Science.gov

Sample records for 858-386-6078 krissy bartels

  1. Solution of the Bartels-Kwiecinski-Praszalowicz equation via Monte Carlo integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachamis, Grigorios; Sabio Vera, Agustín

    2016-08-01

    We present a method of solution of the Bartels-Kwiecinski-Praszalowicz (BKP) equation based on the numerical integration of iterated integrals in transverse momentum and rapidity space. As an application, our procedure, which makes use of Monte Carlo integration techniques, is applied to obtain the gluon Green function in the Odderon case at leading order. The same approach can be used for more complicated scenarios.

  2. Rater Biases in Genetically Informative Research Designs: Comment on Bartels, Boomsma, Hudziak, van Beijsterveldt, and van den Oord (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, William T.

    2007-01-01

    Rater biases are of interest to behavior genetic researchers, who often use ratings data as a basis for studying heritability. Inclusion of multiple raters for each sibling pair (M. Bartels, D. I. Boomsma, J. J. Hudziak, T. C. E. M. van Beijsterveldt, & E. J. C. G. van den Oord, 2007) is a promising strategy for controlling bias variance and may…

  3. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling due to Atmospheric Tides (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.

    2016-04-01

    Within the last decade, a new realization has arrived on the scene of ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) science: terrestrial weather significantly influences space weather. The aspect of space weather referred to here consists of electron density variability that translates to uncertainties in navigation and communications systems, and neutral density variability that translates to uncertainties in orbital and reentry predictions. In the present context "terrestrial weather" primarily refers to the meteorological conditions that determine the spatial-temporal distribution of tropospheric water vapor and latent heating associated with tropical convection, and the middle atmosphere disturbances associated with sudden stratosphere warmings. The net effect of these processes is a spatially- and temporally-evolving spectrum of waves (gravity waves, tides, planetary waves, Kelvin waves) that grows in amplitude with height and enters the IT system near ~100 km. Some members of the wave spectrum penetrate all the way to the base of the exosphere (ca. 500 km). Along the way, nonlinear interactions between different wave components occur, modifying the interacting waves and giving rise to secondary waves. Finally, the IT wind perturbations carried by the waves can redistribute ionospheric plasma, either through the electric fields generated via the dynamo mechanism between 100 and 150 km, or directly by moving plasma along magnetic field lines at higher levels. Additionally, the signatures of wave-driven dynamo currents are reflected in magnetic perturbations observed at the ground. This is how terrestrial atmospheric variability, through the spectrum of vertically- propagating waves that it produces, can effectively drive IT space weather. The primary objective of this Julius Bartels Lecture is to provide an overview of the global observational evidence for the IT consequences of these upward-propagating waves. In honor of Julius Bartels, who performed much research (including

  4. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Min Y.; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Moats, Rex A.

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and subsequent

  5. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shackleford, Gregory M; Shi, Xiang-He; Swanson, Kimberly S; Mahdi, Min Y; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Moats, Rex A

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and subsequent

  6. X-ray computed microtomography of sea ice - comment on "A review of air-ice chemical and physical interactions (AICI): liquids, quasi-liquids, and solids in snow" by Bartels-Rausch et al. (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obbard, R. W.

    2015-07-01

    This comment addresses a statement made in "A review of air-ice chemical and physical interactions (AICI): liquids, quasi-liquids, and solids in snow" by Bartels-Rausch et al. (Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 1587-1633, doi:10.5194/acp-14-1587-2014, 2014). Here we rebut the assertion that X-ray computed microtomography of sea ice fails to reveal liquid brine inclusions by discussing the phases present at the analysis temperature.

  7. The inclusive jet production in the BFKL-Bartels approach with a running coupling introduced via bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    The inclusive cross section for production of a jet with a given transverse momentum off a heavy nucleus is derived in the BFKL framework with a running coupling on the basis of the bootstrap relation. The cross section depends on the same three different coupling constants as the total cross section unlike the cross section for gluon production derived in the dipole approach.

  8. Wooing the White Working-Class Voter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Evan R.

    2008-01-01

    In his book titled "Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age," Larry M. Bartels wrote that "the familiar image of a party system transformed by Republican gains among working-class cultural conservatives turns out to be largely mythical." According to Bartels, who is director of Princeton's Center for the Study of Democratic…

  9. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program, 1992. China: Tradition and Transformation (Curriculum Projects).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee on United States-China Relations, New York, NY.

    This collection of papers is from a seminar on China includes the following papers: "Women in China: A Curriculum Unit" (Mary Ann Backiel); "Education in Mainland China" (Deanna D. Bartels; Felicia C. Eppley); "From the Great Wall to the Bamboo Curtain: China The Asian Giant An Integrated Interdisciplinary Unit for Sixth Grade Students" (Chester…

  10. Delta Pi Epsilon National Conference. Book of Readings (Nashville, Tennessee, November 15-17, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delta Pi Epsilon Society, Little Rock, AR.

    This document contains 23 papers from a conference on promoting excellence in research and teaching for business. The following are among the papers included: "Alternative Licensure/Certification Assessment of State Specialists" (Marilyn Chalupa, Ginny Richerson, Nancy Groneman, Kimberlee Bartel, Randy L. Joyner, Dennis LaBonty); "Assessing Online…

  11. Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    From 1998-2000, Carol Bartell served as President of the California Council on the Education of Teachers. However, election to office in this organization is generally a six-year commitment, because an individual will serve for two years as President Elect, two years as President, and two more as Past President. In this article, she expresses that…

  12. 78 FR 54221 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to Downlist...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... post-disturbance regeneration (Bartel and Knudsen 1983, p. 3). While seed production appears to be... stages of the species. While seed production appears to be strong at each of the sampled populations... in cones in the canopy. As adult trees senesce and die, seed production decreases, such that there...

  13. The Long, the Short, and the Unstructured: A Unifying Model of miRNA Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Denzler, Rémy; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-10-01

    In this issue, Fang and Bartel (2015) report the identification of novel sequence and structural features of human pri-miRNAs, which--together with previously identified sequence motifs--define a unifying model of mammalian pri-miRNAs and advances the de novo design of artificial pri-miRNAs. PMID:26431024

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Communication Technology and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Communication Technology and Policy section of the Proceedings contains the following 15 papers: "The Virtual Sphere: The Internet as a Public Sphere" (Zizi Papacharissi); "Toward a Typology of Internet Users and Online Privacy Concerns" (Kim Bartel Sheehan); "Blind Spots of the Communications Decency Act Debate: A Critique of Jeffersonian…

  15. Multilingualism in an EFL Practicum: Increasing Student Teachers' Pedagogical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivero, María Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Research in second language teacher education has demonstrated that novice teachers have difficulty in using their pedagogical knowledge, which partly results from a heavy focus on theory offered in teacher training programs (e.g., Bartels, 2005, 2009; Tarone & Allwright, 2005). In order to better equip student teachers with the knowledge…

  16. Exceptional Children Research Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, G. Orville, Ed.; Blank, Harriett D., Ed.

    Research reviews are presented for eight areas of exceptionality and for administration. Included are the following reports: 16 on the gifted compiled by Edward C. Frierson; 46 on the mentally retarded reviewed by Howard H. Spicker and Nettie R. Bartel; 20 on the visually impaired presented by William J. Tisdall; 44 on the hearing impaired…

  17. Making the Case for the Total STEM Learning Ecosystem: Why Message Matters and Why the Old Ones are Killing Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, D.

    2015-11-01

    Many have argued that STEM is essential for all students for our national economic competitiveness and security; others for good citizenship. But these traditional frames miss the mark, and actually might do more harm than good. Dr. Bartels presented an alternative perspective and referenced some recent work on STEM communications strategies from the Frameworks Institute in Washington, D.C.

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Penn Linguistics Colloquium (21st, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 22-23, 1997). University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 4, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Alexis, Ed.; Siegel, Laura, Ed.; Surek-Clark, Clarissa, Ed.; Williams, Alexander, Ed.

    This issue contains the following articles: "The Pragmatics of Wh-Question Intonation in English" (Christine Bartels); "The Nature of Object Agreement in Hungarian" (Huba Bartos); "Voah Mei Daett Sei Deitsh: Developments in the Vowel System of Pennsylvania German" (David Bowie); "Event Time Properties" (Gerhard Brugger); "Polarity in Spanish,…

  19. The freezing transition in SF 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, C.; Pawley, G. S.

    1999-08-01

    This work confirms the result of the Bartell group (K.E. Kinney, S. Xu, L.S. Bartell, J. Phys. Chem. 100 (1996) 6935) that the molecular liquid cluster of SF 6, simulated by molecular dynamics, transforms to the plastic phase when cooled sufficiently slowly. This also occurs in the bulk at and below 140 K. Attempts are made to instigate or accelerate this transition by the introduction of 1% of defects, or by modelling the effect of shear and pressure fluctuations. The last method has proved successful, the system at 140 K undergoing a more rapid and distinct change of phase following the application of a few short pressure pulses. The tentative suggestion that pressure fluctuations are associated with nucleation remains open for further investigation.

