between the top and bottom DBRs, the lasing threshold is reduced to one order, which is as low as that of the half cavity. Around the threshold, the time profile of the full-cavity emission is collapsed to a pulsed shape accompanied by a finite turn-on delay. We discuss these observed characteristics in terms of a polariton contribution to the conventional photon lasing.

  19. Bulk vertical micromachining of single-crystal sapphire using inductively coupled plasma etching for x-ray resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.-C.; Lin, P.-T.; Mikolas, D. G.; Tsai, Y.-W.; Wang, Y.-L.; Fu, C.-C.; Chang, S.-L.

    2015-01-01

    To provide coherent x-ray sources for probing the dynamic structures of solid or liquid biological substances on the picosecond timescale, a high-aspect-ratio x-ray resonator cavity etched from a single crystal substrate with a nearly vertical sidewall structure is required. Although high-aspect-ratio resonator cavities have been produced in silicon, they suffer from unwanted multiple beam effects. However, this problem can be avoided by using the reduced symmetry of single-crystal sapphire in which x-ray cavities may produce a highly monochromatic transmitted x-ray beam. In this study, we performed nominal 100 µm deep etching and vertical sidewall profiles in single crystal sapphire using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching. The large depth is required to intercept a useful fraction of a stopped-down x-ray beam, as well as for beam clearance. An electroplated Ni hard mask was patterned using KMPR 1050 photoresist and contact lithography. The quality and performance of the x-ray cavity depended upon the uniformity of the cavity gap and therefore verticality of the fabricated vertical sidewall. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such deep, vertical etching of single-crystal sapphire. A gas mixture of Cl2/BCl3/Ar was used to etch the sapphire with process variables including BCl3 flow ratio and bias power. By etching for 540 min under optimal conditions, we obtained an x-ray resonant cavity with a depth of 95 µm, width of ~30 µm, gap of ~115 µm and sidewall profile internal angle of 89.5°. The results show that the etching parameters affected the quality of the vertical sidewall, which is essential for good x-ray resonant cavities.

  20. Classifications of vertical and horizontal resonances for a metal-insulator-metal waveguide with a side-coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ying; Liu, Haitao

    2016-03-01

    A Fabry-Perot model is proposed to analyze the resonance behaviors of a metal-dielectric-metal waveguide with a rectangular side-coupled cavity that has a horizontal width below one wavelength. Two vertically propagating waveguide modes in the cavity are introduced in the model, and the vertical resonances in the cavity are quantitatively identified by two phase-matching conditions derived from the model. Thus other resonances from the prediction of the phase-matching conditions should be attributed to resonances of horizontally propagating modes in the cavity. These discussions can also give an explanation for the EIT-like transmission characteristics of such a structure. The present analysis provides helpful insight for the design of relevant devices that employ different types of resonances.

  1. Optically pumped GaN vertical cavity surface emitting laser with high index-contrast nanoporous distributed Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Gong, Su-Hyun; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ebaid, Mohamed; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2015-05-01

    Laser operation of a GaN vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is demonstrated under optical pumping with a nanoporous distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). High reflectivity, approaching 100%, is obtained due to the high index-contrast of the nanoporous DBR. The VCSEL system exhibits low threshold power density due to the formation of high Q-factor cavity, which shows the potential of nanoporous medium for optical devices. PMID:25969197

  2. Implications of Increasing Vertical Resolution in an Isopycnal Model of an Ice Shelf Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Boundary layer dynamics and thermodynamic feedback processes govern the efficiency of oceanic heat delivery to ice shelves. Isopycnal models offer an opportunity to resolve thin meltwater-freshened layers, improving the representation of the oceanic boundary layer and water masses modified in the cavity. However, heat, freshwater, and momentum fluxes between ice and ocean pass through a variable density bulk mixed layer (BML). Increased vertical resolution impacts the properties of the BML, and may modify the rate and spatial distribution of basal melting. To investigate these impacts, a series of simulations using the Hallberg Isopycnal Model, modified to represent sub-ice shelf processes, is conducted in an idealized, strongly forced, east-west aligned ice shelf cavity. Meltwater mixtures remain in the BML or fill intermediate density isopycnal layers (from 1-22 layers, depending on resolution) above a uniform (1.4°C) source water mass. Since mixing may mute the benefits of increased resolution, these simulations incorporate differing parameterizations, including a minimum BML thickness, background (tidal) velocities, and Richardson number-dependent entrainment. Water in the BML and, if present, intermediate layers, is advected weakly (O(10-2) ms-1) towards a southern boundary current. Meltwater flux near the ice shelf front is dominated by O(10-1) ms-1 flow in this boundary layer. The thickness of the meltwater-enriched outflow (20-160 m) increases in step with vertical resolution; gradients in tracers are apparent in all but the lowest resolution cases. Area-averaged melt rates of 16-35 myr-1 indicate a strong sensitivity to near-boundary mixing; the spatial distribution of melting reveals the influence of vertical resolution under different regimes. Under uniformly high mixing, melting rates are dominated by "upstream" regions and are insensitive to resolution. Weaker imposed mixing induces a shift to a "shear-driven" regime, with melting intensified in the

  3. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser based optoelectronic asynchronous transfer mode switch

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, C.W.; Duan, C.; Collington, J.R.; Dames, M.P.; Crossland, W.A.

    1999-07-01

    Large broadband asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) switching nodes require novel hardware solutions that could benefit from the inclusion of optical interconnect technology, since electronic solutions are limited by pin out and by the capacitance/inductance of the interconnections. We propose, analyze and demonstrate a new three stage free space optical switch that utilizes vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for the optical interconnections, a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) as a reconfigurable shutter and relatively simple optics for fan out and fan in. A custom complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip is required to introduce a time delay in the optical bit stream and to drive the VCSELs. Analysis shows that the switch should be scalable to 1024{times}1024, which would require 2048 {approximately}2 mW VCSELs. {copyright} {ital 1999 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  4. Frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Thomas D.; Alford, William J.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    A frequency-doubled semiconductor vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) is disclosed for generating light at a wavelength in the range of 300-550 nanometers. The VECSEL includes a semiconductor multi-quantum-well active region that is electrically or optically pumped to generate lasing at a fundamental wavelength in the range of 600-1100 nanometers. An intracavity nonlinear frequency-doubling crystal then converts the fundamental lasing into a second-harmonic output beam. With optical pumping with 330 milliWatts from a semiconductor diode pump laser, about 5 milliWatts or more of blue light can be generated at 490 nm. The device has applications for high-density optical data storage and retrieval, laser printing, optical image projection, chemical-sensing, materials processing and optical metrology.

  5. Numerical model of capacitance in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiak, M.; Śpiewak, P.; Moser, P.; Walczak, J.; Sarzała, R. P.; Czyszanowski, T.; Lott, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present a model of impedance and modulation time constants for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating above threshold current. A 3D numerical model of potential distribution in the device under a constant bias is used to determine resistances and capacitances of an appropriate equivalent circuit. The model has been verified by comparing the theoretical and measured impedance as a function of frequency Z(f). The measured Z(f) is determined from S 11 small signal modulation experiments. The comparison has been performed for frequencies up to 40 GHz and a wide range of above threshold currents, for two oxide-confined VCSELs of different aperture diameters. We obtained a very good quantitative agreement for frequencies up to about 15 GHz and qualitative agreement over the entire range of currents and frequencies.

  6. Comprehensive numerical model for cw vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Warren, M.E.; Choquette, K.D.; Scott, J.W.; Corzine, S.W.

    1995-03-01

    The authors present a comprehensive numerical model for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers that includes all major processes effecting cw operation of axisymmetric devices. In particular, the model includes a description of the 2D transport of electrons and holes through the cladding layers to the quantum well(s), diffusion and recombination processes of these carriers within the wells, the 2D transport of heat throughout the device, and a multi-lateral-mode effective index optical model. The optical gain acquired by photons traversing the quantum wells is computed including the effects of strained band structure and quantum confinement. They employ the model to predict the behavior of higher-order lateral modes in proton-implanted devices, and to provide an understanding of index-guiding in devices fabricated using selective oxidation.

  7. Square-wave switching by crossed-polarization gain modulation in vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mulet, J.; Giudici, M.; Javaloyes, J.; Balle, S.

    2007-10-15

    We study experimentally and theoretically the effects of crossed-polarization reinjection (XPR) on the output characteristics of a vertical-cavity semiconductor laser. We find a set of parameters values for which each polarization component develops a square-wave modulation at a period close to twice the reinjection delay. We analyze the regularity of this modulation in terms of the laser pumping current and of the reinjection level. These observations are numerically reproduced within the spin-flip model modified to account for XPR. In particular, the degradation of the square-wave switching is linked to the finite value of the spin-flip rate, and it occurs when the current approaches the boundaries of polarization bistability.

  8. Stable polarization self-modulation in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hohl, A.; Gavrielides, A.; Hou, H.; Choquette, K.D.

    1998-05-01

    The characteristics of polarization self-modulation in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) were studied for frequencies up to {approx}9 GHz both experimentally and theoretically. Polarization self-modulation was obtained by rotating the linearly polarized output of the VCSEL by 90{degree} and reinjecting it into the laser. Experimentally we simultaneously recorded time traces, optical and radio-frequency spectra. We found for increasing modulation frequencies that the output characteristics changed from square-wave to sinusoidal and the VCSEL system assumed new polarization eigenstates that are different from the free-running VCSEL eigenstates. We modeled polarization self-modulation as an interband process and found a good qualitative agreement between our experimental and numerical results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Critical slowing down in polarization switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Heng; Li, Yueh-Chen; Kuo, Wang-Chuang; Yen, Tsu-Chiang

    2014-05-01

    This research investigated the critical slowing down in polarization switching (PS) of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The experiments were performed by step-function current injection in two types: step-up and stepdown. In the case of step-up and step-down, the relationship between relaxation time and final current in this experiment resembles critical slowing down (CSD). The critical currents of two step-function current experiment are compared. The PS in this experiment is a static case. We also find that the divergence of relaxation time follow a power law. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of CSD in VCSEL's PS (VPS).

  10. Commercial manufacturing of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swirhun, Stan E.; Bryan, Robert P.; Fu, Winston S.; Quinn, William E.; Jewell, Jack L.; Olbright, Greg R.

    1994-06-01

    Optoelectronic integrated circuits based on arrays of vertical- cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) are evolving into functional chips enhancing the performance of fiber optic networks, optical data storage, laser printing and scanning, visual displays, and optoelectronic computing and other systems. This evolution involves the development of advanced manufacturing technology germane to packaged arrays of VCSELs comprising micro- optic lens arrays and interface electronics. In this paper we describe Photonics Research's LASE-ARRAY commercial manufacturing efforts. Specifically we will discuss commercial manufacturing advancements in molecular beam epitaxial growth, full-wafer processing, interface electronics, microoptic lens arrays, packaging and implementation of statistical process control. Yield and reliability will also be discussed. Last we discuss emerging applications for the LASE-ARRAY technology.

  11. Low-frequency fluctuations in vertical cavity lasers: Experiments versus Lang-Kobayashi dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Torcini, Alessandro; Barland, Stephane; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Marin, Francesco

    2006-12-15

    The limits of applicability of the Lang-Kobayashi (LK) model for a semiconductor laser with optical feedback are analyzed. The model equations, equipped with realistic values of the parameters, are investigated below the solitary laser threshold where low-frequency fluctuations (LFF's) are usually observed. The numerical findings are compared with experimental data obtained for the selected polarization mode from a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to polarization selective external feedback. The comparison reveals the bounds within which the dynamics of the LK model can be considered as realistic. In particular, it clearly demonstrates that the deterministic LK model, for realistic values of the linewidth enhancement factor {alpha}, reproduces the LFF's only as a transient dynamics towards one of the stationary modes with maximal gain. A reasonable reproduction of real data from VCSEL's can be obtained only by considering the noisy LK or alternatively deterministic LK model for extremely high {alpha} values.

  12. Dynamics of a low-threshold optically pumped organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayesteh, Mohammad Reza; Darvish, Ghafar

    2016-06-01

    We propose a low-threshold optically pumped organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (OVCSEL). This device has the capability to apply both electrical and optical excitation. The microcavity structure consists of an organic light emitting diode with field-effect electron transport inserted in a high-quality factor double distributed Bragg reflector. The simulated quality factor of the microcavity is shown to be as high as 16,000. Also, we investigate threshold behaviour and the dynamics of the optically pumped OVCSEL with sub-picosecond pulses. Results from numerical simulation show that lasing threshold is 12.8 pJ/0.64 µJ cm-2 when pumped by sub-picosecond pulses of λ = 400 nm wavelength light.

  13. Selective oxidation of buried AlGaAs for fabrication of vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Chui, H.C.; Hou, H.Q.; Hull, R.

    1996-06-01

    The authors discuss the selective conversion of buried layers of AlGaAs to a stable oxide and the implementation of this oxide into high performance vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). The rate of lateral oxidation is shown to be linear with an Arrhenius temperature dependence. The measured activation energies vary with Al composition, providing a high degree of oxidation selectivity between AlGaAs alloys. Thus buried oxide layers can be selectively fabricated within the VCSEL through small compositional variations in the AlGaAs layers. The oxidation of AlGaAs alloys, as opposed to AlAs, is found to provide robust processing of reliable lasers. The insulating and low refractive index oxide provides enhanced electrical and optical confinement for ultralow threshold currents in oxide-apertured VCSELs.

  14. High power 808 nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser with multi-ring-shaped-aperture structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. Q.; Shang, C. Y.; Feng, Y.; Yan, C. L.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, Y. X.; Wang, X. H.; Liu, G. J.

    2011-02-01

    The carrier conglomeration effect has been one of the main problems in developing electrically pumped high power vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with large aperture. We demonstrate a high power 808 nm VCSEL with multi-ring-shaped-aperture (MRSA) to weaken the carrier conglomeration effect. Compared with typical VCSEL with single large aperture (SLA), the 300-μm-diameter VCSEL with MRSA has more uniform near field and far field patterns. Moreover, MRSA laser exhibits maximal CW light output power 0.3 W which is about 3 times that of SLA laser. And the maximal wall-plug efficiency of 17.4% is achieved, higher than that of SLA laser by 10%.

  15. Phase-locked arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Lear, K.L.; Gourley, P.L.; Hadley, G.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Zolper, J.C.; Lott, J.A.; Chalmers, S.A.

    1994-04-01

    Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELS) are of increasing interest to the photonics community because of their surface-emitting structure, simple fabrication and packaging, wafer-level testability, and potential for low cost manufacture. Scaling VCSELs to higher power outputs requires increasing the device area, which leads to transverse mode control difficulties if devices become larger than about 5 microns. One approach to increasing the device size while maintaining a well controlled transverse mode profile is formation of coupled or phase-locked two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs that are individually single-transverse mode. Such arrays have unique optical properties, not all of which are desirable. This paper covers some of the basic principles of these devices and reviews recent work on device designs, fabrication and operation. A technique for improving the far-field properties of the arrays is demonstrated and performance limitations are discussed.

  16. Comprehensive numerical modeling of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Warren, M.E.; Choquette, K.D.; Scott, J.W.; Corzine, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    The authors present a comprehensive numerical model for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers that includes all major processes affecting cw operation of axisymmetric devices. In particular, the model includes a description of the 2-D transport of electrons and holes through the cladding layers to the quantum well(s), diffusion and recombination of these carriers within the wells, the 2-D transport of heat throughout the device, and a multilateral-mode effective index optical model. The optical gain acquired by photons traversing the quantum wells is computed including the effects of strained band structure and quantum confinement. The authors employ the model to predict the behavior of higher-order lateral modes in proton-implanted devices and to provide an understanding of index-guiding in devices fabricated using selective oxidation.

  17. InGaAs vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Geels, R.S.; Corzine, S.W.; Coldren, L.A. )

    1991-06-01

    In this paper the authors give theoretical and experimental results for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL's). The modeling is applied to the design of InGaAs VCSEL's A simple method is introduced to calculate the reflectivity of semiconductor stack mirrors with graded interfaces and compound metal/semiconductor stack mirrors. The theoretical predictions are compared to results from actual device measurements. A novel technique is introduced to determine material parameters: fabrication of in-plane lasers from VCSEL material. The procedure used to determine the optical model in such an in-plane laser is described. Using the insight gained from our modeling, we have increased our external efficiency to {gt}30% with a threshold current density of 1 kA/cm{sup 2}. Linewidth measurements on very high reflectivity VCSEL's have indicated widths as low as 85 MHz and linewidth-power products of 5 MHz {center dot} mW.

  18. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting near 1.5 {mu}m with Sb-based reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    We describe use of AlAsSb/AlGaAsSb lattice matched to InP for distributed Bragg reflectors. These structures are integral to several surface normal devices, in particular vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. The high refractive index ratio of these materials allows formation of a highly reflective mirror with relatively few mirror pairs. As a result, we have been able to show for the first time the 77K CW operation of an optically pumped, monolithic, all-epitaxial vertical cavity laser, emitting at 1.56 {mu}m.

  19. MOVPE growth of visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorn, M.; Knigge, A.; Zeimer, U.; Klein, A.; Kissel, H.; Weyers, M.; Tränkle, G.

    2003-02-01

    This paper summarises the development of the epitaxial growth process for visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The production of these devices which are of particular interest, e.g. for data communications via plastic optical fibres or for consumer electronics, is a real challenge for MOVPE due to the unfavourable material properties in the AlInGaP/AlGaAs material system necessary for this wavelength range. The following stages of the growth process have been investigated with the intention to reach maximum output power and high temperature stability: distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) doping, interface grading, number of p:DBR pairs, oxide confinement layer, cavity design, number of quantum wells, and wavelength alignment. After optimisation devices with record high output powers of more than 4 mW at 650 nm and 10 mW at 670 nm could be fabricated. Single mode VCSELs show laser emission up to 65°C at 650 nm and 87°C at 670 nm. Laser operation for more than 1000 h demonstrates the potential of these devices for industrial applications.

  20. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating an ion implanted aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. T.; Cohen, D. A.; Yonkee, B. P.; Farrell, R. M.; Margalith, T.; Lee, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-07-01

    We report on our recent progress in improving the performance of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) by using an Al ion implanted aperture and employing a multi-layer electron-beam evaporated ITO intracavity contact. The use of an ion implanted aperture improves the lateral confinement over SiNx apertures by enabling a planar ITO design, while the multi-layer ITO contact minimizes scattering losses due to its epitaxially smooth morphology. The reported VCSEL has 10 QWs, with a 3 nm quantum well width, 1 nm barriers, a 5 nm electron-blocking layer, and a 6.95- λ total cavity thickness. These advances yield a single longitudinal mode 406 nm nonpolar VCSEL with a low threshold current density (˜16 kA/cm2), a peak output power of ˜12 μW, and a 100% polarization ratio. The lasing in the current aperture is observed to be spatially non-uniform, which is likely a result of filamentation caused by non-uniform current spreading, lateral optical confinement, contact resistance, and absorption loss.

  1. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  2. Phonon-assisted stimulated emission and ultra-thin active layers in cleaved-cavity and vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    Unique lasing processes in III-V semiconductor lasers are examined. The dynamics of stimulated photon emissions in thin AlGaAs/GaAs single quantum well lasers are observed experimentally and modeled by rate equations describing the electron and photon densities. Agreement between experiment and theory are achieved when the transition probability matrix, calculated with the spreading out of electron and hole wave functions taken into account, is used. The phonon assisted stimulated photon emission observed in this work is delayed with respect to the unassisted emission. This observation is modeled by using a weaker matrix element for the unassisted process which is expected from theory and thus supports the author' claim that this emission is phonon assisted. Rate equations developed to simulate doubly stimulated emission of photons and phonons do not describe the experimental data so the possibility of stimulated phonon emission is ruled out for the samples studied in this work. Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers are also studied since they can be designed to support unique lasing processes. The design and growth of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers are discussed and these concepts are applied to the realization of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser with the thinnest active layer of any laser yet reported. Stimulated emission supported across the sub-monolayer thick InAs single quantum well active region can be understood by considering the spreading of the electron and hole wavefunctions beyond the confines of the quantum well to increase the length of the effective gain region.

  3. Frequency tuning of polarization oscillations in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Markus; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the coupled spin-photon dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) is an attractive opportunity to overcome the limitations of conventional, purely charge based semiconductor lasers. Such spin-controlled VCSELs (spin-VCSELs) offer several advantages, like reduced threshold, spin amplification and polarization control. Furthermore the coupling between carrier spin and light polarization bears the potential for ultrafast polarization dynamics. By injecting spin-polarized carriers, the complex polarization dynamics can be controlled and utilized for high-speed applications. Polarization oscillations as resonance oscillations of the coupled spin- photon system can be generated using pulsed spin injection, which can be much faster than the intensity dynamics in conventional devices. We already demonstrated that the oscillations can be switched in a controlled manner. These controllable polarization dynamics can be used for ultrafast polarization-based optical data communication. The polarization oscillation frequency and therefore the possible data transmission rate is assumed to be mainly determined by the birefringence-induced mode-splitting. This provides a direct tool to increase the polarization dynamics toward higher frequencies by adding a high amount of birefringence to the VCSEL structure. Using this technique, we could recently demonstrate experimentally a birefringence splitting of more than 250 GHz using mechanical strain. Here, we employ the well-known spin-flip model to investigate the tuning of the polarization oscillation frequency. The changing mechanical strain is represented by a linear birefringence sweep to values up to 80πGHz. The wide tuning range presented enables us to generate polarization oscillation frequencies exceeding the conventional intensity modulation frequency in the simulated device by far, mainly dependent on the birefringence in the cavity only.

  4. On the importance of cavity-length and heat dissipation in GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W. J.; Hu, X. L.; Ying, L. Y.; Chen, S. Q.; Zhang, J. Y.; Akiyama, H.; Cai, Z. P.; Zhang, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity-length dependence of the property of optically pumped GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with two dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors was investigated. The cavity lengths were well controlled by employing etching with inductively coupled plasma and chemical mechanical polishing. It was found that the lasing characteristics including threshold, slope efficiency and spontaneous emission coupling factor were substantially improved with reducing the cavity length. In comparison with the device pumped by a 400 nm pulsed laser, the lasing spectrum was featured by a red shift and simultaneous broadening with increasing the pumping energy of a 355 nm pulsed laser. Moreover, the lasing threshold was much higher when pumped by a 355 nm pulsed laser. These were explained by taking into account of the significant heating effect under 355 nm pumping. Our results demonstrate that a short cavity length and good heat-dissipation are essential to GaN-based VCSELs. PMID:25873327

  5. On the importance of cavity-length and heat dissipation in GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, W J; Hu, X L; Ying, L Y; Chen, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Akiyama, H; Cai, Z P; Zhang, B P

    2015-01-01

    Cavity-length dependence of the property of optically pumped GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with two dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors was investigated. The cavity lengths were well controlled by employing etching with inductively coupled plasma and chemical mechanical polishing. It was found that the lasing characteristics including threshold, slope efficiency and spontaneous emission coupling factor were substantially improved with reducing the cavity length. In comparison with the device pumped by a 400 nm pulsed laser, the lasing spectrum was featured by a red shift and simultaneous broadening with increasing the pumping energy of a 355 nm pulsed laser. Moreover, the lasing threshold was much higher when pumped by a 355 nm pulsed laser. These were explained by taking into account of the significant heating effect under 355 nm pumping. Our results demonstrate that a short cavity length and good heat-dissipation are essential to GaN-based VCSELs. PMID:25873327

  6. Integrated plasmonic circuitry on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPolin, Cillian P. T.; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien; Vilain, Sebastien; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel; Wurtz, Gregory A.; Justice, John; Corbett, Brian; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2016-08-01

    Integrated plasmonic sources and detectors are imperative in the practical development of plasmonic circuitry for bio- and chemical sensing, nanoscale optical information processing, as well as transducers for high-density optical data storage. Here we show that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be employed as an on-chip, electrically pumped source or detector of plasmonic signals, when operated in forward or reverse bias, respectively. To this end, we experimentally demonstrate surface plasmon polariton excitation, waveguiding, frequency conversion and detection on a VCSEL-based plasmonic platform. The coupling efficiency of the VCSEL emission to waveguided surface plasmon polariton modes has been optimized using asymmetric plasmonic nanostructures. The plasmonic VCSEL platform validated here is a viable solution for practical realizations of plasmonic functionalities for various applications, such as those requiring sub-wavelength field confinement, refractive index sensitivity or optical near-field transduction with electrically driven sources, thus enabling the realization of on-chip optical communication and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  7. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for free-space interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldren, Larry A.; Thibeault, Brian J.

    1996-01-01

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers have emerged as viable optical sources for low-power, low-cost interconnects. Work over the past few years has involved the use of several different structures, including etched-mesa, proton-implanted and dielectric apertured types. Although much of the development work aimed at manufacture has focused on the proton-implanted structure, more recent work suggests that lower threshold, higher-efficiency configurations may be more desirable for future applications. In this review, we briefly outline the different structures, introduce a general design formalism, overview growth and fabrication issues, summarize some integration work, and finally review some applications that have been identified. Free-space interconnects with AlGaAs/GaAs-based materials are emphasized including a brief summary of recent work on links using integrated microlenses on the VCSELs and detectors to avoid external optics. For completeness, we shall also include some discussion of the progress in long-wavelength InP-based (1.3 - 1.55 micrometer) and short- wavelength AlInGaP/GaAs-based (0.8 - 0.6 micrometer) VCSELs as well as guided-wave data links.

  8. Polarized optical injection in long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, A.; Schires, K.; Khan, N.; Al-Seyab, R.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2011-05-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the effects of polarized optical injection in long-wavelength Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (LW-VCSELs) emitting at the telecom wavelength of 1550nm. We analyze the properties of the polarization switching and bistability that can be induced in a 1550nm-VCSEL under orthogonal and arbitrary polarized optical injection. Additionally, we study the injection locking bandwidth of these devices when subject to different polarized optical injection. Furthermore, we also analyze the relationship existing between the injection locking bandwidth and the polarization switching range when the device is subject to orthogonally-polarized optical injection. Finally, we have identified regions of different nonlinear dynamics outside the injection locking bandwidth, including regions of periodic dynamics (such as limit cycle and period doubling) and chaos when these devices are subject to parallel and to orthogonal optical injection. This rich variety of nonlinear effects observed at 1550nm offers exciting prospects for novel practical uses of VCSELs in optical switching/routing applications in optical networks.

  9. Integrated plasmonic circuitry on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser platform

    PubMed Central

    McPolin, Cillian P. T.; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien; Vilain, Sebastien; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel; Wurtz, Gregory A.; Justice, John; Corbett, Brian; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated plasmonic sources and detectors are imperative in the practical development of plasmonic circuitry for bio- and chemical sensing, nanoscale optical information processing, as well as transducers for high-density optical data storage. Here we show that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be employed as an on-chip, electrically pumped source or detector of plasmonic signals, when operated in forward or reverse bias, respectively. To this end, we experimentally demonstrate surface plasmon polariton excitation, waveguiding, frequency conversion and detection on a VCSEL-based plasmonic platform. The coupling efficiency of the VCSEL emission to waveguided surface plasmon polariton modes has been optimized using asymmetric plasmonic nanostructures. The plasmonic VCSEL platform validated here is a viable solution for practical realizations of plasmonic functionalities for various applications, such as those requiring sub-wavelength field confinement, refractive index sensitivity or optical near-field transduction with electrically driven sources, thus enabling the realization of on-chip optical communication and lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:27491686

  10. Efficient vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for infrared illumination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Guo, Baiming; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Pradhan, Prachi; Wynn, James D.; Khalfin, Viktor; Zou, Wei-Xiong; Ghosh, Chuni; Van Leeuwen, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Infrared illumination is used in the commercial and defense markets for surveillance and security, for high-speed imaging, and for military covert operations. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are an attractive candidate for IR illumination applications as they offer advantageous properties such as efficiency, intrinsically low diverging circular beam, low-cost manufacturing, narrow emission spectrum, and high reliability. VCSELs can also operate at high temperatures, thereby meeting the harsh environmental requirements of many illuminators. The efficiency and brightness of these VCSELs also reduce the requirements of the power supply compared to, for example, an LED approach. We present results on VCSEL arrays for illumination applications, as well as results on VCSEL-based illumination experiments. These VCSELs are used in illuminators emitting from a few Watts up to several hundred Watts. The emission of these VCSEL-based illuminators is speckle-free with no interference patterns. Infra-red illumination at up to 1,600ft (500m) from the source has been demonstrated using VCSEL-based illumination, without any optics.

  11. Integrated plasmonic circuitry on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser platform.

    PubMed

    McPolin, Cillian P T; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien; Vilain, Sebastien; Krasavin, Alexey V; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel; Wurtz, Gregory A; Justice, John; Corbett, Brian; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2016-01-01

    Integrated plasmonic sources and detectors are imperative in the practical development of plasmonic circuitry for bio- and chemical sensing, nanoscale optical information processing, as well as transducers for high-density optical data storage. Here we show that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be employed as an on-chip, electrically pumped source or detector of plasmonic signals, when operated in forward or reverse bias, respectively. To this end, we experimentally demonstrate surface plasmon polariton excitation, waveguiding, frequency conversion and detection on a VCSEL-based plasmonic platform. The coupling efficiency of the VCSEL emission to waveguided surface plasmon polariton modes has been optimized using asymmetric plasmonic nanostructures. The plasmonic VCSEL platform validated here is a viable solution for practical realizations of plasmonic functionalities for various applications, such as those requiring sub-wavelength field confinement, refractive index sensitivity or optical near-field transduction with electrically driven sources, thus enabling the realization of on-chip optical communication and lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:27491686

  12. Phase-locked arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Gourley, P.L.; Vawter, G.A.; Zolper, J.C.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1994-05-01

    Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) are of increasing interest to the photonics community because of their surface-emitting structure, simple fabrication and packaging, wafer-level testability and potential for low cost. Scaling VCSELs to higher power outputs requires increasing the device area, which leads to transverse mode control difficulties if devices become larger than 10-15 microns. One approach to increasing the device size while maintaining a well controlled transverse mode profile is to form coupled or phase-locked, two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs that are individually single-transverse mode. The authors have fabricated and characterized both photopumped and electrically injected two-dimensional VCSEL arrays with apertures over 100 microns wide. Their work has led to an increased understanding of these devices and they have developed new types of devices, including hybrid semiconductor/dielectric mirror VCSEL arrays, VCSEL arrays with etched trench, self-aligned, gold grid contacts and arrays with integrated phase-shifters to correct the far-field pattern.

  13. Al-based thermal oxides in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Ruvimov, S.; Swider, W.; Washburn, Jack; Li, Meng; Li, Gabriel S.; Chang-Hasnain, Constance J.; Weber, Eicke R.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure of wet oxidized layers for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) was studied by transmission electron microscopy. These oxides were formed by reaction of AlxGa1-xAs(x approximately equals 0 - 0.2) with water vapor at elevated temperatures (approximately 400 - 450 degrees Celsius). Due to the excellent carrier confinement provided by the oxidized layer, VCSELS have very low threshold currents and high efficiencies. This study revealed the accumulation of excess As at the interfaces with the oxidized layers and occasionally at the sample surface. To avoid this As accumulation on the sample surface, GaInP layers were grown on top of AlGaAs/GaAs layers. In this case no As was found at the layer surface. In addition, substantial shrinkage was found after oxidation, and the formation of large pores at the interface between the oxide and the high Al content layer, which might be detrimental for the device performance. The dependence of the oxide and interface quality on the composition of the oxidized layers, oxidation time and temperature are discussed in relation to the optical quality of VCSELs.