  20. Withdrawal from Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Maintenance with a Natural Dopaminergic Agonist: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Femino, John; Waite, Roger L; Benya, Lisa; Giordano, John; Borsten, Joan; Downs, William B; Braverman, Eric R; Loehmann, Raquel; Dushaj, Kristina; Han, David; Simpatico, Thomas; Hauser, Mary; Barh, Debmalya; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background While numerous studies support the efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine for the stabilization and maintenance of opioid dependence, clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms occur upon tapering and cessation of dosage. Methods We present a case study of a 35 year old Caucasian female (Krissie) who was prescribed increasing dosages of prescription opioids after carpel tunnel surgery secondary to chronic pain from reflex sympathetic dystrophy and fibromyalgia. Over the next 5 years, daily dosage requirements increased to over 80 mg of Methadone and 300 ug/hr Fentanyl transdermal patches, along with combinations of 12–14 1600 mcg Actig lollipop and oral 100 mg Morphine and 30 mg oxycodone 1–2 tabs q4-6hr PRN for breakthrough pain. Total monthly prescription costs including supplemental benzodiazepines, hypnotics and stimulants exceeded $50,000. The patient was subsequently transferred to Suboxone® in 2008, and the dosage was gradually tapered until her admission for inpatient detoxification with KB220Z a natural dopaminergic agonist. We carefully documented her withdrawal symptoms when she precipitously stopped taking buprenorphine/naloxone and during follow-up while taking KB220Z daily. We also genotyped the patient using a reward gene panel including (9 genes 18 alleles): DRD 2,3,4; MOA-A; COMT; DAT1; 5HTTLLR; OPRM1; and GABRA3. Findings At 432 days post Suboxone® withdrawal the patient is being maintained on KB220Z, has been urine tested and is opioid free. Genotyping data revealed a moderate genetic risk for addiction showing a hypodopaminergic trait. This preliminary case data suggest that the daily use of KB220Z could provide a cost effective alternative substitution adjunctive modality for Suboxone®. We encourage double-blind randomized –placebo controlled studies to test the proposition that KB220Z may act as a putative natural opioid substitution maintenance adjunct. PMID:24273683

  1. Coronal holes, solar wind streams, and geomagnetic activity during the new sunspot cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents results obtained for 1976-1977 using daily He I 10830 A spectroheliograms and photospheric magnetograms. It was found that as the magnetic field patterns changed, the solar atmosphere evolved from a structure with a few large long-lived low-latitude coronal holes to one with numerous small short-lived high-latitude holes. High-latitude holes recurred with a synodic rotation period of 28-29 days instead of the 27-day period already known to be characteristic of low-latitude holes. A Bartels display of the occurrence of holes, wind speed, and geomagnetic activity is considered.

  2. Reconstruction of geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 yr - Part 1: A new geomagnetic data composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, M.; Barnard, L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Owens, M. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davis, C. J.

    2013-11-01

    We present a new composite of geomagnetic activity which is designed to be as homogeneous in its construction as possible. This is done by only combining data that, by virtue of the locations of the source observatories used, have similar responses to solar wind and IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) variations. This will enable us (in Part 2, Lockwood et al., 2013a) to use the new index to reconstruct the interplanetary magnetic field, B, back to 1846 with a full analysis of errors. Allowance is made for the effects of secular change in the geomagnetic field. The composite uses interdiurnal variation data from Helsinki for 1845-1890 (inclusive) and 1893-1896 and from Eskdalemuir from 1911 to the present. The gaps are filled using data from the Potsdam (1891-1892 and 1897-1907) and the nearby Seddin observatories (1908-1910) and intercalibration achieved using the Potsdam-Seddin sequence. The new index is termed IDV(1d) because it employs many of the principles of the IDV index derived by Svalgaard and Cliver (2010), inspired by the u index of Bartels (1932); however, we revert to using one-day (1d) means, as employed by Bartels, because the use of near-midnight values in IDV introduces contamination by the substorm current wedge auroral electrojet, giving noise and a dependence on solar wind speed that varies with latitude. The composite is compared with independent, early data from European-sector stations, Greenwich, St Petersburg, Parc St Maur, and Ekaterinburg, as well as the composite u index, compiled from 2-6 stations by Bartels, and the IDV index of Svalgaard and Cliver. Agreement is found to be extremely good in all cases, except two. Firstly, the Greenwich data are shown to have gradually degraded in quality until new instrumentation was installed in 1915. Secondly, we infer that the Bartels u index is increasingly unreliable before about 1886 and overestimates the solar cycle amplitude between 1872 and 1883 and this is amplified in the proxy data used

  3. Climbing Darwin's ladder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The work of Bartel and Szostak, in which RNA molecules were selected to enhance the ability to catalyze a reaction similar to a step in protein-catalyzed RNA replication, is discussed. An important aspect of this experiment was the ability to reach a high level of functional organization in ten evolutionary steps. Further steps necessary to obtain an RNA enzyme with RNA replicase activity include performing the reaction with mononucleoside 5'-triphosphates, generalizing the reaction to include a variety of sequences without loss of template-dependent specificity, and overcoming template self-structure that could prevent some regions from being copied efficiently.

  4. Can laboratory data explain field observations: The fluxes of HNO3 and HNO4 from snow in the lab and in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    equilibrium partitioning of HNO3 and HNO4 that one would expect based on selected laboratory data. Both, adsorption to the surface of the snow and uptake to the bulk forming a solid solution are discussed (HNO3 only). Further, I address the question, if the snow holds enough HNO3 and HNO4 at its surface or in its bulk (HNO3 only) to fuel the observed emissions. Thus both equilibrium conditions and molecular flux budgets are discussed. These calculations show that adsorption/desorption can indeed explain the observed mixing ratio in the Antarctic boundary layer. Release from a solid solution seems to be too slow. Jones, A. E., Brough, N., Anderson, P. S., & Wolff, E. W. (2014). HO2NO2 and HNO3 in the coastal Antarctic winter night: a "lab-in-the-field" experiment. Acpd, 14(9), 12771-12796. Interactive comment on "HO2NO2 and HNO3 in the coastal Antarctic winter night: a "lab-in-the-field" experiment" by A. E. Jones et al. , T. Bartels-Rausch thorsten.bartels-rausch@psi.ch Received and published: 11 July 2014 Legrand, M., Preunkert, S., Frey, M., Bartels-Rausch, T., Kukui, A., King, M. D., et al. (2014). Large mixing ratios of atmospheric nitrous acid (HONO) at Concordia (East Antarctic plateau) in summer: a strong source from surface snow? Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 14(8), 11749-11785. doi:10.5194/acpd-14-11749-2014 Ulrich, T., Ammann, M., Leutwyler, S., & Bartels-Rausch, T. (2012). The adsorption of peroxynitric acid on ice between 230 K and 253 K. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12(4), 1833-1845. doi:10.5194/acp-12-1833-2012

  5. MicroRNAs: deviants no longer.

    PubMed

    Pasquinelli, Amy E

    2002-04-01

    Almost ten years ago, the Ambros laboratory made the extraordinary discovery that a gene essential for development in Caenorhabditis elegans encoded a 22-nucleotide, untranslated RNA. Further genetic studies in this nematode revealed the existence of a second tiny RNA gene that turned out to be conserved in animals as diverse as flies and humans. Now, the Ambros, Bartel and Tuschl laboratories have proven that those odd RNAs were just the first examples of a large family of RNAs, termed microRNAs (miRNAs). Although untranslated RNA genes, such as transfer RNAs and ribosomal RNAs, perform essential housekeeping roles in all living organisms, growing numbers of other RNAs, some widely conserved across phyla and others limited to certain species, are being uncovered and shown to fulfill specific duties. The discovery of miRNAs establishes a new class of regulatory RNAs and highlights the existence of unexpected RNA genes that, although ancient, are not extinct. PMID:11932009

  6. Helicity evolution at small-x

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2016-01-13

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of αs ln2(1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of αs ln(1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation efects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-Nc and large-Nc & Nf limits. As a cross-check, in the ladder approximation, our equationsmore » map onto the same ladder limit of the infrared evolution equations for g1 structure function derived previously by Bartels, Ermolaev and Ryskin.« less

  7. Darwinian chemistry: towards the synthesis of a simple cell.

    PubMed

    Loakes, David; Holliger, Philipp

    2009-07-01

    The total synthesis of a simple cell is in many ways the ultimate challenge in synthetic biology. Outlined eight years ago in a visionary article by Szostak et al. (J. W. Szostak, D. P. Bartel and P. L. Luisi, Nature, 2001, 409, 387), the chances of success seemed remote. However, recent progress in nucleic acid chemistry, directed evolution and membrane biophysics have brought the prospect of a simple synthetic cell with life-like properties such as growth, division, heredity and evolution within reach. Success in this area will not only revolutionize our understanding of abiogenesis but provide a fertile test-bed for models of prebiotic chemistry and early evolution. Last but not least, a robust "living" protocell may provide a versatile and safe chassis for embedding synthetic devices and systems. PMID:19562107

  8. X-ray diffraction study of GaSb/AlSb strained-layer-superlattices grown on miscut (100) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T. ); Schwartz, G.P.; Guiltieri, G.J.; Gilmer, G. )

    1991-07-01

    A series of superlattices were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100) GaSb substrates which had been miscut by 2, 3, and 4 degrees toward the <011> direction. These superlattices were then studied by scanning all possible (444) or (511) (asymmetric) reflections with high resolution multiple-crystal x-ray diffractometry. In addition, the (400) (quasi-symmetric) reflection was scanned. From peak splittings we extracted mismatch and tilt parameters for the epitaxial unit cell. We compared our results for the non-tetragonal component of the distortion ot calculations based on the coherent strain model of Hornstra and Bartels (J. Cryst. Growth 44,513 (1978)). We find that this model which was developed for epitaxial growth on a general (hkl) plane also describes our results for growth on vicinal (100) planes. The resolution of our data is sufficient to establish that the distortion was not purely tetragonal. A monoclinic unit cell symmetry adequately describes our results.

  9. X-ray diffraction study of GaSb/AlSb strained-layer-superlattices grown on miscut (100) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.; Schwartz, G.P.; Guiltieri, G.J.; Gilmer, G.

    1991-07-01

    A series of superlattices were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100) GaSb substrates which had been miscut by 2, 3, and 4 degrees toward the <011> direction. These superlattices were then studied by scanning all possible [444] or [511] (asymmetric) reflections with high resolution multiple-crystal x-ray diffractometry. In addition, the (400) (quasi-symmetric) reflection was scanned. From peak splittings we extracted mismatch and tilt parameters for the epitaxial unit cell. We compared our results for the non-tetragonal component of the distortion ot calculations based on the coherent strain model of Hornstra and Bartels (J. Cryst. Growth 44,513 (1978)). We find that this model which was developed for epitaxial growth on a general (hkl) plane also describes our results for growth on vicinal (100) planes. The resolution of our data is sufficient to establish that the distortion was not purely tetragonal. A monoclinic unit cell symmetry adequately describes our results.

  10. Seasonal and diurnal variations in AMPERE observations of the Birkeland currents compared to modeled results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxon, J. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2016-05-01

    We reduce measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) to give the total Birkeland (field-aligned) current flowing in both hemispheres in monthly and hourly bins. We analyze these totals using 6 years of data (2010-2015) to examine solar zenith angle-driven variations in the total Birkeland current flowing in both hemispheres, simultaneously, for the first time. A diurnal variation is identified in the total Birkeland current flowing, consistent with variations in the solar zenith angle. A seasonal variation is also identified, with more current flowing in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere during Bartels rotations in northern (southern) summer. For months close to equinox, more current is found to flow in the Northern Hemisphere, contrary to our expectations. We also conduct the first test of the Milan (2013) model for estimating Birkeland current magnitudes, with modifications made to account for solar contributions to ionospheric conductance based on the observed variation of the Birkeland currents with season and time of day. The modified model, using the value of ΦD averaged by Bartels rotation (scaled by 1.7), is found to agree with the observed AMPERE currents, with a correlation of 0.87 in the Northern Hemisphere and 0.86 in the Southern Hemisphere. The improvement over the correlation with dayside reconnection rate is demonstrated to be a significant improvement to the model. The correlation of the residuals is found to be consistent with more current flowing in the Northern Hemisphere. This new observation of systematically larger current flowing in the Northern Hemisphere is discussed in the context of previous results which suggest that the Northern Hemisphere may react more strongly to dayside reconnection than the Southern Hemisphere.

  11. Interaction of Trace gas Species of Atmospheric Interest With ice: Measurement of the Adsorption Enthalpy of Acetone on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, T.; Guimbaud, C.; Gaggeler, H.; Ammann, M.

    2002-12-01

    Ice provides an important substrate for heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere, the upper troposphere, but also in the cold regions of the planetary boundary layer. Thus, we started to investigate the interaction of trace gases of atmospheric interest (acetone) with ice. In the upper troposphere, the photolysis of acetone is the main source of HOX, dominating the one from the reaction of O(1D) + H2O (Jaegle et al., 2001). Source and sinks of acetone need to be quantified to simulate the concentration of the main atmospheric oxidant (HOX). Ice cirrus clouds are suggested to be one of the acetone sinks. Thus, the adsorption enthalpy of acetone on ice needs to be investigated because it determines the mixing ratio of acetone between the gas and the particulate phase and the chemistry of the upper troposphere. In this paper, the chromatographic method applied for the measurement of the adsorption enthalpy of acetone on ice is described. This method uses a chromatographic ice-packed column similar to the one described by Bartels et al. (2002) and is combined with Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) for the monitoring of the acetone concentration in the gas phase. Preliminary results show that the measured standard adsorption enthalpy obtained with a column packed with ice spheres, i.e. (-54+/-8) kJ mol-1, and with a column packed with a snow sample, i.e. (-56+/-3) kJ mol-1, are similar and in agreement with the ones derived by Winkler et al. (2002) and from Domine and Hanot (2002), using a low pressure ice coated wall flow tube reactor and a volumetric method, respectively. More investigations are scheduled in the near future using different ice surfaces (ice crystals, fresh snow). We briefly address the atmospheric implication of this study as well as the perspective of the chromatographic & APCI-MS system to investigate other processes of atmospheric interest. References Bartels, T., B. Eichler, P. Zimmermann, H. W. Gäggeler, and M. Ammann, The

  12. Geomagnetic activity during 10 - 11 solar cycles that has been observed by old Russian observatories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredyn, Tomasz; Wysokinski, Arkadiusz; Kobylinski, Zbigniew; Bialy, Jerzy

    2016-07-01

    A good knowledge of solar-terrestrial relations during past solar activity cycles could give the appropriate tools for a correct space weather forecast. The paper focuses on the analysis of the historical collections of the ground based magnetic observations and their operational indices from the period of two sunspot solar cycles 10 - 11, period 1856 - 1878 (Bartels rotations 324 - 635). We use hourly observations of H and D geomagnetic field components registered at Russian stations: St. Petersburg - Pavlovsk, Barnaul, Ekaterinburg, Nertshinsk, Sitka, and compare them to the data obtained from the Helsinki observatory. We compare directly these records and also calculated from the data of the every above mentioned station IHV indices introduced by Svalgaard (2003), which have been used for further comparisons in epochs of assumed different polarity of the heliospheric magnetic field. We used also local index C9 derived by Zosimovich (1981) from St. Petersburg - Pavlovsk data. Solar activity is represented by sunspot numbers. The correlative and continuous wavelet analyses are applied for estimation of the correctness of records from different magnetic stations. We have specially regard to magnetic storms in the investigated period and the special Carrington event of 1-2 Sep 1859. Generally studied magnetic time series correctly show variability of the geomagnetic activity. Geomagnetic activity presents some delay in relation to solar one as it is seen especially during descending and minimum phase of the even 11-year cycle. This pattern looks similarly in the case of 16 - 17 solar cycles.

  13. Assessment of Multiple Risk Outcomes, Strengths, and Change with the START:AV: A Short-Term Prospective Study with Adolescent Offenders.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Jodi L; Beneteau, Jennifer L; Gulbransen, Erik; Brodersen, Etta; Desmarais, Sarah L; Nicholls, Tonia L; Cruise, Keith R

    2012-01-01

    The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV; Nicholls, Viljoen, Cruise, Desmarais, & Webster, 2010; Viljoen, Cruise, Nicholls, Desmarais, & Webster, in preparation) is a clinical guide designed to assist in the assessment and management of adolescents' risk for adverse events (e.g., violence, general offending, suicide, victimization). In this initial validation study, START:AV assessments were conducted on 90 adolescent offenders (62 male, 28 female), who were prospectively followed for a 3-month period. START:AV assessments had good to excellent inter-rater reliability and strong concurrent validity with Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth assessments (SAVRY; Borum, Bartel, & Forth, 2006). START:AV risk estimates and Vulnerability total scores predicted multiple adverse outcomes, including violence towards others, offending, victimization, suicidal ideation, and substance abuse. In addition, Strength total scores inversely predicted violence, offending, and street drug use. During the 3-month follow-up, risk estimates changed in at least one domain for 92% of youth, and 27% of youth showed reliable changes in Strength and/or Vulnerability total scores (reliable change index, 90% confidence interval; Jacobsen & Truax, 1991). While these findings are promising, a strong need exists for further research on the START:AV, the measurement of change, and on the role of strengths in risk assessment and treatment-planning. PMID:23436983

  14. Chapman and Alfvén: A Rigorous Mathematical Physicist Versus an Inspirational Experimental Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, Syun

    Modern magnetospheric physics owes its initial development to two great pioneers' Sydney Chapman and Hannes Alfvén, who took very different and contrasting approaches for their research activities; Figure 1. This caused one of the most memorable controversies in space physics during the 20th century. The controversy was initiated formally by Alfvén (1951) when he criticized a paper by D.F. Martyn entitled, ``The Theory of Magnetic Storms and Auroras,'' published in Nature in 1951. Alfvén stated: ``Dr. Martyn's treatment is founded on Chapman-Ferraro's theory of magnetic storms. It is not my intention to review here the objections to this theory, objections which I believe to be fatal- nor is it worthwhile to discuss the curious super structure which Dr. Martyn tried to erect on this weak ground.'' Alfvén's objections will be described after briefly providing the background on which the Chapman-Ferraro theory was constructed. It may be mentioned at the outset that Chapman, together with T.G. Cowling, was well recognized by his publication of a classical treatise ``The Mathematical Theory of Non-Uniform Gases'' in 1953 and also, with J. Bartels, of ``Geomagnetism'' in 1940, while Alfvén established himself by the publication of an inspirational book ``Cosmical Electrodynamics'' in 1950.

  15. Explicit simulation of a midlatitude Mesoscale Convective System

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G.D.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    We have explicitly simulated the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 23-24 June 1985 during PRE-STORM, the Preliminary Regional Experiment for the Stormscale Operational and Research and Meterology Program. Stensrud and Maddox (1988), Johnson and Bartels (1992), and Bernstein and Johnson (1994) are among the researchers who have investigated various aspects of this MCS event. We have performed this MCS simulation (and a similar one of a tropical MCS; Alexander and Cotton 1994) in the spirit of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), in which cloud-resolving models are used to assist in the formulation and testing of cloud parameterization schemes for larger-scale models. In this paper, we describe (1) the nature of our 23-24 June MCS dimulation and (2) our efforts to date in using our explicit MCS simulations to assist in the development of a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches. The paper is organized as follows. First, we discuss the synoptic situation surrounding the 23-24 June PRE-STORM MCS followed by a discussion of the model setup and results of our simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulations in developing a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches and summarize our results.

  16. Seismic Holography of the Solar Interior near the Maximum and Minimum of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Alfaro, M.; Pérez Hernández, F.; González Hernández, I.; Hartlep, T.

    2016-06-01

    The base of the convection zone and the tachocline play a major role in the study of the dynamics of the Sun, especially in the solar dynamo. Here, we present a phase-sensitive helioseismic holography method to infer changes in the sound-speed profile of the solar interior. We test the technique using numerically simulated data by Zhao et al. (Astrophys. J. 702, 1150, 2009) with sound-speed perturbations at 0.7 R_{⊙ }. The technique adequately recovers the perturbed sound-speed profile and is seen to be capable of detecting changes in the sound speed as low as 0.05 %. We apply the method to two GONG solar time series of approximately one year, each comprising 13 Bartels rotations, BR2295-BR2307 and BR2387-BR2399, near the maximum and at a minimum of solar activity, respectively. We successfully recover a sound-speed variation with respect to a standard solar model, consistent with previous results. However, we fail to recover a realistic sound-speed variation between maximum and minimum.