  14. Energy-efficiency of optical network units with vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elaine; Mueller, Michael; Dias, Maluge P I; Chan, Chien Aun; Amann, Markus C

    2012-07-01

    The energy savings of 10 Gbps vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) for use in energy-efficient optical network units (ONUs) is critically examined in this work. We experimentally characterize and analytically show that the fast settling time and low power consumption during active and power-saving modes allow the VCSEL-ONU to achieve significant energy savings over the distributed feedback laser (DFB) based ONU. The power consumption per customer using VCSEL-ONUs and DFB-ONUs, is compared through an illustrative example of 10G-EPON for Video-on-Demand delivery. Using energy consumption models and numerical analyses in sleep and doze mode operations, we present an impact study of network and protocol parameters, e.g. polling cycle time, network load, and upstream access scheme used, on the achievable energy savings of VCSEL-ONUs over DFB-ONUs. Guidance on the specific power-saving mode to maximum energy savings throughout the day, is also presented. PMID:22772191

  15. Flattop mode shaping of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser using an external-cavity aspheric mirror.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaohui; Leger, James

    2004-11-01

    Both square-shaped and circular-shaped flattop modes were experimentally demonstrated in extended-cavity broad-area VCSELs using aspheric feedback mirrors. These refractive aspheric mirrors were fabricated by electron-beam lithography on curved substrates. Excellent single-mode operation and improved power extraction efficiency were observed. The three-mirror structure of the VCSEL and the state-of-the-art fabrication of the aspheric mirror contribute to the superior VCSEL performance. The modal loss analysis using a rigid three-mirror-cavity simulation method is discussed. PMID:19484117

  16. Towards monolithic integration of mode-locked vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaz, Rafael I.

    2007-12-01

    The speed and performance of today's high end computing and communications systems have placed difficult but still feasible demands on off-chip electrical interconnects. However, future interconnect systems may need aggregate bandwidths well into the terahertz range thereby making electrical bandwidth, density, and power targets impossible to meet. Optical interconnects, and specifically compact semiconductor mode-locked lasers, could alleviate this problem by providing short pulses in time at 10s of GHz repetition rates for Optical Time Division Multiplexing (OTDM) and clock distribution applications. Furthermore, the characteristic spectral comb of frequencies of these lasers could also serve as a multi-wavelength source for Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) applications. A fully integrated mode-locked Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) is proposed as a low-cost high-speed source for these applications. The fundamental laser platform for such a device has been developed and a continuous-wave version of these lasers has been fabricated and demonstrated excellent results. Output powers close to 60mW have been obtained with very high beam quality factor of M2 < 1.07. The mode-locked laser utilizes a passive mode-locking region provided by a semiconductor saturable absorber integrated together with the gain region. Such an aggressive integration forces the resonant beam in the cavity to have the same area on the gain and absorber sections, placing high demands on the saturation fluence and absorption coefficient for the saturable absorber. Quantum Wells (QWs), excitons in QWs and Quantum Dots (QDs) have been investigated as possible saturable absorbers for the proposed device. QDs have been found to have the lowest saturation fluence and total absorption, necessary to meet the mode-locking requirements for this configuration. The need to further understand QDs as saturable absorbers has led to the development of a theoretical model on the dynamics of

  17. Temperature dependence of spontaneous switch-on and switch-off of laser cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J.; Oppo, G.-L.; Ackemann, T.

    2016-03-01

    A systematic experimental and numerical investigation of the conditions for the spontaneous formation of laser cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback by a volume Bragg grating is reported. It is shown that the switching thresholds are controlled by a combination of frequency shifts induced by ambient temperature and Joule heating. The gain level has only a minor influence on the threshold but controls mainly the power of the solitons. At large initial detuning and high threshold gain, the first observed structure can be a high order soliton. In real devices spatial disorder in the cavity length causes a pinning of solitons and a dispersion of thresholds. The experimental observations are in good agreement with numerical simulations taking into account disorder and the coupling of gain and cavity resonance due to Joule heating. In particular, we demonstrate that the existence of the traps explain the spontaneous switch on of the solitons, but do not modify the soliton shape significantly, i.e. the observed solitons are a good approximation of the ones expected in a homogeneous system.

  18. Effect of pump wave reflections on the excitation of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, M. Yu.; Morozov, Yu. A. Popov, V. V.

    2009-03-15

    The effect of pump wave reflections on the carrier generation rate and uniformity of carrier population in quantum wells (QWs) of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser has been numerically analyzed. The laser's active region has been described within a mathematical model allowing any number of QWs and arbitrary distribution of carrier generation rate. It is shown that the optimal arrangement of blocking layers in the active region of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser allows one to obtain a very uniform QW population. It is established that pump wave reflections significantly affect the local carrier generation rate and, therefore, the distribution of excited carriers in the laser structure.

  19. Route to polarization switching induced by optical injection in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamanna, M.; Panajotov, K.

    2006-02-01

    We perform a theoretical investigation of the polarization dynamics in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the injected field has a linear polarization (LP) orthogonal to that of the free-running VCSEL. In agreement with previous experiments [Z. G. Pan , Appl. Phys. Lett. 63, 2999 (1993)], an increase of the injection strength may lead to a polarization switching accompanied by an injection locking. We find that this route to polarization switching is typically accompanied by a cascade of bifurcations to wave-mixing dynamics and time-periodic and possibly chaotic regimes. A detailed mapping of the polarization dynamics in the plane of the injection parameters (detuning, injection strength) unveils a large richness of dynamical scenarios. Of particular interest is the existence of another injection-locked solution for which the two LP modes both lock to the master laser frequency, i.e., an elliptically polarized injection-locked (EPIL) steady state. Modern continuation techniques allow us to unveil an unfolding mechanism of the EPIL solution as the detuning varies and also to link the existence of the EPIL solution to a resonance condition between the master laser frequency and the free-running frequency of the normally depressed LP mode in the slave laser. We furthermore report an additional case of bistability, in which the EPIL solution may coexist with the second injection-locked solution (the one being locked to the master polarization). This case of bistability is a result of the interaction between optical injection and the two-polarization-mode characteristics of VCSEL devices.

  20. Tunable ultraviolet output from an intracavity frequency-doubled red vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Jennifer E.; Morton, Lynne G.; Kemp, Alan J.; Dawson, Martin D.; Krysa, Andrey B.; Roberts, John S.

    2006-08-01

    An optically pumped red vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with an AlInGaP gain region produced more than 1W of continuous-wave output power at a wavelength of 675nm. Frequency doubling in a beta-barium borate crystal placed at an intracavity beam waist generated 120mW of total output power at 338nm. Using an intracavity birefringent filter a second harmonic tuning range of ˜5nm was achieved.

  1. Development of long-wavelength avalanche photodiodes and vertical-cavity lasers for epitaxial integration as a vertical-cavity photon number amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Andrew Sumika

    The goal of this research was to develop technology for building a vertical-geometry photon number amplifier (vertical PNA) that operates at a wavelength in the low-absorption window for optical fibers near 1.55 mum. An optical amplifier of this design would provide electrically-tappable low-noise polarization-independent optical amplification of laser pulses and serve as a stepping stone toward development of a tunable amplifying wavelength converter. The vertical PNA design consists of a multiple active region (MAR) VCSEL integrated with an avalanche photodiode of the separate absorption, charge, and multiplication layer design (SACM APD): the VCSEL is intended to operate continuous wave (CW), modulated by the APD. Both components were selected for their high gain: in excess of 10 electrons out per photon in for the APD, and slightly more than 1 photon out per electron in for the MAR VCSEL under ideal circumstances. In working toward the vertical PNA, significant technical challenges were addressed: (1) Development of a long-wavelength MAR VCSEL capable of high-temperature CW operation. Although this goal was never achieved, efforts directed to this end resulted in an investigation of basic material science issues that are vital to future improvements of the device. Better DBR and active region designs were developed, the overall thermal impedance of the structure was reduced significantly, a rudimentary optical aperture compatible with InP-based materials was tested, and loss estimates for the device were put on solid ground. (2) Development of a low-noise SACM APD capable of modulating the MAR VCSEL at high speed. Here the vital relationships between growth conditions, material quality, and APD performance were established. Other achievements include demonstration of highly uniform arrays of these devices, extremely low-noise operation, and the largest area long-wavelength APDs ever reported. (3) Successful demonstration of the epitaxial integration of these

  2. Systems applications of vertical-cavity multi-quantum well optoelectronic modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jeffry Scott

    1998-12-01

    A large portion of the 'optical computing' research over the last 10 years has been centered around vertical cavity optoelectronic modulators. These devices have several characteristics which make them desirable from a systems standpoint: low power dissipation, high speed, large contrast ratio, bandwidth, dense arrays, integration with silicon VLSI, and WDM capability. This thesis examines systems applications of these devices. Early experiments using a configuration of two of these devices known as a symmetric self electro-optic effect device to perform threshold logic are discussed and compared with similar devices for Boolean logic. An application of these modulators to optical neural networks is discussed. Modulators are used as output devices and integrated with MESFET circuitry and GaAs photodetectors. Next, I discuss a reflection/transmission modulator (or X-modulator), a very powerful device for optical computation, routing, and interconnection. The device is essentially a 3 input, 3 output conservative and reversible switch, an optoelectronic implementation of a Fredkin gate. The use of these devices for optical logic is exhibited. Using arrays of these modulators, reconfigurable switching, routing, and interconnection networks are constructed, including crossbar switches and field programmable gate arrays. Ongoing research is focussed on improving their characteristics and making them more flexible for systems applications. In particular, reduced operating voltages, optical control, and dual zone structures containing gain layers are investigated. Next, a new technology offered by AT&T at a workshop given last summer which involves smart pixels based on quantum well modulators and detectors flip chip bonded on to silicon VLSI chips is described. This technology has already demonstrated 1000's of optical inputs and outputs on a single chip and thus achieving aggregate data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. This technology has been used here to implement 2 x 2

  3. Optical Injection Locking of Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers: Digital and Analog Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Devang

    With the rise of mobile (cellphones, tablets, notebooks, etc.) and broadband wireline communications (Fiber to the Home), there are increasing demands being placed on transmitters for moving data from device to device and around the world. Digital and analog fiber-optic communications have been the key technology to meet this challenge, ushering in ubiquitous Internet and cable TV over the past 20 years. At the physical layer, high-volume low-cost manufacturing of semiconductor optoelectronic devices has played an integral role in allowing for deployment of high-speed communication links. In particular, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) have revolutionized short reach communications and are poised to enter more markets due to their low cost, small size, and performance. However, VCSELs have disadvantages such as limited modulation performance and large frequency chirp which limits fiber transmission speed and distance, key parameters for many fiber-optic communication systems. Optical injection locking is one method to overcome these limitations without re-engineering the VCSEL at the device level. By locking the frequency and phase of the VCSEL by the direct injection of light from another laser oscillator, improved device performance is achieved in a post-fabrication method. In this dissertation, optical injection locking of VCSELs is investigated from an applications perspective. Optical injection locking of VCSELs can be used as a pathway to reduce complexity, cost, and size of both digital and analog fiber-optic communications. On the digital front, reduction of frequency chirp via bit pattern inversion for large-signal modulation is experimentally demonstrated showing up to 10 times reduction in frequency chirp and over 90 times increase in fiber transmission distance. Based on these results, a new reflection-based interferometric model for optical injection locking was established to explain this phenomenon. On the analog side, the resonance

  4. GaInNAs-based Hellish-vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifier for 1.3 μm operation.

    PubMed

    Chaqmaqchee, Faten Adel Ismail; Mazzucato, Simone; Oduncuoglu, Murat; Balkan, Naci; Sun, Yun; Gunes, Mustafa; Hugues, Maxime; Hopkinson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Hot electron light emission and lasing in semiconductor heterostructure (Hellish) devices are surface emitters the operation of which is based on the longitudinal injection of electrons and holes in the active region. These devices can be designed to be used as vertical cavity surface emitting laser or, as in this study, as a vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifier (VCSOA). This study investigates the prospects for a Hellish VCSOA based on GaInNAs/GaAs material for operation in the 1.3-μm wavelength range. Hellish VCSOAs have increased functionality, and use undoped distributed Bragg reflectors; and this coupled with direct injection into the active region is expected to yield improvements in the gain and bandwidth. The design of the Hellish VCSOA is based on the transfer matrix method and the optical field distribution within the structure, where the determination of the position of quantum wells is crucial. A full assessment of Hellish VCSOAs has been performed in a device with eleven layers of Ga0.35In0.65N0.02As0.08/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) in the active region. It was characterised through I-V, L-V and by spectral photoluminescence, electroluminescence and electro-photoluminescence as a function of temperature and applied bias. Cavity resonance and gain peak curves have been calculated at different temperatures. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results has been obtained. PMID:21711630

  5. GaInNAs-based Hellish-vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifier for 1.3 μm operation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hot electron light emission and lasing in semiconductor heterostructure (Hellish) devices are surface emitters the operation of which is based on the longitudinal injection of electrons and holes in the active region. These devices can be designed to be used as vertical cavity surface emitting laser or, as in this study, as a vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifier (VCSOA). This study investigates the prospects for a Hellish VCSOA based on GaInNAs/GaAs material for operation in the 1.3-μm wavelength range. Hellish VCSOAs have increased functionality, and use undoped distributed Bragg reflectors; and this coupled with direct injection into the active region is expected to yield improvements in the gain and bandwidth. The design of the Hellish VCSOA is based on the transfer matrix method and the optical field distribution within the structure, where the determination of the position of quantum wells is crucial. A full assessment of Hellish VCSOAs has been performed in a device with eleven layers of Ga0.35In0.65N0.02As0.08/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) in the active region. It was characterised through I-V, L-V and by spectral photoluminescence, electroluminescence and electro-photoluminescence as a function of temperature and applied bias. Cavity resonance and gain peak curves have been calculated at different temperatures. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results has been obtained. PMID:21711630

  6. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser emitting at 1.56 microns with AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Lear, K.L.; Vawter, G.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1998-07-01

    The authors report 77K operation of an optically pumped vertical cavity surface emitting laser with an Sb-based cavity. The structure consists of 15 and 20 pair AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb top and bottom reflectors and a bulk InGaAs active region.

  7. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  8. Steady-state characteristics of lateral p-n junction vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Tsutsui, N.; Khmyrova, I.; Ikegami, T.; Vaccaro, P. O.; Taniyama, H.; Aida, T.

    2001-09-01

    We developed an analytical device model for lateral p-n junction vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (LJVCSELs) with a quantum well active region. The model takes into account the features of the carrier injection, transport, and recombination in LJVCSELs as well as the features of the photon propagation in the cavity. This model is used for the calculation and analysis of the LJVCSEL steady-state characteristics. It is shown that the localization of the injected electrons primarily near the p-n junction and the reabsorption of lateral propagating photons significantly effects the LJVCSELs performance, in particular, the LJVCSEL threshold current and power-current characteristics. The reincarnation of electrons and holes due to the reabsorption of lateral propagating photons can substantially decrease the threshold current.

  9. Phase dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with delayed optical feedback and cross-polarized reinjection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaloyes, J.; Marconi, M.; Giudici, M.

    2014-08-01

    We study theoretically the nonlinear polarization dynamics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers in the presence of an external cavity providing delayed optical feedback and cross-polarized reinjection. We show that, far from the laser threshold, the dynamics remains confined close to the equatorial plane of a Poincaré sphere with a fixed radius. It entails that the evolution of the system is described by two phase variables: the orientation phase of the quasilinear polarization and the optical phase of the field. We explore the complex modal structure given by the double reinjection configuration and how it evolves between the cases of single cross-polarized reinjection and single optical feedback, hence disclosing the relationship with the Lang-Kobayashi model. We also reinterpret the square-wave switching observed by J. Mulet et al. [Phys. Rev. A 76, 043801 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevA.76.043801] in terms of phase kinks.

  10. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with selectively etched thin apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feezell, Daniel F.

    Long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) emitting in the 1300--1600nm wavelength window are attractive light sources for short to mid-range optical fiber communications. These devices target low-loss and low-dispersion minima in standard optical fibers and are expected to provide a low-cost alternative to the existing edge-emitting infrastructure. With low-power consumption, on wafer testing; simple packaging, and high fiber-coupling efficiency, VCSELs are ideal transmitters for CWDM, metro, local area, and storage area networks. Recently, much attention has been devoted to a rich variety of approaches to long-wavelength VCSELs. One underlying problem, however, has been the need to match a reliable high-gain active region with high-index-contrast distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) over the full 1300--1600nm wavelength range. One solution to this problem is to utilize well-established InAlGaAs active-region technology coupled with AlGaAsSb DBRs. This combination facilitates monolithic all-epitaxial InP-based devices spanning the entire 1300--1600nm wavelength range. Previously, Dr. Shigeru Nakagawa and Dr. Eric Hall have demonstrated long-wavelength VCSELs with Sb-based technology operating at 1550nm. This dissertation demonstrates the first high-performance InP-based VCSELs with Sb-based DBRs operating at 1310nm, thus solidifying Sb-based technology as a wavelength flexible platform for long-wavelength devices. Also developed is a novel and efficient tunnel-junction aperturing technology for generating extremely low-loss optical and electrical confinement. Lastly, it is shown that the benefits from such an aperturing scheme produce marked improvements in device operation versus previously demonstrated Sb-based VCSELs. The devices from this research generated over 1.6mW single-mode continuous-wave (CW) output power at room temperature (>2mW multi-mode), displayed threshold currents down to 1mA, and operated CW up to 90°C. Furthermore, world

  11. Parallel self-mixing imaging system based on an array of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, John R.; Baque, Johnathon L.; Lim, Yah Leng; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Rakic, Aleksandar D

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the feasibility of a massively parallel self-mixing imaging system based on an array of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) to measure surface profiles of displacement,distance, velocity, and liquid flow rate. The concept of the system is demonstrated using a prototype to measure the velocity at different radial points on a rotating disk, and the velocity profile of diluted milk in a custom built diverging-converging planar flow channel. It is envisaged that a scaled up version of the parallel self-mixing imaging system will enable real-time surface profiling, vibrometry, and flowmetry.

  12. Measurement of formaldehyde H{sub 2}CO concentration in air using diode vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavskii, V Ya; Nadezhdinskii, Aleksandr I; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Chernin, S M

    2011-01-31

    A two-channel gas-analysing spectrometer is developed using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) ({lambda}=1.79 {mu}m) and a multi-pass cell (total optical length 39 m) for studying the absorption spectra and measuring the background concentration of formaldehyde. High-resolution absorption spectra of formaldehyde are obtained within the VCSEL frequency tuning range ({lambda} {approx}1.79 {mu}m). Changing the background concentration of H{sub 2}CO, the sensitivity limit of the gas analyser is estimated. (laser applications)

  13. Flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, K. S. Missinne, J.; Van Steenberge, G.

    2014-02-10

    This letter reports the use of the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique for the fabrication of indium micro-bumps for the flip-chip (FC) bonding of single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser chips. The FC bonded chips were electrically and optically characterized, and the successful functioning of the devices post-bonding is demonstrated. The die shear and life-time tests carried out on the bonded chips confirmed the mechanical reliability of the LIFT-assisted FC bonded assemblies.

  14. Controlled switching of ultrafast circular polarization oscillations in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Höpfner, Henning Lindemann, Markus; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate a scheme for controlled switching of polarization oscillations in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (spin-VCSEL). Under hybrid electrical and optical pumping conditions, our VCSEL devices show polarization oscillations with frequencies far above the VCSEL's electrical modulation bandwidth. Using multiple optical pulses, we are able to excite and amplify these polarization oscillations. When specific phase and amplitude conditions for the optical excitation pulses are met, destructive interference leads to switch-off of the polarization oscillation, enabling the generation of controlled short polarization bursts.

  15. Flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, K. S.; Missinne, J.; Van Steenberge, G.

    2014-02-01

    This letter reports the use of the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique for the fabrication of indium micro-bumps for the flip-chip (FC) bonding of single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser chips. The FC bonded chips were electrically and optically characterized, and the successful functioning of the devices post-bonding is demonstrated. The die shear and life-time tests carried out on the bonded chips confirmed the mechanical reliability of the LIFT-assisted FC bonded assemblies.

  16. GaN-based vertical-cavity laser performance improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Piprek, Joachim

    2014-07-07

    This Letter investigates the output power enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of a 410 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser which enables the repeated use of carriers for light generation (carrier recycling). While the number of quantum wells remains unchanged, the tunnel junction eliminates absorption caused by the non-uniform MQW carrier distribution. The thermal resistance drops and the excess bias lead to a surprisingly small rise in self-heating.

  17. Development of III-Sb metamorphic DBR membranes on InP for vertical cavity laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addamane, S. J.; Mansoori, A.; Renteria, E. J.; Dawson, N.; Shima, D. M.; Rotter, T. J.; Hains, C. P.; Dawson, L. R.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2016-04-01

    Sb-based metamorphic DBR membranes are developed for InP-based vertical cavity laser applications. The reflectivity of the metamorphic DBR membrane is compared to the reflectivity of a lattice-matched DBR to characterize the optical quality of the DBR membrane. The metamorphic interface between InP and the III-antimonides is found to degrade the reflectivity of the DBR. Therefore, the growth temperature for the metamorphic DBR is optimized in order to obtain highly reflective (>99.8%) III-Sb thin-film membranes.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of the Si-photonics-integrated vertical resonant-cavity light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Duanhua; Kim, Taek; Kim, Sihan; Hong, Hyungi; Shcherbatko, Igor; Park, Youngsoo; Shin, Dongjae; Ha, Kyoung-Ho; Jeong, Gitae

    2014-03-01

    We designed and fabricated a 1.3-um hybrid vertical Resonant-Cavity Light-Emitting Diode for optical interconnect by using direct III-V wafer bonding on silicon on insulator (SOI). The device included InP based front distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), InGaAlAs based active layer, and SOI-based high-contrast-grating (HCG) as a back reflector. 42-uW continuous wave optical power was achieved at 20mA at room temperature.

  19. Frequency scanning interferometry with nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode under scanning speed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    Frequency scanning interferometry technique with a nanometer precision using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) is presented. Since the frequency scanning of the VCSEL is linearized by the phase-locked-loop technique, the gradient of the interference fringe order can be precisely determined using linear least squares fitting. This enables a length measurement with a precision better than a quarter wavelength, and the absolute fringe number including the integer part at the atomic transition spectrum (rubidium-D2 line) is accurately determined. The validity of the method is demonstrated by excellent results of block gauge measurement with a root mean square error better than 5 nm.

  20. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.

    2015-10-12

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  1. Improved single-mode emission characteristics of long-wavelength wafer-fused vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by intra-cavity patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volet, Nicolas; Czyszanowski, Tomasz; Walczak, Jarosław; Mutter, Lukas; Dwir, Benjamin; Micković, Zlatko; Gallo, Pascal; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Sirbu, Alexei; Caliman, Andrei; Mereuta, Alexandru; Kapon, Elyahou

    2013-03-01

    We report on transverse mode discrimination in long-wavelength wafer-fused vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) incorporating ring-shaped air gap patterns at the fused interface between the active region and the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). These 60-nm deep patterns were implemented with the aim of favoring the fundamental mode while preserving high output power. The VCSELs under consideration emit in the 1310-nm band and incorporate an AlGaInAs-based quantum well active region, a regrown circular tunnel junction and undoped GaAs/AlGaAs DBRs. A large batch of devices with varying pattern dimensions was investigated by on-wafer mapping, allowing significant statistical analysis leading to conclusions on their typical behavior. We observe experimentally a dependence of the side-mode suppression ratio on the geometrical parameters of the patterns. In particular, we identified a design that statistically increases the maximal single-mode emitted power by more than 20%. Numerical simulations of the patterned-cavity VCSELs based on our fully three dimensional electrical, thermal and optical VCSEL computational model support these observations. They show that patterns with a large inner diameter actually confine the first-order transverse mode and enhance its modal gain. In smaller devices, this mode is pushed out of the optical aperture and suffers larger losses. Optimized parameters were found numerically for enhancing the single-mode properties of the devices with negligible penalty on emitted power and threshold current.

  2. Temperature stable mid-infrared GaInAsSb/GaSb Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs).

    PubMed

    Ikyo, A B; Marko, I P; Hild, K; Adams, A R; Arafin, S; Amann, M-C; Sweeney, S J

    2016-01-01

    GaInAsSb/GaSb based quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating in mid-infrared spectral range between 2 and 3 micrometres are of great importance for low cost gas monitoring applications. This paper discusses the efficiency and temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs emitting at 2.6 μm and the processes that must be controlled to provide temperature stable operation. We show that non-radiative Auger recombination dominates the threshold current and limits the device performance at room temperature. Critically, we demonstrate that the combined influence of non-radiative recombination and gain peak-cavity mode de-tuning determines the overall temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs. The results show that improved temperature stable operation around room temperature can only be achieved with a larger gain peak-cavity mode de-tuning, offsetting the significant effect of increasing non-radiative recombination with increasing temperature, a physical effect which must be accounted for in mid-infrared VCSEL design. PMID:26781492

  3. Temperature stable mid-infrared GaInAsSb/GaSb Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs)

    PubMed Central

    Ikyo, A. B.; Marko, I. P.; Hild, K.; Adams, A. R.; Arafin, S.; Amann, M.-C.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    GaInAsSb/GaSb based quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating in mid-infrared spectral range between 2 and 3 micrometres are of great importance for low cost gas monitoring applications. This paper discusses the efficiency and temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs emitting at 2.6 μm and the processes that must be controlled to provide temperature stable operation. We show that non-radiative Auger recombination dominates the threshold current and limits the device performance at room temperature. Critically, we demonstrate that the combined influence of non-radiative recombination and gain peak – cavity mode de-tuning determines the overall temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs. The results show that improved temperature stable operation around room temperature can only be achieved with a larger gain peak – cavity mode de-tuning, offsetting the significant effect of increasing non-radiative recombination with increasing temperature, a physical effect which must be accounted for in mid-infrared VCSEL design. PMID:26781492

  4. Temperature stable mid-infrared GaInAsSb/GaSb Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikyo, A. B.; Marko, I. P.; Hild, K.; Adams, A. R.; Arafin, S.; Amann, M.-C.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    GaInAsSb/GaSb based quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating in mid-infrared spectral range between 2 and 3 micrometres are of great importance for low cost gas monitoring applications. This paper discusses the efficiency and temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs emitting at 2.6 μm and the processes that must be controlled to provide temperature stable operation. We show that non-radiative Auger recombination dominates the threshold current and limits the device performance at room temperature. Critically, we demonstrate that the combined influence of non-radiative recombination and gain peak - cavity mode de-tuning determines the overall temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs. The results show that improved temperature stable operation around room temperature can only be achieved with a larger gain peak - cavity mode de-tuning, offsetting the significant effect of increasing non-radiative recombination with increasing temperature, a physical effect which must be accounted for in mid-infrared VCSEL design.

  5. Numerical investigation of the aerodynamic performance for the newly designed cavity vane type vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suffer, K. H.; Usubamatov, R.; Quadir, G. A.; Ismail, K. A.

    2015-05-01

    Research and development activities in the field of renewable energy, especially wind and solar, have been considerably increased, due to the worldwide energy crisis and high global emission. However, the available technical designs are not yet adequate to develop a reliable distributed wind energy converter for low wind speed conditions. The last few years have proved that Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) are more suitable for urban areas than Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs). To date, very little has been published in this area to assess good performance and lifetime of VAWTs either in open or urban areas. The power generated by vertical axis wind turbines is strongly dependent on the aerodynamic performance of the turbines. The main goal of this current research is to investigate numerically the aerodynamic performance of a newly designed cavity type vertical axis wind turbine. In the current new design the power generated depends on the drag force generated by the individual blades and interactions between them in a rotating configuration. For numerical investigation, commercially available computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software GAMBIT and FLUENT were used. In this numerical analysis the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k-ω turbulence model is used which is better than the other turbulence models available as suggested by some researchers. The computed results show good agreement with published experimental results.

  6. Optical characterization of InGaN heterostructures for blue light emitters and vertical cavity lasers: Efficiency and recombination dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okur, Serdal

    This thesis explores radiative efficiencies and recombination dynamics in InGaN-based heterostructures and their applications as active regions in blue light emitters and particularly vertical cavities. The investigations focus on understanding the mechanism of efficiency loss at high injection as well as developing designs to mitigate it, exploring nonpolar and semipolar crystal orientations to improve radiative efficiency, integration of optimized active regions with high reflectivity dielectric mirrors in vertical cavity structures, and achieving strong exciton-photon coupling regime in these microcavities for potential polariton lasing. In regard to active regions, multiple double heterostructure (DH) designs with sufficiently thick staircase electron injection (SEI) layers, which act as electron coolers to reduce the overflow of hot electrons injected into the active region, were found to be more viable to achieve high efficiencies and to mitigate the efficiency loss at high injection. Such active regions were embedded in novel vertical cavity structure designs with full dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) through epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO), eliminating the problems associated with semiconductor bottom DBRs having narrow stopbands and the cumbersome substrate removal process. Moreover, the ELO technique allowed the injection of carriers only through the high quality regions with substantially reduced threading dislocation densities compared to regular GaN templates grown on sapphire. Reduced electron-hole wavefunction overlap in polar heterostructures was shown to hamper the efficiency of particularly thick active regions (thicker than 3 nm) possessing three-dimensional density of states needed for higher optical output. In addition, excitation density-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed superior optical quality of double heterostructure (3 nm InGaN wells) active regions compared to quantum wells (2 nm InGaN wells

  7. Spacer and well pumping of InGaN vertical cavity semiconductor lasers with varying number of quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debusmann, R.; Brauch, U.; Hoffmann, V.; Weyers, M.; Kneissl, M.

    2012-08-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the threshold pump power and slope efficiency of 415 nm (In)GaN vertical cavity surface emitting lasers on the wavelength of the pump source and the number of quantum wells. InGaN double quantum well resonant-periodic-gain structures with 6, 8, and 10 periods have been compared. By barrier and well pumping of the samples with a 375 nm dye laser, a nearly 10 times reduction of the laser threshold was observed compared to pumping with a 337 nm nitrogen laser source. The laser threshold was found to be independent of the number of quantum wells. The slope efficiency seems to be not affected by the pump wavelength and resonant-periodic-gain periods. The results are discussed with a rate equation model that takes into account the inhomogeneous pumping of the quantum wells and optical thickness variations in the resonant-periodic-gain structure.

  8. Single-exposure two-dimensional superresolution in digital holography using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array.

    PubMed

    Granero, Luis; Zalevsky, Zeev; Micó, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    We present a new implementation capable of producing two-dimensional (2D) superresolution (SR) imaging in a single exposure by aperture synthesis in digital lensless Fourier holography when using angular multiplexing provided by a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array. The system performs the recording in a single CCD snapshot of a multiplexed hologram coming from the incoherent addition of multiple subholograms, where each contains information about a different 2D spatial frequency band of the object's spectrum. Thus, a set of nonoverlapping bandpass images of the input object can be recovered by Fourier transformation (FT) of the multiplexed hologram. The SR is obtained by coherent addition of the information contained in each bandpass image while generating an enlarged synthetic aperture. Experimental results demonstrate improvement in resolution and image quality. PMID:21479012

  9. Design concepts of monolithic metamorphic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A. Yu. Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I.; Babichev, A. V.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.; Bugrov, V. E.