  17. Fitting of asymmetric spectral lines as diagnostics for HID-lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Martin; Peters, Silke; Schneidenbach, Hartmut; Kettlitz, Manfred

    2006-10-01

    Fitting of optically thick side-on spectra is a valuable alternative to the Bartels' method and the Abel inversion for the determination of partial pressures and radial temperature profiles in HID lamps. We investigate a standard 150 W type HID lamp filled with Hg and NaI during dimming from 150 to 60 W. The model includes LTE plasma chemistry, asymmetric line profiles according to Al-Saqabi and Peach [1]. Van der Waals and Stark broadening constants are determined from spectra of a pure Hg lamp. Broadening constants for the Na D lines are taken from literature. We use the spectra at several side-on positions in order to derive pressures and temperature profiles in the Hg/NaI lamp. The results from fitting show with decreasing electrical power a constriction of the radial temperature profile, a linear decrease of the total pressure and a rapid decrease of the sodium content. Temperatures and total pressures are in good agreement with the experiment. [1] Al-Saqabi B N I, Peach G (1984) J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 20 1175--1191.

  18. An Alternating Sheared AA Pair and Elements of Stability for a Single Sheared Purine-Purine Pair Flanked by Sheared GA Pairs†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Kennedy, Scott D.; Qiao, Jing; Krugh, Thomas R.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    A previous NMR structure of the duplex 5'GGUPCCGGGAAAGGGCUCCG5' revealed an unusually stable RNA internal loop with three consecutive sheared GA pairs. Here, we report NMR studies of two duplexes, 5'GGUPCCGGGAAAGGGCUCCG5' (replacing a UG with a UA closing pair) and 5'GGUPCCGGAAAAGGGCUCCG5' (replacing the middle GA with an AA pair). An unusually stable loop with three consecutive sheared GA pairs forms in the duplex 5'GGUPCCGGGAAAGGGCUCCG5'. The structure contrasts with that reported for this loop in the crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit of Deinococcus radiodurans [Harms, J., Schluenzen, F., Zarivach, R., Bashan, A., Gat, S., Agmon, I., Bartels, H., Franceschi, F., and Yonath, A. (2001) Cell 107, 679–688]. The middle AA pair in the duplex 5'GGUPCCGGAAAAGGGCUCCG5' rapidly exchanges orientations resulting in alternative base stacking and pseudo-symmetry with exclusively sheared pairs. The UGGAAAAGGC internal loop is 2.1 kcal/mol less stable than the UGGGAAAGGC internal loop at 37 °C. Structural, energetic, and dynamic consequences upon functional group substitutions within related 3 × 3 and 3 × 6 internal loops are also reported. PMID:16734425

  19. Level architecture in genetic regulatory networks and the role of microRNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. M.

    2008-03-01

    It is well known that genes that code for proteins regulate the expression of each other through protein-mediated interactions. With the discovery of microRNAs^1 (miRNAs), it has been conjectured that there are many such regulatory miRNAs in the cell that are never transcribed into proteins but are important for regulation and, hence, could explain the nature of the non-coding (or junk) DNA.^2 Furthermore, miRNAs are highly conserved molecules. So, just as genes that code for proteins form regulatory networks, we conjecture that miRNAs form a higher-level regulatory network amongst themselves as mediated by the genes-coding-for-proteins regulatory network to form a complex organism. We investigate this conjecture within the framework of random Boolean networks where the two-level architecture is modelled via two coupled random Boolean networks with one network taking precedence over the other for various input/output values. Aspects of the evolution of the lower-level network will also be addressed. ^1 D. P. Bartel, Cell 116, 281 (2004). ^2 J. S. Mattick, Sci. Amer. 291, 60 (2004).

  20. Assessment of Multiple Risk Outcomes, Strengths, and Change with the START:AV: A Short-Term Prospective Study with Adolescent Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, Jodi L.; Beneteau, Jennifer L.; Gulbransen, Erik; Brodersen, Etta; Desmarais, Sarah L.; Nicholls, Tonia L.; Cruise, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV; Nicholls, Viljoen, Cruise, Desmarais, & Webster, 2010; Viljoen, Cruise, Nicholls, Desmarais, & Webster, in preparation) is a clinical guide designed to assist in the assessment and management of adolescents’ risk for adverse events (e.g., violence, general offending, suicide, victimization). In this initial validation study, START:AV assessments were conducted on 90 adolescent offenders (62 male, 28 female), who were prospectively followed for a 3-month period. START:AV assessments had good to excellent inter-rater reliability and strong concurrent validity with Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth assessments (SAVRY; Borum, Bartel, & Forth, 2006). START:AV risk estimates and Vulnerability total scores predicted multiple adverse outcomes, including violence towards others, offending, victimization, suicidal ideation, and substance abuse. In addition, Strength total scores inversely predicted violence, offending, and street drug use. During the 3-month follow-up, risk estimates changed in at least one domain for 92% of youth, and 27% of youth showed reliable changes in Strength and/or Vulnerability total scores (reliable change index, 90% confidence interval; Jacobsen & Truax, 1991). While these findings are promising, a strong need exists for further research on the START:AV, the measurement of change, and on the role of strengths in risk assessment and treatment-planning. PMID:23436983

  1. Observed Properties of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2008-11-01

    The earliest measurements of the solar wind fully supported Gene Parker's theory. The wind was persistent and nearly radial, its speed was hundreds of km/s, the density was as predicted, and, on average, the interplanetary magnetic field was consistent with an Archimedian spiral. The fastest wind, with speed >700 km/s, traced back to Bartel's unipolar M regions rather than to the hotter active regions, and the highest densities could be explained by compression where the fast wind plowed into the slower wind in its path. But, even in the early data, there were mysteries, some of which are not yet completely resolved. Understanding the alpha particles has been a challenge. Their abundance is highly variable, in the fast wind their temperature is generally > 4 times the proton temperature, and, despite their greater mass, they flow away from the Sun faster than the protons. To complicate the picture further, the protons, alphas, and electrons all have complex, anisotropic distribution functions, often with double peaks. The expanding wind cools more slowly than adiabatically, suggesting a zoo of wave-particle interactions probably responsible for marginal stabilities of the particle distributions. The study of interplanetary waves and turbulence is an active field of research. Recent decades have also seen the study of ions heavier than alphas, including particles in the wind that did not originate at the Sun. Fifty years after Parker's landmark paper, solar-wind physics is still an active area of research.

  2. Radio Telescopes Reveal Youngest Stellar Corpse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers using a global combination of radio telescopes to study a stellar explosion some 30 million light-years from Earth have likely discovered either the youngest black hole or the youngest neutron star known in the Universe. Their discovery also marks the first time that a black hole or neutron star has been found associated with a supernova that has been seen to explode since the invention of the telescope nearly 400 years ago. M51 An artist's impression of Supernova 1986J. The newly discovered nebula around the black hole or neutron star in the center is shown in blue, and is in the center of the expanding, fragmented shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion, which is shown in red. CREDIT: Norbert Bartel and Michael F. Bietenholz, York University; Artist: G. Arguner (Click on image for larger version) Image Files Artist's Conception (above image, 836K) Galaxy and Supernova (47K) A VLA image (left) of the galaxy NGC 891, showing the bright supernova explosion below the galaxy's center. At right, a closer view of the supernova, made with a global array of radio telescopes. CREDIT: Miguel A. Perez-Torres, Antxon Alberdi and Lucas Lara, Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia - CSIC, Spain, Jon Marcaide and Jose C. Guirado, Universidad de Valencia, Spain Franco Mantovani, IRA-CNR, Italy, Eduardo Ros, MPIfR, Germany, and Kurt W. Weiler, Naval Research Laboratory, USA Multi-Frequency Closeup View (201K) Blue and white area shows the nebula surrounding the black hole or neutron star lurking in the center of the supernova. This nebula is apparent at a higher radio frequency (15 GHz). The red and also the contours show the distorted, expanding shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion. This shell is seen at a lower radio frequency (5 GHz). CREDIT: Michael F. Bietenholz and Norbert Bartel, York University, Michael Rupen, NRAO, NRAO/AUI/NSF A supernova is the explosion of a massive star after it exhausts its supply of nuclear fuel and

  3. Development of a toolbox of organic synthetic reactions that can be induced on individual molecules by STM

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig Bartels

    2003-09-25

    OAK B262 Final Report DOE Grant No.: DE-FG03-01ER15263 ''Development of a toolbox of organic synthetic reactions that can be induced on individual molecules by STM'' Abstract Bommisetty V. Rao, Ki-Young Kwon, Robert Perry, Luke Nysen, Gregory Pavin, Qibin Zhang, Casey Dugger and Ludwig Bartels University of California at Riverside, Pierce Hall, Riverside, CA92521, email: Ludwig.Bartels@ucr.edu The key scientific objective of this project is the development of a set of reliable techniques for the addressal of specific bonds of individual molecules in order to assemble functional molecules on a metal surface at single-atom precision. Success in this direction will open up a conceptually novel route to single molecule chemistry, which can provide its products at any desired surface location without involving any lithographic steps at all. In the course of this project a number of halo-substituted aryls and alkyls where investigated with special concern to two properties: clean deposition of the reactants from the gas phase on metallic surfaces and STM-based addressability of individual substituents of them. In order to prevent contamination of the sample by deposition of solvent residue, a special depositions source was developed that uses a skimmed molecular beam. Exemplary substances studied were 1,3-iodobromobenzene (IBB), 3 bromopropionitrile (BPN) and 4,4'-dibromobiphenyl (DBB). In STM-induced reactions, IBB shows concerted activation of both halogens, which does not allow the individual addressal of one bond at a time. The concept of individual addressabilities of bonds in bi-substituted molecule was confirmed by use of BPN. This reactant is, however, strongly bound to the substrate and, hence, not very suitable for the assembly of larger aggregates, even if the nitrile group could be activated. We found individual activation of one of the bromines of DBB. This molecule lies flat on the surface and it is a promising candidate for the assembly of larger molecular

  4. [For the Introduction of a Conceptual Perspective in Mathematics: Dedekind, Noether, van der Waerden].

    PubMed

    Koreuber, Mechthild

    2015-09-01

    ,,She [Noether] then appeared as the creator of a new direction in algebra and became the leader, the most consistent and brilliant representative, of a particular mathematical doctrine - of all that is characterized by the term ‚Begriffliche Mathematik‘.“ The aim of this paper is to illuminate this "new direction", which can be characterized as a conceptual [begriffliche] perspective in mathematics, and to comprehend its roots and trace its establishment. Field, ring, ideal, the core concepts of this new direction in mathematical images of knowledge, were conceptualized by Richard Dedekind (1831-1916) within the scope of his number theory research and associated with an understanding of a formation of concepts as a "free creation of the human spirit". They thus stand for an abstract perspective of mathematics in their entirety, described as 'modern algebra' in the 1920s and 1930s, leading to an understanding of mathematics as structural sciences. The establishment of this approach to mathematics, which is based on "general mathematical concepts" [allgemein-mathematische Begriffe], was the success of a cultural movement whose most important protagonists included Emmy Noether (1882-1935) and her pupil Bartel L. van der Waerden (1903-1996). With the use of the term 'conceptual', a perspective is taken in the analysis which allows for developing connections between the thinking of Dedekind, the "working and conceptual methods" [Arbeits- und Auffassungsmethoden] of Noether as well as the methodological approach, represented through the thought space of the Noether School as presented under the term "conceptual world" [Begriffswelt] in the Moderne Algebra of van der Waerden. This essay thus makes a contribution to the history of the introduction of a structural perspective in mathematics, a perspective that is inseparable from the mathematical impact of Noether, her reception of the work of Dedekind and the creative strength of the Noether School. PMID

  5. Prenatal, but not early postnatal, exposure to a Western diet improves spatial memory of pigs later in life and is paired with changes in maternal prepartum blood lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Clouard, Caroline; Kemp, Bas; Val-Laillet, David; Gerrits, Walter J J; Bartels, Andrea C; Bolhuis, J Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    Maternal obesity and perinatal high-fat diets are known to affect cognitive development. We examined the effects of late prenatal and/or early postnatal exposure to a Western-type diet, high in both fat and refined sugar, on the cognition of pigs (Sus scrofa) in the absence of obesity. Thirty-six sows and their offspring were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, with 8 wk prenatal and 8 wk postnatal exposure to a Western diet (enriched in fat, sucrose, and cholesterol) or control diets as factors. Compared to controls, piglets exposed to the prenatal Western diet showed enhanced working and reference memory during the acquisition and reversal phases of a spatial hole-board task. Mothers fed the prenatal Western diet had higher prepartum blood cholesterol and free fatty acid levels. Postnatal exposure to the Western diet did not affect piglet cognitive performance, but it did increase postpartum maternal and postweaning piglet cholesterol levels. The Western diet had no effect on maternal or offspring insulin sensitivity or leptin levels. In conclusion, a prenatal Western diet improved memory function in pigs, which was paired with changes in prepartum maternal blood cholesterol levels. These findings highlight the key role of late fetal nutrition for long-term programming of cognition.-Clouard, C., Kemp, B., Val-Laillet, D., Gerrits, W. J. J., Bartels, A. C., Bolhuis, J. E. Prenatal, but not early postnatal, exposure to a Western diet improves spatial memory of pigs later in life and is paired with changes in maternal prepartum blood lipid levels. PMID:26985006

  6. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories and now a

  7. The relationship between parent-child conflict and adolescent antisocial behavior: confirming shared environmental mediation.

    PubMed

    Klahr, Ashlea M; Rueter, Martha A; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G; Burt, S Alexandra

    2011-07-01

    Prior studies have indicated that the relationship between parent-child conflict and adolescent antisocial behavior is at least partially shared environmental in origin. However, all available research on this topic (to our knowledge) relies exclusively on parent and/or adolescent informant-reports, both of which are subject to various forms of rater bias. As the presence of significant shared environmental effects has often been attributed to rater bias in the past (Baker et al. Journal of Abnormal Psychology 16:219-235, 2007; Bartels et al. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 42:1351-1359, 2003, Twin Research 7:162-175, 2004; Hewitt et al. Behavior Genetics 22:293-317, 1992), it would be important to confirm that findings of shared environmental mediation persist when even examining (presumably more objective) observer-ratings of these constructs. The current study thus examined the origins of the relationship between parent-child conflict and adolescent acting-out behavior, as measured using both observer-ratings and various informant-reports. Participants included 1,199 adopted and non-adopted adolescents in 610 families from the Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study (SIBS). Results indicated that parent-child conflict consistently predicts acting-out behavior in adopted adolescents, and moreover, that this association is equivalent to that in biologically-related adolescents. Most importantly, these findings did not vary across parent- and adolescent-reported or observer-ratings of parent-child conflict and acting-out behavior. Such findings argue strongly against rater bias as a primary explanation of shared environmental mediation of the association between parent-child conflict and adolescent antisocial behavior. PMID:21484334

  8. Low LET radiolysis escape yields for reducing radicals and H2 in pressurized high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterniczuk, Marcin; Yakabuskie, Pamela A.; Wren, J. Clara; Jacob, Jasmine A.; Bartels, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiolysis escape yields (G values) are reported for the sum (G(radH)+G(e-)aq) and for G(H2) in subcritical water up to 350 °C. The scavenger system 1-10 mM acetate/0.001 M hydroxide/0.00048 M N2O was used with simultaneous mass spectroscopic detection of H2 and N2 product. Temperature-dependent measurements were carried out with 2.5 MeV electrons from a van de Graaff accelerator, while room temperature calibration measurements were done with a 60Co gamma source. The concentrations and dose range were carefully chosen so that initial spur chemistry is not perturbed and the N2 product yield corresponds to those reducing radicals that escape recombination in pure water. In comparison with a recent review recommendation of Elliot and Bartels (AECL report 153-127160-450-001, 2009), the measured reducing radical yield is seven percent smaller at room temperature but in fairly good agreement above 150 °C. The H2 escape yield is in good agreement throughout the temperature range with several previous studies that used much larger radical scavenging rates. Previous analysis of earlier high temperature measurements of Gesc(radOH) is shown to be flawed, although the actual G values may be nearly correct. The methodology used in the present report greatly reduces the range of possible error and puts the high temperature escape yields for low-LET radiation on a much firmer quantitative foundation than was previously available.

  9. Long periods (1 -10 mHz) geomagnetic pulsations variation with solar cycle in South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon Silva, Willian; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Guimarães Dutra, Severino Luiz; Babulal Trivedi, Nalin; Claudir da Silva, Andirlei; Souza Savian, Fernando; Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli; de Siqueira, Josemar; Espindola Antunes, Cassio

    The occurrence and intensity of the geomagnetic pulsations Pc-5 (2-7 mHz) and its relationship with the solar cycle in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly -SAMA is presented. The study of geomagnetic pulsations is important to help the understanding of the physical processes that occurs in the magnetosphere region and help to predict geomagnetic storms. The fluxgate mag-netometers H, D and Z, three axis geomagnetic field data from the Southern Space Observatory -SSO/CRS/INPE -MCT, São Martinho da Serra (29.42° S, 53.87° W, 480m a.s.l.), RS, Brasil, a were analyzed and correlated with the solar wind parameters (speed, density and temperature) from the ACE and SOHO satellites. A digital filtering to enhance the 2-7 mHz geomagnetic pulsations was used. Five quiet days and five perturbed days in the solar minimum and in the solar maximum were selected for this analysis. The days were chosen based on the IAGA definition and on the Bartels Musical Diagrams (Kp index) for 2001 (solar maximum) and 2008 (solar minimum). The biggest Pc-5 amplitude averages differences between the H-component is 78,35 nT for the perturbed days and 1,60nT for the quiet days during the solar maximum. For perturbed days the average amplitude during the solar minimum is 8,32 nT, confirming a direct solar cycle influence in the geomagnetic pulsations intensity for long periods.

  10. Sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field in the second half of the 19th century inferred from ground-based magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanin, M.; Ponyavin, D. I.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) polarities can be inferred in the pre-satellite era using Svalgaard-Mansurov effect, according to which different IMF directions lead to different geomagnetic variations at polar stations. Basing on this effect we propose a method to derive a sector structure of the IMF when only ground based data are available. Details of the method and results have been presented in our recent paper: Vokhmyanin, M. V., and D. I. Ponyavin (2012), Inferring interplanetary magnetic field polarities from geomagnetic variations, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A06102, doi:10.1029/2011JA017060. Using data from eight stations: Sitka, Sodankyla, Godhavn, Lerwick, Thule, Baker Lake, Vostok and Mirny, we reconstructed sector structure back to 1905. The quality of inferring from 1965 to 2005 ranges between 78% and 90% depending on the used set of stations. Our results show both high success rate and good agreement with the well-known Russell-McPherron and Rosenberg-Coleman effects. In the current study we applied the technique to historical data of Helsinki observatory where digital versions of hourly geomagnetic components are available from 1844 to 1897. Helsinki station stopped operates at the beginning of 20th century. Thus, to create a model describing the local Svalgaard-Mansurov effect we analyzed data from Nurmijarvi station located near the same region. The success rate of reconstruction from 1965 to 2005 is around 82%. So we assume that the IMF polarities obtained for the period 1869-1889 have sufficient quality. Inferred sector structure at this time consists of two sectors typically for all declining phases of solar activity cycle. Catalogue of IMF proxies seem to be important in analyzing structure and dynamics of solar magnetic fields in the past.; Left: Bartels diagram of IMF sector structure inferred from Helsinki data. Right: sunspot number indicating solar cycles.