    2015-11-15

    Possible design concepts for long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range on GaAs substrates are suggested. It is shown that a metamorphic GaAs–InGaAs heterostructure with a thin buffer layer providing rapid transition from the lattice constant of GaAs to that of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As with an indium fraction of x < 0.3 can be formed by molecular-beam epitaxy. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the effective localization of mismatch dislocations in the thin buffer layer and full suppression of their penetration into the overlying InGaAs metamorphic layer.

  10. Lateral integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and slow light Bragg reflector waveguide devices.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Toshikazu; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-03-20

    We present the modeling and the experiment on the lateral integration of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and slow light Bragg reflector waveguide devices. The modeling shows an efficient direct-lateral coupling from a VCSEL to an integrated slow light waveguide. The calculated result shows a possibility of 13 dB chip gain and an extinction ratio over 5 dB for a compact slow light semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and electroabsorption modulator integrated with a VCSEL, respectively. We demonstrate an SOA-integrated VCSEL, exhibiting the maximum output power over 6 mW. Also, we fabricate a sub-50-μm long electroabsorption modulator laterally integrated with a VCSEL. An extinction ratio of over 15 dB for a voltage swing of 2.0 V is obtained without noticeable change of threshold. In addition, we demonstrate an on-chip electrothermal beam deflector integrated with a VCSEL. PMID:24663452

  11. Circular polarization switching and bistability in an optically injected 1300 nm spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Hurtado, A.; Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M.

    2015-01-12

    We report the experimental observation of circular polarization switching (PS) and polarization bistability (PB) in a 1300 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). We demonstrate that the circularly polarized optical signal at 1300 nm can gradually or abruptly switch the polarization ellipticity of the spin-VCSEL from right-to-left circular polarization and vice versa. Moreover, different forms of PS and PB between right- and left-circular polarizations are observed by controlling the injection strength and the initial wavelength detuning. These results obtained at the telecom wavelength of 1300 nm open the door for novel uses of spin-VCSELs in polarization sensitive applications in future optical systems.

  12. Quantum well intermixing technique using proton implantation for carrier confinement of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwaki, Shouhei; Saitou, Minoru; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated quantum well intermixing (QWI) using proton implantation to form the carrier confinement structure in the active layer of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The required potential barrier height is discussed referring to the result of numerical analysis. The bandgap change due to the QWI was investigated experimentally for various quantum well structures, proton dose densities, and thermal annealing conditions. A potential barrier height of 30 meV was observed using a high-indium and thin-well structure. High crystalline quality was confirmed by photoluminescence intensity measurement, even after the QWI process, and the lasing of the fabricated QWI-VCSEL was observed without any deterioration. The proposed technique would be effective in improving the device performance in a simple fabrication process.

  13. Measurement of groove features and dimensions of the vertical test cathode and the choke joint of the superconducting electron gun cavity of the Energy Recovery LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, L.; Ke, M.

    2011-10-13

    A testing program for the superconducting electron gun cavity that has been designed for the Energy Recovery LINAC is being planned. The goal of the testing program is to characterize the RF properties of the gun cavity at superconducting temperatures and, in particular, to study multipacting that is suspected to be occurring in the choke joint of the cavity where the vertical test cathode is inserted. The testing program will seek to understand the nature and cause of this multipacting and attempt to eliminate it, if possible, by supplying sufficient voltage to the cavity. These efforts are motivated by the multipacting issues that have been observed in the processing of the fine-grain niobium gun cavity. This cavity, which is being processed at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory for Brookhaven, has encountered multipacting at a gradient of approximately 3 MV/m and, to date, has resisted efforts at elimination. Because of this problem, a testing program is being established here in C-AD that will use the large-grain niobium gun cavity that currently resides at Brookhaven and has been used for room-temperature measurements. The large-grain and fine-cavities are identical in every aspect of construction and only differ in niobium grain size. Thus, it is believed that testing and conditioning of the large-grain cavity should yield important insights about the fine-grain cavity. One element of this testing program involves characterizing the physical features of the choke joint of the cavity where the multipacting is believed to be occurring and, in particular the grooves of the joint. The configuration of the cavity and the vertical test cathode is shown in Figure 1. In addition, it is important to characterize the groove of the vertical test cathode. The grooved nature of these two components was specifically designed to prevent multipacting. However, it is suspected that, because of the chemical processing that the fine-grain gun cavity underwent along with the

  14. Growth and testing of vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) for intracavity cooling of Yb:YLF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederberg, J. G.; Albrecht, A. R.; Ghasemkhani, M.; Melgaard, S. D.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    2014-05-01

    Optically-pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) have unique characteristics that make them attractive for use in intracavity optical cooling of rare earth doped crystals. We present the development of high power VECSELs at 1020 nm for cooling ytterbium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Yb:YLF). The VECSEL structures use AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors and InGaAs/GaAsP resonant periodic gain epitaxially grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. To achieve the necessary output power, we investigated thinning the substrate to improve the thermal characteristics. We demonstrated a VECSEL structure that was grown inverted, bonded to the heat sink, and the substrate removed by chemical etching. The inverted structure allows us to demonstrate 15 W output with 27% slope efficiency. Wavelength tuning of 30 nm around 1020 nm was achieved by inserting a birefringent quartz window into the cavity. The window also narrows the VECSEL emission, going from a FWHM of 5 nm to below 0.5 nm at a pump power of 40 W.

  15. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Shen, C.; Margalith, T.; Ng, T. K.; DenBaars, S. P.; Ooi, B. S.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with IIInitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 μm aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of ~550 μW with a threshold current density of ~3.5 kA/cm2, while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of ~80 μW and threshold current densities of ~7 kA/cm2.

  16. Fabrication of two-color surface emitting device of a coupled vertical cavity structure with InAs quantum dots formed by wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Hiroto; Lu, Xiangmeng; Kumagai, Naoto; Kitada, Takahiro; Isu, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    We fabricated a two-color surface emitting device of a coupled cavity structure, which is applicable to terahertz light source. GaAs/AlGaAs vertical multilayer cavity structures were grown on (001) and (113)B GaAs substrates and the coupled multilayer cavity structure was fabricated by wafer bonding them. The top cavity contains self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) as optical gain materials for two-color emission of cavity-mode lights. The bonding position was optimized for the equivalent intensity of two-color emission. We formed a current injection structure, and two-color emission was observed by current injection, although no lasing was observed.

  17. Coherent polarization stabilization in large-aperture rectangular post bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Ning, Y. Q.; Tian, Z. H.; Zhang, X.; Shi, J. J.; Wang, Z. F.; Zhang, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Qin, L.; Wang, L. J.

    2011-03-01

    The output characteristics of large-aperture rectangular post bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) were investigated. It was shown that the output power of the rectangle VCSELs can be up to 660 mW at a current of 5 A. Both H-polarization (horizontal) and V-polarization (vertical) demonstrated a coherent stabilization over the entire range of operation current, and coherent spectrum blue-shift of H-polarization light occurred with respect to V-polarization light at three different injected currents. The polarization states of output light were stabilized in the two orthogonal directions and H-polarization was the most principal polarization which was parallel to the longer side of the rectangular aperture. From the relationship between polarization ratio and aspect ratio of the oxidation confinement aperture (OCA), it was found that the highest polarization ratio (about 2:1) took place when the appropriate aspect ratio was 5:3, which meant better polarization stabilization in large-aperture VCSELs.

  18. Power coupler and cold window for seven-cell superconducting cavity vertical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E.R.; Spalek, G.

    1992-10-01

    For tests of the LANL 805MHz seven cell superconducting cavity, we are developing a variable coaxial rf power coupler. Its Q{sub ext} will be variable over a range from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 12}. It will operate nominally at 3kW CW and lOOkW peak for high power processing. The coupler consists of a 3 inch driveline and window, a 3.45 inch T supported by a {lambda}/4 shorted stub followed by a step transition to a 2 inch coupler port. A {approximately} 6.6 Ohm impedance choke joint located at the step transition allows the large center conductor travel necessary for the Q{sub ext} variation. The folded choke joint is located at a standing wave current node to keep its excitation below the multipacting level even at high power levels. A low contact-pressure sliding rf seal prevents arcing at the choke joints current node during its filling time.

  19. Power coupler and cold window for seven-cell superconducting cavity vertical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E.R.; Spalek, G.

    1992-01-01

    For tests of the LANL 805MHz seven cell superconducting cavity, we are developing a variable coaxial rf power coupler. Its Q[sub ext] will be variable over a range from 10[sup 5] to 10[sup 12]. It will operate nominally at 3kW CW and lOOkW peak for high power processing. The coupler consists of a 3 inch driveline and window, a 3.45 inch T supported by a [lambda]/4 shorted stub followed by a step transition to a 2 inch coupler port. A [approximately] 6.6 Ohm impedance choke joint located at the step transition allows the large center conductor travel necessary for the Q[sub ext] variation. The folded choke joint is located at a standing wave current node to keep its excitation below the multipacting level even at high power levels. A low contact-pressure sliding rf seal prevents arcing at the choke joints current node during its filling time.

  20. Ultrafast pulse amplification in mode-locked vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Böttge, C. N. Hader, J.; Kilen, I.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2014-12-29

    A fully microscopic many-body Maxwell–semiconductor Bloch model is used to investigate the influence of the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics on the short-pulse amplification in mode-locked semiconductor microlaser systems. The numerical solution of the coupled equations allows for a self-consistent investigation of the light–matter coupling dynamics, the carrier kinetics in the saturable absorber and the multiple-quantum-well gain medium, as well as the modification of the light field through the pulse-induced optical polarization. The influence of the pulse-induced non-equilibrium modifications of the carrier distributions in the gain medium and the saturable absorber on the single-pulse amplification in the laser cavity is identified. It is shown that for the same structure, quantum wells, and gain bandwidth the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics lead to two preferred operation regimes: one with pulses in the (sub-)100 fs-regime and one with multi-picosecond pulses. The recovery time of the saturable absorber determines in which regime the device operates.

  1. All-epitaxial, lithographically defined, current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser based on selective interfacial fermi-level pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J.; Lu, D.; Deppe, D.G.

    2005-01-10

    An approach is presented to fabricate a current- and mode-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser that is all-epitaxial and lithographically defined. The device uses selective Fermi level pinning to self-align the electrical injection to a mode-confining intracavity phase-shifting mesa.

  2. Absorber and gain chip optimization to improve performance from a passively modelocked electrically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, C. A. Mangold, M.; Pallmann, W. P.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Keller, U.; Gronenborn, S.; Moench, H.; Weichmann, U.; Miller, M.

    2014-03-24

    We present an electrically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (EP-VECSEL) modelocked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with significantly improved performance. In different cavity configurations, we present the shortest pulses (2.5 ps), highest average output power (53.2 mW), highest repetition rate (18.2 GHz), and highest peak power (4.7 W) to date. The simple and low-cost concept of EP-VECSELs is very attractive for mass-market applications such as optical communication and clocking. The improvements result from an optimized gain chip from Philips Technologie GmbH and a SESAM, specifically designed for EP-VECSELs. For the gain chip, we found a better trade-off between electrical and optical losses with an optimized doping scheme in the substrate to increase the average output power. Furthermore, the device's bottom contact diameter (60 μm) is smaller than the oxide aperture diameter (100 μm), which favors electro-optical conversion into a TEM{sub 00} mode. Compared to optically pumped VECSELs we have to increase the field enhancement in the active region of an EP-VECSEL which requires a SESAM with lower saturation fluence and higher modulation depth for modelocking. We therefore used a resonant quantum well SESAM with a 3.5-pair dielectric top-coating (SiN{sub x} and SiO{sub 2}) to enhance the field in the absorber at the lasing wavelength of 980 nm. The absorption bandedge at room temperature is detuned (965 nm) compared to the resonance (980 nm), which enables temperature-tuning of the modulation depth and saturation fluence from approximately 2.5% up to 15% and from 20 μJ/cm{sup 2} to 1.1 μJ/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  3. Absorber and gain chip optimization to improve performance from a passively modelocked electrically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaugg, C. A.; Gronenborn, S.; Moench, H.; Mangold, M.; Miller, M.; Weichmann, U.; Pallmann, W. P.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Keller, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present an electrically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (EP-VECSEL) modelocked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with significantly improved performance. In different cavity configurations, we present the shortest pulses (2.5 ps), highest average output power (53.2 mW), highest repetition rate (18.2 GHz), and highest peak power (4.7 W) to date. The simple and low-cost concept of EP-VECSELs is very attractive for mass-market applications such as optical communication and clocking. The improvements result from an optimized gain chip from Philips Technologie GmbH and a SESAM, specifically designed for EP-VECSELs. For the gain chip, we found a better trade-off between electrical and optical losses with an optimized doping scheme in the substrate to increase the average output power. Furthermore, the device's bottom contact diameter (60 μm) is smaller than the oxide aperture diameter (100 μm), which favors electro-optical conversion into a TEM00 mode. Compared to optically pumped VECSELs we have to increase the field enhancement in the active region of an EP-VECSEL which requires a SESAM with lower saturation fluence and higher modulation depth for modelocking. We therefore used a resonant quantum well SESAM with a 3.5-pair dielectric top-coating (SiNx and SiO2) to enhance the field in the absorber at the lasing wavelength of 980 nm. The absorption bandedge at room temperature is detuned (965 nm) compared to the resonance (980 nm), which enables temperature-tuning of the modulation depth and saturation fluence from approximately 2.5% up to 15% and from 20 μJ/cm2 to 1.1 μJ/cm2, respectively.

  4. Chaos synchronization in vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser based on rotated polarization-preserved optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazhan, Salam; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Busawon, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of the rotating polarization-preserved optical feedback on the chaos synchronization of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is investigated experimentally. Two VCSELs' polarization modes (XP) and (YP) are gradually rotated and re-injected back into the VCSEL. The anti-phase dynamics synchronization of the two polarization modes is evaluated using the cross-correlation function. For a fixed optical feedback, a clear relationship is found between the cross-correlation coefficient and the polarization angle θp. It is shown that high-quality anti-phase polarization-resolved chaos synchronization is achieved at higher values of θp. The maximum value of the cross-correlation coefficient achieved is -0.99 with a zero time delay over a wide range of θp beyond 65° with a poor synchronization dynamic at θp less than 65°. Furthermore, it is observed that the antiphase irregular oscillation of the XP and YP modes changes with θp. VCSEL under the rotating polarization optical feedback can be a good candidate as a chaotic synchronization source for a secure communication system.

  5. Polarization behavior of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers under the influence of in-plane anisotropic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Michael; Panajotov, Krassimir P.; Verschaffelt, Guy; Nagler, Bob; Albert, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Veretennicoff, Irina P.; Danckaert, Jan

    2002-06-01

    It is well known that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can abruptly switch between two orthogonal linear polarization states if the current is changed. The impact of externally induced in-plane anisotropic strain on this switching was experimentally demonstrated in proton-implanted devices. In this contribution we present a further and thorough experimental investigation of the polarization behavior of different types of VCSELs (proton-implanted, air-post and oxide-confined), under varying strain conditions. We first measure the influence of the strain on the orientation of the axes of the linear polarization states. These axes can be rotated from the crystallographic direction [110] over [100] to [110]. At the same time, we monitor the exact birefringence. From the combination of these two measurements the amount of residual strain in these devices is deduced. Applying strain not only changes the frequency splitting between the two modes (due to birefringence) and their orientation, but also lifts the degeneracy in the gain of the polarization modes. We therefore also measure the gain difference (dichroism) as a function of the applied strain, via the mode suppression ratio and the optical spectrum. Due to the effect on both the birefringence and the dichroism, strain also changes the position of the polarization switching point as a function of current and can lead to the observation of double (consecutive) polarization switching. All this experimental evidence will help to build up a better understanding of the physics of polarization switching in VCSELs.

  6. Continuous sensing of tumor-targeted molecular probes with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashurama, Natesh; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; De La Zerda, Adam; El Kalassi, Pascale; Cho, Seongjae; Liu, Hongguang; Teed, Robert; Levy, Hart; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Cheng, Zhen; Levi, Ofer; Harris, James S.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2012-11-01

    Molecular optical imaging is a widespread technique for interrogating molecular events in living subjects. However, current approaches preclude long-term, continuous measurements in awake, mobile subjects, a strategy crucial in several medical conditions. Consequently, we designed a novel, lightweight miniature biosensor for in vivo continuous optical sensing. The biosensor contains an enclosed vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser and an adjacent pair of near-infrared optically filtered detectors. We employed two sensors (dual sensing) to simultaneously interrogate normal and diseased tumor sites. Having established the sensors are precise with phantom and in vivo studies, we performed dual, continuous sensing in tumor (human glioblastoma cells) bearing mice using the targeted molecular probe cRGD-Cy5.5, which targets αVβ3 cell surface integrins in both tumor neovasculature and tumor. The sensors capture the dynamic time-activity curve of the targeted molecular probe. The average tumor to background ratio after signal calibration for cRGD-Cy5.5 injection is approximately 2.43±0.95 at 1 h and 3.64±1.38 at 2 h (N=5 mice), consistent with data obtained with a cooled charge coupled device camera. We conclude that our novel, portable, precise biosensor can be used to evaluate both kinetics and steady state levels of molecular probes in various disease applications.

  7. Bistability characteristics of different types of optical modes amplified by quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasaimeh, Omar

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the characteristics of optical bistability of different types of optical modes amplified by small-size quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers operated in reflection. Our analysis reveals that TE01 mode exhibits stronger intensity-dependent non-linearity in small radius devices, which results in stronger optical phase modulation and therefore larger hysteresis width compared with the other modes. The effect of the wavelength detuning of the input signal on the shape of the hysteresis loop is studied. We find that butterfly hysteresis loop exhibits the largest hysteresis width compared with clockwise and counterclockwise loops. Our analysis reveals that doping the quantum dots with p-type doping slightly reduces the hysteresis width while doping the dots with n-type doping clearly increases the hysteresis width for any wavelength detuning. We estimate that the hysteresis width of quantum dot active layer will exhibit higher hysteresis width compared with quantum well active layer having the same threshold gain.

  8. Continuous sensing of tumor-targeted molecular probes with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Parashurama, Natesh; O’Sullivan, Thomas D.; De La Zerda, Adam; El Kalassi, Pascale; Cho, Seongjae; Liu, Hongguang; Teed, Robert; Levy, Hart; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Cheng, Zhen; Levi, Ofer; Harris, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Molecular optical imaging is a widespread technique for interrogating molecular events in living subjects. However, current approaches preclude long-term, continuous measurements in awake, mobile subjects, a strategy crucial in several medical conditions. Consequently, we designed a novel, lightweight miniature biosensor for in vivo continuous optical sensing. The biosensor contains an enclosed vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser and an adjacent pair of near-infrared optically filtered detectors. We employed two sensors (dual sensing) to simultaneously interrogate normal and diseased tumor sites. Having established the sensors are precise with phantom and in vivo studies, we performed dual, continuous sensing in tumor (human glioblastoma cells) bearing mice using the targeted molecular probe cRGD-Cy5.5, which targets αVβ3 cell surface integrins in both tumor neovasculature and tumor. The sensors capture the dynamic time-activity curve of the targeted molecular probe. The average tumor to background ratio after signal calibration for cRGD-Cy5.5 injection is approximately 2.43±0.95 at 1 h and 3.64±1.38 at 2 h (N=5 mice), consistent with data obtained with a cooled charge coupled device camera. We conclude that our novel, portable, precise biosensor can be used to evaluate both kinetics and steady state levels of molecular probes in various disease applications. PMID:23123976

  9. The transverse instability in a differentially heated vertical cavity filled with molecular radiating gases. I. Linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borget, V.; Bdéoui, F.; Soufiani, A.; Le Quéré, P.

    2001-05-01

    Radiation effects on the onset of the transverse instability in a differentially heated vertical cavity containing molecular emitting and absorbing gases in the so-called conduction regime is studied theoretically. Radiative transfer is treated using the full integro-differential formulation. The neutral stability curves are determined using a combined Galerkin-collocation method based on Chebyshev polynomials. A modified correlated-k model and the absorption distribution function model are used in order to take into account the spectral structure of the absorption coefficient for radiating molecules such as H2O and CO2. For transparent media, perfect agreement is found with the available data reported in the literature and, particularly, the principle of exchange of stability is found to hold for Prandtl number values less than 12.46. The study of gray media allows us to examine the basic mechanisms that yield to the onset of transverse instability as traveling waves. For real radiating gases, a parametric study for H2O and CO2 is reported. It is shown that the radiative transfer delays the onset of the transverse instability and this delay increases with temperature and decreases with boundary emissivities, while layer depth effects depend on the level of saturation of the gas active absorption bands. Whatever the gas considered, it is found that neither radiation effect on the basic flow nor the radiative power disturbances can be neglected.

  10. Upstream vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers for fault monitoring and localization in WDM passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elaine; Zhao, Xiaoxue; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2008-04-01

    As wavelength division multiplexed passive optical networks (WDM-PONs) are expected to be first deployed to transport high capacity services to business customers, real-time knowledge of fiber/device faults and the location of such faults will be a necessity to guarantee reliability. Nonetheless, the added benefit of implementing fault monitoring capability should only incur minimal cost associated with upgrades to the network. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a fault monitoring and localization scheme based on a highly-sensitive and potentially low-cost monitor in conjunction with vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The VCSELs are used as upstream transmitters in the WDM-PON. The proposed scheme benefits from the high reflectivity of the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror of optical injection-locked (OIL) VCSELs to reflect monitoring channels back to the central office for monitoring. Characterization of the fault monitor demonstrates high sensitivity, low bandwidth requirements, and potentially low output power. The added advantage of the proposed fault monitoring scheme incurs only a 0.5 dB penalty on the upstream transmissions on the existing infrastructure.

  11. Retinal, anterior segment and full eye imaging using ultrahigh speed swept source OCT with vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers

    PubMed Central

    Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J.; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Lu, Chen D.; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex E.; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate swept source OCT utilizing vertical-cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) technology for in vivo high speed retinal, anterior segment and full eye imaging. The MEMS tunable VCSEL enables long coherence length, adjustable spectral sweep range and adjustable high sweeping rate (50–580 kHz axial scan rate). These features enable integration of multiple ophthalmic applications into one instrument. The operating modes of the device include: ultrahigh speed, high resolution retinal imaging (up to 580 kHz); high speed, long depth range anterior segment imaging (100 kHz) and ultralong range full eye imaging (50 kHz). High speed imaging enables wide-field retinal scanning, while increased light penetration at 1060 nm enables visualization of choroidal vasculature. Comprehensive volumetric data sets of the anterior segment from the cornea to posterior crystalline lens surface are also shown. The adjustable VCSEL sweep range and rate make it possible to achieve an extremely long imaging depth range of ~50 mm, and to demonstrate the first in vivo 3D OCT imaging spanning the entire eye for non-contact measurement of intraocular distances including axial eye length. Swept source OCT with VCSEL technology may be attractive for next generation integrated ophthalmic OCT instruments. PMID:23162712

  12. Dual-wavelength vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser: strict growth control and scalable design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasik, Agata; Sokół, Adam Kamil; Broda, Artur; Sankowska, Iwona; Wójcik-Jedlińska, Anna; Wasiak, Michał; Kubacka-Traczyk, Justyna; Muszalski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the design and fabrication of a dual-wavelength vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Grown by molecular beam epitaxy, the laser structures have a relatively simple active region divided into two sections, between which there is no optical filter. Comparable threshold power was achieved for both wavelengths. The growth rate was controlled precisely by growing AlAs/GaAs superlattices with different period thicknesses and testing them with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry. The simultaneous emission of two wavelengths was detected in setup without a heat spreader, one of 991 nm and the other of 1038 nm. After diamond heat spreader was bonded, both wavelengths lased in continuous-wave mode with the combined output power of 1.79 W. The design scalability allowed us to obtain two further structures with layers thinned by about 3 % in the first and by about 6 % in the second, operating at 958/1011 and 928/977 nm, respectively.

  13. Frequency-induced polarization bistability in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with orthogonal optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gatare, I.; Panajotov, K.; Sciamanna, M.

    2007-02-15

    We report theoretically on a pure frequency-induced polarization bistability in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the master laser light polarization is orthogonal to that of the slave VCSEL. As the frequency detuning is scanned from negative to positive values and for a fixed injected power, the VCSEL exhibits two successive and possibly bistable polarization switchings. The first switching (from the slave laser polarization to the injected light polarization) exhibits a bistable region whose width is maximum for a given value of the injected power. Such a dependency of hysteresis width on the injected power is similar to that recently found experimentally by Hong et al.[Electron. Lett. 36, 2019 (2000)]. The bistability accompanying the second switching (from the injected light polarization back to the slave laser free-running polarization) exhibits, however, significantly different features related to the occurrence of optical chaos. Interestingly, the width of the bistable region can be tuned over a large range not only by modifying the injection parameters but also by modifying the device parameters, in particular the VCSEL linewidth enhancement factor.

  14. Harmonic distortion dependent on optical feedback, temperature and injection current in a vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazhan, Salam; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Busawon, Krishna

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, selective optical feedback is used to investigate the nonlinearity behaviours of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with the modulation signal. A single mode VCSEL with both parallel and orthogonal optical feedback (OF) signals modulated at 1 MHz frequency over a range of modulation depth is investigated. We also investigate the nonlinear characteristics of the orthogonal polarization modes XP and YP of the VCSEL by changing the injection current and temperature. The results show an enhancement in the harmonic distortions (HDs) of both XP and YP modes with parallel OF, and the total suppression of HDs with orthogonal OF. We show that for the VCSEL with orthogonal OF, the second and third harmonic components of the XP and YP modes decrease and reach the noise floor level of the output power spectrum. Additionally, peaks of second and third harmonic components change radically when varying the bias current and temperature. The results reveal that orthogonal OF can be employed as a new tool to improve the linear dynamic range and to control the nonlinear characteristics of the VCSEL, thus making these devices a promising optical source in present and future optical communication applications.

  15. In-well pumped mid-infrared PbTe/CdTe quantum well vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiar, A.; Volobuev, V.; Witzan, M.; Hochreiner, A.; Eibelhuber, M.; Springholz, G.

    2014-06-01

    Optical in-well pumped mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers based on PbTe quantum wells embedded in CdTe barriers are realized. In contrast to the usual ternary barrier materials of lead salt lasers such as PbEuTe of PbSrTe, the combination of narrow-gap PbTe with wide-gap CdTe offers an extremely large carrier confinement, preventing charge carrier leakage from the quantum wells. In addition, optical in-well pumping can be achieved with cost effective and readily available near infrared lasers. Free carrier absorption, which is a strong loss mechanism in the mid-infrared, is strongly reduced due to the insulating property of CdTe. Lasing is observed from 85 K to 300 K covering a wavelength range of 3.3-4.2 μm. The best laser performance is achieved for quantum well thicknesses of 20 nm. At low temperature, the threshold power is around 100 mWP and the output power more than 700 mWP. The significance of various charge carrier loss mechanisms are analyzed by modeling the device performance. Although Auger losses are quite low in IV-VI semiconductors, an Auger coefficient of CA = 3.5 × 10-27 cm6 s-1 was estimated for the laser structure, which is attributed to the large conduction band offset.

  16. Spectral dynamics of picosecond gain-switched pulses from nitride-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Ito, Takashi; Asahara, Akifumi; Yoshita, Masahiro; Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Jiangyong; Zhang, Baoping; Suemoto, Tohru; Akiyama, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Short pulses generated from low-cost semiconductor lasers by a simple gain-switching technique have attracted enormous attention because of their potential usage in wide applications. Therein, reducing the durations of gain-switched pulses is a key technical point for promoting their applications. Therefore, understanding the dynamic characteristics of gain-switched pulses is highly desirable. Herein, we used streak camera to investigate the time- and spectral-resolved lasing characteristics of gain-switched pulses from optically pumped InGaN single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. We found that fast initial components with ultra-short durations far below our temporal resolution of 5.5 ps emerged on short-wavelength sides, while the entire pulses were down-chirped, resulting in the simultaneous broadening of the spectrum and pulse width. The measured chirp characteristics were quantitatively explained using a single-mode rate-equation model, combined with carrier-density-dependent gain and index models. The observed universal fast short-wavelength components can be useful in generating even shorter pulses from gain-switched semiconductor lasers. PMID:24710268

  17. Study on effect of quantum well number on performance characteristics of GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi Goharrizi, A.; Alahyarizadeh, Gh.; Hassan, Z.; Abu Hassan, H.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of number of quantum wells and quantum well thickness on the optical performance of InGaN vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) was numerically investigated using Integrated System Engineering Technical Computer Aided Design (ISE TCAD) simulation program. The simulation results indicated that the output power and differential quantum efficiency of the double quantum well (DQW) laser were increased and threshold current decreased as compared to the single and triplet quantum wells VCSEL. Threshold current enhancement in the single quantum well (SQW) is attributed to the electron carrier leakage increasing from active layers because of the lower optical confinement factor. Simulation results show that in the double quantum well, the optical material gain and electron and hole carrier densities are approximately uniform with respect to the SQW and TQW. Also these results indicated that the electron current density in the DQW is the lowest. In the active region, electrical field decreased for the double quantum well because of the built-in electrical field reduction inside the quantum well. Finally the effect of quantum well thickness in DQW GaN-based VCSEL was investigated and it was observed that DQW VCSEL with 3 nm quantum wells thickness had the optimum threshold current.

  18. High-power vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with an optimized p-contact diameter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Ning, Yongqiang; Qin, Li; Wang, Ye; Cui, Jinjiang; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Zhenfu; Sun, Yanfang; Liu, Yun; Wang, Lijun

    2010-07-01

    A 980 nm bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a p-contact diameter is reported to achieve high power and good beam quality. A numerical simulation is conducted on the current spreading in a VCSEL with oxidation between the active region and the p-type distributed Bragg reflector. It is found that, for a particular oxide aperture diameter, somewhat homogeneous current distribution can be achieved for a VCSEL with an optimized p-contact diameter. The far-field divergence angle from a 600 microm diameter VCSEL is suppressed from 30 degrees to 15 degrees, and no strong sidelobe is observed in the far-field pattern by using the optimized p-contact diameter. There is a slight rise in threshold and optical output power that is due to the p-contact optimization. By improving the device packaging method, the maximum optical output power of the device is 2.01 W. PMID:20648149

  19. Power scaling and beam divergence compression of bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Ning, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jianwei; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jinsheng; Jia, Peng; Li, Xiushan; Shi, Jingjing; Qin, Li; Liu, Yun; Tong, Cunzhu; Wang, Lijun

    2013-09-01

    Power scaling and beam divergence compression of 980 nm bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presented in this paper. First, the relationships among the reflectivity of the n-doped distributed Bragg reflector, threshold current, and output power were analyzed, and the n-DBR reflectivity was optimized to achieve higher slope efficiency in a relatively low threshold current. Second, the influence of the p-contact on the current density distribution inside the active region was analyzed using the three-dimensional finite-element method. Uniform current distribution was achieved by optimizing the diameter of the p-contact, and a consequent improvement in beam divergence was observed. A low divergence of 5.4° was obtained for a single device with continuous-wave (CW) of 1.46 W at room temperature. The 8×8 VCSEL array showed a divergence angle of 10.2° at 4A. This array afforded a CW output power of 1.95 W under an injected current of 4 A and a pulse output power of 115 W under a pulse drive current of 130 A, a pulse width of 100 ns, and a repetition frequency of 100 Hz. VCSEL array chips were packaged in series to form a "quasi-array" to further increase the output power. This series achieved a peak output power of 475 W under a pulse drive current of 120 A.