  11. Reward and motivation systems: a brain mapping study of early-stage intense romantic love in Chinese participants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaomeng; Aron, Arthur; Brown, Lucy; Cao, Guikang; Feng, Tingyong; Weng, Xuchu

    2011-02-01

    Early-stage romantic love has been studied previously in the United States and United Kingdom (Aron et al. [2005]: J Neurophysiol 94:327–337; Bartels and Zeki [2000]: Neuroreport 11:3829–3834; Ortigue et al. [2007]: J Cogn Neurosci 19:1218–1230), revealing activation in the reward and motivation systems of the brain. In this study, we asked what systems are activated for early-stage romantic love in Easterners, specifically Chinese participants? Are these activations affected by individual differences within a cultural context of Traditionality and Modernity? Also, are these brain activations correlated with later satisfaction in the relationship? In Beijing, we used the same procedure used by Aron et al. (Aron et al. [2005]: J Neurophysiol 94:327–337). The stimuli for 18 Chinese participants were a picture of the face of their beloved, the face of a familiar acquaintance, and a countback task. We found significant activations specific to the beloved in the reward and motivation systems, particularly, the ventral tegmental area and the caudate. The mid-orbitofrontal cortex and cerebellum were also activated, whereas amygdala, medial orbitofrontal, and medial accumbens activity were decreased relative to the familiar acquaintance. Self-reported Traditionality and Modernity scores were each positively correlated with activity in the nucleus accumbens, although in different regions and sides of the brain. Activity in the subgenual area and the superior frontal gyrus was associated with higher relationship happiness at 18-month follow-up. Our results show that midbrain dopamine-rich reward/motivation systems were activated by early-stage romantic love in Chinese participants, as found by other studies. Neural activity was associated with Traditionality and Modernity attitudes as well as with later relationship happiness for Chinese participants. PMID:21229613

  12. Impact of Exposure Uncertainty on the Association between Perfluorooctanoate and Preeclampsia in the C8 Health Project Population

    PubMed Central

    Avanasi, Raghavendhran; Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Vieira, Verónica M.; Savitz, David A.; Bartell, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uncertainty in exposure estimates from models can result in exposure measurement error and can potentially affect the validity of epidemiological studies. We recently used a suite of environmental models and an integrated exposure and pharmacokinetic model to estimate individual perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) serum concentrations and assess the association with preeclampsia from 1990 through 2006 for the C8 Health Project participants. Objectives The aims of the current study are to evaluate impact of uncertainty in estimated PFOA drinking-water concentrations on estimated serum concentrations and their reported epidemiological association with preeclampsia. Methods For each individual public water district, we used Monte Carlo simulations to vary the year-by-year PFOA drinking-water concentration by randomly sampling from lognormal distributions for random error in the yearly public water district PFOA concentrations, systematic error specific to each water district, and global systematic error in the release assessment (using the estimated concentrations from the original fate and transport model as medians and a range of 2-, 5-, and 10-fold uncertainty). Results Uncertainty in PFOA water concentrations could cause major changes in estimated serum PFOA concentrations among participants. However, there is relatively little impact on the resulting epidemiological association in our simulations. The contribution of exposure uncertainty to the total uncertainty (including regression parameter variance) ranged from 5% to 31%, and bias was negligible. Conclusions We found that correlated exposure uncertainty can substantially change estimated PFOA serum concentrations, but results in only minor impacts on the epidemiological association between PFOA and preeclampsia. Citation Avanasi R, Shin HM, Vieira VM, Savitz DA, Bartell SM. 2016. Impact of exposure uncertainty on the association between perfluorooctanoate and preeclampsia in the C8 Health Project population

  13. A Statewide Nested Case–Control Study of Preterm Birth and Air Pollution by Source and Composition: California, 2001–2008

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Olivier; Hu, Jianlin; Li, Lianfa; Kleeman, Michael J.; Bartell, Scott M.; Cockburn, Myles; Escobedo, Loraine; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    to both primary and secondary pollutants were associated with an increase in PTB. Citation: Laurent O, Hu J, Li L, Kleeman MJ, Bartell SM, Cockburn M, Escobedo L, Wu J. 2016. A statewide nested case–control study of preterm birth and air pollution by source and composition: California, 2001–2008. Environ Health Perspect 124:1479–1486; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510133 PMID:26895492

  14. [Woman and race biology].

    PubMed

    Hanson, H

    1993-01-01

    Early 20th century race biology takes a special interest in woman as part of the "intra-racial" project of bringing forth healthy and competitive individuals. But there are other motives as well for the race biologist to take an interest in woman. She is believed to develop fewer individual characteristics and is therefore a more typical representative of her race than man. The development level of the race is also presupposed to be discernible by the degree of "gender diformism": a race of higher standing would exhibit a greater difference between the sexes. The anthropologist, anatomist, gynaecologist--or whatever guise the race biologist may adopt-- will, in principle, stress that the relation between the sexes is not a matter of "more or less", but one of differences in kind. In reality, the "more-or-less of comparison is the very cornerstone of the issue. Quantitative differences, directly observed or obtained from statistics, are construed as signs of difference in kind. 18th century medical philosophy and sex-linked anthropology laid the theoretical foundation of the 19th century essentialist conception of woman, which is also that adopted by race biology. Eugenics of social Darwinist inspiration regarded prophylactic health care and social welfare programs with scepticism. A race biology founded on the man-woman dualism could sustain altogether different conclusions. An advanced culture calls for extensive division of labour. An extended childhood renders possible higher development but will also impose higher demands on woman. The protection of the female organism is thus an exigency for any people or race striving to survive and evolve. From society's care for the female organism health care for women and preventive maternity care will emerge. Race biology has been a preeminently German concern, as indicated by the selection of works taken to represent this perspective on woman: Bartels-Ploss' Das Weib, C.H. Stratz' Die Rassenschönheit des Weibes and

  15. A Long-term Ring Current Measure Created by Using the VMO MANGO Service Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.; King, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    A set of computational routines called MANGO (Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geomagnetic Observatories) is utilized to calculate a new measure of magnetic storm activity for the years 1932 to the near present. The MANGO routines are part of an effort to enhance data services available to users of the Heliophysics VxOs, specifically for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). The community can utilize MANGO to derive value-added data products and images suitable for publication via the VMO web site. MANGO routines will be demonstrated through their application to study magnetic storms, a field of research that began in 1828 when von Humboldt launched an investigation of observations taken simultaneously from magnetic field stations spread around the Earth. The defining signature of magnetic storms is a worldwide decrease of the horizontal component of the magnetic field caused by fluctuations in the strength of the ring current. In the 1940's, Bartel pushed for deriving an index to measure the strength of magnetic storms. Progress intensified during the International Geophysical Year leading to the definition of the Dst index. The definitive Dst index is calculated at WDC-C2 for Geomagnetism in Kyoto by using a derivation scheme certified by Division V of IAGA. The Dst index time series spans the years 1957 to present with a cadence equal to 1-hr. The new data set we will present is a magnetic storm measure that is similar to the Dst index though it is calculated by using MANGO and a method that differs slightly from the official scheme. The MANGO data service package is based on a set of IDL routines that decompose ground magnetic field observations to isolate secular, diurnal, and disturbance variations of the magnetic field station-by-station. Each MANGO subroutine has been written in modular fashion to allow "plug and play"- style flexibility and each has been designed to account for failure modes and noisy data so that the programs will run to

  16. Theory and case studies on solar induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Gerald; Freund, Friedemann; Kosovichev, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    Huge electric current vortices are continuously generated in the Earth's lithosphere through electromagnetic induction from powerful ionospheric electric vortex currents that arise from ionization on the sun-lit side of the Earth (Chapman S. and Bartels J., 1940). The circular telluric currents in the Earth's lithosphere interact with the Earth's main magnetic field (H), building up a magnetic moment (M). According to T = [M x H] a mechanic torque (T) results from this interaction that can reach values as high as 5x10exp13 Nm (Duma G. and Ruzhin Y., 2003). We present evidence that this ionospherically induced telluric torque, which reaches deep into the lithosphere, influences the diurnal seismicity patterns in major earthquake zones as documented by earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.0. Our results confirm observations of distinct time-of-day patterns of seismic activity reported for over a century (Omori F., 1902; Conrad V., 1932 ; Shimshoni M., 1971; Duma G. and Vilardo G., 1998; Schekotov A.Yu., Molchanov O.A. and Hayakawa M., 2005) and even much earlier by Pliny the Elder, 79 A.D. A solar influence on earthquake frequency is apparent not only in diurnal patterns, but also in seasonal (e.g. Lipovics T., 2005) and decadal patterns. The effect can be validated by data recorded continuously at geomagnetic observatories, the INTERMAGNET stations (http://www.intermagnet.org), operating on all continents. The observatories continuously record magnetic variations which arise from the telluric currents in the Earth's lithosphere. Theory and model are presented, starting from the primary source for the effect, which is the varying solar wind speed as measured by satellites. The data are provided by the OMNI 2 directory (NASA, http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov). We offer 7 case studies that deal with seismic activity patterns in the diurnal, seasonal and long term time domains for seismic zones in Asia (Japan, Taiwan, Sumatra), N-America (California), the Mid Atlantic Ridge

  17. Temperature dependence of the Fricke dosimeter and spur expansion time in the low-LET high-temperature radiolysis of water up to 350 °C: a Monte-Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Muroya, Yusa; Tippayamontri, Thititip; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Lin, Mingzhang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2011-06-14

    radiolysis database of Elliot (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) and Bartels (University of Notre Dame) that contains all the best currently available information on the rate constants, reaction mechanisms, and g-values in the range 20 to 350 °C. PMID:21552602