  20. Tunable high-power high-brightness vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li

    The extraction of high power with high beam quality from semiconductor lasers has long been a goal of semiconductor laser research. Optically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) have already shown the potential for their high power high brightness operation. In addition, the macroscopic nature of the external cavity in these lasers makes intracavity nonlinear frequency conversion quite convenient. High-power high-brightness VECSELs with wavelength flexibility enlarge their applications. The drawbacks of the VECSELs are their poor spectral characteristics, thermal-induced wavelength shift and a few-nm-wide linewidth. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate tunable high-power high-brightness VECSELs with spectral and polarization control. The low gain and microcavity resonance of the VECSEL are the major challenges for developing tunable high-power VECSELs with large tunability. To overcome these challenges, the V-shaped cavity, where the anti-reflection coated VECSEL chip serves as a folding mirror, and an extremely low-loss (at tuned wavelength) intracavity birefringent filter at Brewster's angle are employed to achieved the high gain, low-loss wavelength selectivity and the elimination of microcavity. This cavity results in multi-watt TEM00 VECSELs with a wavelength tuning range of 20˜30 nm about 975 nm. Also the longitudinal mode discrimination introduced by birefringent filter makes the linewidth narrow down to 0.5 nm. After the tunable linearly polarized fundamental beam is achieved, the tunable blue-green VECSELs are demonstrated by using type I intracavity second-harmonic generation. The spectral control of VECSELs makes it possible to apply them as an efficient pump source for Er/Yb codoped single-mode fiber laser and to realize the spectral beam combining for multi-wavelength high-brightness power scaling. In this dissertation, theory, design, fabrication and characterization are presented. Rigorous microscopic

  1. Birefringence controlled room-temperature picosecond spin dynamics close to the threshold of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. Y.; Jähme, H.; Soldat, H.; Gerhardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.; Ackemann, T.

    2010-11-01

    We analyze the spin-induced circular polarization dynamics at the threshold of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers at room-temperature using a hybrid excitation combining electrically pumping without spin preference and spin-polarized optical injection. After a short pulse of spin-polarized excitation, fast oscillations of the circular polarization degree (CPD) are observed within the relaxation oscillations. A theoretical investigation of this behavior on the basis of a rate equation model shows that these fast oscillations of CPD could be suppressed by means of a reduction of the birefringence of the laser cavity.

  2. Characteristics of bistable localized emission states in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguy, Y.; Ackemann, T.; Jaeger, R.

    2006-11-15

    Small-area bistable lasing spots (about 10 {mu}m full width at half maximum) can be created at different positions within the aperture of a broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (aperture diameter 80 {mu}m) with frequency-selective feedback from a grating in Littrow configuration, and an additional pinhole localizing feedback to a part of the laser. Their characteristics are analyzed depending on the grating tuning, injection current, and feedback strength. These spots are considered to be good candidates for self-localized cavity solitons, if the perturbation by boundaries can be reduced using devices with larger diameter.

  3. High-power temperature-insensitive gain-offset InGaAs/GaAs vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.B.; Scott, J.W.; Peters, F.H.; Thibeault, B.J.; Corzine, S.W.; Peters, M.G.; Lee, S.L.; Coldren, L.A. )

    1993-02-01

    The authors have grown 997 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with an offset between the wavelength of the cavity mode and the quantum well gain peak to improve high temperature operation, and with higher aluminum-content barriers around the active region to improve the carrier confinement. They fabricated lasers of 8-15 and 20 [mu]m diameters. The 8[mu]m diameter devices exhibited CW operation up to 140 C with little change in threshold current from 15 C, and the 20[mu]m diameter devices showed CW output power of 11 mW at 25 C without significant heat-sinking.

  4. In-well pumped mid-infrared PbTe/CdTe quantum well vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Khiar, A. Witzan, M.; Hochreiner, A.; Eibelhuber, M.; Springholz, G.; Volobuev, V.

    2014-06-09

    Optical in-well pumped mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers based on PbTe quantum wells embedded in CdTe barriers are realized. In contrast to the usual ternary barrier materials of lead salt lasers such as PbEuTe of PbSrTe, the combination of narrow-gap PbTe with wide-gap CdTe offers an extremely large carrier confinement, preventing charge carrier leakage from the quantum wells. In addition, optical in-well pumping can be achieved with cost effective and readily available near infrared lasers. Free carrier absorption, which is a strong loss mechanism in the mid-infrared, is strongly reduced due to the insulating property of CdTe. Lasing is observed from 85 K to 300 K covering a wavelength range of 3.3–4.2 μm. The best laser performance is achieved for quantum well thicknesses of 20 nm. At low temperature, the threshold power is around 100 mW{sub P} and the output power more than 700 mW{sub P}. The significance of various charge carrier loss mechanisms are analyzed by modeling the device performance. Although Auger losses are quite low in IV–VI semiconductors, an Auger coefficient of C{sub A} = 3.5 × 10{sup −27} cm{sup 6} s{sup −1} was estimated for the laser structure, which is attributed to the large conduction band offset.

  5. Polarization mode structure in long-wavelength wafer-fused vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volet, N.; Iakovlev, V.; Sirbu, A.; Caliman, A.; Suruceanu, G.; Mereuta, A.; Kapon, E.

    2012-06-01

    Applications of long-wavelength (λ > 1 μm) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) generally require close control over wavelength and polarization of the emitted light. In most cases, single mode and polarization stable lasing is desired. We report here on the detailed modal analysis of wafer-fused 1550-nm wavelength VCSELs incorporating an AlGaInAs/InP active region, a re-grown circular tunnel junction (TJ) and undoped AlGaAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). We experimentally determined the diameter of the TJ that optimizes the output power and threshold current, finding a value between 7.0 μm and 9.5 μm depending on the temperature. Moreover, we investigated the impact of the TJ aperture diameter on the mode structure. A large batch of devices was investigated, allowing drawing conclusions on typical behavior of these devices. The measured emission spectra show that the fundamental spatial mode is split into two orthogonal polarization modes, which are spectrally separated in wavelength by δ, used as a birefringence parameter. We observed that this parameter is independent of current but depends on the particular chip, suggesting that it is caused by stress, growth inhomogeneities, or etched mesa shape. The higher order spatial modes show similar polarization doublets with a splitting also equal to δ. This suggests that the birefringence results from effects not particular to the mechanism of mode confinement. Finally, the spectral separation Δ01 between the fundamental mode and the first-order transverse mode increases linearly with current, with a slope that depends only on the TJ aperture diameter. This confirms that the mode confinement is induced by the structured TJ, and possibly also by the temperature distribution induced by the current injection.

  6. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. T.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Megalini, L.; Lee, S.; Speck, J. S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ˜22 kA/cm2 (25 mA), with a peak output power of ˜180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP12,1), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture.

  7. Record low-threshold index-guided InGaAs/GaAlAs vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a native oxide confinement structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Mukaihara, T.; Hatori, N.; Ohnoki, N.; Matsutani, A.; Koyama, F.; Iga, K.

    1995-03-01

    An index-guided InGaAs/GaAlAs vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a native oxide confinement structure has been proposed and fabricated. A record threshold current of 70 micro A was achieved with a 5 micron-diameter core device. The proposed structure provides strong electrical and optical confinements. Also a reduction in nonradiative recombination and an improvement in the thermal resistance can be expected.

  8. Measurement of refractive index and size of microparticles by optical traps generated by vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Richard A.

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool in the biological sciences for manipulating cells, bacteria, viruses and organelles within cells. Optical traps can measure tiny biological forces on the order of picoNewtons or less. Currently particle manipulation and force measurement are the two main applications of optical traps. Conventional optical traps are generated by large expensive lasers aligned to full sized laboratory microscopes. In this era lab-on-a-chip bioanalysis technologies, the trapping laser must be miniaturized while the analysis capabilities of optical traps should be expanded to address a larger span of applications. The research that forms the basis of this dissertation involves the use of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) that are compact and arrayable for optical trapping and toward the development of a new and parallel method to measure the refractive index and size of a particle within an optical trap. The current best technique for measuring refractive index of a microparticle, refractometry, requires changing the fluid composition of the sample. The proposed optical trap technique works with any transparent fluid, a significant advantage for biological analysis. VCSEL arrays are applied to create arrays of optical traps. VCSEL arrays offer a low cost, low power, compact and arrayable solution to creating many simultaneous optical traps in parallel. VCSEL traps are shown to manipulate 3x3 arrays of biological cells. Cell types manipulated include red blood cells, yeast cells, NIH 3T3 Murine fibroblasts and rat primary hepatocytes. Forces exerted by VCSEL traps are quantified. Scaling of the array size is analyzed. VCSEL traps are applied to creating a co-culture of fibroblasts and hepatocytes, enabling the study of intracellular communication. Finally, VCSELS are shown to cause negligible damage to hepatocytes after 5 min exposure. The counter-propagating optical trap measurement (COTM) system extends the capabilities of optical

  9. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications. PMID:27036765

  10. Characterization of 2.3 μm GaInAsSb-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structures using photo-modulated reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, G. M. T.; Hosea, T. J. C.; Fox, N. E.; Hild, K.; Ikyo, A. B.; Marko, I. P.; Sweeney, S. J.; Bachmann, A.; Arafin, S.; Amann, M.-C.

    2014-01-07

    We report angle dependent and temperature dependent (9 K–300 K) photo-modulated reflectance (PR) studies on vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures, designed for 2.3 μm mid-infrared gas sensing applications. Changing the temperature allows us to tune the energies of the quantum well (QW) transitions relative to the VCSEL cavity mode (CM) energy. These studies show that this VCSEL structure has a QW-CM offset of 21 meV at room temperature. Consequently the QW ground-state transition comes into resonance with the CM at 220 ± 2 K. The results from these PR studies are closely compared with those obtained in a separate study of actual operating devices and show how the PR technique may be useful for device optimisation without the necessity of having first to process the wafers into working devices.

  11. Long wavelength (1.3 {mu}m) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with a wafer-bonded mirror and an oxygen-implanted confinement region

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Y.; Zhu, Z.H.; Lo, Y.H.; Huffaker, D.L.; Deppe, D.G.; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Lin, W.; Tu, Y.K.

    1997-07-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a novel design for long wavelength (1.3 {mu}m) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). In this design, oxygen-implanted current-confinement regions were formed in a GaAs/AlGaAs Bragg reflector which is the bottom mirror wafer bonded to an AlGaInAs/InP cavity consisting of nine strain-compensated quantum wells. Room- temperature continuous-wave (cw) operation of 1.3 {mu}m-VCSELs with a record low cw threshold current density of 1.57kA/cm{sup 2} and a record low cw threshold current of 1 mA have been realized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  13. Quasi-bichromatic laser for a lin⊥lin coherent population trapping clock produced by vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Peter; Tan, Bozhong; Deng, Wei; Yang, Jing; Gu, Sihong

    2012-09-01

    With two vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers working under the master-slave sideband injection-locking configuration, we have realized a quasi-bichromatic laser beam with residual phase noise Δϕ2 < 0.282 rad2. The two wanted frequency components share more than 96% power of the beam. With the realized beam, we have carried out coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance experiment with 87Rb in the lin⊥lin CPT scheme, and recorded CPT resonance signal with contrast of 60%. Such laser system is promising to realize a lin⊥lin CPT clock with high performance and low power consumption.

  14. GaSb-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with an emission wavelength at 3 μm.

    PubMed

    Andrejew, Alexander; Sprengel, Stephan; Amann, Markus-Christian

    2016-06-15

    GaSb-based electrically pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with a buried tunnel junction emitting at 3 μm are demonstrated. To achieve this, a low optical loss VCSEL concept with an undoped epitaxial distributed Bragg reflector and intracavity contact is presented. The devices operate up to 5°C continuous wave and up to 50°C in pulsed mode. Single-mode operation with a side-mode suppression ratio of 30 dB and electro-thermal tuning range of 19.7 nm is achieved. PMID:27304292

  15. Continuous wave operation of high power GaN-based blue vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Tatsushi; Fuutagawa, Noriyuki; Izumi, Shouichiro; Murayama, Masahiro; Narui, Hironobu

    2016-02-01

    We have succeeded in achieving continuous-wave operation of gallium nitride (GaN) based vertical-cavity surfaceemitting lasers (VCSELs), which was fabricated by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) using dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors(DBRs) as masks for selective growth. The device exhibited CW operation at a wavelength of 453.9nm. The maximum output power was 1.1 mW, which is the highest value reported in previously published articles. The ELO process used for this study represents a breakthrough for challenges which were indicated by other former reports for GaN-based VCSELs and is suitable for mass production.

  16. Low-speckle laser projection with a broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser in the nonmodal emission regime.

    PubMed

    Riechert, Falko; Craggs, Gordon; Meuret, Youri; Van Giel, Bart; Thienpont, Hugo; Lemmer, Uli; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate low-speckle laser projection using a broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) emitting at 840 nm wavelength as the illumination source. By driving the source in a nonmodal emission regime, we were able to achieve speckle contrast values as low as 3.5% in a realistic projection setup. This was done by driving the VCSEL with specific current pulses without using any additional or mechanically moving components to destroy the coherence of the laser beam. We quantitatively model the speckle contrast reduction based on polarization scrambling and the reduced temporal and spatial coherence of the VCSEL. PMID:19183610

  17. Vertical-coupled high-efficiency tunable III-V- CMOS SOI hybrid external-cavity laser.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiyun; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Cunningham, John E; Shubin, Ivan; Luo, Ying; Yao, Jin; Li, Guoliang; Thacker, Hiren; Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Raj, Kannan; Zheng, Xuezhe; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2013-12-30

    We demonstrate a hybrid III-V/SOI laser by vertically coupling a III-V RSOA chip with a SOI-CMOS chip containing a tunable wavelength selective reflector. We report a waveguide-coupled wall-plug-efficiency of 5.5% and output power of 10 mW. A silicon resistor-based microheater was integrated to thermally tune a ring resonator for precise lasing wavelength control. A high tuning efficiency of 2.2 nm/mW over a range of 18 nm was achieved by locally removing the SOI handler substrate. C-band single mode lasing was confirmed with a side mode suppression ratio of 35 dB. This grating coupler based vertical integration approach can be scaled up in two dimensions for efficient multi-wavelength sources in silicon photonics. PMID:24514836

  18. Anomalous lasing of high-speed 850 nm InGaAlAs oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with a large negative gain-to-cavity wavelength detuning

    SciTech Connect

    Blokhin, S. A. Bobrov, M. A.; Maleev, N. A.; Sakharov, A. V.; Ustinov, V. M.; Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Blokhin, A. A.; Moser, P.; Lott, J. A.; Bimberg, D.

    2014-08-11

    The impact of a large negative quantum well gain-to-cavity etalon wavelength detuning on the static and dynamic characteristics of 850 nm InGaAlAs high-speed oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) was investigated. Three distinct lasing regimes were revealed in large square aperture (≥7 μm per side) devices with large detuning including: (1) an anomalous lasing via higher order Hermite–Gaussian modes at low forward bias current; (2) lasing via the lowest order Hermite–Gaussian modes at high bias current; and (3) simultaneous lasing via both types of transverse modes at intermediate bias currents. In contrast to conventional multimode VCSELs a two-resonance modulation response was observed for the case of co-lasing via multiple transverse modes with high spectral separation. The reduction in the oxide aperture area resulted in classical lasing via the lowest order modes with a conventional single-resonance frequency response.

  19. Three-dimensional study of macro- and mesosegregation formation in a rectangular cavity cooled from one vertical side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, V. F.; Tveito, K. O.; Založnik, M.; Combeau, H.; M'Hamdi, M.

    2012-07-01

    In metal alloys the solidification process leads to heterogeneities in chemical composition, which result in macroscopic (on the scale of the product) and mesoscopic (on the scale of several grains) segregation structures in the casting. Mesosegregations are a severe form of segregation in which solute concentration changes abruptly with respect to the surrounding regions and can induce structural heterogeneities in the casting. In this paper we move on from [1,2], in which channel mesosegregations and their numerical prediction were studied on a two-dimensional configuration - a small (10 × 6 cm) ingot of a Sn-10wt%Pb binary alloy. We extend the study to a slender three-dimensional cavity (10 × 6 × 1 cm) and we investigate three-dimensional effects in the formation of channel mesosegregations in a columnar mushy zone. We investigate the effects of the three-dimensionality on the structure of channels in the mushy zone and of channel mesosegregations. We present the influence of the permeability of the mushy zone on the channel structures. We show that channels can form either as lamellar or as tubular structures: at higher permeability secondary instabilities across the cavity thickness promote a transition from lamellar to tubular channels.

  20. In-vitro detection of artificial caries on vertical dental cavity walls using infrared photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen H; Vu, Jaclyn T; Amaechi, Bennett T

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the ability of frequency-domain photothermal radiometry (PTR) and modulated luminescence (LUM) to detect secondary caries lesions on the walls of restorations (wall lesions). Changes in experimental PTR-LUM signals due to sequential demineralization on entire vertical walls of sectioned tooth samples were investigated. In addition, transverse micro-radiography (TMR) analysis (used as a gold standard) was conducted to measure the degree of demineralization that occurred in each sample. Statistical correlation between TMR results and PTR-LUM signals was determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. LUM signals were found to be dominated by the scattered component of the incident laser beam. The more clinically relevant cases of localized demineralization and remineralization on vertical walls were also investigated to examine whether PTR-LUM signals are sensitive to demineralization and remineralization of much smaller areas. The overall results demonstrated that PTR-LUM is sensitive to progressive demineralization and remineralization on vertical walls of sectioned tooth samples. PMID:23203324

  1. In-vitro detection of artificial caries on vertical dental cavity walls using infrared photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen H.; Vu, Jaclyn T.; Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the ability of frequency-domain photothermal radiometry (PTR) and modulated luminescence (LUM) to detect secondary caries lesions on the walls of restorations (wall lesions). Changes in experimental PTR-LUM signals due to sequential demineralization on entire vertical walls of sectioned tooth samples were investigated. In addition, transverse micro-radiography (TMR) analysis (used as a gold standard) was conducted to measure the degree of demineralization that occurred in each sample. Statistical correlation between TMR results and PTR-LUM signals was determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. LUM signals were found to be dominated by the scattered component of the incident laser beam. The more clinically relevant cases of localized demineralization and remineralization on vertical walls were also investigated to examine whether PTR-LUM signals are sensitive to demineralization and remineralization of much smaller areas. The overall results demonstrated that PTR-LUM is sensitive to progressive demineralization and remineralization on vertical walls of sectioned tooth samples.

  2. Low threshold continuous-wave lasing of yellow-green InGaN-QD vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Weng, Guoen; Mei, Yang; Liu, Jianping; Hofmann, Werner; Ying, Leiying; Zhang, Jiangyong; Bu, Yikun; Li, Zengcheng; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Baoping

    2016-07-11

    Low threshold continuous-wave (CW) lasing of current injected InGaN quantum dot (QD) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) was achieved at room temperature. The VCSEL was fabricated by metal bonding technique on a copper substrate to improve the heat dissipation ability of the device. For the first time, lasing was obtained at yellow-green wavelength of 560.4 nm with a low threshold of 0.61 mA, corresponding to a current density of 0.78 kA/cm2. A high degree of polarization of 94% were measured. Despite the operation in the range of "green gap" of GaN-based devices, single longitudinal mode laser emission was clearly achieved due to the high quality of active region based on InGaN QDs and the excellent thermal design of the VCSELs. PMID:27410828

  3. High-differential-quantum-efficiency, long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers using five-stage bipolar-cascade active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Koda, R.; Wang, C.S.; Lofgreen, D.D.; Coldren, L.A.

    2005-05-23

    We present five-stage bipolar-cascade vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers emitting at 1.54 {mu}m grown monolithically on an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A differential quantum efficiency of 120%, was measured with a threshold current density of 767 A/cm{sup 2} and voltage of 4.49 V, only 0.5 V larger than 5x0.8 V, the aggregate photon energy. Diffraction loss study on deeply etched pillars indicates that diffraction loss is a major loss mechanism for such multiple-active region devices larger than 20 {mu}m. We also report a model on the relationship of diffraction loss to the number of active stages.

  4. Type-II vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with Watt level output powers at 1.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, C.; Fuchs, C.; Berger, C.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Koch, M.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, W.

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor laser characteristics based on type-II band-aligned quantum well heterostructures for the emission at 1.2 μm are presented. Ten "W"-quantum wells consisting of GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs are arranged as resonant periodic gain in a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Its structure is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and reflectance measurements. The laser's power curves and spectra are investigated. Output powers at Watt level are achieved, with a maximum output power of 4 W. It is confirmed that laser operation only involves the type-II transition. A blue shift of the material gain is observed while the modal gain exhibits a red shift.

  5. AlGaAs/GaAs/InGaAs pnp-type vertical-cavity surface-emitting transistor-lasers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, C; Yu, X; Yang, C; Zabel, T; Hammar, M; Akram, M N

    2015-06-15

    We report on the design, fabrication and analysis of vertical-cavity surface-emitting transistor-lasers (T-VCSELs) based on the homogeneous integration of an InGaAs/GaAs VCSEL and an AlGaAs/GaAs pnp-heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Epitaxial regrowth confinement, modulation doping, intracavity contacting and non-conducting mirrors are used to ensure a low-loss structure, and a variety of design variations are investigated for a proper internal biasing and current injection to ensure a wide operating range. Optimized devices show mW-range output power, mA-range base threshold current and high-temperature operation to at least 60°C with the transistor in its active mode of operation for base currents well beyond threshold. Current confinement schemes based on pnp-blocking layers or a buried tunnel junction are investigated as well as asymmetric current injection for reduced extrinsic resistances. PMID:26193547

  6. Lasing-Polarization-Dependent Output from Orthogonal Waveguides in High-Index-Contrast Subwavelength Grating Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    We propose a high-index-contrast subwavelength grating vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (HCG-VCSEL) incorporating a polarization-independent HCG coupled with two orthogonal in-plane output waveguides and numerically investigate the optical output characteristics from the waveguides using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. The light coupled more strongly to the waveguide in the direction perpendicular to the polarization of the resonant mode than to that in the parallel direction. The extinction ratio between the waveguides was 11.9, indicating that the output waveguide can be switched by changing the lasing polarization. The propagating modes in the strongly and weakly coupled waveguides were the TE and TM modes, respectively.

  7. Efficient double intracavity-contacted vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with very low-threshold and low-power dissipation designed for cryogenic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Hains, C.P.; Cheng, J.; Allerman, A.A.

    2000-02-01

    Efficient continuous wave operation of oxide-confined double intracavity-contacted InGaAs-GaAs vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL's) with low-threshold voltage, low-threshold current and low-power dissipation has been achieved over a wide range of cryogenic temperatures (77 K--250 K). Low operating voltages were obtained by routing current through two intracavity contacts to bypass both distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirrors, while lower optical losses were achieved by using undoped DBR mirrors with abrupt heterointerfaces. This resulted in low operating voltages (<1.5 V), submillampere threshold currents (I{sub th} {approximately} 0.15 mA), low-power dissipation ({approximately} 0.21 mW at threshold) and a high power conversion efficiency ({eta}{sub eff} = 31%).

  8. Control of emitted light polarization in a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser subject to circularly polarized optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Hurtado, A.; Al Seyab, R. K.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M.

    2014-11-03

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the light polarization emitted by a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) at room temperature. This is achieved by means of a combination of polarized optical pumping and polarized optical injection. Without external injection, the polarization of the optical pump controls that of the spin-VCSEL. However, the addition of the externally injected signal polarized with either left- (LCP) or right-circular polarization (RCP) is able to control the polarization of the spin-VCSEL switching it at will to left- or right-circular polarization. A numerical model has been developed showing a very high degree of agreement with the experimental findings.

  9. Compact electro-absorption modulator integrated with vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalir, Hamed; Ahmed, Moustafa; Bakry, Ahmed; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate a compact electro-absorption slow-light modulator laterally-integrated with an 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), which enables highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation. We found a strong leaky travelling wave in the lateral direction between the two cavities via widening the waveguide width with a taper shape. The small signal response of the fabricated device shows a large enhancement of over 55 dB in the modulation amplitude at frequencies beyond 35 GHz; thanks to the photon-photon resonance. A large group index of over 150 in a Bragg reflector waveguide enables the resonance at millimeter wave frequencies for 25 μm long compact modulator. Based on the modeling, we expect a resonant modulation at a higher frequency of 70 GHz. The resonant modulation in a compact slow-light modulator plays a significant key role for high efficient narrow-band modulation in the millimeter wave range far beyond the intrinsic modulation bandwidth of VCSELs.

  10. The influence of quaternary electron blocking layer on the performance characteristics of intracavity-contacted oxide-confined InGaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharrizi, A. Zandi; Alahyarizadeh, Gh.; Hassan, Z.; Hassan, H. Abu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of electron blocking layer (EBL) on the performance characteristics of InGaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) was numerically investigated using an integrated system engineering technical computer aided design (ISE TCAD) simulation program. Simulation results indicated that the performance characteristics of InGaN quantum well VCSEL were improved by the ternary Al0.17Ga0.83N EBL. Better performance was also obtained when Al0.17Ga0.83N EBL was replaced by a polarization-matched Al0.275In0.115Ga0.61N EBL having the same energy bandgap. The quaternary EBL enhances the output power and differential quantum efficiency (DQE) as well as reduces the threshold current compared with the ternary EBL. Enhancement in the value of the optical intensity was also observed in the VCSEL structure with quaternary EBL. Furthermore, the effect of Al composition of AlInGaN EBL on the performance of InGaN-based VCSEL structure that uses the quaternary AlInGaN EBL was studied. In mole fraction was 0.115, Al mole fraction changed from 0.260 to 0.290 by step 0.005, and optimum performance was achieved in 0.275 Al mole fraction of AlInGaN EBL.

  11. Fabrication and alignment of large sapphire microlenses for use in electrically-injected GaN-based vertical-cavity laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Robert; Feezell, Daniel; Ishida, Masahiro; Newman, Scott; Cohen, Daniel; Nakamura, Shuji

    2007-03-01

    We have fabricated large sapphire microlenses for use in electrically-injected GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) applications. Thermally reflown photoresist microlenses are used as sacrificial masks for a BCl3/Cl2-based dry etch of sapphire. Sapphire microlenses with base diameters ranging from 10-250 μm and radii of curvature (ROC) ranging from 50-2000 μm are created by varying the initial thickness and diameter of the photoresist mask. Typical rms surface roughnesses of 1.5 å over 5.0 μm x 5.0 μm scan areas are achieved by utilizing specialized post-etch cleaning techniques. By coating the sapphire microlenses with dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and aligning them to current apertures on InGaN-based devices on the opposite side of the sapphire wafer, we have demonstrated a viable technique for making high-reflectivity concave micromirrors for use in electrically-injected GaN-based VCSELs.

  12. Demonstration of a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a III-nitride tunnel junction intracavity contact

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J. T. Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Margalith, T.; Speck, J. S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-08-31

    We report on a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a III-nitride tunnel junction (TJ) intracavity contact. The violet nonpolar VCSEL employing the TJ is compared to an equivalent VCSEL with a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contact. The TJ VCSEL shows a threshold current density (J{sub th}) of ∼3.5 kA/cm{sup 2}, compared to the ITO VCSEL J{sub th} of 8 kA/cm{sup 2}. The differential efficiency of the TJ VCSEL is also observed to be significantly higher than that of the ITO VCSEL, reaching a peak power of ∼550 μW, compared to ∼80 μW for the ITO VCSEL. Both VCSELs display filamentary lasing in the current aperture, which we believe to be predominantly a result of local variations in contact resistance, which may induce local variations in refractive index and free carrier absorption. Beyond the analyses of the lasing characteristics, we discuss the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth of the TJ, as well as its unexpected performance based on band-diagram simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the intrinsic advantages of using a TJ intracavity contact in a VCSEL using a 1D mode profile analysis to approximate the threshold modal gain and general loss contributions in the TJ and ITO VCSEL.

  13. Demonstration of a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a III-nitride tunnel junction intracavity contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Margalith, T.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-08-01

    We report on a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a III-nitride tunnel junction (TJ) intracavity contact. The violet nonpolar VCSEL employing the TJ is compared to an equivalent VCSEL with a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contact. The TJ VCSEL shows a threshold current density (Jth) of ˜3.5 kA/cm2, compared to the ITO VCSEL Jth of 8 kA/cm2. The differential efficiency of the TJ VCSEL is also observed to be significantly higher than that of the ITO VCSEL, reaching a peak power of ˜550 μW, compared to ˜80 μW for the ITO VCSEL. Both VCSELs display filamentary lasing in the current aperture, which we believe to be predominantly a result of local variations in contact resistance, which may induce local variations in refractive index and free carrier absorption. Beyond the analyses of the lasing characteristics, we discuss the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth of the TJ, as well as its unexpected performance based on band-diagram simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the intrinsic advantages of using a TJ intracavity contact in a VCSEL using a 1D mode profile analysis to approximate the threshold modal gain and general loss contributions in the TJ and ITO VCSEL.

  14. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser in the long-wavelength (700 nm) region in the visible by energy transfer between organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhifu; Zhou, Yuan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Wang, Zhiyu; Qian, Guodong

    2014-06-01

    In this work, organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with single-mode laser output in the long-wavelength region (~700 nm) of the visible were reported based on the energy transfer between dye pairs consisting of pyrromethene 597 (PM597) and rhodamine 700 (LD700). By co-doping PM597 into the polymeric hosts, the fluorescence intensity of LD700 was enhanced by 30-fold and the photophysical parameters of the donor-acceptor pairs were investigated, indicating the involvement of non-radiative resonance energy transfer processes between PM597 and LD700. Active distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) were made by alternately spin-coating dye-doped polyvinylcarbazole and cellulose acetate thin films as the high and low refractive index layers, respectively. By sandwiching the active layer with 2 DBR mirrors, VCSEL emission at 698.9 nm in the biological first window (650-950 nm) was observed under the 532-nm laser pulses. The laser slope efficiency and threshold were also measured.

  15. Blue vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers based on second-harmonic generation grown on (311)B and (411)A GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Nakagawa, Shigeru; Ichimura, Yoshikatsu; Yamada, Norihide; Mars, Dan E.; Takeuchi, Tetsuya

    2000-02-01

    We have studied blue vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) grown on (411)A and (311)B GaAs substrates in order to investigate suitable substrate orientations for SHG-VCSELs. The comparison among substrate orientations has been made on three parameters, SHG conversion efficiency, transparency current density and gain coefficient. The transparency current density and the gain coefficient are characterized by edge emitting lasers grown on the above substrates. We also discuss the transparency current density and the gain coefficient for (311)A reported previously by Takahashi et al. [M. Takahashi, M. Hirai, K. Fujita, N. Egami, and K. Iga, J. Appl. Phys. 82, 4551 (1997)]. SHG conversion efficiency is 38 and 30% W for SHG-VCSELs grown on (311)B and (411)A substrates, respectively, which is consistent with theory, assuming identical nonlinear coefficients for the A face and B face. Transparency current density for (311)A, (311)B and (411)A is 80, 105 and 60 A/cm2, and gain coefficients for (311)A, (311)B and (411)A are 20, 13 and 18 cm-1, respectively. There are no significant differences between (311)A and (411)A, while those for (311)B are less than those for (311)A. In conclusion, SHG efficiency is dependent on crystal orientation consistent with theory and thus the (311) orientation is preferable. Optical gain is independent of substrate orientation, while it is dependent on substrate face and A face is preferable.