  18. The Derer´s biological - cosmic week and the Halberg´s circaseptan chronome.

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, M; Mikulecky, M

    2014-01-01

    There are three common periodic intervals in the life of each human being from time immemorial: the day, the week and the year. The first one is given by the Earth´s rotation, the latter one by its revolution around the Sun. These both do have clear biomedical counterparts. The 7-day week, basically linguistically "period of change" (or a similar period, e.g.10 days in Egypt or 8 days in Etrutria) was obviously originally considered mainly as a product of a societal agreement. Two groups of Czechoslovak clinicians-scientists, however, noted in forties of the XXth century an approximately week period in human laboratory data, after similar attempts abroad a few years earlier. In fifties, L.Dérer, respecting the mathematical and biological principles in medicine and supported by the mathematician A.Huťa, demonstrated the presence of the "6-day" rhythm in blood leukocyte counts in patients with leukemia, treated by cytostatics. Posing the question "Where is it from?", he considered also cosmic influences but was unable to study this issue more deeply due to his premature decease. Two decades later, the "Dérer´s circaseptans" found wide confirmation not only in human medicine but also in biology. The pioneering role here belongs to Franz Halberg, USA, the godfather of the "circadians" (originally "Halberg´s paranoia") since the fifties. The possible geocosmic roots of circaseptans are supposed in the geomagnetic activity from interplanetary space, generating under the influence of the Sun rotation the periods around 6-7 days. This is presently documented, surprisingly, also by analysing the Dérer´s original data using more advanced, inferentially statistical method - the Halberg cosinor regression. Thus, the optimal approximation has been achieved for the period of 6.75 days - the 4th harmonics of the Bartels solar rotation cycle. Accordingly, the week can be now, after Dérer and Halberg, understood also - same as day and year - as a biological - geocosmic

  19. EDITORIAL: Ice in the environment: connections to atmospheric chemistry Ice in the environment: connections to atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Hastings, Meredith G.

    2008-12-01

    understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of ice: the role of a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) or quasi-brine layer (QBL) at the ice surface. The studies presented here advance our understanding of the complex interactions of snow and ice with important reactive components in our atmosphere. It has become clear in recent years that the polar regions do not act as an ultimate sink for many compounds—the release of halogens and reactive nitrogen oxides from ice and snow are examples of this. Two notable implications arise from these findings (i) the impact of anthropogenic pollutants in our environment may extend further than we fully appreciate with current global atmospheric chemistry models and (ii) our interpretation of chemical records in ice cores requires that we fundamentally understand and quantify air-snow and air-ice interactions. Additionally, laboratory studies are elucidating the details of heterogeneous reactions that are prevalent on ice and snow surfaces throughout the troposphere, and we are poised to make significant strides in the near future quantifying these effects on regional and global scales. We look forward to continued progress in this field in the coming years, and we will continue to work to connect those conducting modeling, field and laboratory studies. Focus on Connections between Atmospheric Chemistry and Snow and Ice Contents HONO emissions from snow surfaces Harry Beine, Agustín J Colussi, Antonio Amoroso, Giulio Esposito, Mauro Montagnoli and Michael R Hoffmann Heterogeneous ozonation kinetics of phenanthrene at the air-ice interface T F Kahan and D J Donaldson Release of gas-phase halogens from sodium halide substrates: heterogeneous oxidation of frozen solutions and desiccated salts by hydroxyl radicals S J Sjostedt and J P D Abbatt Uptake of acetone, ethanol and benzene to snow and ice: effects of surface area and temperature J P D Abbatt, T Bartels-Rausch, M Ullerstam and T J Ye Interaction of gaseous elemental mercury with snow surfaces

  20. Reconstruction of Geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Mike; Nevanlinna, Heikki; Barnard, Luke; Owens, Mat; Harrison, Giles; Rouillard, Alexis; Scott, Chris; Vokhmyanin, Mikhail; Ponyavin, Dmitri; Sokolov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Records of geomagnetic activity have previously been used to reconstruct the conditions in near-Earth space, such as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), solar wind speed (Vsw) and open solar flux (OSF). Reliable geomagnetic activity records exist back until the mid-1800's, and these data provide one of the few means of inferring variations in the conditions in near-Earth space before the advent of the space age. However, there are challenges in using geomagnetic activity records to reconstruct interplanetary conditions. In particular it is necessary to ensure, as best as is possible, the homogeneity and reliability of any geomagnetic indices used. This becomes increasingly difficult further back in history, as both the quality of the data and the number of observing stations decreases. A new geomagnetic activity index, the IDV(1D) index, is presented, which is designed to be as homogeneous in its construction as possible (Lockwood et al. 2013a). This is achieved by only combining data that, by virtue of the locations of the source observatories used, have similar responses to solar wind and IMF variations. IDV(1d) employs many of the principles of the IDV index (Svalgaard and Cliver (2010)), inspired by the u index of Bartels (1932). The index uses interdiurnal variation data from Helsinki for 1845- 1890 and 1893-1896 and from Eskdalemuir from 1911 to the present. The gaps are filled using data from the Potsdam (1891-1892 and 1897-1907) and the nearby Seddin observatories (1908-1910) and intercalibration achieved using the Potsdam-Seddin sequence. The index is compared with independent, early data from European-sector stations, as well as the composite u index and the IDV index. Agreement is found to be extremely good in most cases. IDV(1D) does not suffer from the poor homogeneity of the IDV index, and is more highly correlated with the IMF, consequently it yields a more reliable reconstruction (Lockwood et al 2013b). For completeness, we use 4 different

  1. Physical Meaning of the Equinoctial Effect for Seasonal Variation of Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, A.

    2008-12-01

    The general tendency for magnetic disturbances to be more stormy at equinoxes than at solstices has been recognised for more than 150 years. To explain the seasonal variation three principal hypotheses have been proposed; the axial hypothesis (Cortie, 1912), the equinoctial hypothesis (Bartels, 1932; McIntosh, 1959), and the Russell and McPherron (RM) hypothesis (Russell and McPherron, 1973). The RM hypothesis, which is based on the recognition that the magnetic field in the solar equatorial plane tends to have the largest southward component in geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM) coordinates in early April and October, has been largely accepted for many years. However, recent studies have confirmed that the RM effect accounts for only a subordinate proportion of the seasonal variation of geomagnetic activity, and that the larger part of the phenomenon is attributable to the equinoctial effect in which the angle between the solar wind flow and the dipole axis of the Earth plays an essential role (Cliver, Kamide and Ling, 2000; Cliver, Kamide, Ling and Yokoyama, 2001; O'Brien and McPherron, 2002). In this paper physical meaning of the equinoctial effect is investigated based on the data of three-hourly am index and solar wind parameters acquired by the ACE satellite. The am indices are well correlated with BsVxVx, where Bs is the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and Vx is the solar wind velocity in the sun-earth direction. It is found, however, that the am - BsVxVx relation depends on the range of VxVx: The am in higher ranges of VxVx tends to be larger than am in lower ranges of VxVx for both equinoctial and solstitial epochs for the same value of BsVxVx. Using the data sets of the same VxVx range, it is shown that distribution of points in the am - BsVxVx diagram at the solstitial epochs overlaps with that at the equinoctial epochs and the average am values in each BsVxVx bin in solstitial epochs are almost equal to those in

  2. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, L. I.; Frey, S.; Rawlings, S.

    than 30 contributed papers from that symposium have been published recently in Baltic Astronomy (2005, Vol. 14, No. 3). This book contains a set of invited review presentations given at the symposium. They cover a range of scientific topics in extragalactic and galactic radio astronomy studies as well as recent developments in radio astronomy techniques aimed at the next generation radio astronomy facilities. On behalf of the organisers and participants of the symposium, we express our gratitude to the sponsors of the event and this publication: the European Astronomical Society, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, Konkoly Observatory, Eötvös Loránd Physical Society, Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy (ASTRON), Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Hungarian Scientific Research Fund, EC FP5 Infrastructure Cooperation Network RadioNET and EC FP6 Integrated Infrastructure Initiative RadioNet. We are grateful to the members of the Scientific Organising Committee of the Symposium. Ken Kellermann made very useful remarks on several papers. Ellen Bouton and Pat Smiley helped to include in this book several photos from the AUI-NRAO archive. Mark Bentum designed the cover picture of the book, visual components for which were kindly supplied by W.A. Baan, M.F. Bietenholz, R. Boomsma, R. Braun, N. Bartel, M.A. Garrett, J.M. van der Hulst, H.R. Klockner, NASA/WMAP Science Team, T.A. Oosterloo, M.P. Rupen, R. Sancisi, B. Stappers, R.G. Strom, D.A. Thilker, and R.A.M. Walterbos. Most of all, we are grateful to all the authors of this book for their efforts in the increasingly old-fashioned art of writing papers for a real “paper” publication as opposed to putting powerpoint files on a web site. We do hope that their nice work will be appreciated by the readers. Leonid Gurvits, Dwingeloo, The Netherlands Sándor Frey, Budapest, Hungary Steve Rawlings, Oxford, UK

  3. Possible relationship between changes in IMF, M7+ earthquakes and VEI index, during the transition between the solar minimum cycle 23 and the rise of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Michele; Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    Numerous scientific papers seem to suggest a possible influence of solar activity on geological dynamics (hypothesis triggers earthquakes or volcanic activity) on Earth. In the following study, all earthquakes around the globe with a magnitude greater than or equal to 7, from January 2010 to November 2012, were taken into account which corresponds to the appearance of the first sunspot of Solar Cycle SC24. The data was then compared with the graph that shows the variations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). This second track is the result of a moving average equal to 27 (solar rotation of Bartel) starting from the daily values of the field, detected by the magnetometer on board the probe Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). The analysis reveals a first major change in February 2010, when the IMF changes from 4.5 nT to about 5.8 nT . A second identical significant change is found in February 2011, when the IMF, went from 4.5 nT to about 5.8 nT. In March 2012, we have, the other way around, a third important change in the IMF, with later's dynamics registering a variation from 5.6 nT to about 6.8 nT. We find that the three most important seismic events of the last three years (M8.8 in Chile 27/02/2010; M9 in Japan on 11/03/2011, and M8.6 on 11/04/2012 in Sumatra) occurred at the same time or slightly after the peaks (Bmax) of increase in the magnetic field of the heliosphere "facing the Earth" were reached. The analysis also suggests further connections between earthquakes with M> 7 and when the peak (maximum value the IMF) were reached, recorded in other changes in the field in these three years. Like, for example, the earthquake of M7.5 in India of 12/06/2010, when the IMF increased from 4.5 nT to 5.2 nT, or the earthquake in Sumatra 25/10/2010, when the IMF went from 4.4 nT to 5.1 nT. The variation of the IMF, recorded in May 2011, from 4.7 nT to 5.9 nT, relates, for example, not only with the M7.6 earthquake in Kermadec (07/06/2011), but also with

  4. Polarized Sources, Targets and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciullo, Guiseppe; Contalbrigo, Marco; Lenisa, P.