  16. Continuous wave vertical cavity surface emitting lasers at 2.5 μm with InP-based type-II quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Sprengel, S.; Andrejew, A.; Federer, F.; Veerabathran, G. K.; Boehm, G.; Amann, M.-C.

    2015-04-13

    A concept for electrically pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) for emission wavelength beyond 2 μm is presented. This concept integrates type-II quantum wells into InP-based VCSELs with a buried tunnel junction as current aperture. The W-shaped quantum wells are based on the type-II band alignment between GaInAs and GaAsSb. The structure includes an epitaxial GaInAs/InP and an amorphous AlF{sub 3}/ZnS distributed Bragg reflector as bottom and top (outcoupling) mirror, respectively. Continuous-wave operation up to 10 °C at a wavelength of 2.49 μm and a peak output power of 400 μW at −18 °C has been achieved. Single-mode emission with a side-mode suppression ratio of 30 dB for mesa diameters up to 14 μm is presented. The long emission wavelength and current tunability over a wavelength range of more than 5 nm combined with its single-mode operation makes this device ideally suited for spectroscopy applications.

  17. Nano-polymer-dispersed liquid crystal as phase modulator for a tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at 1.55 mum.

    PubMed

    Levallois, C; Caillaud, B; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, J-L; Dupont, L; Lecorre, A; Folliot, H; Dehaese, O; Loualiche, S

    2006-11-20

    We demonstrate what we believe is the first nonmechanical tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser operating in the C band. This was achieved as a result of the combination of an InGaAs quantum well structure with a 6lambda thickness tunable index nano-polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal material. Experimental results exhibited a potential tunable range close to 10 nm, in the preliminary version, and excellent single mode locking due to the side-mode suppression ratio (more than 20 dB) over the whole spectral range. Another decisive advantage, compared to mechanical solutions, was the tuning response time of a few tens of microseconds (>30 micros) to scan the full spectral range (10 nm), making this device appropriate for some access network functions, as well as being robust and low cost. The voltage values are the main limitation to wavelength range extension. We present a first version of the device optically pumped. The next version will be electrically pumped as required for the access network applications targeted here. PMID:17086259

  18. Room-temperature CW operation of a nitride-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser using thick GaInN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Takashi; Matsui, Kenjo; Horikawa, Kosuke; Ikeyama, Kazuki; Kozuka, Yugo; Yoshida, Shotaro; Akagi, Takanobu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Iwaya, Motoaki; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated a room-temperature (RT) continuous-wave (CW) operation of a GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) using a thick GaInN quantum well (QW) active region and an AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector. We first investigated the following two characteristics of a 6 nm GaInN 5 QWs active region in light-emitting diode (LED) structures. The light output power at a high current density (∼10 kA/cm2) from the 6 nm GaInN 5 QWs was the same or even higher than that from standard 3 nm 5 QWs. In addition, we found that hole injection into the farthest QW from a p-layer was sufficient. We then demonstrated a GaN-based VCSEL with the 6 nm 5 QWs, resulting in the optical confinement factor of 3.5%. The threshold current density under CW operation at RT was 7.5 kA/cm2 with a narrow (0.4 nm) emission spectrum of 413.5 nm peak wavelength.

  19. Intensity- and phase-noise correlations in a dual-frequency vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser operating at telecom wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Syamsundar; Baili, Ghaya; Bouchoule, Sophie; Alouini, Mehdi; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2015-05-01

    The amplitude and phase noises of a dual-frequency vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (DF-VECSEL) operating at telecom wavelength are theoretically and experimentally investigated in detail. In particular, the spectral behavior of the correlation between the intensity noises of the two modes of the DF-VECSEL is measured. Moreover, the correlation between the phase noise of the radio-frequency beat note generated by optical mixing of the two laser modes with the intensity noises of the two modes is investigated. All these spectral behaviors of noise correlations are analyzed for two different values of the nonlinear coupling between the laser modes. We find that to describe the spectral behavior of noise correlations between the laser modes, it is of utmost importance to have precise knowledge about the spectral behavior of the pump noise, which is the dominant source of noise in the frequency range of interest (10 kHz to 35 MHz). Moreover, it is found that the noise correlation also depends on how the spatially separated laser modes of the DF-VECSEL intercept the noise from a multimode fiber-coupled laser diode used for pumping both the laser modes. To this aim, a specific experiment is reported which aims at measuring the correlations between different spatial regions of the pump beam. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with a theoretical model based on modified rate equations.

  20. Failure mode analysis of degraded InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well multi-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Lingley, Zachary; Brodie, Miles; Huang, Michael; Bushmaker, Adam; Theiss, Jesse; Presser, Nathan; Foran, Brendan; Moss, Steven C.

    2016-03-01

    Remarkable progress made in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) emitting at 850 and 980 nm has led them to find an increasing number of applications in high speed data communications as well as in potential space satellite systems. However, little has been reported on reliability and failure modes of InGaAs VCSELs emitting at ~980 nm although it is crucial to understand failure modes and underlying degradation mechanisms in developing these VCSELs that exceed lifetime requirements for space missions. The active layer of commercial VCSELs that we studied consisted of two or three InGaAs quantum wells. The laser structures were fabricated into deep mesas followed by a steam oxidation process to form oxide-apertures for current and optical confinements. Our multi- mode VCSELs showed a laser threshold of ~ 0.5 mA at RT. Failures were generated via accelerated life-testing of VCSELs. For the present study, we report on failure mode analysis of degraded oxide-VCSELs using various techniques. We employed nondestructive techniques including electroluminescence (EL), optical beam induced current (OBIC), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques as well as destructive techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) and high-resolution TEM techniques to study VCSELs that showed different degradation behaviors. Especially, we employed FIB systems to locally remove a portion of top-DBR mirrors of degraded VCSELs, which made it possible for our subsequent EBIC and OBIC techniques to locate damaged areas that were generated as a result of degradation processes and also for our HR-TEM technique to prepare TEM cross sections from damaged areas. Our nondestructive and destructive physical analysis results are reported including defect and structural analysis results from pre-aged VCSELs as well as from degraded VCSELs life-tested under different test conditions.

  1. Smooth e-beam-deposited tin-doped indium oxide for III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser intracavity contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. T.; Cohen, D. A.; Yonkee, B. P.; Farrell, R. M.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-10-01

    We carried out a series of simulations analyzing the dependence of mirror reflectance, threshold current density, and differential efficiency on the scattering loss caused by the roughness of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts for 405 nm flip-chip III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). From these results, we determined that the ITO root-mean-square (RMS) roughness should be <1 nm to minimize scattering losses in VCSELs. Motivated by this requirement, we investigated the surface morphology and optoelectronic properties of electron-beam (e-beam) evaporated ITO films, as a function of substrate temperature and oxygen flow and pressure. The transparency and conductivity were seen to increase with increasing temperature. Decreasing the oxygen flow and pressure resulted in an increase in the transparency and resistivity. Neither the temperature, nor oxygen flow and pressure series on single-layer ITO films resulted in highly transparent and conductive films with <1 nm RMS roughness. To achieve <1 nm RMS roughness with good optoelectronic properties, a multi-layer ITO film was developed, utilizing a two-step temperature scheme. The optimized multi-layer ITO films had an RMS roughness of <1 nm, along with a high transparency (˜90% at 405 nm) and low resistivity (˜2 × 10-4 Ω-cm). This multi-layer ITO e-beam deposition technique is expected to prevent p-GaN plasma damage, typically observed in sputtered ITO films on p-GaN, while simultaneously reducing the threshold current density and increasing the differential efficiency of III-nitride VCSELs.

  2. Thermal oxidation rates of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As in H(2)O vapor and oxide-defined vertical cavity surface emitting laser characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Mari

    The incorporation of oxides into semiconductor structures formed by the thermal oxidation of Alsb{x}Gasb{1-x}As in water vapor has resulted in a marked improvement in device performance. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL's), in particular, have benefited from this technology, demonstrating record operating characteristics. This study focuses on the following areas with respect to oxide defined VCSEL's: the establishment of rate laws for the lateral oxidation of AlAs, the fabrication of VCSEL's, and the characterization of VCSEL's designed for high speed operation. An oxidation rate study was conducted on structures with AlAs oxidation layers. At low temperatures and short oxidation times, oxidation was found to be reaction rate limited. Conversely, diffusion across the oxide was determined to be the rate limiting mechanism at high temperature or long oxidation times. The observed rates can be modeled by rate equations by which the two component mechanisms can be separated. An activation energy of 1.6 eV and 0.8 eV was determined for the reaction and diffusion limited mechanism, respectively. A reduction in oxidation rates was observed with decreasing oxidation layer thickness and increasing doping concentration. The thickness dependence can be incorporated into the rate equations by assuming an oxidation reaction rate which is inhibited by the presence of strain in thin layers. The reaction rate can be characterized by a threshold thickness for which a value of 20 nm was determined for Alsb{x}Gasb{1-x}As. Oxide defined GaAs VCSEL's varying in size and oxidation layer composition were fabricated. Threshold currents of 450 muA and external differential quantum efficiencies of 0.5 were obtained. Finally, the large signal modulation characteristics of oxide defined VCSEL's were investigated. A threshold carrier lifetime of 1.6 nanoseconds VCSEL's was determined from laser turn-on delay measurements. The laser turn-on delay was also measured under various

  3. On-Chip High-Resolution Beam Scanner Based on Bragg Reflector Slow-Light Waveguide Amplifier and Tunable Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahama, Masanori; Gu, Xiaodong; Shimada, Toshikazu; Koyama, Fumio

    2012-04-01

    We propose a monolithic beam scanner consisting of a Bragg reflector slow-light waveguide amplifier and a tunable micro-electro-mechanical vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Continuous beam steering of over 30° and a narrow divergence angle of below 0.1° are predicted, which gives us a number of resolution points over 300. In addition, the modeling on saturation characteristics of a slow light amplifier shows a possibility of the maximum output power of over 10 mW.

  4. Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting 625-nm laser upon optical pumping of an InGaP/AlGaInP nanostructure with a Bragg mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovskii, Vladimir I; Lavrushin, B M; Skasyrsky, Yan K; Tiberi, M D

    2009-08-31

    Pulsed lasing is obtained in a multilayer quantum-well InGaP/AlGaInP structure in a cavity with an external mirror and a Bragg AlAs/AlGaAs mirror pumped by the 532-nm second harmonic from a diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Lasing is obtained at the TEM{sub 00} fundamental transverse mode of the cavity at a wavelength of 625 nm. The pulse beam power was 3.1 W and the radiation divergence achieved a diffraction limit of 10-12 mrad for 5-ns pulses with a repetition rate of 6 kHz. (lasers)

  5. The use of spatially ordered arrays of etched holes for fabrication of single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers based on submonolayer InGaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenkov, A. G. Blokhin, S. A.; Maleev, N. A.; Sakharov, A. V.; Tikhomirov, V. G.; Maksimov, M. V.; Ustinov, V. M.; Kovsh, A. R.; Mikhrin, S. S.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Yang, H. P. D.; Lin, G.; Hsiao, R. S.; Chi, J. Y.

    2007-10-15

    To suppress the generation of high-order modes in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers based on submonolayer InGaAs quantum dots, the method of formation of a spatially ordered array of etched holes in the upper distributed Bragg reflector was used. Single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for spectral region of 990 nm with current-aperture diameter of 20 {mu}m, threshold current 0.9 mA, and maximum output power 3.8 mW at room temperature were demonstrated. Single-mode lasing with the coefficient of side-mode suppression in excess of 35 dB is retained in the entire range of pump currents. A decrease in the current oxide aperture to sizes that are close to those of the optical aperture brings about an increase in the external quantum efficiency; however, in this case, the transition to the multimode of lasing is observed at high pump currents.

  6. Swept-source optical coherence tomography powered by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser enables 2.3-mm-deep brain imaging in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-10-01

    We report noninvasive, in vivo optical imaging deep within a mouse brain by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), enabled by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). VCSEL SS-OCT offers a constant signal sensitivity of 105 dB throughout an entire depth of 4.25 mm in air, ensuring an extended usable imaging depth range of more than 2 mm in turbid biological tissue. Using this approach, we show deep brain imaging in mice with an open-skull cranial window preparation, revealing intact mouse brain anatomy from the superficial cerebral cortex to the deep hippocampus. VCSEL SS-OCT would be applicable to small animal studies for the investigation of deep tissue compartments in living brains where diseases such as dementia and tumor can take their toll.

  7. Ultrawide continuously tunable 1.55-μm vertical air-cavity wavelength-selective elements for VCSELs using micromachined electrostatic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, Hartmut H.; Daleiden, Juergen; Prott, Cornelia; Roemer, Friedhard; Irmer, Soeren; Ataro, Edwin; Tarraf, Amer; Gutermuth, D.; Kommallein, I.; Strassner, Martin

    2003-08-01

    Surface-micromachined 1.55μm vertical-resonator-based devices, capable of wide, continuous, monotonic and kink-free tuning are designed, technologically implemented and characterized. Tuning is achieved by mechanically actuating one or several membranes in a vertical resonator including two ultra-highly reflective DBR mirrors. The tuning is controlled by a single parameter (actuation voltage). The two different layers composing the mirrors reveal a very strong refractive index contrast. Filters including InP/air-gap DBR's (3.5 periods) using GaInAs sacrificial layers reveal a continuous tuning of up to 9% of the absolute wavelength. Varying a reverse voltage (U=0 .. -3.2V) between the membranes, a tuning range up to 142nm was obtained by electrostatic actuation. The correlation of the wavelength and the applied voltage is accurately reproducible without any hysteresis. Theoretical model calculations are performed for symmetric and asymmetric device structures, varying layer thickness and compositions. Models of highly sophisticated color tuning can be found in nature, e.g. in tunable spectral light filtering by trogon and butterfly wings. Bionics transfers the principles of success of nature into natural science, engineering disciplines and applications (here filters and VCSELs for optical communication on the basis of WDM). Light interferes constructively and destructively with nano- and microstructures of appropriate shape, dimensions and materials, both in the artificial DBR structures fabricated in our labs as well as in the natural ones.

  8. Bionics: prcise color tuning by interference in nature and technology-applications in surface-micromachined 1.55μm vertical air-cavity filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, Hartmut; Daleiden, Juergen; Prott, Cornelia; Irmer, Soeren; Roemer, Friedhard; Ataro, Edwin; Tarraf, Amer; Ruehling, H.; Maniak, Markus; Strassner, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Bionics transfers the principles of success of nature into natural science, engineering disciplines and applications. Often generation and detection of different spectral colors play key roles in communication in both, nature and technology. The latter one refers e.g. to dense wavelength division multiplex optical communication systems. This paper shows interesting parallels in tunable spectral light filtering by butterfly wings and by tunable optical filters used in optical communication systems. In both cases light interferes constructively and destructively with nano- and microstructures of appropriate shape, dimensions and materials. In this paper methodology is strongly emphasized. We demonstrate that tailored scaling allows the effectiveness of physical effects to be enhanced in nature and technology. These principles are rigorously applied in micromachined 1.55μm vertical-resonator-based filters, capable of wide, continuous, monotonic and kink-free tuning by a single control parameter. Tuning is achieved by mechanically actuating one or several membranes embedded by air-gaps in a vertical resonator including two ultra-highly reflective DBR mirrors. The layers of mirrors reveal a very strong refractive index contrast. Filters including InP/air-gap DBR's (3.5 periods) using GaInAs sacrificial layers reveal a continuous tuning of >9% of the absolute wavelength. Varying a reverse voltage (U=0 .. -3.2V) between the membranes, a tuning range up to 142nm was obtained due to electrostatic actuation. Appropriate miniaturization is shown to increase the mechanical stability and the effectiveness of spectral tuning by electrostatic actuation since the relative significance of the fundamental physical forces can be shifted considerably by appropriate scaling.

  9. A Novel, Free-Space Optical Interconnect Employing Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Diodes and InGaAs Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetectors for Gbit/s RF/Microwave Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savich, Gregory R.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2006-01-01

    Emerging technologies and continuing progress in vertical-cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode and metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector research are making way for novel, high-speed forms of optical data transfer in communication systems. VCSEL diodes operating at 1550 nm have only recently become commercially available, while MSM photodetectors are pushing the limits of contact lithography with interdigitated electrode widths reaching sub micron levels. We propose a novel, free-space optical interconnect operating at about 1Gbit/s utilizing VCSEL diodes and MSM photodetectors. We report on development, progress, and current work, which are as follows: first, analysis of the divergent behavior of VCSEL diodes for coupling to MSM photodetectors with a 50 by 50 m active area and second, the normalized frequency response of the VCSEL diode as a function of the modulating frequency. Third, the calculated response of MSM photodetectors with varying electrode width and spacing on the order of 1 to 3 m as well as the fabrication and characterization of these devices. The work presented here will lead to the formation and characterization of a fully integrated 1Gbit/s free-space optical interconnect at 1550 nm and demonstrates both chip level and board level functionality for RF/microwave digital systems.

  10. Atmospheric vertical profiles of O3, N2O, CH4, CCl2F2, and H2O retrieved from external-cavity quantum-cascade laser heterodyne radiometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tracy R; Rose, Rebecca A; Weidmann, Damien; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-12-20

    Atmospheric vertical profiles of ozone, nitrous oxide, methane, dichlorodifluoromethane, and water are retrieved from data collected with a widely tunable external-cavity quantum-cascade laser heterodyne radiometer (EC-QC-LHR) covering a spectral range between 1120 and 1238 cm(-1). The instrument was operated in solar occultation mode during a two-month measurement campaign at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire, UK, in winter 2010/2011, and ultrahigh-resolution (60 MHz or 0.002 cm(-1)) transmission spectra were recorded for multiple narrow spectral windows (~1 cm(-1) width) specific to each molecule. The ultrahigh spectral resolution of the EC-QC-LHR allows retrieving altitudinal profiles from transmission spectra that contain only few (1-3) significant absorption lines of a target molecule. Profiles are validated by comparing with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational atmospheric profiles (ozone and water), with other data in the literature (nitrous oxide, methane, dichlorodifluoromethane), and with retrievals from a lower resolution (600 MHz or 0.02 cm(-1)) Fourier transform spectroscopy data that were also recorded during the measurement campaign. PMID:23262617

  11. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Heindel, T.; Koch, M.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g(2)(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  12. 2.5 W continuous wave output at 665 nm from a multipass and quantum-well-pumped AlGaInP vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Cherry May N; Brauch, Uwe; Kahle, Hermann; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Abdou Ahmed, Marwan; Michler, Peter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    An output power of 2.5 W at a wavelength of 665 nm was obtained from a quantum-well (QW) and multipass-pumped AlGaInP-based vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser operated at a heat sink temperature of 10°C. Intracavity frequency doubling resulted in an output power of 820 mW at a wavelength of 333 nm. To the best of our knowledge, these are the highest continuous wave output powers from this type of laser both at the fundamental wavelength and in frequency-doubled operation. In fundamental wavelength operation, further power scaling by increasing the pump-spot size increased the output power to 3.3 W. However, at this power level, the laser was highly unstable. When the laser was operated at 50% pump duty cycle, a reproducible and stable peak output power of 3.6 W was obtained. These results demonstrate the potential of optical QW pumping combined with multipass pumping for the operation of AlGaInP-based semiconductor disk lasers. PMID:26977680

  13. Single-photon emission at a rate of 143 MHz from a deterministic quantum-dot microlens triggered by a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehahn, A.; Gschrey, M.; Schnauber, P.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T. Reitzenstein, S.; Gaafar, M.; Vaupel, M.; Stolz, W.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Koch, M.

    2015-07-27

    We report on the realization of a quantum dot (QD) based single-photon source with a record-high single-photon emission rate. The quantum light source consists of an InGaAs QD which is deterministically integrated within a monolithic microlens with a distributed Bragg reflector as back-side mirror, which is triggered using the frequency-doubled emission of a mode-locked vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (ML-VECSEL). The utilized compact and stable laser system allows us to excite the single-QD microlens at a wavelength of 508 nm with a pulse repetition rate close to 500 MHz at a pulse width of 4.2 ps. Probing the photon statistics of the emission from a single QD state at saturation, we demonstrate single-photon emission of the QD-microlens chip with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.03 at a record-high single-photon flux of (143 ± 16) MHz collected by the first lens of the detection system. Our approach is fully compatible with resonant excitation schemes using wavelength tunable ML-VECSELs, which will optimize the quantum optical properties of the single-photon emission in terms of photon indistinguishability.

  14. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  15. Metasurface external cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  16. Optical heterodyning with a frequency difference of 1 THz in the 850-nm range.

    PubMed

    Acef, O; Nez, F; Rovera, G D

    1994-09-01

    We report our recent progress on detection of large frequency difference (up to 1.028 THz, Deltalambda = 2.5 nm) between two laser diodes at 852 nm, using a Schottky diode as harmonic mixer/detector. Using the 11th harmonic of a klystron operating at 93.5 GHz or the 991-GHz line of an optically pumped HCOOH far-infrared laser, we were able to observe a signal-to-noise ratio of 2 dB in a 1-MHz-resolution bandwidth. PMID:19855492

  17. Cavity-resonator-integrated guided-mode resonance filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ura, Shogo; Kintaka, Kenji; Inoue, Junichi; Nishio, Kenzo; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2013-03-01

    A cavity-resonator-integrated guided-mode-resonance filter (CRIGF) consisting of a grating coupler (GC) and a pair of distributed-Bragg-reflectors (DBRs) on a thin-film dielectric waveguide is reviewed. The CRIGF has been recently proposed by the authors to provide a narrow-band reflection spectrum for an incident wave of a small beam width from the free space. A newly developed analysis model for device design with performance simulation is introduced. Curved gratings are utilized to construct a resonator for a small-aperture CRIGF. Design, fabrication and characterization of CRIGFs of 10 μm aperture are described with a resonance wavelength of 850 nm. A Ge:SiO2 guiding core layer was deposited on a SiO2 glass substrate, and GC and DBRs were formed by the electron-beam direct writing lithography. A normal polarization-dependent CRIGF is shown with a obtained narrowband reflection spectrum of 0.2 nm full width at half maximum. A crossed-CRIGF is also discussed to eliminate the polarization dependence. It is successfully demonstrated that measured reflection spectra for TE and TM incident beams were well coincident with each other.

  18. Cavity magnomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  19. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  20. Advances with vertical epitaxial heterostructure architecture (VEHSA) phototransducers for optical to electrical power conversion efficiencies exceeding 50 percent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafard, S.; Proulx, F.; York, M. C. A.; Wilkins, M.; Valdivia, C. E.; Bajcsy, M.; Ban, D.; Jaouad, A.; Bouzazi, B.; Arès, R.; Aimez, V.; Hinzer, K.; Masson, D. P.

    2016-03-01

    A monolithic compound semiconductor phototransducer optimized for narrow-band light sources was designed for and has achieved conversion efficiencies exceeding 50%. The III-V heterostructure was grown by MOCVD, based on the vertical stacking of a number of partially absorbing GaAs n/p junctions connected in series with tunnel junctions. The thicknesses of the p-type base layers of the diodes were engineered for optimal absorption and current matching for an optical input with wavelengths centered in the 830 nm to 850 nm range. The device architecture allows for improved open-circuit voltage in the individual base segments due to efficient carrier extraction while simultaneously maintaining a complete absorption of the input photons with no need for complicated fabrication processes or reflecting layers. Progress for device outputs achieving in excess of 12 V is reviewed in this study.

  1. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  2. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  3. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  4. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  5. Schottky-contacted vertically self-aligned ZnO nanorods for hydrogen gas nanosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranwa, Sapana; Kumar, Mohit; Singh, Jitendra; Fanetti, Mattia; Kumar, Mahesh

    2015-07-01

    Vertically well aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs) were grown on Si(100) substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. Scanning electron microscopy images confirms uniform distribution of NRs on 2 in. wafer with average diameter, height and density being ˜75 nm, ˜850 nm, and ˜1.5 × 1010 cm-2, respectively. X-ray diffraction reveals that the ZnO NRs are grown along c-axis direction with wurtzite crystal structure. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, which shows a single strong peak around 3.24 eV with full width half maxima 130 meV, indicates the high crystalline and optical quality of ZnO and very low defect density. Vertically aligned nanosensors were fabricated by depositing gold circular Schottky contacts on ZnO NRs. Resistance responses of nanosensors were observed in the range from 50 to 150 °C in 1% and 5% hydrogen in argon environment, which is below and above the explosive limit (4%) of hydrogen in air. The nanosensor's sensitivity increases from 11% to 67% with temperature from 50 to 150 °C and also shows fast response time (9-16 s) and moderate recovery time (100-200 s). A sensing mechanism is proposed based on Schottky barrier changes at heterojunctions and change in depletion region of NRs.

  6. Large Grain Superconducting RF Cavities at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Brinkmann, A.; Ermakov, A.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Matheisen, A.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Singer, X.; Spiwek, M.; Wen, H.; Brokmeier, H. G.

    2007-08-09

    The DESY R and D program on cavities fabricated from large grain niobium explores the potential of this material for the production of approx. 1000 nine-cell cavities for the European XFEL. The program investigates basic material properties, comparing large grain material to standard sheet niobium, as well as fabrication and preparation aspects. Several single-cell cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated from large grain niobium. A gradient up to 41 MV/m at Q0 = 1.4{center_dot}1010 (TB = 2K) was measured after electropolishing. The first three large grain nine-cell cavities worldwide have been produced under contract of DESY with ACCEL Instruments Co. The first tests have shown that all three cavities reach an accelerating gradient up to 30 MV/m after BCP (Buffered Chemical Polishing) treatment, what exceeds the XFEL requirements for RF test in the vertical cryostat.

  7. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  8. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  9. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  10. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  11. Photon storage cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1991-08-01

    A general analysis is presented of a photon storage cavity, coupled to free-electron laser (FEL) cavity. It is shown that if the coupling between the FEL cavity and the storage cavity is unidirectional (for example, a ring resonator storage cavity) then storage is possible, but that if the coupling is bi-directional then storage is not possible. Parameters are presented for an infra-red FEL storage cavity giving an order of magnitude increase in the instantaneous photon power within the storage cavity. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  13. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300 to 850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function proposed by Schutgens and Stammes (2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  14. Contiguous polarisation spectra of the Earth from 300-850 nm measured by GOME-2 onboard MetOp-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, L. G.; Lang, R.; Munro, R.; Aben, I.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present the first contiguous high-resolution spectra of the Earth's polarisation observed by a satellite instrument. The measurements of the Stokes fraction Q/I are performed by the spectrometer GOME-2 onboard the MetOp-A satellite. Polarisation measurements by GOME-2 are performed by onboard polarisation measurement devices (PMDs) and the high-resolution measurements discussed in this paper are taken in the special "PMD RAW" mode of operation. The spectral resolution of these PMD RAW polarisation measurements varies from 3 nm in the ultraviolet (UV) to 35 nm in the near-infrared wavelength range. We first compare measurements of the polarisation from cloud-free scenes with radiative transfer calculations for a number of cases. We find good agreement but also a spectral discrepancy at 800 nm, which we attribute to remaining imperfections in the calibration key data. Secondly, we study the polarisation of scenes with special scattering geometries that normally lead to near-zero Q/I. The GOME-2 polarisation spectra indeed show this behaviour and confirm the existence of the small discrepancy found earlier. Thirdly, we study the Earth polarisation for a variety of scenes. This provides a blueprint of Q/I over land and sea surfaces for various degrees of cloud cover. Fourthly, we compare the spectral dependence of measurements of Q/I in the UV with the generalised distribution function that was proposed in the past (Schutgens and Stammes, 2002) to describe the shape of the UV polarisation spectrum. The GOME-2 data confirm that these functions match the spectral behaviour captured by the GOME-2 PMD RAW mode.

  15. Repair of surgical bone defects grafted with hydroxylapatite + β-TCP and irradiated with λ=850 nm LED light.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Guarda, Milena G; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of bone loss due to different etiologic factors is difficult and many techniques aim to improve the repair, including a wide range of biomaterials and recently, photobioengineering. This work aimed to assess by histological analysis the repair of bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA + β-TCP associated with LED phototherapy. Forty rats were divided into 4 groups (Clot, LED, Biomaterial and LED + Biomaterial) each subdivided into 2 subgroups according to the time of animal death (15 and 30 days). Surgical bone defects were prepared on the femur of each animal with a trephine drill. In animals of the Clot group the defect was filled only by blood clot, in the LED group the defect filled with the clot was further irradiated. In the animals of Biomaterial and LED + Biomaterial groups the defect was filled by biomaterial and the last one was further irradiated (λ = 850 ± 10 nm, 150 mW, Φ ~ 0.5 cm2, 20 J/cm2 - session, 140 J/cm2- treatment) at 48-h intervals for 2 weeks. Following animal death, samples were taken and analyzed by light microscopy. Using the degree of maturation of the bone by assessment of the deposition/organization of the basophilic lines in the newly formed bone tissue, the LED + Biomaterial group was the one in a more advanced stage of bone repair process at the end of the experiment. It may be concluded that the use of LED phototherapy was effective in positively modulating the process of bone repair of bone defects in the femur of rats submitted or not to biomaterial grafting. PMID:25672379

  16. Ultrastable lasers based on vibration insensitive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Millo, J.; Magalhaes, D. V.; Mandache, C.; Le Coq, Y.; English, E. M. L.; Westergaard, P. G.; Lodewyck, J.; Bize, S.; Lemonde, P.; Santarelli, G.

    2009-05-15

    We present two ultrastable lasers based on two vibration insensitive cavity designs, one with vertical optical axis geometry, the other horizontal. Ultrastable cavities are constructed with fused silica mirror substrates, shown to decrease the thermal noise limit, in order to improve the frequency stability over previous designs. Vibration sensitivity components measured are equal to or better than 1.5x10{sup -11}/m s{sup -2} for each spatial direction, which shows significant improvement over previous studies. We have tested the very low dependence on the position of the cavity support points, in order to establish that our designs eliminate the need for fine tuning to achieve extremely low vibration sensitivity. Relative frequency measurements show that at least one of the stabilized lasers has a stability better than 5.6x10{sup -16} at 1 s, which is the best result obtained for this length of cavity.

  17. Design of half-reentrant SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, M.; Grimm, T. L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-07-01

    The shape of a TeSLA inner cell can be improved to lower the peak surface magnetic field at the expense of a higher peak surface electric field by making the cell reentrant. Such a single-cell cavity was designed and tested at Cornell, setting a world record accelerating gradient [V. Shemelin et al., An optimized shape cavity for TESLA: concept and fabrication, 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, Travemünde, Germany, September 8-12, 2003; R. Geng, H. Padamsee, Reentrant cavity and first test result, Pushing the Limits of RF Superconductivity Workshop, Argonne National Laboratory, September 22-24, 2004]. However, the disadvantage to a cavity is that liquids become trapped in the reentrant portion when it is vertically hung during high pressure rinsing. While this was overcome for Cornell’s single-cell cavity by flipping it several times between high pressure rinse cycles, this may not be feasible for a multi-cell cavity. One solution to this problem is to make the cavity reentrant on only one side, leaving the opposite wall angle at six degrees for fluid drainage. This idea was first presented in 2004 [T.L. Grimm et al., IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 15(6) (2005) 2393]. Preliminary designs of two new half-reentrant (HR) inner cells have since been completed, one at a high cell-to-cell coupling of 2.1% (high- kcc HR) and the other at 1.5% (low- kcc HR). The parameters of a HR cavity are comparable to a fully reentrant cavity, with the added benefit that a HR cavity can be easily cleaned with current technology.

  18. Mode analysis of photonic crystal L3 cavities in self-suspended lithium niobate membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Diziain, Séverine Geiss, Reinhard; Zilk, Matthias; Schrempel, Frank; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Pertsch, Thomas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-16

    We report on a multimodal analysis of photonic crystal L3 cavities milled in lithium niobate free-standing membranes. The classical L3 cavity geometry is compared to an L3 cavity containing a second lattice superimposed on the primary one. Those two different geometries are investigated in terms of vertical radiation and quality (Q) factor for each mode of the cavities. Depending on the cavity geometry, some modes undergo an enhancement of their vertical radiation into small angles while other modes experience a higher Q factor. Experimental characterizations are corroborated by three-dimensional finite difference time domain simulations.

  19. Spectral analysis of cavity chemiluminescence of a combustion-driven HF laser fueled by NF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Wang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    The visible and near infrared spectra of cavity chemiluminescence of a combustion driven HF laser fueled by NF3 were collected and analyzed. The spectral line at 529 nm for the green chemiluminescence was attributed to electronic excited NF molecules in b1∑ state, i.e. NF(b). The diffuse bands from 570 nm to 700 nm were attributed to the N2(B-A) emission. The spectral lines from 850 nm to 1000 nm were attributed to the HF Δυ = 3 emission bands. At the end of every experiment, the spectral line at 874 nm would be observed, which was attributed to the electronic excited NF molecules in a1 Δ state, i.e. NF(a). The NF(a-X) emission was found experimentally to be always avoiding the HFΔυ = 3 emission bands. It was also found experimentally that the NF(b-X) emission always accompanied the HF Δυ = 3 emission bands and their emission intensities had the same trends as a function of experimental time. Whereas the NF(a) molecules was produced in the optical cavity directly by the reaction of H atoms with NF2 molecules in the incomplete combustion effluents, the NF(b) molecules were suggested to be produced mainly by the near resonant energy transfer from vibrational excited HF(v<=2) molecules to NF(a) molecules. In other words, the vibrational excited state HF(v<=2) molecules can be efficiently deactivated by the NF(a) molecules by near resonant V-E energy transfer process. Therefore we concluded that incomplete dissociation of NF3 might be harmful to the HF(v<=2) population.

  20. R&D of BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, YaPing; Wang, GuangWei; Pan, WeiMin; Li, JiZhen; Liu, DeGui; Sun, Yi; Li, ZhongQuan; Dai, JianPing; Li, ShaoPeng; He, Kun; Wang, GuoPing; Zhao, GuangYuan; Ma, Qiang; Lin, HaiYing; Sha, Peng; Wang, QunYao; Qiu, Feng; Meng, FanBo; Li, Han

    2011-12-01

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCCs) in each ring for higher accelerated gradient, higher Q and lower impedance (Wang et al. The proceedings of SRF'07). There's no spare cavity due to the limited time and funding during BEPCII construction. If any serious trouble happened on either one of the two cavities and could not be recovered in a short time, the operation of BEPCII facility will be affected. Therefore, since 2009 three spare cavities have been fabricated in China to ensure reliable operation, and two of them have been successfully vertically tested in January and July 2011. This paper will briefly present the manufacture, post-process and vertical test performance of the 500 MHz spare cavities.

  1. Research on Field Emission and Dark Current in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexin; Li, Yongming; Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Field emission and dark current are issues of concern for SRF cavity performance and SRF linac operation. Complete understanding and reliable control of the issue are still needed, especially in full-scale multi-cell cavities. Our work aims at developing a generic procedure for finding an active field emitter in a multi-cell cavity and benchmarking the procedure through cavity vertical test. Our ultimate goal is to provide feedback to cavity preparation and cavity string assembly in order to reduce or eliminate filed emission in SRF cavities. Systematic analysis of behaviors of field emitted electrons is obtained by ACE3P developed by SLAC. Experimental benchmark of the procedure was carried out in a 9-cell cavity vertical test at JLab. The energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung X-rays is measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. The end-point energy in the X-ray energy spectrum is taken as the highest kinetic electron energy to predict longitudinal position of the active field emitter. Angular location of the field emitter is determined by an array of silicon diodes around irises of the cavity. High-resolution optical inspection was conducted at the predicted field emitter location.

  2. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  3. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  4. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  5. Degenerate astigmatic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, Jérémie; Mohamed, Ajmal; Romanini, Daniele

    2013-10-01

    At the output of a high-finesse cavity a succession of Lissajous patterns may be observed as the cavity length is finely tuned inside a “degenerate region” around a reentrant spherical configuration. This behavior is ascribed to a small parasitic astigmatism of the cavity mirrors. Simple geometrical optics modeling confirms this hypothesis, and then a more realistic analysis using transverse Gaussian modes reveals that the Lissajous patterns correspond to an organization of the astigmatism-split modes into a finer substructure of degenerate modes relative to that of a reentrant spherical cavity. This provides a thorough understanding of the field patterns observed in the degenerate region, including an intriguing spatial symmetry of the patterns corresponding to opposite displacements with respect to a specific central cavity length. This investigation represents a generalization of the theory of reentrant spherical cavities to the astigmatic case.

  6. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  7. Characterization of cavity wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, James A.

    Scope and Method of Study. This research focused on flow over deep cavities at subsonic speeds with emphasis on the wake downstream of the cavity. Cavity wake behaviors have not been studied in detail and are a major concern for air vehicles with cavities and in particular for optical sensor systems installed in cavities. Other key behaviors for sensor survival and performance are cavity resonance and turbulence scales in the shear layer. A wind tunnel test apparatus was developed to explore cavity and wake characteristics. It consisted of a test section insert for the OSU Indraft Wind Tunnel with an additional contraction cone for significantly increased speed. The test section included a variable depth cavity in a boundary layer splitter plate/fairing assembly, a Y-Z traverse and pitot rake with in-situ pressure transducers for high frequency response. Flows were measured over clean cavities with length to depth (L/D) ratios of 4 to 1/2 and on cavities with a porous fence for resonance suppression. Measurements were taken in streamwise and cross-stream sections to three cavity lengths downstream of the cavity trailing edge. Flow visualization using laser sheet and smoke injection was also used. Findings and Conclusions. The high speed insert demonstrated a significant new capability for the OSU wind tunnel, reaching speeds of 0.35 Mach (390 feet/second) in a 14"x14" test section. Inlet room flow was found to be quite unsteady and recommendations are made for improved flow and quantitative visualization. Key findings for cavity wake flow include its highly three dimensional nature with asymmetric peaks in cross section with boundary layer thicknesses and integral length scales several times that of a normal flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Turbulent intensities (TI) of 35% to 55% of freestream speeds were measured for the clean configuration. Fence configuration TI's were 20% to 35% of free stream and, in both configurations, TI's decayed to

  8. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  9. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  10. Shielding Studies for Superconducting RF Cavities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-07-20

    A semi-empirical method that allows us to predict intensity of generated field emission in superconducting RF cavities is described. Spatial, angular and energy distributions of the generated radiation are calculated with the FISHPACT code. The Monte Carlo code MARS15 is used for modeling the radiation transport in matter. A comparison with dose rate measurements performed in the Fermilab Vertical Test Facility for ILC-type cavities with accelerating gradients up to 35 MV/m is presented as well.

  11. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  12. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  13. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  14. Back-contact vertical-junction solar cell and method

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, M.W.; Kolesar, E.S. Jr.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes vertical-junction back contact solar cell apparatus. It comprises: a wafer of semiconductor material having upward and downward facing surfaces and predetermined thickness, first conductivity type dopant, crystal orientation, and concentration; an array of radiant energy capturing vertical walled and tilted flat bottomed cavity members disposed in rows across the semiconductor wafer upward facing surface with each of the cavities including an internal surface area received layer of pn-junction forming second conductivity type dopant containing semiconductor; a first grid of electrically interconnected electrodes dispersed across the downward facing wafer surface in surface contact with first electrical polarity current collection regions of each the pn-junction inclusive cavity member; a second grid of electrically interconnected electrodes electrically segregated from the first grid and dispersed across the downward facing wafer surface in surface contact with second electrical polarity current collection regions of each the pn-junction inclusive cavity member.

  15. Cavities for electron spin resonance: predicting the resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, John; Miller, Kyle; Meehan, Michael; Spencer, Ross

    Microwave cavities are used in electron spin resonance to enhance magnetic fields. Dielectric resonators (DRs), pieces of high dielectric material, can be used to tailor the resonant frequency of a cavity. However, designing cavities with DRs to obtain desired frequencies is challenging and in general can only be done numerically with expensive software packages. We present a new method for calculating the resonant frequencies and corresponding field modes for cylindrically symmetric cavities and apply it to a cavity with vertically stacked DRs. The modes of an arbitrary cavity are expressed as an expansion of empty cavity modes. The wave equation for D gives rise to an eigenvalue equation whose eigenvalues are the resonant frequencies and whose eigenvectors yield the electric and magnetic fields of the mode. A test against theory for an infinitely long dielectric cylinder inside an infinite cavity yields an accuracy better than 0.4% for nearly all modes. Calculated resonant frequencies are also compared against experiment for quasi-TE011 modes in resonant cavities with ten different configurations of DRs; experimental results agree with predicted values with an accuracy better than 1.0%. MATLAB code is provided at http://www.physics.byu.edu/research/coltonlab/cavityresonance.

  16. Theory and Practice of Cavity RF Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Powers

    2006-08-28

    Over the years Jefferson Lab staff members have performed about 2500 cold cavity tests on about 500 different superconducting cavities. Most of these cavities were later installed in 73 different cryomodules, which were used in three different accelerators. All of the cavities were tested in our vertical test area. About 25% of the cryomodules were tested in our cryomodule test facility and later commissioned in an accelerator. The remainder of the cryomodules were tested and commissioned after they were installed in their respective accelerator. This paper is an overview which should provide a practical background in the RF systems used to test the cavities as well as provide the mathematics necessary to convert the raw pulsed or continuous wave RF signals into useful information such as gradient, quality factor, RF-heat loads and loaded Q?s. Additionally, I will provide the equations necessary for determining the measurement error associated with these values.

  17. Cavity preparation machine for the standardization of in vitro preparations.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Gomide, Henner Alberto; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-01-01

    Several in vitro studies employ the confection of cavity preparations that are difficult to standardize by means of manual high speed handpieces. This study presents the development of a cavity preparation machine designed to standardize in vitro cavity preparations. A metal base of 25 mm x 25 mm x 4 mm (length x width x height) was coupled to a small mobile table which was designed to be able to move by means of two precision micrometers (0.01-mm accuracy) in the horizontal directions (right-left, and back-front). A high speed handpiece was coupled to a metallic connecting rod which had an accurate dial indicator enabling control of the vertical movement. The high speed handpiece is also able to move 180 degrees around its longitudinal axis and 360 degrees around its transversal axis. The suggested cavity preparation machine precisely helps in the standardization of cavity preparations for in vitro studies. PMID:18949317

  18. Acoustically Generated Flow and Temperature Fields in a Rectangular Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouk, Bakhtier; Oran, Elaine

    1998-11-01

    Flows induced by a vibrating transducer in a gas-filled two-dimensional cavity are investigated by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The transducer (driver) is located along the left vertical wall of the cavity whereas the right rigid wall acts as an acoustic reflector. Both the left and right vertical walls of the cavity are considered to be conducting (isothermal) walls. The top and the bottom walls are insulated. The frequency of the driver was varied between 10 and 500 kHz. The length of the cavity was adjusted such that standing waves are formed within the cavity, which in turn create well defined vortical flows (acoustic streaming. The characteristics of the two-dimensional acoustically generated flows are studied systematically by varying the frequency and amplitude of the motion of the transducer and the aspect ratio of the cavity. The result exhibit organized flow structures within the cavity and the existence of lateral temperature gradients. Such acoustically induced temperature gradients are essential in the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The effect of cooling or heating the reflector wall on the acoustically generated flows are also investigated. Long time solutions of the governing equations exhibit the existence of pseudo-steady oscillatory flow conditions.

  19. Lithographic wavelength control of an external cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal cavity-based resonant reflector.

    PubMed

    Liles, Alexandros A; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new design for external cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with fiber reflector and a photonic crystal (PhC)-based resonant reflector on SOI. The silicon reflector is composed of an SU8 polymer bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and side-mode suppression ratios of more than 25 dB. PMID:26974073

  20. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have

  1. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  2. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  3. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double

  4. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  5. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  6. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  7. RF tests of the beta - 0.5 five cell TRASCO cavities

    SciTech Connect

    A. Bosotti; Carlo Pagani; P. Pierini; J.P. Charrier; B. Visentin; Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2004-07-01

    Two complete 5 cell superconducting cavities at {beta} = 0.5 have been fabricated in the TRASCO INFN program. The cavities have been designed to minimize peak electric and magnetic fields, with a goal of 8.5 MV/m of accelerating gradient, at a Q > 5 10{sup 9}. The cavities have been tested in vertical cryostats at TJNAF and Saclay and the results are summarized here.

  8. Results of Cavity Series Fabrication at Jefferson Laboratory for the Cryomodule “R100”

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, W.A. Clemens, M.A. Drury, D. Forehand, J. Henry, S. Manning, R.B. Overton, R.S. Williams

    2011-09-01

    A series production of eight superconducting RF cavities for the cryomodule R100 was conducted at JLab in 2010. The cavities underwent chemical post-processing prior to vertical high power testing and routinely exceeded the envisaged performance specifications. After cryomodule assembly, cavities were successfully high power acceptance tested. In this paper, we present the achievements paving the way for the first demonstration of 100 MV (and beyond) in a single cryomodule to be operated at CEBAF.

  9. STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

  10. Design of vertical packaging technology for RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Deepak; Sharma, Akshdeep; Kaur, Maninder; Rangra, K. J.

    2012-10-01

    Wafer-level micro-encapsulation is an innovative, low-cost, wafer-level packaging method for encapsulating RF MEMS switches. This article presents an approach for design and processing steps related to encapsulation of individual RF components e.g. CPW, RF MEMS switches, in view of the variation in performance subsequent to packaging. Bottom contact vertical packaging is more prone to misalignment margin and easy to make connections. Cavity height of 30 µm is optimized for bottom contact vertical packaging.

  11. Vertical Map Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Joanne M.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the superiority of vertical filing of maps in compressor-style vertical units over horizontal filing in drawers, emphasizing such factors as physical protection of the collection, ease of filing and retrieval, and efficient use of space. Disadvantages of vertical filing are also reviewed. (Author/JL)

  12. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  13. Synchronization of Bloch oscillations by a ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Samoylova, M; Piovella, N; Robb, G R M; Bachelard, R; Courteille, Ph W

    2015-06-01

    We consider Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms stored in a one-dimensional vertical optical lattice and simultaneously interacting with a unidirectionally pumped optical ring cavity whose vertical arm is collinear with the optical lattice. We find that the feedback provided by the cavity field on the atomic motion synchronizes Bloch oscillations via a mode-locking mechanism, steering the atoms to the lowest Bloch band. It also stabilizes Bloch oscillations against noise, and even suppresses dephasing due to atom-atom interactions. Furthermore, it generates periodic bursts of light emitted into the counter-propagating cavity mode, providing a non-destructive monitor of the atomic dynamics. All these features may be crucial for future improvements of the design of atomic gravimeters based on recording Bloch oscillations. PMID:26072841

  14. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  15. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  16. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  17. Silicon-integrated short-wavelength hybrid-cavity VCSEL.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Emanuel P; Kumari, Sulakshna; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan S; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Larsson, Anders

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate a short-wavelength hybrid-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) heterogeneously integrated on silicon. A GaAs-based "half-VCSEL" has been attached to a dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on a silicon wafer using ultra-thin divinylsiloxane-bis-benzocyclobutene (DVS-BCB) adhesive bonding, thereby creating a cavity with the standing-wave optical field extending over the silicon- and GaAs-based parts of the cavity. A 9 µm oxide aperture diameter VCSEL with a threshold current of 1.2 mA produces 1.6 mW optical output power at 6.0 mA bias current with a wavelength of ~845 nm. PMID:26832027

  18. Cross-coupled composite-cavity organic microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Sudzius, M.; Mischok, A.; Fröb, H.; Leo, K.

    2016-07-01

    We report on cross-coupled composite-cavity microresonators consisting of a vertical cavity and a second-order distributed feedback structure which employ the same organic active medium and support surface-normal and in-plane emission at the same time. The optical coupling is due to a first-order light diffraction on a second-order Bragg grating and, in the degenerate case, can be as efficient as the coupling observed in more classical cascade coupled cavities. When the system is non-degenerate, the diffraction efficiency is suppressed because of sub-coherence-length dimensions of the composite-cavity and both resonators tend to operate as independent structures without experiencing substantial losses due to diffraction on the distributed-feedback grating.

  19. Multiple scattering of surface waves by cavities in a half-space

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Haidang; Cho, Younho; Ju, Taeho; Achenbach, Jan D.

    2014-02-18

    Scattering of surface waves from multiple two-dimensional cavities at the surface of a homogenous, isotropic, linearly elastic half-space is analyzed in this work. For the case of multiple cavities, the scattered field is shown to be equivalent to the total radiation from the distributions of tractions, calculated from the incident wave, over the surfaces of the cavities. The multiple-scattering model is obtained from known single-scattering calculation for a cavity by the use of the self-consistent method. The second order approximation to the multiple-scattering problem by a random distribution of cavities is then considered and solved analytically. The vertical displacement at some distance from the cavities is calculated and verified by the solution of the same problem obtained by the boundary element method (BEM). The analytical and BEM results are graphically displayed and show good agreement when the depths of the cavities are small compared to the wavelength.

  20. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  1. Multicolor cavity soliton.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Liang, Hanxiao; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-25

    We show a new class of complex solitary wave that exists in a nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The cavity soliton consists of multiple soliton-like spectro-temporal components that exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, formed together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor cavity soliton shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which would be very useful for versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy. PMID:27464131

  2. The auroral plasma cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    A region of diminished plasma density has been found to occur at the source of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). The density within this auroral plasma cavity, determined from limited Hawkeye wave data, was less than 1/cu cm from 1.8 to 3 earth radii geocentric, at 70 deg + or - 3 deg invariant magnetic latitude. The altitude variation of the magnetic field produces a minimum in the ratio of plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency within the cavity which accounts for the observed spectrum of AKR.

  3. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  4. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  5. Craters and Granular Jets Generated by Underground Cavity Collapse.

    PubMed

    Loranca-Ramos, F E; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Pacheco-Vázquez, F

    2015-07-10

    We study experimentally the cratering process due to the explosion and collapse of a pressurized air cavity inside a sand bed. The process starts when the cavity breaks and the liberated air then rises through the overlying granular layer and produces a violent eruption; it depressurizes the cavity and, as the gas is released, the sand sinks under gravity, generating a crater. We find that the crater dimensions are totally determined by the cavity volume; the pressure does not affect the morphology because the air is expelled vertically during the eruption. In contrast with impact craters, the rim is flat and, regardless of the cavity shape, it evolves into a circle as the cavity depth increases or if the chamber is located deep enough inside the bed, which could explain why most of the subsidence craters observed in nature are circular. Moreover, for shallow spherical cavities, a collimated jet emerges from the collision of sand avalanches that converge concentrically at the bottom of the depression, revealing that collapse under gravity is the main mechanism driving the jet formation. PMID:26207506

  6. Craters and Granular Jets Generated by Underground Cavity Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranca-Ramos, F. E.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Pacheco-Vázquez, F.

    2015-07-01

    We study experimentally the cratering process due to the explosion and collapse of a pressurized air cavity inside a sand bed. The process starts when the cavity breaks and the liberated air then rises through the overlying granular layer and produces a violent eruption; it depressurizes the cavity and, as the gas is released, the sand sinks under gravity, generating a crater. We find that the crater dimensions are totally determined by the cavity volume; the pressure does not affect the morphology because the air is expelled vertically during the eruption. In contrast with impact craters, the rim is flat and, regardless of the cavity shape, it evolves into a circle as the cavity depth increases or if the chamber is located deep enough inside the bed, which could explain why most of the subsidence craters observed in nature are circular. Moreover, for shallow spherical cavities, a collimated jet emerges from the collision of sand avalanches that converge concentrically at the bottom of the depression, revealing that collapse under gravity is the main mechanism driving the jet formation.

  7. Design of N-type feedthrough for HOM coupler for cERL injector cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Shishido, T.

    2014-01-01

    The injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. The cryomodule with 3L-band 2-cell cavities was built in June 2012. A prototype 2-cell cavity and three other 2-cell cavities with five higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers for actual operation were fabricated in May 2011. The vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) from October 2010 to March 2012. Radio-frequency feedthroughs with high thermal conductivity for the HOM coupler were also developed to achieve 12.5 MV/m CW operation in the cryomodule. A Kyocera NR-type connector was modified to connect to this target. The results of vertical tests of the 2-cell cavities to measure their feedthrough performance will be reported in this paper.

  8. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  9. Dividers for reduction of aerodynamic drag of vehicles with open cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A drag-reduction concept for vehicles with open cavities includes dividing a cavity into smaller adjacent cavities through installation of one or more vertical dividers. The dividers may extend the full depth of the cavity or only partial depth. In either application, the top of the dividers are typically flush with the top of the bed or cargo bay of the vehicle. The dividers may be of any material, but are strong enough for both wind loads and forces encountered during cargo loading/unloading. For partial depth dividers, a structural angle may be desired to increase strength.

  10. First attempt of at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael; Palczewski, Ari

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first result of at-cavity X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring. In the 8-cavity cryomodule F100, two silicon diodes were installed near the end flange of each cavity. Each cavity was individually tested during the cryomodule test in JLab’s cryomodule test facility. The behaviors of these at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detectors were compared with those of the standard ‘in air’ Geiger-Muller (G-M) tubes. Our initial experiments establish correlation between X-ray response of near diodes and the field emission source cavity in the 8-cavity string. For two out of these eight cavities, we also carried out at-cavity X-ray detection experiment during their vertical testing. The aim is to track field emission behavior uniquely from vertical cavity testing to horizontal cavity testing in the cryomodule. These preliminary results confirmed our expectation and warrant further effort toward the establishment of permanent at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection for SRF development and operation.

  11. Dispersion engineering for vertical microcavities using subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaorong; Zhang, Bo; Deng, Hui

    2015-02-20

    We show that the energy-momentum dispersion of a vertical semiconductor microcavity can be modified by design using a high-index-contrast subwavelength grating (SWG) as a cavity mirror. We analyze the angular dependence of the reflection phase of the SWG to illustrate the principles of dispersion engineering. We show examples of engineered dispersions such as ones with much reduced or increased energy density of states and one with a double-well-shaped dispersion. This method of dispersion engineering is compatible with maintaining a high cavity quality factor and incorporating fully protected active media inside the cavity, thus enabling the creation of new types of cavity quantum electrodynamics systems. PMID:25763957

  12. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  13. Seamless/bonded niobium cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.

    2006-07-01

    Technological aspects and performance of seamless cavities produced by hydroforming are presented. Problems related to the fabrication of seamless cavities from bulk niobium are mainly solved thanks to the progress of the last years. The highest achieved accelerating gradients are comparable for both seamless and welded versions (ca. 40 MV/m) Nevertheless further development of seamless cavities is desirable in order to avoid the careful preparation of parts for welding and get reliable statistic. Fabrication of NbCu clad cavities from bimetallic tubes is an interesting option that gives new opportunity to the seamless technique. On the one hand it allows reducing the niobium costs contribution; on the other hand it increases the thermal stability of the cavity. The highest accelerating gradient achieved on seamless NbCu clad single cell cavities (ca. 40 MV/m) is comparable to the one reached on bulk Nb cavities. Fabrication of multi-cell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was recently proven.

  14. Effective Cavity Length of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotron oscillators for electron cyclotron heating and non-inductive current drive (ECH&CD) in magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas have relatively low cavity quality factors in the range of 1000 to 2000. The effective length of their cavities cannot be simply deduced from the cavity electric field profile, since this has by far not a Gaussian shape. The present paper presents a novel method to estimate the effective length of a gyrotron cavity just from the eigenvalue of the operating TEm,n mode, the cavity radius and the exact oscillation frequency which may be numerically computed or precisely measured. This effective cavity length then can be taken to calculate the Fresnel parameter in order to confirm that the cavity is not too short so that the transverse structure of any mode in the cavity is the same as that of the corresponding mode in a long circular waveguide with the same diameter.

  15. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  16. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-09-20

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth.

  17. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  18. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  20. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  1. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  2. Gyromultiplier with sectioned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Mishakin, S. V.

    2010-11-15

    A novel scheme of a self-exciting single-cavity terahertz gyromultiplier is proposed and theoretically investigated. Simulations predict a possibility to obtain a power of 75 W at the frequency of 1.3 THz from the 80 kV/0.7 A electron beam when operating at the fourth cyclotron harmonic at the relatively low magnetic field of 14 T.

  3. Single mode cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.W.; Levy, J.L.

    1984-01-17

    This external cavity laser utilizes an unstable resonator in conjuction with a high reflectivity stripe end mirror which is oriented substantially parallel to the plane of the maximum divergence of the laser diode output beam and whose axis is substantially parallel to the plane of the junction of the laser diode. This configuration operates with high efficiency to select only the fundamental mode of the laser diode with a minimal divergence in the output beam.

  4. Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

  5. Deterministic coupling of delta-doped nitrogen vacancy centers to a nanobeam photonic crystal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan C.; Cui, Shanying; Zhang, Xingyu; Russell, Kasey J.; Magyar, Andrew P.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Bracher, David O.; Ohno, Kenichi; McLellan, Claire A.; Alemán, Benjamin; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania; Andrich, Paolo; Awschalom, David; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-12-29

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy center (NV) in diamond has generated significant interest as a platform for quantum information processing and sensing in the solid state. For most applications, high quality optical cavities are required to enhance the NV zero-phonon line (ZPL) emission. An outstanding challenge in maximizing the degree of NV-cavity coupling is the deterministic placement of NVs within the cavity. Here, we report photonic crystal nanobeam cavities coupled to NVs incorporated by a delta-doping technique that allows nanometer-scale vertical positioning of the emitters. We demonstrate cavities with Q up to ∼24 000 and mode volume V ∼ 0.47(λ/n){sup 3} as well as resonant enhancement of the ZPL of an NV ensemble with Purcell factor of ∼20. Our fabrication technique provides a first step towards deterministic NV-cavity coupling using spatial control of the emitters.

  6. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  7. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  8. Particle and field measurements of the Starfish diamagnetic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyal, Palmer

    2006-12-01

    Recently analyzed beta particle and magnetic field measurements obtained from five instrumented rocket payloads located around the 1962 Starfish nuclear burst are used to describe the diamagnetic cavity produced in the geomagnetic field. Three of the payloads were located in the cavity during its expansion and collapse, one payload was below, and the fifth was above the fully expanded cavity. This multipoint data set shows that the cavity expanded into an elongated shape 1840 km along the magnetic field lines and 680 km vertically across in 1.2 s and required an unexpectedly long time of about 16 s to collapse. The beta flux contained inside the cavity was measured to be relatively uniform throughout and remained at 3 × 1011 beta/cm2 s for at least 7 s. The plasma continued to expand upward beyond the fully expanded cavity boundary and injected a flux measuring 2.5 × 1010 beta/cm2 s at H + 34 s into the most intense region of the artificial belt. Measured 10 hours later by the Injun I spacecraft, this flux was determined to be 1 × 109 beta/cm2 s.

  9. Resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    A resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis. The apparatus comprises a resonant optical cavity having an analysis region within the cavity for containing one or more biological cells or dielectric particles to be analyzed. In the presence of a cell or particle, a light beam in the form of spontaneous emission or lasing is generated within the resonant optical cavity and is encoded with information about the cell or particle. An analysis means including a spectrometer and/or a pulse-height analyzer is provided within the apparatus for recovery of the information from the light beam to determine a size, shape, identification or other characteristics about the cells or particles being analyzed. The recovered information can be grouped in a multi-dimensional coordinate space for identification of particular types of cells or particles. In some embodiments of the apparatus, the resonant optical cavity can be formed, at least in part, from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The apparatus and method are particularly suited to the analysis of biological cells, including blood cells, and can further include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis thereof.

  10. Resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, P.L.

    1998-08-11

    A resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis is described. The apparatus comprises a resonant optical cavity having an analysis region within the cavity for containing one or more biological cells or dielectric particles to be analyzed. In the presence of a cell or particle, a light beam in the form of spontaneous emission or lasing is generated within the resonant optical cavity and is encoded with information about the cell or particle. An analysis means including a spectrometer and/or a pulse-height analyzer is provided within the apparatus for recovery of the information from the light beam to determine a size, shape, identification or other characteristics about the cells or particles being analyzed. The recovered information can be grouped in a multi-dimensional coordinate space for identification of particular types of cells or particles. In some embodiments of the apparatus, the resonant optical cavity can be formed, at least in part, from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The apparatus and method are particularly suited to the analysis of biological cells, including blood cells, and can further include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis. 35 figs.

  11. Camera assembly design proposal for SRF cavity image collection

    SciTech Connect

    Tuozzolo, S.

    2011-10-10

    This project seeks to collect images from the inside of a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) large grain niobium cavity during vertical testing. These images will provide information on multipacting and other phenomena occurring in the SRF cavity during these tests. Multipacting, a process that involves an electron buildup in the cavity and concurrent loss of RF power, is thought to be occurring near the cathode in the SRF structure. Images of electron emission in the structure will help diagnose the source of multipacting in the cavity. Multipacting sources may be eliminated with an alteration of geometric or resonant conditions in the SRF structure. Other phenomena, including unexplained light emissions previously discovered at SLAC, may be present in the cavity. In order to effectively capture images of these events during testing, a camera assembly needs to be installed to the bottom of the RF structure. The SRF assembly operates under extreme environmental conditions: it is kept in a dewar in a bath of 2K liquid helium during these tests, is pumped down to ultra-high vacuum, and is subjected to RF voltages. Because of this, the camera needs to exist as a separate assembly attached to the bottom of the cavity. The design of the camera is constrained by a number of factors that are discussed.

  12. Dusty plasma cavities: Probe-induced and natural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, B. J.; Matthews, L. S.; Hyde, T. W.

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive exploration of regional dust evacuation in complex plasma crystals is presented. Voids created in three-dimensional crystals on the International Space Station have provided a rich foundation for experiments, but cavities in dust crystals formed in ground-based experiments have not received as much attention. Inside a modified Gaseous Electronics Conference rf cell, a powered vertical probe was used to clear the central area of a dust crystal, producing a cavity with high cylindrical symmetry. Cavities generated by three mechanisms are examined. First, repulsion of micrometer-sized particles by a negatively charged probe is investigated. A model of this effect developed for a dc plasma is modified and applied to explain experimental data in rf plasma. Second, the formation of natural cavities is surveyed; a radial ion drag proposed to occur due to a curved sheath is considered in conjunction with thermophoresis and a flattened confinement potential above the center of the electrode. Finally, cavity formation upon increasing the probe potential above the plasma floating potential is justified by a combination of ion drag and sheath edge modification. The cavities produced by these methods appear similar, but each is shown to be facilitated by fundamentally different processes.