    2011-01-01

    Remarks on the history of workshops on "spin tools" / E. Steffens -- Polarized proton beams in RHIC / A. Zelenski -- The COSY/Julich polarized H[symbol] and D[symbol] ion source / O. Felden -- The new source of polarized ions for the JINR accelerator complex / V. V. Fimushkin -- Resonance effects in nuclear dichroism - an inexpensive source of tensor-polarized deuterons / H. Seyfarth -- Polarized electrons and positrons at the MESA accelerator / K. Aulenbacher -- Status report of the Darmstadt polarized electron injector / Y. Poltoratska -- The Mott polarimeter at MAMI / V. Tioukine -- Proton polarimetry at the relativistic heavy ion collider / Y. Makdisi -- Polarisation and polarimetry at HERA / B. Sobloher -- Polarisation measurement at the ILC with a Compton polarimeter / C. Bartels -- Time evolution of ground motion-dependent depolarisation at linear colliders / A. Hartin -- Electron beam polarimetry at low energies and its applications / R. Barday -- Polarized solid targets: recent progress and future prospects / C. D. Keith -- HD gas distillation and analysis for HD frozen spin targets / A. D'Angelo -- Electron spin resonance study of hydrogen and alkyl free radicals trapped in solid hydrogen aimed for dynamic nuclear polarization of solid HD / T. Kumada -- Change of ultrafast nuclear-spin polarization upon photoionization by a short laser pulse / T. Nakajima -- Radiation damage and recovery in polarized [symbol]NH[symbol] ammonia targets at Jefferson lab / J. D. Maxwell.Polarized solid proton target in low magnetic field and at high temperature / T. Uesaka -- Pulse structure dependence of the proton spin polarization rate / T. Kawahara -- Proton NMR in the large COMPASS [symbol]NH[symbol] target / J. Koivuniemi -- DNP with TEMPO and trityl radicals in deuterated polystyrene / L. Wang -- The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources / L. Rinolfi -- Status of high intensity polarized electron gun at MIT-Bates / E. Tsentalovich -- Target section for spin

  5. EDITORIAL: From reciprocal space to real space in surface science From reciprocal space to real space in surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2012-09-01

    Triest.let's finish—aus basta Some move atoms around to hear how they sound.Karl-Heinz Rieder, Erice, 6 April 1998 From reciprocal space to real space in surface science contents From reciprocal space to real space in surface scienceLudwig Bartels and Karl-Heinz Ernst Karl-Heinz Reider: the quiet pioneerGiorgio Benedek Scattering of CO and N2 molecules by a graphite surfaceJunepyo Oh, Takahiro Kondo, Keitaro Arakawa, Yoshihiko Saito, Junji Nakamura, W W Hayes and J R Manson Helium, neon and argon diffraction from Ru(0001)M Minniti, C Díaz, J L Fernández Cuñado, A Politano, D Maccariello, F Martín, D Farías and R Miranda Enhanced charge transfer in a monolayer of the organic charge transfer complex TTF-TNAP on Au(111)T R Umbach, I Fernandez-Torrente, J N Ladenthin, J I Pascual and K J Franke Extended pattern recognition scheme for self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo simulationsSyed Islamuddin Shah, Giridhar Nandipati, Abdelkader Kara and Talat S Rahman Acetylene on Cu(111): imaging a molecular surface arrangement with a constantly rearranging tipYeming Zhu, Jonathan Wyrick, Kamelia D Cohen, Katie Marie Magnone, Connor Holzke, Daniel Salib, Quan Ma, Dezheng Sun and Ludwig Bartels Coulomb attraction during the carpet growth mode of NaClFriederike Matthaei, Sarah Heidorn, Konrad Boom, Cord Bertram, Ali Safiei, Jörg Henzl and Karina Morgenstern Molecular self-assembly on an insulating surface: interplay between substrate templating and intermolecular interactionsMarkus Kittelmann, Philipp Rahe and Angelika Kühnle Vertical manipulation of native adatoms on the InAs(111)A surfaceJ Yang, C Nacci, J Martínez-Blanco, K Kanisawa and S Fölsch Charge transfer between isomer domains on n+-doped Si(111)-2 × 1: energetic stabilizationR M Feenstra, G Bussetti, B Bonanni, A Violante, C Goletti, P Chiaradia, M G Betti and C Mariani Probing the properties of metal-oxide interfaces: silica films on Mo and Ru supportsLeonid Lichtenstein, Markus Heyde, Stefan Ulrich, Niklas Nilius

  6. Powerful Nearby Supernova Caught By Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    previously thought, but it also teaches us more about the tremendous upheavals that massive stars can undergo during their lifetime," said co-author Vikram Dwarkadas of the University of Chicago. SN 1996cr, at a distance of about 12 million light years, will be a compelling target for future work because it is nearby and so much brighter than a typical supernova. These results will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. Other co-authors on this paper include Niel Brandt (Penn State), Stefan Immler (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), Norbert Bartel (York University, Canada), and Michael Bietenholz (York University and Hartebeesthoek Radio Observatory, South Africa). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass.

  7. Supernova 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafatos, Minas; Michalitsianos, Andrew G.

    2006-11-01

    Foreword; Acknowledgements; Workshop participants; 1. Images and spectrograms of Sanduleak - 69º202, the SN 1987a progenitor N. R. Walborn; 2. The progenitor of SN 1987A G. Sonneborn; 3. Another supernova with a blue progenitor C. M. Gaskell and W. C. Keel; 4. Optical and infrared observations of SN 1987A from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory M. M. Phillips; 5. SN 1987A: observational results obtained at ESO I. J. Danziger, P. Bouchet, R. A. E. Fosbury, C. Gouiffes, L. B. Lucy, A. F. M. Moorwood, E. Oliva and F. Rufener; 6. Observations of SN 1987A at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) M. W. Feast; 7. Observations of SN 1987A at the Anglo-Australian Telescope W. J. Couch; 8. Linear polarimetric study of SN 1987A A. Clocchiatti, M. Méndez, O. Benvenuto, C. Feinstein, H. Marraco, B. García and N. Morrell; 9. Infrared spectroscopy of SN 1987A from the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory H. P. Larson, S. Drapatz, M. J. Mumma and H. A. Weaver; 10. Radio observations of SN 1987A N. Bartel et al.; 11. Ultraviolet observations of SN 1987A: clues to mass loss R. P. Kirshner; 12. On the energetics of SN 1987A N. Panagia; 13. On the nature and apparent uniqueness of SN 1987A A. V. Filippenko; 14. A comparison of the SN 1987A light curve with other type II supernovae, and the detectability of similar supernovae M. F. Schmitz and C. M. Gaskell; 15. P-Cygni features and photospheric velocities L. Bildsten and J. C. L. Wang; 16. The Neutrino burst from SN 1987A detected in the Mont Blanc LSD experiment M. Aglietta et al.; 17. Toward observational neutrino astrophysics M. Koshiba; 18. The discovery of neutrinos from SN 1987A with the IMB detector J. Matthews; 19. Peering into the abyss: the neutrinos from SN 1987A A. Burrows; 20. Phenomenological analysis of neutrino emission from SN 1987A J. N. Bahcall, D. N. Spergel and W. H. Press; 21. Mass determination of neutrinos H. Y. Chiu; 22. Neutrino transport in a type II supernova D. C. Ellison, P. M. Giovanoni

  8. NARRATIVE: A short history of my life in science A short history of my life in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, Joseph R.

    2010-08-01

    bicycle rides taken with these colleagues and many others through the streets of Göttingen and the surrounding countryside of Niedersachsen. The long series of visits to Göttingen were interrupted by three summers beginning in 1988 at the Institut für Grenzflachenforschung and Vakuumphysik at the Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany working with George Comsa and his group. I had met Comsa in the late 1970s at a scientific meeting in France and we had continued our scientific correspondence ever since, which eventually led to the invitation to visit his lab for an extended stay. Among the very large range of surface-related experiments being carried out in the Comsa group were machines, operated by Bene Poelsema and Rudolf David and the then graduate students Klaus Kern and Peter Zeppenfeld, devoted to He atom scattering from metal and adsorbate-covered surfaces. Once again, it was a great privilege to carry out scientific research in such a stimulating environment. In 1998, with a three-month summer visit, I began a collaboration with Professor Karl-Heinz Rieder at the Institut für Experimentalphysik of the Freie Universität Berlin in Germany. Rieder was a pioneer in the field of surface scattering experiments using helium and other rare gas atomic beams as projectiles and after he moved to the Freie Universität from the IBM Zürich laboratories he continued this work as well as becoming a world leader in the field of single molecule manipulation on surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). This collaboration resulted in visits to Berlin every summer through 2006 during which we collaborated on several projects involving both atom-surface scattering and STM. The work during this period included interesting collaborative work with many members of the Rieder group including Ludwig Bartels, Daniel Farías, Gerhard Meyer and Saw Hla. It was a great experience to be able to pursue science in such favorable surroundings, and to have, in addition, all the