  13. Dusty plasma cavities: Probe-induced and natural.

    PubMed

    Harris, B J; Matthews, L S; Hyde, T W

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive exploration of regional dust evacuation in complex plasma crystals is presented. Voids created in three-dimensional crystals on the International Space Station have provided a rich foundation for experiments, but cavities in dust crystals formed in ground-based experiments have not received as much attention. Inside a modified Gaseous Electronics Conference rf cell, a powered vertical probe was used to clear the central area of a dust crystal, producing a cavity with high cylindrical symmetry. Cavities generated by three mechanisms are examined. First, repulsion of micrometer-sized particles by a negatively charged probe is investigated. A model of this effect developed for a dc plasma is modified and applied to explain experimental data in rf plasma. Second, the formation of natural cavities is surveyed; a radial ion drag proposed to occur due to a curved sheath is considered in conjunction with thermophoresis and a flattened confinement potential above the center of the electrode. Finally, cavity formation upon increasing the probe potential above the plasma floating potential is justified by a combination of ion drag and sheath edge modification. The cavities produced by these methods appear similar, but each is shown to be facilitated by fundamentally different processes. PMID:26172806

  14. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can ... staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach. The surgery does not involve cutting ...

  15. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  16. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  17. Through tubing progressing cavity pump

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A.E.

    1986-06-03

    A method is described of installing a progressing cavity pump assembly within a well, the pump assembly being of the type having a stator, a helical rotor located in the stator and rotated by a string of sucker rods extending through tubing to the surface. The method consists of: securing a tubular seating member to a lower end of the tubing and lowering the tubing into the well; mounting a seating member on a lower end of the pump assembly; mounting a rotor nipple to the upper end of the stator and a drive rod to the upper end of the rotor, and providing the rotor nipple and drive rod with engaging means that allows a selected amount of vertical movement of the rotor with respect to the stator; connecting the upper end of the drive rod to the sucker rods; lowering the pump assembly into the tubing on the sucker rods until the seating member on the pump assembly contacts the tubular seating member; continuing to lower the sucker rods without rotation, moving the rotor downward with respect to the stator and forcing the seating members together with the weight of the sucker rods applied to the stator through the engaging means; then moving the sucker rods and the rotor a selected distance upward while the stator remains stationary to position the top of the rotor above the stator a selected distance; then connecting the sucker rods at the surface to a rotary power source and rotating the sucker rods to cause the pump to operate.

  18. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  19. S0 Tight Loop Studies on ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Fumio; Konomi, T.; Saito, Kenji; Bice, Damon; Crawford, Anthony C.; Geng, Rongli

    2009-11-01

    We have continued high gradient R&D of ICHIRO 9-cell cavities at KEK. ICHIRO 9-cell cavity #5 (I9#5) that has no end groups on beam tube to focus on high gradient sent to Jlab as S0 tight loop study. Surface treatments and vertical test were repeated 3 times at Jlab, and then I9#5 sent back to KEK. We also repeated surface treatments and test at KEK. Maximum gradients were 36.5MV/m at Jlab, and 33.7MV/m at KEK so far. Now we are struggling with the puzzle why the results of singles do not work well on 9-cell cavities.

  20. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  1. Raman ratios on the repair of grafted surgical bone defects irradiated or not with laser (λ780 nm) or LED (λ850 nm).

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-09-01

    This work aimed to assess biochemical changes associated to mineralization and remodeling of bone defects filled with Hydroxyapatite+Beta-Beta-tricalcium phosphate irradiated or not with 2 light sources. Ratios of intensities, band position and bandwidth of selected Raman peaks of collagen and apatites were used. Sixty male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups subdivided into 2 subgroups (15th and 30th days). A standard surgical defect was created on one femur of each animal. In 3 groups the defects were filled with blood clot (Clot, Clot+Laser and Clot+LED groups) and in the remaining 3 groups the defects were filled with biomaterial (Biomaterial, Biomaterial+Laser and Biomaterial+LED groups). When indicated, the defects were irradiated with either Laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ∼0.4 cm(2)) or LED (λ850±10 nm, 150 mW, Φ∼0.5 cm(2)), 20 J/cm(2) each session, at 48 h intervals/2 weeks (140 J/cm(2) treatment). Following sacrifice, bone fragments were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis (ANOVA General Linear Model, p<0.05) showed that both grafting and time were the variables that presented significance for the ratios of ∼1660/∼1670 cm(-1) (collagen maturation), ∼1077/∼854 cm(-1) (mineralization), ∼1077/∼1070 cm(-1) (carbonate substitution) and the position of the ∼960 cm(-1) (bone maturation). At 30th day, the ratios indicated an increased deposition of immature collagen for both Clot and Biomaterial groups. Biomaterial group showed increased collagen maturation. Only collagen deposition was significantly dependent upon irradiation independently of the light source, being the amount of collagen I increased in the Clot group at the end of the experimental time. On the other hand, collagen I deposition was reduced in biomaterial irradiated groups. Raman ratios of selected protein matrix and phosphate and carbonate HA indicated that the use of biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA+Beta-TCP graft improved the repair of bone defects, associated or not with Laser or LED light, because of the increasing deposition of HA. PMID:24935415

  2. Preparation of dental amalgam and spectral diagnosis of mercury in plasmas-laser in the region of 250 nm - 850 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Ossa, A.; Pacheco, P.; Sarmiento, R.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we presents results of the spectral study of plasmas-laser of dental amalgam by technique Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Plasmas were generated focusing the beam of a Nd: YAG laser on the matrix of the mixture Ag-Sn-Cu and on amalgams with different proportions of mercury (3:2, 5:2, 6:2). Based on the spectral results and reported atomic parameters, became estimation of electron temperature plasmas- laser and their behavior with the concentration of Hg. The estimated values of the electron temperature for the respective proportions were 20 846 K, 19 139 K and 16 872 K, using the distribution of population of Boltzmann energy levels associated with spectral lines, considering conditions Local Thermodinamic Equilibrium (LTE) of plasmas.

  3. Monitoring the convergence and the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities by echometric techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Denzau, H.; Erhardt, S.; Wierczeyco, E.

    1988-01-01

    To demonstrate the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities and to monitor cavity convergence, a fully computerized echometric sonar technique was developed in the early eighties. Cavity surveys made by this technique at regular intervals in accordance with requirements imposed by mining authorities are necessary to monitor the stability of cavities as well as to predict cavity life and the effect of cavity convergence on the surface. Unlike conventional methods determining overall cavity closure, the new echometric sonar method allows the calculation of convergence as a function of depth by an intercomparison of data from different surveys. The first operation in the interpretation process is a numerical comparison of the data of vertical and horizontal cross-sections of two successive surveys. This operation will identify changes in the shape of a cavity which may occur if the cavity is leached in a steep-sloped salt dome. Following a verification of the computerized interpretation of the data, the volume of fall is calculated and cross-checked against the volume of rock deposited on the bottom of the cavity.

  4. Optical modeling of certical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presently the subject of intense research due to their potential as compact, efficient, astigmatic laser sources for a number of important applications. Of special interest are the selectively-oxidized VCSELs that have recently set records for threshold current and wall-plug efficiency. The onset of higher-order modes at powers of a few milliWatts, however, presently limits the wide utilization of these devices and indicates the need for improvements in design. Unfortunately, their complexity precludes optimization based solely upon empirical methods, and points instead to the need for better numerical models. Modeling the optical field in a vertical-cavity laser, however, is especially difficult due to both the high Q of the optical cavity and the distributed reflectivity of the mirrors. Our approach to this dilemma has been the development of modeling techniques on two complexity scales. We first derived an effective- index model that is numerically efficient and thus can be included together with carrier transport and thermal models to make up a self-consistent modeling package. In addition to its use in the overall VCSEL model, this simplified optical model has been extremely valuable in elucidating the basic principles of waveguiding in VCSELs that in turn have led to new ideas in device design. More specifically, the derived expression for the effective index shows clearly that index guiding in a VCSEL depends only on variations in optical cavity length, and thus can be engineered without the need to alter the material index of refraction. Also, we have designed index- guided and antiguided devices whose cavity lengths are modified in certain regions by etching of the cavity material prior to growth of the second mirror. Fabrication of these new device designs is presently in progress.

  5. Development of vertical electropolishing process applied on 1300 and 704 MHz superconducting niobium resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eozénou, F.; Boudigou, Y.; Carbonnier, P.; Charrier, J.-P.; Gasser, Y.; Maurice, L.; Peauger, F.; Roudier, D.; Servouin, C.; Muller, K.

    2014-08-01

    An advanced setup for vertical electropolishing of superconducting radio-frequency niobium elliptical cavities has been installed at CEA Saclay. Cavities are vertically electropolished with circulating standard HF-HF-H2SO4 electrolytes. Parameters such as voltage, cathode shape, acid flow, and temperature have been investigated. A low voltage (between 6 and 10 V depending on the cavity geometry), a high acid flow (25 L /min), and a low acid temperature (20° C) are considered as promising parameters. Such a recipe has been tested on single-cell and nine-cell International Linear Collider (ILC) as well as 704 MHz five-cell Super Proton Linac (SPL) cavities. Single-cell cavities showed similar performances at 1.6 K being either vertically or horizontally electropolished. The applied baking process provides similar benefit. An asymmetric removal is observed with faster removal in the upper half-cells. Multicell cavities (nine-cell ILC and five-cell SPL cavities) exhibit a standard Q0 value at low and medium accelerating fields though limited by power losses due to field emitted electrons.

  6. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  7. Multicolor cavity metrology.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kiwamu; Arai, Koji; Barr, Bryan; Betzwieser, Joseph; Brooks, Aidan; Dahl, Katrin; Doravari, Suresh; Driggers, Jennifer C; Korth, W Zach; Miao, Haixing; Rollins, Jameson; Vass, Stephen; Yeaton-Massey, David; Adhikari, Rana X

    2012-10-01

    Long-baseline laser interferometers used for gravitational-wave detection have proven to be very complicated to control. In order to have sufficient sensitivity to astrophysical gravitational waves, a set of multiple coupled optical cavities comprising the interferometer must be brought into resonance with the laser field. A set of multi-input, multi-output servos then lock these cavities into place via feedback control. This procedure, known as lock acquisition, has proven to be a vexing problem and has reduced greatly the reliability and duty factor of the past generation of laser interferometers. In this article, we describe a technique for bringing the interferometer from an uncontrolled state into resonance by using harmonically related external fields to provide a deterministic hierarchical control. This technique reduces the effect of the external seismic disturbances by 4 orders of magnitude and promises to greatly enhance the stability and reliability of the current generation of gravitational-wave detectors. The possibility for using multicolor techniques to overcome current quantum and thermal noise limits is also discussed. PMID:23201656

  8. Observation of Cavity Rydberg Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Jia, Ningyuan; Ryou, Albert; Schine, Nathan; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate hybridization of optical cavity photons with atomic Rydberg excitations using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The resulting dark state Rydberg polaritons exhibit a compressed frequency spectrum and enhanced lifetime indicating strong light-matter mixing. We study the coherence properties of cavity Rydberg polaritons and identify the generalized EIT linewidth for optical cavities. Strong collective coupling suppresses polariton losses due to inhomogeneous broadening, which we demonstrate by using different Rydberg levels with a range of polarizabilities. Our results point the way towards using cavity Rydberg polaritons as a platform for creating photonic quantum materials.

  9. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  10. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  11. Extremely Large Cusp Diamagnetic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, which is unexpected by the current MHD (or ISM) models, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash, which provides a challenge to the existing MHD (or ISM) models. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. During high solar wind pressure period on April 21, 1999, the POLAR spacecraft observed lower ion flux in the dayside high-latitude magnetosheath than that in the neighbouring cusp cavities. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity have significant global impacts on the geospace environment research and will be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in upstream ion events.

  12. Extremely large cusp diamagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T.; Siscoe, G.

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities are always there day by day. Some of the diamagnetic cavities have been observed in the morningside during intervals when the IMF By component was positive (duskward), suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity to the entire magnetopause may have significant global impacts on the geospace environment. They will possibly be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in the regions upstream of the subsolar magnetopause where energetic ion events frequently are observed.

  13. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  14. Vertical Seismoelectric Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araji, A.

    2011-12-01

    The seismoelectric method corresponds to the measurement of electromagnetic disturbances associated with the passage of seismic waves in a porous medium. The coupling is due to the existence of the electric double layer at the solid/water interfaces. We consider the case of vertical seismoelectric profiling in which we trigger a seismic source in a vertical borehole and measure the seismoelectric response on the surface. We aim to image hetrogeneities in that section of the subsurface by utilizing the seismoelectric sources created at interfaces. An iterative source localization inversion algorithm is used to achieve the imaging of interfaces.

  15. High Gradient Results of ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavity in Collaboration With KEK and Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, F.; Konomi, T.; Saito, K.; Eremeev, G. V.; Geng, R. L.

    2011-07-01

    KEK and Jlab have continued S0-study collaboration on ICHIRO 9-cell cavities since 2008. In 2010, we have started S0 study on ICHIRO#7, full 9-cell cavity with end groups. Surface treatments and vertical tests have been repeated at Jlab. Maximum gradient of 40MV/m was achieved so far. We will describe the details of that and further plan of S0-study on ICHIRO 9-cell.

  16. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  17. Three-dimensional shape analysis of miarolitic cavities and enclaves in the Kakkonda granite by X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Tomoyuki; Nakano, Tsukasa; Nakashima, Yoshito; Muraoka, Hirofumi

    2001-11-01

    Three-dimensional shape analysis of miarolitic cavities and enclaves from the Kakkonda granite, NE Japan, was performed by X-ray computed tomography (CT) and image analysis. The three-dimensional shape of the miarolitic cavities and enclaves was reconstructed by stacked two-dimensional CT slice images with an in-plane resolution of 0.3 mm and an inter-slice spacing of 1 mm. An ellipsoid was fitted to each reconstructed object by the image processing programs. The shortest, intermediate, and longest axes of the ellipsoids fitted to miarolitic cavities had E-W, N-S, and vertical directions, respectively. The shortest axes of the ellipsoids fitted to enclaves were sub-vertical to vertical. Three-dimensional strains calculated from miarolitic cavities and enclaves have E-W and vertical shortening, respectively. The shape characteristics of miarolitic cavities probably reflect regional stress during the late magmatic stage, and those of enclaves reflect shortening by later-intruded magma or body rotation during the early magmatic stage. The miarolitic cavities may not be strained homogeneously with the surrounding granite, because the competence of minerals is different from that of the fluid-filled cavities. Although the strain markers require sufficient contrast between their CT numbers and those of the surrounding minerals, this method has several advantages over conventional methods, including the fact that it is non-destructive, expedient, and allows direct three-dimensional observation of each object.

  18. A scanning cavity microscope.

    PubMed

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm(2); we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  19. Accessory oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneswaran, Manica Ramamoorthy; Varadarajan, Usha; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Kamatchi, Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a patient around 11 years with the complaint of extra mouth who reported to the hospital for removal of that extra mouth. On examination there was accessory oral cavity with small upper and lower lips, seven teeth and saliva was drooling out. Under general anesthesia crevicular incision from 32 to 43 was put and labial gingiva with alveolar mucosa was reflected completely and bone exposed to lower border of mandible. There were seven teeth resembling lower permanent anterior teeth in the accessory mouth, which was excised with the accessory lips. 41 extracted and osteotomy carried out extending the incision from the extracted site and osteotomy carried out. Dermoid cyst both below and above the mylohyoid muscle and rudimentary tongue found and excised and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. The wound was closed and uneventful healing noted to the satisfaction of the patient. This is a rare and interesting case which has been documented. PMID:23833508

  20. A scanning cavity microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm2; we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  1. HOM/LOM Coupler Study for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, L.; Li, Z.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2007-04-16

    The FNAL 9-cell 3.9GHz deflecting mode cavity designed for the CKM experiment was chosen as the baseline design for the ILC BDS crab cavity. The full 9-cell CKM cavity including the coupler end-groups was simulated using the parallel eigensolver Omega3P and scattering parameter solver S3P. It was found that both the notch filters for the HOM/LOM couplers are very sensitive to the notch gap, which is about 1.6MHz/micron and is more than 10 times more sensitive than the TTF cavity. It was also found in the simulation that the unwanted vertical {pi}-mode (SOM) is strongly coupled to the horizontal 7{pi}/9 mode which causes x-y coupling and reduces the effectiveness of the SOM damping. To meet the ILC requirements, the HOM/LOM couplers are redesigned to address these issues. With the new designs, the damping of the HOM/LOM modes is improved. The sensitivity of the notch filter for the HOM coupler is reduced by one order of magnitude. The notch filter for the LOM coupler is eliminated in the new design which significantly simplifies the geometry. In this paper, we will present the simulation results of the original CKM cavity and the progresses on the HOM/LOM coupler re-design and optimization.

  2. Water exclusion from tunnel cavities in the saturated capillary fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngs, E. G.; Kacimov, A. R.; Obnosov, Yu. V.

    2004-03-01

    The problem of water flow around a tunnel cavity located in the saturated capillary fringe on top of a very permeable, freely draining substratum is considered for the critical non-leakage condition when there is uniform vertical downward flow through the upper surface of the saturated region. In this critical condition the soil-water pressure is equal to zero everywhere on the cavity wall that is also a streamline. The conditions at the upper fringe boundary are that the soil-water pressure is equal to the air-entry value of the soil and the flux through this surface is the uniform infiltration rate. The cavity surface and the fringe boundary which is elevated above the cavity position, are found through conformal mapping and the use of integral representations of non-standard mixed boundary-value problems. They are calculated for a range of infiltration rates and compared with those obtained by assuming the upper fringe boundary to be horizontal. The exact analysis given here gives larger tunnel cavities than those given by the approximate treatment of the problem. The results have application in the design of underground repositories against entry of seepage water, the construction of protective capillary barriers and in the design of interceptor drainage systems.

  3. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  4. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  5. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  6. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  7. Trislot-cavity microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flush-mountable assembly composed of disk radiator sandwiched between planes of metal-clad dielectric board has greater bandwidths and beamwidths than simple disk antenna. Conducting planes connect so that disk is enclosed in cavity with Y-shaped slot in top plane. Cavity is excited by microwave energy from disk and radiates from trislot aperature.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  9. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  10. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  11. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  12. Wavelength-controlled external-cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal resonant reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, A. A.; Liles, Alexandros A.; Persheyev, Saydulla; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of an alternative design of external-cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V Semiconductor Optical Amplifier with fiber reflector and a Photonic Crystal (PhC) based resonant reflector on SOI. The Silicon reflector comprises a polymer (SU8) bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and sidemode suppression ratio of more than 25 dB.

  13. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  14. An equivalent circuit model and power calculations for the APS SPX crab cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Berenc, T. )

    2012-03-21

    An equivalent parallel resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit with beam loading for a polarized TM110 dipole-mode cavity is developed and minimum radio-frequency (rf) generator requirements are calculated for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) short-pulse x-ray (SPX) superconducting rf (SRF) crab cavities. A beam-loaded circuit model for polarized TM110 mode crab cavities was derived. The single-cavity minimum steady-state required generator power has been determined for the APS SPX crab cavities for a storage ring current of 200mA DC current as a function of external Q for various vertical offsets including beam tilt and uncontrollable detuning. Calculations to aid machine protection considerations were given.

  15. High-Temperature Heat Treatment Study on a Large-Grain Nb Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Dhakal, R. Myneni, P. Maheshwari, F.A. Stevie

    2011-07-01

    Improvement of the cavity performance by a high-temperature heat-treatment without subsequent chemical etching have been reported for large-grain Nb cavities treated by buffered chemical polishing, as well as for a fine-grain cavity treated by vertical electropolishing. Changes in the quality factor, Q{sub 0}, and maximum peak surface magnetic field achieved in a large-grain Nb single-cell cavity have been determined as a function of the heat treatment temperature, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. The highest Q{sub 0} improvement of about 30% was obtained after heat-treatment at 800 °C-1000 °C. Measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry on large-grain samples heat-treated with the cavity showed large reduction of hydrogen concentration after heat treatment.

  16. Implicit and explicit computations of flows past cavities with and without yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Yen, Guan-Wei

    1990-01-01

    Implicit and explicit computations are presented to study the supersonic, turbulent flows past three-dimensional, rectangular cavities at 0 and 45 deg yaw angle. The Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible, complete Navier-Stokes equations are solved time-accurately, including the Reynolds stresses. The number of major vortices inside and the separation characteristics on the cavity floor are different for cavities with length-to-depth ratios of 3.0 and 6.7. Due to the oscillations of the shear layer, which randomly exposes the cavity flow to the external flow, vortices are shed into the mainstream. When the upstream flow approaches a cavity at yaw, the width-to-depth ratio also becomes an important parameter. The dominant rotational planes of the major vortices incline at an angle to the vertical plane due to yaw. The execution of the implicit scheme is about three times faster, but it requires about four times more computer memory.

  17. Reactor cavity seal ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1986-04-22

    A hydrostatic seal is described for sealing an annular gap between two flat substantially horizontal coplanar surfaces comprising, in combination: a generally flat annular plate of a width sufficient to span a gap between two surfaces: compressible annular sealing means disposed on the bottom surface of the flat annular plate for sealingly engaging the two flat surfaces in response to a downward force exerted on the plate; and fastening means, distributed along the center line of the plate, for releasably fastening the plate in a position to span the gap to be sealed and exert a downward force on the plate, each fastening means including a pair of elongated members of a size to fit into the gap to be sealed, means for mounting the members on the bottom surface of the plate so that at least a portion of each member is radially moveable in a direction toward a respective one of the vertical side surfaces defining the gap to be sealed to engage same and so that the plate is moveable relative to the members in a downward direction in response to hydrostatic pressure applied to the upper surface of the plate when the members are engaging the vertical side surfaces of an annular gap, and an actuating means, mounted on the plate for movement therewith in response to hydrostatic pressure, for radially moving the members, the actuating means extending through a bore in the plate to the upper surface of the plate.

  18. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    PubMed Central

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka³a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20–30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O’Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca2+, Pi, Na+, Cl−, total protein, albumins, F− and Sr2+ were determined. Results The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca2+ (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K+ (P<.04), Sr2+ (P<.03), Na+ (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Conclusion Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters. PMID:19212491

  19. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  20. Vertical optical ring resonators fully integrated with nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Abbas; Kleinert, Moritz; Stolarek, David; Zimmermann, Lars; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate full integration of vertical optical ring resonators with silicon nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates to accomplish a significant step towards 3D photonic integration. The on-chip integration is realized by rolling up 2D differentially strained TiO2 nanomembranes into 3D microtube cavities on a nanophotonic microchip. The integration configuration allows for out of plane optical coupling between the in-plane nanowaveguides and the vertical microtube cavities as a compact and mechanically stable optical unit, which could enable refined vertical light transfer in 3D stacks of multiple photonic layers. In this vertical transmission scheme, resonant filtering of optical signals at telecommunication wavelengths is demonstrated based on subwavelength thick walled microcavities. Moreover, an array of microtube cavities is prepared and each microtube cavity is integrated with multiple waveguides which opens up interesting perspectives towards parallel and multi-routing through a single cavity device as well as high-throughput optofluidic sensing schemes.

  1. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  2. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  3. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  4. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  5. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-chuan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A new read gate design for the vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory is disclosed which offers larger operating margin than the existing read gate designs. In the existing read gate designs, a current is applied to all the stripes. The stripes that contain a VBL pair are chopped, while the stripes that do not contain a VBL pair are not chopped. The information is then detected by inspecting the presence or absence of the bubble. The margin of the chopping current amplitude is very small, and sometimes non-existent. A new method of reading Vertical Bloch Line memory is also disclosed. Instead of using the wall chirality to separate the two binary states, the spatial deflection of the stripe head is used. Also disclosed herein is a compact memory which uses vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement in the form of stacks of VBL memory layers is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. High data transfer rate is achieved by operating all the layers in parallel. Using Hall effect sensing, and optical sensing via the Faraday effect to access the data from within the three-dimensional packages, an even higher data transfer rate can be achieved due to parallel operation within each layer.

  6. Progressive cavity pump

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.W.

    1989-04-04

    A progressive cavity pump is described, comprising: a first housing portion defining an inlet; a second housing portion attachable to the first housing portion and defining an outlet; a substantially elastomeric stator comprising an outer portion removably attached to the first and second housing portions, having a first end and a second end spaced from the first end, an inner portion defining a pumping chamber and spaced an annular end portion interconnecting the first ends of the outer and inner portions; a rotor disposed in the inner portion of the stator and extending through the pumping chamber for pumping fluid from the inlet to the outlet in response to rotation of the rotor; and an elongated member disposed in the housing portions and generally annularly between the inner and outer portions of the stator and longitudinally between the annular end portion of the stator and a portion of the second housing portion, the member being removable from the housing portions and separable from the stator.

  7. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  8. 1310nm VCSELs in 1-10Gb/s commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Jack; Graham, Luke; Crom, Max; Maranowski, Kevin; Smith, Joseph; Fanning, Tom

    2006-02-01

    Beginning with 4 Gigabit/sec Fibre-Channel, 1310nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are now entering the marketplace. Such VCSELs perform like distributed feedback lasers but have drive currents and heat dissipation like 850nm VCSELs, making them ideal for today's high-performance interconnects and the only choice for the next step in increased interconnection density. Transceiver performances at 4 and 10 Gigabits/sec over fiber lengths 10-40km are presented. The active material is extremely robust, resulting in excellent reliability.

  9. Multiply scattered light tomography and confocal imaging: detecting neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Ann E.; Miura, Masahiro; Burns, Stephen Allan; Beausencourt, E.; Kunze, C.; Kelley, L. M.; Walker, J. P.; Wing, G. L.; Raskauskas, P. A.; Fletcher, D. C.; Zhou, Qienyuan; Dreher, Andreas W.

    2000-07-01

    A novel technique, Multiply Scattered Light Tomography (MSLT), and confocal Infrared Imaging are used to provide diagnostic information using a comfortable, rapid, and noninvasive method. We investigated these techniques in detecting neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. The MSLT used a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) at 850 nm, while the confocal imaging technique used either the VCSEL or a 790 nm laser diode. Both were implemented into the topographical scanning system (TopSS, Laser Diagnostic Technologies, Inc.) Confocal imaging with both lasers provided different information about neovascularization as a function of focal plane, and different also from MSLT.

  10. VCSEL-based flexible opto-fluidic fluorescence sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dongseok; Gai, Boju; Yoon, Jongseung

    2016-03-01

    Flexible opto-fluidic fluorescence sensors based on microscale vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (micro-VCSELs) and silicon photodiodes (Si-PDs) are demonstrated, where arrays of 850 nm micro-VCSELs and thin film Si-PDs are heterogeneously integrated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by transfer printing, in conjunction with elastomeric fluidic channel. Enabled with optical isolation trenches together with wavelength- and angle-selective spectral filters implemented to suppress the absorption of excitation light, the integrated flexible fluorescence sensors exhibited significantly enhanced signal-to-background ratio, resulting in a maximum sensitivity of 5 × 10-5 wt% of infrared-absorbing organic dyes.

  11. Polymer wedge for perfectly vertical light coupling to silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrauwen, J.; Scheerlinck, S.; Van Thourhout, D.; Baets, R.

    2009-02-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a refractive polymer wedge that allows perfectly vertical coupling of light into a silicon waveguide, which is of interest for flip-chip bonding of vertical cavity emitting light sources on a silicon integrated circuit. The structure includes a conventional diffractive grating coupler that requires off-normal incidence to avoid second order Bragg reflections. The polymer wedge is thus used to refract vertically impinging light into an off-normal wave that couples into the underlying grating. The fabrication involves two steps: mold fabrication and imprint replication. Firstly negative wedge-shaped craters are etched into a quartz mold by Focused-ion-beam milling. Secondly the mold is used to imprint a UV-curable polymer onto a silicon chip containing waveguides and grating couplers, and so replicating the wedges. The characterization setup consisted of a fiber-to-fiber transmission measurement of a silicon waveguide equipped with a pair of grating couplers and polymer wedges. The obtained fiber coupling efficiency was equal to the efficiency of regular grating couplers and fiber positioned at an off-normal angle. The proposed fabrication method enables low cost integration of vertical cavity emitting light sources on silicon integrated photonic circuits.

  12. Novel Crab Cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Sah, R.; Rimmer, B.; Wang, H.

    2011-03-01

    A 20-50 MV integrated transverse voltage is required for the Electron-Ion Collider. The most promising of the crab cavity designs that have been proposed in the last five years are the TEM type crab cavities because of the higher transverse impedance. The TEM design approach is extended here to a hybrid crab cavity that includes the input power coupler as an integral part of the design. A prototype was built with Phase I monies and tested at JLAB. The results reported on, and a system for achieving 20-50 MV is proposed.

  13. Call for Papers: Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, W.; Gerard, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    Cavity QED interactions of light and matter have been investigated in a wide range of systems covering the spectrum from microwaves to optical frequencies, using media as diverse as single atoms and semiconductors. Impressive progress has been achieved technologically as well as conceptually. This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is intended to provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of cavity QED by uniting contributions from researchers active across this field. As Guest Editors of this topical issue, we invite manuscripts on current theoretical and experimental work on any aspects of cavity QED. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletCavity QED in optical microcavities bulletSemiconductor cavity QED bulletQuantum dot cavity QED bulletRydberg atoms in microwave cavities bulletPhotonic crystal cavity QED bulletMicrosphere resonators bulletMicrolasers and micromasers bulletMicrodroplets bulletDielectric cavity QED bulletCavity QED-based quantum information processing bulletQuantum state engineering in cavities The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the

  14. Vertical integration of ultrafast semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, D. J. H. C.; Bellancourt, A.-R.; Rudin, B.; Golling, M.; Unold, H. J.; Südmeyer, T.; Keller, U.

    2007-09-01

    Lasers generating short pulses - referred to as ultrafast lasers - enable many applications in science and technology. Numerous laboratory experiments have confirmed that ultrafast lasers can significantly increase telecommunication data rates [1], improve computer interconnects, and optically clock microprocessors [2, 3]. New applications in metrology [4], supercontinuum generation [5], and life sciences with two-photon microscopy [6] only work with ultrashort pulses but have relied on bulky and complex ultrafast solid-state lasers. Semiconductor lasers are ideally suited for mass production and widespread applications, because they are based on a wafer-scale technology with a high level of integration. Not surprisingly, the first lasers entering virtually every household were semiconductor lasers in compact disk players. Here we introduce a new concept and make the first feasibility demonstration of a new class of ultrafast semiconductor lasers which are power scalable, support both optical and electrical pumping and allow for wafer-scale fabrication. The laser beam propagates vertically (perpendicularly) through the epitaxial layer structure which has both gain and absorber layers integrated. In contrast to edge-emitters, these lasers have semiconductor layers that can be optimized separately by using different growth parameters and with no regrowth. This is especially important to integrate the gain and absorber layers, which require different quantum confinement. A saturable absorber is required for pulse generation and we optimized its parameters with a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot layer at low growth temperatures. We refer to this class of devices as modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting lasers (MIXSEL). Vertical integration supports a diffraction-limited circular output beam, transform-limited pulses, lower timing jitter, and synchronization to an external electronic clock. The pulse repetition rate scales from 1-GHz to 100-GHz by

  15. CRAB Cavity in CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Beam collisions with a crossing angle at the interaction point are often necessary in colliders to reduce the effects of parasitic collisions which induce emittance growth and decrease beam lifetime. The crossing angle reduces the geometrical overlap of the beams and hence the luminosity. Crab cavity offer a promising way to compensate the crossing angle and to realize effective head-on collisions. Moreover, the crab crossing mitigates the synchro-betatron resonances due to the crossing angle. A crab cavity experiment in SPS is proposed as a proof of principle before deciding on a full crab-cavity implementation in the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the effects of a single crab cavity on beam dynamics in the SPS and life time.

  16. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  17. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  18. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control. PMID:27521039

  19. Development of the superconducting rf 2-cell cavity for cERL injector at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Noguchi, S.; Kako, E.; Umemori, K.; Shishido, T.

    2013-06-01

    An injector cryomodule for the compact energy recovery linac (cERL) is under development at KEK. This injector cryomodule has 3 L-band 2-cell superconducting rf cavities. The cERL is required to accelerate a 10-mA CW electron beam to 5 MeV. The required accelerating gradient per cavity is 7.5-12.5 MV/m at ˜30 kW input power to the cavity and the beam. The operational frequency is 1300 MHz at 2 K and the mode of operation is CW. In this application, the critical hardware components are not the cavities, but the rf input couplers and higher-order-mode (HOM) dampers. Initially, a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler was chosen for HOM damping of the injector cavities. However, this HOM coupler had a heating problem at low gradients (a few MV/m) in CW operation. The components heated in the accelerating mode were the HOM body and the feedthrough that extracts HOM power from the cavity. To control the heating problem, a new HOM coupler was designed based on a TESLA-style coaxial HOM coupler, and the feedthrough was also modified based on a Kyocera N-R type connector to have better thermal conductivity. A prototype 2-cell cavity and 3 other 2-cell cavities with 5 new HOM couplers for actual operation were fabricated through May 2011. Vertical tests of these cavities were carried out after standard surface preparation at the KEK Superconducting Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-STF) through March 2012. The accelerating gradient achieved exceeded 50 MV/m without quenching during the vertical test using the prototype 2-cell cavity and feedthroughs. The magnetic field at the cell equator was 2127 Oe. Three 2-cell cavities passing the criteria of the High Pressure Gas Safety Institute of Japan exceeded 25 MV/m without field emissions. The cavities with the best performance were prepared in March 2012 for the cERL injector. The designs of the HOM couplers and feedthroughs and the results of the vertical tests to evaluate their performance are reported here.

  20. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  1. The vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosein, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Today's flight simulators, such as NASA's multimillion dollar Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), recreate an authentic aircraft environment, and reproduce the sensations of flight by mechanically generating true physical events. In addition to their application as a training tool for pilots, simulators have become essential in the design, construction, and testing of new aircraft. Simulators allow engineers to study an aircraft's flight performance and characteristics without the cost or risk of an actual test flight. Because of their practicality, simulators will become more and more important in the development and design of new, safer aircraft.

  2. Cavity-Enhanced Immunoassay Measurements in Microtiter Plates Using BBCEAS.

    PubMed

    Bajuszova, Zuzana; Ali, Zulfiqur; Scott, Simon; Seetohul, L Nitin; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-17

    We report on the first detailed use of broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) as a detection system for immunoassay. A vertical R ≥ 0.99 optical cavity was integrated with a motorized XY stage, which functioned as a receptacle for 96-well microtiter plates. The custom-built cavity enhanced microplate reader was used to make measurements on a commercially available osteocalcin sandwich ELISA kit. A 30-fold increase in path length was obtained with a minimum detectable change in the absorption coefficient, αmin(t), of 5.3 × 10(-5) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). This corresponded to a 39-fold increase in the sensitivity of measurement when directly compared to measurements in a conventional microplate reader. Separate measurements of a standard STREP-HRP colorimetric reaction in microtiter plates of differing optical quality produced an increase in sensitivity of up to 115-fold compared to a conventional microplate reader. The sensitivity of the developed setup compared favorably with previous liquid-phase cavity enhanced studies and approaches the sensitivity of typical fluorometric ELISAs. It could benefit any biochemical test which uses single pass absorption as a detection method, through either the label free detection of biologically important molecules at lower concentrations or the reduction in the amount of expensive biochemicals needed for a particular test, leading to cheaper tests. PMID:27089516

  3. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  4. Vertical organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. PMID:26466388

  5. Radiation shielding for superconducting RF cavity test facility at A0

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Ginsburg, C.; Rakhno, I.; Wu, G.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding study performed with the MARS15 code for the vertical test facility at the A0 north cave enclosure at Fermilab are presented and discussed. The vertical test facility at the A0 north cave is planned to be used for testing 1.3 GHz single-cell superconducting RF cavities with accelerating length of 0.115 m. The operations will be focused on high accelerating gradients--up to 50 MV/m. In such a case the facility can be a strong radiation source [1]. When performing a radiation shielding design for the facility one has to take into account gammas generated due to interactions of accelerated electrons with cavity walls and surroundings (for example, range of 3.7-MeV electrons in niobium is approximately 3.1 mm while the thickness of the niobium walls of such RF cavities is about 2.8 mm). The electrons are usually the result of contamination in the cavity. The radiation shielding study was performed with the MARS15 Monte Carlo code [2]. A realistic model of the source term has been used that describes spatial, energy and angular distributions of the field-emitted electrons inside the RF cavities. The results of the calculations are normalized using the existing experimental data on measured dose rate in the vicinity of such RF cavities.

  6. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  7. Radius vertical graded nanoscale interlaced-coupled photonic crystal sensors array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pan; Tian, Huiping; Yang, Daquan; Liu, Qi; Zhou, Jian; Huang, Lijun; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-11-01

    A radius vertical graded photonic crystal sensors array based on a monolithic substrate is proposed, which is potentially to be used as label-free detection in aqueous environments. The sensors array device consists of five resonant cavities including three H1 cavities and two L2 cavities which are interlaced-coupled to a radius vertical graded single photonic crystal line defect waveguide (W1). Each resonator has a different resonant wavelength dip which can shift independently with crosstalk lower than -13 dB in response to the refractive index change of air holes around every cavity. With three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) method, simulation results demonstrate that the quality factors of microcavities are over 104. Besides, the refractive index sensitivity is 100 nm/RIU with the detection limit approximately of 5.63×10-4. Meanwhile, the radius vertical graded photonic crystal with more interlaced cavities is more suited to ultracompact optical monolithic integration.

  8. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  9. Coupling of an overdriven cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Garbin, H.D.

    1993-11-01

    It is well known that when a nuclear test is conducted in a sufficiently large cavity, the resulting seismic signal is sharply reduced when compared to a normal tamped event. Cavity explosions are of interest in the seismic verification community because of this possibility of reducing the seismic energy generated which can lower signal amplitudes and make detection difficult. Reduced amplitudes would also lower seismic yield estimates which has implications in a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT). In the past several years, there have been a number of nuclear tests at NTS (Nevada Test Site) inside hemispherical cavities. Two such tests were MILL YARD and MISTY ECHO which had instrumentation at the surface and in the free-field. These two tests differ in one important aspect. MILL YARD was completely decoupled i.e., the cavity wall behaved in an elastic manner. It was estimated that MILL YARD`s ground motion was reduced by a factor of at least 70. In contrast, MISTY ECHO was detonated in a hemispherical cavity with the same dimensions as MILL YARD, but with a much larger device yield. This caused an inelastic behavior on the wall and the explosion was not fully decoupled.

  10. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Bousson, Sebastien; Duthil, Patxi; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  11. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Olivier, Gilles; Renard, Bertrand; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  12. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousson, Sebastien; Darve, Christine; Duthil, Patxi; Elias, Nuno; Molloy, Steve; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  13. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Renard, Bertrand; Olivier, Gilles; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  14. Cavity optomechanics and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Mishkatul

    2009-05-01

    Cavity optomechanics is an emerging field at the intersection of quantum optics, atomic physics, nanoscience and gravitational wave interferometry. It involves cavities (with one or more mechanical degrees of freedom) driven by laser radiation. The ensuing optical control of macroscopic mechanical motion may have implications for precision sensing, coherent control of atoms and molecules, and quantum information processing. Due to recent innovations optomechanical physics has been realized in a variety of experimental systems spanning many orders of magnitude in mass and time-scales. In this talk, I will first introduce the basic paradigm of a laser-driven two mirror cavity used for cooling a vibrational mode. A three-mirror configuration recently implemented using a partially transmissive dielectric membrane in a high finesse cavity will then be discussed, and shown to be superior to the two-mirror design in a number of ways. One implication of the three-mirror configuration is the possibility of scaling optomechanical techniques to multiple oscillators. This topic will be explored by analysing the case of two membranes in a cavity where it will be shown that the collective(center-of-mass and breathing) modes of vibration can be cooled independently, analogous to a chain of trapped ions. Finally, future directions for possible applications to the control of atoms and molecules will be indicated briefly.

  15. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  16. Measurement of ultralow vertical emittance using a calibrated vertical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Very few experimental techniques are useful for the direct observation of ultralow vertical emittance in electron storage rings. In this work, quantitative measurements of ultralow (pm rad) electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator are presented. An undulator radiation model was developed using the measured magnetic field of the APPLE-II type undulator. Using calibrated experimental apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of ɛy=0.9 ±0.3 pm rad has been observed. These measurements could also inform modeling of the angular distribution of undulator radiation at high harmonics, for proposed diffraction-limited storage ring light sources.

  17. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  18. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  19. Optimization Studies for Radiation Shielding of a Superconducting RF Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-07-09

    Test facilities for high-gradient superconducting RF cavities must be shielded for particle radiation, which is generated by field emitted electrons in the cavities. A major challenge for the shielding design is associated with uncertainty in modeling the field emission. In this work, a semi-empirical method that allows us to predict the intensity of the generated field emission is described. Spatial, angular and energy distributions of the generated radiation are calculated with the FISHPACT code. The Monte Carlo code MARS15 is used for modeling the radiation transport in matter. The detailed distributions of the generated field emission are used for studies with 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavities in the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility. This approach allows us to minimize the amount of shielding inside cryostat which is an essential operational feature.

  20. Phoxonic crystals and cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; El-Jallal, Said; Pennec, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Phoxonic crystals are dual phononic/photonic crystals exhibiting simultaneously band gaps for both types of excitations. Therefore, they have the ability to confine phonons and photons in the same cavity and in turn allow the enhancement of their interaction. In this paper, we review some of our theoretical works on cavity optomechanical interactions in different types of phoxonic crystals, including two-dimensional, slab, and nanobeam structures. Two mechanisms are behind the phonon-photon interaction, namely the photoelastic and the moving interface effects. Coupling rates of a few MHz are obtained with high-frequency phonons of a few GHz. Finally, we give some preliminary results about the optomechanical interaction when a metallic nanoparticle is introduced into the cavity, giving rise to coupled photon-plasmon modes or, in the case of very small particles, to an enhancement of the electric field at the position of the particle. xml:lang="fr"

  1. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  2. Apparatus For Linewidth Reduction in Distributed Feedback or Distributed Bragg Reflector Semiconductor Lasers Using Vertical Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony L. (Inventor); Hendricks, Herbert D. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The linewidth of a distributed feedback semiconductor laser or a distributed Bragg reflector laser having one or more second order gratings is reduced by using an external cavity to couple the vertical emission back into the laser. This method and device prevent disturbance of the main laser beam, provide unobstructed access to laser emission for the formation of the external cavity, and do not require a very narrow heat sink. Any distributed Bragg reflector semiconductor laser or distributed feedback semiconductor laser that can produce a vertical emission through the epitaxial material and through a window in the top metallization can be used. The external cavity can be formed with an optical fiber or with a lens and a mirror or grating.

  3. Advance in Vertical Buffered Electropolishing on Niobium for Particle Accelerators*

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, J.D. Mammosser, C.E. Reece, R.A. Rimmer,L. Lin, X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Niobium (Nb) is the most popular material that has been employed for making superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in various particle accelerators over the last couple of decades. One of the most important steps in fabricating Nb SRF cavities is the final chemical removal of 150 {mu}m of Nb from the inner surfaces of the SRF cavities. This is usually done by either buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP). Recently a new Nb surface treatment technique called buffered electropolishing (BEP) has been developed at Jefferson Lab. It has been demonstrated that BEP can produce the smoothest surface finish on Nb ever reported in the literature while realizing a Nb removal rate as high as 10 {mu}m/min that is more than 25 and 5 times quicker than those of EP and BCP(112) respectively. In this contribution, recent advance in optimizing and understanding BEP treatment technique is reviewed. Latest results from RF measurements on BEP treated Nb single cell cavities by our unique vertical polishing system will be reported.

  4. Experimental cavity pressure distributions at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to define pressure distributions for rectangular cavities over a range of free-stream Mach numbers and cavity dimensions. These pressure distributions together with schlieren photographs are used to define the critical values of cavity length-to-depth ratio that separate open type cavity flows from closed type cavity flows. For closed type cavity flow, the shear layer expands over the cavity leading edge and impinges on the cavity floor, whereas for open type cavity flow, the shear layer bridges the cavity. The tests were conducted by using a flat-plate model permitting the cavity length to be remotely varied from 0.5 to 12 in. Cavity depths and widths were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 in. The flat-plate boundary layer approaching the cavity was turbulent and had a thickness of approximately 0.2 in. at the cavity front face for the range of test Mach numbers from 1.5 to 2.86. Presented are a discussion of the results and a complete tabulation of the experimental data.

  5. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity.

    PubMed

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction. PMID:25871175

  6. Blackbody Cavity for Calibrations at 200 to 273 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Dane; Ryan, Robert; Ryan, Jim; Henderson, Doug; Clayton, Larry

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory blackbody cavity has been designed and built for calibrating infrared radiometers used to measure radiant temperatures in the range from about 200 to about 273 K. In this below-room-temperature range, scattering of background infrared radiation from room-temperature surfaces could, potentially, contribute significantly to the spectral radiance of the blackbody cavity, thereby contributing a significant error to the radiant temperature used as the calibration value. The present blackbody cavity is of an established type in which multiple reflections from a combination of conical and cylindrical black-coated walls are exploited to obtain an effective emissivity greater than the emissivity value of the coating material on a flat exposed surface. The coating material in this case is a flat black paint that has an emissivity of approximately of 0.91 in the thermal spectral range and was selected over other, higher-emissivity materials because of its ability to withstand thermal cycling. We found many black coatings cracked and flaked after thermal cycling due to differences in the coefficient of expansion differences. On the basis of theoretical calculations, the effective emissivity is expected to approach 0.999. The cylindrical/conical shell enclosing the cavity is machined from copper, which is chosen for its high thermal conductivity. In use, the shell is oriented vertically, open end facing up, and inserted in a Dewar flask filled with isopropyl alcohol/dry-ice slush. A flange at the open end of the shell is supported by a thermally insulating ring on the lip of the Dewar flask. The slush cools the shell (and thus the black-body cavity) to the desired temperature. Typically, the slush starts at a temperature of about 194 K. The slush is stirred and warmed by bubbling dry air or nitrogen through it, thereby gradually increasing the temperature through the aforementioned calibration range during an interval of several hours. The temperature of the slush

  7. Heat and mass transfer in multi-porous cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Saghir, M.Z.

    1998-10-01

    The study of heat and mass transfer in porous media has a large number of applications in the areas of environmental geothermal and petroleum engineering. Problems such as the disposal of waste material and groundwater contamination are only few applications of the present work. When heat and species transfer takes place within a fluid layer, the temperature and concentration gradients create a convection mode. This phenomenon is called double-diffusive convection. In this paper, two-dimensional non-linear double diffusive convection in a multiporous cavity is considered. The Darcy equation, including Brinkman term to account for the viscous effects, is used as the momentum equation. The model consists of two rectangular cavities filled with glass beads having a diameter d{sub 1} of either 5.25 mm (Case 1) or 3.25 mm (Case 2). The smaller cavity is located at the top left corner of the larger one. The larger cavity is filled initially with hot salty fluid while the smaller one contains initially cold fresh fluid. At the initial time, the obstacle between the two cavities was released and the double diffusive phenomena were studied in details. The momentum, solutal, energy and continuity equations are solved numerically using the finite element technique. This transient problem is solved for two different Darcy numbers. For each Darcy number, the influence of the solutal Rayleigh number on double diffusive convection was studied in details. The permeability in the horizontal and vertical direction was assumed identical. A comparison of the intruding force between this case and the open flow case studied by Saghir et al. showed that it is inversely proportional to the Darcy number. Finite element modeling results indicate that salinity induces stronger convection than the thermal ones.

  8. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents on-line tools for proper vertical positioning of vertical sampling intervals during site assessment. Proper vertical sample interval selection is critical for generate data on the vertical distribution of contamination. Without vertical delineation, th...

  9. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  10. Great progress in developing 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, JianFei; Hou, HongTao; Mao, DongQing; Feng, ZiQiang; Ma, ZhenYu; Luo, Chen; Zhao, ShenJie; Zhao, YuBin; Yu, HaiBo; Yin, Bo; Zhang, ZhiGang; Zheng, Xiang; Li, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    Superconducting cavities have been adopted in many kinds of accelerator facilities such as synchrotron radiation light source, hard X-ray free electron laser linac, colliders and energy recovery linacs (ERL). The 500 MHz superconducting cavities will be a candidate to be installed in the high current accelerators and high current ERLs for their large beam aperture, low higher order modes impedance and high current threshold value. This paper presents great progress in the whole sequence of developing 500 MHz superconducting cavity in China. It describes the first in-house successful development of 500 MHz single cell superconducting cavity including the deep-drawing of niobium half cells, electron beam wielding of cavity, surface preparations and vertical testing. The highest accelerating gradient of the fabricated cavity #SCD-02 higher than 10 MV/m was obtained while the quality factor was better than 4×108 at 4.2 K, which has reached the world level of the same kind of cavities.

  11. Utilization of Cavity Vortex To Delay the Wetting Transition in One-Dimensional Structured Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Anvesh; Agrawal, Amit; Joshi, Suhas S; Thompson, M C

    2015-12-15

    Frictional resistance across rough surfaces depends on the existence of slip on the liquid-gas interface; therefore, prolonging the existence of liquid-gas interface becomes relevant. In this work, we explore manipulation of the cavity shape in order to delay the wetting transition. We propose that liquid-driven vortices generated in the air cavity dissipate sufficient energy to delay the Cassie-Wenzel transition. Toward this, we fabricated cavities on the side walls of a polydimethylsiloxane-based microchannel for easy visualization and analysis of the dynamics of the liquid-gas interface. Two distinct flow regimes are identified in the experimental envelope. In the first regime, the liquid-gas interface is found to be protruding into the flow field, thus increasing the pressure drop at low Reynolds number. In the second regime, flow rate and geometry-based wetting transitions are established at moderate to high Reynolds numbers. We then investigate the effect of different cavity shapes (square, trapezoidal, and U-shape) in delaying the wetting transition by manipulating liquid-driven vortices. Out of the shapes considered in this study, trapezoidal cavities perform better than cavities with vertical walls in delaying the wetting transition due to geometrical squeezing of vortices toward the liquid-gas interface. Numerical simulations corroborate the experimental findings in that cavities with inclined walls exert more force on the liquid-gas interface, thus delaying their wetting transition. The proposed method being passive in nature appears more attractive than previous active methods. PMID:26598001

  12. Atomic and Photonic Entanglement Generation in n Coupled Atom-Cavity Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sufiani, R.; Darkhosh, A.

    2015-07-01

    Based on two-photon Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian for the n coupled optical cavities each of them containing a single three level atom, the n-qubit and n-photonic state transfer between the corresponding atoms and cavities is investigated. In fact, we consider that the cavities are located at the nodes (vertices) of the complete network (graph) K n at which all of the nodes are connected, so that the cavities are interact with each other (via two photon exchange) completely. Then, quantum state transfer, photon transition between cavities and entanglement generations between n atoms are discussed. More clearly, by employing the consistency of number of photons and atomic excitations (the symmetry of Hamiltonian), the hamiltonian of the system is reduced from 3 n dimensional space into 2 n dimensional one. Moreover, by introducing suitable basis for the atom-cavity state space based on Fourier transform, the reduced Hamiltonian is block-diagonalized, with 2 dimensional blocks. Then, the initial state of the system is evolved under the corresponding Hamiltonian and the suitable times T at which the initially unentangled atoms, become maximally entangled, are determined in terms of the hopping strength ξ between cavities.

  13. First Test Results of the bERLinPro 2-cell Booster Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Burrill, Andrew; Anders, W.; Frahm, A.; Knobloch, Jens; Neumann, Axel; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Kneisel, Peter; Turlington, Larry

    2015-09-01

    The bERLinPro Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently being built at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin in order to study the physics of operating a high-current, a 100 mA, 50 MeV ERL utilizing all SRF cavity technology. This machine will utilize three unique SRF cryomodules for the photoinjector, booster and linac cryomodules respectively. The focus of this paper will be on the cavities contained within the booster cryomodule. Here there will be three 2-cell SRF cavities, based on the original design by Cornell University, but optimized to meet the needs of the project. All of the cavity fabrication, processing and testing was carried out at Jefferson Laboratory, where 4 cavities were produced, and the 3 cavities with the best RF performance were fitted with helium vessels for installation in the cryomodule. This paper will report on the test results of the cavities as measured in the vertical testing dewar at JLab after fabrication and again after outfitting with the helium vessels.

  14. Progress on a Be Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Palmer, R.; Stratakis, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-12-24

    Previous RF experiments with normal-conducting cavities have demonstrated that there is a significant degradation in maximum gradient when the cavity is subjected to a strong axial magnetic field. We have developed a model suggesting that a cavity with beryllium walls may perform better than copper cavities. In this paper we outline the issues that led us to propose fabricating a Be-wall cavity. We also discuss a concept for fabricating such a cavity and mention some of the manufacturing issues we expect to face.

  15. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  16. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  17. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  18. Vertically reciprocating auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Mark; Morgan, Scott; Fain, Robert; Pearson, Jonathan; Weldi, Kevin; Woodrough, Stephen B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical model and test results developed for the Vertically Reciprocating Auger (VRA) are summarized. The VRA is a device capable of transporting cuttings that result from below surface drilling. It was developed chiefly for the lunar surface, where conventional fluid flushing while drilling would not be practical. The VRA uses only reciprocating motion and transports material through reflections with the surface above. Particles are reflected forward and land ahead of radially placed fences, which prevent the particles from rolling back down the auger. Three input wave forms are considered to drive the auger. A modified sawtooth wave form was chosen for testing, over a modified square wave or sine wave, due to its simplicity and effectiveness. The three-dimensional mathematical model predicted a sand throughput rate of 0.2667 pounds/stroke, while the actual test setup transported 0.075 pounds/stroke. Based on this result, a correction factor of 0.281 is suggested for a modified sawtooth input.

  19. Large-mode enhancement cavities.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Henning; Holzberger, Simon; Kaster, Jan; Weitenberg, Johannes; Pervak, Volodymyr; Apolonski, Alexander; Fill, Ernst; Krausz, Ferenc; Pupeza, Ioachim

    2013-05-01

    In passive enhancement cavities the achievable power level is limited by mirror damage. Here, we address the design of robust optical resonators with large spot sizes on all mirrors, a measure that promises to mitigate this limitation by decreasing both the intensity and the thermal gradient on the mirror surfaces. We introduce a misalignment sensitivity metric to evaluate the robustness of resonator designs. We identify the standard bow-tie resonator operated close to the inner stability edge as the most robust large-mode cavity and implement this cavity with two spherical mirrors with 600 mm radius of curvature, two plane mirrors and a round trip length of 1.2 m, demonstrating a stable power enhancement of near-infrared laser light by a factor of 2000. Beam radii of 5.7 mm × 2.6 mm (sagittal × tangential 1/e(2) intensity radius) on all mirrors are obtained. We propose a simple all-reflective ellipticity compensation scheme. This will enable a significant increase of the attainable power and intensity levels in enhancement cavities. PMID:23670017

  20. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  1. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  2. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  3. ADPF spoke cavity cryomodule concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J. P.; Roybal, P. L.; La Fave, R. P.; Waynert, J. A.; Schrage, D. L.; Schmierer, E. N.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Garnett, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Driven Test Facility (ADTF) is being developed as a reactor concepts test bed for transmutation of nuclear waste. A 13.3 mA continuous-wave (CW) proton beam will be accelerated to 600 MeV and impinged on a spallation target. The subsequent neutron shower is used to create a nuclear reaction within a subcritical assembly of waste material that reduces the waste half-life from the order of 10{sup 5} years to 10{sup 2} years. Additionally, significant energy is produced that can be used to generate electrical power. The ADTF proton accelerator consists of room-temperature (RT) structures that accelerate the beam to 6.7-MeV and superconducting (SC) elements that boost the beam's energy to 600-MeV. Traditional SC elliptical cavities experience structural difficulties at low energies due to their geometry. Therefore, stiff-structured SC spoke cavities have been adopted for the energy range between 6.7 and 109 MeV. Elliptical cavities are used at the higher energies. This paper describes a multi-spoke-cavity cryomodule concept for ADTF.

  4. Nanobeam cavities for Reconfigurable Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deotare, Parag B.

    We investigate the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, with theoretical quality factors of 1.4 x 107 in silicon, operating at ˜ 1550 nm. By detecting the cross-polarized resonantly scattered light from a normally incident laser beam, we measure a quality factor of nearly 7.5 x 105. We show on-chip integration of the cavities using waveguides and an inverse taper geometry based mode size converters, and also demonstrate tuning of the optical resonance using thermo-optic effect. We also study coupled cavities and show that the single nanobeam cavity modes are coupled into even and odd superposition modes. Using electrostatic force and taking advantage of the highly dispersive nature of the even mode to the nanobeam separation, we demonstrate dynamically reconfigurable optical filters tunable continuously and reversibly over a 9.5 nm wavelength range. The electrostatic force, obtained by applying bias voltages directly to the nanobeams, is used to control the spacing between the nanobeams, which in turn results in tuning of the cavity resonance. The observed tuning trends were confirmed through simulations that modeled the electrostatic actuation as well as the optical resonances in our reconfigurable geometries. Finally we demonstrate reconfiguration of coupled cavities by using optical gradient force induced mechanical actuation. Propagating waveguide modes that exist over wide wavelength range are used to actuate the structures and in that way control the resonance of a localized cavity mode. Using this all-optical approach, more than 18 linewidths of tuning range is demonstrated. Using an on-chip temperature self-referencing method that we developed, we determined that 20% of the total tuning was due to optomechanical reconfiguration and the rest due to thermo-optic effects. By operating the device at frequencies higher than the thermal cut-off, we show high speed operation dominated by

  5. Optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining and fusion splicing for refractive index sensing.

    PubMed

    Liao, C R; Hu, T Y; Wang, D N

    2012-09-24

    We demonstrate a fiber in-line Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity sensor for refractive index measurement. The interferometer cavity is formed by drilling a micro-hole at the cleaved fiber end facet, followed by fusion splicing. A micro-channel is inscribed by femtosecond laser micromachining to vertically cross the cavity to allow liquid to flow in. The refractive index sensitivity obtained is ~994 nm/RIU (refractive index unit). Such a device is simple in configuration, easy for fabrication and reliable in operation due to extremely low temperature cross sensitivity of ~4.8 × 10(-6) RIU/°C. PMID:23037431

  6. Extinction measurement with open-path cavity ring-down technique of variable cavity length.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao; Li, Bincheng; Han, Yanling; Wang, Jing; Gao, Chunming; Wang, Yafei

    2016-06-13

    Open-path cavity ring down (OPCRD) technique with variable cavity length was developed to measure optical extinction including scattering and absorption of air in laboratory environment at 635 nm wavelength. By moving the rear cavity mirror of the ring-down cavity to change cavity length, ring-down time with different cavity lengths was experimentally obtained and the dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length was determined. The extinction coefficient of air was determined by the slope of linear dependence of total cavity loss on cavity length. The extinction coefficients of air with different particle concentrations at 635 nm wavelength were measured to be from 10.46 to 84.19 Mm-1 (ppm/m) in a normal laboratory environment. This variable-cavity-length OPCRD technique can be used for absolute extinction measurement and real-time environmental monitoring without closed-path sample cells and background measurements. PMID:27410351

  7. Rigorous design of an ultra-high Q/V photonic/plasmonic cavity to be used in biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conteduca, D.; Dell'Olio, F.; Innone, F.; Ciminelli, C.; Armenise, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid device based on a 1D PhC dielectric cavity vertically coupled to a plasmonic slot is proposed for use in biosensing applications. Under efficient coupling conditions between the Bloch mode in the 1D PhC dielectric cavity and the surface plasmon polaritons mode in the metal slot, an ultra-high Q/V ratio (~107(λ/n)-3) has been achieved with a remarkable resonance transmission T (=47%), due to high spectral and spatial confinement in the cavity. The rigorous design process of the cavity, including the influence of geometrical and physical parameters on its performance, has been carried out using the 3D Finite Element Method. A strong light-matter interaction was observed, making the photonic-plasmonic cavity suitable for biosensing and, in particular, for optical trapping of living matter at nanoscale, such as proteins and DNA sections, as required in several biomedical applications.

  8. The Gains from Vertical Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Domingue, Ben

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that a vertical scale is necessary when value-added models depend upon the gain scores of students across two or more points in time. This article examines the conditions under which the scale transformations associated with the vertical scaling process would be expected to have a significant impact on normative interpretations…

  9. Scale Shrinkage in Vertical Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Three potential causes of scale shrinkage (measurement error, restriction of range, and multidimensionality) in item response theory vertical equating are discussed, and a more comprehensive model-based approach to establishing vertical scales is described. Test data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress are used to illustrate the…

  10. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  12. Vertical electrostatically 90° turning flaps for reflective MEMS display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Fabio; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2011-03-01

    A new kind of MEMS reflective display is being developed having high contrast and reflectivity, better than on printed paper. The system is based on novel vertical flaps, which can be electrostatically turned by 90° to horizontal position. After fabrication, the poly-silicon flaps are vertical to the wafer surface and on the top suspended by torsion beams. In this state the pixel is black, incoming ambient light passes by the flaps and is absorbed by an underlying absorptive layer. When the flaps are turned to horizontal position light is reflected back and the pixel gets white. A self-aligning four masks bulk microfabrication process is employed, which uses poly-silicon filling of high aspect-ratio cavities. Parylene was also employed as flap material. Thanks to auto stress-compensation the flaps are not deformed due to intrinsic stresses. Low actuation voltages down to 20V can be achieved.

  13. Understanding cavity resonances with intracavity dispersion properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Jiteng; Wu Haibin; Mumba, M.; Gea-Banacloche, J.; Xiao Min

    2011-02-15

    We experimentally study the strongly coupled three-level atom-cavity system at both cavity and coupling frequency detuning cases. Side peak splitting and anti-crossing-like phenomena are observed under different experimental conditions. Intracavity dispersion properties are used to explain qualitatively the complicated cavity resonance structures in the composite system of inhomogeneously broadened three-level atoms inside an optical ring cavity with relatively strong driving intensities.

  14. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  15. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.

    1992-08-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity toning and matching problems.

  16. The nasal cavity microbiota of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the nares has been widely studied. However, relatively few studies have investigated the microbiota of the nasal cavity posterior to the nares. This distinct environment has the potential to contain a distinct microbiota and play an important role in health. Results We obtained 35,142 high-quality bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequence reads from the nasal cavity and oral cavity (the dorsum of the tongue and the buccal mucosa) of 12 healthy adult humans and deposited these data in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) (Bioproject: PRJNA248297). In our initial analysis, we compared the bacterial communities of the nasal cavity and the oral cavity from ten of these subjects. The nasal cavity bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria and were statistically distinct from those on the tongue and buccal mucosa. For example, the same Staphylococcaceae operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was present in all of the nasal cavity samples, comprising up to 55% of the community, but Staphylococcaceae was comparatively uncommon in the oral cavity. Conclusions There are clear differences between nasal cavity microbiota and oral cavity microbiota in healthy adults. This study expands our knowledge of the nasal cavity microbiota and the relationship between the microbiota of the nasal and oral cavities. PMID:25143824

  17. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...